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Sample records for ntms quadrangle kansas

  1. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Grand Island NTMS Quadrangle, Nebraska/Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Grand Island Quadrangle, Nebraska/Kansas are reported. Statistical data and areal distributions for uranium and uranium-related variables are presented for 564 groundwater and 532 stream sediment samples. Also included is a brief discussion on location and geologic setting. Groundwater data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur primarily in shallow wells (0 to 20 m) along or near the Platte and Republican Rivers, which flow west to east along the northern and southern portions of the quadrangle, respectively. Waters containing high concentration of uranium in the northern portion of the quadrangle occur in recent alluvium and nearby glacial deposits. In the southern portion of the quadrangle, waters containing high uranium concentrations occur in Recent alluvium and the Niobrara Chalk in the southeast. Stream sediment data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur in sediments along the Platte River in the northern portion of the quadrangle and paralleling the Republican River in the southeastern portion. Sediments with high uranium values along the Platte River are derived from glacial and alluvial deposits. High uranium values paralleling the Republican River in the southeast are derived from the Niobrara Chalk, the Carlile Shale, and glacial and alluvial deposits. High U-NT and thorium values, and high values for cerium, niobium, scandium, titanium, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium suggest the presence of clays and/or residual minerals in the southeast. Sediment derivation and the leaching of possible ash-rich loess and alluvial deposits and/or uranium-rich alkaline evaporite deposits could account for high uranium concentrations in sediment and groundwaters within the quadrangle

  2. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Dodge City NTMS Quadrangle, Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Dodge City Quadrangle are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 756 groundwater and 321 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that the most promising areas for uranium mineralization are as follows: (1) in the north central area of the quadrangle within close proximity to the Arkansas River, mostly from waters of the Ogallala Formation; (2) in the west central area, from groundwater samples of the Dakota and the Ogallala Formations; and (3) between the North Fork of the Cimarron River and the main Cimarron River, mostly in waters from the Ogallala Formation. Associated with the high uranium values are high concentrations for magnesium, strontium, and sulfate. Of the groundwater samples taken 81% were collected from the Ogallala Formation. Stream sediment data indicate high uranium concentrations in scattered samples in the northwestern, central, and southwestern areas of the quadrangle. Most of the samples with high uranium values were collected from the Quaternary alluvium. Associated with the high uranium values are high concentrations of barium, cerium, iron, manganese, titanium, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium

  3. Mesa NTMS 10 x 20 quadrangle area. Supplemental data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for stream sediments and ground water. The samples were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Mesa 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Results are reported for 24 elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, W, Y, Zn, and extractable U) in sediments and 31 elements (Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Sc, Se, Si, Sr, Th, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and Zr) as well as pH, alkalinity, and conductivity in ground water. Field data and NAA data will be open-filed when they are available. Microfiche cards have been placed in a pocket on the last page of this report. These cards contain the following information: Cards marked Pg. 1, Pg. 2, and Pg. 3 contain histograms, cumulative frequency plots, and areal distribution plots for sediment samples. The card marked Plate 1 is a site-code map for sediment samples

  4. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS Quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. The purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  5. Geology of the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles, Alabama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, C.W.; Beg, M.A.

    1979-04-01

    This document is a facsimile edition (with accompanying maps) of geologic reports on the Birmingham, Gadsden, and Montgomery 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles prepared for SRL by the Geological Survey of Alabama. Purpose of these reports is to provide background geologic information to aid in the interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance data. Each report includes descriptions of economic mineral localities as well as a mineral locality map and a geologic map

  6. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Hutchinson Quadrangle, Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, C.L.; Smit, D.E.; Gundersen, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    Surface reconnaissance and detailed subsurface studies were done within the Hutchinson Quadrangle, Kansas, to evaluate uranium favorability in accordance with National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. These studies were designed in part to follow up prior airborne radiometric, hydrogeochemical, and stream-sediment surveys. Over 4305 well records were examined in the subsurface phase of this study. The results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant sandstone deposits in rocks of Cretaceous age and for Wyoming and Texas roll-type deposits in sandstones of Pennsylvanian age. The Cretaceous sandstone environments exhibit favorable characteristics such as a bottom unconformity; high bedload; braided, fluvial channels; large-scale cross-bedding; and an anomalous outcrop. The Pennsylvanian sandstone environments exhibit favorable characteristics such as arkosic cross-bedded sandstones, included pyrite and organic debris, interbedded shales, and gamma-ray log anomalies. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestone and dolomite environments, marine black shale environments, evaporative precipitate environments, and some fluvial sandstone environments. Environments considered unevaluated due to insufficient data include Precambrian plutonic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, even though a large number of thin sections were available for study

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Manhattan Quadrangle, Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fair, C.L.; Smit, D.E.

    1982-08-01

    Surface reconnaissance and detailed subsurface studies were conducted in the Manhattan Quadrangle, Kansas, to evaluate uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. These studies were designed in part to follow up airborne radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment surveys. More than 600 well records were examined in the subsurface phase of the study. Results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant sandstone uranium deposits in Cretaceous rocks and for Wyoming roll-type deposits in Pennsylvanian sandstones. The Cretaceous sandstone environments exhibit such favorable characteristics as a bottom unconformity, high bed load, braided fluvial channels, large-scale cross-bedding, and one anomalous outcrop. The Pennsylvanian sandstone environments exhibit such favorable characteristics as arkosic cross-bedded sandstones, included pyrite and organic debris, interbedded shales, and gamma-ray log anomalies. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are limestone and dolomite environments, marine black shale environments, evaporative precipitate environments, and some fluvial sandstone environments. Environments considered unevaluated because not enough data were available include Precambrian plutonic, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks, even though a large number of thin sections were available for study

  8. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Kingman NTMS Quadrangle, Arizona, California, and Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qualheim, B.J.

    1978-07-01

    This report presents the results of the geochemical reconnaissance sampling in the Kingman 1 x 2 quadrangle of the National Topographical Map Series (NTMS). Wet and dry sediment samples were collected throughout the 18,770-km arid to semiarid area and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Neutron activation analysis of uranium and trace elements and other measurements made in the field and laboratory are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes five full-size overlays for use with the Kingman NTMS 1 : 250,000 quadrangle. Water sampling sites, water sample uranium concentrations, water-sample conductivity, sediment sampling sites, and sediment-sample total uranium and thorium concentrations are shown on the separate overlays. General geological and structural descriptions of the area are included and known uranium occurrences on this quadrangle are delineated. Results of the reconnaissance are briefly discussed and related to rock types in the final section of the report. The results are suggestive of uranium mineralization in only two areas: the Cerbat Mountains and near some of the western intrusives

  9. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Kingman NTMS Quadrangle, Arizona, California, and Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualheim, B.J.

    1978-07-01

    This report presents the results of the geochemical reconnaissance sampling in the Kingman 1 x 2 quadrangle of the National Topographical Map Series (NTMS). Wet and dry sediment samples were collected throughout the 18,770-km arid to semiarid area and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Neutron activation analysis of uranium and trace elements and other measurements made in the field and laboratory are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes five full-size overlays for use with the Kingman NTMS 1 : 250,000 quadrangle. Water sampling sites, water sample uranium concentrations, water-sample conductivity, sediment sampling sites, and sediment-sample total uranium and thorium concentrations are shown on the separate overlays. General geological and structural descriptions of the area are included and known uranium occurrences on this quadrangle are delineated. Results of the reconnaissance are briefly discussed and related to rock types in the final section of the report. The results are suggestive of uranium mineralization in only two areas: the Cerbat Mountains and near some of the western intrusives.

  10. Mesa NTMS 10 x 20 quadrangle area. Supplemental data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, G.R.

    1980-01-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for stream sediments and ground water. The samples were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Mesa 1 0 x 2 0 quadrnangle. Results are reported for 24 elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, Th, W, Y, Zn, and extractable U) in sediments and 31 elements (Ag, Al, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Sc, Se, Si, Sr, Th, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and Zr) as well as pH, alkalinity, and conductivity in ground water

  11. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Williams NTMS quadrangle, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.L.

    1979-02-01

    Wet and dry sediments were collected throughout the 18,500-km 2 arid-to-semiarid region and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Samples were collected between August 1977 and January 1978. Results of neutron activation analyses of uranium and trace elements and other field and laboratory analyses are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes six full-size overlays for use with the Williams NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle. Sediment samples are divided into five general groups according to the source rock from which the sediment was derived. Background uranium concentrations for the quadrangle are relatively low, ranging from 1.91 to 2.40 ppM, with the highest associated with the Precambrian igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Basin and Range province. Uranium correlates best with the rare-earth elements and iron, scandium, titanium, and manganese. Known uranium occurrences are not readily identified by the stream sediment data

  12. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Kansas City Quadrangle of Kansas and Missouri. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Kansas City quadrangle covers approximately 7400 square miles in northwestern Missouri and northeastern Kansas. It overlies the southeastern edge of the Forest City Basin, which contains predominantly Paleozoic sediments. Permian and Pennsylvanian formations cover much of the surface, but Quaternary sedimentation dominates certain regions of the quadrangle. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of 102 uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant and all appear to be related to cultural features. Magnetic data appears to correlate directly with underlying Precambrian material

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Atlin NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Altin NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Only 6 samples were taken in the Atlin Quadrangle. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report. Chemical analysis and field data for water samples from this quadrangle were open filed by the DOE Grand Junction Office as GJX-166

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples.

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Healy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Healy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements multivariate statistical analyses have been included

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Seldovia NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Seldovia NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  18. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Philip Smith Mountains NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Chandalar NTMS quadrangle, Alaska are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, may field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  20. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Winnemucca NTMS Quadrangle, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchlik, K.P.

    1978-05-01

    Results are presented of the geochemical reconnaissance sampling in the Winnemucca 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). Wet and dry sediment samples were collected throughout the 18,770-km 2 arid to semi-arid area and water samples at available streams, springs and wells. Results of neutron activation analyses are presented of uranium and trace elements and other measurements made in the field and laboratory in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes 5 full-size overlays for use with the Winnemucca NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle. Water sampling sites, water-sample uranium and thorium concentrations, sediment sampling sites, and sediment-sample total uranium and thorium concentrations are shown on the separate overlays. General geological and structural descriptions of the area are given and the 12 known uranium occurrences are described. The results indicate that the uranium geochemistry of the area is diverse. High concentrations (greater than 5 ppM) of uranium in sediments are associated mainly with rhyolitic ash falls and flows and silicic intrusives. In defining areas of interest the ratio of relatively insoluble thorium to uranium was considered. The anomalies as defined are then the sediment samples containing low Th/U and high uranium concentrations. These areas consist mainly of fluvial-lacustrine units. Most known uranium occurrences were also identified by this technique. The main Humboldt River shows an irregular increase in uranium concentration downstream which may be related to agricultural modification of the stream flow. U/Cl ratios were used to evaluate the effects of evaporative concentration. Of interest are spring and tributary waters containing high U/Cl and high uranium values. These waters mainly drain acid intrusives, silicic volcanic rocks and related sediments. One such area is the Shoshone and Cortez Mountains

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Cheyenne NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trexler, P.K.

    1978-06-01

    Between June 1976 and October 1977, 1138 water and 600 sediment samples were systematically collected from 1498 locations in the Cheyenne NTMS quadrangle of southeast Wyoming. The samples were analyzed for total uranium at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The uranium concentration in waters ranged from 0.01 to 296.30 parts per billion (ppB), with a median of 3.19 ppB and a mean of 8.34 ppB. The uranium in sediments ranged from 0.8 to 83.0 parts per million (ppM) with a median of 3.4 ppM and a mean of 4.5 ppM. Arbitrary anomaly thresholds were selected to isolate those water and sediment samples containing uranium concentrations above those of 98% of the population sampled. Using this procedure, 23 water samples above 54.50 ppB and 12 sediment samples above 14.0 ppM were considered anomalous. Several areas appear favorable for further investigation for possible uranium mineralization. High uranium concentrations were detected in waters from the northeast corner of the Cheyenne quadrangle. High uranium concentrations were detected in sediments from locations in the southern and central Laramie Mountains and along the southeast and east-central edges of the study area

  2. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data report for Williams NTMS quadrangle, Arizona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.L.

    1979-02-01

    Wet and dry sediments were collected throughout the 18,500-km/sup 2/arid-to-semiarid region and water samples at available streams, springs, and wells. Samples were collected between August 1977 and January 1978. Results of neutron activation analyses of uranium and trace elements and other field and laboratory analyses are presented in tabular hardcopy and microfiche format. The report includes six full-size overlays for use with the Williams NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle. Sediment samples are divided into five general groups according to the source rock from which the sediment was derived. Background uranium concentrations for the quadrangle are relatively low, ranging from 1.91 to 2.40 ppM, with the highest associated with the Precambrian igneous and metamorphic complexes of the Basin and Range province. Uranium correlates best with the rare-earth elements and iron, scandium, titanium, and manganese. Known uranium occurrences are not readily identified by the stream sediment data.

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Rawlins NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, T.A.; Morris, W.A.; Trexler, P.K.

    1978-04-01

    During the spring and winter of 1976 and January and June of 1977, 570 natural water and 1281 waterborne sediment samples were collected from 1369 locations in the Rawlins, Wyoming, NTMS quadrangle. The samples obtained from this 18 700-km 2 area were analyzed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for total uranium. The uranium concentrations in waters ranged from less than the detectable limit of 0.2 parts per billion (ppB) to 448 ppB, with a mean value of 6 ppB. The concentrations in sediments ranged from 1.2 parts per million (ppM) to 60.4 ppM, with a mean value of 4.1 ppM. Based on simple statistical analyses of these data, arbitrary anomaly thresholds were set at 50 ppB for water samples and 9 ppM for sediment samples. Eleven water and 44 sediment samples were considered anomalous; 1 anomalous water and 25 anomalous sediments could be associated with four of the five major uranium occurrences in the quadrangle. Only the Ketchum Buttes area did not show up in the data. Twelve minor reported occurrences could not be identified by the data. Eleven anomalous samples (8 waters and 3 sediments) and 13 near-anomalous samples (10 waters and 3 sediments) outline a broad area in the northeast corner of the quadrangle (corresponding to the drainage area of the Medicine Bow River) where two airborne radiometric anomalies were discovered in an earlier study. This area, and perhaps others, may warrant further, more detailed geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigations

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Raton NTMS quadrangle, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.; Broxton, D.E.

    1978-10-01

    A total of 824 water and 1340 sediment samples were collected from 1844 sample locations in the Raton NTMS quadrangle and analyzed for uranium. Samples were collected at a nominal density of one per 10 km 2 . Notably high uranium values were found in both water and sediment samples collected from tributaries of Costilla Creek in the Culebra Range. Uranium contents in stream waters from this area range from individual high values of 145.1 and 76.1 to values slightly higher than the background concentrations in adjacent areas. Stream sediments range from 4.1 to 202.2 ppM uranium and average 30 ppM. The Culebra Range is a favorable setting for hard-rock type uranium mineralization. The uraniferous water and sediment samples call attention to this area as a possible exploration target. Numerous groups of ground waters with high uranium concentrations come from locations along the Cimarron and Sierra Grande Arches in the eastern part of the quadrangle. The Cimarron Arch is the locus of the largest group of uraniferous ground waters, with concentrations ranging between 5.2 and 103.3 ppB. Aquifers from which these samples were derived include the Fort Hays and Smoky Hill members of the Niobrara formation, the Pierre shale, and Quaternary surficial deposits. Most of the uraniferous ground waters along the Sierra Grande Arch occur in small, isolated groups that probably represent minor, local sources of uranium. Carbonate complexing of uranium may contribute to the high uranium values seen in these samples. Stream sediment samples with high uranium concentrations (10.1 to 51.4 ppM) were found in several drainages from the western front of the Taos Range. One group of locations providing high-uranium sediments is near known uranium occurrence in the vicinity of Cabresto and Latir Peaks. The western Taos Range is a favorable setting for hard rock uranium mineralization and may also warrant further study

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Arctic NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nome NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nome NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL, and will not be included in this report

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Teshekpuk NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Teshekpuk NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Cordova NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Cordova NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the White Sulfur Springs NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the White Sulphur Springs NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through C describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the McCarthy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the McCarthy NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of stream sediments. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical result. Statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  12. National uranium resource evaluation. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Greeley NTMS quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Greeley NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Grand Junction NTMS quadrangle, Colorado/Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Kenai NTMS quadrangle, Colorado/Utah. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Denver NTMS quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance of the Denver NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through E describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses

  15. Results of elemental analyses of water and waterborne sediment samples from the Fairbanks NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Aamodt, P.L; Hill, D.E.

    1979-04-01

    During the late spring and then again in late summer, 1977, lake and stream water and bottom sediment samples were collected at a nominal density of one location every 16 km 2 from throughout the approximate 16,500-km 2 area of the Fairbanks NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. These samples were collected using standard procedures by investigators from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, as part of a special Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) study to identify variance in total uranium contents related to natural factors such as seasonal changes, source types, and geologic/geographic environments. Histograms and statistical summaries of total uranium in a number of sample populations presented herein indicate that water samples collected in late summer have a mean uranium content that is slightly higher than the mean for waters collected in the spring. Dilution and/or evaporative concentration are possible causes for this difference. Sediment samples collected from streams and springs have a slightly higher mean uranium content than those collected from lakes, and this is consistent with HSSR data from other Alaskan areas. The Alaskan investigators will complete a detailed analysis of variance study of these data in the near future and a second open-file report will be forthcoming upon its completion

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Solomon NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Solomon NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and stream water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Youngquist, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Hughes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others into groups of stream sediment and lake sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  18. Uraniam hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Wiseman NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wiseman NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample media and summarizes the analytical results for each medium. The data were subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (198a) into stream sediment samples. For the group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lamar quadrangle, Colorado and Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maarouf, A.M.; Johnson, V.C.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium resources of the Lamar Quadrangle, Colorado and Kansas, were evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. The environment favorable for uranium is the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone in the area east of John Martin Reservoir for south Texas roll-type sandstone deposits. Carbonaceous trash and sulfides are abundant in the Dakota Sandstone. The unit underlies a thick Upper Cretaceous section that contains bentonitic beds and uraniferous marine black shale. Water samples from the Dakota Sandstone aquifer contain as much as 122 ppB U 3 O 8 . Geologic units considered unfavorable include most of the Paleozoic rocks, except in the Brandon Fault area; the Upper Cretaceous rocks; and the Ogallala Formation. The Dockum Group, Morrison Formation, and Lytle Member of the Purgatoire Formation are unevaluated because of lack of data

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Valdez NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Valdez NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form through the Grand Junction Office Information System (GJOIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. In addition, maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses have been included. Further information about the HSSR program in general, or about the LANL portion of the program in particular, can be obtained in quarterly or semiannual program progress reports on open-file at DOE's Technical Library in Grand Junction. Information about the field and analytical procedures used by LANL during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the LANL and will not be included in this report

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Durango NTMS quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, H.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1979-01-01

    During the spring and summer of 1976, 1518 water and 1604 waterborne sediment samples were collected from 1804 locations in the Durango NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. The samples obtained from this 19 940-km 2 area were analyzed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for total uranium. The uranium concentrations in waters ranged from less than the detectable limit of 0.2 ppB to 25.7 ppB, with a mean value of 0.84 ppB. The concentrations in sediments ranged from 1.0 ppM to 71.6 ppM, with a mean value of 4.2 ppM. Study of total water and total sediment populations indicated that both are actually mixtures of several populations. Consequently, samples were chosen for discussion on the basis of their having conspicuously high uranium concentrations relative to surrounding background values. Thirty-four water samples (approximately 2.2% of the total water population) had uranium concentrations above 5.00 ppB, the highest of which were well water samples from the San Luis Valley. Thirty-seven sediment samples (approximately 2.3% of the total sediment population) had uranium concentrations above 12.0 ppM. The majority of these were taken from sites in Precambrian rocks, but several came from Paleozoic and Mesozoic strate and Tertiary volcanics. The uranium concentrations in sediment samples from areas of Precambrian rock were especially high and these areas may warrant further, more detailed investigations

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nulato NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Znkl, R.J.; Shellel, D.C. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nulato NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Sagavanirktok NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Sagavanirktok NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Candle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Candle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Port Alexander NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available fom DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Tanacross NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Tanacross NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Minor, M.M.; McInteer, C.; Hansel, J.N.; Broxton, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Point Lay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Point Lay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Unalakleet NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Unalakleet NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information onthe field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance Misheguk Mountain NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Misheguk Mountain NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Glasgow NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through C describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, stream-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Umiat NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Umiat NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Howard Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Howard Pass NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analysis, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Circle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Circle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Ruby NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Selawik NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Selawik NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  18. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Melozitna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Melozitna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Beechey Point NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Beechey Point NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANI) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981) and will not be included in this report

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Utukok River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Utukok River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Beaver NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Martell, C.J.; Maassen, L.W.

    1981-11-01

    The report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Ketchikan NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) protion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Nabesne NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Garcia, S.R.; Hanks, D.; George, W.E.; Boliver, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Nabesna NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981), and will not be included in this report

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Sterling NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Garcia, S.R.; Hanks, D.; George, W.E.; Boliver, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaisance (HSSR) of the Sterling NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1;1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Limon NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Minor, M.M.; McInteer, C.; Hansel, J.N.; Broxton, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Limon NTMS quadrangle, Colorado. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume, these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information of the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory (see, for example, Planner and others, 1981) and will not be included in this report

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Coleen NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Coleen NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these date are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laborarory and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, L. C.; D& #x27; Andrea, Jr., R. F.; Zinkl, R. J.; Shettel, Jr., D. L.; Langfeldt, S. L. [comps.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.

    1982-02-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Big Delta NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wainwright NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Livengood NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1981-11-01

    This report presents results of a hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Livengood NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-water and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Wyoming portions of the Driggs, Preston, and Ogden NTMS Quadrangles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.; Nunes, H.P.

    1978-04-01

    This report describes work done in the Wyoming portions of the Driggs and Preston, Wyoming/Idaho, and the Ogden, Wyoming/Utah, National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangles (1 : 250,000 scale) by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) as part of the nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The HSSR is designed to identify areas having higher than normal concentrations of uranium in ground waters, surface waters, and water-transported sediments. During the fall of 1976, 1108 water samples and 1956 sediment samples were taken from 1999 locations by a private contractor within the Wyoming portion of Driggs, Preston, and Ogden quadrangles. An additional 108 water samples and 128 sediment samples were collected in the Grand Teton National Park during the fall of 1977 by staff members from the LASL. All of the samples were collected and treated according to standard specifications described in Appendix A. Uranium concentrations were determined at the LASL using standard analytical methods and procedures, also described briefly in Appendix A. Appendixes B-I through B-III and C-I through C-III are listings of all field and analytical data for the water and sediment samples, respectively. Appendixes D-I and D-II provide keys to codes used in the data listings. Statistical data describing the mean, range, and standard deviations of uranium concentrations are summarized by quadrangle and sample source-type in Tables I through III

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnasissance of the Trinidad NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Uranium and other elemental data resulting from the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Trinidad National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) are reported herein. This study was conducted as part of the United States Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE), which is designed to provide improved estimates of the availability and economics of nuclear fuel resources and to make available to industry information for use in exploration and development of uranium resources. The HSSR data will ultimately be integrated with other NURE data (e.g., airborne radiometric surveys and geological investigations) to complete the entire NURE program. This report is a supplement to the HSSR uranium evaluation report for the Trinidad quadrange (Morris et al, 1978), which presented the field and uranium data for the 1060 water and 1240 sediment samples collected from 1768 locations in the quadrangle. The earlier report contains an evaluation of the uranium concentrations of the samples as well as descriptions of the geology, hydrology, climate, and uranium occurrences of the quadrange. This supplement presents the sediment field and uranium data again and the analyses of 42 other elements in the sediments. All uranium samples were redetermined by delayed-neutron counting (DNC) when the sediment samples were analyzed for 31 elements by neutron activation. For 99.6% of the sediment samples analyzed, the differences between the uranium contents first determined (Morris et al, 1978) and the analyses reported herein are less than 10%

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1979-11-01

    During the summers of 1976 and 1977, 570 water and 1249 sediment samples were collected from 1517 locations within the 18,000-km 2 area of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle of central Wyoming. Water samples were collected from wells, springs, streams, and artifical ponds; sediment samples were collected from wet and dry streams, springs, and wet and dry ponds. All water samples were analyzed for 13 elements, including uranium, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit to 84.60 parts per billion (ppb) with a mean of 4.32 ppb. All water sample types except pond water samples were considered as a single population in interpreting the data. Pond water samples were excluded due to possible concentration of uranium by evaporation. Most of the water samples containing greater than 20 ppb uranium grouped into six clusters that indicate possible areas of interest for further investigation. One cluster is associated with the Pumpkin Buttes District, and two others are near the Kaycee and Mayoworth areas of uranium mineralization. The largest cluster is located on the west side of the Powder River Basin. One cluster is located in the central Big Horn Basin and another is in the Wind River Basin; both are in areas underlain by favorable host units. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.08 parts per million (ppm) to 115.50 ppm with a mean of 3.50 ppm. Two clusters of sediment samples over 7 ppm were delineated. The first, containing the two highest-concentration samples, corresponds with the Copper Mountain District. Many of the high uranium concentrations in samples in this cluster may be due to contamination from mining or prospecting activity upstream from the sample sites. The second cluster encompasses a wide area in the Wind River Basin along the southern boundary of the quadrangle

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1979-11-01

    During the summers of 1976 and 1977, 570 water and 1249 sediment samples were collected from 1517 locations within the 18,000-km/sup 2/ area of the Arminto NTMS quadrangle of central Wyoming. Water samples were collected from wells, springs, streams, and artifical ponds; sediment samples were collected from wet and dry streams, springs, and wet and dry ponds. All water samples were analyzed for 13 elements, including uranium, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit to 84.60 parts per billion (ppb) with a mean of 4.32 ppb. All water sample types except pond water samples were considered as a single population in interpreting the data. Pond water samples were excluded due to possible concentration of uranium by evaporation. Most of the water samples containing greater than 20 ppb uranium grouped into six clusters that indicate possible areas of interest for further investigation. One cluster is associated with the Pumpkin Buttes District, and two others are near the Kaycee and Mayoworth areas of uranium mineralization. The largest cluster is located on the west side of the Powder River Basin. One cluster is located in the central Big Horn Basin and another is in the Wind River Basin; both are in areas underlain by favorable host units. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.08 parts per million (ppm) to 115.50 ppm with a mean of 3.50 ppm. Two clusters of sediment samples over 7 ppm were delineated. The first, containing the two highest-concentration samples, corresponds with the Copper Mountain District. Many of the high uranium concentrations in samples in this cluster may be due to contamination from mining or prospecting activity upstream from the sample sites. The second cluster encompasses a wide area in the Wind River Basin along the southern boundary of the quadrangle.

  15. Aerial gama ray and magnetic survey: Lawrence Quadrangle of Kansas and Missouri. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    The Lawrence quadrangle covers approximately 7500 square miles in Kansas and Missouri over the western edge of the Ozark Uplift. Sediments in this area are mostly Pennsylvanian and Permian sandstone, shale, limestone, and coal. As mapped, these are the dominant units in the quadrangle. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of 94 uranium anomalies were detected and are discussed briefly. Most appear to be related to cultural features. Those associated with coal mine tailings appear to be most significant. Magnetic data appears to relate to complexities in the Precambrian basement

  16. National uranium resource evaluation. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Fairweather NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Martell, C.J.; Maassen, L.W.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Fairweather NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in macine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  17. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Dallas NTMS Quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Dallas Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 284 groundwater and 545 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distribution plots of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided. Groundwater produced from the Navarro Group, Neylandville Formation, Marlbrook Marl, and the Glen Rose and Twin Mountains Formations exhibit anomalous uranium (> 9.05 ppB) and specific conductance (> 1871 μmhos/cm) values. The anomalies represent a southern extension of a similar trend observed in the Sherman Quadrangle, K/UR-110. Stream sediments representing the Eagle Ford Group and Woodbine Formation exhibit the highest concentrations of total and hot-acid-soluble uranium and thorium of samples collected in the Dallas Quadrangle. The U/TU value indicates that > 80% of this uranium is present in a soluble form

  18. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Milbank NTMS Quadrangle, Minnesota; North Dakota; South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey are reported for the Milbank Quadrangle, Minnesota; North Dakota; South Dakota. Statistical data and areal distributions for uranium and uranium-related variables are presented for 662 groundwater and 319 stream sediment samples. Also included is a brief discussion on location and geologic setting

  19. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Dickinson NTMS Quadrangle, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Dickinson Quadrangle, North Dakota are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 544 groundwater and 554 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Interpretation of the groundwater data indicates that scattered localities in the central portion of the quadrangle appear most promising for uranium mineralization. High values of uranium in this area are usually found in waters of the Sentinel Butte and Tongue River Formations. Uranium is believed to be concentrated in the lignite beds of the Fort Union Group, with concentrations increasing with proximity to the pre-Oligocene unconformity. Stream sediment data indicate high uranium values distributed over the central area of the quadrangle. Uranium in stream sediments does not appear to be associated with any particular geologic unit and is perhaps following a structural trend

  20. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Watertown NTMS Quadrangle, South Dakota; Minnesota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Watertown Quadrangle are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 711 groundwater and 603 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that high uranium concentrations are derived predominantly from glacial aquifers of variable water composition located on the Coteau des Prairies. Elements associated with high uranium values in these waters include barium, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, selenium, sulfate, and total alkalinity. Low uranium values were observed in waters originating from the Cretaceous Dakota sandstone whose water chemistry is characterized by high concentrations of boron, sodium, and chloride. Stream sediment data indicate that high uranium concentrations are scattered across the glacial deposits of the Coteau des Prairies. A major clustering of high uranium values occurs in the eastern portion of the glaciated quadrangle and is associated with high concentrations of selenium, lithium, iron, arsenic, chromium, and vanadium. The sediment data suggest that the drift covering the Watertown Quadrangle is compositionally homogeneous, although subtle geochemical differences were observed as a result of localized contrasts in drift source-rock mineralogy and modification of elemental distributions by contemporaneous and postglacial hydrologic processes

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Teller NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Teller NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  2. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance of the Bendeleben NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Bendeleben NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting program of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Noatak NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Noatak NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report. 16 figures, 12 tables

  4. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Charley River NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Charley River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Shishmaref NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Shishmaref NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  6. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Kateel River NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Kateel River NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Wolf Point NTMS Quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Wolf Point NTMS quadrangle, Montana. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  8. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Shungnak NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Shungnak NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Clovis NTMS Quadrangle, New Mexico. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Clovis NTMS Quadrangle, New Mexico. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through E describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses.Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  10. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Black River NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Black River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  11. National uranium resource evaluation. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Lookout Ridge NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; Garcia, S.R.; Hanks, D.; George, W.E.; Bolivar, S.L.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the lookout Ridge NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  12. National uranium resource evaluation. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Harrison Bay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Minor, M.M.; McInteer, C.; Hansel, J.N.; Broxton, D.E.

    1982-03-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Harrison Bay NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  13. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance of the Seward NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, D.L.; Hardy, L.D.

    1982-07-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream-Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Seward NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A through D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment, lake-sediment, stream-water, and lake-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Ophir NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Ophir NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report. 14 figures, 10 tables

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Kantishna River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Kantishna River NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Tanana NTMS Quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Tanana NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendix A describes the sample medium and summarizes the analytical results for that medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting program of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will be included in this report

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Eagle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.; Zinkl, R.J.; Hardy, L.C.

    1982-08-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Eagle NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment stream-water, lake-water, and ground-water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report

  18. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Fremont Quadrangle, Nebraska, Iowa; Lincoln Quadrangle, Nebraska; Manhattan Quadrangle, Kansas; Hutchinson Quadrangle, Kansas. Final report. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    A high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic survey of the East Salina Basin Area (Kansas and Nebraska) was conducted. The project area, the Hutchinson and Manhattan, Kansas sheets, consists of approximately 30,800 square miles. A total of 11,287 line miles of high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic data were collected. All data were collected utilizing a fixed wing aircraft, and over 3,500 cubic inches of NaI crystal detector. Magnetometer data were collected utilizing a high sensitivity 0.25 gamma, proton magnetometer. All field data were returned to GeoMetrics, Sunnyvale, California computer facilities for processing, statistical analysis and interpretation. As an integral part of this final report, other data are presented which include corrected profiles of all radiometric variables (total count, K, U, Th, U/Th, U/K, and Th/K, ratios), magnetic data, radar altimeter data, barometric altimeter data, air temperature and airborne Bi contributions. Radiometric data presented are corrected for Compton Scatter, altitude dependence and atmospheric Bismuth. These data are presented in the form of strip charts as averaged one second samples using a 5 second moving average window, microfiche and digital magnetic tapes containing raw spectral data, single record data, averaged record data, and statistical analysis results. In addition, computer generated anomaly maps and interpretation maps are presented relating known geology or soil distribution to the corrected radiometric data

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Denver and Greeley NTMS Quadrangles, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Broxton, D.E.; Olsen, C.E.

    1978-03-01

    Although this report covers two National Topographic Map Series 2 0 quadrangles, the data for each quadrangle are presented separately. Evaluation of the data by quadrangle resulted in the delineation of areas in which water and/or sediment uranium concentrations are notably higher than surrounding background concentrations. The major clusters of anomalous water samples were found in areas of the Denver Basin underlain by the Pierre, Laramie, Fox Hills, Denver, and Arapahoe formations. Most of the anomalous sediment samples were collected in areas of the Front Range underlain by Precambrian crystalline rocks, particularly granites of the Silver Plume-Sherman group. Many of the anomalous sediment samples are from sites located near fault zones. The data in this report are also presented by geologic/physiographic province because background uranium concentrations in Front Range samples differ significantly from those in the Denver Basin. Denver Basin waters have higher mean uranium concentrations (mean 14.4 ppB) than Front Range waters (mean 3.3 ppB). Conversely, Front Range sediments are more uraniferous (mean 14.7 ppM) than those in the Denver Basin (mean 6.1 ppM). These differences in background uranium concentrations between Front Range and Denver Basin samples can be attributed to differences in regional geology, physiography, and (in the case of water) the ratio of surface water to ground water sites sampled. There is a significant northward increase in uranium concentrations in water samples from the Denver Basin. The higher uranium concentrations in water samples from the northern part of the basin are probably due to leaching of uraniferous strata in the Pierre and Laramie formations which crop out in that area

  20. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Brownsville-McAllen NTMS Quadrangles, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Brownsville-McAllen Quadrangles, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 427 groundwater and 171 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. Pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate the most promising area for potential uranium mineralization occurs in the northwestern section of the quadrangles (Jim Hogg, Starr, and Zapata Counties), where waters are derived from the Catahoula Formation. These groundwaters have high concentrations of uranium, uranium associated elements, and low values for specific conductance. Another area with high uranium concentrations is in the southeastern portion of the survey area (Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties). Shallow wells <10 m (30 ft) are numerous in this area and high specific conductance values may indicate contamination from extensive fertilization. Stream sediment data for the survey does not indicate an area favorable for uranium mineralization. Anomalous acid soluble uranium values in the southeastern area (Hidalgo, Cameron, and Willacy Counties) can be attributed to phosphate fertilizer contamination. Four samples in the western part of the area (western Starr County) have anomalously high total uranium values and low acid soluble uranium values, indicating the uranium may be contained in resistate minerals

  1. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Lawton NTMS quadrangle, Oklahoma; Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 703 groundwater and 782 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. Groundwater data indicate that the most promising areas for potential uranium mineralization occur in the Lower Permian units surrounding the granite outcrops of the Wichita Mountains. Waters from the Hennessey and Clearfork Groups and the Garber Sandstone contain the highest uranium values. Elements associated with the uranium are arsenic, boron, barium, molybdenum, sodium, selenium, and vandium. Stream sediment data indicate that the promising areas for potential uranium mineralization occur around the Wichita Mountains where stream sediments are derived from the Lower Permian Post Oak Conglomerate, Hennessey Group, and Garber Sandstone and from the Cambrian igneous rocks. Other areas of interest occur (1) in the western part of the quadrangle where the sediments are derived from rocks of the El Reno Group, and (2) along the southern border of the quadrangle where the sediments are derived from the Wichita Group

  2. Analysis of stream sediment reconnaissance data for mineral resources from the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyth, M.; Broxton, D.; McInteer, C.; Averett, W.R.; Stablein, N.K.

