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Sample records for nsf career award

  1. Preparing Scientists for Scientific Careers: Broader Impacts from an NSF CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    The scientific focus of my NSF CAREER Award is the impact of patterns, topographical and surface chemical in design, on the adhesion of soft polymer interfaces. Although this topic has provided a strong foundation for the mentoring and training of graduate students, the primary broader impacts of my award have focused on the development of ``soft'' skills in graduate and post-doctoral researchers in STEM disciplines. I have developed a course on ``Scientific and Engineering Management,'' which provides an open forum for students to explore the skills that, in many ways, define successful careers for many scientists. Topics include: leadership, proposal writing, group management, communication in diverse environments, and ethics. In this presentation, I highlight the primary phases of this program, how it meshes with scientific goals, and general statements about the mission of education outreach within STEM disciplines.

  2. CAREER opportunities at the Condensed Matter Physics Program, NSF/DMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durakiewicz, Tomasz

    The Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is a Foundation-wide activity, offering prestigious awards in support of junior faculty. Awards are expected to build the careers of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. Condensed Matter Physics Program receives between 35 and 45 CAREER proposals each year, in areas related to fundamental research of phenomena exhibited by condensed matter systems. Proposal processing, merit review process, funding levels and success rates will be discussed in the presentation. NSF encourages submission of CAREER proposals from junior faculty members from CAREER-eligible organizations and encourages women, members of underrepresented minority groups, and persons with disabilities to apply. NSF/DMR/CMP homepage: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5666

  3. NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative and the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajhar, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2011, the National Science Foundation (NSF) began the Career-Life Balance Initiative to support graduate students, postdoctoral students, and early-career researchers in STEM fields. NSF is focusing first on its most prestigious programs for early-career scientists---the CAREER program and the postdoctoral programs, including the NSF Astronomy and Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowships (AAPF)---where career-life balance opportunities can help retain a significant fraction of early career talent. Subject to budget constraints, NSF plans to further integrate and enhance career-life balance opportunities over time through other programs, like the Graduate Research Fellowships Program and ADVANCE, and subsequently through the broader portfolio of NSF activities. In addition, to comply with Title IX, NSF has regulations to ensure that educational programs that receive NSF funds are free of gender discrimination and harassment. A primary goal of this presentation is to put facts about NSF into the hands of students, faculty, staff, administrators and other policy makers to benefit the advancement of career-life balance in the astronomical community. The presentation focus areas will (1) address common misconceptions about NSF rules regarding parental leave; (2) discuss benefits already available through the AAPF program, Graduate Research Fellowships, and other programs; and (3) listen to community concerns and issues to bring these back to the foundation for consideration. Did you know that NSF allows paid parental leave under many circumstances? For example, the AAPF program currently allows two months of paid parental leave during the fellow's tenure. What are the rules for NSF Graduate Research Fellowships? Come to the session and find out; the answers to such questions might surprise you.

  4. LHCb Early Career Scientist Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrick Koppenburg for the LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    On 15 September 2016, the LHCb collaboration awarded the first set of prizes for outstanding contributions of early career scientists.   From left to right: Guy Wilkinson (LHCb spokesperson), Sascha Stahl, Kevin Dungs, Tim Head, Roel Aaij, Conor Fitzpatrick, Claire Prouvé, Patrick Koppenburg (chair of committee) and Sean Benson. Twenty-five nominations were submitted and considered by the committee, and 5 prizes were awarded to teams or individuals for works that had a significant impact within the last year. The awardees are: Roel Aaij, Sean Benson, Conor Fitzpatrick, Rosen Matev and Sascha Stahl for having implemented and commissioned the revolutionary changes to the LHC Run-2 high-level-trigger, including the first widespread deployment of real-time analysis techniques in High Energy Physics;   Kevin Dungs and Tim Head for having launched the Starterkit initiative, a new style of software tutorials based on modern programming methods. “Starterkit is a group of ph...

  5. 45 CFR 680.11 - Staff involvement with NSF proposals and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching careers to spend a year or two at NSF and then return to research and teaching, usually at the... SCIENCE FOUNDATION NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION RULES OF PRACTICE AND STATUTORY CONFLICT-OF-INTEREST EXEMPTIONS Rules of Practice for the National Science Foundation § 680.11 Staff involvement with NSF...

  6. Building A Drought Science Learning Community: Education and Engagement in an NSF CAREER Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiring, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes the education and engagement plan of the NSF CAREER award that I received in 2011 (Role of Soil Moisture in Seasonal to Interannual Climate Variability in the U.S. Great Plains; NSF Award #1056796). A key component of this plan is the development of a Drought Science Learning Community. A learning community is a program of courses and activities, which may include social and academic activities outside the classroom, that form a single program of instruction. Learning communities serve to increase faculty-student and student-student interaction, improve active and collaborative learning, and develop curricular coherence. The goal of a learning community is to encourage integration of learning across courses and to involve students with one of the grand challenges facing society. Students will be recruited from a Freshman Year Seminar (FYS) that I teach every Fall. Students who belong to the learning community will participate in the Water Management and Hydrological Sciences Seminar Series, relevant field trips, and monthly brown bag lunch meetings where students and faculty will discuss their current research projects and recently published scientific articles. Students who participate in learning community activities will benefit from a common intellectual experience that will help them to develop linkages between courses, regular interactions with faculty mentors, and the opportunity to contribute to faculty research. All students will be encouraged to complete an undergraduate thesis as the capstone experience of their participation in the learning community. In addition to describing the organization of the education and engagement plan, I will also discuss expected outcomes, best practices and lessons learned.

  7. International perspective on nanotechnology papers, patents, and NSF awards (2000-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongyi; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Hsinchun; Roco, Mihail C.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the development of nanotechnology between 2000 and 2016 as reflected in the Web of Science papers, United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), World International Property Organization (WIPO) patents, and National Science Foundation (NSF) awards, with a special reference to the United States (US), European Union (EU27), P.R. China, Japan, and South Korea. The field of nanotechnology is branching out into novel scientific and technology platforms, and it is increasingly difficult to separate foundational nanoscale components from divergent application areas. The average global growth rate has been sustained at about 15% for both papers and patents in the selected interval. The growth rates among regions are non-uniform. P.R. China and South Korea have increased faster in both the numbers and quality of their scientific publications, and currently P.R. China has the largest volume of nanotechnology publications and South Korea the most publications per capita in the field of nanotechnology. The US, EU27, and Japan are maintaining leadership in the upstream, better cited, conceptual components of nanotechnology research and development.

  8. Unconscious Bias - The Focus of the University of Arizona's NSF ADVANCE Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Tolbert, L. P.; Vaillancourt, A. M.; Leahey, E. E.; Rodrigues, H. A.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Arizona ADVANCE program focuses on unconscious bias and ways to minimize its negative impact on the academy. Unconscious bias involves social stereotypes about certain groups of people that individuals form outside their own consciousness. Overwhelming scientific evidence supports that unconscious bias pervasively influences hiring, evaluation, selection of leaders, and even daily interactions. UA ADVANCE has a three-tiered strategy for improving the representation and advancement of women faculty in STEM departments that includes: 1) fostering the scientific and leadership careers of women; 2) promoting responsibility for gender equity among faculty and administrators; and 3) developing management software useful for promoting more equitable decision-making. This strategy has brought together a diverse array of faculty, staff, and faculty administrators working toward a common goal of promoting faculty diversity and the equitable treatment of faculty. Among the most effective aspects of our programming and products have been: 1) department head and search committee trainings; 2) monthly career discussion series events, and; 3) a salary modeling tool for department heads and deans. One key to the success of these efforts has been collaborations with campus partners, including the Office of the Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs, the Office of the Special Advisor to the President for Diversity and Inclusion, and the Division of Human Resources. A second key has been a commitment to the use of research-based material and tools, presented by respected colleagues, in small workshop-style settings that foster discussion. This has enabled us to extend our reach to more STEM departments and secure broader support in creating a more equitable environment for women faculty. Nearing the close of our grant period, our efforts are now concentrated on institutionalizing success. UA ADVANCE needs continued support from an increasingly tasked administration

  9. Similarities and differences in the career trajectories of male and female career development award recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; DeCastro, Rochelle; Griffith, Kent A; Rangarajan, Soumya; Churchill, Cristina; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A

    2011-11-01

    To examine the careers of career development award recipients. In 2009, a postal survey was conducted of 818 recipients of K08 and K23 awards in 2000-2001 to examine career paths and personal characteristics. Of 589 respondents (72% response rate), 211 (35.9%) were female. Women were less likely to have children (Psuccessful (P=.002), and they published fewer papers (P=.001). Overall, 118 women (55.9%) and 274 men (72.5%) met at least one of the following criteria for success: serving as principal investigator on an R01 or grants>$1,000,000 since K award receipt, publishing at least 35 publications since K award year, or serving as dean, department chair, or division chief. In a multivariate model, gender (odds ratio 1.72, P=.003) was associated with the likelihood of success by this definition, and analysis revealed no significant interactions (including with parental status). Most of these promising investigators of both genders remained in academia and received promotions. However, gender differences in success existed, unrelated to parental status, suggesting a need for ongoing investigation of the causes of gender differences in academic medical careers.

  10. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Laurie A.

    2013-10-01

    Alexander G. Hayes Jr. received the 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science at the 2012 AGU Fall Meeting, held 3-7 December in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes significant early-career contributions to planetary science.

  11. Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology: Nancy S. Elman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2017 recipient of this award is Nancy S. Elman, whose leadership roles have brought significant advancements for the education and training of psychologists. Her award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Julio J. Ramirez: Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Career Contributions to Education and Training in Psychology is given in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. The 2014 recipient of this award is Julio J. Ramirez, for "creating a national infrastructure to support education and training in behavioral neuroscience and biological psychology, for playing a seminal role in creating an undergraduate neuroscience education journal, and for creating a nationally recognized mentoring program for junior faculty in the neurosciences, particularly with underrepresented groups." Ramirez's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Thomas L. Griffiths: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the winners of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (2012). Thomas L. Griffiths won the award for bringing mathematical precision to the deepest questions in human learning, reasoning, and concept formation. In his pioneering work,…

  14. J. David Creswell: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    APA's Awards for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology recognize excellent young psychologists who have not held a doctoral degree for more than nine years. One of the 2014 award winners is J. David Creswell, for "outstanding and innovative research on mechanisms linking stress management strategies to disease." Creswell's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Bernice Lott: Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Presents a short biography of the winner of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Senior Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. The 2012 winner is Bernice Lott. Lott's commitment to the public interest has always guided her career, as her groundbreaking research on gender, ethnicity, and race…

  16. Evaluation of a mid-career investigator career development award: Assessing the ability of OppNet K18 awardees to obtain NIH follow-on research funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy-Carter, Cassidy A; Williams, Sharon R; Han, Xueying; Elwood, William N; Zuckerman, Brian L

    2018-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) K18 award mechanism provides funded opportunities for established investigators to gain knowledge in fields outside of their primary disciplines, but outcomes associated with these awards have not been evaluated to date. NIH's Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet) is one of the few initiatives that has used this award mechanism. We explored how the unique features of K18 awards affect the ability of recipients to obtain follow-on NIH research funding. We compared outcomes (ability to obtain follow-on funding and interval between receipt of the primary award and receipt of the first follow-on award) associated with OppNet K18 awards to findings from evaluations of other NIH career development (K) awards, which usually target early-career investigators. We hypothesized that K18 award recipients might be (1) more successful than are other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on NIH research funding due to their career experience or (2) less successful due to the competing demands of other projects. By analyzing follow-on NIH research awards and interview data, we found that OppNet K18 award recipients were at least as successful as were other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on funding and may have been more successful by certain measures. K18 awards produce their outcomes with a lower investment per investigator than do other K awards, suggesting continued or enhanced use of the mechanism.