    1980-06-01

    Multivariate statistical analysis to support the National Uranium Resource Evaluation and to evaluate strategic and other commercially important mineral resources was carried out on Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the Montrose quadrangle, Colorado. The analysis suggests that: (1) the southern Colorado Mineral Belt is an area favorable for uranium mineral occurrences; (2) carnotite-type occurrences are likely in the nose of the Gunnison Uplift; (3) uranium mineral occurrences may be present along the western and northern margins of the West Elk crater; (4) a base-metal mineralized area is associated with the Uncompahgre Uplift; and (5) uranium and base metals are associated in some areas, and both are often controlled by faults trending west-northwest and north

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes quadrangle, Alaska, are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and Laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report

  4. Multivariate statistical analysis of stream sediments for mineral resources from the Craig NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyth, M.; McInteer, C.; Broxton, D.E.; Bolivar, S.L.; Luke, M.E.

    1980-06-01

    Multivariate statistical analyses were carried out on Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the Craig quadrangle, Colorado, to support the National Uranium Resource Evaluation and to evaluate strategic or other important commercial mineral resources. A few areas for favorable uranium mineralization are suggested for parts of the Wyoming Basin, Park Range, and Gore Range. Six potential source rocks for uranium are postulated based on factor score mapping. Vanadium in stream sediments is suggested as a pathfinder for carnotite-type mineralization. A probable northwest trend of lead-zinc-copper mineralization associated with Tertiary intrusions is suggested. A few locations are mapped where copper is associated with cobalt. Concentrations of placer sands containing rare earth elements, probably of commercial value, are indicated for parts of the Sand Wash Basin

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Rock Springs NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report contains data collected by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) during a regional geochemical survey for uranium in the Rock Springs National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, southwestern Wyoming, as part of the nationwide hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 397 water and 1794 sediment samples were collected from 1830 locations in the Rock Springs quadrangle of southern Wyoming during the summer of 1976. The average uranium concentration of all water samples is 6.57 ppb and the average sediment uranium concentration is 3.64 ppM. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in the appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. A sample location overlay (Plate I) at 1:250 000 scale for use in conjunction with the Rock Springs NTMS quadrangle sheet (US Geological Survey, 1954) is provided. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, T, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. These analytical methods are described briefly in the appendix. This report is simply a data release and is intended to make the data available to the DOE and to the public as quickly as possible

  6. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Ashland NTMS Quadrangle, Wisconsin; Michigan; Minnesota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Ashland Quadrangle, Wisconsin; Michigan; Minnesota are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 312 groundwater and 383 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that the most promising area for potential uranium mineralization occurs along the Douglas Thrust Fault in northern Douglas County, Wisconsin. The Douglas Fault brings Fond du Lac Formation sediments in contact with Chengwatana volcanics where carbonate-rich water derived from the mafic volcanics enter the arkosic Fond du Lac Formation. Another area of interest surrounds the Bad River Indian Reservation in northern Ashland and Iron Counties. The waters here are produced from red lithic sandstone and are also associated with the Douglas Fault. Water chemistry of these waters appears similar to the waters from the Douglas County area. The stream sediment data are inconclusive because of the extensive cover of glacial deposits. A moderately favorable area is present in a strip along Lake Superior in Douglas County, where sediments are derived from arkoses of the Fond du Lac Formation

  7. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Seguin NTMS quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Sequin Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 848 groundwater, 950 stream sediment, and 406 stream water samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwater data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur along several northeast-southwest trends paralleling the regional strike of the major formations located within the survey area. The stream sediment data indicate that uranium is associated with heavy and/or resistate minerals in the Carrizo Sand and certain members of the Claiborne Group. Soluble uranium is primarily associated with the Cretaceous Formations, the Whitsett and Catahoula Formations, and sections of the Oakville and Fleming Formations. Stream water data corroborate well with both groundwater and stream sediment data. Anomalous values for uranium and associated pathfinder elements indicate that the Whitsett and Catahoula Formations and sections of the Oakville and Fleming Formations are potentially favorable for uranium mineralization. Anomalous values for certain pathfinder elements also occur in basins draining from the Beaumont Formation and may warrant further investigation

  8. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Lubbock NTMS Quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 994 groundwater and 602 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Interpretation of the groundwater data indicate that the area which appears most promising for uranium mineralization is located in the southwestern part of the quadrangle, particularly in Crosby, Garza, Lynn, and Lubbock Counties. The waters produced from the Ogallala Formation in this area have high values for arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Groundwaters from the Dockum Group in Garza County where uranium is associated with selenium, molybdenum, and copper indicate potential for uranium mineralization. Uranium is generally associated with copper, iron, and sulfate in the Permian aquifers reflecting the red bed evaporite lithology of those units. The stream sediment data indicate that the Dockum Group has the highest potential for uranium mineralization, particularly in and around Garza County. Associated elements indicate that uranium may occur in residual minerals or in hydrous manganese oxides. Sediment data also indicate that the Blaine Formation shows limited potential for small red bed copper-uranium deposits

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Bozeman NTMS quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.

    1978-11-01

    A total of 1251 water and 1536 sediment samples were collected from 1586 locations over a 17 400-km 2 area at a nominal density of one location per 10 km 2 . Samples were collected predominantly from surface streams although 38 ground water locations were also sampled. The uranium concentrations in waters sampled range from below the detection limit of 0.20 ppB to 41.35 ppB, with a mean concentration of 1.17 ppB. Waters with anomalous uranium concentrations as defined were found in tributaries of the Boulder River which drain Precambrian rocks in the Beartooth Mountains and in tributaries of the Three Forks basin which are underlain predominantly by Tertiary-Quaternary sediments. The two areas appearing most favorable for future exploration on the basis of water data are in the Three Forks basin in the vicinity of the Madison plateau and in a district about 20 km due west of Three Forks. Sediment samples from the quadrangle were found to have uranium concentrations that range from 0.90 ppM to 94.30 ppM, with a mean concentration of 3.71 ppM. The majority of anomalous sediment samples were collected from areas underlain by Precambrian rocks. Based on the data from sediments, the areas appearing most favorable for future exploration include the tributaries of the Boulder River in the Beartooth Mountains, the northern part of the Madison Range, and the Tobacco Root Mountains just north of Virginia City. The uranium concentrations in the sediments from these areas are probably associated with uraniferous siliceous veins or pegmatites

  10. Little Rock and El Dorado 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles and adjacent areas, Arkansas: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel, K.F.; Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series Little Rock 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle (Cleveland, Dallas, and Howard Counties do not have stream sediment analyses); the El Dorado 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle (only Clark County has stream sediment analyses); the western part (Lonoke and Jefferson Counties) of Helena 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle; the southern part (Franklin, Logan, Yell, Perry, Faulkner, and Lonoke Counties) of Russellville 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle; and the southwestern corner (Ashley County) of the Greenwood 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Stream samples were collected at 943 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 806 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 121 sites in the Helena area, 292 sites in the Russellville area, and 77 in the Greenwood area. Ground water samples were collected at 1211 sites in the Little Rock quadrangle, 1369 sites in the El Dorado quadrangle, 186 sites in the Helena area, 470 sites in the Russellville area, and 138 sites in the Greenwood area. Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at nominal density of one site per 21 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from less than 0.1 ppM to 23.5 ppM with a mean of 1.7 ppM. The ground water uranium mean concentration is 0.113 ppB, and the uranium concentrations range from less than 0.002 ppB to 15.875 ppB. High ground water uranium values in the Ouachita Mountain region of the Little Rock quadrangle appear to be associated with Ordovician black shale units

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the vernal NTMS quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purson, J.D.

    1980-08-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory conducted a geochemical reconnaissance for uranium in the Vernal NTMS quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, in the summers of 1977 and 1978. Totals of 422 water and 1552 sediment samples were collected from 1652 locations. These samples were collected at an average density of one sample location per 11 km 2 over an 18,800 km 2 area. Water samples were collected from streams and springs. Only those samples containing >10 ppB uranium for waters and >8 ppM uranium for sediments are discussed; however, all field and analytical data are included in the appendixes. The uranium concentrations in waters range from below the detection limit of 0.01 ppB to 108.04 ppB, with a mean uranium concentration for all water types of 3.11 ppB. Three clusters of samples containing relatively high uranium values are defined; they are associated with the Duchesne River formation, the Mancos shale, or the Uinta Mountain group and Browns Park formations. A few of the samples having the highest uranium values are associated with host rocks favorable for significant uranium mineralization. Sediments collected in this study have uranium concentrations that range between 0.70 ppM and 56.70 ppM, with a mean of 3.46 ppM. The majority of sediment samples with relatively high uranium concentrations were collected from one area in the Sand Wash basin in the northeastern corner of the quadrangle and are associated with the Wasatch formation. None of the water clusters define areas of significant interest; however, the area having high uranium values in sediments is worthy of further study

  12. Detailed uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the eastern portion of the Montrose NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    In September and October 1979, the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) conducted a detailed geochemical survey for uranium primarily in the Sawatch Range in the eastern part of the Montrose National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle, Colorado, as part of the National Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). Totals of 1034 water and 2087 sediment samples were collected from streams and springs from 2088 locations within a 5420-km 2 area. Statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples are presented. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments in appendices. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as Al, Sb, As, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sm, Sc, Se, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, Zn, and Zr. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. Sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Descriptions of procedures as analytical precisions and detection limits are given in the appendix

  13. Geology and mineral resources of the Johnson City, Phenix City, and Rome 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karfunkel, B.S.

    1981-11-01

    This document provides geologic and mineral resources data for the Savannah River Laboratory-National Uranium Resource Evaluation hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reports for the Johnson City, Phenix City, and Rome 1 0 x 2 0 National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in the southeastern United States

  14. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Emory Peak NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium Resource Evaluation Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Emory Peak Quadrangle, Texas, are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 193 groundwater samples and 491 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and the pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. In groundwater, uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile outline an area in the northwest portion of the quadrangle which is dominated by tertiary tuffaceous ash beds which disconformably overlie cretaceous units. The relationship between uranium and related variables indicates this area appears to have the best potential for uranium mineralization within the quadrangle. Stream sediment data indicate four areas that appear to be favorable for potential uranium mineralization: the Upper Green Valley-Paradise Valley region, the Terlingua Creek-Solitario region, an area in the vicinity of Big Bend National Park, and an area east of long. 102 0 15' W. In the first three of the preceding areas, soluble uranium is associated with tertiary igneous rocks. In the fourth area, soluble uranium is present in carbonate-dominant cretaceous strata

  15. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Butte NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.; George, W.E.; Montoya, J.V.; Martell, C.J.; Hensley, W.K.; Hanks, D.

    1980-05-01

    This report contains data collected during a geochemical survey for uranium in the Butte National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) quadrangle of west-central Montana. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. This report contains uranium analyses for water samples and multielement analyses for sediment samples. A supplemental report containing the results of multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediment samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  16. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the thermopolis NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maassen, L.W.

    1980-08-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory conducted a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance for uranium in the Thermopolis National Topographic Map Series quadrangle, Wyoming. Totals of 920 water and 1821 sediment samples were collected from 1977 locations at an average density of one sample location per 9 km 2 over an 18,000-km 2 area. Water samples were collected from streams, springs, and wells; sediment samples were collected from streams and springs. The uranium contents of water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 307.98 ppB with a median of 0.56 ppB. Six clusters of anomalous water samples were delineated within the Wind River Basin and are associated predominantly with the Wind River formation. Two clusters of anomalous waters were collected on the southern margin of the Bighorn Basin and are associated with sandstone and shales of Permian through Cretaceous age. The uranium contents of sediment samples range from 0.43 to 94.65 ppM with a median of 2.90 ppM. Most sediment samples with uranium concentrations of greater than 12 ppM are underlain by Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Wind River Range; this area contains the highest uranium values found in sediments from the Thermopolis quadrangle. Other samples containing greater than 12 ppM uranium are found associated with the Wind River and Aycross formations along the northern margin of the Wind River Basin, and one sample was collected from Precambrian granitic terrain of the Owl Creek Mountains

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Gillette NTMS quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.G.; George, W.E.; Minor, M.M.; Simi, O.R.; Talcott, C.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Cheadle, J.M. III.

    1980-08-01

    During 1976 and 1977, 752 water and 843 sediment samples were collected from 1419 locations within the 17 700-km 2 area of the Gillette quadrangle, Wyoming. Water samples were collected primarily from wells, and also from springs, ponds, and streams; sediment samples were collected primarily from stream channels, and also from springs and ponds. Each water sample was analyzed for uranium and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including uranium and thorium. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 to 212.20 ppB and have a median of 1.10 ppB. The highest background uranium concentrations, as well as the highest individual uranium values, are in areas where favorable host units for uranium mineralization crop out. These units are the Wasatch and Fort Union formations in the Powder River Basin and the Inyan Kara group in the Black Hills. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.64 to 29.83 ppM and have a median of 3.24 ppM. Background uranium concentrations are strongly controlled by the exposed geologic unit, and range from 4 to 8 ppM for the Cretaceous Colorado group to 1 to 3 ppM for the Triassic and Paleozoic units exposed in the Black Hills. Several areas where the Wasatch and Fort Union formations are exposed exhibit uranium concentrations in sediment samples that are slightly, but distinctly, above background values for these units. All of these areas are also associated with notably high uranium concentrations in water samples. Because epigenetic uranium mineralization in economically important areas can exhibit a similar geochemical signature, these areas within the Gillette quadrangle should be further examined for the possible presence of uranium mineralization

  18. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Red Creek quartzite special study area, Vernal NTMS Quadrangle, Utah/Colorado, including concentrations of forty-six additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.; George, W.E.; Apel, C.T.; Hansel, J.M.; Fuka, M.A.; Bunker, M.E.; Hanks, D.

    1981-04-01

    Totals of 22 water and 140 sediment samples were collected from 148 locations in the study area. The study area, in the north-central portion of the Vernal NTMS quadrangle, is covered by four 7-1/2' topographic maps: Dutch John, Goslin Mountain, and Clav Basin, Utah; and Willow Creek Butte, Utah/Colorado. Additional HSSR data are available for the entire Vernal quadrangle (Purson, 1980). All field and analytical data are presented in Appendix I. Figure 1 is an index and sample location map that can be used in conjunction with the 1:250,000-scale topographic map of the Vernal quadrangle (USGS, 1954). Standarized field, analytical, and data base management procedures were followed in all phases of the study. These procedures are described briefly in Appendix II-A and in reports by Sharp (1977), Hues et al (1977), Sharp and Aamodt (1978), Cheadle (1977), and Kosiewicz (1979). The data presented in Appendix I are available on magnetic tape from GJOIS Project, Union Carbide Corporation (UCC-ND), Computer Applications Department, 4500 North Building, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box X, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830. Because this is simply a data release, intended to make the data available to the DOE and the public as quickly as possible, no discussion of the geology of the region, uranium occurrences, or data evaluation is included

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the McGrath and Talkeetna NTMS Quadrangles, Alaska, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, P.L.; Jacobsen, S.I.; Hill, D.E.

    1979-04-01

    During the summer of 1977, 1268 water and 1206 sediment samples were collected from 1292 lakes and streams throughout the two quadrangles in south-central Alaska. Each of the water samples was analyzed for uranium and 12 other elements and each of the sediment samples for uranium, thorium, and 41 other elements. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below 0.02 ppB to 19.64 ppB. In general, lake waters contain somewhat less uranium than stream waters, and the highest concentrations in both sample types were found in or near the Alaska Range. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 0.10 ppM to 172.40 ppM. The highest concentrations are found in samples collected in the Alaska Range near areas of felsic igneous rocks. Sediment samples having high thorium concentrations also come from areas underlain by felsic igneous rocks in the Alaska Range. The following areas were found to be most favorable for significant uranium mineralization: (1) the Windy Fork stock on the southeastern boundary of the McGrath quadrangle; (2) an area in the northwest corner of the Talkeetna quadrangle near the Mespelt prospects; (3) the Hidden River drainage in the northeast corner of the Talkeetna quadrangle; (4) an area near Chelatna Lake in the center of the Talkeetna quadrangle; (5) the Kichatna River drainage, near the western border of the Talkeetna quadrangle; and (6) an area near the Mount Estelle pluton in the extreme southwest corner of the Talkeetna quadrangle

  20. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Beeville NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium resource evaluation project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-31

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Beeville Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 373 groundwater and 364 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. The groundwater data indicate that the northwestern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential uranium mineralization. Favorability is indicated by high uranium concentrations; high arsenic, molybdenum, and vanadium concentrations; and proximity and similar geologic setting to the mines of the Karnes County mining district. Other areas that appear favorable are an area in Bee and Refugio Counties and the northeastern part of the quadrangle. Both areas have water chemistry similar to the Karnes County area, but the northeastern area does not have high concentrations of pathfinder elements. The stream sediment data indicate that the northeastern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential mineralization, but agricultural practices and mineralogy of the outcropping Beaumont Formation may indicate a false anomaly. The northwestern corner of the quadrangle is considered favorable because of its proximity to the known uranium deposits, but the data do not seem to support this.

  1. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Beeville NTMS Quadrangle, Texas. Uranium resource evaluation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Beeville Quadrangle, Texas are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 373 groundwater and 364 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. The groundwater data indicate that the northwestern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential uranium mineralization. Favorability is indicated by high uranium concentrations; high arsenic, molybdenum, and vanadium concentrations; and proximity and similar geologic setting to the mines of the Karnes County mining district. Other areas that appear favorable are an area in Bee and Refugio Counties and the northeastern part of the quadrangle. Both areas have water chemistry similar to the Karnes County area, but the northeastern area does not have high concentrations of pathfinder elements. The stream sediment data indicate that the northeastern corner of the quadrangle is the most favorable for potential mineralization, but agricultural practices and mineralogy of the outcropping Beaumont Formation may indicate a false anomaly. The northwestern corner of the quadrangle is considered favorable because of its proximity to the known uranium deposits, but the data do not seem to support this

  2. Geology and mineral resources of the Florence, Beaufort, Rocky Mount, and Norfolk 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangles. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.B.

    1982-08-01

    This document provides geologic and mineral resources data for previously-issued Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reports of the Beaufort, Florence, Norfolk, and Rocky Mount 1 0 x 2 0 National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in the southeastern United States. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Lime Hills and Tyonek NTMS Quadrangles, Alaska, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, S.I.; Aamodt, P.L.; Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The U contents of the 671 waters from the Lime Hills quadrangle range from below 0.02 ppB to a high of 11.29 ppB. U contents of the 667 sediments from this quadrangle range from a low of 0.1 ppM to a high of 94.9 ppM. Both waters and sediments containing relatively high U concentrations are found to cluster in association with plutonic rocks in the Alaska Range, and particularly so in the vicinity of the Tired Pup batholith and Mount Estelle pluton. The U contents of 575 waters from the Tyonek quadrangle range from below the detection limit to 13.13 ppB. Relatively high U concentrations in waters were found to cluster near the Mount Estelle pluton and undifferentiated igneous, metasedimentary, and volcanic rocks in the Alaska Range and in Pleistocene deposits along the Castle Mountain fault. Uranium contents in 502 sediments from the Tyonek quadrangle range from 0.1 to 58 ppM. Most sediment samples having high U concentrations are from locations near the Mount Estelle pluton and Styx River batholith in the Alaska Range. Data for samples collected in the Alaska Range and the two flanking lowlands were also examined separately. Water samples from all source types in the Alaska Range had a higher mean U concentration (0.85 ppB) than those from the Western Lowland (0.34 ppB) or the Susitna Lowland (0.51 ppB). The mean U concentrations for lake water samples from the Alaska Range and the lowland areas are similar. Sediment samples from streams and lakes in the Alaska Range have a markedly higher mean U concentration (7.00 ppM) than sediment samples from either the Western Lowland (2.46 ppM) or the Susitna Lowland area

  4. Geology and mineral resources of the Florence, Beaufort, Rocky Mount, and Norfolk 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.B.

    1982-08-01

    This document provides geologic and mineral resources data for previously-issued Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reports of the Beaufort, Florence, Norfolk, and Rocky Mount 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in the southeastern United States. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program.

  5. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Dalhart NTMS quadrangle, New Mexico/Texas/Oklahoma, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, T.L.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1583 water samples and 503 sediment samples were collected from 2028 locations within the 20 000-km 2 area of the quadrangle at an average density of one location per 9.86 km 2 . Water samples were collected from wells, springs, and streams and were analyzed for uranium. Sediment samples were collected from streams and springs and were analyzed for uranium, thorium, and 41 additional elements. All field and analytical data are listed in the appendixes of this report. Discussion is limited to anomalous samples, which are considered to be those containing over 20 ppB uranium for waters and over 5 ppM uranium for sediments. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.2 ppB to 1457.65 ppB and average 7.41 ppB. Most of the seventy anomalous water samples (4.4% of all water samples) are grouped spatially into five clusters or areas of interest. Samples in three of the clusters were collected along the north edge of the quadrangle where Mesozoic strata are exposed. The other two clusters are from the central and southern portions where the Quaternary Ogallala formation is exposed. Sediment samples from the quadrangle have uranium concentrations that range from 0.90 ppM to 27.20 ppM and average 3.27 ppM. Fourteen samples (2.8% of all sediment samples) contain over 5 ppM uranium and are considered anomalous. The five samples with the highest concentrations occur where downcutting streams expose Cretaceous units beneath the Quaternary surficial deposits. The remaining anomalous sediment samples were collected from scattered locations and do not indicate any single formation or unit as a potential source for the anomalous concentrations

  6. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data release for the New Mexico portions of the Hobbs and Brownfield NTMS quadrangles, New Mexico/Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.G.; Nunes, H.P.

    1978-06-01

    U concentrations in waters approximate a lognormal distribution with a mean of 4.73 parts per billion (ppB) for the combined water samples from the western halves of both quadrangles. The highest U concentration found in a water sample is 139.7 ppb. About 93% of these samples were collected from 1008 wells. Of the remainder, 1 sample was collected from a spring and 75 samples were collected from combined surface water sources of artificial and natural ponds. The mean U content of the samples from surface water sources (7.63 ppB) is higher than that of the samples from wells (4.50 ppB). The water samples having the highest U content are from wells and ponds in the western, and especially the northwestern, portion of the Brownfield quadrangle. Most waters containing less than 20 ppB U were collected from areas in which the Dockum group underlies a thin veneer of surficial deposits, near the edge of the caprock, or from saline ponds. The U concentrations in sediments approximate a normal distribution with a mean of 2.18 ppM for the 914 sediment samples collected from the western halves of both quadrangles. The highest U value found in a sediment sample is 19.3 ppM. Sediments were collected from 154 dry streams, 522 dry natural ponds, 166 dry artificial ponds, and a total of 72 wet natural ponds, wet artificial ponds, and springs. The mean U content for sediments derived from the wet sources (2.77 ppM) is noticeably higher than that from dry sources (2.11 ppM).The highest U contents within the report area generally are associated with sediments collected from locations in which the Dockum group underlies a thin cover of surficial deposits. A cluster of seven sediments containing more than 3.0 ppM U is centered at 33 0 34'N, 103 0 53'W, where a U occurrence is reported at the Hoffacker test hole in the middle Dockum group

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Lewistown NTMS Quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 758 water and 1170 sediment samples were collected from 1649 locations in the Levistown quadrangle. Water samples were collected at streams, springs, wells, ponds, and marshes; sediment samples were obtained from streams, springs, and ponds. Histograms and statistical data for uranium concentrations in water and sediment samples and thorium concentrations in sediment samples are given. All samples were collected at the nominal reconnaissance density of one sample location per 10 km 2 . Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium to thorium (U/Th) ratios for sediment samples are included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB U were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for U and Th as well as Al, Sb, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Cu, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Pb, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Ni, Nb, K, Rb, Sa, Sc, Ag, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Sn, Ti, W, V, Yb, and Zn. All sediments were analyzed for U by delayed neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediments samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  8. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Dixon Entrance NTMS and Prince Rupert D-6 quadrangles, Alaska, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.G.; Hensley, W.K.; Hanks, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    During August 1978, sediment and water samples were collected from 203 lakes, streams, and springs in the Dixon Entrance and Prince Rupert D-6 quadrangles, Alaska. Variations in concentrations of all 43 elements among the five sieve fractions at each location are generally less than analytical uncertainty. Therefore, elemental analyses are generally comparable for a wide range in sieve fractions for sediment sample locations in southeastern Alaska. However, at some few locations, several elemental concentrations increase with finer mesh size; for uranium, such an increase may be associated with mineralization. Waterborne sediment samples collected from the center of a stream yield analyses essentially identical to those collected from the adjacent bank for most elements. Chlorine concentrations are generally higher in bank sediments, probably as a result of concentration of halogens in the vegetation that stabilizes the bank. At a few locations, concentrations of the ferrous elements, particularly Mn and Co, differ notably between the stream center and bank: such behavior is characteristic of mineralized areas. Concentrations of the ferrous elements, particularly Mn and Co, are strikingly enriched in the stream sediments compared either to lake sediments or to crustal abundances. This suggests that this area might be a favorable location for strategic resources of these elements. Uranium concentrations in all 950 sediment samples of all sieve fractions range from 0.54 to 22.80 ppM, with a median of 2.70 ppM

  9. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Elk City NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broxton, D.E.; Beyth, M.

    1980-07-01

    Totals of 1580 water and 1720 sediment samples were collected from 1754 locations in the quadrangle. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in Appendix I-B. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included in Appendix I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 parts per billion (ppB) uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). A supplemental report containing the multielement analyses of water samples will be open filed in the near future. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium. Basic statistics for 40 of these elements are presented. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  10. National uranium resource evaluation program. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Oklahoma City NTMS Quadrangle, Oklahoma. Uranium resource evaluation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Field and laboratory data are presented for 812 groundwater samples and 847 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and other possibly uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on the results from groundwater sampling, the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization in the quadrangle are the Permian Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hills Formations. These units are characterized by relatively high average concentrations of uranium, conductivity, arsenic, calcium, lithium, molybdenum, and sulfate. In addition, groundwaters from the Pennsylvanian Oscar Formation are characterized by values above the 85th percentile for uranium, conductivity, the uranium/sulfate ratio, arsenic, and vanadium. Results of stream sediment sampling indicate that the most promising formations for potential uranium mineralization include the same Permian Formation as indicated by groundwater sampling (Bison, Purcell-Salt Plains-Kingman, Fairmont, Dog-Creek, Chickasha, Duncan, and Cedar Hill Formations) in an area where these formations crop out north of the North Canadian River. Stream sediment samples from this area are characterized by concentrations above the 85th percentile for uranium, thorium, arsenic, lithium, manganese, and vanadium

  11. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Dubois NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaDelfe, C.M.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1024 water samples and 1600 sediment samples were collected from 1669 locations in the Dubois quadrangle. Water samples were taken at streams, springs, and wells; sediment samples were collected from streams and springs. All field and analytical data are presented for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than the upper detection limit of uranium were reanalyzed by delayed neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium rubidium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  12. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Dubois NTMS Quadrangle, Idaho/Montana, including concentrations of forty-five additional elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaDelfe, C.M.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 1024 water samples and 1600 sediment samples were collected from 1669 locations in the Dubois quadrangle. Water samples were taken at streams, springs, and wells; sediment samples were collected from streams and springs. All field and analytical data are presented for waters in Appendix I-A and for sediments in I-B. All elemental analyses were performed at the LASL. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than the upper detection limit of uranium were reanalyzed by delayed neutron counting. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium rubidium, samarium, scandium, selenium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, zinc and zirconium. All sediments were analyzed for uranium by delayed-neutron counting. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron-activation analysis for 30 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 12 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million.

  13. Williamsport 10 x 20 NTMS area, Pennsylvania: supplemental data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1328 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Williamsport 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 elements (extractable U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were open-filed in DPST-79-146-8 [GJBX-152(79)

  14. Williamsport 10 x 20 NTMS area Pennsylvania: supplemental data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1328 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Williamsport 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 elements (extractable U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were open-filed in DPST-79-146-8 [GJBX-152(79)

  15. Raw data report: Cave Valley orientation study, Lund 10 x 20 NTMS area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchlik, K.P.; Holder, B.E.; Smith, C.F.

    1977-11-01

    This report presents the results of the Cave Valley, Nevada, orientation study in the Lund 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). Wet, dry, and playa sediment samples were collected throughout the 360 km 2 semi-arid, closed basin. Water samples were collected at the few available streams and springs. In addition to neutron activation analysis for uranium and 15 to 20 trace elements on all samples, field and laboratory measurements were made on water samples. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tabular hardcopy and fiche format. Four full-size overlays for use with the Lund NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangle are included. Water site locations, water sample uranium concentration, sediment site locations, and sediment sample total uranium concentration are shown on the separate overlays. A general description of the area and the rock type distribution is presented

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Aberdeen quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    During the months of June through October, 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. This report discusses the results obtained over the Aberdeen, South Dakota map area. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Devils Lake quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    During the months of June through October, 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. This report discusses the results obtained over the Devil's Lake map area of North Dakota. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps

  18. Lewiston 10 x 20 NTMS area Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont: supplemental data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1168 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Lewiston 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 elements (extractable, U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were open-filed in DPST-80-146-18 [GJBX-14(81)

  19. Vya 10 x 20 NTMS area, Nevada data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    This abbreviated data reort presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Vya 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1339 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Surface water samples were collected at 115 of these sites. Ground water samples were collected at 368 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analyticl data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations in the sediments which were above detection limits ranged from 0.50 to 24.3 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.47. Groups of high (>10 ppM) uranium occur in the DC and BF quadrangles

  20. Richfield 10 x 20 NTMS area, Utah: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.

    1980-09-01

    Results of groundwater and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Richfield 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1546 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Groundwater samples were collected at 210 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in groundwater. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in groundwater. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Data from groundwater sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements (water temperature, well description where applicable, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th and U/Hf ratios, and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Uranium concentrations in sediments of the Richfield quadrangle are relatively low, having a mean of 2.5 ppM and a maximum value of 68.3 ppM. The anomalously high values of uranium in Quadrangle CE correspond with the proportionately high values of thorium, suggesting that the uranium is present in resistate minerals. Groundwater and surface water sampling sites are too widely dispersed to allow preliminary interpretation

  1. Albany 10 x 20 NTMS area Connecticut, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New York and Vermont: supplemental data report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1328 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Albany 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis were open-filed in DPST-79-146-10 [GJBX-140(79)

  2. Marble Canyon 10 x 20 NTMS area Arizona: data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, J.D.

    1980-07-01

    Results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Marble Canyon 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density for all media collected was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 884 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparse population resulted in the collection of only 2 ground water samples. Grand Canyon National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and much Indian tribal land in the southern half of the quadrangle were not sampled. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements for sediment samples are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); physical measurements (water temperature, and scintillometer readings); and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity; and elemental analyses(U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Histograms, cumulative frequency, and areal distribution plots for most elements; Log U/Th, Log U/Hf, and Log U/(Th + Hf) ratios; and scintillometer readings are included

  3. Trona 10 x 20 NTMS area, California: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.

    1980-09-01

    Results of groundwater and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Trona 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Two separate size fractions of surface sediments were collected at 898 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 23 square kilometers. Groundwater samples were collected at 99 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in groundwater. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in groundwater. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Data from groundwater sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements (water temperature, well description where applicable, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Uranium concentrations in sediments of the Trona quadrangle are relatively low, with a mean of 1.3 ppM and a maximum value of 8.7 ppM in the coarse fraction, and a mean of 3.3 ppM and a maximum value of 29.5 ppM in the fine fraction. Groundwater and surface water sampling sites are too widely dispersed to allow preliminary interpretation

  4. Lewiston 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont: supplemental data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    This data report presents supplemental analytical results for 1168 stream sediment samples that were collected as part of the SRL-NURE reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Lewiston 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle. Results are reported for 23 elements (extractable, U, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn). Analyses are tabulated and displayed graphically on microfiche. Field data and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were open-filed in DPST-80-146-18 (GJBX-14(81)).

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Harrison Bay Quadrangle, Alaska. Final report, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    During the months of July and August of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 3 0 x 1 0 and one (1) 4 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles of the Alaska North Slope. These include the Barrow, Wainwright, Meade River, Teshekpuk, Harrison Bay, Beechey Point, Point Lay, Utukok River, Lookout Ridge, Ikpikpuk River, Umiat, and Sagavanirktok quadrangles. This report discusses the results obtained over the Harrison Bay map area

  6. Atlanta 10 x 20 NTMS area: Alabama and Georgia. Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.L.

    1979-08-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Atlanta 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 1312 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 951 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 18 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water and surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included

  7. Phenix City 10 x 20 NTMS area, Alabama and Georgia: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.

    1981-08-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water, surface water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Phenix City 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1153 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 949 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water, and for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurments are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations above detection limits in the sediment samples ranged from 1.0 to 171, with a mean of 10.6 ppM. Uranium concentrations detected in the ground water samples ranged from 0.006 to 23.1 ppB, with a mean of 0.28 ppB

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States

  11. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Nebraska/Texas Project, the Alliance and Scottsbluff quadrangles of Nebraska. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    During the months of September and October 1979, EG and G geoMetrics collected 3156 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in the state of Nebraska in two 1 by 2 degree NTMS quadrangles. This project is part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully corrected and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as three Volumes (one Volume I and two Volume II's). Both quadrangles are dominated by Tertiary nonmarine strata, though the Sand Hills in the eastern central portion of the area is covered by Quaternary dune sand. Some Late Cretaceous marine shales are exposed in the northwest quadrant of Alliance quadrangle. No uranium deposits are known in this area, but outcrops of shales thought to be uraniferous outcrop in the Alliance quadrangle

  12. Harrisburg 10 x 20 NTMS area, Pennsylvania: data release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, J.D.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results of ground water, stream sediment, and stream water reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Harrisburg 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Stream sediment and stream water samples were collected from small streams at 1021 sites for a nominal density of one site per 18 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 1310 sites for a nominal density of one site per 15 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water and surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data are presented in page-sized hard copy. Supplementary data are on microfiche. Key data from ground water sites (Appendix A) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) well depth, (3) elemental analyses (U, Br, Cl, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V), and (4) graphical presentation only of Al and Dy analyses. Key data from stream sediment sites (Appendix B) include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) important elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, and V). Key data from stream water sites (Appendix C) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses

  13. Grand Canyon 10 x 20 NTMS area: Arizona. Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    This data report presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Grand Canyon 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1013 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 16 square kilometers (six square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 84 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites (on microfiche in pocket) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites (also on microfiche in pocket) include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th, U/Hf, and Th/La ratios, and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included on the microfiche

  14. Ritzville 10 x 20 NTMS area, Washington: data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.B.

    1980-07-01

    This data report presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Ritzville 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1063 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 20 square kilometers (eight square miles). Dry conditions contributed to the relatively small number (109) of surface water samples collected. Ground water samples were collected at 830 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements where applicable (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al,Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulatd. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, and Th/La ratios; and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included on the microfiche

  15. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Idaho Project, Hailey, Idaho Falls, Elk City quadrangles of Idaho/Montana and Boise quadrangle, Oregon/Idaho. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-09-01

    During the months of July and August, 1979, geoMetrics, Inc. collected 11561 line mile of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in Idaho and adjoining portions of Oregon and Montana over four 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles (Boise, Hailey, Idaho Falls, and Elk City) as part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully corrected and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as five volumes (one Volume I and four Volume II's). Approximately 95 percent of the surveyed areas are occupied by exposures of intrusive and extrusive rocks. The Cretaceous-Tertiary Idaho Batholith dominates the Elk City and Hailey quadrangles. The Snake River volcanics of Cenozoic Age dominate the Idaho Falls quadrangle and southeast part of the Hailey sheet. Tertiary Columbia River basalts and Idaho volcanics cover the Boise quadrangle. There are only two uranium deposits within the four quadrangles. The main uranium producing areas of Idaho lie adjacent to the surveyed area in the Challis and Dubois quadrangles

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Forsyth quadrangle, Round Up quadrangle, Hardin quadrangle (Montana), Sheridan quadrangle, (Wyoming). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Forsyth, Hardin, and Sheridan, and Roundup, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration Pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results

  17. Kansas Power Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Power Plants database depicts, as point features, the locations of the various types of power plant locations in Kansas. The locations of the power plants...

  18. Kansas Electric Transmission Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set is a digital representation of the EletcircTransmission lines for the State of Kansas as maintained by the Kansas Corporation Commission. Data is...

  19. Kansas Playa Wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This digital dataset provides information about the distribution, areal extent, and morphometry of playa wetlands throughout western Kansas. Playa wetlands were...

  20. Norfolk and southern eastville 10 x 20 NTMS areas Virginia and North Carolina. Data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Norfolk 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle and the southern one-half of the Eastville 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 840 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 1008 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included. Uranium concentrations in the sediments that were above detection limits ranged from 0.60 to 40.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.61. A large area of high uranium concentrations occurs in the southwestern part of the Norfolk quadrangle. High concentrations of thorium and hafnium in the same area indicate that the uranium is associated with the resistate minerals monazite and zircon

  1. Baltimore 10 x 20 NTMS area, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, W.M.

    1981-07-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water, surface water, and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Baltimore 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 993 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 777 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water, and for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments that were above detection limits ranged from up to 38.7 ppM. The samples with high uranium values also have high thorium values, suggesting that most of the uranium is held within resistate minerals. The north-northeast trend of the geologic units is clearly reflected in the data

  2. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Raw data report: Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin orientation study, Lovelock and Reno 10 x 20 NTMS area, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puchlik, K.P.; Holder, B.E.; Smith, C.F.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of the Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin, Nevada, orientation study in the Lovelock and Reno 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangles of the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS). Wet, dry, and playa sediment samples were collected throughout the 597 km 2 semi-arid, closed basin. Water samples were collected at the few available streams and springs. In addition to neutron activation analysis for uranium and 15 to 20 trace elements on all samples, field and laboratory measurements were made on water samples. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tabular hardcopy and fiche format. Eight full-size overlays for use with the Lovelock and Reno NTMS 1:250,000 quadrangles are included. Water sample site locations, water sample uranium concentration, sediment sample site locations, and sediment sample total uranium concentration are shown on the separate overlays. A general description of the area and the rock type distribution is presented. Some of the data in this report have been issued previously in ''Preliminary Report on the Winnemucca Dry Lake Basin Pilot Study,'' GJBX-41(76), August 1976

  3. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey: NE Washington area, Okanogan NM 11-10, Sandpoint NM 11-11 Quadrangles. Volume I. Narrative report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, LKB Resources, Inc. has performed a rotary-wing, reconnaissance high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey in north-east Washington. Three 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles (Spokane, Sandpoint, and Okanogan) were surveyed. A total of 14,421 line miles (23,203 kilometers) of data were collected utilizing a Sikorsky S58T helicopter. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at 1.0 and 3.0 mile (1.6 and 4.8 kilometers) spacing, with tie lines flown in a north-south direction at 12 mile (20 kilometer) spacing. The data were digitally recorded at 1.0 second intervals. The NaI terrestrial detectors used in this survey had a total volume of 2,154 cubic inches. The magnetometer employed was a modified ASQ-10 fluxgate system. This report covers only the Okanogan and Sandpoint 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles. Spokane 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangle is covered in a separate report. The radiometric data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The data are presented in the form of computer listings on microfiche and as stacked profile plots. Profile plots are contained in Volume II of this report. A geologic interpretation of the radiometric and magnetic data is included as part of this report.

  4. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey: NE Washington area, Okanogan NM 11-10, Sandpoint NM 11-11 Quadrangles. Volume I. Narrative report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, LKB Resources, Inc. has performed a rotary-wing, reconnaissance high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey in north-east Washington. Three 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles (Spokane, Sandpoint, and Okanogan) were surveyed. A total of 14,421 line miles (23,203 kilometers) of data were collected utilizing a Sikorsky S58T helicopter. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at 1.0 and 3.0 mile (1.6 and 4.8 kilometers) spacing, with tie lines flown in a north-south direction at 12 mile (20 kilometer) spacing. The data were digitally recorded at 1.0 second intervals. The NaI terrestrial detectors used in this survey had a total volume of 2,154 cubic inches. The magnetometer employed was a modified ASQ-10 fluxgate system. This report covers only the Okanogan and Sandpoint 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles. Spokane 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangle is covered in a separate report. The radiometric data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The data are presented in the form of computer listings on microfiche and as stacked profile plots. Profile plots are contained in Volume II of this report. A geologic interpretation of the radiometric and magnetic data is included as part of this report

  5. Kansas Rivers TMDL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This data set includes all the streams in the Kansas 2006 Water Register that have established TMDLs as of October 17, 2006. The impairments and implementation...

  6. Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Cartographic Database (KCD) is an exact digital representation of selected features from the USGS 7.5 minute topographic map series. Features that are...

  7. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey: Blue Ridge area, Greensboro NJ 17-12, Winston-Salem NJ 17-11, and Johnson City NJ 17-10 Quadrangles. Volume I. Narrative report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, LKB Resources, Inc. has performed a rotary-wing, reconnaissance high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey in the Blue Ridge area of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Five (5) 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles (Greensboro, Winston-Salem, Johnson City, Knoxville, and Charlotte) were surveyed. A total of 15,753 line miles (25,347 kilometers) of data were collected utilizing a Sikorsky S58 and S58T helicopter. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at 3.0 mile (4.8 kilometer) spacing, with tie lines flown in a north-south direction at 12 mile (20 kilometer) spacing. The data were digitally recorded at 1.0 second intervals. The NaI terrestrial detectors used in this survey had a total volume of 2,154 cubic inches. The magnetometer employed was a modified ASQ-10 fluxgate system. This report covers the Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and Johnson City NTMS 1:250,000 scale quadrangles. The Knoxville and Charlotte NTMS 1:250,000 scale quadrangles are covered in a separate report. The radiometric data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance, and are presented in the form of computer listings on microfiche and as stacked profile plots. Profile plots are contained in Volume II of this report. A geologic interpretation of the radiometric and magnetic data is included as part of this report

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Lund quadrangle, Ely quadrangle, Nevada. Volume I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Ely and Lund 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS quadrangle maps). The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer having a large crystal volume, and a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The maps were interpreted and an anomaly interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data processing procedures, the data display format, the interpretation rationale, and interpretation methodology. Volume II contains the data displays for a quadrangle and the interpretation results

  9. Johnson City 10 x 20 NTMS area, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia: data report (abbreviated). National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, W.M.

    1980-10-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Johnson City 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 959 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 1099 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements; and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are given. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. The Johnson City Quadrangle is underlain by Precambrian cyrstalline rocks in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle and by Paleozoic sediments in the remainder of the quadrangle. The highest uranium concentrations in sediments (up to 22 ppM) are in samples from the Precambrian crystalline rock areas. These samples also have high thorium concentrations suggesting that most of the uranium is in resistate minerals such as monazite. The U/Th ratios in sediment samples are generaly low with the higher values (up to 2.07) mostly within the lower Paleozoic sediments, particularly the Copper Ridge Dolomite. The uranium concentration in ground water is also highest in the lower Paleozoic sediments

  10. Science programs in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Ariele R.; Kelly, Brian P.

    2017-05-08

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is a non-regulatory Earth science agency within the Department of the Interior that provides impartial scientific information to describe and understand the health of our ecosystems and environment; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. The USGS cooperates with Federal, State, tribal, and local agencies in Kansas to deliver long-term data in real-time and interpretive reports describing what those data mean to the public and resource management agencies. USGS science programs in Kansas provide real-time groundwater monitoring at more than 23 locations; streamflow monitoring at more than 218 locations; water-quality and trends in the Little Arkansas and Kansas Rivers; inflows and outflows of sediment to/from reservoirs and in streams; harmful algal bloom research in the Kansas River, Milford Lake, and Cheney Reservoir; water-quantity and water-quality effects of artificial groundwater recharge for the Equus Beds Aquifer Storage and Recovery project near Wichita, Kansas; compilation of Kansas municipal and irrigation water-use data statewide; the occurrence, effects, and movement of environmental pesticides, antibiotics, algal toxins, and taste-and-odor compounds; and funding to the Kansas Water Resources Research Institute to further research and education through Kansas universities.

  11. Evaluation of uranium geochemical anomalies in the Charlotte 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a synthesis of published geological, geophysical, and geochemical information for portions of Cabarrus and Rowan Counties, NC, where uranium geochemical anomalies have been described by Heffner and Ferguson (1978). The results of a ground radiation survey in selected areas are also described. Based on an evaluation of published information and the data obtained in the field study, conclusions are made regarding the possible occurrence of uranium concentration. Recommendations for detailed surveys in certain areas are also presented

  12. Elko 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area: Nevada and Utah. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, W.M.

    1980-07-01

    Results of ground water and surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Elko 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 1713 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparce population contributed to the relatively small number of ground water (154) samples collected. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity, and (2) elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (coordinates, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th and U/Hf ratios, and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included.

  13. Grand Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area: Arizona. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, G R

    1979-01-01

    This data report presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Grand Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1013 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 16 square kilometers (six square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 84 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites (on microfiche in pocket) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites (also on microfiche in pocket) include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th, U/Hf, and Th/La ratios, and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included on the microfiche.

  14. Elko 10 x 20 NTMS area: Nevada and Utah. Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, W.M.

    1980-07-01

    Results of ground water and surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Elko 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 1713 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparce population contributed to the relatively small number of ground water (154) samples collected. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity, and (2) elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (coordinates, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th and U/Hf ratios, and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included

  15. Ritzville 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area, Washington: data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C.B.

    1980-07-01

    This data report presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Ritzville 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1063 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 20 square kilometers (eight square miles). Dry conditions contributed to the relatively small number (109) of surface water samples collected. Ground water samples were collected at 830 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements where applicable (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al,Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulatd. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, and Th/La ratios; and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included on the microfiche.

  16. Athens 10 x 20 NTMS area, Georgia and South Carolina: preliminary basic data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents preliminary results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Athens 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 1200 sites for a nominal density of one site per 18 square kilometers (seven square miles) in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 771 sites for a nominal density of one site per 28 square kilometers (eleven square miles). Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data are presented in page-sized hard copy. Supplementary data are on microfiche. Key data from ground water sites (Appendix A) include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) well depth, and (3) elemental analyses (U, Br, Cl, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Supplementary data include site descriptors, (well age, frequency of use of well, etc.) and analytical data for Al and Dy. Key data from stream sediment sites (Appendix B) include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) important elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, and V). Supplementary data from stream sediment sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.), and additional elemental analyses

  17. Providence 10 x 20 NTMS area, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-11-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Providence 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 318 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 180 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments ranged from 1.2 to 61.7 ppM with an average of 4.5 ppM. A group of high uranium concentrations was found in Barnstable County, Massachusetts. These sites also had high concentrations of thorium and rare-earth elements that indicate the presence of a sand with a high proportion of heavy minerals

  18. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1 0 x 2 0 areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States

  19. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1 0 x 2 0 areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States

  20. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data from the area of the Noatak and portions of the Baird Mountains and Ambler River Quadrangles, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, P.L.; Hill, D.E.; Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1978-05-01

    During August 1976, a total of 876 natural waters and 861 bottom sediments were collected at a nominal density of one location each 23 km 2 from streams and small lakes throughout the Noatak NTMS quadrangle, the southern two-thirds of the Baird Mountains NTMS quadrangle, and in the southwest corner of the Ambler River NTMS quadrangle. These samples were collected as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program in Alaska being conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The field collection and treatment of the samples were performed following strict LASL specifications. Total uranium was measured in the waters by fluorometry and in the sediments by delayed-neutron counting, using stringent quality assurance controls at the LASL. The uranium contents of the waters ranged from below the detection limit of 0.02 parts per billion (ppB) to a high of 8.38 ppB, and the uranium contents of the sediments ranged from a low of 0.3 parts per million (ppM) to a high of 34.0 ppM. In general, the locations of waters containing relatively high uranium contents were found to occur in clusters, and particularly in the headwaters of streams draining the southern slopes of the Baird Mountains. Few sediments contained relatively high uranium contents. These usually occurred singly at isolated locations scattered throughout the area. No obvious association exists between the location of high-uranium waters and sediments anywhere in the study area. The geology, mineralogy, and hydrology of this area is only generally described in the literature; therefore, it is difficult to correlate these data with particular aspects of the physical environment where individual samples were collected. However, the data do indicate that certain areas underlaid by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks and granitic intrusives within the Baird Mountains and a quartz-pebble conglomerate in the Waring Mountains may warrant more detailed field investigations

  1. Introducing Kansas Lava

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andy; Bull, Tristan; Kimmell, Garrin; Perrins, Erik; Komp, Ed; Werling, Brett

    Kansas Lava is a domain specific language for hardware description. Though there have been a number of previous implementations of Lava, we have found the design space rich, with unexplored choices. We use a direct (Chalmers style) specification of circuits, and make significant use of Haskell overloading of standard classes, leading to concise circuit descriptions. Kansas Lava supports both simulation (inside GHCi), and execution via VHDL, by having a dual shallow and deep embedding inside our Signal type. We also have a lightweight sized-type mechanism, allowing for MATLAB style matrix based specifications to be directly expressed in Kansas Lava.

  2. Ecoregions of Kansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. They are designed to serve as a...

  3. Santa Cruz 10 x 20 NTMS area, California: data report (abbreviated), National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Santa Cruz 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1270 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers (five square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 636 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Uranium concentrations in the sediments which were above detection limits ranged from 0.10 t 51.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.53. A group of high uranium concentrations occurs near the junctions of quadrangles AB, AC, and BB

  4. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Upper Kansas River Watershed Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period as part of a...

  5. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  6. Kansas Road Centerline Fle (KRCF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This version of the Kansas Road Centerline File (0801) represents the first effort to create a statewide roads layer from best available data sources. KGS integrated...

  7. Kansas Agents Study Grain Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeff, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Author is an extension specialist in feed and grain marketing for Kansas State University. He describes a tour set up to educate members of the Kansas Grain and Feed Dealers' Association in the area of grain marketing and exporting. (GB)

  8. Sexting in Kansas Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is an exploratory study about sexting, the sending of sexually explicit or illicit photos or video between cell phones, in Kansas public schools. An on-line survey asked superintendents to report if they have had an occurrence of sexting in their district. They were also asked if they felt sexting is currently a problem in their…

  9. Forests of Kansas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Kansas based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. For annual inventory years 2001-2013, the sample length was equal to 5 years. Beginning in 2014, the cycle length was changed to 7 years. For the 2015 inventory,...

  10. Forests of Kansas, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacia M. Meneguzzo

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in Kansas based on inventories conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station. For annual inventory years 2001-2013, the sample length was equal to 5 years. Beginning in 2014, the cycle length was changed to 7 years. For the 2016 inventory,...

  11. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Peoria, Decater, Belleville Quadrangles, (IL). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Peoria, Decatur, and Belleville, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton procession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results

  12. Flagstaff 10 x 20 NTMS area Arizona: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, P.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    Sampling in the northern half of the quadrangle was restricted to areas outside the Hopi Indian Reservation. Surface sediment samples were collected at 977 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 45 sites in the southwestern part of the quadrangle. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading); and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available; and elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th + Hf), and Th/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included.Uranium concentrations in sediments of the Flagstaff quadrangle are relatively low, with a maximum value of 11 ppM. The mean of the logs of uranium values in sediments is 0.35, which corresponds to a value of about 2.2 ppM. Highest values occur in areas underlain by Quaternary volcanics and alluvium in the south-western part of the quadrangle, and in lacustrine deposits in the Hopi Buttes area on the eastern edge of the quadrangle. Both of these areas have known uranium occurrences

  13. Kansas Wind Energy Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenbacher, Don [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    2015-12-31

    This project addresses both fundamental and applied research problems that will help with problems defined by the DOE “20% Wind by 2030 Report”. In particular, this work focuses on increasing the capacity of small or community wind generation capabilities that would be operated in a distributed generation approach. A consortium (KWEC – Kansas Wind Energy Consortium) of researchers from Kansas State University and Wichita State University aims to dramatically increase the penetration of wind energy via distributed wind power generation. We believe distributed generation through wind power will play a critical role in the ability to reach and extend the renewable energy production targets set by the Department of Energy. KWEC aims to find technical and economic solutions to enable widespread implementation of distributed renewable energy resources that would apply to wind.

  14. Pocatello 10 x 20 NTMS area Idaho. Data report: National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    This data report presents results of groundwater and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Pocatello 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface samples (sediment) were collected from 1701 sites. The target sampling density was one site per 16 square kilometers (six square miles). Ground water samples were collected at 381 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements where applicable (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings for sediment sample sites are included on the microfiche. Data from groundwater sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from stream water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); and (2) elemental analyses

  15. Two-dimensional coherence analysis of magnetic and gravity data from the Cascer Quadrangle, Wyoming. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    QEB, Inc. has completed a two-dimensional coherence analysis of gravity and magnetic data from the Casper, Wyoming NTMS quadrangle. Magnetic data from an airborne survey were reduced to produce a Residual Magnetic map, and gravity data obtained from several sources were reduced to produce a Complete Bouguer Gravity map. Both sets of data were upward continued to a plane one kilometer above the surface; and then, to make the magnetic and gravity data comparable, the magnetic data were transformed to pseudo-gravity data by the application of Poisson's relationship for rocks that are both dense and magnetic relative to the surrounding rocks. A pseudo-gravity map was then produced and an analysis made of the two-dimensional coherence between the upward continued Bouguer gravity and the pseudo-gravity data. Based on the results of the coherence analysis, digital filters were designed to either pass or reject wavelength bands with high coherence

  16. Boston 10 x 20 NTMS area, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. Data report (abbreviated): National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Boston 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 669 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 303 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). The maximum uranium concentration in the sediments of the Boston quadrangle was 82.1 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations in sediments was 0.68, which corresponds to 4.8 ppM uranium. A cluster of samples with uranium values greater than 40 ppM and which have low thorium concentrations occurs in Essex County, Massachusetts

  17. Lake Champlain 10 x 20 NTMS area New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire: data report (abbreviated). National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-03-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Lake Champlain 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1196 sites. Ground-water samples were collected at 619 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water, and for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground-water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. A real distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mg, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments range from 0.30 to 43.40 ppM with a mean of 3.03 ppM. A cluster of high log (U/Th+Hf) ratios appear in the southeastern portion of the quadrangle. The U x 1000/conductivity ratio in surface water is high in this same area

  18. Creation of second order magnetic barrier inside chaos created by NTMs in the ASDEX UG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Halima; Punjabi, Alkesh

    2012-10-01

    Understanding and stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTM) in tokamaks is an important problem. For low temperature plasmas, tearing modes are believed to be mainly driven by current density gradient. For collisionless plasmas, even when plasma is stable to classical tearing modes, helical reduction in bootstrap current in O-point of an island can destabilize NTMs when an initial island is seeded by other global MHD instabilities or when microturbulence triggers the transition from a linear to nonlinear instability. The onset of NTMs leads to the most serious beta limit in ASDEX UG tokamak [O. Gubner et al 2005 NF 39 1321]. The important NTMs in the ASDDEX UG are (m,n)=(3,2)+(4,3)+(1,1). Realistic parameterization of these NTMs and the safety factor in ASDEX UG are given in [O. Dumbrajs et al 2005 POP 12 1107004]. We use a symplectic map in magnetic coordinates for the ASDEX UG to integrate field lines in presence of the NTMs. We add a second order control term [H. Ali and A. Punjabi 2007 PPCF 49 1565] to this ASDEX UG field line Hamiltonian to create an invariant magnetic surface inside the chaos generated by the NTMs. The relative strength, robustness, and resilience of this barrier are studied to ascertain the most desirable noble barrier in the ASDEX UG with NTMs. We present preliminary results of this work, and discuss its implications with regard to magnetic transport barriers for increasing strength of magnetic perturbations. This work is supported by the grants DE-FG02-01ER54624 and DE-FG02-04ER54793.

  19. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, Thief River Falls, Grand Forks, Fargo, Milbank, Watertown, New Ulm and St. Cloud quadrangles of North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    During the months of August and September 1979, geoMetrics, Inc., collected 12,415 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in adjoining portions of South Dakota and Minnesota over seven 1 by 2 degree NTMS quadrangles (Thief River Falls, Grand Forks, Fargo, Milbank, Watertown, New Ulm, and St. Cloud) as part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully corrected and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as eight volumes (one Volume I and seven Volume II's). Regional geology for these seven quadrangles can be divided into two logical sections. The first comprises the surficial glacial deposits, which mantle most of the area and can be up to hundreds of feet thick. The second section consists of the underlying bedrock which is exposed in small scattered outcrops, generally along major drainages. No sedimentary structures exist within the quadrangles. As of this writing, no known uranium deposits exist within the seven quadrangles

  20. Klamath falls 10 x 20 NTMS area: Oregon. Data report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, G.R.

    1980-08-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1413 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 150 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity, (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th and U/Hf ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Uranium concentrations in sediments of the Klamath Falls quadrangle are relatively low, with a maximum value of 17 ppM. Highest values occur in tertiary volcanic rocks in the uranium-producing area near the town of Lakeview and in Quaternary volcanics in the north-central part of the quadrangle

  1. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Bozeman NTMS quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.; Hensley, W.K.; Van Haaften, I.J.; Pirtle, J.; George, W.E.; Gallimore, D.; Apel, C.; Hansel, J.

    1980-07-01

    This report contains uranium analyses for 1251 water samples and multielement analyses for 1536 sediment samples. Sediments were analyzed for uranium and thorium as well as aluminum, antimony, barium, beryllium, bismuth, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chlorine, chromium, cobalt, copper, dysprosium, europium, gold, hafnium, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, niobium, potassium, rubidium, samarium, scandium, silver, sodium, strontium, tantalum, terbium, tin, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, ytterbium, and zinc. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements, by x-ray fluorescence for 9 elements, and by arc-source emission spectrography for 2 elements. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million. Descriptions of procedures used for analysis of water and sediment samples as well as analytical precisions and detection limits are given

  2. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Newcastle NTMS Quadrangle, Wyoming, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, S.J.; Sandoval, W.F.; Gallimore, D.L.; Talcott, C.L.; Martinez, R.G.; Minor, M.E.; Mills, C.F.

    1980-06-01

    Water and sediment samples were collected and each water sample was analyzed for U, and each sediment sample was analyzed for 43 elements, including U and Th. Uranium concentrations in water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 702.26 ppB and have a median of 1.73 ppB and a mean of 11.76 ppB. Water samples containing high uranium concentrations generally are associated with known uranium mining activity or units known to be uranium bearing. About one-third of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations within the Pumpkin Buttes and Turnercrest-Ross Districts. Nearly half of the water samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from locations just west of the Monument Hill and Highland Flats-Box Creek Districts. Similar anomalous uranium concentrations in this region have been reported updip from Exxon's Highland uranium deposits. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek-Old Woman Anticline District. Uranium concentrations in sediment samples range from 1.14 to 220.70 ppM and have a median of 3.37 ppM and a mean of 4.03 ppM. Throughout the major uranium mining districts of the Powder River Basin, sediment samples with high uranium concentrations were collected from dry streams located near wells producing water samples with high uranium concentrations. High uranium concentrations were also found associated with the Lance Creek oil field where uranium mineralization is known in the White River formation. High uranium concentrations were also found in sediment samples in areas where uranium mineralization is not known. These samples are from dry streams in areas underlain by the White River formation, the Niobrara formation, and the Pierre, Carlisle, Belle Fourche, and Mowry shales

  3. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, the Alpena, Blind River, Cheboygan, Escanaba, and Sault Sainte Marie quadrangles of Michigan and Wisconsin. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    During the month of September, 1979, EG and G geoMetrics collected 2,547 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in the states of Michigan and Wisconsin in five 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles. This project is part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully correcthed and interpreted by geoMetrics and are presented as four Volumes (one Volume I and three Volume II's). The study area is dominated by Pleistocene glacial debris. Underlying sediments of the Michigan Basin are predominantly limestone and dolomites of Ordovician through Devonian age. No uranium deposits are known in this region, but major uranium-producing areas lie just north of the project area in Precambrian quartz-pebble conglomerates

  4. Kansas Non-State Road System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset is a single centerline road network representation of 120,000 miles of the Kansas non-state highway system with limited attribution. It includes rural...

  5. Kansas Water Quality Action Targeting System (KATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This system is a revision of the original KATS system developed in 1990 as a tool to aid resource managers target Kansas valuable and vulnerable water resources for...

  6. 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns Update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — In 2008, an update of the 1990 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) database was undertaken. The 1990 KLCP database depicts 10 general land cover classes for the State...

  7. Price 10 x 20 NTMS area, Utah. Data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1444 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 137 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th + Hf), and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Uranium concentrations in sediments of the Price quadrangle are relatively low, with a maximum value of 14.7 ppM. The mean of the logs of uranium values in sediments is 0.38, which corresponds to a value of about 2.4 ppM. Many of the lowest uranium concentrations occur in the northern part of the San Raphael Swell, in the southeastern portion of the quadrangle. Ground water sampling sites are too widely dispersed to allow preliminary interpretation

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Barrow Quadrangle, Alaska. Final report. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    During the months of July-August 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over eleven (11) 3 0 x 1 0 and one (1) 4 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles of the Alaskan North Slope. This report discusses the results obtained over the Barrow map area. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps, flight path maps, and computer printer maps. The histograms and the multiparameter profiles are presented with the anomaly maps and flight path map in a separate bound volume. Complete data listings of both the reduced single record and the reduced averaged record data are found in the back of this report. The format of the printout of the microfiches and the format of the data files delivered on magnetic tape are in accordance with the specifications of the BFEC 1200-C and are described in appendices F through L of this report

  9. KANSAS KIDS COUNT Data Book, 2000: Kansas Children at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    This KIDS COUNT Data Book provides state and county data on the well-being of Kansas' children. The statistical portrait is based on 22 indicators of well-being: (1) births to single teens; (2) children living in poverty; (3) children receiving free school meals; (4) children in families receiving economic assistance; (5) childhood deaths; (6)…

  10. Death Valley 10 x 20 NTMS area, California and Nevada. Data report: National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-04-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Death Valley 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 649 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 20 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 62 sites or at a nominal density of one site per 220 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water and surface water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) scintillometer readings, and (3) elemental analyses (U, Br, Cl, F, He, Mn, Na, and V). Supplementary data include site descriptors, tabulated analytical data for Al, Dy, and Mg, and histograms and cumulative frequency plots for all elements. Key data from stream sediment sites include (1) water quality measurements (2) important elemental analyses, (U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Sc, Na, Ti, and V), and (3) scintillometer readings. Supplementary data from stream sediment sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.), additional elemental analyses (Dy, Eu, La, Lu, Sm, and Yb), and histograms and cumulative frequency plots for all elements

  11. Savannah River Laboratory Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance. Preliminary raw data release: Spartanburg 10 x 20 NTMS area, North Carolina and South Carolina. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, J.D.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1977-12-01

    Preliminary results are presented of stream sediment and ground water reconnaissance in the Spartanburg National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 1202 sites for a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers (five square miles) in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 771 sites for a nominal density of one site per 25 square kilometers (ten square miles). Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data are presented in page-sized hard copy. Supplementary data are on microfiche. Key data from stream sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) elements that may be related to potential uranium and thorium mineralization in this area (U, Th, Hf, Ce, and Dy), and (3) elements useful for geologic classification of the sample area (Ti, V, Fe, Mn, A, and Sc). Supplementary data from stream sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, stream width, etc.) and additional elemental analyses that may be useful (F, Eu, Sm, La, Yb, and Lu). Key data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Na, Cl, Mg, Al, Mn, Br, V, and F). Supplementary data include site descriptors, information about the collection of the samples (well age, well depth, frequency of use of well, etc.), and analytical data for dyprosium

  12. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Preliminary raw data release, Charlotte 10 x 20 NTMS area, North Carolina and South Carolina. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, J.D.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents preliminary results of stream sediment and ground water reconnaissance in the Charlotte National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 1254 sites for a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers (five square miles) in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 759 sites for a nominal density of one site per 25 square kilometers (ten squre miles). Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data are presented in page-sized hard copy. Supplementary data are on microfiche. Key data from stream sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) elements that may be related to potential uranium and thorium mineralization in this area (U, Th, Hf, Ce, and Dy), and (3) elements useful for geologic classification of the sample area (Ti, V, Fe, Mn, Al, and Sc). Supplementary data from stream sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, stream width, etc.) and additional elemental analyses that may be useful (F, Eu, Sm, La, Yb, and Lu). Key data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Na, Cl, Mg, Al, Mn, Br, V, and F). Supplementary data include site descriptors, information about the collection of the samples (well age, well depth, frequency of use of well, etc.), and analytical data for dysprosium

  13. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Kansas single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  14. Single-edition quadrangle maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1998-01-01

    In August 1993, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Mapping Division and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Forest Service signed an Interagency Agreement to begin a single-edition joint mapping program. This agreement established the coordination for producing and maintaining single-edition primary series topographic maps for quadrangles containing National Forest System lands. The joint mapping program saves money by eliminating duplication of effort by the agencies and results in a more frequent revision cycle for quadrangles containing national forests. Maps are revised on the basis of jointly developed standards and contain normal features mapped by the USGS, as well as additional features required for efficient management of National Forest System lands. Single-edition maps look slightly different but meet the content, accuracy, and quality criteria of other USGS products. The Forest Service is responsible for the land management of more than 191 million acres of land throughout the continental United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico, including 155 national forests and 20 national grasslands. These areas make up the National Forest System lands and comprise more than 10,600 of the 56,000 primary series 7.5-minute quadrangle maps (15-minute in Alaska) covering the United States. The Forest Service has assumed responsibility for maintaining these maps, and the USGS remains responsible for printing and distributing them. Before the agreement, both agencies published similar maps of the same areas. The maps were used for different purposes, but had comparable types of features that were revised at different times. Now, the two products have been combined into one so that the revision cycle is stabilized and only one agency revises the maps, thus increasing the number of current maps available for National Forest System lands. This agreement has improved service to the public by requiring that the agencies share the same maps and that the maps meet a

  15. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  16. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  17. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  18. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Harrisburg Quadrangle, Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popper, G.H.P.

    1982-08-01

    The Harrisburg Quadrangle, Pennsylvania, was evaluated to identify geologic environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. The evaluation, based primarily on surface reconnaissance, was carried out for all geologic environments within the quadrangle. Aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance surveys provided the supplementary data used in field-work followup studies. Results of the investigation indicate that environments favorable for peneconcordant sandstone uranium deposits exist in the Devonian Catskill Formation. Near the western border of the quadrangle, this environment is characterized by channel-controlled uranium occurrences in basal Catskill strata of the Broad Top syncline. In the east-central portion of the quadrangle, the favorable environment contains non-channel-controlled uranium occurrences adjacent to the Clarks Ferry-Duncannon Members contact. All other geologic environments are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits

  20. Mesa 10 x 20 NTMS area, Arizona: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Koller, G.R.

    1980-09-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 713 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 365 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water and surface water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading) and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Helium analyses are given for ground water. Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th+Hf), and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included on the microfiche. The maximum uranium concentration found in sediments in the Mesa quadrangle was 36.6 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.58, which is equivalent to 3.8 ppM. High uranium concentrations are related to Precambrian granites; however, high log (U/Th) values appear to be related to Tertiary volcanic rocks

  1. A Kansas Integrated Commercialization Information Network (KICIN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, C.; And Others

    A consortium of Kansas economic development service providers is building a web of virtual satellite offices that will demonstrate the delivery of economic development services in all areas of Kansas. These "offices" will use the Internet and a novel information delivery system to reach small and medium-sized businesses and individuals…

  2. Kansas Adult Observational Safety Belt Usage Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Methodology of Adult Survey - based on the federal guidelines in the Uniform Criteria manual. The Kansas survey is performed at 548 sites on 6 different road types in 20 randomly selected counties which encompass 85% of the population of Kansas. The ...

  3. My Kansas Library on the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author, a technology consultant for the Northeast Kansas Library System (NEKLS), shares the story of how the Kansas Library on the Web (KLOW) program was created. KLOW's story begins with the initial startup fund finding and the enthusiasm of the six pilot libraries. The middle of the story has to do with building a flexible,…

  4. Kansas Energy Sources: A Geological Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, D.F.; Brady, L.L.; Newell, K.D.

    2012-01-01

    Kansas produces both conventional energy (oil, gas, and coal) and nonconventional (coalbed gas, wind, hydropower, nuclear, geothermal, solar, and biofuels) and ranks the 22nd in state energy production in the U. S. Nonrenewable conventional petroleum is the most important energy source with nonrenewable, nonconventional coalbed methane gas becoming increasingly important. Many stratigraphic units produce oil and/or gas somewhere in the state with the exception of the Salina Basin in north-central Kansas. Coalbed methane is produced from shallow wells drilled into the thin coal units in southeastern Kansas. At present, only two surface coal mines are active in southeastern Kansas. Although Kansas has been a major exporter of energy in the past (it ranked first in oil production in 1916), now, it is an energy importer. ?? 2011 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  5. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Crescent Quadrangle, Burns Quadrangle, Canyon City Quadrangle, Bend Quadrangle, Salem Quadrangle (Oregon). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combining radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy over the area covered by the Burns, Crescent, Canyon City, Bend, and Salem, Washington 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series, 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle maps. The survey was a part of DOE's National Aerial Radiometric Reconnaissance program, which is in turn a part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer having a large crystal volume, and a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test range. Data quality was ensured throughout the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. These maps were interpreted and an anomaly interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data processing procedures, the data display format, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results

  6. Digital Orthophoto Quarter Quadrangles (DOQQ) 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground...

  7. Digital Orthophoto Quarter Quadrangles (DOQQ) 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — Orthophotos combine the image characteristics of a photograph with the geometric qualities of a map. The primary digital orthophotoquad (DOQ) is a 1-meter ground...