  17. Evaluation of a mid-career investigator career development award: Assessing the ability of OppNet K18 awardees to obtain NIH follow-on research funding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassidy A Pomeroy-Carter

    Full Text Available The National Institutes of Health (NIH K18 award mechanism provides funded opportunities for established investigators to gain knowledge in fields outside of their primary disciplines, but outcomes associated with these awards have not been evaluated to date. NIH's Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Opportunity Network (OppNet is one of the few initiatives that has used this award mechanism. We explored how the unique features of K18 awards affect the ability of recipients to obtain follow-on NIH research funding. We compared outcomes (ability to obtain follow-on funding and interval between receipt of the primary award and receipt of the first follow-on award associated with OppNet K18 awards to findings from evaluations of other NIH career development (K awards, which usually target early-career investigators. We hypothesized that K18 award recipients might be (1 more successful than are other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on NIH research funding due to their career experience or (2 less successful due to the competing demands of other projects. By analyzing follow-on NIH research awards and interview data, we found that OppNet K18 award recipients were at least as successful as were other K award recipients in obtaining follow-on funding and may have been more successful by certain measures. K18 awards produce their outcomes with a lower investment per investigator than do other K awards, suggesting continued or enhanced use of the mechanism.

  18. Hayes Receives 2012 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alexander G.

    2013-10-01

    I am deeply honored to be the inaugural recipient of the Ronald Greeley Early Career Award. Ron was an icon in the field of planetary science, and the establishment of this award is a fitting way to pay tribute to his legacy. I applaud Laurie Leshin, Bill McKinnon, and the rest of the AGU Planetary Science section officers and selection committee for taking the time to organize this memorial. Ron is remembered not only for his fundamental scientific contributions but also for his mentorship and support of early-career scientists, both his own students and postdocs and those of his colleagues.

  19. 78 FR 15008 - Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP); Correction AGENCY: Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Department of... the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys . At...

  20. 78 FR 38304 - Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program (NHCTEP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program (NHCTEP); Correction Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA), Number: 84.259A... Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov...

  1. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Christian N. L. Olivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Christian N. L. Olivers, winner of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for outstanding research on visual attention and working memory. Olivers uses classic experimental designs in an innovative and sophisticated way to determine underlying mechanisms. He has formulated important theoretical…

  2. Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology: Ahmad R. Hariri

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Ahmad R. Hariri, recipient of the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology, is cited for pioneering contributions to understanding the neurobiological mechanisms driving individual differences in complex behavior traits. Hariri has integrated molecular genetics, neuropharmacology, neuroimaging, and psychology in…

  3. Thompson Receives 2013 Early Career Hydrologic Science Award: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katul, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Sally Thompson grew up in Perth, where she was trained as an environmental engineer at the University of Western Australia. She graduated with honors in 2003 and worked for a few years as an environmental engineering consultant. Following the award of the Sir John Monash Fellowship in Australia, Sal accepted the admissions offer from the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University in 2006, completing her Ph.D. within 4 years and defending her dissertation in 2010. I was most fortunate to have Sal join me at Duke after an enthusiastic recommendation from Siva. Upon her arrival at Duke University, it was immediately clear to all that Sal is a special person with the remarkable skill of being able to identify the main aspects of a problem and throw at them the best that theory, experiment, and modeling tools offer.

  4. Theodore P. Beauchaine: award for distinguished scientific early career contributions to psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Presents the citation for Theodore P. Beauchaine, who received the Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology (psychopathology) "for core contributions in developmental psychopathology, especially related to the biological underpinnings of various mental disorders among children, sophisticated and elegant quantitative approaches to these issues, and exemplary work on the prevention of such conditions." A brief profile and a selected bibliography accompany the citation. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. A 10-year analysis of American Society For Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimple, Randall J; Kao, Gary D

    2013-03-15

    Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimple, Randall J.; Kao, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members

  7. A 10-Year Analysis of American Society for Radiation Oncology Junior Faculty Career Development Awards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimple, Randall J., E-mail: rkimple@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Kao, Gary D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Between 2000 and 2010, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) awarded 22 Junior Faculty Career Development Awards (JFA) totaling $4.4 million. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of these awards on the grantees' career development, including current position, publications, and subsequent independent grant funding. Methods: Each awardee was requested via email and telephone to provide an updated curriculum vitae, a National Institutes of Health (NIH) biosketch, and information regarding current position of employment. Twenty-one of the 22 JFA recipients complied. Reported grant funding was extracted from each candidate's CV, and the amounts of NIH grants obtained were confirmed via NIH REPORTER. Reported publications were confirmed via PubMed. Results: All survey respondents (21 of 21) have remained in academic positions. Subsequent aggregate grant funding totaled more than $25 million (range, $0-$4.1 million), 5.9 times the initial investment. NIH grant funding totaled almost $15 million, 3 times the initial investment. Awardees have published an average of 34.6 publications (range, 0-123) for an overall rate of 4.5 papers/year (range, 1-11). Conclusions: ASTRO JFAs over the past decade have been strongly associated with grantees remaining in academic positions, success in attracting private and NIH grants, and publication productivity. In an era of dwindling federal research funding, the support provided by the ASTRO JFA may be especially helpful to support the research careers of promising junior faculty members.

  8. Impacts of a CAREER Award on Advancing 3D Visualization in Geology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billen, M. I.

    2011-12-01

    CAREER awards provide a unique opportunity to develop educational activities as an integrated part of one's research activities. This CAREER award focused on developing interactive 3D visualization tools to aid geology students in improving their 3D visualization skills. Not only is this a key skill for field geologists who need to visualize unseen subsurface structures, but it is also an important aspect of geodynamic research into the processes, such as faulting and viscous flow, that occur during subduction. Working with an undergraduate student researcher and using the KeckCAVES developed volume visualization code 3DVisualizer, we have developed interactive visualization laboratory exercises (e.g., Discovering the Rule of Vs) and a suite of mini-exercises using illustrative 3D geologic structures (e.g., syncline, thrust fault) that students can explore (e.g., rotate, slice, cut-away) to understand how exposure of these structures at the surface can provide insight into the subsurface structure. These exercises have been integrated into the structural geology curriculum and made available on the web through the KeckCAVES Education website as both data-and-code downloads and pre-made movies. One of the main challenges of implementing research and education activities through the award is that progress must be made on both throughout the award period. Therefore, while our original intent was to use subduction model output as the structures in the educational models, delays in the research results required that we develop these models using other simpler input data sets. These delays occurred because one of the other goals of the CAREER grant is to allow the faculty to take their research in a new direction, which may certainly lead to transformative science, but can also lead to more false-starts as the challenges of doing the new science are overcome. However, having created the infrastructure for the educational components, use of the model results in future

  9. Expanding the Field of Surgical Researchers: The Jahnigen Career Development Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Stacie

    2017-10-01

    Under a long-standing collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation (JAHF), the Atlantic Philanthropies (AP), and specialty societies in 10 targeted specialties, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) has been working to improve quality of care provided to older adults by surgical and related medical specialists. To support and nurture future academic leaders, the Geriatrics-for-Specialists Initiative (GSI) established the Dennis W. Jahnigen Career Development Scholar Award (JCDA) program in 2002, with AP joining JAHF as a core funder of the awards in 2003. Commencing in 2011, the National Institute on Aging (NIA) launched the Grants for Early Medical/Surgical Specialists' Transition to Aging Research (GEMSSTAR) program, using an RO3 mechanism. Recipients of the JCDA and the GEMSSTAR are provided with 2 years of research support and networking opportunities with other scholars; 79 JCDA and 26 surgical and related medical specialty GEMSSTAR scholars have been funded through these award mechanisms, with AGS, JAHF, and surgical and related medical specialty societies providing matching support for 20 of the GEMSSTAR scholars for leadership development programs. One of the primary criteria for judging the overall success of the program was eventual transition of the award to a federally funded program, which was achieved when NIA launched the GEMSSTAR program in 2011. © 2017, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, William B.

    2014-07-01

    The Greeley Early Career Award is named for pioneering planetary scientist Ronald Greeley. Ron was involved in nearly every major planetary mission from the 1970s until his death and was extraordinarily active in service to the planetary science community. Ron's greatest legacies, however, are those he mentored through the decades, and it is young scientists whose work and promise we seek to recognize. This year's Greeley award winner is Jonathan L. Mitchell, an assistant professor at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Jonathan received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, and after a postdoc at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, he joined the UCLA faculty, where he holds a joint appointment in Earth and space sciences and in atmospheric sciences.

  11. Laboratory-based educational and outreach activities in the framework of a CAREER award at the University of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindeman, I. N.