  8. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Norton Bay Quadrangle (Alaska). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    During the months of July, August, and September 1979, an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten 3 0 x 1 0 NTMS quadrangles of West-Central Alaska. The results obtained over the Norton Bay Map area are discussed. The final data are presented in four different forms: on magnetic tape; on microfiche; in graphic form as profiles and histograms; and in map form as anomaly maps and flight path maps. The histograms and the multiparameter are presented with the anomaly maps and flight path map in a separate volume. A total of twenty (20) uranium anomalies have been indicated on the interpretation map. No thorium anomalies were found. The uranium anomalies are all weak and generally have only U/K or U/T expression. Often the uranium concentration within the zone is low, and generally is less than 2.5 ppM. Only zones 9, with an average of 3.0 ppM eU, and 14, with 2.6 ppm have above average uranium content. Zone 14 is also the only uranium anomaly with combined U/K and U/T ratio anomalies. No single uranium anomaly is believed to represent an economic follow-up target. The most prospective area appears to be the elongate zone of generally high uranium content, formed by the deposits of the Shaktolik group, to the east of the Ungalik conglomerate. This zone flanks an elongate area of relatively strong shallow magnetic sources, interpreted to be related to a monozonitic intrusive of which the Christmas mountain forms part. This intrusive rock contains in other neighboring areas often high thorium and uranium concentrations and may here as well served as a possible source of uranium deposits

  9. Dubois Quadrangle, Idaho and Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodzicki, A.; Krason, J.

    1981-06-01

    Within the Dubois Quadrangle (Idaho and Montana), environments favorable for uranium deposits, based on National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria, occur in the McGowan Creek Formation and within some Tertiary sedimentary basins. The Mississippian McGowan Creek Formation consists of uraniferous, black, siliceous mudstone and chert with minor porous sedimentary channels. In the southern Beaverhead Mountains it has been fractured by a bedding-plane fault, and uranium has been further concentrated by circulating groundwater in the porous channels and brecciated zones, both of which contain about 200 ppM uranium. The northern parts of the Pahsimeroi River, Lemhi River, Medicine Lodge Creek, Horse Prairie, and Sage Creek Basins are considered favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits. Evidence present includes suitable source rocks such as rhyolitic flow breccia, laharic deposits, or strongly welded tuffs; permeable sediments, including most sandstones and conglomerates, providing they do not contain devitrified glass; suitable reductants such as lignite, pyrite, or low-Eh geothermal water; and uranium occurrences

  10. Dillon quadrangle, Montana and Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wodzicki, A.; Krason, J.

    1981-04-01

    All geologic conditions in the Dillon quadrangle (Montana and Idaho) have been thoroughly examined, and, using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria, environments are favorable for uranium deposits along fractured zones of Precambrian Y metasediments, in the McGowan Creek Formation, and in some Tertiary sedimentary basins. A 9-m-wide quartz-bearing fractured zone in Precambrian Y quartzites near Gibbonsville contains 175 ppM uranium, probably derived from formerly overlying Challis Volcanics by supergene processes. The Mississippian McGowan Creek Formation consists of uraniferous, black, siliceous mudstone and chert. In the Melrose district it has been fractured by a low-angle fault, and uranium has been further concentrated by circulating ground water in the 2- to 6-m-thick brecciated zones that in outcrop contain 90 to 170 ppM uranium. The Wise River, northern Divide Creek, Jefferson River, Salmon River, Horse Prairie, Beaverhead River, and upper Ruby River Basins are considered favorable for uranium deposits in sandstone. Present are suitable uraniferous source rocks such as the Boulder batholith, rhyolitic flow breccia, laharic deposits, or strongly welded tuffs; permeable sediments, including most sandstones and conglomerates, providing they do not contain devitrified glass; suitable reductants such as lignite, pyrite, or low-Eh geothermal water; and uranium occurrences

  11. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level I, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns map represents Phase 1 of a two-phase mapping initiative occurring over a three-year period. The map is designed to be explicitly...

  12. 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns, Level IV, State of Kansas (300m buffer) and Kansas River Watershed (1,000m buffer)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The 2005 Kansas Land Cover Patterns (KLCP) Mapping Initiative was a two-phase mapping endeavor that occurred over a three-year period (2007-2009). Note that while...

  13. Geology of the Harper Quadrangle, Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, M.R.; Chidester, A.H.; Baker, M.G.W.

    1974-01-01

    As part of a program undertaken cooperatively by the Liberian Geological Survey (LGS) and the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), under the sponsorship of the Government of Liberia and the Agency for International Development, U. S. Department of State, Liberia was mapped by geologic and geophysical methods during the period 1965 to 1972. The resulting geologic and geophysical maps are published in ten folios, each covering one quadrangle (see index map). The first systematic mapping in the Harper quadrangle was by Baker, S. P. Srivastava, and W. E. Stewart (LGS) at a scale of 1:500,000 in the vicinity of Harper in the southeastern, and of Karloke in the northeastern part of the quadrangle in 1960-61. Brock and Chidester carried out systematic mapping of the quadrangle at a scale of 1:250,000 in the period September 1971-May 1972; the geologic map was compiled from field data gathered by project geologists and private companies as indicated in the source diagram, photogeologic maps, interpretation of airborne magnetic and radiometric surveys, field mapping, and ground-based radiometric surveys in which hand-held scintillators were used. R. W. Bromery, C. S. Wotorson, and J. C. Behrendt contributed to the interpretation of geophysical data. Total-intensity aeromagnetic and total-count gamma radiation maps (Behrendt and Wotorson, in press a, b), and unpublished data derived from those maps, including the near-surface and the regional magnetic components and aeromagnetic/radiometric correlations, were used in the interpretation.

  14. Geology of the Huntsville quadrangle, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, T.H.; Malmberg, G.T.; West, L.R.

    1961-01-01

    The 7 1/2-minute Huntsville quadrangle is in south-central Madison County, Ala., and includes part of the city of Hunstville. The south, north, east, and west boundaries of the quadrangle are about 3 miles north of the Tennessee River, 15 1/2 miles south of the Tennessee line, 8 miles west of the Jackson County line, and 9 miles east of the Limestone County line. The bedrock geology of the Huntsville quadrangle was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the city of Hunstville and the Geological Survey of Alabama as part of a detailed study of the geology and ground-water resources of Madison County, with special reference to the Huntsville area. G. T. Malmberg began the geologic mapping of the county in July 1953, and completed it in April 1954. T. H. Sanford, Jr., assisted Malmberg in the final phases of the county mapping, which included measuring geologic sections with hand level and steel tape. In November 1958 Sanford, assisted by L. R. West, checked contacts and elevations in the Hunstville quadrangle; made revisions in the contact lines; and wrote the text for this report. The fieldwork for this report was completed in April 1959.

  15. Uranium Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance data from the area of the Teller, Bendeleben, Candle, and Kateel River Quadrangles, Seward Peninsula and vicinity, Alaska

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.; Hill, D.E.

    1978-05-01

    During July-August 1976, 2026 natural waters and 2085 bottom sediments were collected from 2209 sample locations (at a nominal density of one location each 23 km 2 ) on streams and small lakes throughout the Teller, Bendeleben, Candle, and western one-third of the Kateel River NTMS quadrangles, Alaska. Total uranium was measured in the waters by fluorometry and in the sediments and a few waters by delayed-neutron counting. The uranium content of the waters ranged from below the detection limit of 0.02 parts per billion (ppB) to a high of 14.50 ppB, averaging 0.44 ppB, and that of the sediments ranged from a low of 0.2 parts per million (ppM) to a high of 107.4 ppM, averaing 3.93 ppM. The uranium data for water and sediment are separately presented--as computer listings that include pertinent field measurements from each location, as graphically portrayed concentration overlays at 1:250,000 scale for each quadrangle, and as reduced figures showing contours drawn at various concentration levels for each quadrangle--and their areal distributions are compared and correlated with the known features and uranium showings. A test of increasingly detailed methods of data evaluation shows that the more extensive the evaluation, the more useful the reconnaissance uranium data are likely to be. The validity and potential usefulness of the HSSR uranium data are conclusively substantiated by the fact that evidence of all 23 of the reported uranium showings in the 50,000-km 2 study area can be discerned. Several new locations of interest for further field investigation are identified in each of the quadrangles, and most notably in the Bendeleben Mountains. However, the data presented would appear equally useful in guiding field investigation around the uranium occurrences already known, as noteworthy samples often come from close by but on tributary drainages adjacent, opposite, or above them

  16. 78 FR 50409 - Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket Nos. EL13-84-000] Kansas Municipal Energy Agency v. Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Mid-Kansas Electric Company, LLC, Southwest... 306 of the Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 824e and 825e and Rule 206 of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  17. Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance. Preliminary raw data release: Greenville 10 x 20 NTMS area Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, R.B.

    1978-03-01

    Preliminary results of stream sediment and ground water reconnaissance in the Greenville National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Stream sediment samples were collected from small streams at 1413 sites for a nominal density of one site per 13 square kilometers in rural areas. Ground water samples were collected at 731 sites for a nominal density of one site per 25 square kilometers. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Key data are presented in page-sized hard copy. Supplementary data are on microfiche. Key data from stream sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) elements that may be related to potential uranium and thorium mineralization in this area (U, Th, Hf, Ce, and Dy) and (3) elements useful for geologic classification of the sample area (Ti, V, Fe, Mn, Al, and Sc). Supplementary data from stream sites include sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, stream width, etc.) and additional elemental analyses that may be useful (F, Eu, Sm, La, Yb, and Lu). Key data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Na, Cl, Mg, Al, Mn, Br, V, and F). Supplementary data include site descriptors, information about the collection of the samples (well age, well depth, frequency of use of well, etc.), and analytical data for dysprosium

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  20. ASTER 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  1. Landsat TM and ETM+ Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2000-2001 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and...

  2. Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID) 2004-2005 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM)...

  3. Kansas Protects and Restores Wetlands, Streams and Riparian Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetland Program Development Grant (WPDG) in 2007 when the Kansas State Conservation Commission began identifying team members interested in developing a framework for a comprehensive Kansas Wetland and Aquatic Resources Conservation Plan.

  4. MODIS 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Llano Quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droddy, M.J.; Hovorka, S.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Llano 2 0 quadrangle was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. The areas were delineated according to criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Surface studies included investigations of uranium occurrences described in the literature, location of aerial radiometric anomalies, carborne scintillometer surveys, outcrop investigations, and followup of hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data. A radon emanometry survey and investigations of electric and gamma-ray well logs, drillers' logs, and well core samples were performed to evaluate the subsurface potential of the Llano Quadrangle. An environment favorable for pegmatitic deposits is identified in the Town Mountain Granite

  6. Endangered Fish Species in Kansas: Historic vs Contemporary Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Kansas state has more freshwater fish species than other states in the west and northern US. Based on recent count, more than 140 fishes have been documented in Kansas rivers. And at least five are categorized as endangered species in Kansas (and thre...

  7. Geology of the V28 Quadrangle: Hecate Chasma, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, E. R.; Guest, J. E.; Brian, A. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Hecate Chasma Quadrangle (V28), mapped at 1:5,000,000 scale, extends from 0-25 N and 240-270 Longitude. The quadrangle has thirteen impact craters, several large volcanoes, many coronae, three chasmata, and northern Hinemoa Planitia.

  8. Lewiston 10 x 20 NTMS area, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont. Data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.; Koller, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1168 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 638 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for U and 16 other elements in sediments, and for U and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description) and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: stream water chemistry measurements, and element analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation) are given. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included. Key data from stream water sites include: water quality measurements and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). The maximum uranium concentration in the sediments of the Lewiston quadrangle is 75 ppM. The highest concentrations occur in the southern part of the quadrangle in the White Mountain batholith and in the Sebago pluton. The areal distribution plot of log (U/Th) shows a cluster of high values in the north-central part of the area, apparently from sediments derived from the Mooselookmeguntic pluton. The highest concentration of uranium in ground water is 119.8 ppB. Two high concentrations occur side-by-side in the northeast corner of the quadrangle, and these high values persist in their U x 1000/conductivity ratios. The highest uranium concentration in stream water is 10.2 ppB. A group of high values was found in the north-central part of the quadrangle, similar in distribution to the log (U/Th) ratio in sediments

  9. National uranium resource evaluation, Montrose Quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodknight, C.S.; Ludlam, J.R.

    1981-06-01

    The Montrose Quadrangle in west-central Colorado was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits according to National Uranium Resource Evaluation program criteria. General surface reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were conducted in all geologic environments in the quadrangle. Preliminary data from aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance were analyzed and brief followup studies were performed. Twelve favorable areas were delineated in the quadrangle. Five favorable areas contain environments for magmatic-hydrothermal uranium deposits along fault zones in the Colorado mineral belt. Five areas in parts of the Harding and Entrada Sandstones and Wasatch and Ohio Creek Formations are favorable environments for sandstone-type uranium deposits. The area of late-stage rhyolite bodies related to the Lake City caldera is a favorable environment for hydroauthigenic uranium deposits. One small area is favorable for uranium deposits of uncertain genesis. All near-surface Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks are unfavorable for uranium deposits, except parts of four formations. All near-surface plutonic igneous rocks are unfavorable for uranium deposits, except five areas of vein-type deposits along Tertiary fault zones. All near-surface volcanic rocks, except one area of rhyolite bodies and several unevaluated areas, are unfavorable for uranium. All near-surface Precambrian metamorphic rocks are unfavorable for uranium deposits. Parts of two wilderness areas, two primitive areas, and most of the subsurface environment are unevaluated

  10. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Bozeman Quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, I.M.; Fields, R.W.; Fountain, D.M.; Moore, J.N.; Qamar, A.I.; Silverman, A.J.; Thompson, G.R.; Chadwick, R.A.; Custer, S.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1982-08-01

    The Bozeman Quadrangle, Montana, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas containing environments favorable for uranium deposits. This evaluation was conducted using methods and criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. General surface reconnaissance, mapping, radiometric traverses, and geochemical sampling were performed in all geologic environments within the quadrangle. Aerial radiometric and HSSR data were evaluated and followup studies of these anomalies and most of the previously known uranium occurrences were conducted. Detailed gravity profiling was done in the Tertiary Three Forks-Gallatin Basin and the Madison and Paradise Valleys. Also, selected well waters were analyzed. Eight areas are considered favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. They include the Tertiary Three Forks-Gallatin basin, the Madison and Paradise Valleys, and five areas underlain by Cretaceous fluvial and marginal-marine sandstones. Other environments within the quadrangle are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits when judged by the program criteria. A few environments were not evaluated due to inaccessibility and/or prior knowledge of unfavorable criteria

  11. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Bozeman Quadrangle, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, I.M.; Fields, R.W.; Fountain, D.M.; Moore, J.N.; Qamar, A.I.; Silverman, A.J.; Thompson, G.R.; Chadwick, R.A.; Custer, S.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1982-08-01

    The Bozeman Quadrangle, Montana, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas containing environments favorable for uranium deposits. This evaluation was conducted using methods and criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. General surface reconnaissance, mapping, radiometric traverses, and geochemical sampling were performed in all geologic environments within the quadrangle. Aerial radiometric and HSSR data were evaluated and followup studies of these anomalies and most of the previously known uranium occurrences were conducted. Detailed gravity profiling was done in the Tertiary Three Forks-Gallatin Basin and the Madison and Paradise Valleys. Also, selected well waters were analyzed. Eight areas are considered favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. They include the Tertiary Three Forks-Gallatin basin, the Madison and Paradise Valleys, and five areas underlain by Cretaceous fluvial and marginal-marine sandstones. Other environments within the quadrangle are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits when judged by the program criteria. A few environments were not evaluated due to inaccessibility and/or prior knowledge of unfavorable criteria.

  12. Integration of NURE and other data sets with emphasis on their utilization in generating exploration models in the Lubbock, TX 10 x 20 Quadrangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lankston, M.M.; Lankston, R.W.

    1979-05-01

    The study reviewed the geology of the region covered by the Lubbock, Texas 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS Quadrangle. The geology was integrated with NURE aerial radiometric data that had been recorded before the study was undertaken. The integration indicates that several of the geologic units in the area have recognizable radiometric signatures. These signatures were checked and substantiated by two ground radiometric survey systems, one truck-mounted and one hand-held. Numerous areas were seen which suggested that areas had been mismapped, that recent wind or stream action had modified the surface exposure of units, or that the radiometric data acquisition systems were able to detect surface units which were too small to be presented at the scale of the published geologic map. Two exploration models for the Lubbock region are proposed. The first and most obvious model involves basal Dockum (Triassic) sandstone which has been known for twenty years as a potentially economic uranium zone. The second model is more speculative. By integrating subsurface geologic data, NURE HSSR data, and ground and airborne radiometric data, a band of anomalies is seen extending in a generally north-south direction at the edge of the maximum eastern subsurface extent of Cretaceous rocks. Related to this band of anomalies is the group of very high radiometric anomalies over the Pleistocene lake basins in the southwestern corner of the study area. The basins also may be potential exploration targets

  13. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Pueblo NTMS quadrangel, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-three additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1978-12-01

    This report is a supplement to the HSSR uranium evaluation report for the Pueblo quadrangle (Shannon, 1978), which presented the field and uranium data for the 861 water and 1060 sediment samples collected from 1402 locations in the quadrangle. This supplement presents those data again and the results of subsequent multielement analyses of those HSSR samples. In addition to uranium, the concentrations of 12 elements are presented for the waters and 42 elements for the sediments

  14. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Powder River II Project: the Newcastle and Gillette Quadrangles of Wyoming and South Dakota; the Ekalaka Quadrangle of Montana, South and North Dakota. Volume I. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-04-01

    During the months of August through September 1978, geoMetrics, Inc. flew approximately 9000 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in eastern Wyoming and southern Montana over three 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangle (Newcastle, Gillette, and Ekalaka) as part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully reduced and interpreted by geoMetrics, and are presented as four volumes (one Volume I and three Volume II's) in this report. The survey area lies entirely within the northern Great Plains Physiographic Province. The deep Powder River Basin and the Black Hills Uplift are the two dominant structures in the area. Both structures strike NNW approximately parallel to each other with the Powder River Basin to the west of the Uplift. The Basin is one of the largest and deepest in the northern Great Plains and contains over 17,000 feet of Phanerozoic sediments at its deepest point. Economic deposits of oil, coal, bentonite and uranium are found in the Tertiary and/or Cretaceous rocks of the Basin. Gold, silver, lead, copper, manganese, rare-earth elements and uranium have been mined in the Uplift. Epigenetic uranium deposits lie primarily in the Monument Hills - Box Creek and Pumpkin Buttes - Turnercrest districts within arkosic sandstones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. A total of 368 groups of statistical values in the uranium window meet the criteria for valid anomalies and are discussed in the interpretation sections (83 in Newcastle, 109 in Gillette, and 126 in Ekalaka). Most anomalies lie in the Tertiary sediments of the Powder River Basin, but only a few are clearly related to known uranium mines or prospects. Magnetic data generally delineate the deep Powder River Basin relative to the Black Hills Uplift. Higher frequency anomalies appear related to producing oil fields and mapped sedimentary structures

  15. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Powder River II Project: the Newcastle and Gillette Quadrangles of Wyoming and South Dakota; the Ekalaka Quadrangle of Montana, South and North Dakota. Volume I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    During the months of August through September 1978, geoMetrics, Inc. flew approximately 9000 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in eastern Wyoming and southern Montana over three 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangle (Newcastle, Gillette, and Ekalaka) as part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully reduced and interpreted by geoMetrics, and are presented as four volumes (one Volume I and three Volume II's) in this report. The survey area lies entirely within the northern Great Plains Physiographic Province. The deep Powder River Basin and the Black Hills Uplift are the two dominant structures in the area. Both structures strike NNW approximately parallel to each other with the Powder River Basin to the west of the Uplift. The Basin is one of the largest and deepest in the northern Great Plains and contains over 17,000 feet of Phanerozoic sediments at its deepest point. Economic deposits of oil, coal, bentonite and uranium are found in the Tertiary and/or Cretaceous rocks of the Basin. Gold, silver, lead, copper, manganese, rare-earth elements and uranium have been mined in the Uplift. Epigenetic uranium deposits lie primarily in the Monument Hills - Box Creek and Pumpkin Buttes - Turnercrest districts within arkosic sandstones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. A total of 368 groups of statistical values in the uranium window meet the criteria for valid anomalies and are discussed in the interpretation sections (83 in Newcastle, 109 in Gillette, and 126 in Ekalaka). Most anomalies lie in the Tertiary sediments of the Powder River Basin, but only a few are clearly related to known uranium mines or prospects. Magnetic data generally delineate the deep Powder River Basin relative to the Black Hills Uplift. Higher frequency anomalies appear related to producing oil fields and mapped sedimentary structures.

  16. Geologic quadrangle maps of the United States: geology of the Casa Diablo Mountain quadrangle, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, C. Dean; Ross, Donald Clarence

    1957-01-01

    The Casa Diablo Mountain quadrangle was mapped in the summers of 1952 and 1953 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the California State Division of Mines as part of a study of potential tungsten-bearing areas.

  17. NURE hydrogeochemical and stream sediment data release for pilot study samples from portions of the Sterling and Greeley NTMS Quadrangles, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, H.P.

    1978-10-01

    During four distinct time periods between December 1976 and August 1977, students collected samples from the two areas. One purpose was to determine the effect of seasonal variations upon the elemental concentrations, particularly uranium

  18. NURE hydrogeochemical and stream sediment data release for pilot study samples from portions of the Sterling and Greeley NTMS Quadrangles, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, H.P.

    1978-10-01

    During four distinct time periods between December 1976 and August 1977, students collected samples from the two areas. One purpose was to determine the effect of seasonal variations upon the elemental concentrations, particularly uranium.

  19. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data release for the Leadville NTMS Quadrangle, Colorado, including concentrations of forty-two additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, H.N.

    1980-10-01

    A total of 1797 locations was sampled over a 19 330-km 2 area, providing an average density of one sample location per 11 km 2 . This report contains results for uranium in water samples and uranium and 42 additional elements in sediment samples. A total of 1279 water samples was collected from streams (1125) and springs (154). Uranium concentrations for all water samples range from below the detection limit of 0.02 ppB to 37.56 ppB. Mean concentrations in streams and springs are 1.05 ppB and 1.19 ppB, respectively. A total of 1784 sediment samples was collected from streams (1590), springs (193), and one pond. Uranium concentrations in sediments range from 1.27 to 223.80 ppM. Statistical mean uranium concentrations for wet stream (8.55 ppM) and spring (7.51 ppM) sediments are found to be greater than their dry counterparts (5.13 ppM and 4.96 ppM, respectively). Field data, recorded at the collection site, are reported with the elemental concentrations for each water and sediment sample listed. These data include a scintillometer determination of the equivalent uranium, pH and conductivity measurements, and geographic and weather information

  20. Index Grids - QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN: Boundaries of 7.5-Minute Quadrangles in Indiana, (United States Geological Survey, 1:24,000 Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile defining the boundaries of the USGS 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) quadrangles which cover the state of Indiana. Dates of...

  1. Kansas State University Libraries' OCR Labeling Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierer, Joyce; Bower, Merry

    This publication describes the planning and implementation of an optical character recognition (OCR) labeling project, the first stage of Kansas State University (KSU) Libraries' program of conversion from a manual to an automated circulation system. It is noted that a telephone survey of libraries with automated circulation systems and…

  2. Kansas Nursing Home Medication Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Myrna J.; Fornelli, Linda K.

    This curriculum guide is designed to aid Kansas instructors in conducting a course for teaching nursing home medication aides. Covered first are various introductory topics such as the role and responsibilities of medication aides, pharmacodynamics, forms in which medication is now available, common medical abbreviations, mathematics and weights…

  3. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use... Creek 10270102 88 Secondary Contact Recreation Sand Creek 10270102 65 Secondary Contact Recreation...

  4. Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project: Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

    2007-01-01

    KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

  5. Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges. Audit Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Office of the State Auditor, Jefferson City.

    This audit report reviews the employment contracts, related compensation, and other benefits provided for the chancellor and other officers of the Kansas City Metropolitan Community Colleges (KCMCC) in Missouri. The chancellor is allowed to either solicit bids or negotiate for contracted services such as architects, construction managers,…

  6. Streamflow alteration at selected sites in Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Eng, Ken

    2017-06-26

    An understanding of streamflow alteration in response to various disturbances is necessary for the effective management of stream habitat for a variety of species in Kansas. Streamflow alteration can have negative ecological effects. Using a modeling approach, streamflow alteration was assessed for 129 selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages in the State for which requisite streamflow and basin-characteristic information was available. The assessment involved a comparison of the observed condition from 1980 to 2015 with the predicted expected (least-disturbed) condition for 29 streamflow metrics. The metrics represent various characteristics of streamflow including average flow (annual, monthly) and low and high flow (frequency, duration, magnitude).Streamflow alteration in Kansas was indicated locally, regionally, and statewide. Given the absence of a pronounced trend in annual precipitation in Kansas, a precipitation-related explanation for streamflow alteration was not supported. Thus, the likely explanation for streamflow alteration was human activity. Locally, a flashier flow regime (typified by shorter lag times and more frequent and higher peak discharges) was indicated for three streamgages with urbanized basins that had higher percentages of impervious surfaces than other basins in the State. The combination of localized reservoir effects and regional groundwater pumping from the High Plains aquifer likely was responsible, in part, for diminished conditions indicated for multiple streamflow metrics in western and central Kansas. Statewide, the implementation of agricultural land-management practices to reduce runoff may have been responsible, in part, for a diminished duration and magnitude of high flows. In central and eastern Kansas, implemented agricultural land-management practices may have been partly responsible for an inflated magnitude of low flows at several sites.

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lewistown Quadrangle, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culver, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    Uranium resources in the Lewistown Quadrangle, Montana, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft). All existing geologic data were considered, including geologic surveys, literature, theses, radiometric surveys, oil- and water-well logs. Additional data were generated during the course of two field seasons, including the collection of more than 350 water, rock, crude oil and panned concentrate samples for analyses, sedimentary facies maps, structural geology and isopach maps, and field examination of reported areas of anomalous radioactivity. Three environments with potential for the occurrence of a minimum of 100 t of 0.01% U 3 O 8 were delineated. The most favorable environment is located in the southeastern portion of the quadrangle; here, Tertiary felsic dikes intrude four potential sandstone host rocks in the Kootenai Formation and the Colorado Shale. Structural-chemical traps for allogenic uranium are provided by the juxtaposition of oil-bearing domes. A second potential environment is located in the Eagle Sandstone in the northwestern and western portions of the quadrangle; here, anomalous water samples were obtained downtip from oxidized outcrops that are structurally related to Tertiary intrusive rocks of the Bearpaw and Highwood Mountains. Lignitic lenses and carbonaceous sandstones deposited in a near-shore lagoonal and deltaic environment provide potential reductants for hexavalent uranium in this environment. A third environment, in the Judith River Formation, was selected as favorable on the basis of water-well and gamma-ray log anomalies and their structural relationship with the Bearpaw Mountains. Organic materials are present in the Judith River Formation as potential reductants. They were deposited in a near-shore fluvial and lagoonal system similar to the depositional environment of the Jackson Group of the Texas Gulf Coast

  8. Geology of the Shakespeare quadrangle (H03), Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetta, L.; Galluzzi, V.; Ferranti, L.; Palumbo, P.

    2017-09-01

    A 1:3M geological map of the H03 Shakespeare quadrangle of Mercury has been compiled through photointerpretation of the remotely sensed images of the NASA MESSENGER mission. This quadrangle is characterized by the occurrence of three main types of plains materials and four basin materials, pertaining to the Caloris basin, the largest impact crater on Mercury's surface. The geologic boundaries have been redefined compared to the previous 1:5M map of the quadrangle and the craters have been classified privileging their stratigraphic order rather than morphological appearance. The abundant tectonic landforms have been interpreted and mapped as thrusts or wrinkle ridges.

  9. National uranium resource evaluation: Nogales Quadrangle, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luning, R.H.; Brouillard, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    Literature research, surface geologic investigations, rock sampling, and radiometric surveys were conducted in the Nogales Quadrangle, Arizona, to identify environments and to delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits according to criteria formulated during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The studies were augmented by aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment surveys. No favorable environments were identified. Environments that do display favorable characteristics include magmatic-hydrothermal and authigenic environments in Precambrian and Jurassic intrusives, as well as in certain Mesozoic and Cenozoic igneous and sedimentary rocks

  10. History of natural flows--Kansas River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Elwood R.

    1958-01-01

    Through its Water Resources Division, the United States Geological Survey has become the major water-resources historian for the nation. The Geological Survey's collection of streamflow records in Kansas began on a very small scale in 1895 in response to some early irrigation interest, Since that time the program has grown, and we now have about 21 350 station-years of record accumulated. A station-year of record is defined as a continuous record of flow collected at a fixed point for a period of one year. Volume of data at hand, however, is not in itself an, adequate measure of its usefullness. An important element in historical streamflow data which enhances its value as a tool for the prediction of the future is the length of continuous records available in the area being studied. The records should be of sufficient length that they may be regarded as a reasonable sample of what has gone before and may be expected in the future. Table 1 gives a graphical inventory of the available streamflow records in Kansas. It shows that, in general, there is a fair coverage of stations with records of about thirty-seven years in length, This is not a long period as history goes but it does include considerable experience with floods and droughts.Although a large quantity of data on Kansas streamflow has been accumulated, hydrologists and planning engineers find that stream flow information for many areas of the State is considerably less than adequate. The problem of obtaining adequate coverage has been given careful study by the Kansas Water Resources Board in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey and a report entitled "Development of A Balanced Stream-Gaging Program For Kansas", has been published by the Board as Bulletin No. 4, That report presents an analysis of the existing stream-gaging program and recommendations for a program to meet the rapidly expanding needs for more comprehensive basic data.The Kansas River is formed near Junction City, Kansas, by the

  11. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Marfa Quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, C.D.; Duex, T.W.; Wilbert, W.P.

    1982-09-01

    The uranium favorability of the Marfa 1 0 by 2 0 Quadrangle, Texas, was evaluated in accordance with criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Surface and subsurface studies, to a 1500 m (5000 ft) depth, and chemical, petrologic, hydrogeochemical, and airborne radiometric data were employed. The entire quadrangle is in the Basin and Range Province and is characterized by Tertiary silicic volcanic rocks overlying mainly Cretaceous carbonate rocks and sandstones. Strand-plain sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous San Carlos Formation and El Picacho Formation possess many favorable characteristics and are tentatively judged as favorable for sandstone-type deposits. The Tertiary Buckshot Ignimbrite contains uranium mineralization at the Mammoth Mine. This deposit may be an example of the hydroauthigenic class; alternatively, it may have formed by reduction of uranium-bearing ground water produced during diagenesis of tuffaceous sediments of the Vieja Group. Although the presence of the deposit indicates favorability, the uncertainty in the process that formed the mineralization makes delineation of a favorable environment or area difficult. The Allen intrusions are favorable for authigenic deposits. Basin fill in several bolsons possesses characteristics that suggest favorability but which are classified as unevaluated because of insufficient data. All Precambrian, Paleozoic, other Mesozoic, and other Cenozoic environments are unfavorable

  12. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Durango Quadrangle, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, N.J.; Madson, M.E.; Rosenlund, G.C.; Reinhart, W.R.; Gardner, H.A.

    1981-06-01

    The Durango Quadrangle (2 0 ), Colorado, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to determine environments favorable for uranium deposits. General reconnaissance, geologic and radiometric investigations, was augmented by detailed surface examination and radiometric and geochemical studies in selected areas. Eight areas favorable for uranium deposits were delineated. Favorable geologic environments include roscoelite-type vanadium-uranium deposits in the Placerville and Barlow Creek-Hermosa Creek districts, sandstone uranium deposits along Hermosa Creek, and vein uranium deposits in the Precambrian rocks of the Needle Mountains area and in the Paleozoic rocks of the Tuckerville and Piedra River Canyon areas. The major portions of the San Juan volcanic field, the San Juan Basin, and the San Luis Basin within the quadrangle were judged unfavorable. Due to lack of information, the roscoelite belt below 1000 ft (300 m), the Eolus Granite below 0.5 mi (0.8 km), and the Lake City caldera are unevaluated. The Precambrian Y melasyenite of Ute Creek and the Animas Formation within the Southern Ute Indian Reservation are unevaluated due to lack of access

  13. Geologic evolution of iron quadrangle on archean and early proterozoic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, N.; Noce, C.M.; Ladeira, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    The preliminary results of U-Pb geochronology of iron quadrangle. Brazil are presented, using the Davis linear regression program for determining of intersection concordance-discord and for estimation the associate mistakes. (C.G.C.)

  14. Colour mapping of the Shakespeare (H-03) quadrangle of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, N.; Doressoundiram, A.; Perna, D.; Zambon, F.; Carli, C.; Capaccioni, F.

    2017-09-01

    We will present a colour mapping of the Shakespeare (H-03) quadrangle of Mercury, as well as the spectral analysis and a preliminary correlation between the spectral properties and the geological units.

  15. Geologic Map of the Shakespeare Quadrangle (H03), Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetta, L.; Galluzzi, V.; Ferranti, L.; Palumbo, P.

    2018-05-01

    A 1:3M geological map of the H03 Shakespeare quadrangle of Mercury has been compiled through photointerpretation of the MESSENGER images. The most prominent geomorphological feature is the Caloris basin, the largest impact crater on Mercury.

  16. Surficial geologic map of the Dillingham quadrangle, southwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    2018-05-14

    The geologic map of the Dillingham quadrangle in southwestern Alaska shows surficial unconsolidated deposits, many of which are alluvial or glacial in nature. The map area, part of Alaska that was largely not glaciated during the late Wisconsin glaciation, has a long history reflecting local and more distant glaciations. Late Wisconsin glacial deposits have limited extent in the eastern part of the quadrangle, but are quite extensive in the western part of the quadrangle. This map and accompanying digital files are the result of the interpretation of black and white aerial photographs from the 1950s as well as more modern imagery. Limited new field mapping in the area was conducted as part of a bedrock mapping project in the northeastern part of the quadrangle; however, extensive aerial photographic interpretation represents the bulk of the mapping effort.

  17. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Saxtons River quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG96-52A Ratcliffe, NM�and Armstrong, TR, 1996, Digital bedrock geologic map of the Saxtons River quadrangle, Vermont, USGS Open-File Report...

  18. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Essex Junction Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG12-3, Gale, M., Kim. J., and Ruksznis, A., 2012, Bedrock Geologic Map of the essex Junction Quadrangle: Vermont Geological Survey Open File...

  19. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Cavendish quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-203A Ratcliffe, NM, 1995,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Cavendish quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 95-203, 2 plates, scale...

  20. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Hinesburg Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from Thompson, P., Thompson, T.B., and Doolan, B., 2004, Bedrock Geology of the Hinesburg quadrangle, Vermont. The bedrock geologic map data at a scale...

  1. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Bristol, VT Quadrangle

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG13-1 Kim, J, Weber, E, and Klepeis, K, 2013, Bedrock Geologic Map of the Bristol, VT Quadrangle: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  2. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand; Alliez, Pierre; Morvan, Jean-Marie

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse

  3. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Jay Peak, VT Quadrangle

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG99-1 Compilation bedrock geologic map of the Jay Peak quadrangle, Compiled by B. Doolan, 1999: VGS Open-File Report VG99-1, 1 plate, scale...

  4. Geologic map of the Lada Terra quadrangle (V-56), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. Senthil; Head, James W.

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides a geological map of Lada Terra quadrangle (V–56), a portion of the southern hemisphere of Venus that extends from lat 50° S. to 70° S. and from long 0° E. to 60° E. V–56 is bordered by Kaiwan Fluctus (V–44) and Agnesi (V–45) quadrangles in the north and by Mylitta Fluctus (V–61), Fredegonde (V–57), and Hurston (V–62) quadrangles in the west, east, and south, respectively. The geological map of V–56 quadrangle reveals evidence for tectonic, volcanic, and impact processes in Lada Terra in the form of tesserae, regional extensional belts, coronae, and volcanic plains. In addition, the map also shows relative age relations such as overlapping or cross-cutting relations between the mapped geologic units. The geology observed within this quadrangle addresses (1) how coronae evolved in association with regional extensional belts and (2) how tesserae, regional plains, and impact craters, which are also significant geological units observed in Lada Terra quadrangle, were formed.