    2011-12-01

    The Stable Isotope Laboratory at the University of Oregon has been used as a learning and outreach center in the framework of the 09 award entitled "Stable isotope insights into large-volume volcanic eruptions". The PI and other members of the group have actively recruitted undergraduate students, summer session and catalytic outreach undergraduates, and hosted international students, visitors, and collaborators from Russia, Iceland, France, the UK, Australia, and Switzerland. We also integrated closely with the Oregon-wide summer program that brings community college students to the University of Oregon for 2.5 months summer research residence (UCORE). In total we gave supervised five undergraduate students and three UCORE students. Additionally, we recruited undergraduates from U of Chicago, Colorado and Pomona Colleges to spend summers in the lab and in the field. In conjunction with the NSF funded PIRE program, two female graduate and one female undergraduate students participated in fieldwork in Kamchatka, and three Kamchatka undergraduates, and one Moscow graduate student visited the University Oregon. Students performed their own projects or Senior Theses and reported their results locally and at AGU conferences. We developed a management structure in which graduate students, a postdoc, and lab technician co-supervised students and visitors and this exposed them into the supervisory roles, contributed to the project progress, and liberated PI from micromanagement duties. The talk will present our experience with this management concept of a lab-based-learning initiative, which defines roles for each member of the lab. Our outreach activities included public lectures at community colleges by PI and a graduate student, and the topical Penrose conference co-organized by the PI, which attracted many students and visitors who collected their data in the lab. PI has introduced a voluntary fieldtrip as a part of his Volcanoes and Earthquake large enrollment class

  12. Are we there yet? An NSF-CAREER sponsored field program as a vehicle for engaging high school students in geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    Many students graduate from high school having never been exposed to the geosciences. The idea of a career in the geosciences is therefore often not on the radar when students embark on university studies. History on the Rocks, a field-based summer program developed as part of a NSF-CAREER grant and offered annually since 2008, is designed to expose high school students to geology through hands-on experiences. The program focuses on interpreting the sedimentary rock record, the major archive of Earth history. Following a day of introductory exercises in the lab, participants travel to world-class geologic sites around Nebraska and collect evidence that allows them to interpret environment and climate at the time of deposition. They use their data to consider how climate change, sea level, and catastrophic events leave their imprints on the rock record and to reconstruct Nebraska's geologic history. In 2008, 12 high school science teachers from districts across Nebraska, incuding the Santee Nation district, enrolled in the program. Teachers developed a set of lesson plans related to their field experience. They posted the plans online and now routinely use them in their home schools, thereby exposing their students to geology. Subsequent programs have been held for groups of high school students drawn from rural and urban regions throughout the state. Working with students raised some unforeseen issues related to accident liability and parental concern about students working in remote areas. These problems were solved by offering the program through existing, well-known entities, including Girls Inc., a nonprofit organization that empowers girls from low-income families in urban settings (i.e., Omaha), and the 4H Youth Development Extension Office at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL). Both groups are eager to provide students with the opportunity to visit a university and explore careers. Convincing inner-city students, who generally came to the program with

  13. Adam M. Grant: Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Adam M. Grant, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Early Career Contributions to Psychology. "For extensive, elegant, and programmatic research on the power of relational job design in enhancing employee motivation, productivity, and satisfaction; for creative and rigorous studies documenting the profound and surprising effects of connecting employees to their impact on others; for highlighting prosocial motivation, not only extrinsic and intrinsic motivations, as a key force behind employee behavior; and for demonstrating by example the feasibility and benefits of conducting field experiments, yielding studies rich in internal validity, external validity, and practical impact. In addition to his accomplishments, Adam M. Grant is known for his generosity as a scholar, teacher, and colleague." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Patterns of Feedback on the Bridge to Independence: A Qualitative Thematic Analysis of NIH Mentored Career Development Award Application Critiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatz, Anna; Dattalo, Melissa; Regner, Caitlin; Filut, Amarette; Carnes, Molly

    2016-01-01

    NIH Mentored Career Development (K) Awards bridge investigators from mentored to independent research. A smaller proportion of women than men succeed in this transition. The aim of this qualitative study was to analyze reviewers' narrative critiques of K award applications and explore thematic content of feedback provided to male and female applicants. We collected 88 critiques, 34 from 9 unfunded and 54 from 18 funded applications, from 70% (n = 26) of investigators at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with K awards funded between 2005 and 2009 on the first submission or after revision. We qualitatively analyzed text in the 5 critique sections: candidate, career development plan, research plan, mentors, and environment and institutional commitment. We explored thematic content within these sections for male and female applicants and for applicants who had received a subsequent independent research award by 2014. Themes revealed consistent areas of criticism for unfunded applications and praise for funded applications. Subtle variations in thematic content appeared for male and female applicants: For male applicants criticism was often followed by advice but for female applicants it was followed by questions about ability; praise recurrently characterized male but not female applicants' research as highly significant with optimism for future independence. Female K awardees that obtained subsequent independent awards stood out as having track records described as "outstanding." This exploratory study suggests that K award reviewer feedback, particularly for female applicants, should be investigated as a potential contributor to research persistence and success in crossing the bridge to independence.

  15. Implementing and Assessing Inquiry-Based Learning through the CAREER Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudzinski, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    In order to fully attain the benefits of inquiry-based learning, instructors who typically employ the traditional lecture format need to make many adjustments to their approach. This change in styles can be intimidating and logistically difficult to overcome, both for instructors and students, such that a stepwise approach to this transformation is likely to be more manageable. In this session, I will describe a series of tools to promote inquiry-based learning that I am helping to implement and assess in classroom courses and student research projects. I will demonstrate the importance of integrating with existing institutional initiatives as well as recognizing how student development plays a key role in student engagement. Some of the features I will highlight include: defining both student learning outcomes and student development outcomes, converting content training to be self-directed and asynchronous, utilizing conceptests to help students practice thinking like scientists, and employing both objective pre/post assessment and student self-reflective assessment. Lastly, I will reflect on how the well-defined goal of teaching and research integration in the CAREER award solicitation resonated with me even as an undergraduate and helped inspire my early career.

  16. Recipients of major scientific awards: A descriptive and predictive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Andrew Calvin

    Recent trends demonstrate an increase of women in leadership roles, STEM fields, and participating in higher education including graduate and doctoral programs, which is a result of Title IX. This quantitative study considered major scientific awards awarded to females and examines demographic characteristics of awardees from the Nobel, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and National Science Foundation (NSF). More specifically, the following awards were examined the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, the NAS Public Welfare Medal, and the NSF National Medal of Science within the discipline of Physical Science. Also, this study focused on equality to determine if a fair playing field and equal opportunity for women in academics has improved since Title IX. A limited amount of research has explored female award recipients. Specifically, existing research, has not examined the pinnacle of academic performance in the form of national and international awards. In the present study, I posed research questions relating to demographic characteristics of award recipients from the Nobel, NAS, and NSF between 1975 and 2015. Additionally, I examined if sex and age of the awardees could predict early career award obtainment. Through the frame of Social cognitive theory (Bandura, 1986, 1997, and 2005) I considered how perceptions of gender roles are a product of influence by society and the possible connection to performance. Results indicated a limited number of females have received these scientific awards and the awardees age could predict receiving an award early in their career. Additionally, the study provided insight into the progression of Title IX within the context of athletics and academics. It addressed the incremental and systematic increase in academics for women at high school, college, career, and scientific awards. Perhaps most importantly, it identified an observed pattern for female science award recipients reaching a critical mass and a tipping point.

  17. Mentor Perspectives on the Place of Undergraduate Research Mentoring in Academic Identity and Career Development: An Analysis of Award Winning Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Eric E.; Walkington, Helen; Shanahan, Jenny Olin; Ackley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Kearsley A.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines how Undergraduate Research (UR) mentoring fits into the career profile of award-winning UR mentors and the factors that motivate engagement as UR mentors. Twenty-four award-winning UR mentors in four countries were interviewed about their mentoring practices. Six themes emerged: (1) Academic Identity and Motivations; (2)…

  18. Strengthening the career development of clinical translational scientist trainees: a consensus statement of the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Research Education and Career Development Committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Frederick J; Begg, Melissa D; Fleming, Michael; Merchant, Carol

    2012-04-01

    The challenges for scholars committed to successful careers in clinical and translational science are increasingly well recognized. The Education and Career Development (EdCD) of the national Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium gathered thought leaders to propose sustainable solutions and an agenda for future studies that would strengthen the infrastructure across the spectrum of pre- and postdoctoral, MD and PhD, scholars. Six consensus statements were prepared that include: (1) the requirement for career development of a qualitatively different investigator; (2) the implications of interdisciplinary science for career advancement including institutional promotion and tenure actions that were developed for discipline-specific accomplishments; (3) the need for long-term commitment of institutions to scholars; (4) discipline-specific curricula are still required but curricula designed to promote team work and interdisciplinary training will promote innovation; (5) PhD trainees have many pathways to career satisfaction and success; and (6) a centralized infrastructure to enhance and reward mentoring is required. Several themes cut across all of the recommendations including team science, innovation, and sustained institutional commitment. Implied themes include an effective and diverse job force and the requirement for a well-crafted public policy that supports continued investments in science education. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Edward A. Delgado-Romero: Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Edward A. Delgado-Romero, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Early Career Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest. "Societies, professions, and individual citizens are enriched by the contributions of those who care. Edward A. Delgado-Romero has demonstrated through his scholarship, leadership in psychological associations such as the National Latina/Latino Psychological Association, and collaborations with universities and school districts in Georgia that he cares and is committed to addressing challenges in the provision of culturally sensitive psychological services to benefit the public interest. His example of servant leadership leaves a legacy to other early career professionals and graduate students alike. Es un hijo honorado." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved). 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  20. POCA Update: An NSF PAARE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mayo, E. A.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the status of "A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)” under the NSF's "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. This partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. We have reached the midpoint of this 5-year award and discuss the successes, challenges and obstacles encountered to date. Included is a summary of our summer REU program, the POCA graduate fellowship program, faculty research capacity building, outreach activities, increased use of NSF facilities and shared resources. Additional POCA research presentations by the authors are described elsewhere in these proceedings. Support for this work was provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

  1. Mitchell Receives 2013 Ronald Greeley Early Career Award in Planetary Science: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2014-07-01

    I am honored to receive this award in memory of Ron Greeley. Although I did not have the opportunity to know him, I had the pleasure of getting to know his wife, Cynthia, at a luncheon prior to the special awards session at the AGU Fall Meeting. Cynthia is an intelligent and elegant southern woman with a confident gaze. She spoke fondly of Ron and of her sincere respect for his work ethic and dedication to planetary science. What most impressed me, though, was the respect Ron showed to her and the kids by always "giving them the evenings"; no matter how busy things got, Ron always kept his evenings open for Cynthia. This clearly meant the world to her. As a family man, I can only hope that my wife and kids will speak so kindly of me many years from now. I would like to dedicate this award to them in gratitude for their seemingly unconditional love and support.

  2. 78 FR 35877 - Applications for New Awards; Native Hawaiian Career and Technical Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... parents, including single pregnant women; (e) Displaced homemakers; and (f) Individuals with limited... organization could not use NHCTEP funds to provide child care for single parents if non-Federal funds... services for single parents participating in non-career and technical education programs and these services...

  3. Factors Associated With Success of Clinician-Researchers Receiving Career Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health: A Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Griffith, Kent A; Jones, Rochelle D; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the careers of recent career development awardees is essential to guide interventions to ensure gender equity and success in academic medicine. In 2010-2011 (T1) and 2014 (T2), 1,719 clinician-researchers who received new K08 and K23 awards in 2006-2009 were longitudinally surveyed. Multivariable analyses evaluated the influence of factors on success, including demographics, job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. Of 1,275 respondents at T1, 1,066 (493 women; 573 men) responded at T2. Men and women differed in job characteristics, work environment, priorities, and domestic responsibilities. By T2, women had less funding (mean $780,000 vs. $1,120,000, P = .002) and published fewer papers (mean 33 vs. 45). Using a composite measure that considered funding, publications, or leadership to define success, 53.5% (264/493) of women and 67.0% (384/573) of men were successful. Gender differences in success persisted after accounting for other significant predictors-K award type, specialty, award year, work hours, funding institute tier, feeling responsible for participating in department/division administration, importance of publishing prolifically, feeling responsible for contributing to clinical care, importance of publishing high-quality research, collegiality of the mentoring relationship, adequacy of research equipment, and departmental climate. A significant interaction existed between K award type and gender; the gender difference in success was most pronounced among K23 researchers (among whom the odds ratio for females = 0.32). Men and women continue to have different experiences and career outcomes, with important implications for the design of interventions to promote equity and success.