  5. USGS 1:24000 (7 1/2 Minute) Quadrangle Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Mathematically generated grid representing USGS 7 1/2 Minute Quadrangle Map outlines. Quadrangle names and standard identifiers are included with the data set.

  6. Site environmental report for calendar year 1992, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Kansas City Plant is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. AlliedSignal and its predecessors have been the operating contractors since 1949. The principal operation performed at the Kansas City Plant is the manufacture of non-nuclear components for nuclear weapons. This activity involves metals and plastics machining, plastics fabrication, plating, microelectronics, and electrical and mechanical assembly. No radioactive materials are machined or processed. This report presents information and data pertaining to the environmental monitoring program and compliance with environmental standards

  7. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3468, Chak Wardak Syahgerd (509) and Kabul (510) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  8. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3564, Chahriaq (Joand) (405) and Gurziwan (406) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  9. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3364, Pasa-Band (417) and Kejran (418) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  10. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3464, Shahrak (411) and Kasi (412) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  11. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3266, Ourzgan (519) and Moqur (520) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  12. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3568, Polekhomri (503) and Charikar (504) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  13. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3366, Gizab (513) and Nawer (514) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  14. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3466, Lal-Sarjangal (507) and Bamyan (508) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  15. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3162, Chakhansur (603) and Kotalak (604) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  16. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3670, Jam-Kashem (223) and Zebak (224) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  17. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3166, Jaldak (701) and Maruf-Nawa (702) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  18. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3164, Lashkargah (605) and Kandahar (606) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  19. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3362, Shin-Dand (415) and Tulak (416) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  20. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3264, Nawzad-Musa-Qala (423) and Dehrawat (424) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  1. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3462, Herat (409) and Chesht-Sharif (410) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  2. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3262, Farah (421) and Hokumat-E-Pur-Chaman (422) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  3. National uranium resource evaluation Prescott Quadrangle Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.T.; White, D.L.; Nystrom, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Prescott Quadrangle was evaluated for uranium favorability by means of a literature search, examination of uranium occurrences, regional geochemical sampling of Precambrian rocks, limited rubidium-strontium studies, scintillometer traverses, measurement of stratigraphic sections, subsurface studies, and an aerial radiometric survey. A limited well-water sampling program for Cenozoic basins was also conducted. Favorability criteria used were those developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Five geologic environments are favorable for uranium. Three are in Tertiary rocks of the Date Creek-Artillery Basin, Big Sandy Valley, and Walnut Grove Basin. Two are in Precambrian rocks in the Bagdad and Wickenburg areas. Unfavorable areas include the southwestern crystalline terrane, the Paleozoic and Mesozoic beds, and metamorphic and plutonic Precambrian rocks of the Bradshaw and Weaver Mountains. Unevaluated areas are the basalt-covered mesas, alluvium-mantled Cenozoic basins, the Hualapai Mountains, and the Kellwebb Mine

  4. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Tonopah quadrangle, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.W.; Parker, D.P.

    1982-04-01

    The Tonopah Quadrangle, Nevada, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to identify and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Investigations included reconnaissance and detailed surface geologic and radiometric studies, geochemical sampling and evaluation, analysis and ground-truth followup of aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data, and subsurface data evaluation. The results of these investigations indicate environments favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits in Miocene lacustrine sediments of the Big Smoky Valley west of Tonopah. The northern portion of the Toquima granitic pluton is favorable for authigenic uranium deposits. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include Quaternary sediments; intermediate and mafic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks; Mesozoic, Paleozoic, and Precambrian sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks; those plutonic rocks not included within favorable areas; and those felsic volcanic rocks not within the Northumberland and Mount Jefferson calderas

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Okanogan Quadrangle, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.L.; Powell, L.K.; Wicklund, M.A.

    1982-06-01

    The Okanogan Quadrangle, Washington, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas containing environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits using criteria developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by aerial radiometric surveys and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. The results of the investigations indicate six environments favorable for uranium deposits. They are unclassified, anatectic, allogenic, and contact-metasomatic deposits in Late Precambrian and (or) Early Paleozoic mantling metamorphic core-complex rocks of the Kettle gneiss dome; magmatic-hydrothermal deposits in the Gold Creek pluton, the Magee Creek pluton, the Wellington Peak pluton, and the Midnite Mine pluton, all located in the southeast quadrant of the quadrangle; magmatic-hydrothermal allogenic deposits in Late Paleozoic and (or) Early Mesozoic black shales in the Castle Mountain area; allogenic deposits in Early Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks in the Harvey Creek area and in Late Precambrian metasedimentary rocks in the Blue Mountain area; and sandstone deposits in Eocene sedimentary rocks possibly present in the Enterprise Valley. Seven geologic units are considered unfavorable for uranium deposits. They are all the remaining metamorphic core-complex rocks, Precambrian metasedimentary rocks,Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic rocks, and all Pleistocene and Recent deposits; and, excluding those rocks in the unevaluated areas, include all the remaining plutonic rocks, Paleozoic miogeoclinical rocks, and Upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic eugeosynclinal rocks. Three areas, the Cobey Creek-Frosty Creek area, the Oregon City Ridge-Wilmont Creek area, and the area underlain by the Middle Cambrian Metaline Formation and its stratigraphic equivalents may possibly be favorable but are unevaluated due to lack of data

  6. Baker 10 x 20 NTMS area, Oregon and Idaho: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-05-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1426 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 460 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water and surface water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water and surface water sites include: (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Helium analyses are given for ground water. Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for these elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th + Hf), and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included on the microfiche. The maximum uranium concentration found in sediments in the Baker quadrangle was 21.1 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.77. Concentrations of uranium and the rare-earth elements were high along the eastern edge of the quadrangle

  7. Bluefield 10 x 20 NTMS area, Virginia, and West Virginia: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 886 sites, and surface water samples were collected at 595 of these sites. Ground water samples were collected at 1374 of these sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water, and for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements, where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements; and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements; and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sedments that were above detection limits ranged from 0.10 to 27.2 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations was 0.53. A series of clusters containing many of the higher uranium values occur across the southern part of the quadrangle. A few of these sites are also high in the U/Th and U/Hf maps. A group of sites in the northwest corner of the quadrangle are high in the U/Th + Hf map

  8. Pick-N-Pull Auto Dismantlers, Kansas City, LLC Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Pick-N-Pull Auto Dismantlers, Kansas City, LLC, a subsidiary of Schnitzer Steel Industries, Inc., for alleged violations at its facilities at 8012 East Truman Rd., Kansas C

  9. Kansas's forests, 2005: statistics, methods, and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick D. Miles; W. Keith Moser; Charles J. Barnett

    2011-01-01

    The first full annual inventory of Kansas's forests was completed in 2005 after 8,868 plots were selected and 468 forested plots were visited and measured. This report includes detailed information on forest inventory methods and data quality estimates. Important resource statistics are included in the tables. A detailed analysis of Kansas inventory is presented...

  10. 76 FR 63940 - Kansas; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-14

    ... follows: I have determined that the damage in certain areas of the State of Kansas resulting from flooding... Act for Public Assistance and Hazard Mitigation will be limited to 75 percent of the total eligible... declaration of a major disaster for the State of Kansas (FEMA-4035-DR), dated September 23, 2011, and related...

  11. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1998. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    The Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of Kansas children. The statistical portrait is based on trends in 22 indicators of child well-being, grouped into 5 areas: (1) economic well-being--births to single teens, free school meals, family economic assistance, child poverty rates; (2) physical health and safety--childhood deaths,…

  12. Kansas Kids Count Data Book, 1999. A Project of Kansas Action for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Action for Children, Inc., Topeka.

    The Kids Count Data Book examines trends in the well-being of Kansas children. This statistical portrait is based on trends in 22 indicators of child well-being, grouped into 5 areas: (1) economic well-being--births to single teens, child poverty rates, free school meals, and family economic assistance; (2) physical health and safety--childhood…

  13. Physics Incubator at Kansas State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Bret; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    Funded by a major private endowment, the physics department at Kansas State University has recently started a physics incubator program that provides support to research projects with a high probability of commercial application. Some examples of these projects will be discussed in this talk. In a parallel effort, undergraduate physics majors and graduate students are being encouraged to work with our business school to earn an Entrepreneurship minor and a certification in Entrepreneurship. We will discuss how these efforts are promoting a ``culture change'' in the department. We will also discuss the advantages and the difficulties in running such a program in a Midwest college town.

  14. NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey: Big Bend area, Marfa MH 13-5, Fort Stockton MH 13-6, Presidio MH 13-8, Emory Peak MH 13-9 Quadrangles. Volume I. Narrative report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    A rotary-wing, reconnaissance, high sensitivity, radiometric and magnetic survey was performed in the Big Bend area of Texas. Four 1:250,000 scale NTMS quadrangles (Marfa, Ft. Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Peak) were surveyed. A total of 7,529 line miles (12,115 kilometers) of data were collected utilizing a Sikorsky S58T helicopter. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at 3.0 mile (5 kilometer) spacing, with tie lines flown in a north-south direction at 12.5 mile (20 kilometer) spacing. The data were digitally recorded at 1.0 second intervals. The NaI terrestrial detectors used in this survey had a total volume of 2,154 cubic inches. The magnetometer employed was a modified ASQ-10 fluxgate system. The radiometric data was normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance and is presented in the form of computer listings on microfiche and as stacked profile plots. Profile plots are contained in Volume II of this report. A geologic interpretation of the radiometric and magnetic data is included as part of this report

  15. Geology of the Cupsuptic quadrangle, Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, David S.

    1966-01-01

    The Cupsuptic quadrangle, in west-central Maine, lies in a relatively narrow belt of pre-Silurian rocks extending from the Connecticut River valley across northern New Hampshire to north-central Maine. The Albee Formation, composed of green, purple, and black phyllite with interbedded-quartzite, is exposed in the core of a regional anticlinorium overlain to the southeast by greenstone of the Oquossoc Formation which in turn is overlain by black slate of the Kamankeag Formation. In the northern part of the quadrangle the Albee Formation is overlain by black slate, feldspathic graywacke, and minor greenstone of the Dixville Formation. The Kamankeag Formation is dated as 1-ate Middle Ordovician by graptolites (zone 12) found near the base of the unit. The Dixville Formation is correlated with the Kamankeag Formation and Oquossoc Formation and is considered to be Middle Ordovician. The Albee Formation is considered to be Middle to Lower Ordovician from correlations with similar rocks in northeastern and southwestern Vermont. The Oquossoc and Kamankeag Formations are correlated with the Amonoosuc and Partridge Formations of northern New Hampshire. The pre-Silurian rocks are unconformably overlain by unnamed rocks of Silurian age in the southeast, west-central, and northwest ninths of the quadrangle. The basal Silurian units are boulder to cobble polymict conglomerate and quartz-pebble conglomerate of late Lower Silurian (Upper Llandovery) age. The overlying rocks are either well-bedded slate and quartzite, silty limestone, or arenaceous limestone. Thearenaceous limestone contains Upper Silurian (Lower Ludlow) brachiopods. The stratified rocks have been intruded by three stocks of biotite-muscovite quartz monzonite, a large body of metadiorite and associated serpentinite, smaller bodies of gabbro, granodiorite, and intrusive felsite, as well as numerous diabase and quartz monzonite dikes. The metadiorite and serpentinite, and possibly the gabbro and granodiorite are Late

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Greensboro Quadrangle, North Carolina and Virginia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dribus, J.R.; Hurley, B.W.; Lawton, D.E.; Lee, C.H.

    1982-07-01

    The Greensboro Quadrangle, North Carolina and Virginia, was evaluated to identify and delineate areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. General surface reconnaissance and geochemical sampling were carried out in all geologic environments within the quadrangle. Aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data were analyzed, and ground-truth followup studies of anomalies were conducted. Detailed surface investigations, log and core studies, and a radon emanometry survey were conducted in selected environments. The results of this investigation suggest environments favorable for allogenic uranium deposits in metamorphic rocks adjacent to the intrusive margins of the Rolesville, Castalia, Redoak, and Shelton granite plutons, and sandstone-type deposits in the sediments of the Durham and Dan River Triassic basin systems. Environments in the quadrangle considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are pegmatites and metamorphic rocks and their included veins associated with fault and shear zones

  17. Estadio de Kansas City (EE. UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy, C. F.

    1978-05-01

    Full Text Available The Crosby Kemper stadium, located in the center of an industrial district of Kansas City, was designed for various uses which include activities ranging from music and sports competitions to equestrian sports. It has a capacity for approximately 16 to 18,000 people and parking for 4,000 cars. The outstanding feature of its architectonic conception is the solution adopted for building the roof, by means of enormous metal tubular beams, of triangular section and a height of 8.25 meters with pipe diameters reaching 120 cm.

    El estadio Crosby Kemper, situado en el centro de un distrito industrial de Kansas, fue concebido para un funcionamiento diverso que comprende actividades que van desde la música y competiciones deportivas hasta pruebas hípicas. Tiene capacidad para unas 16.000 ó 18.000 personas, y plazas de aparcamiento para 4.000 coches. En su concepción arquitectónica sobresale la solución adoptada para la realización de la cubierta, mediante enormes vigas tubulares metálicas, de sección triangular y altura de 8,25 m, con diámetros de tubo que alcanzan los 120 cm.

  18. Enactment of mandatory pharmacy technician certification in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Amber; Massey, Lindsay; Gill, Taylor; Burger, Gregory; Little, Jeff D

    2016-02-01

    The successful enactment of mandatory pharmacy technician certification in Kansas is described. In 2004, Kansas began requiring registration of all pharmacy technicians with the state board of pharmacy. Registration identified individuals working as pharmacy technicians but did not require any specific education or certification. In September 2012, the Kansas Board of Pharmacy created a task force of key stakeholders including pharmacists from multiple areas of practice, the University of Kansas School of Pharmacy, organizational leaders from the Kansas Council of Health-System Pharmacists (KCHP) and Kansas Pharmacists Association, and professional lobbyists. The goals of this task force were to research practices of technician certification in other states and to make recommendations to the state board of pharmacy on how Kansas could accomplish mandatory technician certification. The task force outlined the steps needed to achieve legislation that could be supported by the members. These topics included the creation of a technician trainee category, grandfathering certain technicians who had been practicing for a designated period of time, state board-approved exemptions, training requirements, age and education requirements, continuing-education requirements, and pharmacist:technician ratio. The recommendations were finalized at the August 2013 Kansas Pharmacy Summit, and the proposed legislation was introduced and passed during the 2014 legislative session. KCHP members learned many valuable lessons about advocacy and the legislative process with this initiative, including building relationships, working with legislators, and working with other professional organizations. The formation of a task force led to the successful passage of a bill granting the Kansas Board of Pharmacy the authority to issue regulations regarding mandatory pharmacy technician certification. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Isotropic 2D quadrangle meshing with size and orientation control

    KAUST Repository

    Pellenard, Bertrand

    2011-12-01

    We propose an approach for automatically generating isotropic 2D quadrangle meshes from arbitrary domains with a fine control over sizing and orientation of the elements. At the heart of our algorithm is an optimization procedure that, from a coarse initial tiling of the 2D domain, enforces each of the desirable mesh quality criteria (size, shape, orientation, degree, regularity) one at a time, in an order designed not to undo previous enhancements. Our experiments demonstrate how well our resulting quadrangle meshes conform to a wide range of input sizing and orientation fields.

  20. Geology of the Lachesis Tessera Quadrangle (V-18), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Eileen M.; McGill, George G.

    2010-01-01

    The Lachesis Tessera Quadrangle (V-18) lies between 25deg and 50deg north, 300deg and 330deg east. Most of the quadrangle consists of "regional plains" (1) of Sedna and Guinevere Planitiae. A first draft of the geology has been completed, and the tentative number of mapped units by terrain type is: tesserae - 2; plains - 4; ridge belts - 1; fracture belts - 1 (plus embayed fragments of possible additional belts); coronae - 5; central volcanoes - 2; shield flows - 2; paterae - 1; impact craters - 13; undifferentiated flows - 1; bright materials - 1.

  1. Geologic map of the Bateman Spring Quadrangle, Lander County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramelli, Alan R.; Wrucke, Chester T.; House, P. Kyle

    2017-01-01

    This 1:24,000-scale geologic map of the Bateman Spring 7.5-minute quadrangle in Lander County, Nevada contains descriptions of 24 geologic units and one cross section. Accompanying text includes full unit descriptions and references. This quadrangle includes lower Paleozoic siliciclastic sedimentary rocks of the Roberts Mountain allochthon, Miocene intrusive dikes, alluvial deposits of the northern Shoshone Range piedmont, and riverine deposits of the Reese and Humboldt rivers.Significant findings include: refined age estimates for the Ordovician-Cambrian Valmy Formation and Devonian Slaven Chert, based on new fossil information; and detailed mapping of late Quaternary fault traces along the Shoshone Range fault system.

  2. Geological mapping of the Kuiper quadrangle (H06) of Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomini, Lorenza; Massironi, Matteo; Galluzzi, Valentina

    2017-04-01

    Kuiper quadrangle (H06) is located at the equatorial zone of Mercury and encompasses the area between longitudes 288°E - 360°E and latitudes 22.5°N - 22.5°S. The quadrangle was previously mapped for its most part by De Hon et al. (1981) that, using Mariner10 data, produced a final 1:5M scale map of the area. In this work we present the preliminary results of a more detailed geological map (1:3M scale) of the Kuiper quadrangle that we compiled using the higher resolution of MESSENGER data. The main basemap used for the mapping is the MDIS (Mercury Dual Imaging System) 166 m/pixel BDR (map-projected Basemap reduced Data Record) mosaic. Additional datasets were also taken into account, such as DLR stereo-DEM of the region (Preusker et al., 2016), global mosaics with high-incidence illumination from the east and west (Chabot et al., 2016) and MDIS global color mosaic (Denevi et al., 2016). The preliminary geological map shows that the western part of the quadrangle is characterized by a prevalence of crater materials (i.e. crater floor, crater ejecta) which were distinguished into three classes on the basis of their degradation degree (Galluzzi et al., 2016). Different plain units were also identified and classified as: (i) intercrater plains, represented by densely cratered terrains, (ii) intermediate plains, which are terrains with a moderate density of superposed craters, and (iii) smooth plains, which are poorly cratered volcanic deposits emplaced mainly on the larger crater floors. Finally, several structures were mapped all over the quadrangle. Most of these features are represented by thrusts, some of which appear to form systematic alignments. In particular, two main thrust systems have been identified: i) the "Thakur" system, a 1500 km-long system including several scarps with a NNE-SSW orientation, located at the edge between the Kuiper and Beethoven (H07) quadrangles; ii) the "Santa Maria" system, located at the centre of the quadrangle. It is a 1700 km

  3. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  4. National uranium resource evaluation: Williams quadrangle, Arizona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, A.J.; Nystrom, R.J.; Thiede, D.S.

    1981-03-01

    Geologic environments of the Williams Quadrangle, Arizona, were evaluated for uranium favorability by means of literature research, uranium-occurrence investigation and other surface studies, subsurface studies, aerial radiometric data, hydrogeochemical data, and rock-sample analytic data. Favorability criteria are those of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Three geologic environments are favorable for uranium: the Tertiary fluvial rocks of the Colorado Plateau where they unconformably overlie impermeable bed rock (for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits); collapse breccia pipes in Paleozoic strata of the Colorado Plateau (for vein-type deposits in sedimentary rocks); and Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Hualapai, Peacock, and Aquarius Mountains, and Cottonwood and Grand Wash Cliffs (for magmatic-hydrothermal deposits). Unfavorable geologic environments are: Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary rocks of the Colorado Plateau, nearly all Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and the Precambrian-Cambrian unconformity of the Grand Wash Cliffs area. Tertiary rocks in Cenozoic basins and Precambrian crystalline rocks in the Grand Canyon region and in parts of the Aquarius Mountains and Cottonwood and Grand Wash Cliffs are unevaluated

  5. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Salina Quadrangle, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupe, R.D.; Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Luft, S.J.; Peterson, F.; Robinson, K.

    1982-09-01

    Two stratigraphic units, the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation and the Triassic Chinle Formation, were determined to be favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the US Department of Energy in the Salina 1 x 2 0 Quadrangle, Utah. Three areas judged favorable for the Salt Wash Member are the Tidwell and Notom districts, and the Henry Mountains mineral belt. The criteria used to establish favorability were the presence of: (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Four favorable areas have been outlined for the Chinle Formation. These are the San Rafael Swell, Inter River, and the Orange Cliffs subareas and the Capitol Reef area. The criteria used to establish these areas are: the sandstone-to-mudstone ratios and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation which is considered as the probable source for the uranium

  6. Charlottesville 10 x 20 NTMS area Virginia and West Virginia: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-04-01

    Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.) and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments range from 0.20 to 165.90 ppM with a mean of 5.19 ppM. As with the Roanoke quadrangle to the south, the geochemical data are strongly correlated with the geology of the area. All elements in the sediment symbol plot maps are aligned with the regional structure and clearly belong to several populations

  7. Geologic map of the Ganiki Planitia quadrangle (V-14), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosfils, Eric B.; Long, Sylvan M.; Venechuk, Elizabeth M.; Hurwitz, Debra M.; Richards, Joseph W.; Drury, Dorothy E.; Hardin, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    The Ganiki Planitia (V-14) quadrangle on Venus, which extends from 25° N. to 50° N. and from 180° E. to 210° E., derives its name from the extensive suite of plains that dominates the geology of the northern part of the region. With a surface area of nearly 6.5 x 106 km2 (roughly two-thirds that of the United States), the quadrangle is located northwest of the Beta-Atla-Themis volcanic zone and southeast of the Atalanta Planitia lowlands, areas proposed to be the result of large scale mantle upwelling and downwelling, respectively. The region immediately south of Ganiki Planitia is dominated by Atla Regio, a major volcanic rise beneath which localized upwelling appears to be ongoing, whereas the area just to the north is dominated by the orderly system of north-trending deformation belts that characterize Vinmara Planitia. The Ganiki Planitia quadrangle thus lies at the intersection between several physiographic regions where extensive mantle flow-induced tectonic and volcanic processes are thought to have occurred. The geology of the V-14 quadrangle is characterized by a complex array of volcanic, tectonic, and impact-derived features. There are eleven impact craters with diameters from 4 to 64 km, as well as four diffuse 'splotch' features interpreted to be the product of near-surface bolide explosions. Tectonic activity has produced heavily deformed tesserae, belts of complex deformation and rifts as well as a distributed system of fractures and wrinkle ridges. Volcanic activity has produced extensive regional plains deposits, and in the northwest corner of the quadrangle these plains host the initial (or terminal) 700 km of the Baltis Vallis canali, an enigmatic volcanic feature with a net length of ~7,000 km that is the longest channel on Venus. Major volcanic centers in V-14 include eight large volcanoes and eight coronae; all but one of these sixteen features was noted during a previous global survey. The V-14 quadrangle contains an abundance of minor

  8. Evaluation of Motorcycle Safety in Kansas : Technical Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, motorcycle fatalities have increased at an alarming rate in the United States. Motorcycle safety issues in Kansas are no different from the national scenario. Accordingly, this study attempted to investigate motorcycle cr...

  9. Improving safety of teenage and young adult drivers in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Statistics show that young drivers have higher motor vehicle crash rates compared to other age groups. This study investigated : characteristics, contributory causes, and factors which increase injury severity of young driver crashes in Kansas by com...

  10. Place attachment among retirees in Greensburg, Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeffrey S; Cartlidge, Matthew R

    2011-01-01

    On 4 May 2007 an ef-5 tornado leveled 95 percent of Greensburg, Kansas. Because city leaders encouraged everyone to use “green” building techniques as they rebuilt their homes and businesses, not only has the return to normalcy been exceedingly slow, but some of the town's older residents feel that officials have overlooked their needs. These minor episodes of discord enabled us to learn what features are most important to people in retirement. The features include identifiable landmarks, a space in which to socialize, and age-specific businesses. We assert that the lessons learned in Greensburg are applicable to other communities with a sizable older population. As baby boomers rapidly enter retirement they will seek places to live that are elder friendly and enable them to effectively bond with place. As previous research attests, people who have a strong attachment to place commonly have a good quality of life.

  11. Streamflow conditions along Soldier Creek, Northeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2017-11-14

    The availability of adequate water to meet the present (2017) and future needs of humans, fish, and wildlife is a fundamental issue for the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation in northeast Kansas. Because Soldier Creek flows through the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Reservation, it is an important tribal resource. An understanding of historical Soldier Creek streamflow conditions is required for the effective management of tribal water resources, including drought contingency planning. Historical data for six selected U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages along Soldier Creek were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends by Juracek (2017). Streamflow data for the period of record at each streamgage were used to compute annual mean streamflow, annual mean base flow, mean monthly flow, annual peak flow, and annual minimum flow. Results of the assessment are summarized in this fact sheet.

  12. US hydropower resource assessment for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francfort, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Department of Energy is developing an estimate of the hydropower development potential in this country. The Hydropower Evaluation Software (HES) is a computer model that was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for this purpose. The HES measures the potential hydropower resources available in the United States, using uniform criteria for measurement. The software was developed and tested using hydropower information and data provided by the Southwestern Power Administration. It is a dBASE menu-driven software application that allows the personal computer user to assign environmental attributes to potential hydropower sites, calculate development suitability factors for each site based on the environmental attributes present, and generate reports based on these suitability factors. This report details the resource assessment results for the state of Kansas.

  13. Ramona, Kansas, Corrective Action Monitoring Report for 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report describes groundwater monitoring in 2015 for the property at Ramona, Kansas, on which a grain storage facility was formerly operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The monitoring was implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory and was conducted as specified in the Long-Term Groundwater Monitoring Plan (Argonne 2012) approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2012).

  14. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Andover quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG96-31A Ratcliffe, N.M., 1996,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Andover quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 96-31-A, 2 plates, scale...

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Iron River Quadrangle, Michigan and Wisconsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frishman, D

    1982-09-01

    No area within the Iron River 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Michigan and Wisconsin, appears to be favorable for the existence of a minimum of 100 tons of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at a grade of 0.01 percent or better.

  16. Geology of the Horse Range Mesa quadrangle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Fred W.; Bush, A.L.; Bell, Henry; Withington, C.F.

    1953-01-01

    The Horse Range Mesa quadrangle is one of eighteen 7 1/2-minute quadrangles covering the principal carnotite-producing area of southwestern Colorado. The geology of the quadrangles was mapped by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Atomic Energy Commission as part of a comprehensive study of carnotite deposits. The rocks exposed in the eighteen quadrangles consist of crystalline rocks of pre-Cambrian age and sedimentary rocks that range in age from late Paleozoic to Quaternary. Over much of the area the sedimentary rocks are flat lying, but in places the rocks are disrupted by high-angle faults, and northwest-trending folds. Conspicuous among the folds are large anticlines having cores of intrusive salt and gypsum. Most of the carnotite deposits are confined to the Salt Wash sandstone member of the Jurassic Morrison formation. Within this sandstone, most of the deposits are spottily distributed through an arcuate zone known as the "Uravan Mineral Belt". Individual deposits range in size from irregular masses containing only a few tons of ore to large, tabular masses containing many thousands of tons. The ore consists largely of sandstone selectively impregnated and in part replaced by uranium and vanadium minerals. Most of the deposits appear to be related to certain sedimentary strictures in sandstones of favorable composition.

  17. Geological Mapping of the Debussy Quadrangle (H-14) Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, D. L.; Rothery, D. A.; Balme, M. R.; Conway, S. J.

    2018-05-01

    We present the current status of geological mapping of the Debussy quadrangle. Mapping underway as part of a program to map the entire planet at a scale of 1:3M using MESSENGER data in preparation for the BepiColombo mission.

  18. Surficial geology of Panther Lake Quadrangle, Oswego County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.

    1981-01-01

    The location and extent of eight kinds of surficial deposits in Panther Lake quadrangle, Oswego County, N.Y., are mapped on a 7.5-minute U.S. Geological Survey topographic map. The map was compiled to indicate the lithology and potential for groundwater development at any specific location. (USGS)

  19. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Weston quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG96-526A Ratcliffe, NM�and Burton, WC, 1996,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Weston quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 96-526, 2...

  20. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Chester quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-576A Ratcliffe, N.M., 1995,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Chester quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 95-576, 2 plates, scale...

  1. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Plymouth quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG94-654A Walsh, G.J., and Ratcliffe, N.M., 1994,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Plymouth quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 94-654, 2...

  2. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Johnson quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-2 Thompson, PJ�and Thompson, TB, 1998,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Johnson quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File Report VG98-2, 2 plates,...

  3. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Rochester quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG96-33A Walsh, GJ�and Falta, CK, 1996, Digital bedrock geologic map of the Rochester quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 96-33-A, 2 plates,...

  4. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Eden quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-3 Kim, J, Springston, G, and Gale, M, 1998,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Eden quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File Report VG98-3, 2...

  5. Geologic map of the Agnesi quadrangle (V-45), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vicki L.; Tharalson, Erik R.

    2014-01-01

    The Agnesi quadrangle (V–45), named for centrally located Agnesi crater, encompasses approximately 6,500,000 km2 extending from lat 25° to 50° S. and from long 30° to 60° E. The V–45 quadrangle lies within Venus’ lowland broadly between highlands Ovda Regio to the northeast and Alpha Regio to the west. The region ranges in altitude from 6,051 to 6,054 km, with an average of ~6,052 km, which is essentially mean planetary radius. The quadrangle displays a wide range of features including large to small arcuate exposures of ribbon-tessera terrain (Hansen and Willis, 1998), ten lowland coronae, two montes, 13 pristine impact craters, and long but localized volcanic flows sourced to the west in V–44. Shield terrain (Hansen, 2005) occurs across much of the V–45 quadrangle. Although V–45 lies topographically within the lowland, it includes only one planitia (Fonueha Planitia), perhaps because the features mentioned decorate it.

  6. THE JAMES MADISON WOOD QUADRANGLE, STEPHENS COLLEGE, COLUMBIA, MISSOURI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCBRIDE, WILMA

    THE JAMES MADISON WOOD QUADRANGLE AT STEPHENS COLLEGE IS A COMPLEX OF BUILDINGS DESIGNED TO MAKE POSSIBLE A FLEXIBLE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT. A LIBRARY HOUSES A GREAT VARIETY OF AUDIO-VISUAL RESOURCES AND BOOKS. A COMMUNICATION CENTER INCORPORATES TELEVISION AND RADIO FACILITIES, A FILM PRODUCTION STUDIO, AND AUDIO-VISUAL FACILITIES. THE LEARNING…

  7. Surficial geology of Hannibal Quadrangle, Oswego County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd S.

    1981-01-01

    The location and extent of 10 kinds of surficial deposits in part of Hannibal quadrangle, Oswego County, N.Y., are mapped on a 7.5-minute U.S. Geological Survey topographic map. The map was compiled to indicate the lithology and potential for ground-water development at any specific location. (USGS)

  8. Modern shelf ice, equatorial Aeolis Quadrangle, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakenridge, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    As part of a detailed study of the geological and geomorphological evolution of Aeolis Quadrangle, I have encountered evidence suggesting that near surface ice exists at low latitudes and was formed by partial or complete freezing of an inland sea. The area of interest is centered at approximately -2 deg, 196 deg. As seen in a suite of Viking Orbiter frames obtained at a range of approximately 600 km, the plains surface at this location is very lightly cratered or uncratered, and it is thus of late Amazonian age. Extant topographic data indicate that the Amazonian plains at this location occupy a trough whose surface lies at least 1000 m below the Mars datum. A reasonable hypothesis is that quite recent surface water releases, perhaps associated with final evolution of large 'outflow chasms' to the south, but possibly from other source areas, filled this trough, that ice floes formed almost immediately, and that either grounded ice or an ice-covered sea still persists. A reasonable hypothesis is that quite recent surface water releases, perhaps associated with final evolution of large 'outflow chasms' to the south, but possibly from other source areas, filled this trough, that ice floes formed almost immediately, and that either grounded ice or an ice-covered sea still persists. In either case, the thin (a few meters at most) high albedo, low thermal inertia cover of aeolian materials was instrumental in allowing ice preservation, and at least the lower portions of this dust cover may be cemented by water ice. Detailed mapping using Viking stereopairs and quantitative comparisons to terrestrial shelf ice geometries are underway.

  9. Geologic Map of the Greenaway Quadrangle (V-24), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Nicholas P.; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2010-01-01

    The Greenaway quadrangle (V-24; lat 0 degrees -25 degrees N., long 120 degrees -150 degrees E.), Venus, derives its name from the impact crater Greenaway, centered at lat 22.9 degrees N., long 145.1 degrees E., in the northeastern part of the quadrangle. Greenaway was a well-noted writer and illustrator of children`s books in Britain during the nineteenth century. In Greenaway`s honor, the Library Association of Great Britain presents the annual Kate Greenaway Medal to an illustrator living and publishing in Britain who has produced the most distinguished children`s book illustrations for that year. The Greenaway quadrangle occupies an 8,400,000 km2 equatorial swath of lowlands and highlands. The map area is bounded by the crustal plateau, Thetis Regio, to the south and Gegute Tessera to the west. The rest of the quadrangle consists of part of Llorona Planitia, which is part of the vast lowlands that cover about 80 percent of Venus` surface. The southern map area marks the north edge of Aphrodite Terra, including Thetis Regio, that includes the highest topography in the quadrangle with elevations reaching >1 km above the Mean Planetary Radius (MPR; 6,051.84 km). Northern Aphrodite Terra abruptly slopes north to Llorona Planitia. A broad northeast-trending topographic arch pocked with coronae separates two northeast-trending elongate basins, Llorona Planitia on the east, that form depositional centers for shield and coronae-sourced materials; both basins drop to elevations of history for this region, which in turn provides insights into volcanic and tectonic processes that shaped the Venusian surface. Map relations illustrate that aerially expansive shield terrain (unit st) played a primary role and coronae played a secondary role in volcanic resurfacing across the map area.

  10. Raleigh 10 x 20 NTMS area, North Carolina: data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1981-07-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1199 sites. Surface water samples were collected at 124 of these sites. Ground water samples were collected at 907 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, for uranium and 9 other elements in surface water, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.); and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: (1) stream water chemistry measurements; and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements; and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments range from 0.20 to 237.8 ppM with a mean of 8.93 ppM. The highest uranium concentrations appear to be associated with monazite, as the U/Th ratios are quite low. Higher uranium values in ground water seem to be related to a Triassic basin in the quadrangle

  11. McDermitt 10 x 20 NTMS area, Nevada. Data report (abbreviated)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, P.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1980-07-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected at 1337 sites, at a target sampling density of one site per 13 square kilometers. Ground water samples were collected at 255 sites and surface water samples were collected at 41 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water and surface water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Data from ground water and surface water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). He analyses are given for ground water. Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements from sites where water was available, and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements; U/Th, U/Hf, U/(Th + Hf), and U/La ratios; and scintillometer readings at sediment sample sites are included. Uranium concentrations in sediments of the McDermitt quadrangle are relatively low, with a maximum value of 20.5 ppM. The mean of the logs of uranium values in sediments is 0.56, which corresponds to a value of about 3.6 ppM. Many of the highest uranium values occur in the Santa Rosa Range and in the Bull Run and Tuscarora Mountains. Most of the higher uranium values occur in areas underlain by tertiary-age granitic intrusive rocks and Tertiary felsic volcanic rocks. Ground water and stream water samples are too widely dispersed to allow for preliminary interpretation

  12. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Arlington quadrangle and a Vermont portion of the Shushan quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 95-483, 2 plates, scale 1:24000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-483A Lyttle, PT,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Arlington quadrangle and a Vermont portion of the Shushan quadrangle, Vermont: USGS...

  13. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3368 and Part of Quadrangle 3370, Ghazni (515), Gardez (516), and Jaji-Maydan (517) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  14. Public-supply water use in Kansas, 1990-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Joan F.

    2014-01-01

    This fact sheet describes water-use data collection and quantities of surface water and groundwater diverted for public supply in Kansas for the years 1990 through 2012. Data used in this fact sheet are from the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Water Resources and the Kansas Water Office. Water used for public supply represents about 10 percent of all reported water withdrawals in Kansas. Between 1990 and 2012, annual withdrawals for public supply ranged from a low of 121 billion gallons in 1993 to a high of 159 billion gallons in 2012. Differences in annual withdrawals were associated primarily with climatic fluctuations. Six suppliers distributed about one-half of the total water withdrawn for public supply, and nearly three-quarters of the surface water. Surface water represented between 52 and 61 percent of total annual withdrawals for public supply. The proportion of surface water obtained through contracts from Federal reservoirs increased from less than 5 percent in the 1990s to 8 percent in 2011 and 2012. More than 99 percent of the reported water withdrawn for public supply in Kansas in 2012 was metered, which was an increase from 92 percent in 1990. State population increased steadily from 2.5 million people in 1990 to 2.9 million in 2012. Recent estimates indicate that about 95 percent of the total population was served by public water supply; the remainder obtained water from other sources such as private wells. Average per capita water use as calculated for State conservation planning purposes varied by region of the State. The smallest regional average water use for the years 1990–2012 was 98 gallons per person per day in easternmost Kansas, and the largest regional average water use was 274 gallons per person per day in westernmost Kansas.

  15. Landsat TM and ETM+ 2002-2003 Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2002-2003 consists of image data gathered by three sensors. The first image data are terrain-corrected, precision...

  16. Kansas business plan for commercial vehicle operations using intelligent transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-29

    This state business plan is the product of a cooperative effort between state agencies, the Federal Highway Administration, Kansas Turnpike Authority, and the Kansas Motor Carrier Association. The plan represents a shared commitment to move forward w...

  17. Kansas City Transportation and Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In fall 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the Kansas City Transportation Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) to learn more about local community air quality in three neighborhoods in Kansas City, KS.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Kansas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Kansas.

  19. Benchmarking the Kansas 4-H Judging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M. Taylor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the methods and policies associated with 4-H project judging at the county level within the Kansas 4-H Program. Extension Agents surveyed about current 4-H judging processes indicated a variety of methods used. Data collected showed that 21.8% of the counties surveyed practiced some type of project judging without the 4-H member present. In regard to feedback received by the youth in non-livestock project judging, 64.1% of counties reported both verbal and written forms of feedback, with 25.6% receiving only verbal. In livestock project judging, 93.8% reported that youth receive feedback only verbally. The majority of non-livestock projects are judged using the Danish system, while the number of livestock projects judged are split among both the Danish system and peer system of competitive judging. It was concluded that a wide-variety of judging methods are used, resulting in incongruent programs offered to 4-H members.

  20. Uranium Yellow Cake accident - Wichita, Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    A tractor and semi trailer containing Uranium Yellow Cake, had overturned on I-235, Wichita, Kansas on Thursday, March 22, 1979. The truck driver and passenger were transported, with unknown injuries, to the hospital by ambulance. The shipment consisted of 54 drums of Uranium Ore Concentrate Powder. Half of the drums were damaged or had their lids off. Since it was raining at the time of the accident, plastic was used to cover the barrels and spilled material in an attempt to contain the yellow cake. A bulldozer was used to construct a series of dams in the median and the ditch to contain the run-off water from the contaminated area. Adverse and diverse weather conditions hampered the clean up operations over the next several days. The contaminated water and soil were shipped back to the mine for reintroduction into the milling process. The equipment was decontaminated prior to being released from the site. The clean up personnel wore protective clothing and respiratory protection equipment, if necessary. All individuals were surveyed and decontaminated prior to exiting the area

  1. 77 FR 72737 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas City, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas City, MO AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... River, mile 359.4, at Kansas City, Missouri. The deviation is necessary to allow the replacement of 64... deviation for the Harry S. Truman Railroad Drawbridge, across the Missouri River, mile 359.4, at Kansas City...

  2. 77 FR 24147 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas City, MO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas City, MO AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... River, mile 359.4, at Kansas City, Missouri. The deviation is necessary to allow the replacement of... Railroad Drawbridge, across the Missouri River, mile 359.4, at Kansas City, Missouri to remain in the...

  3. 40 CFR 81.251 - Northeast Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Northeast Kansas Intrastate Air... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.251 Northeast Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Northeast Kansas Intrastate Air Quality Control Region consists of the territorial area encompassed by the...

  4. Analysis of endangered Kansas fish species distribution during historical and contemporary periods (pre- and post-1969)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Kansas has more freshwater fish species than other states in the west and northern US. More than 140 fishes have recently been documented in Kansas rivers; of these, at least five are categorized as endangered species in Kansas (and threatened species ...

  5. Routine environment audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri. During this audit the activities the audit team conducted included reviews of internal documents and reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted October 24-November 4, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program,{close_quotes} establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is enhancement of environmental protection and minimization of risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission by conducting systematic and periodic evaluations of the Department`s environmental programs within line organizations and by using supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, state, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE Orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  6. Surface water-quality assessment of the lower Kansas River basin, Kansas and Nebraska; project description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, J.K.; Jordan, P.R.; Engberg, R.A.; Dugan, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    In 1986 the U.S. Geological Survey began a National Water-Quality Assessment Program to: (1) provide nationally consistent descriptions of the current status of water quality for a large, diverse, and geographically distributed part of the Nation 's surface water resources; (2) where possible, define trends in water quality; and (3) identify and describe the relation between water quality and natural and land use factors. This report describes the pilot study of the lower Kansas River basin, which is one of four surface water pilot studies that will be used to test, and modify as necessary, assessment concepts and approaches in preparation for future full implementation of the national program. Water quality issues in the lower Kansas River basin are dominated by possible nonpoint sources of contamination from agricultural land, with issues including: (1) large sediment discharge in the streams and sediment deposition in the reservoirs caused by intensive cultivation of row crops and subsequent erosion; (2) occurrence of pesticides in streams and reservoirs that could impair the suitability of water for aquatic life and has the potential for impairing the water 's suitability for public supply; (3) bacterial contamination caused by runoff from pastureland and feedlot operations and municipal wastewater discharges; and (4) nutrient enrichment of reservoirs. Data from fixed stations will be used to determine frequency distributions of constituent concentrations and mass balances of constituents between stations. Subbasin or river reach studies will provide a better understanding of the origin, movement, and fate of potential contaminants. (Lantz-PTT)

  7. Geologic map of the Lower Valley quadrangle, Caribou County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlindacher, H. Peter; Hovland, R. David; Miller, Susan T.; Evans, James G.; Miller, Robert J.

    2018-04-05

    The Lower Valley 7.5-minute quadrangle, located in the core of the Southeast Idaho Phosphate Resource Area, includes Mississippian to Triassic marine sedimentary rocks, Pliocene to Pleistocene basalt, and Tertiary to Holocene surficial deposits. The Mississippian to Triassic marine sedimentary sequence was deposited on a shallow shelf between an emergent craton to the east and the Antler orogenic belt to the west. The Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation hosts high-grade deposits of phosphate that were the subject of geologic studies through much of the 20th century. Open-pit mining of the phosphate has been underway within and near the Lower Valley quadrangle for several decades.

  8. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Baker Quadrangle, Oregon and Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, M.L.; Robins, J.W.

    1982-05-01

    The Baker Quadrangle, Oregon, and Idaho, was evaluated to identify areas containing geologic environments favorable for uranium deposits. The criteria used was developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Stream-sediment reconnaissance and detailed surface studies were augmented by subsurface-data interpretion and an aerial radiometric survey. Results indicate that lower Pliocene sedimentary rocks in the Lower Powder River Valley-Virtue Flat basin are favorable characteristics, they remain unevaluated because of lack of subsurface data. Tertiary sandstones, possibly present at depth in the Long and Cascade Valleys, also remain unevaluated due to lack of subsurface data. All remaining environments in the Baker Quadrangle are unfavorable for all classes of uranium deposits

  9. Geologic map of the Western Grove quadrangle, northwestern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Turner, Kenzie J.; Repetski, John E.

    2006-01-01

    This map summarizes the geology of the Western Grove 7.5-minute quadrangle in northern Arkansas that is located on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, a late Paleozoic regional uplift. The exposed bedrock of this map area comprises approximately 1,000 ft of Ordovician and Mississippian carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks that have been mildly folded and broken by faults. A segment of the Buffalo River loops through the southern part of the quadrangle, and the river and adjacent lands form part of Buffalo National River, a park administered by the U.S. National Park Service. This geologic map provides information to better understand the natural resources of the Buffalo River watershed, particularly its karst hydrogeologic framework.

  10. Geologic Map of the Weaverville 15' Quadrangle, Trinity County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.

    2009-01-01

    The Weaverville 15' quadrangle spans parts of five generally north-northwest-trending accreted terranes. From east to west, these are the Eastern Klamath, Central Metamorphic, North Fork, Eastern Hayfork, and Western Hayfork terranes. The Eastern Klamath terrane was thrust westward over the Central Metamorphic terrane during early Paleozoic (Devonian?) time and, in Early Cretaceous time (approx. 136 Ma), was intruded along its length by the massive Shasta Bally batholith. Remnants of overlap assemblages of the Early Cretaceous (Hauterivian) Great Valley sequence and the Tertiary Weaverville Formation cover nearly 10 percent of the quadrangle. The base of the Eastern Klamath terrane in the Weaverville quadrangle is a peridotite-gabbro complex that probably is correlative to the Trinity ophiolite (Ordovician), which is widely exposed farther north beyond the quadrangle. In the northeast part of the Weaverville quadrangle, the peridotite-gabbro complex is overlain by the Devonian Copley Greenstone and the Mississippian Bragdon Formation. Where these formations were intruded by the Shasta Bally batholith, they formed an aureole of gneissic and other metamorphic rocks around the batholith. Westward thrusting of the Eastern Klamath terrane over an adjacent body of mafic volcanic and overlying quartzose sedimentary rocks during Devonian time formed the Salmon Hornblende Schist and the Abrams Mica Schist of the Central Metamorphic terrane. Substantial beds of limestone in the quartzose sedimentary unit, generally found near the underlying volcanic rock, are too metamorphosed for fossils to have survived. Rb-Sr analysis of the Abrams Mica Schist indicates a metamorphic age of approx. 380 Ma. West of Weavervillle, the Oregon Mountain outlier of the Eastern Klamath terrane consists mainly of Bragdon Formation(?) and is largely separated from the underlying Central Metamorphic terrane by serpentinized peridotite that may be a remnant of the Trinity ophiolite. The North Fork

  11. National uranium resource evaluation: Clifton Quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.L.; Foster, M.

    1982-05-01

    The Clifton Quadrangle, Arizona and New Mexico, was evaluated to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. The evaluation used criteria formulated for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Evidence for the evaluation was based on surface studies, hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, and aerial radiometric surveys. The quadrangle encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Colorado Plateau, the transition zone, and the Basin and Range. The one environment determined, during the present study, to be favorable for uranium deposits is the Whitewater Creek member of the Cooney tuff, which is favorable for magmatic-hydrothermal uranium deposits on the west side of the Bursum caldera. No other areas were favorable for uranium deposits in sandstone, limestone, volcanogenic, igneous, or metamorphic environments. The subsurface is unevaluated because of lack of information, as are areas where access is a constraint

  12. Geological Mapping of the Lada Terra (V-56) Quadrangle, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. Senthil; Head, James W., III

    2009-01-01

    Geological mapping of the V-56 quadrangle (Fig. 1) reveals various tectonic and volcanic features and processes in Lada Terra that consist of tesserae, regional extensional belts, coronae, volcanic plains and impact craters. This study aims to map the spatial distribution of different material units, deformational features or lineament patterns and impact crater materials. In addition, we also establish the relative age relationships (e.g., overlapping or cross-cutting relationship) between them, in order to reconstruct the geologic history. Basically, this quadrangle addresses how coronae evolved in association with regional extensional belts, in addition to evolution of tesserae, regional plains and impact craters, which are also significant geological units of Lada Terra.

  13. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains

  14. Geologic Mapping of the Devana Chasma (V-29) Quadrangle, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg, E. R.; Bleamaster, L. F., III

    2010-01-01

    The Devana Chasma quadrangle (V-29; 0-25degN/270-300degE) is situated over the northeastern apex of the Beta-Atla-Themis (BAT) province and includes the southern half of Beta Regio, the northern and transitional segments of the Devana Chasma complex, the northern reaches of Phoebe Regio, Hyndla Regio, and Nedolya Tesserae, and several smaller volcano-tectonic centers and impact craters.

  15. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Cortez quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J A

    1982-09-01

    Six stratigraphic units are recognized as favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy in the Cortez 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. These units include the Jurassic Salt Wash, Recapture, and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation and the Entrada Sandstone, the Late Triassic Chinle Formation, and the Permian Cutler Formation. Four areas are judged favorable for the Morrison members which include the Slick Rock, Montezuma Canyon, Cottonwood Wash and Hatch districts. The criteria used to determine favorability include the presence of the following (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox Basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Two areas of favorability are recognized for the Chinle Formation. These areas include the Abajo Mountain and Aneth-Ute Mountain areas. The criteria used to determine favorability include the sandstone-to-mudstone ratio for the Chinle Formation and the geographic distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle Formation. Two favorable areas are recognized for the Cutler Formation. Both of these areas are along the northern border of the quadrangle between the Abajo Mountains and the Dolores River Canyon area. Two areas are judged favorable for the Entrada Sandstone. One area is in the northeast corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district and the second is along the eastern border of the quadrangle on the southeast flank of the La Plata Mountains.

  16. Geological Map of the Fredegonde (V-57) Quadrangle, Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    The area of V-57, the Fredegonde quadrangle (50-75degS, 60-120degE, Fig.1), is located within the eastern portion of Lada Terra within the topographic province of midlands (0-2 km above MPR [1,2]). Midlands form the most abundant portion of the surface of Venus and are characterized by diverse sets of units and structures [3-11]. The area of the Fredegonde quadrangle is in contact with the elevated portion of Lada Terra to the W and with the lowland of Aino Planitia to the NE. The transitions of the mid-lands to the lowlands and highlands are, thus, one of the main themes of the geology within the V-57 quadrangle. The character of the transitions and distribution and sequence of units/structures in the midlands are crucially important in understanding the time and modes of formation of this topographic province. The most prominent features in the map area are linear deformational zones consisting of swarms of grooves and graben and large coronae. The zones characterize the central and NW portions of the map area and represent regionally important, broad (up to 100s km wide) ridges that are 100s m high. Relatively small (100s km across, 100s m deep) equidimensional basins occur between the corona-groove-chains in the west and border the central chain from the east. Here we describe units that make up the surface within the V-57 quadrangle and present a summary of our geological map that shows the areal distribution of the major groups of units.

  17. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Aztec quadrangle, New Mexico and Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    Areas and formations within the Aztec 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, New Mexico and Colorado considered favorable for uranium endowment of specified minimum grade and tonnage include, in decreasing order of favorability: (1) the Early Cretaceous Burro Canyon Formation in the southeastern part of the Chama Basin; (2) the Tertiary Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the east-central part of the San Juan Basin; and (3) the Jurassic Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation in the southwestern part of the quadrangle. Favorability of the Burro Canyon is based on the presence of favorable host-rock facies, carbonaceous material and pyrite to act as a reductant for uranium, and the presence of mineralized ground in the subsurface of the Chama Basin. The Ojo Alamo Sandstone is considered favorable because of favorable host-rock facies, the presence of carbonaceous material and pyrite to act as a reductant for uranium, and the presence of a relatively large subsurface area in which low-grade mineralization has been encountered in exploration activity. The Morrison Formation, located within the San Juan Basin adjacent to the northern edge of the Grants mineral belt, is considered favorable because of mineralization in several drill holes at depths near 1500 m (5000 ft) and because of favorable facies relationships extending into the Aztec Quadrangle from the Grants mineral belt which lies in the adjacent Albuquerque and Gallup Quadrangles. Formations considered unfavorable for uranium deposits of specified tonnage and grade include the remainder of sedimentary and igneous formations ranging from Precambrian to Quaternary in age. Included under the unfavorable category are the Cutler Formation of Permian age, and Dakota Sandstone of Late Cretaceous age, and the Nacimiento and San Jose Formations of Tertiary age

  18. Geologic Map of the Diana Chasma Quadrangle (V-37), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, V.L.; DeShon, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction The Diana Chasma quadrangle (V-37), an equatorial region between 0° to 25° S. and 150° to 180° E. that encompasses ~8,400,000 km2, is broadly divided into southern Rusalka Planitia in the north, eastern Aphrodite Terra in the central region, and unnamed regions to the south. Geologic mapping constrains the temporal and spatial relations of the major features, which include a tessera inlier, Markham crater, six large coronae (300-675 km diameter), four smaller coronae (150-225 km diameter), Diana and Dali chasmata, a large fracture zone, and southern Rusalka Planitia. Eastern Aphrodite Terra, marked here by large coronae, deep chasmata, and an extensive northeast-trending fracture zone, extends from Atla Regio to Thetis Regio. The large coronae are part of a chain of such features that includes Inari Corona to the west-southwest and Zemina Corona to the northeast. V-37 quadrangle is bounded on the north by Rusalka Planitia and on the south by Zhibek Planitia. International Astronomical Union (IAU) approved and provisional nomenclature and positions for geographic features within Diana Chasma quadrangle are shown on the geologic map. [Note: Atahensik Corona was referred to as Latona Corona in much previously published literature.

  19. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, V.P.; Bradley, M.T.; Nagy, P.A.

    1982-08-01

    Uranium resources of the Lovelock Quadrangle, Nevada and California, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using available surface and subsurface geological information. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, as interpreted from the aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey and from the hydrochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance survey reports, were also investigated. A general reconnaissance of the geologic environments exposed in surface outcrops was carried out; and over 400 rock, sediment, and water geochemical analyses were made from the samples taken. Additionally, 119 rock samples were petrographically studied. A total of 21 occurrences were located, sampled, and described in detail. Six uranium occurrences, previously unreported in the literature, were located during hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, aerial radiometric reconnaissance survey followup, or general outcrop reconnaissance. Nine areas of uranium favorability were delineated within the Lovelock Quadrangle. One area, which contains the basal units of the Hartford Hill Rhyolite, is favorable for hydroallogenic uranium deposits. Eight areas are favorable for uranium deposits in playa sediments. These playas are considered favorable for nonmarine carbonaceous sediment deposits and evaporative deposits. The total volume of rock in favorable areas of the Lovelock Quadrangle is estimated to be 190 km 3 . The remaining geologic units are considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits. These include upper Paleozoic and Mesozoic volcanic, plutonic, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Also unfavorable are Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic flows and intrusive phases, tuffs, and sediments

  20. Kansas State University accelerator laboratory upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, P.

    1989-01-01

    The J.R. Macdonald Laboratory is undergoing a major upgrade of its facilities and capabilities. The laboratory is dedicated to the study of ion-atom collisions using highly charged ions from accelerators and/or ion sources. The mainstay of the laboratory over the last two decades has been a 6 MV tandem accelerator. It has been used to produce one- to a few-MeV/u highly charged ions for studying high energy atomic collisions, and to produce recoil ions from ocllisions with projectile ions for studying low energy atomic collisions. In order to enhance the capabilities of studying atomic collisions in these two energy regimes, we are constructing a superconducting LINAC booster to the tandem, and a stand-alone CRYEBIS source. The project, which is funded by the US Department of Energy, began in May 1985 with a May 1989 completion schedule. The upgrade includes a building addition, funded by the State of Kansas, to house the new facilities. The LINAC consists of a time-superbunching module, followed by three large cryostat modules each containing four superconducting resonators, and followed by an energy-rebunching module. The resonators are the split-ring superconducting Nb type designed and constructed at Argonne National Laboratory, and are presently being tested at KSU. The CRYEBIS source, which consists of a 1 m long 5 T superconducting solenoid with a high degree of straightness, is in the final stages of assembly. We have in operation a new computer network for data acquisition and analysis. A progress report on the status of the upgrade is presented. (orig.)

  1. Geologic Map of the Tower Peak Quadrangle, Central Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahrhaftig, Clyde

    2000-01-01

    Introduction The Tower Peak quadrangle, which includes northernmost Yosemite National Park, is located astride the glaciated crest of the central Sierra Nevada and covers an exceptionally well-exposed part of the Sierra Nevada batholith. Granitic plutonic rocks of the batholith dominate the geology of the Tower Peak quadrangle, and at least 18 separate pre-Tertiary intrusive events have been identified. Pre-Cretaceous metamorphic rocks crop out in the quadrangle in isolated roof pendants and septa. Tertiary volcanic rocks cover granitic rocks in the northern part of the quadrangle, but are not considered in this brief summary. Potassium-argon (K-Ar) age determinations for plutonic rocks in the quadrangle range from 83 to 96 million years (Ma), including one of 86 Ma for the granodiorite of Lake Harriet (Robinson and Kistler, 1986). However, a rubidium-strontium whole-rock isochron age of 129 Ma has been obtained for the Lake Harriet pluton (Robinson and Kistler, 1986), which field evidence indicates is the oldest plutonic body within the quadrangle. This suggests that some of the K-Ar ages record an episode of resetting during later thermal events and are too young. The evidence indicates that all the plutonic rocks are of Cretaceous age, with the youngest being the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite at about 83 Ma. The pre-Tertiary rocks of the Tower Peak quadrangle fall into two groups: (1) an L-shaped area of older plutonic and metamorphic rocks, 3 to 10 km wide, that extends diagonally both northeast and southeast from near the center of the quadrangle; and (2) a younger group of large, probably composite intrusions that cover large areas in adjacent quadrangles and extend into the Tower Peak quadrangle from the east, north, and southwest.

  2. Geologic map of the Yacolt quadrangle, Clark County, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evarts, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    The Yacolt 7.5' quadrangle is situated in the foothills of the western Cascade Range of southwestern Washington approximately 35 km northeast of Portland, Oregon. Since late Eocene time, the Cascade Range has been the locus of an active volcanic arc associated with underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the North American continent along the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Volcanic and shallow-level intrusive rocks emplaced early in the history of the arc underlie most of the Yacolt quadrangle, forming a dissected and partly glaciated terrain with elevations between 250 and 2180 ft (75 and 665 m). The bedrock surface slopes irregularly but steeply to the southwest, forming the eastern margin of the Portland Basin, and weakly consolidated Miocene and younger basin-fill sediments lap up against the bedrock terrain in the southern part of the map area. A deep canyon, carved by the East Fork Lewis River that flows westward out of the Cascade Range, separates Yacolt and Bells Mountains, the two highest points in the quadrangle. Just west of the quadrangle, the river departs from its narrow bedrock channel and enters a wide alluvial floodplain. Bedrock of the Yacolt quadrangle consists of near-horizontal strata of Oligocene volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks that comprise early products of the Cascade volcanic arc. Basalt and basaltic andesite flows predominate. Most were emplaced on the flanks of a large mafic shield volcano and are interfingered with crudely bedded sections of volcanic breccia of probable lahar origin and a variety of well bedded epiclastic sedimentary rocks. At Yacolt Mountain, the volcanogenic rocks are intruded by a body of Miocene quartz diorite that is compositionally distinct from any volcanic rocks in the map area. The town of Yacolt sits in a north-northwest-trending valley apparently formed within a major fault zone. Several times during the Pleistocene, mountain glaciers moved down the Lewis River valley and spread southward into the map area

  3. Preliminary geologic map of the Turayf Quadrangle, sheet 31C, and part of the An Nabk quadrangle, sheet 31B, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, C.R.; Riddler, G.P.; Van Eck, Marcel; Aspinall, N.C.; Farasani, A.M.; Dini, S.M.

    1989-01-01

    The An Nabk and Turayf quadrangles lie at the northern border of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Middle and upper Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks form the surface of the quadrangles, and sedimentary rocks of the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and lower Cenozoic are found in the subsurface. The Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks, described from drill hole records, include the Tabuk, Upper Sudair, Lower Jilh and Aruma formations which are mostly of marine origin.

  4. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  5. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3570, Tagab-E-Munjan (505) and Asmar-Kamdesh (506) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  6. Topographic Map of Quadrangles 3062 and 2962, Charburjak (609), Khanneshin (610), Gawdezereh (615), and Galachah (616) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  7. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3566, Sang-Charak (501) and Sayghan-O-Kamard (502) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The open-file report (OFR) numbers for each quadrangle range in sequence from 1092 - 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS

  8. Geological Map of the Fredegonade (V-57) Quadrangle, Venus: Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, J. W.

    2010-01-01

    The Fredegonde quadrangle (V-57; 50-75degS, 60-120degE, Fig. 1) corresponds to the northeastern edge of Lada Terra and covers a broad area of the topographic province of midlands (0-2 km above MPR [1,2]). This province is most abundant on Venus and displays a wide variety of units and structures [3-11]. The sequence of events that formed the characteristic features of the midlands is crucially important in understanding of the timing and modes of evolution of this topographic province. Topographically, the Fredegonde quadrangle is within a transition zone between the elevated portion of Lada Terra to the west (Quetzalpetlatl-Boala Coronae rise, approx.3.5 km) and the lowland of Aino Planitia to the north and northeast (approx.-0.5 km). This transition is one of the key features of the V-57 quadrangle. In this respect the quadrangle resembles the region of V-4 quadrangle [12] that shows transition between the midlands and the lowlands of Atalanta Planitia. One of the main goals of our mapping within the V-57 quadrangle is comparison of this region with the other transitional topographic zones such as quadrangles V-4 and V-3 [13]. The most prominent features in the V-57 quadrangle are linear deformational zones of grooves and large coronae. The zones characterize the central and NW portions of the map area and represent broad (up to 100s of km wide) ridges that are 100s of m high. Morphologically and topographically, these zones are almost identical to the groove belt/corona complexes at the western edge of Atalanta Planitia [12]. Within the Fredegonde area, however, the zones are oriented at high angles to the general trend of elongated Aino Planitia, whereas within the V-4 quadrangle they are parallel to the edge of Atalanta Planitia. Relatively small (100s of km across, 100s of m deep) equidimensional basins occur between the corona-groove-chains in the area of V-57 quadrangle. These basins are similar to those that populate the area of the V-3 quadrangle [13

  9. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Powder River R and D Project. Portions of the: Forsyth and Hardin, Montana, and the Sheridan, Arminto, Newcastle, and Gillette, Wyoming Quadrangles. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-05-01

    During the months of August through September, 1978, geoMetrics, Inc. flew approximately 1520 line miles of high sensitivity airborne radiometric and magnetic data in Wyoming and southern Montana within four 1 0 x 2 0 NTMS quadrangles (Arminto, Sheridan, Hardin and Forsyth), and 1390 lines miles in the detail area in eastern Wyoming, as part of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. All radiometric and magnetic data were fully reduced and interpreted by geoMetrics, and are presented as three volumes (one Volume I and two Volume II's) in this report. The survey area lies largely within the northern Great Plains Physiographic Province. The deep Powder River Basin is the dominant structure in the area. Portions of the Casper Arch, Big Horn Uplift, and Porcupine Dome fall within the western limits of the area. The Basin is one of the largest and deepest in the northern Great Plains and contains over 17,000 feet of Phanerozoic sediments at its deepest point. Economic deposits of oil, coal, bentonite and uranium are found in the Tertiary and/or Cretaceous rocks of the Basin. Epigenetic uranium deposits lie primarily in the Pumpkin Buttes - Turnercrest districts within arkosic sandstones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation. A total of 62 groups of statistical values for the R and D area and 127 for the Arminto Detail in the uranium window meet the criteria for valid anomalies and are discussed in their respective interpretation sections. Most anomalies lie in the Tertiary sediments of the Powder River Basin. Some of the anomalies in the Arminto Detail are clearly related to mines or prospects

  10. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This second horticulture guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Leadership, (2) Supervised Occupational Experience, (3) Plant Propagation, (4) Soil and Plant Growth Media, (5) Fertilizers, (6) Greenhouse, (7) Plant…

  11. Kansas Vocational Agriculture Education. Basic Core Curriculum Project, Horticulture III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albracht, James, Ed.

    This secondary horticulture curriculum guide is one of a set of three designated as the basic core of instruction for horticulture programs in Kansas. Units of instruction are presented in eight sections: (1) Human Relations, (2) Business Operations, (3) Greenhouse, (4) Retail Flowershop Operation, (5) Landscape Nursery, (6) Lawn Maintenance, (7)…

  12. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  13. Indiana and the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medland, William J.; Rosenberg, Morton M.

    1984-01-01

    The Kansas-Nebraska Act, which repealed the ban against slavery in the North, served as a catalyst to activate numerous groups which were unhappy with the Indiana Democratic Party. From this period emerged the new Republican party and also a revitalized Democratic party with new leadership. (IS)

  14. Digital Learning Compass: Distance Education State Almanac 2017. Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Julia E.; Seaman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This brief report uses data collected under the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Fall Enrollment survey to highlight distance education data in the state of Kansas. The sample for this analysis is comprised of all active, degree-granting…

  15. Wind farm turbulence impacts on general aviation airports in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines and wind farms have become popular in the State of Kansas. Some general aviation pilots have expressed a concern about the : turbulence that the spinning blades are creating. If a wind farm is built near an airport, does this affect the...

  16. Full depth bituminous recycling of I-70, Thomas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, 13 full depth asphalt pavement test sections were built on a portion of I-70 in Thomas County, Kansas. Various combinations of hot mix and cold recycle mixes with different additives were used to build the test sections. Two of the test sect...

  17. Perfect Octagon Quadrangle Systems with an upper C4-system and a large spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigia Berardi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An octagon quadrangle is the graph consisting of an 8-cycle (x1, x2,..., x8 with two additional chords: the edges {x1, x4} and {x5, x8}. An octagon quadrangle system of order ν and index λ [OQS] is a pair (X,H, where X is a finite set of ν vertices and H is a collection of edge disjoint octagon quadrangles (called blocks which partition the edge set of λKν defined on X. An octagon quadrangle system Σ=(X,H of order ν and index λ is said to be upper C4-perfect if the collection of all of the upper 4-cycles contained in the octagon quadrangles form a μ-fold 4-cycle system of order ν; it is said to be upper strongly perfect, if the collection of all of the upper 4-cycles contained in the octagon quadrangles form a μ-fold 4-cycle system of order ν and also the collection of all of the outside 8-cycles contained in the octagon quadrangles form a ρ-fold 8-cycle system of order ν. In this paper, the authors determine the spectrum for these systems, in the case that it is the largest possible.

  18. Geologic map of the Rusalka Planitia Quadrangle (V-25), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Duncan A.; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2003-01-01

    The Rusalka Planitia quadrangle (herein referred to as V-25) occupies an 8.1 million square kilometer swath of lowlands nestled within the eastern highlands of Aphrodite Terra on Venus. The region (25?-0? N., 150?-180? E.) is framed by the crustal plateau Thetis Regio to the southwest, the coronae of the Diana-Dali chasmata complex to the south, and volcanic rise Atla Regio to the west. Regions to the north, and the quadrangle itself, are part of the vast lowlands, which cover four-fifths of the surface of Venus. The often-unspectacular lowlands of Venus are typically lumped together as ridged or regional plains. However, detailed mapping reveals the mode of resurfacing in V-25's lowlands: a mix of corona-related flow fields and local edifice clusters within planitia superimposed on a background of less clearly interpretable extended flow fields, large volcanoes, probable corona fragments, and edifice-flow complexes. The history detailed within the Rusalka Planitia quadrangle is that of the extended evolution of long-wavelength topographic basins in the presence of episodes of extensive corona-related volcanism, pervasive low-intensity small-scale eruptions, and an early phase of regional circumferential shortening centered on central Aphrodite Terra. Structural reactivation both obscures and illuminates the tectonic development of the region. The data are consistent with progressive lithospheric thickening, although the critical lack of an independent temporal marker on Venus severely hampers our ability to test this claim and correlate between localities. Two broad circular basins dominate V-25 geology: northern Rusalka Planitia lies in the southern half of the quadrangle, whereas the smaller Llorona Planitia sits along the northwestern corner of V-25. Similar large topographic basins occur throughout the lowlands of Venus, and gravity data suggest that some basins may represent dynamic topography over mantle downwellings. Both planitiae include coronae and

  19. Geologic map of the Lakshmi Planum quadrangle (V-7), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2010-01-01

    The Lakshmi Planum quadrangle is in the northern hemisphere of Venus and extends from lat 50 degrees to 75 degrees N., and from long 300 degrees to 360 degrees E. The elevated volcanic plateau of Lakshmi Planum, which represents a very specific and unique class of highlands on Venus, dominates the northern half of the quadrangle. The surface of the planum stands 3-4 km above mean planetary radius and the plateau is surrounded by the highest Venusian mountain ranges, 7-10 km high. Before the Magellan mission, the geology of the Lakshmi Planum quadrangle was known on the basis of topographic data acquired by the Pioneer-Venus and Venera-15/16 altimeter and radar images received by the Arecibo telescope and Venera-15/16 spacecraft. These data showed unique topographic and morphologic structures of the mountain belts, which have no counterparts elsewhere on Venus, and the interior volcanic plateau with two large and low volcanic centers and large blocks of tessera-like terrain. From the outside, Lakshmi Planum is outlined by a zone of complexly deformed terrains that occur on the regional outer slope of Lakshmi. Vast low-lying plains surround this zone. After acquisition of the Venera-15/16 data, two classes of hypotheses were formulated to explain the unique structure of Lakshmi Planum and its surrounding. The first proposed that the western portion of Ishtar Terra, dominated by Lakshmi Planum, was a site of large-scale upwelling while the alternative hypothesis considered this region as a site of large-scale downwelling and underthrusting. Early Magellan results showed important details of the general geology of this area displayed in the Venera-15/16 images. Swarms of extensional structures and massifs of tesserae populate the southern slope of Lakshmi. The zone of fractures and grabens form a giant arc thousands of kilometers long and hundreds of kilometers wide around the southern flank of Lakshmi Planum. From the north, the deformational zones consist mostly of

  20. Geologic map of the Murray Quadrangle, Newton County, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Turner, Kenzie J.

    2016-07-06

    This map summarizes the geology of the Murray quadrangle in the Ozark Plateaus region of northern Arkansas. Geologically, the area is on the southern flank of the Ozark dome, an uplift that has the oldest rocks exposed at its center, in Missouri. Physiographically, the Murray quadrangle is within the Boston Mountains, a high plateau region underlain by Pennsylvanian sandstones and shales. Valleys of the Buffalo River and Little Buffalo River and their tributaries expose an approximately 1,600-ft-thick (488-meter-thick) sequence of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks that have been mildly deformed by a series of faults and folds. The Buffalo National River, a park that encompasses the Buffalo River and adjacent land that is administered by the National Park Service is present at the northwestern edge of the quadrangle.Mapping for this study was carried out by field inspection of numerous sites and was compiled as a 1:24,000 geographic information system (GIS) database. Locations and elevation of sites were determined with the aid of a global positioning satellite receiver and a hand-held barometric altimeter that was frequently recalibrated at points of known elevation. Hill-shade relief and slope maps derived from a U.S. Geological Survey 10-meter digital elevation model as well as orthophotographs were used to help trace ledge-forming units between field traverses within the Upper Mississippian and Pennsylvanian part of the stratigraphic sequence. Strike and dip of beds were typically measured along stream drainages or at well-exposed ledges. Structure contours, constructed on the top of the Boone Formation and the base of a prominent sandstone unit within the Bloyd Formation, were drawn based on the elevations of field sites on these contacts well as other limiting information for their minimum elevations above hilltops or their maximum elevations below valley bottoms.