  4. The SC State NSF PAARE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald; Ajello, Marco; Brittain, Sean; Cash, Jennifer; Fogle, Bryan; Hartmann, Dieter; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve; King, Jeremy; Leising, Mark; Smith, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    We report on the activities of our NSF PAARE program during Year 3 of the project. Our partnership under this award includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and individual investigators at NASA Ames and elsewhere. Our partnership with the Citizen CATE Experiment and involvement in the total solar eclipse which passed through our campus on August 21, 2017, will be discussed. The PAARE project continues to strengthen our partnership with Clemson. We are close to completing a memorandum of agreement between the two institutions that will allow for the seamless transfer of an undergraduate from SC State to Clemson’s graduate program in physics and astronomy. Additionally, we have worked together under the Citizen CATE project and through other research activities. SC State is a member of the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) and participates through its faculty and undergraduates, one of whom (Wesley Red) is reporting on his summer internship at this conference. We also served as the state coordinator for South Carolina for the Citizen CATE Experiment. The August 21st path of totality crossed through our campus and the campus of our partner Clemson University. Additional colleges, universities and citizen scientist groups partnered with us to provide 7 sites of coverage across South Carolina from the foothills of the Appalachian mountains to the Atlantic Ocean near the site of departure of the shadow from the continental U.S. Support for this work includes our NSF PAARE award AST-1358913 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. CATE work has been supported by NASA SMD award NNX16AB92A to the National Solar Observatory. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu

  5. Opportunities for Funding at NSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafafi, Zakya H.

    2009-03-01

    Materials science, inter- and multi-disciplinary in nature, provides the bridge to many areas of fundamental and applied sciences such as biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, computer sciences, and engineering. Strong links that may exist between materials science and other disciplines, such as biology or chemistry or physics, very often lead to novel applications and enable technologies of great benefit to our society. The Division of Materials Research (DMR) invested 274.0 M in FY 2008 and is estimated to invest 324.6 M in FY 2009 funding research and education as well as enabling tools & instrumentation for individual investigators, groups, centers, and national facilities. DMR programs cover a wide spectrum of materials research and education ranging from condensed matter and materials physics, solid-state and materials chemistry, multifunctional, hybrid, electronic, photonic, metallic, ceramic, polymeric, bio-materials, composites and nanostructures to list a few. New modes of funding, research opportunities and directions, such as the recent SOLAR solicitation, will be described. This Solar Energy Initiative launched jointly by three divisions, namely Chemistry, Materials Research and Mathematical Science is aimed at supporting truly interdisciplinary efforts that address the scientific challenges of highly efficient harvesting, conversion, and storage of solar energy. The goal of this new program is to create a new modality of linking the mathematical with the chemical and materials sciences to develop transformative paradigms based on the integrated expertise and synergy from three disciplinary communities. DMR is also seeking new ways to transform materials science and education, and make it more attractive as a career for bright, young women & men. A description will be given of several workshops held this year and planned for next year with this purpose in mind. Outreach programs that emphasize how the innovations resulting from materials research

  6. 5 CFR 534.405 - Performance awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... one-half of the membership of a Performance Review Board must be career SES appointees. The only...) This section covers the payment of performance awards to career appointees in the Senior Executive Service (SES). (1) To be eligible for an award, the individual must have been an SES career appointee as...

  7. The ADVANCE Program: Targeting the Increase in the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperanca, S.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of NSF's ADVANCE Program is to help increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers. The Program tries to address this under representation by focusing on support for men and women with three approaches: institutional (Institutional Transformation), grass-root (Leadership), and individual (Fellows) support. The ADVANCE Program alternates with a round of Institutional and Leadership awards in one year and a Fellows competition the next. Since its inception in 2001, NSF has had two competitive rounds for each of the three award types and will have spent approximately 75 M\\ by the end of the next fiscal year (2004). The first and second ADVANCE Institutional Transformation competitions (FY 2001 and 2003) received over 70 proposals each. These awards are for multi-year support in the amount of 3-4M\\ each. Details and access to the websites for the ADVANCE programs of each institution can be found in NSF's ADVANCE webpage at http://nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/advance/itwebsites.htm. The number of proposals submitted for the Leadership awards competition dropped from 35 in 2001 to 26 in 2003, despite an increase in the allowed award size for the second round. In terms of projected goals, this part of ADVANCE is perhaps the most eclectic. Some Leadership awards were made to professional societies to work specifically with their respective scientific communities in identifying needs that might be peculiar to a field of science. In the first round of the Leadership awards, PI Mary-Anne Holmes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators received a grant to work with the Association of Women Geoscientists to determine the current status of women geoscientists in the US. These grantees hope to disseminate the information gathered under this award broadly in order to educate women students and faculty on strategies to

  8. Distinguished Lectureship Award on the Applications of Physics: Illuminating My Career - From Flash Gordon to Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James

    2015-03-01

    As a child, I was fascinated by television programs about Flash Gordon. His partner in conquering the universe was Dr. Alexis Zarkov, a physicist, who had invented, among other things, a death ray gun. My personal ``death ray'' was a magnifying glass, focusing sunlight on unsuspecting insects, like crawling ants. I also practiced sneaking up on resting, flying, stinging insects and burning their wings before they could take off and attack me. So I understood something about the power of sunlight. In my senior year of high school, I had a fabulous physics teacher, Lewis E. Love, and I knew after one week that I wanted to be a physicist, not a medical doctor, which is the career my parents wanted me to pursue. It turns out that the first laser functioned on May 16, 1960, just one month before I graduated from high school, and it was inevitable that I would pursue a career working with lasers. My first job as a physicist, during the summer of 1963, was working with lasers at TRG, Inc. a small company whose guru was Gordon Gould, now recognized as the inventor of the laser. After three summers at TRG, I spent three years working on nonlinear optics for my PhD thesis, under the guidance of Prof. Nicolaas Bloembergen, who later won the Nobel Prize in Physics for codifying nonlinear optics. Following completion of my PhD research in 1969, I joined IBM Research, where I have worked ever since. Upon joining the Quantum Electronics group in the Physical Sciences Dept. of the T.J. Watson Research Center, my management told me to ``do something great'' with lasers. After working on atomic spectroscopy with dye lasers through the 1970s, I had the inspiration to acquire an excimer laser for the Laser Physics and Chemistry group. Using this laser, my colleagues and I discovered excimer laser surgery, capable of removing human and animal tissue with great precision, while leaving the underlying and adjacent tissue free of collateral damage. This discovery laid the foundation for

  9. Supporting "The Best and Brightest" in Science and Engineering: NSF Graduate Research Fellowships

    OpenAIRE

    Richard B. Freeman; Tanwin Chang; Hanley Chiang

    2005-01-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF) is a highly prestigious award for science and engineering (S&E) graduate students. This paper uses data from 1952 to 2004 on the population of over 200,000 applicants to the GRF to examine the determinants of the number and characteristics of applicants and the characteristics of awardees. In the early years of the program, GRF awards went largely to physical science and mathematics students and disproportionately to w...

  10. Research and Education: Planning an Effective Outreach Program in Balance with a Research Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Brian

    2002-04-01

    As scientific scholars and educators we are in a position to make a difference in outreach efforts to elementary and high school students as well as the general public, in addition to mentoring undergraduate and doctoral students. Outreach is a major component of the CAREER grant, the Lederman fellowship, as well as the primary focus of the Young Physicists Outreach Panel (YPOP). As recipients of these awards, and participants in YPOP, we would like to share our insights with the audience. The talk will cover the topics of YPOP, the Lederman Fellowship, and the CAREER grant. The Lederman Fellowship is awarded in recognition of Leon Lederman's legacy as an educator, where the fellows participate in educational/outreach programs of their choice. The NSF makes the CAREER awards to junion faculty. Outreach is of fundamental importance in these grants, with a 40 percent weight attached to the outreach and education component of the proposal. The speakers, a graduate student, a post-doctoral research fellow, and an Assistant Professor, will describe the educational/outreach activities they have been involved in, and discuss how outreach can be integrated into a career in physics research.

  11. Update on the NSF PAARE Program at SC State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald K.; Ajello, Marco; Brittain, Sean D.; Cash, Jennifer; Hartmann, Dieter; Ho, Shirley; Howell, Steve B.; King, Jeremy R.; Leising, Mark D.; Smith, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    We report on results from our NSF PAARE program during Year 2 of the project. Our partnership under this PAARE award includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) as well as individual investigators at NASA Ames and Carnegie Mellon University. Our recent work on variable and peculiar stars, work with the Kepler Observatory and our educational products in cosmology for non-STEM majors will be presented. We have successfully piloted sharing our teaching resources by offering an upper-level astrophysics course taught at Clemson via video conferencing , allowing a graduating senior from SC State to take a course not available through his home institution. Additionally, we are working on a memorandum of agreement between the two institutions that will allow for the seamless transfer of an undergraduate from SC State to Clemson’s graduate program in physics and astronomy. Our curriculum work includes new web-based cosmology activities and laboratory experiments. SC State undergraduates are reporting at this conference on their work with the light curves of semiregular variables using Kepler data. Additionally, we are heavily involved in the Citizen CATE Experiment. A PAARE scholarship student from SC State and the PAARE PI traveled to Indonesia for the March 2016 solar eclipse. Their results are also being presented elsewhere at this conference (see Myles McKay’s poster). Support for this work includes our NSF PAARE award AST-1358913 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Additional support has been provided by the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium and from NASA to SC State under awards NNX11AB82G and NNX13AC24G. CATE work has been supported by NASA SMD award NNX16AB92A to the National Solar Observatory. Additional details can be found at: http://physics.scsu.edu

  12. NSF-CBMS Regional Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Rubenfeld, Lester

    1981-01-01

    The articles of these proceedings arise from a NSF-CBMS regional conference on the mathematical modeling of the hearing process, that was held at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the summer of 1980. To put the a=ticles in perspective, it is best to briefly review the history of suc~ modeling. It has proceeded, more or less, in three stages. The first was initiated by Herman Helmholtz in the 1880's, whose theories dominated the subject for years. However, because of his lack of accurate experimental data and his heuristic arguments it became apparent that his models needed revision. Accordingly, based on the experimental observations of von Bekesy, the "long wave" theories were developed in the 1950's by investigators such as Zwislocki, Peterson, and Bogert. However, as the ex?eri~ents became more refined (such as Rhode's ~wssbauer Measurements) even these models came into question. This has brought on a flurry of 'activity in recent years into how to extend the models to account for these more recent eXT. ...

  13. Society News: Fellow sets new world record; RAS thesis prize winners; Galileo in the courtyard; Need a room? Society announces new award for early-career researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Generous sponsorship from Winton Capital Management has made possible two new RAS Awards, to be given annually to postdoctoral researchers who have made outstanding progress in the years immediately after their PhD.

  14. Professional Development for Graduate Students through Internships at Federal Labs: an NSF/USGS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, E.; Jones, E.; Patino, L. C.; Wasserman, E.; Isern, A. R.; Davies, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2013 the White House initiated an effort to coordinate STEM education initiatives across federal agencies. This idea spawned several important collaborations, one of which is a set of National Science Foundation programs designed to place graduate students in federal labs for 2-12 months of their Ph.D. training. The Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP) and the Graduate Student Preparedness program (GSP) each have the goal of exposing PhD students to the federal work environment while expanding their research tools and mentoring networks. Students apply for supplementary support to their Graduate Research Fellowship (GRIP) or their advisor's NSF award (GSP). These programs are available at several federal agencies; the USGS is one partner. At the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists propose projects, which students can find online by searching USGS GRIP, or students and USGS scientists can work together to develop a research project. At NSF, projects are evaluated on both the scientific merit and the professional development opportunities they afford the student. The career development extends beyond the science (new techniques, data, mentors) into the professional activity of writing the proposal, managing the budget, and working in a new and different environment. The USGS currently has 18 GRIP scholars, including Madeline Foster-Martinez, a UC Berkeley student who spent her summer as a GRIP fellow at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center working with USGS scientist Jessica Lacy. Madeline's Ph.D. work is on salt marshes and she has studied geomorphology, accretion, and gas transport using a variety of research methods. Her GRIP fellowship allowed her to apply new data-gathering tools to the question of sediment delivery to the marsh, and build and test a model for sediment delivery along marsh edges. In addition, she gained professional skills by collaborating with a new team of scientists, running a large-scale field deployment, and

  15. US Global Change Research Program Distributed Cost Budget Interagency Funds Transfer from DOE to NSF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhle, Maria [National Science Foundation (NSF), Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-22

    These funds were transferred from DOE to NSF as DOE's contribution to the U.S. Global Change Research Program in support of 4 internationalnactivities/programs as approved by the U.S. Global Change Research Program on 14 March 2014. The programs are the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme, the DIVERSITAS programme, and the World Climate Research Program. All program awards ended as of 09-23-2015.

  16. NCI Research Specialist Award (R50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Award enables scientists to pursue stable research careers within an existing cancer research program, but not serve as independent investigators. Letter of Intent due: January 2, 2017 Application due: February 2, 2017

  17. 10 years of Elsevier/JQSRT awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, José; Bernath, Peter F.; Mengüç, M. Pinar; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2017-10-01

    The Elsevier award program administered by the Editorial Board of the Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer (JQSRT) was conceived in June of 2006 at the 9th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in St. Petersburg, Russia. Initially the program included three annual Elsevier/JQSRT awards for exceptional early-career scientists working in the main research fields covered by JQSRT: quantitative spectroscopy, radiative transfer, and electromagnetic scattering. In June of 2010 at the 12th Electromagnetic and Light Scattering Conference in Helsinki, Finland, it was decided to expand the award program to include three biennial Elsevier awards intended to celebrate fundamental life-time achievements of internationally recognized leaders in the same research fields. Finally, in 2013 the Elsevier award program was augmented to include a fourth annual early-career award in the category of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing.

  18. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th…

  19. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Early-career scientists honoured Nine physicists were among 67 US-based researchers to be awarded a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers at a White House ceremony in late December 2008. The award comes with up to five years' funding for research deemed critical to government missions. This year's winners include nuclear physicist Mickey Chiu and particle physicist Hooman Davoudiasl, both of the Brookhaven National Laboratory; biophysicist Michael Elowitz of the California Institute of Technology; Chad Fertig, an atomic physicist at the University of Georgia; astronomer Charles Kankelborg of Montana State University; astrophysicist Merav Opher of George Mason University; theorist Robin Santra of the Argonne National Laboratory; quantum-computing researcher Raymond Simmons of the National Institute of Standards and Technologies in Boulder, Colorado; and string theorist Anastasia Volovich of Brown University.

  20. Award for Lise Meitner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    It is a matter of history that the work in the 1930's of Lise Meitner, Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann played a great part in pointing the way to exploiting the possibilities of fission. One of the most interesting occasions the Agency has known came in 1963 when Lise Meitner paid a visit to talk about her life as a scientist, thus returning to the city where she had started her university career in 1901. Her account of a career which had brought her into contact with scientists such as Einstein, Planck, Rutherford, Bohr and many others took her listeners back to the birth of the atomic age. A photograph is shown taken at Dr. Meitner's home in Cambridge, UK, when she received the Enrico Fermi award for 1966, shared with Hahn and Strassmann

  1. CMS Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Ali Mohammad Rafiee receives the CMS Gold Award from Michel Della Negra of CMS. As part of the fifth annual CMS Awards, Iranian contractor HEPCO, located in Arak, an industrial town 200 km west of Tehran, received their Gold Award in a ceremony held on 14 June 2004 (the other award winners were reported in bulletin 13/2004). The Awards are given each year to a small number of the approximately one thousand contractors working on the CMS project. Gold Awards are given for outstanding technical achievement in work carried out for the detector. HEPCO received the Award for the excellent quality of their work in constructing two 25 tonne support tables, two 75 tonne shields (FCS) and eight supporting brackets to lower the HF into the cavern. Welds and machining obtained tolerances that were very difficult in structures of that size. Mr. A. M. Rafiee, the General Manager of the company, acknowledged the benefits of this collaboration, and thanked the efforts and skills of the many staff involved.

  2. What Lies Behind NSF Astronomer Demographics? Subjectivities of Women, Minorities and Foreign-born Astronomers within Meshworks of Big Science Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen, Reynal; Gu, D.; Holbrook, J.; Murillo, L. F.; Traweek, S.

    2011-01-01

    Our current research focuses on the trajectory of scientists working with large-scale databases in astronomy, following them as they strategically build their careers, digital infrastructures, and make their epistemological commitments. We look specifically at how gender, ethnicity, nationality intersect in the process of subject formation in astronomy, as well as in the process of enrolling partners for the construction of instruments, design and implementation of large-scale databases. Work once figured as merely technical support, such assembling data catalogs, or as graphic design, generating pleasing images for public support, has been repositioned at the core of the field. Some have argued that such databases enable a new kind of scientific inquiry based on data exploration, such as the "fourth paradigm" or "data-driven" science. Our preliminary findings based on oral history interviews and ethnography provide insights into meshworks of women, African-American, "Hispanic," Asian-American and foreign-born astronomers. Our preliminary data suggest African-American men are more successful in sustaining astronomy careers than Chicano and Asian-American men. A distinctive theme in our data is the glocal character of meshworks available to and created by foreign-born women astronomers working at US facilities. Other data show that the proportion of Asian to Asian American and foreign-born Latina/o to Chicana/o astronomers is approximately equal. Futhermore, Asians and Latinas/os are represented in significantly greater numbers than Asian Americans and Chicanas/os. Among professional astronomers in the US, each ethnic minority group is numbered on the order of tens, not hundreds. Project support is provided by the NSF EAGER program to University of California, Los Angeles under award 0956589.

  3. Cornell's LEPP, CHESS research labs expected to get $124 million in NSF funding for elementary particle and X-ray research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Cornell University will be awarded up to $124 million over the next five years by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to support research at the Laboratory for Elementary-Particle Physics (LEPP) and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), a national user facility" (1 page).

  4. Building a Community of Scholars: One University's Story of Students Engaged in Learning Science, Mathematics, and Engineering through a NSF S-STEM Grant--Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalevitch, Maria; Maurer, Cheryl; Badger, Paul; Holdan, Greg; Sirinterlikci, Arif

    2015-01-01

    The School of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science (SEMS) at Robert Morris University (RMU) was awarded a five-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to fund scholarships to 21 academically talented but financially challenged students majoring in the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Each…

  5. NSF-RANN Trace Contaminants Program directory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnell, P.A.; Smith, S.K.; Wilkes, C.F.

    1976-10-01

    This directory is designed to aid effective communication throughout the National Science Foundation's Trace Contaminants Program, Research Applied to National Needs. The majority of the participants in the Program are represented by name, address, telephone number, and a very brief description of research interest. The directory has five major divisions to facilitate its use. Section I contains a listing of the program managers associated with the NSF-RANN Trace Contaminants Program. Section II lists the principal investigators, co-principal investigators, and coordinators of each of the research grants in the Program. Section III lists the personnel by individual projects. Section IV contains a total alphabetic listing complete with project titles and Section V contains a keyword index. This directory is maintained by the Toxic Materials Information Center as part of the Environmental Resource Center of the Information Center Complex, Information Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  6. Hero Award

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-07

    This podcast is a lecture given by William H. Foege, MD, MPH when he was honored October 7, 2009 as the 2009 CDC Foundation Hero Award Recipient.  Created: 10/7/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/22/2009.

  7. NSF Funding Rate History By State and Organization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation — Contains FY 2006-FY 2015 National Science Foundation (NSF) funding rates for competitive research proposals by organizational unit. The funding rate is calculated by...

  8. CMS AWARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Lowette

    Working under great time pressure towards a common goal in gradual steps can sometimes cause us to forget to take a step back, and celebrate what marvels have been achieved. A general need was felt within CMS to expand the recognition for our young scientists that made outstanding, well recognized and creative contributions to CMS, which served to significantly advance the performance of CMS as a complete and powerful experiment. Therefore, the Collaboration Board endorsed in March 2009 a proposal from the CB Chair and Advisory Group to award each year the newly created "CMS Achievement Award" to fourteen graduate students and postdocs that made exceptional contributions to the Tracker, ECAL, HCAL and Muon subdetectors as well as the TriDAS project, the Commissioning of CMS and the Offline Software and Computing projects. It was also agreed that there was a need to go back in time, and retroactively attribute awards for the years 2007 and 2008 when CMS went from a bare cavern to a detect...

  9. NSF celebrates half a century with big plans

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The future looks good for the NSF as it approaches its 50th birthday. The Clinton administration has proposed a $675 million budget increase for the agency next year. The NSF has also been asked to lead most of the government's recent science initiatives such as those in nanotechnology and computing (1 page).

  10. 48 CFR 2515.215-70 - NSF negotiation authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION Negotiation Authorities 2515.215-70 NSF negotiation authorities. (a) Authorities. Citation: 42 U.S.C. 1870(c). (b) Application. When an NSF contract... international cooperation or national security.” Contracts or their modifications entered into under this...

  11. News Focus: NSF Director Erich Bloch Discusses Foundation's Problems, Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Relates the comments offered in an interview with Erich Bloch, the National Science Foundation (NSF) Director. Discusses issues related to NSF and its funding, engineering research centers, involvement with industry, concern for science education, computer centers, and its affiliation with the social sciences. (ML)

  12. 48 CFR 2527.7002 - NSF patent policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NSF patent policy. 2527... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Disposition of Rights in Inventions 2527.7002 NSF patent policy. As authorized by the National Science Board at its 230th meeting, October 15-16, 1981, the...