  1. Mercury: Photomosaic of the Shakespeare Quadrangle (Northern Half) H-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    This computer generated photomosaic from Mariner 10 is of the northern half of Mercury's Shakespeare Quadrangle, named for the ancient Shakespeare crater located on the lower edge to the left of center. This portion of the quadrangle covers the geographic region from 45 to 70 degrees north latitude and from 90 to 180 degrees longitude. The photomosaic was produced using computer techniques and software developed in the Image Processing Laboratory of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The pictures have been high-pass filtered and contrast enhanced to accentuate surface detail, and geometrically transformed into a Lambert conformal projection.The illuminated surface observed by Mariner 10 as it first approached Mercury is dominated by craters and basins. In marked contrast to this view, the surface photographed after the flyby exhibited features totally different, including large basins and extensive relatively smooth areas with few craters. The most striking feature in this region of the planet is a huge circular basin, 1300 kilometers in diameter, that was undoubtedly produced from a tremendous impact comparable to the event that formed the Imbrium basin on the Moon. This prominent Mercurian structure in the Shakespeare and Tolstoj quadrangles (lower left corner of this image), named Caloris Planitia, is filled with material forming a smooth surface or plain that appears similar in many respects to the lunar maria.The above material was taken from the following publication... Davies, M. E., S. E. Dwornik, D. E. Gault, and R. G. Strom, Atlas of Mercury, NASA SP-423 (1978).The Mariner 10 mission was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  2. Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks of Baird Mountains Quadrangle, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumoulin, J.A.; Harris, A.G.

    1985-04-01

    Lower Paleozoic carbonate rocks in the Baird Mountains quadrangle form a relatively thin (about 550 m), chiefly shallow-water succession that has been imbricately thrust and metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. Middle and Upper Cambrian rocks - the first reported from the western Brooks Range - occur in the northeastern quarter of the quadrangle, south of Angayukaqsraq (formerly Hub) Mountain. They consist of marble grading upward into thin-bedded marble/dolostone couplets and contain pelagiellid mollusks, acetretid brachiopods, and agnostid trilobites. Sedimentologic features and the Pelagiellas indicate a shallow-water depositional environment. Overlying these rocks are Lower and Middle Ordovician marble and phyllite containing graptolites and conodonts of midshelf to basinal aspect. Upper Ordovician rocks in this area are bioturbated to laminated dolostone containing warm, shallow-water conodonts. In the Omar and Squirrel Rivers areas to the west, the Lower Ordovician carbonate rocks show striking differences in lithofacies, biofacies, and thickness. Here they are mainly dolostone with locally well-developed fenestral fabric and evaporite molds, and bioturbated to laminated orange- and gray-weathering dolomitic marble. Upper Silurian dolostone, found near Angayukaqsraq Mountain and on the central Squirrel River, contains locally abundant corals and stronmatoporoids. Devonian carbonate rocks are widely distributed in the Baird Mountains quadrangle; at least two distinct sequences have been identified. In the Omar area, Lower and Middle Devonian dolostone and marble are locally cherty and rich in megafossils. In the north-central (Nakolik River) area, Middle and Upper Devonian marble is interlayered with planar to cross-laminated quartz-carbonate metasandstone and phyllite.

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Athens Quadrangle, Georgia and South Carolina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.

    1979-09-01

    Reconnaissance and detailed geologic and radiometric investigations were conducted throughout the Athens Quadrangle, Georgia and South Carolina, to evaluate the uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Surface and subsurface studies were augmented by aerial radiometric surveys, emanometry studies and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. The results of the investigations indicate environments favorable for allogenic deposits in metamorphic rocks adjacent to granite plutons, and Texas roll-type sandstone deposits in the Coastal Plain Province. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits are the placers of the Monazite Belt, pegmatites, and base- and precious-metal veins associated with faults and shear zones in metamorphic rocks

  4. Stratigraphy and Observations of Nepthys Mons Quadrangle (V54), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N. T.

    2001-01-01

    Initial mapping has begun in Venus' Nepthys Mons Quadrangle (V54, 300-330 deg. E, 25-50 deg. S). Major research areas addressed are how the styles of volcanism and tectonism have changed with time, the evolution of shield volcanoes, the evolution of coronae, the characteristics of plains volcanism, and what these observations tell us about the general geologic history of Venus. Reported here is a preliminary general stratigraphy and several intriguing findings. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Roanoke 10 x 20 NTMS area, Virginia. Data report (abbreviated): National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-12-01

    This abbreviated data report presents results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series Roanoke 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle. Surface sediment samples were collected at 1235 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 767 sites. Neutron activation analysis results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Uranium concentrations in the sediments range from 0.50 to 83.50 ppM with a mean of 6.67 ppM. A cluster of high log (U/Th + Hf) ratios appear in the southeastern portion of the quadrangle. Uranium, thorium, and the rare earth elements show a striking correlation with the geology of the area

  6. Topographic Map of Quadrangle 3768 and 3668, Imam-Saheb (215), Rustaq (216), Baghlan (221), and Taloqan (222) Quadrangles, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, Robert G.

    2006-01-01

    This map was produced from several larger digital datasets. Topography was derived from Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) 85-meter digital data. Gaps in the original dataset were filled with data digitized from contours on 1:200,000-scale Soviet General Staff Sheets (1978-1997). Contours were generated by cubic convolution averaged over four pixels using TNTmips surface-modeling capabilities. Minor artifacts resulting from the auto-contouring technique are present. Streams were auto-generated from the SRTM data in TNTmips as flow paths. Flow paths were limited in number by their Horton value on a quadrangle-by-quadrangle basis. Peak elevations were averaged over an area measuring 85 m by 85 m (represented by one pixel), and they are slightly lower than the highest corresponding point on the ground. Cultural data were extracted from files downloaded from the Afghanistan Information Management Service (AIMS) Web site (http://www.aims.org.af). The AIMS files were originally derived from maps produced by the Afghanistan Geodesy and Cartography Head Office (AGCHO). Because cultural features were not derived from the SRTM base, they do not match it precisely. Province boundaries are not exactly located. This map is part of a series that includes a geologic map, a topographic map, a Landsat natural-color-image map, and a Landsat false-color-image map for the USGS/AGS (Afghan Geological Survey) quadrangles covering Afghanistan. The maps for any given quadrangle have the same open-file report (OFR) number but a different letter suffix, namely, -A, -B, -C, and -D for the geologic, topographic, Landsat natural-color, and Landsat false-color maps, respectively. The OFR numbers range in sequence from 1092 to 1123. The present map series is to be followed by a second series, in which the geology is reinterpreted on the basis of analysis of remote-sensing data, limited fieldwork, and library research. The second series is to be produced by the USGS in cooperation with the

  7. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, North Region: Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the North Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the North Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  8. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, South East Region: Volume 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the South East Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the South East Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  9. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, South West Region: Volume 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the South West Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the South West Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  10. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, East Region: Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the East Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the East Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  11. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, Mid West Region: Volume 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the Mid West Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the Mid West Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  12. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, North West Region: Volume 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the North West Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the North West Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  13. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, West Region: Volume 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the West Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the West Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  14. NURE [National Uranium Resource Evaluation] HSSR [Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance] Quadrangle Summary Tables, Mid East Region: Volume 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This volume presents a summary of the distribution of elemental concentrations for water and sediment samples across quadrangles located in the Mid East Regional File. The next section briefly outlines the approach used by ISP in preparing these data tables. This is followed by an Alphabetical Index to the quadrangles contained in the Mid East Regional File and a Quadrangle Map; both the Index and Map present a record count for each quadrangle. The last section presents the data summary tables organized by sample type (water or sediments) and displaying elements within quads and quads within elements. These data summary tables show the general ranges of values present in the NURE Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance sample data in each quadrangle or state. As with all summaries, they represent the data according to the best judgement of the professionals doing the analysis. This section gives a general description of the procedures used to produce the quadrangle summary percentiles

  15. Estimation of potential runoff-contributing areas in the Kansas-Lower Republican River Basin, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    1999-01-01

    Digital soils and topographic data were used to estimate and compare potential runoff-contributing areas for 19 selected subbasins representing soil, slope, and runoff variability within the Kansas-Lower Republican (KLR) River Basin. Potential runoff-contributing areas were estimated separately and collectively for the processes of infiltration-excess and saturation-excess overland flow using a set of environmental conditions that represented high, moderate, and low potential runoff. For infiltration-excess overland flow, various rainfall intensities and soil permeabilities were used. For saturation-excess overland flow, antecedent soil-moisture conditions and a topographic wetness index were used. Results indicated that the subbasins with relatively high potential runoff are located in the central part of the KLR River Basin. These subbasins are Black Vermillion River, Clarks Creek, Delaware River upstream from Muscotah, Grasshopper Creek, Mill Creek (Wabaunsee County), Soldier Creek, Vermillion Creek (Pottawatomie County), and Wildcat Creek. The subbasins with relatively low potential runoff are located in the western one-third of the KLR River Basin, with one exception, and are Buffalo Creek, Little Blue River upstream from Barnes, Mill Creek (Washington County), Republican River between Concordia and Clay Center, Republican River upstream from Concordia, Wakarusa River downstream from Clinton Lake (exception), and White Rock Creek. The ability to distinguish the subbasins as having relatively high or low potential runoff was possible mostly due to the variability of soil permeability across the KLR River Basin.

  16. The geology and ore deposits of the Bisbee quadrangle, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransome, Frederick Leslie

    1904-01-01

    The Bisbee quadrangle lies in Cochise County, in the southeastern part of Arizona, within what has been called in a previous paper the mountain region of the Territory. It is inclosed between meridians 109 ° 45' and 110 ° 00' and parallels 31° 30' and 31 ° 20', the latter being locally the Mexican boundary line. The area of the quadrangle is about 170 square miles, and includes the southeastern half of the Mule Mountains, one of the smaller of the isolated ranges so characteristic of the mountain region of Arizona. The Mule Mountains, while less markedly linear than the Dragoon, Huachuca, Chiricahua, and other neighboring ranges, have a general northwest-southeast trend. They may be considered as extending from the old mining town of Tombstone to the Mexican border, a distance of about 30 miles. On the northeast they are separated by the broad fiat floor of Sulphur Spring Valley form the Chiricahua Range, and on the southwest by the similar broad valley of the Rio San Pedro from the Huachuca Range (Pl. V, A). 

  17. Geologic map of the Themis Regio quadrangle (V-53), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofan, Ellen R.; Brian, Antony W.

    2012-01-01

    The Themis Regio quadrangle (V-53), Venus, has been geologically mapped at 1:5,000,000 scale as part of the NASA Planetary Geologic Mapping Program. The quadrangle extends from lat 25° to 50° S. and from long 270° to 300° E. and encompasses the Themis Regio highland, the surrounding plains, and the southernmost extension of Parga Chasmata. Themis Regio is a broad regional topographic high with a diameter of about 2,000 km and a height of about 0.5 km that has been interpreted previously as a hotspot underlain by a mantle plume. The Themis rise is dominated by coronae and lies at the terminus of the Parga Chasmata corona chain. Themis Regio is the only one of the three corona-dominated rises that contains significant extensional deformation. Fractures and grabens are much less common than along the rest of Parga Chasmata and are embayed by corona-related flows in places. Rift and corona formation has overlapped in time at Themis Regio.

  18. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Crystal City Quadrangle, Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greimel, T.C.

    1982-08-01

    The uranium resources of the Crystal City Quadrangle, Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using surface and subsurface geologic information. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature, in reports of the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Geological Survey Computerized Resources Information Bank, were located, described, and sampled. Geochemical anomalies interpreted from hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance were also investigated and sampled in detail. Areas of uranium favorability in the subsurface were located through interpretation of lithofacies patterns and structure derived from electric-log data. Gamma-ray well logs and results of geochemical sample analyses were used as supportive data in locating these areas. Fifteen surface and subsurface favorable areas were delineated in the quadrangle. Eight are in fluvial and genetically associated facies of the Pliocene Goliad Sandstone, Miocene Oakville Sandstone, Miocene Catahoula Tuff, and Oligocene Frio Clay. One area encompasses strand plain-barrier bar, fluvial-deltaic, and lagoonal-margin facies of the Eocene Jackson Group. Two areas are in strand plain-barrier bar and probable fluvial facies of the Eocene Yegua Formation. Four areas are in fluvial-deltaic, barrier-bar, and lagoonal-margin facies of the Eocene Queen City Formation and stratigraphically equivalent units. Seventeen geologic units are considered unfavorable, and seven are unevaluated due to lack of data

  19. Digital bedrock geologic map of parts of the Huntington, Richmond, Bolton and Waterbury quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-9A Thompson, PJ�and Thompson, TB, 1995, Digital bedrock geologic map of parts of the Huntington, Richmond, Bolton and Waterbury quadrangles,...

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: New Rockford quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Volume II contains the flight path, radiometric multi-parameter stacked profiles, magnetic and ancillary parameter stacked profiles, histograms, and anomaly maps for the New Rockford Quadrangle in North Dakota

  1. Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital data from VG2016-3 Springston, G., 2016, Surficial geology of the Cabot 7 1/2 minute quadrangle, Vermont:�Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report...

  2. Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Wallingford quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-335A Burton, WC, and Ratcliffe, NM, 2000, Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Wallingford quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File...

  3. Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Pico Peak quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-226A Walsh, G. J., and Ratcliffe, N.M., 1998,�Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Pico Peak quadrangle, Vermont: USGS...

  4. Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Chittenden quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG97-854A Ratcliffe, NM, 1997,�Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Chittenden quadrangle, Vermont: USGS Open-File Report 97-854, 1...

  5. Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Mount Carmel quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-330A Ratcliffe, N.M., and Walsh, G. J., 1998,�Digital and preliminary bedrock geologic map of the Mount Carmel quadrangle, Vermont: USGS...

  6. USGS 1:12000 (Quarter 7 1/2 Minute) Quadrangle Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This is a mathematically generated grid in which each polygon represents one quarter of a standard USGS 7 1/2 minute quadrangle. The result is a 3 3/4 minute...

  7. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Mount Snow & Readsboro quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG95-DM1 Ratcliffe, NM, 1995, Digital bedrock geologic map of the Mount Snow & Readsboro quadrangles, Vermont, scale 1:24000, The bedrock...

  8. Digital bedrock geologic map of the Morrisville quadrangle,�Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG98-1 Springston, G., Kim, J., and Applegate, G.S., 1998,�Digital bedrock geologic map of the Morrisville quadrangle,�Vermont: VGS Open-File...

  9. Bedrock geologic map of parts of the Eden, Albany, Lowell, and Irasburg quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG09-4 (Digitized draft of VG97-5): Kim, J., 2009, Bedrock geologic map of parts of the Eden, Albany, Lowell, and Irasburg quadrangles, VGS...

  10. Digital compilation bedrock geologic map of part of the Waitsfield quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG96-03�Digital compilation bedrock geologic map of part of the Waitsfield quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File Report VG96-3A, 2 plates, scale...

  11. Digital data for the Hazens Notch and a portion of the Lowell quadrangles, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG03-3B Digital data for the Hazens Notch and a portion of the Lowell quadrangles, Vermont: Vermont Geological Survey Open File Report VG03-3B, The...

  12. Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Digital Data from VG2017-2 Thompson, P. J., and Thompson, T. B., 2017, Bedrock Geologic Map of the Mount Mansfield 7.5 Minute Quadrangle, Vermont: VGS Open-File...

  13. Continuous real-time water information: an important Kansas resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loving, Brian L.; Putnam, James E.; Turk, Donita M.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous real-time information on streams, lakes, and groundwater is an important Kansas resource that can safeguard lives and property, and ensure adequate water resources for a healthy State economy. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates approximately 230 water-monitoring stations at Kansas streams, lakes, and groundwater sites. Most of these stations are funded cooperatively in partnerships with local, tribal, State, or other Federal agencies. The USGS real-time water-monitoring network provides long-term, accurate, and objective information that meets the needs of many customers. Whether the customer is a water-management or water-quality agency, an emergency planner, a power or navigational official, a farmer, a canoeist, or a fisherman, all can benefit from the continuous real-time water information gathered by the USGS.

  14. Catastrophic sinkhole formation in Kansas: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, J.L.; Miller, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Sinkholes represent a hazard to property and human safety in a wide variety of geologic settings across the globe. In most cases, the subsidence rate of a sinkhole represents the most significant potential impact and risk to public safety. Since 1979, the Kansas Geological Survey has studied numerous sinkholes using high-resolution seismic reflection in an attempt to better understand the mechanisms that control their formation. Most sinkholes in central Kansas form as a result of dissolution of the Permian Hutchinson salt (Figure 1). The fluid source and associated pathway responsible for leaching these bedded evaporites have been natural, anthropogenic, and a combination of both. Sinkholes have been a part of the landscape in the North American midcontinent long before modern oil, gas, and mineral exploration, but clearly the activities of man have played a significant role in both increasing the number of sinkholes and affecting their subsidence rates.

  15. Kansas nurse leader residency programme: advancing leader knowledge and skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Kansas Nurse Leader Residency (KNLR) programme in improving nurses' leadership knowledge and skills and its acceptability, feasibility and fidelity. The Future of Nursing Report (Institute of Medicine, 2011) calls for nurses to lead change and advance health. The 6-month KNLR programme was developed by the Kansas Action Coalition to support nurses' leadership development. Nurses (n = 36) from four nursing specialties (acute care, long-term care, public health and school health) participated in the programme. The adapted Leader Knowledge and Skill Inventory was used to assess leadership knowledge and skills. Programme acceptability, feasibility and implementation fidelity also were evaluated. The programme completion rate was 67.7% (n = 24). Programme completers had significantly improved self-assessed and mentor-assessed leadership knowledge and skills (p leaders are critical for successful transition into management positions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Preliminary geologic map of the Thaniyat Turayf Quadrangle, sheet 29C, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, C.R.; Dini, S.M.; Farasani, A.M.; Riddler, G.P.; Smith, G.H.; Griffin, M.B.; Van Eck, Marcel

    1990-01-01

    The Thaniyat Turayf quadrangle, sheet 29C, lies in the northwestern part of Saudi Arabia near the border with Jordan. The quadrangle is located between lat 29°00'-30°00' N. and long 37°30'-39°00' E. It includes the southwestern rim of the Sirhan-Turayf Basin and is underlain by Silurian to Miocene- Pliocene sedimentary rocks that are partly covered by surficial duricrust, sand, and gravel.

  17. Serpentinization and the origin of hydrogen gas in Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coveney, R.M. Jr.; Goebel, E.D.; Zeller, E.J.; Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Angino, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen gas occurs in ten Kansas wells near the Mid-Continent rift system. Since 1982, two wells have yielded small amounts of gases containing an average of 29-37 mole % H/sub 2/, the remainder being chiefly N/sub 2/ with only traces of hydrocarbons. Isotopic compositions for hydrogen (delta D = -740 to -836 per thousand) imply near-ambient (about 10/sup 0/C) equilibration temperatures for the gases, which are among the most deuterium-depleted in nature and resemble the H/sub 2/-rich gases described from ophiolites in Oman. Isotopic values for the Kansas N/sub 2/ differ slightly from those of the atmosphere, but not enough to rule out an atmospheric origin. Because they are low in CH/sub 4/ and CO/sub 2/, expected byproducts of biogenic activity, the gases are probably abiogenic in origin. The existence of such gases near a major rift system, containing mafic rocks, and not far from known kimberlites is consistent with an origin from reactions involving Fe/sup +2/ oxidation, for example during serpentinization. Because the gases may be associated with kimberlites and deep-seated rifting, mantle outgassing is possible, but such an origin would be difficult to reconcile with the low isotopic temperatures. The H/sub 2/ gases from Kansas (and elsewhere) seem to be too low in pressure to have commercial value. However, neither the Kansas gases nor those from other H/sub 2/ occurrences have been adequately examined to assess their importance as potential resources. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Assessing urban forest effects and values: Douglas County, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Allison R. Bodine; Robert E. Hoehn; Alexis Ellis; Kim Bomberger; Daniel E. Crane; Theodore A. Endreny; Thomas Taggert; Emily. Stephan

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of trees in Douglas County, Kansas, reveals that this area has about 14,164,000 trees with tree and shrub canopy that covers 25.2 percent of the county. The most common tree species are American elm, northern hackberry, eastern redcedar, Osage-orange, and honeylocust. Trees in Douglas County currently store about 1.7 million tons of carbon (6.4 million tons...

  19. Dissolution of Kansas evaporites: the radioactive waste disposal problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive waste repository at Lyons, Kansas, focused attention on the problem of evaporite dissolution. More study is needed in the determination of the mechanisms responsible for deterioration. Also, recent water-use policies have been questioned with the need pointed out for increased effectiveness in planning. Good water planning has to take into account the role of evaporite dissolution in water quality. 23 references

  20. Bendix Kansas City Division technological spinoff through 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, H.T.

    1979-02-01

    The results of work of Bendix Kansas City Division are made available in the form of technical reports that are processed through the DOE Technical Information Center in Oak Ridge. The present report lists the documents released by the Division, along with author and subject indexes. Drawing sets released are also listed. Locations of report collections in the U.S., other countries, and international agencies are provided

  1. Sample Archaeological Survey of Public Use Areas, Milford Lake, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    especially ceramics); Middle "" Mississippian, Middle Woodland and Central Plains archaeology ; the engineering and building technology of the Maya ...Sample Archaeological Survey of Public Use Areas -- 0C 0 awo (L" . .614 4.- -. 1?CNOV 1 40484 * , "n. O ji - 0" By Laura S. Schwiekhard Thn ’.iint haUs...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Milford Lake, Kansas Sample Archaeological Survey of Public Use

  2. Coalbed methane production base established in Southeast Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckinger, W.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that revenue from coalbed methane gas sales is growing and currently far exceeds that of what little conventional gas is produced in southeastern Kansas. And this only 2-1/2 years after Stroud Oil Properties, Wichita, brought in the first coalbed methane well in the Sycamore Valley in Montgomery County 6 miles north of Independence. Another operator contributing to the success is Conquest Oil, Greeley, Colo. Conquest acquired a lease with 20 old wells near Sycamore, recompleted five of them in Weir coal, and has installed a compressor. It hopes to being selling a combined 300 Mcfd soon. Great Eastern Energy, Denver, reportedly can move 2 MMcfd from its Sycamore Valley holdings. The fever is spreading into Northeast Kansas, where a venture headed by Duncan Energy Co. and Farleigh Oil Properties, also of Denver, plan 12 coalbed methane wildcats. The two companies received in October 1991 from the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) a 40 acre well spacing for seven counties and an exclusion from burdensome gas testing procedures. The test procedures are on the books but not applicable to coal gas wells

  3. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance data listing release for the Three Forks Basin, Spanish Peaks, and Boulder River areas for the Bozeman NTMS quadrangle, Montana, including concentrations of forty-six additional elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolivar, S.L.; George, W.E.; Gallimore, D.L.; Apel, C.T.; Gansel, J.M.; Hensley, W.K.; Van Haaften, I.J.; Pirtle, J.

    1980-08-01

    Totals of 531 water and 1275 sediment samples were collected from 1275 stream and spring locations. Elemental concentration, field measurement, weather, geologic, and geographic data for each sample location are listed for waters and for sediments. Uranium/thorium ratios for sediment samples are also included. Water samples were initially analyzed for uranium by fluorometry. All water samples containing more than 40 ppB uranium were reanalyzed by delayed-neutron counting (DNC). All sediments were analyzed for uranium by DNC. Other elemental concentrations in sediments were determined by neutron activation analysis for 31 elements (Al, Sb, Ba, Ca, Ce, Cs, Cl, Cr, Co, Dy, Eu, Au, Hf, Fe, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, K, Rb, Sn, Sc, Na, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, Ti, V, Yb, and Zn), by x-ray fluorescence for 13 elements (As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni, Nb, Se, Ag, Sn, W, and Zr), and by arc-source emission spectrography for Li and Be. Analytical results for sediments are reported as parts per million

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Factors Related to Customer Satisfaction with MoDOT in the Kansas City Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A mailed survey was sent to approximately twenty thousand citizens from District Four (Kansas City Area) residents in order to gather statistical evidence for : supporting or eliminating reasons for the satisfaction discrepancy between Kansas City Ar...

  5. Hemoglobin Kansas found by electrophoretic diagnosis in Brazil Hemoglobina Kansas diagnosticada através de eletroforese no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R. Bonini-Domingos

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hemoglobin variants with abnormal oxygen affinity have been reported so far from various regions of the world. They can be classified by their oxygen affinity and 15 variants with low oxygen affinity have been reported. A number of hemoglobin mutants which show an abnormal affinity for oxygen have been reported, but only few cases of hemoglobin Kansas. All cases reported so far are from Japan or in Japanese families. In this paper we describe a Brazilian patient with cyanosis and hemoglobin Kansas diagnosed by an electrophoretical procedure.Hemoglobinas variantes com afinidade anormal ao oxigênio têm sido encontradas em várias partes do mundo. Pela sua afinidade ao oxigênio, estas hemoglobinas variantes têm sido classificadas e 15 variantes com baixa afinidade relatadas. Numerosas hemoglobinas mutantes com afinidade anormal têm também sido relatadas, mas somente poucos casos de Hemoglobina Kansas. Os casos são de pacientes procedentes do Japão, ou de famílias com descendentes japoneses. Neste relato descrevemos um paciente com manifestações de cianose que teve o seu diagnóstico confirmado através da eletroforese.

  6. En Garde: Fencing at Kansas City's Central Computers Unlimited/Classical Greek Magnet High School, 1991-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poos, Bradley W.

    2015-01-01

    Central High School in Kansas City, Missouri is one of the oldest schools west of the Mississippi and the first public high school built in Kansas City. Kansas City's magnet plan resulted in Central High School being rebuilt as the Central Computers Unlimited/Classical Greek Magnet High School, a school that was designed to offer students an…

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wells Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proffitt, J.L.; Mayerson, D.L.; Parker, D.P.; Wolverson, N.; Antrim, D.; Berg, J.; Witzel, F.

    1982-08-01

    The Wells 2 0 Quadrangle, Nevada, Idaho, and Utah, was evaluated using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria to delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Our investigation has resulted in the delineation of areas that contain Tertiary sedimentary rocks favorable for hydroallogenic deposits in the Mountain City area (Favorable Area A) and in the Oxley Peak area north of Wells (Favorable Area B). Environments considered to be unfavorable for uranium deposits include Tertiary felsic volcanic, felsic plutonic, intermediate to mafic volcanic, Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, Precambrian rocks, and most Tertiary sedimentary rocks located outside the favorable areas. Present-day basins are unevaluated environments because of a paucity of adequate outcrop and subsurface data. However, the scarce data indicate that some characteristics favorable for uranium deposits are present in the Susie Creek-Tule Valley-Wild Horse basin, the Contact-Granite Range-Tijuana John stocks area, the Charleston Reservoir area, and the Wells-Marys River basin

  8. National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damp, J.N.; Jennings, M.D.

    1982-04-01

    The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated

  9. National uranium resource evaluation, Rapid City Quadrangle, South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanna, R.F.; Milton, E.J.

    1982-04-01

    The Rapid City (1 0 x 2 0 ) Quadrangle, South Dakota, was evaluated for environments favorble for uranium deposits to a depth of 1500 m. Criteria used were those of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. Field reconnaissance involved the use of hand-held scintillometers to investigate uranium occurrences reported in the literature and anomalies in aerial radiometric surveys, and geochemical samples of stream sediments and well waters. Gamma-ray logs were used to define the favorable environments in the subsurface. Environments favorable for sandstone-type uranium deposits occur in the Inyan Kara Group, the Fox Hills Sandstone, and the Hell Creek Formation. Environments considered unfavorable for uranium deposits include all Precambrian, Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary rocks other than those identified as favorable

  10. Surficial and applied surficial geology of the Belchertown Quadrangle, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caggiano, Joseph A.

    1977-01-01

    Till and stratified drift overlie maturely dissected topography in the Belchertown quadrangle, an area that straddles the New England Upland and Connecticut Valley Lowland in central Massachusetts. Lower Paleozoic, massive quartzo-feldspathic gneiss, quartzite and schist of the Pelham dome and Devonian granodiorite and quartz diorite of the Belchertown intrusive complex are in contact with Triassic arkosic fanglomerate and basalt along a lengthy normal fault separating the New England Upland from the Connecticut Valley Lowland. The orientation of striae, roches moutonnees, and streamline ridges indicate that the last Wisconsinian glacier advanced generally south 12? east. This glacier removed several meters of rock from the upland and an unknown larger quantity from the preglacial valley of the Connecticut River. Till is thin in the uplands, but several tens of feet of drift overlie bedrock in the lowland. Three lithic facies of sandy, clast-rich, non-compact, subarkosic till derived from the three major source rocks rest on bedrock or on highly weathered, compact, clast-poor, fissile probably older till. The mean for all upper till is 69.6% sand, 21.7% silt, and 8.8% clay; lower till consists of 48% sand, 23% silt and 29% clay. Mud-rich, compact, sparsely stony till in drumlins in and along the flank of the Connecticut Valley Lowland is composed of 51.5% sand, 28% silt, and 20.5% clay. Upper tills are facies equivalent deposits of the youngest Wisconsinian drift. Lower till is compact deeply weathered, jointed and stained suggesting it is correlative with other lower till in New England deposited by an earlier Wisconsinian glacier. Drumlin till may be a facies equivalent of a lower till or a mud-rich upper till derived from earlier glaciolacustrine deposits. Upper and lower till of the Belchertown quadrangle is texturally similar to other New England upper and lower tills to which they are equivalent. Both tills are interpreted as lodgment till derived from

  11. National uranium resource evaluation, Dickinson quadrangle, North Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.H.; Pack, D.D.; Galipeau, J.M.; Lawton, D.E.

    1982-05-01

    The Dickinson Quadrangle, North Dakota, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. Criteria used in the evaluation were developed for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. The evaluation primarily consisted of a surface study, subsurface investigation, and an in-house ground-water geochemical study. These studies were augumented by aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment studies. The evaluation results indicate that the Sentinel Butte and Tongue River Members of the Fort Union Formation have environments favorable for uraniferous lignite deposits. The Sentinel Butte, Tongue River, and Ludlow Members of the Fort Union Formation are favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Environments unfavorable for uranium deposits are the remaining Cenozoic rocks and all the rocks of the Cretaceous

  12. National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damp, J N; Jennings, M D

    1982-04-01

    The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated.

  13. Reconnaissance geologic map of the Hyampom 15' quadrangle, Trinity County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.

    2010-01-01

    The Hyampom 15' quadrangle lies west of the Hayfork 15' quadrangle in the southern part of the Klamath Mountains geologic province of northern California. It spans parts of four generally northwest-trending tectono- stratigraphic terranes of the Klamath Mountains, the Eastern Hayfork, Western Hayfork, Rattlesnake Creek, and Western Jurassic terranes, as well as, in the southwest corner of the quadrangle, a small part of the Pickett Peak terrane of the Coast Range province. Remnants of the Cretaceous Great Valley overlap sequence that once covered much of the pre-Cretaceous bedrock of the quadrangle are now found only as a few small patches in the northeast corner of the quadrangle. Fluvial and lacustrine deposits of the mid-Tertiary Weaverville Formation crop out in the vicinity of the village of Hyampom. The Eastern Hayfork terrane is a broken formation and m-lange of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that include blocks of chert and limestone. The chert has not been sampled; however, chert from the same terrane in the Hayfork quadrangle contains radiolarians of Permian and Triassic ages, but none clearly of Jurassic age. Limestone at two localities contains late Paleozoic foraminifers. Some of the limestone from the Eastern Klamath terrane in the Hayfork quadrangle contains faunas of Tethyan affinity. The Western Hayfork terrane is part of an andesitic volcanic arc that was accreted to the western edge of the Eastern Hayfork terrane. It consists mainly of metavolcaniclastic andesitic agglomerate and tuff, as well as argillite and chert, and it includes the dioritic Ironside Mountain batholith that intruded during Middle Jurassic time (about 170 Ma). This intrusive body provides the principal constraint on the age of the terrane. The Rattlesnake Creek terrane is a melange consisting mostly of highly dismembered ophiolite. It includes slabs of serpentinized ultramafic rock, basaltic volcanic rocks, radiolarian chert of Triassic and Jurassic ages, limestone containing

  14. 78 FR 70934 - Trespassing on DOE Property: Kansas City Plant Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... than $5,000.' By operation of law, the Criminal Fine Improvements Act of 1987, Public Law 100-185, 101 Stat. 1279 (1987), increased the fine amounts from $1000/$5000 to $5000/$100,000. See, e.g., U.S. v..., Director, Security & Information Technology Systems, NNSA Kansas City Plant, 14520 Botts Road, Kansas City...

  15. Building and Running a Collaborative Internet Filter Is Akin to a Kansas Barn Raising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The Northeast Kansas Library System's filtering project started out as a response to the passage of CIPA, the Children's Internet Protection Act, in January 2001. Originally called "onGuard," it was a service that the Northeast Kansas Library System created for its members. When the Supreme Court ruling did uphold the constitutionality…

  16. Pick-N-Pull Auto Dismantlers, Kansas City, LLC Inc. - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Pick-N-Pull Auto Dismantlers, Kansas City, LLC, a subsidiary of Schnitzer Steel Industries, Inc., for alleged violations at its facilities at 8012 East Truman Rd., Kansas C

  17. 78 FR 13662 - Kansas Gas Service, a Division of ONEOK, Inc.; Notice of Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR13-18-001] Kansas Gas Service, a Division of ONEOK, Inc.; Notice of Petition Take notice that on February 6, 2013, Kansas Gas... fully detailed in the petition. Any person desiring to participate in this rate filing must file in...

  18. 77 FR 21760 - Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR12-19-000] Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Baseline Filing Take notice that on March 30, 2012, Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division (Atmos) submitted a baseline filing of their Statement of Operating Conditions for...

  19. 77 FR 23244 - Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-18

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR12-22-000] Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division; Notice of Revised Baseline Filing Take notice that on April 10, 2012, Atmos Energy Colorado/Kansas Division (Atmos) filed a revised baseline filing of their Statement of Operating...

  20. Dr. North and the Kansas City Newspaper War: Public Health Advocacy Collides with Main Street Respectability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovarik, Bill

    A case study examined a 1920 controversy between two newspapers. One of the last vestiges of the era of "yellow journalism" was the editorial "war" between the Kansas City "Star" and the Kansas City "Post" which culminated in a 1921 showdown. The "Star," a champion of main street interests and…

  1. Characteristics of Child Abuse Homicides in the State of Kansas from 1994 to 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajese, Tanyaradzwa M.; Nguyen, Linh T.; Pham, Giao Q.; Pham, Van K.; Melhorn, Katherine; Kallail, K. James

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study described the epidemiology of child abuse homicides in the state of Kansas from 1994 to 2007. It focused on obtaining significant details on all recorded child abuse homicides in Kansas during this time frame to provide critical information that can be used for future preventive measures. Methods: A retrospective case review…

  2. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albuquerque Quadrangle, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.W.