  13. Career Planning and Development for Early-Career Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Early career development can be looked at as being of two major phases. The first phase is the formal educational process leading to an awarded degree, postdoctoral training, and potentially formal certification in a scientific discipline. The second phase is the informal educa...

  14. Cyberinfrastructure for the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, J. A.; Vernon, F. L.; Arrott, M.; Chave, A.; Krueger, I.; Schofield, O.; Glenn, S.; Peach, C.; Nayak, A.

    2007-12-01

    The Internet today is vastly different than the Internet that we knew even five years ago and the changes that will be evident five years from now, when the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) prototype has been installed, are nearly unpredictable. Much of this progress is based on the exponential growth in capabilities of consumer electronics and information technology; the reality of this exponential behavior is rarely appreciated. For example, the number of transistors on a square cm of silicon will continue to double every 18 months, the density of disk storage will double every year, and network bandwidth will double every eight months. Today's desktop 2TB RAID will be 64TB and the 10Gbps Regional Scale Network fiber optical connection will be running at 1.8Tbps. The same exponential behavior characterizes the future of genome sequencing. The first two sequences of composites of individuals' genes cost tens of millions of dollars in 2001. Dr. Craig Venter just published a more accurate complete human genome (his own) at a cost on the order of 100,000. The J. Craig Venter Institute has provided support for the X Prize for Genomics offering 10M to the first successful sequencing of a human genome for $1,000. It's anticipated that the prize will be won within five years. Major advances in technology that are broadly viewed as disruptive or revolutionary rather than evolutionary will often depend upon the exploitation of exponential expansions in capability. Applications of these ideas to the OOI will be discussed. Specifically, the agile ability to scale cyberinfrastructure commensurate with the exponential growth of sensors, networks and computational capability and demand will be described.

  15. ESO and NSF Sign Agreement on ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    Green Light for World's Most Powerful Radio Observatory On February 25, 2003, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the US National Science Foundation (NSF) are signing a historic agreement to construct and operate the world's largest and most powerful radio telescope, operating at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelength. The Director General of ESO, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, and the Director of the NSF, Dr. Rita Colwell, act for their respective organizations. Known as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), the future facility will encompass sixty-four interconnected 12-meter antennae at a unique, high-altitude site at Chajnantor in the Atacama region of northern Chile. ALMA is a joint project between Europe and North America. In Europe, ESO is leading on behalf of its ten member countries and Spain. In North America, the NSF also acts for the National Research Council of Canada and executes the project through the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) operated by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI). The conclusion of the ESO-NSF Agreement now gives the final green light for the ALMA project. The total cost of approximately 650 million Euro (or US Dollars) is shared equally between the two partners. Dr. Cesarsky is excited: "This agreement signifies the start of a great project of contemporary astronomy and astrophysics. Representing Europe, and in collaboration with many laboratories and institutes on this continent, we together look forward towards wonderful research projects. With ALMA we may learn how the earliest galaxies in the Universe really looked like, to mention but one of the many eagerly awaited opportunities with this marvellous facility". "With this agreement, we usher in a new age of research in astronomy" says Dr. Colwell. "By working together in this truly global partnership, the international astronomy community will be able to ensure the research capabilities needed to meet the long-term demands of our scientific enterprise, and

  16. Newly established AGU awards and lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, Beth; Kumar, Mohi

    2012-05-01

    The Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring (Biogeosciences section) recognizes AGU members who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences while excelling as teachers and serving as role models for the next generation of female scientists. This new award acknowledges the importance of female mentors in enhancing gender balance in physical science career paths. The award is being endowed to honor Elizabeth Sulzman, an isotope biogeochemist and soil scientist, whose enthusiasm for teaching awed many undergraduates at Oregon State University. Current plans are to present the first Sulzman award at the 2013 Fall Meeting. Applicants must be women who are within 15 years of receiving their Ph.D., and nomination packages should include a cover letter, resumé, and three letters of recommendation. As they become available, more details will be posted on the Biogeosciences section Web site (http://www.agu.org/sections/biogeo/). The award will provide up to $1000 to one successful nominee each year, although the exact monetary amount is yet to be determined. AGU is currently accepting donations to endow this award; contact Victoria Thompson (vthompson@agu.org) to get involved.

  17. Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This award is given by the Board of Educational Affairs in recognition of the efforts of psychologists who have made distinguished contributions to education and training, who have produced imaginative innovations, or who have been involved in the developmental phases of programs in education and training in psychology. These contributions might include important research on education and training; the development of effective materials for instruction; the establishment of workshops, conferences, or networks of communication for education and training; achievement and leadership in administration that facilitates education and training; or activity in professional organizations that promote excellence. The Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education and Training in psychology recognizes a specific contribution to education and training. The Career designation is added to the award at the discretion of the Education and Training Awards Committee to recognize continuous significant contributions made over a lifelong career in psychology. This year the Education and Training Awards Committee selected a psychologist for the Career designation. The 2017 recipients of the APA Education and Training Contributions Awards were selected by the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee appointed by the Board of Educational Affairs (BEA). Members of the 2016 Education and Training Awards Committee were Erica Wise, PhD (Chair); Ron Rozensky, PhD; Jane D. Halonen, PhD; Sharon Berry, PhD (Chair Elect); Emil Rodolfa, PhD; and Sylvia A. Rosenfield, PhD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. NSF Obligations for Top 200 Institutions by Fiscal Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation — An text/xml file containing FY 2001 through FY 2015 National Science Foundation (NSF) obligations by institution for the top 200 recipients defined in terms of total...

  19. The NSF and the geosciences community: Rotating program officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiza, Rodey; Rea, David K.; Rumble, Douglas, III

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is a federal agency charged with the care and feeding of basic scientific research in U.S. colleges and universities. NSF is a major contributor toward the support of research in Earth, ocean, and atmospheric sciences, disciplines of great importance to AGU members.NSF makes a regular practice of employing scientists from universities, nonprofit research organizations, industry, and state or local governments as temporary program officers (“rotators”) with terms of service from 1 to 2 years. There are several reasons for the use of rotators: It brings to NSF people who have firsthand, recent knowledge of "what it is really like" beyond the Washington, D.C. beltway. Knowledge of new ideas, recent graduates, and a fresh look at the system are worth considerably more than the problems that arise owing to inexperienced program officers.It sheds some sunshine on internal NSF procedures when the rotator returns with his tales to his home institution.It provides NSF management with considerable flexibility in coping with changing staff requirements.

  20. Year 4 Of The NSF-funded PAARE Project At SC State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald K.; Brittain, S. D.; Cash, J. L.; Hartmann, D. H.; Howell, S. B.; King, J. R.; Leising, M. D.; Mayo, E. A.; Mighell, K. J.; Smith, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the progress made through Year 4 of "A Partnership in Observational and Computational Astronomy (POCA)". This NSF-funded project is part of the "Partnerships in Astronomy and Astrophysics Research and Education (PAARE)" program. Our partnership includes South Carolina State University (a Historically Black College/University), Clemson University (a Ph.D. granting institution) and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Fellowships provided by POCA as well as recruitment efforts on the national level have resulted in enrolling a total of four underrepresented minorities into the Ph.D. program in astronomy at Clemson. We report on the success and challenges to recruiting students into the undergraduate physics major with astronomy option at SC State. Our summer REU program under POCA includes underrepresented students from across the country conducting research at each of our three institutions. Examples are given of our inquiry-based, laboratory exercises and web- based activities related to cosmology that have been developed with PAARE funding. We discuss our ground-based photometric and spectroscopic study of RV Tauri and Semi-Regular variables which has been expanded to include successful Cycle 2 Kepler observations of a dozen of these objects reported elsewhere at this conference (see D.K. Walter, et.al.). Support for the POCA project is provided by the NSF PAARE program to South Carolina State University under award AST-0750814 as well as resources and support provided by Clemson University and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. Support for the Kepler observations is provided by NASA to South Carolina State University under award NNX11AB82G.

  1. Career adaptability and career entrenchment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes; Ambiel, Rodolfo A.M.; Noronha, Ana Paula Porto

    2015-01-01

    Career adaptability constitutes a resource that can help employees to effectively manage career changes and challenges. The goal of this study was to investigate the relationship between the two higher-order constructs of career adaptability and career entrenchment (i.e., the perceived inability

  2. Congressional hearing reviews NSF major research and facilities projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    An 8 March congressional hearing about the U.S. National Science Foundation's Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction (NSF MREFC) account focused on fiscal management and accountability of projects in that account and reviewed concerns raised by NSF's Office of Inspector General (OIG). NSF established the MREFC account in 1995 to better plan and manage investments in major equipment and facilities projects, which can cost from tens of millions to hundreds of millions of dollars, and the foundation has funded 17 MREFC projects since then. The Obama administration's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget includes funding for four MREFC projects: Advanced Laser Gravitational-Wave Observatory (AdvLIGO), Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), National Ecological Observatory (NEON), and Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). The hearing, held by a subcommittee of the House of Representatives' Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, reviewed management oversight throughout the life cycles of MREFC projects and concerns raised in recent OIG reports about the use of budget contingency funds. NSF's February 2012 manual called "Risk management guide for large facilities" states that cost contingency is "that portion of the project budget required to cover `known unknowns,'" such as planning and estimating errors and omissions, minor labor or material price fluctuations, and design developments and changes within the project scope. Committee members acknowledged measures that NSF has made to improve the MREFC oversight process, but they also urged the agency to continue to take steps to ensure better project management.

  3. Acceptance of the 2017 F.W. Clarke Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, Francis M.

    2018-03-01

    Thank you, Steelie, for that very kind and touching citation. Madam President and delegates of the 2017 Goldschmidt, I stand before you today both humbled and honored to receive the 2017F.W. Clarke Award from the Geochemical Society. It is quite intimidating to see the distinguished list of past recipients of this award. The accomplished careers of these individuals attest to the prestige of this great honor, and I consider myself fortunate to be listed among these individuals. Although I was elated by the news that I will receive this award, I also recognize that there are many other early career scientists that are equally deserving of such accolades. I consider it an honor to be part of such a strong community of early career geochemists, and I look forward to seeing the scientific accomplishments that will be achieved by our generation in the coming decades.

  4. Career success in a boundaryless career world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arthur, Michael B.; Khapova, S.N.; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares contemporary career theory with the theory applied in recent career success research. The research makes inconsistent use of career theory, and in particular neglects the interdependence of the objective and subjective careers, and boundaryless career issues of

  5. Awards for Lyn Evans and Philippe Lebrun

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lyn Evans has received the American Physical Society’s Robert R. Wilson Prize, while Philippe Lebrun has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the Wrocław University of Technology in Poland. Lyn Evans in front of an LHC dipole magnet. Philippe Lebrun (centre) with the Dean of the Faculty of mechanical and power engineering of the Wrocław University during the ceremony (courtesy of Laurent Tavian).Numerous honours are going to the LHC and those behind it even before this exceptional machine begins operation. The LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, has recently been awarded the "Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators" by the American Physical Society (APS). According to the citation, the prize was awarded "for a sustained career of technical innovation and leadership in the SPS proton-antiproton collider, culminating in the construction and commissioning of the LHC&am...

  6. NWWA Science Award given

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Bill

    John G. Ferris, a U.S. Geological Survey retiree, received the National Water Well Association (NWWA) Science Award for 1985 on September 10, 1985, in Baltimore, Md. The award recognizes Ferris's renowned contributions to the science of groundwater.

  7. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) and gadolinium-based contrast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), unknown before March 1997 and first described in 2000, is a systemic disorder characterised by widespread tissue fibrosis. The first known case occurred in 1997, after the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) at high doses in patients with renal failure had become routine.

  8. The design of a switchyard for the NSF isotope separator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolm, I.C.; Grant, I.S.

    1982-01-01

    In examining design requirements for the optics of the NSF isotope separator, first-order considerations, voltage requirements, second-order considerations, and shim coil design are discussed. The results are given of a computer study of the system comprising of quadrupole triplet, magnetic and electrostatic sectors. The effects of the accuracy in the fabrication of the electrostatic sector are considered. (U.K.)

  9. Announcing the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for Post-Doctoral Fellows and Ph.D. Students

    OpenAIRE

    Tesh, Vernon L.

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of promoting the development of early career investigators in the field of toxinology, Toxins welcomed applications for the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for post-doctoral fellows and Ph.D. students. [...

  10. Announcing the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for Post-Doctoral Fellows and Ph.D. Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon L. Tesh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of promoting the development of early career investigators in the field of toxinology, Toxins welcomed applications for the 2016 Toxins Travel Awards for post-doctoral fellows and Ph.D. students. [...

  11. 76 FR 39615 - Applications for New Awards; Promise Neighborhoods Program-Implementation Grant Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... talking with their child about the importance of college and career; or --possible fourth indicator TBD by... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Applications for New Awards; Promise Neighborhoods Program-- Implementation Grant Competition AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education. ACTION...

  12. NSF-Sponsored Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Glover, D. M.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Work, T. T.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem research projects are inherently interdisciplinary and benefit from improved access to well-documented data. Improved data sharing practices are important to the continued exploration of research themes that are a central focus of the ocean science community and are essential to interdisciplinary and international collaborations that address complex, global research themes. In 2006, the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to serve the data management requirements of scientific investigators funded by the National Science Foundation’s Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections. BCO-DMO staff members work with investigators to manage marine biogeochemical, ecological, and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research. These valuable data sets are documented, stored, disseminated, and protected over short and intermediate time frames. One of the goals of the BCO-DMO is to facilitate regional, national, and international data and information exchange through improved data discovery, access, display, downloading, and interoperability. In May 2010, NSF released a statement to the effect that in October 2010, it is planning to require that all proposals include a data management plan in the form of a two-page supplementary document. The data management plan would be an element of the merit review process. NSF has long been committed to making data from NSF-funded research publicly available and the new policy will strengthen this commitment. BCO-DMO is poised to assist in creating the data management plans and in ultimately serving the data and information resulting from NSF OCE funded research. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: geospatial and text-based data discovery and access systems; recent enhancements to data search tools; data

  13. Career Transitions and Career Success in the "New" Career Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudzikowski, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The "new" career, most notably the boundaryless career, is associated with high career mobility, which is in turn associated with employability and career success of individuals. The current study examined how frequency, form (organisational, horizontal or vertical) and impact (objective career success) of career transitions have changed…

  14. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Neil Lutsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Neil Lutsky. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Distinguished Teaching Award…

  15. 21st Century Kinematics : The 2012 NSF Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    21st Century Kinematics focuses on algebraic problems in the analysis and synthesis of mechanisms and robots, compliant mechanisms, cable-driven systems and protein kinematics. The specialist contributors provide the background for a series of presentations at the 2012 NSF Workshop. The text shows how the analysis and design of innovative mechanical systems yield increasingly complex systems of polynomials, characteristic of those systems. In doing so, takes advantage of increasingly sophisticated computational tools developed for numerical algebraic geometry and demonstrates the now routine derivation of polynomial systems dwarfing the landmark problems of even the recent past. The 21st Century Kinematics workshop echoes the NSF-supported 1963 Yale Mechanisms Teachers Conference that taught a generation of university educators the fundamental principles of kinematic theory. As such these proceedings will be provide admirable supporting theory for a graduate course in modern kinematics and should be of consid...

  16. NSF's Perspective on Space Weather Research for Building Forecasting Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Bisi, M. M.; Pulkkinen, A. A.; Webb, D. F.; Oughton, E. J.; Azeem, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    Space weather research at the National Science Foundation (NSF) is focused on scientific discovery and on deepening knowledge of the Sun-Geospace system. The process of maturation of knowledge base is a requirement for the development of improved space weather forecast models and for the accurate assessment of potential mitigation strategies. Progress in space weather forecasting requires advancing in-depth understanding of the underlying physical processes, developing better instrumentation and measurement techniques, and capturing the advancements in understanding in large-scale physics based models that span the entire chain of events from the Sun to the Earth. This presentation will provide an overview of current and planned programs pertaining to space weather research at NSF and discuss the recommendations of the Geospace Section portfolio review panel within the context of space weather forecasting capabilities.

  17. Career Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verification of Employment Life at the Lab Career Stories Dual Careers Inclusion & Diversity Work-Life ) Make yourself at home Life at the Lab Life at the Lab Inclusion & Diversity Inclusion & © & Cover Letter Tips Social Media Tips Learn More Watch Videos Employee Spotlight Student Successes

  18. Extracellular Gd-CA: Differences in prevalence of NSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, Henrik S.; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a generalized fibrotic disorder, in renal failure patients. As no prospective studies can be performed we must rely on retrospective data. From those data it is obvious that the prevalence of NSF is significantly higher after the unstable agent gadodiamide than after any other gadolinium-based agent (3-7% versus 0-1% per injection) in patients with reduced renal function. Prevalence after exposure to two gadodiamide injections is as high as 36% in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5. No report of NSF after the most stable agents has been reported in the peer-reviewed literature documenting that there is a difference between the various agents regarding triggering NSF

  19. Announcement of the Diagnostics 2016 Junior Scientists Travel Award

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of medical diagnostics by early-career investigators, including assistant professors, postdoctoral students and PhD students, and assisting them in attending international conferences in 2016, early this year Diagnostics accepted nominations for the Junior Scientists Travel Award 2016.

  20. 42 CFR 59.206 - Evaluation and grant award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Development of a capability within family planning service projects to provide pre- and in-service training to... and health services personnel; (iii) Improvement in the utilization and career development of... PLANNING SERVICES Grants for Family Planning Service Training § 59.206 Evaluation and grant award. (a...

  1. Award-Winning Faculty at a Faith-Based Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Jennifer; Jun, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the development of excellent teachers could contribute to the revision of current practices in faculty recruitment, evaluation, workload expectations, and reward systems. This grounded theory study examined the professional careers of nine award-winning faculty members of a faith-based institution of higher education. The data, collected…

  2. Virginia Tech announces AdvanceVT awards seed grants; names leadership fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Clara B.

    2004-01-01

    AdvanceVT, a comprehensive program that promotes and enhances the careers of women in science and engineering at Virginia Tech, has awarded its first seed grants and named its first leadership fellows as part of an ongoing effort to increase the number of women electing to pursue or remain in academic careers.

  3. 2004 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winner, Jeneil Biosurfactant Company, makes biobased, rhamnolipid surfactants by fermentation that are less toxic and more biodegradable than conventional surfactants.

  4. Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2009 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Steven Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This is an exceptional moment in my career, and so I want to thank all of my teachers, colleagues and mentors who have made this possible. From my co-authors and myself, many thanks to the International Atomic Energy Agency, IOP Publishing, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, and the selection committee for the great honor of receiving this award. Also gratitude to Kikuchi-sensei, not only for the inventive and visionary creation of this award, but also for being a key mentor dating back to his efforts in producing high neutron output in JT-60U. It was also a great honor to receive the award directly from IAEA Deputy Director General Burkart during the 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon. Receiving the award at this venue is particularly exciting as Daejeon is home to the new, next-generation KSTAR tokamak device that will lead key magnetic fusion research areas going forward. I would also like to thank the mayor of Daejeon, Dr Yum Hong-Chul, and all of the meeting organizers for giving us all a truly spectacular and singular welcoming event during which the award was presented. The research leading to the award would not have been possible without the support of the US Department of Energy, and I thank the Department for the continued funding of this research. Special mention must be made to a valuable co-author who is no longer with us, Professor A. Bondeson, who was a significant pioneer in resistive wall mode (RWM) research. I would like to thank my wife, Mary, for her infinite patience and encouragement. Finally, I would like to personally thank all of you that have approached and congratulated me directly. There are no units to measure how important your words have been in this regard. When notified that our paper had been shortlisted for the 2009 Nuclear Fusion Award, my co-authors responded echoing how I felt—honored to be included in such a fine collection of research by colleagues. It was unfathomable—would this paper follow the brilliant work

  5. Minority Undergraduate Training for Energy-Related Careers (MUTEC); FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, C.; Yih, T.C.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    OAK-B135 Minority Undergraduate Training for Energy-Related Careers (MUTEC). First, all the co-investigators would like to thank the Department of Energy's Minority Impact Office for awarding FIU with the MUTEC grant for the past five years. We believe it has made a difference, especially in the creation of a new, streamlined curriculum that began with the Mechanical Engineering Program and has now become college wide. Second, we have given 774 students an introduction to engineering, something that did not exist 3 years ago. Third, we have given FLAME the opportunity to participate in this program through the equivalent introduction to engineering course. Over 150 of those students have participated and have a 100% record of completing the program once, they start. Over 80% of those students have gone on to college. Fourth, we have aided 32 undergraduates continue in their engineering studies. Of those half have already graduated, and half of those have gone on to graduate school. One of these graduate school students has graduated with an MSME and another has won an NSF Scholarship. Fifth, we have created a bank of 51 2-hour tapes in 10 science and engineering science areas and covered the spectrum of math courses from geometry/trigonometry to differential equations. Sixth, we have created two examinations for use in preparation for entry into the engineering programs and in preparation for the EIT. Seventh, we have created a streamlined curriculum and four options, two of which are energy related. From these points, we believe that the program was very successful and for that we wish to thank the Department of Energy and specifically Ms. Estela Romo for her unwavering support

  6. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  7. Creativity Awards: Great Expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgour, Mark; Sasser, Sheila; Koslow, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Given the creativity inherent in advertising, one useful measure of creativity may be the advertising creativity award. Although creativity awards have been used by academics, agencies, and clients as indicators of exemplary creative work, there is surprisingly little research as to what creative elements they actually represent. Senior agency…

  8. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    test

    Example of the letter required by IDRC: Reference: IDRC Awards competition: John Smith (Please indicate the title of the award.) a) As research supervisor of Mr. John Smith, I confirm that I approve and support the research proposal submitted by the candidate. b) Mr. Smith has successfully completed the following course(s):.