    1982-09-01

    Areas and formations within the Albuquerque 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, New Mexico designated as favorable, in order of decreasing relative favorability, include: (1) the Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation; (2) the Todilto Limestone of Late Jurassic age; (3) the Dakota Sandstone of Early and Late Cretaceous age; (4) the Ojo Alamo Sandstone of Tertiary age on the eastern side of the San Juan Basin; (5) the Galisteo Formation of Tertiary age within the Hagan Basin, in the eastern part of the Albuquerque Quadrangle; and (6) the Menefee Formation of Late Cretaceous age in the eastern part of the San Juan Basin. Favorability of the Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin is based on the presence of favorable facies and sandstone-to-shale ratios, the presence of large masses of detrital and humic organic matter in sandstone host rocks, low to moderate dip of host beds, high radioactivity of outcropping rocks, numerous uranium occurrences, and the presence of large subsurface uranium deposits. The Todilto Limestone is considered favorable because of the presence of numerous medium to small uranium deposits in association with intraformational folds and with detrital and humic organic matter. The Dakota Sandstone is considered favorable only in areas within the Grants mineral belt where Tertiary faulting has allowed movement of uranium-bearing groundwater from the underlying Morrison Formation into organic-rich sandstone in the basal part of the Dakota. The Menefee Formation is locally favorable in the area of La Ventana Mesa where the control for known uranium deposits is both structural and stratigraphic. The Ojo Alamo Sandstone and the Galisteo Formations are considered favorable because of favorable facies, the presence of organic matter and pyrite; and low- to medium-grade mineral occurrences

  3. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Moab Quadrangle, Colorado and Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.A.; Franczyk, K.J.; Lupe, R.D.; Peterson, F.

    1982-09-01

    Portions of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison, the Chinle, the Rico, the Cutler, and the Entrada Formations are favorable for uranium deposits that meet the minimum size and grade requirements of the US Department of Energy within the Moab 1' x 2' Quadrangle, Utah and Colorado. Nine areas are judged favorable for the Late Jurassic Salt Wash Member. The criteria used to evaluate these areas as favorable include the presence of (1) fluvial sandstone beds deposited by low-energy streams; (2) actively moving major and minor structures such as the Paradox basin and the many folds within it; (3) paleostream transport directions approximately perpendicular to the trend of many of the paleofolds; (4) presence of favorable gray lacustrine mudstone beds; and (5) known uranium occurrences associated with the favorable gray mudstones. Three favorable areas have been outlined for the Late Triassic Chinle Formation. The criteria used to evaluate these areas are the sandstone-to-shale ratios for the Chinle Formation and the distribution of the Petrified Forest Member of the Chinle, which is considered the source for the uranium. Two favorable areas have been delineated for the Permian Cutler Formation, and one for the Permian Rico Formation. The criteria used to outline favorable areas are the distribution of favorable facies within each formation. Favorable facies are those that are a result of deposition in environments that are transitional between fluvial and marine. One favorable area is outlined in the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle in the Placerville district. Boundaries for this area were established by geologic mapping

  4. Map Showing Geologic Terranes of the Hailey 1°x2° Quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1°x2° Quadrangle, south-central Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The paper version of Map Showing Geologic Terranes of the Hailey 1°x2° Quadrangle and the western part of the Idaho Falls 1°x2° Quadrangle, south-central Idaho was...

  5. Geologic map of the Fraser 7.5-minute quadrangle, Grand County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroba, Ralph R.; Bryant, Bruce; Kellogg, Karl S.; Theobald, Paul K.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2010-01-01

    The geologic map of the Fraser quadrangle, Grand County, Colo., portrays the geology along the western boundary of the Front Range and the eastern part of the Fraser basin near the towns of Fraser and Winter Park. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle include gneiss, schist, and plutonic rocks of Paleoproterozoic age that are intruded by younger plutonic rocks of Mesoproterozoic age. These basement rocks are exposed along the southern, eastern, and northern margins of the quadrangle. Fluvial claystone, mudstone, and sandstone of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, and fluvial sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone of the Lower Cretaceous Dakota Group, overlie Proterozoic rocks in a small area near the southwest corner of the quadrangle. Oligocene rhyolite tuff is preserved in deep paleovalleys cut into Proterozoic rocks near the southeast corner of the quadrangle. Generally, weakly consolidated siltstone and minor unconsolidated sediments of the upper Oligocene to upper Miocene Troublesome Formation are preserved in the post-Laramide Fraser basin. Massive bedding and abundant silt suggest that loess or loess-rich alluvium is a major component of the siltstone in the Troublesome Formation. A small unnamed fault about one kilometer northeast of the town of Winter Park has the youngest known displacement in the quadrangle, displacing beds of the Troublesome Formation. Surficial deposits of Pleistocene and Holocene age are widespread in the Fraser quadrangle, particularly in major valleys and on slopes underlain by the Troublesome Formation. Deposits include glacial outwash and alluvium of non-glacial origin; mass-movement deposits transported by creep, debris flow, landsliding, and rockfall; pediment deposits; tills deposited during the Pinedale and Bull Lake glaciations; and sparse diamictons that may be pre-Bull Lake till or debris-flow deposits. Some of the oldest surficial deposits may be as old as Pliocene.

  6. Geologic map of the Montauk quadrangle, Dent, Texas, and Shannon Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, David J.

    2015-04-30

    The Montauk 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in south-central Missouri within the Salem Plateau region of the Ozark Plateaus physiographic province. About 2,000 feet (ft) of flat-lying to gently dipping lower Paleozoic sedimentary rocks, mostly dolomite, chert, sandstone, and orthoquartzite, overlie Mesoproterozoic igneous basement rocks. Unconsolidated residuum, colluvium, terrace deposits, and alluvium overlie the sedimentary rocks. Numerous karst features, such as caves, springs, and sinkholes, have formed in the carbonate rocks. Many streams are spring fed. The topography is a dissected karst plain with elevations ranging from approximately 830 ft where the Current River exits the middle-eastern edge of the quadrangle to about 1,320 ft in sec. 16, T. 31 N., R. 7 W., in the southwestern part of the quadrangle. The most prominent physiographic features within the quadrangle are the deeply incised valleys of the Current River and its major tributaries located in the center of the map area. The Montauk quadrangle is named for Montauk Springs, a cluster of several springs that resurge in sec. 22, T. 32 N., R. 7 W. These springs supply clean, cold water for the Montauk Fish Hatchery, and the addition of their flow to that of Pigeon Creek produces the headwaters of the Current River, the centerpiece of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways park. Most of the land in the quadrangle is privately owned and used primarily for grazing cattle and horses and growing timber. A smaller portion of the land within the quadrangle is publicly owned by either Montauk State Park or the Ozark National Scenic Riverways (National Park Service). Geologic mapping for this investigation was conducted in 2007 and 2009.

  7. NURE aerial gamma ray and magnetic reconnaissance survey, Thorpe area, Scranton NK18-8 Quadrangle. Volume I. Narrative report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    A rotary wing combined airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray and magnetic survey of four 1:250,000 quadrangles covering portions of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York was made. The results are given for the Scranton NK18-8 quadrangle

  8. Effects of Regulation on Induced Seismicity in Southern Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, J. L.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Dougherty, S. L.

    2016-12-01

    The appearance of seismicity concurrent with the expansion of oil and gas activities in southern Kansas since September 2012 suggests that industrial operations are inducing earthquakes there. Much of the seismicity can be related to high-rate injection wells within 5 km of the earthquakes. There is significant complexity to the situation, though. Some of the seismicity, including the 2014 M4.8 Milan earthquake, the largest earthquake to occur in the area, lies at least 10km from high-rate injection wells. Additionally, the presence of high-rate wells does not guarantee that there will be nearby seismicity. Many of the highest-rate injection wells are located to the southwest of our study area, where there is minimal seismicity. We have also seen changes in earthquake rates shortly following the March 2015 enactment of new limits on the rate of wastewater disposal in five areas in southern Kansas. Overall, the earthquake rate has decreased significantly since these rules went into place. In more detail, however, earthquake rates within the five areas decreased, but the rate outside the five zones increased. It is likely that fluid-pressure diffusion is responsible for the migration of seismicity outside the areas of reduced injection because there is little injection in the areas unaffected by the new injection rules. This increase is also a reminder that seismicity can persist long after the reduction or cessation of injection. In addition to the effect of the new injection rules, it is possible that the reduction in injection may be partially caused by economic factors that have resulted in a decrease in the production of oil and gas. We have yet to disentangle the effects of the new injection rules and the low prices of oil and gas on the induced seismicity in southern Kansas.

  9. Reconnaissance geologic map of the Dubakella Mountain 15 quadrangle, Trinity, Shasta, and Tehama Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, William P.; Yule, J. Douglas; Court, Bradford L.; Snoke, Arthur W.; Stern, Laura A.; Copeland, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The Dubakella Mountain 15' quadrangle is located just south of the Hayfork quadrangle and just east of the Pickett Peak quadrangle. It spans a sequence of four northwest-trending tectonostratigraphic terranes of the Klamath Mountains geologic province that includes, from east to west, the Eastern Hayfork, Western Hayfork, Rattlesnake Creek, and Western Jurassic terranes, as well as, in the southwest corner of the quadrangle, part of a fifth terrane, the Pickett Peak terrane of the Coast Ranges geologic province. The Eastern Hayfork terrane is a broken formation and melange of volcanic and sedimentary rocks that include blocks of limestone and chert. The limestone contains late Permian microfossils of Tethyan faunal affinity. The chert contains radiolarians of Mesozoic age, mostly Triassic, but none clearly Jurassic. The Western Hayfork terrane is an andesitic volcanic arc that consists mainly of agglomerate, tuff, argillite, and chert, and includes the Wildwood pluton. That pluton is related to the Middle Jurassic (about 170 Ma) Ironside Mountain batholith that is widely exposed farther north beyond the Dubakella Mountain quadrangle. The Rattlesnake Creek terrane is a highly disrupted ophiolitic melange of probable Late Triassic or Early Jurassic age. Although mainly ophiolitic, the melange includes blocks of plutonic rocks (about 200 Ma) of uncertain genetic relation. Some scattered areas of well-bedded mildly slaty detrital rocks of the melange appear similar to Galice Formation (unit Jg) and may be inliers of the nearby Western Jurassic terrane. The Western Jurassic terrane consists mainly of slaty to phyllitic argillite, graywacke, and stretched-pebble conglomerate and is correlative with the Late Jurassic Galice Formation of southwestern Oregon. The Pickett Peak terrane, the most westerly of the succession of terranes of the Dubakella Mountain quadrangle, is mostly fine-grained schist that includes the blueschist facies mineral lawsonite and is of Early

  10. Annual Report of Monitoring at Morrill, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Morrill, Kansas, was initially identified in 1985 during statewide testing of public water supply wells for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). High levels of nitrate were also present in the public water supply wells. The city of Morrill is located in Brown County in the northeastern corner of the state, about 7 mi east of Sabetha (Figure 1.1). The population of Morrill as of the 2010 Census was approximately 230 (down from 277 in 2000). All residents of Morrill now obtain their drinking water from the Sabetha municipal water system via a pipeline constructed in 1991. This document reports the findings concerning the groundwater in Morrill.

  11. Geologic map of the Leadville North 7.5’ quadrangle, Eagle and Lake Counties, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruleman, Chester A.; Brandt, Theodore R.; Caffee, Marc W.; Goehring, Brent M.

    2018-04-24

    The Leadville North 7.5’ quadrangle lies at the northern end of the Upper Arkansas Valley, where the Continental Divide at Tennessee Pass creates a low drainage divide between the Colorado and Arkansas River watersheds. In the eastern half of the quadrangle, the Paleozoic sedimentary section dips generally 20–30 degrees east. At Tennessee Pass and Missouri Hill, the core of the Sawatch anticlinorium is mapped as displaying a tight hanging-wall syncline and foot-wall anticline within the basement-cored structure. High-angle, west-dipping, Neogene normal faults cut the eastern margin of the broad, Sawatch anticlinorium. Minor displacements along high-angle, east- and west-dipping Laramide reverse faults occurred in the core of the north-plunging anticlinorium along the western and eastern flanks of Missouri Hill. Within the western half of the quadrangle, Meso- and Paleoproterozoic metamorphic and igneous rocks are uplifted along the generally east-dipping, high-angle Sawatch fault system and are overlain by at least three generations of glacial deposits in the western part of the quadrangle. 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic nuclide ages of the youngest glacial deposits indicate a last glacial maximum age of about 21–22 kilo-annum and complete deglaciation by about 14 kilo-annum, supported by chronologic studies in adjacent drainages. No late Pleistocene tectonic activity is apparent within the quadrangle.

  12. Streamflow characteristics and trends along Soldier Creek, Northeast Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juracek, Kyle E.

    2017-08-16

    Historical data for six selected U.S. Geological Survey streamgages along Soldier Creek in northeast Kansas were used in an assessment of streamflow characteristics and trends. This information is required by the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation for the effective management of tribal water resources, including drought contingency planning. Streamflow data for the period of record at each streamgage were used to assess annual mean streamflow, annual mean base flow, mean monthly flow, annual peak flow, and annual minimum flow.Annual mean streamflows along Soldier Creek were characterized by substantial year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trends. On average, annual mean base flow accounted for about 20 percent of annual mean streamflow. Mean monthly flows followed a general seasonal pattern that included peak values in spring and low values in winter. Annual peak flows, which were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability, were most likely to occur in May and June and least likely to occur during November through February. With the exception of a weak yet statistically significant increasing trend at the Soldier Creek near Topeka, Kansas, streamgage, there were no pronounced long-term trends in annual peak flows. Annual 1-day, 30-day, and 90-day mean minimum flows were characterized by considerable year-to-year variability with no pronounced long-term trend. During an extreme drought, as was the case in the mid-1950s, there may be zero flow in Soldier Creek continuously for a period of one to several months.

  13. Distribution and Sources of Nitrate-Nitrogen in Kansas Groundwater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Kansas is primarily an agricultural state. Irrigation water and fertilizer use data show long- term increasing trends. Similarly, nitrate-N concentrations in groundwater show long-term increases and exceed the drinking-water standard of 10 mg/l in many areas. A statistical analysis of nitrate-N data collected for local and regional studies in Kansas from 1990 to 1998 (747 samples found significant relationships between nitrate-N concentration with depth, age, and geographic location of wells. Sources of nitrate-N have been identified for 297 water samples by using nitrogen stable isotopes. Of these samples, 48% showed fertilizer sources (+2 to +8 and 34% showed either animal waste sources (+10 to +15 with nitrate-N greater than 10 mg/l or indication that enrichment processes had occurred (+10 or above with variable nitrate-N or both. Ultimate sources for nitrate include nonpoint sources associated with past farming and fertilization practices, and point sources such as animal feed lots, septic systems, and commercial fertilizer storage units. Detection of nitrate from various sources in aquifers of different depths in geographically varied areas of the state indicates that nonpoint and point sources currently impact and will continue to impact groundwater under current land uses.

  14. Annual Report of Monitoring at Barnes, Kansas, in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Barnes, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 150) located in Washington County, in north-central Kansas (Figure 1.1). Barnes is located in Section 9, Township 4 South, Range 5 East, at approximate latitude 39°43'0'' north and longitude 96°52'25'' west (USGS 1968). The city lies in a transition zone between the Flint Hills and the glaciated region. The area’s topography consists of gently sloping hills of Pleistocene loess (< 20 ft) overlying a shale unit and interbedded shale, limestone, and siltstone of the Permian Chase Group. Groundwater for the public water supply is obtained from wells PWS2 and PWS3 at reported depths of 155 ft and 160 ft, respectively, located in the northwestern portion of the city. The water is produced from the bedrock aquifer of the Chase Group. Section 2 summarizes the hydrogeologic conceptual site model. This report summarizes findings for groundwater inspection in Barnes.

  15. Indoor smoking ordinances in workplaces and public places in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberger, John S; Davis, Ken; Nazir, Niaman; Dunton, Nancy; Winn, Kimberly; Jacquot, Sandy; Moler, Don

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the preferences of elected city officials regarding the need for a statewide clean indoor air law and to analyze the content of local smoking ordinances. A survey of elected officials in 57 larger Kansas cities obtained information on the perceived need for statewide legislation, venues to be covered, and motivating factors. Clean indoor air ordinances from all Kansas cities were analyzed by venue. The survey response rate was 190 out of 377 (50.4%) for elected officials. Over 70% of the respondents favored or strongly favored greater restrictions on indoor smoking. Sixty percent favored statewide legislation. Among these, over 80% favored restrictions in health care facilities, theaters, indoor sports arenas (including bowling alleys), restaurants, shopping malls, lobbies, enclosed spaces in outdoor arenas, and hotel/motel rooms. Officials who had never smoked favored a more restrictive approach. Employee and public health concerns were cited as influential by 76%-79% of respondents. Thirty-eight ordinances, covering over half of the state's population, were examined. They varied considerably in their exemptions. Official's attitudes toward smoking regulations were associated with their smoking status. The examination of existing ordinances revealed a piecemeal approach to smoking regulations.

  16. Geologic map of the Frisco quadrangle, Summit County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Karl S.; Bartos, Paul J.; Williams, Cindy L.

    2002-01-01

    New 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping along the Interstate-70 urban corridor in western Colorado, in support of the USGS Central Region State/USGS Cooperative Geologic Mapping Project, is contributing to a more complete understanding of the stratigraphy, structure, tectonic evolution, and hazard potential of this rapidly developing region. The 1:24,000-scale Frisco quadrangle is near the headwaters of the Blue River and straddles features of the Blue River graben (Kellogg, K.S., 1999, Neogene basins of the northern Rio Grande rift?partitioning and asymmetry inherited from Laramide and older uplifts: Tectonophysics, v. 305, p. 141-152.), part of the northernmost reaches of the Rio Grande rift, a major late Oligocene to recent zone of extension that extends from Colorado to Mexico. The Williams Range thrust fault, the western structural margin of the Colorado Front Range, cuts the northeastern corner of the quadrangle. The oldest rocks in the quadrangle underlie the Tenmile Range and include biotite-sillimanite schist and gneiss, amphibolite, and migmatite that are intruded by granite inferred to be part of the 1,667-1,750 Ma Routt Plutonic Suite (Tweto, Ogden, 1987, Rock units of the Precambrian- basement in Colorado: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1321-A, 54 p.). The oldest sedimentary unit is the Pennsylvanian Maroon Formation, a sequence of red sandstone, conglomerate, and interbedded shale. The thickest sequence of sedimentary rocks is Cretaceous in age and includes at least 500 m of the Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale. The sedimentary rocks are intruded by sills and dikes of dacite porphyry sills of Swan Mountain, dated at 44 Ma (Marvin, R.F., Mehnert, H.H., Naeser, C.W., and Zartman, R.E., 1989, U.S. Geological Survey radiometric ages, compilation ?C??Part five?Colorado, Montana, Utah, and Wyoming: Isochron/West, no. 53, p. 14-19. Simmons, E.C., and Hedge, C.E., 1978, Minor-element and Sr-isotope geochemistry of Tertiary stocks, Colorado mineral belt

  17. Geologic map of the Hasty Quadrangle, Boone and Newton Counties, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Mark R.; Murray, Kyle E.

    2004-01-01

    This digital geologic map compilation presents new polygon (for example, geologic map unit contacts), line (for example, fault, fold axis, and structure contour), and point (for example, structural attitude, contact elevations) vector data for the Hasty 7.5-minute quadrangle in northern Arkansas. The map database, which is at 1:24,000-scale resolution, provides geologic coverage of an area of current hydrogeologic, tectonic, and stratigraphic interest. The Hasty quadrangle is located in northern Newton and southern Boone Counties about 20 km south of the town of Harrison. The map area is underlain by sedimentary rocks of Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian age that were mildly deformed by a series of normal and strike-slip faults and folds. The area is representative of the stratigraphic and structural setting of the southern Ozark Dome. The Hasty quadrangle map provides new geologic information for better understanding groundwater flow paths in and adjacent to the Buffalo River watershed.

  18. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Tarpon Springs and Orlando quadrangles, Florida. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    The Tarpon Springs and Orlando quadrangles cover 7850 square miles of central peninsular Florida. Cretaceous and younger platform deposits overlie a complex core of Precambrian, Paleozoic and early Mesozoic crystalline rocks and sediments. Tertiary and Quaternary platform deposits and alluvium cover the surface. Extensive mining for phosphates is taking place in certain areas of the two quadrangles. No known uranium deposits are present within the quadrangles, but the phosphates are known to contain higher than normal amounts of uranium. Statistical analysis resulted in the selection of 47 anomalies. All appear to be related to culture, but some that are associated with the phosphate region have extremely high apparent uranium values. Detailed resource study should concentrate on the phosphates and on the possibility of uranium recovery as a by-product of phosphate mining

  19. Geologic map of the Hiller Mountain Quadrangle, Clark County, Nevada, and Mohave County, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Keith A.; Hook, Simon; Phelps, Geoffrey A.; Block, Debra L.

    2003-01-01

    Map Scale: 1:24,000 Map Type: colored geologic map The Hiller Mountains Quadrangle straddles Virgin Canyon in the eastern part of Lake Mead. Proterozoic gneisses and granitoid rocks underlie much of the quadrangle. They are overlain by upper Miocene basin-filling deposits of arkosic conglomerate, basalt, and the overlying Hualapai Limestone. Inception of the Colorado River followed deposition of the Hualapai Limestone and caused incision of the older rocks. Fluvial gravel deposits indicate various courses of the early river across passes through highlands of the Gold Butte-Hiller Mountains-White Hills structural block. Faults and tilted rocks in the quadrangle record tectonic extension that climaxed in middle Miocene time.

  20. Data release on the Salton Sea Quadrangle, California and Arizona. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, R.T. III; Antrim, D.R.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) was to delineate and evaluate all geologic environments favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits. A favorable environment was defined as having the potential to contain an occurrence of at least 100 tons of U 3 O 8 at an average grade of not less than 0.01% U 3 O 8 . In the Salton Sea Quadrangle, reported uranium occurrences were evaluated, and geologic environments thought to be favorable were examined. This report includes the field data collected during that work and a summary of the quadrangle geology and uranium favorability. This is the final report to be prepared on this quadrangle under the NURE program

  1. Structural nature of the Humboldt fault zone in northeastern Nemaha County, Kansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stander, T.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey has conducted a major re-evaluation of the geology and seismicity of Kansas in connection with design criteria for dams, nuclear-power plants, and other earthquake-sensitive structures. Northeast Kansas was chosen as a study area because of the concentration of seismic activity and the stratigraphic evidence for the maximum amount of vertical displacement of the humboldt fault. This study determines the nature of the deformation on the Humboldt fault and resolves its lateral position and total vertical throw in the near-surface

  2. Leveraging community-academic partnerships to improve healthy food access in an urban, Kansas City, Kansas, community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabachi, Natabhona M; Kimminau, Kim S

    2012-01-01

    Americans can combat overweight (OW) and obesity by eating unprocessed, fresh foods. However, all Americans do not have equal access to these recommended foods. Low-income, minority, urban neighborhoods in particular often have limited access to healthy resources, although they are vulnerable to higher levels of OW and obesity. This project used community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles to investigate the food needs of residents and develop a business plan to improve access to healthy food options in an urban, Kansas City, Kansas, neighborhood. Partner community organizations were mobilized to conduct a Community Food Assessment survey. The surveys were accompanied by flyers that were part of the communication engagement strategy. Statistical analysis of the surveys was conducted. We engaged low-income, minority population (40% Latino, 30% African American) urban communities at the household level. Survey results provided in-depth information about residents' food needs and thoughts on how to improve food access. Results were reported to community members at a town hall style meeting. Developing a strategic plan to engage a community and develop trust is crucial to sustaining a partnership particularly when working with underserved communities. This project demonstrates that, if well managed, the benefits of academic and community partnerships outweigh the challenges thus such relationships should be encouraged and supported by communities, academic institutions, local and national government, and funders. A CBPR approach to understanding an urban community's food needs and opinions is important for comprehensive food access planning.

  3. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mississippi and Florida airborne survey, Russellville quadrangle, Arkansas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The Russellville quadrangle in north central Arkansas overlies thick Paleozoic sediments of the Arkoma Basin. These Paleozoics dominate surface exposure except where covered by Quaternary alluvial materials. Examination of available literature shows no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. Eighty-eight groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed briefly. None were considered significant, and most appeared to be of cultural origin. Magnetic data show character that suggest structural and/or lithologic complexity, but imply relatively deep-seated sources

  4. Geologic map of the Stephens City quadrangle, Clark, Frederick, and Warren Counties, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weary, D.J.; Orndorff, R.C.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W.

    2006-01-01

    The Stephens City 1:24,000-scale quadrangle is one of several quadrangles in Frederick County, Virginia being mapped by geologists from the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, VA with funding from the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program. This work is part of a project being lead by the U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Discipline, Virginia District, to investigate the geologic framework and groundwater resources of Frederick County as well as other areas in the northern Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and West Virginia.

  5. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Mason City quadrangle, Iowa and Minnesota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    The Mason City quadrangle covers 6900 miles of the northern Midwestern Physiographic Province in northern Iowa and southern Minnesota. The surface is largely covered by Quaternary glacial and related deposits. The subglacial surface is exposed only in the northeast and is composed of thin Mesozoic and Paleozoic sediments overlying Precambrian basement. A search of available literature revealed no known uranium deposits. A total of 89 uranium anomalies were detected and briefly described in this report. None were considered significant, and all appear to be related to cultural features. Concentrations of K, U, and T are extremely low throughout the quadrangle. Magnetic data appear to illustrate complexities in the underlying Precambrian

  6. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, M T; Truesdell, D B

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks.

  7. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, M.T.; Truesdell, D.B.

    1982-09-01

    The Albany 1 0 x 2 0 Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks

  8. Aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey: Minnesota Project, New Ulm quadrangle of Minnesota. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-11-01

    The New Ulm 1:250,000 scale quadrangle of southwestern Minnesota is entirely covered by variable thicknesses of Late Wisconsin age glacial deposits (drift). Precambrian bedrock is primarily exposed within the Minnesota River Valley, but only in very small, scattered outcrops. Approximately 50% of the bedrock is composed of Cretaceous sediments. There are no known uranium deposits (or occurrences) within the quadrangle. One hundred forty-six (146) groups of uranium samples were defined as anomalies and are discussed. None were considered significant

  9. Surface-water-quality assessment of the lower Kansas River basin, Kansas and Nebraska; results of investigations, 1987-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, J.O.

    1995-01-01

    Surface-water-quality conditions and trends were assessed in the lower Kansas River Basin, which drains about 15,300 square miles of mainly agricultural land in southeast Nebraska and northeast Kansas. On the basis of established water-quality criteria, most streams in the basin were suitable for uses such as public-water supply, irrigation, and maintenance of aquatic life. However, most concerns identified from a previous analysis of available data through 1986 are substantiated by analysis of data for May 1987 through April 1990. Less-than-normal precipitation and runoff during 1987-90 affected surface-water quality and are important factors in the interpretation of results.Dissolved-solids concentrations in the main stem Kansas River during May 1987 through April 1990 commonly exceeded 500 milligrams per liter, which may be of concern for public-water supplies and for the irrigation of sensitive crops. Large concentrations of chloride in the Kansas River are derived from ground water discharging in the Smoky Hill River Basin west of the study unit. Trends of increasing concentrations of some dissolved major ions were statistically significant in the northwestern part of the study unit, which could reflect substantial increases in irrigated acreage.The largest concentrations of suspended sediment in streams during May 1987 through April 1990 were associated with high-density cropland in areas of little local relief and medium-density irrigated cropland in more dissected areas. The smallest concentrations were measured downstream from large reservoirs and in streams draining areas having little or no row-crop cultivation. Mean annual suspended-sediment transport rates in the main stem Kansas River increased substantially in the downstream direction. No conclusions could be reached concerning the relations of suspended-sediment transport, yields, or trends to natural and human factors.The largest sources of nitrogen and phosphorus in the study unit were fertilizer

  10. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Newcastle Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.S.; Robinson, K.; Geer, K.A.; Blattspieler, J.G.

    1982-09-01

    Uranium resources of the Newcastle 1 0 x2 0 Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft) using available surface and subsurface geologic information. Many of the uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the US Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled and described. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, interpreted from an aerial radiometric survey, were outlined. Areas favorable for uranium deposits in the subsurface were evaluated using gamma-ray logs. Based on surface and subsurface data, two areas have been delineated which are underlain by rocks deemed favorable as hosts for uranium deposits. One of these is underlain by rocks that contain fluvial arkosic facies in the Wasatch and Fort Union Formations of Tertiary age; the other is underlain by rocks containing fluvial quartzose sandstone facies of the Inyan Kara Group of Early Cretaceous age. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Tertiary age above the Wasatch Formation, all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and most rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and all rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group

  11. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shaieb, Z.; Thomas, R.G.; Stewart, G.F.

    1982-04-01

    Uranium resources of the Lawton Quadrangle, Oklahoma and Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Five areas of uranium favorability were delineated. Diagenetically altered, quartzose and sublithic, eolian and marginal-marine sandstones of the Permian Rush Springs Formation overlying the Cement Anticline are favorable for joint-controlled deposits in sandstone, non-channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits, and Texas roll-front deposits. Three areas contain lithologies favorable for channel-controlled peneconcordant deposits: arkosic sandstones and granule conglomerates of the Permian Post Oak Conglomerate south of the Wichita Mountains; subarkosic and sublithic Lower Permian fluvio-deltaic and coastal-plain sandstones of the eastern Red River Valley; and subsurface arkosic, subarkosic, and sublithic alluvial-fan and fan-delta sandstones of the Upper Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian sequence in the eastern Hollis Basin. The coarse-grained facies of the Cambrian Quanah Granite and genetically related aplite and pegmatite dikes in the Wichita Mountains are favorable for orthomagmatic and autometasomatic deposits, respectively

  12. Geologic Map of the Helen Planitia Quadrangle (V-52), Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ivan; Hansen, Vicki L.

    2008-01-01

    The Magellan spacecraft orbited Venus from August 10, 1990, until it plunged into the Venusian atmosphere on October 12, 1994. Magellan Mission objectives included (1) improving the knowledge of the geological processes, surface properties, and geologic history of Venus by analysis of surface radar characteristics, topography, and morphology and (2) improving the knowledge of the geophysics of Venus by analysis of Venusian gravity. The Helen Planitia quadrangle (V-52), located in the southern hemisphere of Venus between lat 25 deg S. and 50 deg S. and between long 240 deg E. and 270 deg E., covers approximately 8,000,000 km2. Regionally, the map area is located at the southern limit of an area of enhanced tectonomagmatic activity and extensional deformation, marked by a triangle that has highland apexes at Beta, Atla, and Themis Regiones (BAT anomaly) and is connected by the large extensional belts of Devana, Hecate, and Parga Chasmata. The BAT anomaly covers approximately 20 percent of the Venusian surface.

  13. National Uranium Resource Evaluation, Tularosa Quadrangle, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, V.P.; Nagy, P.A.; Spreng, W.C.; Barnes, C.W.; Smouse, D.

    1981-12-01

    Uranium favorability of the Tularosa Quadrangle, New Mexico, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Uranium occurrences reported in the literature were located, sampled, and described in detail. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, interpreted from an aerial radiometric survey, and geochemical anomalies, interpreted from hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance, were also investigated. Additionally, several hundred rock samples were studied in thin section, and supplemental geochemical analyses of rock and water samples were completed. Fluorometric analyses were completed for samples from the Black Range Primitive Area to augment previously available geochemical data. Subsurface favorability was evaluated using gamma-ray logs and descriptive logs of sample cuttings. One area of uranium favorability was delineated, based on the data made available from this study. This area is the Nogal Canyon cauldron margin zone. Within the zone, characterized by concentric and radial fractures, resurgent doming, ring-dike volcanism, and intracauldron sedimentation, uranium conentration is confined to magmatic-hydrothermal and volcanogenic uranium deposits

  14. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Newcastle Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, E S; Robinson, K; Geer, K A; Blattspieler, J G

    1982-09-01

    Uranium resources of the Newcastle 1/sup 0/x2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Wyoming and South Dakota were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m (5000 ft) using available surface and subsurface geologic information. Many of the uranium occurrences reported in the literature and in reports of the US Atomic Energy Commission were located, sampled and described. Areas of anomalous radioactivity, interpreted from an aerial radiometric survey, were outlined. Areas favorable for uranium deposits in the subsurface were evaluated using gamma-ray logs. Based on surface and subsurface data, two areas have been delineated which are underlain by rocks deemed favorable as hosts for uranium deposits. One of these is underlain by rocks that contain fluvial arkosic facies in the Wasatch and Fort Union Formations of Tertiary age; the other is underlain by rocks containing fluvial quartzose sandstone facies of the Inyan Kara Group of Early Cretaceous age. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Tertiary age above the Wasatch Formation, all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and most rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group. Unfavorable environments characterize all rock units of Cretaceous age above the Inyan Kara Group, and all rock units of Mesozoic and Paleozoic age below the Inyan Kara Group.

  15. Hydro-geological studies at the PINSTECH quadrangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, K.; Qureshi, A.A.; Khattak, N.; Akram, M.; Farooq, M.

    2000-05-01

    In order to save the huge amount of water bill and to overcome the shortage of water supply during summer, a resistivity survey was carried out to locate some suitable water bearing horizons within the PINSTECH Quadrangle. Eight shallow bore holes yielding limited amount of water supply were also drilled on trial basis. The work so far done indicates the existence of two water-bearing horizons in this area. a. A shallow water bearing horizon present at the contact of recent alluvium with bedrock at a depth between 7-20 meters. b. A deep water bearing horizon present erratically in the sandstone of Kamlial Formation at a depth between 85-180 meters. On the basis of resistivity measurements, thirteen sites have been earmarked which may contain water bearing zones in the deep horizon. Out of these, nine sites have been classified as the favorable and four as semi-favorable sites. A geological survey of the area was also carried out. The Kamlial sandstone, indicated by the resistivity survey to contain water bearing zones, is less porous with low permeability. Therefore it is not a favorable lithology to contain an aquifer to produce a good water discharge. However, the hole/s penetrating through a faulted/fractured zone being charged through a stream in the vicinity may yield water. (author)

  16. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, M.B.; Andersen, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    The uranium favorability of the Wichita Falls Quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma, was determined by using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria; by subsurface studies of structure, facies distribution, and gamma-ray anomalies in well logs to a depth of 1500 m; and by surface studies involving extensive field sampling and radiometric surveying. These were supplemented by both aerial radiometric and hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance studies. Favorable environments were identified in fluviodeltaic to fan-delta sandstones in the upper Strawn, Canyon, and Cisco Groups (Pennsylvania to Lower Permian), which occur exclusively in the subsurface. Evaluation was based on the presence of a good uranium source, abundant feldspar, good hydrogeologic characteristics, association with carbonaceous shales, presence of coal and oil fields, and anomalies in gamma logs. Additional favorable environments include deltaic to alluvial sandstones in the Wichita-Albany Group (Lower Permian), which crops out widely and occurs in the shallow subsurface. Evaluation was based on high uranium values in stream-sediment samples, a small uranium occurrence located during the field survey, anomalous gamma logs, good uranium source, and hydrogeologic characteristics. Unfavorable environments include Cambrian to Permian limestones and shales. Pennsylvanian to Permian fluviodeltaic systems that have poor uranium sources, and Permian, Cretaceous, and Pleistocene formations that lack features characteristic of known uranium occurrences

  17. Kansas State Briefing Book on low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Kansas State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Kansas. The profile is the result of a survey of radioactive material licensees in Kansas. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may affect waste management practices in Kansas

  18. Kansas Department of Transportation research & technology news, vol. 6 #2, December 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Research & Technology News is a newsletter published by the Kansas Department of : Transportation, Bureau of Researchs Technology Transfer Section, in cooperation with : the Federal Highway Administration and the U.S. Department of Transportation.

  19. Development of new precipitation frequency tables for counties in Kansas using NOAA Atlas 14 : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report documents the development of KDOTs new rainfall tables for counties in : Kansas based on NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 8. These new tables provide rainfall depths : and intensities for durations from 5 minutes to 24 hours and recurrence interva...

  20. Development of new precipitation frequency tables for counties in Kansas using NOAA Atlas 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report documents the development of KDOTs new rainfall tables for counties in Kansas based on : NOAA Atlas 14 Volume 8. These new tables provide rainfall depths and intensities for durations from 5 : minutes to 24 hours and recurrence interva...