  9. Pension Fund award

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Pension Fund won the Investments & Pensions Europe (IPE) 2013 Gold Award in the Medium Real-Estate Investor category. IPE is the leading European publication on the subject of pensions. The awards were judged by a panel of 22 members, which included leading European investment consultants and pension fund executives.     Théodore Economou (left), the CERN Pension Fund’s Chief Executive Officer, receives the IPE 2013 Gold Award.   The award recognised the “fresh thinking” behind the CERN Pension Fund’s updated real-estate strategy, which has brought it “focus” on “high-quality assets and diversification.” The jury also noted the Fund’s “streamlined and cost-efficient” management, and noted that CERN is “running a tight ship”. While the awards are given by a European institution, they have a worldwide scope, and winners in ot...

  10. Awards aplenty in Krakow

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    CERN will be well represented this year at the award ceremony organized by the European Physical Society (EPS) in Krakow. The Gargamelle Collaboration is being awarded the High Energy and Particle Physics prize, while Maurizio Pierini shares the Young Physicist Prize. Both Mick Storr and Andrzej Siemko will be awarded the Medal of the Polish Commission of National Education.This year’s EPS-High Energy and Particle Physics Prize is being awarded to the Gargamelle Collaboration for the discovery of the weak neutral current. Gargamelle’s large bubble chamber is now displayed in the Microcosm garden at CERN in commemoration of the discovery that led to the acceptance of the electroweak theory and the award of the Noble prize to Glashow, Salam and Weinberg in 1979. On 3 September 1973 the collaboration published two papers in the same issue of Physics Letters, one on neutral currents involving electrons, the other on neutral current interactions with hadrons (protons and neut...

  11. Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Asher, Pranoti; Farrington, John; Fine, Rana; Leinen, Margaret S.; LeBoy, Phoebe

    2011-11-01

    AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in learning why there is a higher proportion of female recipients of service and education awards over the past 2 decades. Combined with a lower rate of receipt of research awards, these results suggest that implicit (subconscious) bias in favor of male candidates still influences awardee selection. Six other professional societies (American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, American Society of Anesthesiologists, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Neuroscience, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) are participating in the project. Volunteers from each participant society attended an Association for Women in Science (AWIS)-sponsored workshop in May 2010 to examine data and review literature on best practices for fair selection of society awardees. A draft proposal for implementing these practices will be brought before the AGU Council and the Honors and Recognition Committee at their upcoming meetings.

  12. Perioperative careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicker, Paul

    2012-05-01

    When I look back at how my career started, I think to myself, what if I had undertaken the BA in Business Studies which I had been accepted for, instead of the BSc in Nursing for which I was still waiting to hear the results of my interview? Well, probably I would have spent four years studying business, followed by 40 years sitting in an office somewhere; Tesco, Sainsbury's or Marks and Spencer probably. I was lucky though, my father phoned up every couple of weeks (I was only 17 and didn't really have a clue what I wanted to do) and eventually they said 'yes' and I started my nursing career. Perhaps this is the first bit of advice for anybody thinking of a career in health:

  13. Analysis of the NSF IUSE Physics & Astronomy Education Portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    The National Science Foundation’s IUSE:EHR (Improving Undergraduate STEM Education) Program is now over 3 years old. This presentation will describe the characteristics of the awards presently in the physics & astronomy portfolio. Awards will be described based upon a) general characteristics (duration, total funding, PI rank, type of institution, etc.), b) applicability (intended audience, level, and arena of implementation), c) nature of project (educational research, practical implementation, or both), and d) pedagogical focus (curriculum, STEM recruitment, STEM retention, information collection, and tools and/or skills development). General trends and exemplars will be identified as well as voids in the portfolio. Understanding what has been funded will help attendees design future proposals that will make innovative contributions to the portfolio.

  14. NSF-RANN Trace Contaminants Program directory. [Personnel directory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purnell, P.A.; Smith, S.K.; Wilkes, C.F.

    1976-10-01

    This directory is designed to aid effective communication throughout the National Science Foundation's Trace Contaminants Program, Research Applied to National Needs. The majority of the participants in the Program are represented by name, address, telephone number, and a very brief description of research interest. The directory has five major divisions to facilitate its use. Section I contains a listing of the program managers associated with the NSF-RANN Trace Contaminants Program. Section II lists the principal investigators, co-principal investigators, and coordinators of each of the research grants in the Program. Section III lists the personnel by individual projects. Section IV contains a total alphabetic listing complete with project titles and Section V contains a keyword index. This directory is maintained by the Toxic Materials Information Center as part of the Environmental Resource Center of the Information Center Complex, Information Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Geoscience Workforce Development at UNAVCO: Leveraging the NSF GAGE Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Miller, M.

    2013-12-01

    Global economic development demands that the United States remain competitive in the STEM fields, and developing a forward-looking and well-trained geoscience workforce is imperative. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the geosciences will experience a growth of 19% by 2016. Fifty percent of the current geoscience workforce is within 10-15 years of retirement, and as a result, the U.S. is facing a gap between the supply of prepared geoscientists and the demand for well-trained labor. Barring aggressive intervention, the imbalance in the geoscience workforce will continue to grow, leaving the increased demand unmet. UNAVCO, Inc. is well situated to prepare undergraduate students for placement in geoscience technical positions and advanced graduate study. UNAVCO is a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences and in addition UNAVCO manages the NSF Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope (GAGE) facility. The GAGE facility supports many facets of geoscience research including instrumentation and infrastructure, data analysis, cyberinfrastructure, and broader impacts. UNAVCO supports the Research Experiences in the Solid Earth Sciences for Students (RESESS), an NSF-funded multiyear geoscience research internship, community support, and professional development program. The primary goal of the RESESS program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented students entering graduate school in the geosciences. RESESS has met with high success in the first 9 years of the program, as more than 75% of RESESS alumni are currently in Master's and PhD programs across the U.S. Building upon the successes of RESESS, UNAVCO is launching a comprehensive workforce development program that will network underrepresented groups in the geosciences to research and opportunities throughout the geosciences. This presentation will focus on the successes of the RESESS program and plans to expand on this success with broader

  16. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    year, paid, ... the areas of democracy, human rights and economic growth. ... Networked Economies is seeking a Research Award Recipient to explore research questions ... such as engineering or computer/information science;.

  17. CASE Recognition Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  18. Great Indoors Awards 2007

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Hollandis Maastrichtis jagati 17. XI esimest korda rahvusvahelist auhinda The Great Indoors Award. Aasta sisekujundusfirmaks valiti Masamichi Katayama asutatud Wonderwall. Auhinna said veel Zaha Hadid, Heatherwick Studio, Ryui Nakamura Architects ja Item Idem

  19. FY11 Coc Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This report displays the renewal homeless assistance projects being awarded by HUD under the 2011 Continuum of Care (CoC) competitive grants process. Approximately...

  20. Research Award: Climate Change

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or division ... successful candidate's time will include contributions to program operations, which may include ... Civil engineering. • Water resource ...

  1. 2015 Gulf Guardian Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  2. CPD Allocations and Awards

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The CPD Allocation and Award database provides filterable on-screen and exportable reports on select programs, such as the Community Development Block Grant Program,...

  3. An Analysis of NSF Geosciences Research Experience for Undergraduate Site Programs from 2009 through 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, E. L.; Patino, L. C.; Weiler, S.; Sanchez, S. C.; Colon, Y.; Antell, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) Program at the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) provides U.S. undergraduate students from any college or university the opportunity to conduct research at a different institution and gain a better understanding of research career pathways. The Geosciences REU Sites foster research opportunities in areas closely aligned with geoscience programs, particularly those related to earth, atmospheric and ocean sciences. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the Geosciences REU Site programs run in 2009 through 2011. A survey requesting information on recruitment methods, student demographics, enrichment activities, and fields of research was sent to the Principal Investigators of each of the active REU Sites. Over 70% of the surveys were returned with the requested information from about 50 to 60 sites each year. The internet is the most widely used mechanism to recruit participants, with personal communication as the second most important recruiting tool. The admissions rate for REU Sites in Geosciences varies from less than 10% to 50%, with the majority of participants being rising seniors and juniors. Many of the participants come from non-PhD granting institutions. Among the participants, gender distribution varies by discipline, with ocean sciences having a large majority of women and earth sciences having a majority of men. Regarding ethnic diversity, the REU Sites reflect the difficulty of attracting diverse students into Geosciences as a discipline; a large majority of participants are Caucasian and Asian students. Furthermore, participants from minority-serving institutions and community colleges constitute a small percentage of those taking part in these research experiences. The enrichment activities are very similar across the REU Sites, and mimic activities common to the scientific community, including intellectual exchange of ideas (lab meetings, seminars, and professional meetings

  4. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  5. Demonstration of differential quantitative requirements for NSF among multiple vesicle fusion pathways of GLUT4 using a dominant-negative ATPase-deficient NSF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiaoli; Matsumoto, Hideko; Hinck, Cynthia S.; Al-Hasani, Hadi; St-Denis, Jean-Francois; Whiteheart, Sidney W.; Cushman, Samuel W.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relative participation of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) in vivo in a complex multistep vesicle trafficking system, the translocation response of GLUT4 to insulin in rat adipose cells. Transfections of rat adipose cells demonstrate that over-expression of wild-type NSF has no effect on total, or basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface expression of HA-tagged GLUT4. In contrast, a dominant-negative NSF (NSF-D1EQ) can be expressed at a low enough level that it has little effect on total HA-GLUT4, but does reduce both basal and insulin-stimulated cell-surface HA-GLUT4 by ∼50% without affecting the GLUT4 fold-translocation response to insulin. However, high expression levels of NSF-D1EQ decrease total HA-GLUT4. The inhibitory effect of NSF-D1EQ on cell-surface HA-GLUT4 is reversed when endocytosis is inhibited by co-expression of a dominant-negative dynamin (dynamin-K44A). Moreover, NSF-D1EQ does not affect cell-surface levels of constitutively recycling GLUT1 and TfR, suggesting a predominant effect of low-level NSF-D1EQ on the trafficking of GLUT4 from the endocytic recycling compared to the intracellular GLUT4-specific compartment. Thus, our data demonstrate that the multiple fusion steps in GLUT4 trafficking have differential quantitative requirements for NSF activity. This indicates that the rates of plasma and intracellular membrane fusion reactions vary, leading to differential needs for the turnover of the SNARE proteins

  6. Career Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Margery

    2012-01-01

    While a main goal for corporate trainers traditionally has been to train employees to reach organizational goals, many trainers may find their roles expanding. With companies cutting back on staffing and consolidating multiple job roles into single positions, career development has taken on a much larger significance. At forward-thinking…

  7. Volcanic Surface Deformation in Dominica From GPS Geodesy: Results From the 2007 NSF- REU Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, R.; James, S.; Styron, R. H.; Turner, H. L.; Ashlock, A.; Cavness, C.; Collier, X.; Fauria, K.; Feinstein, R.; Staisch, L.; Williams, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Cothren, J.

    2007-12-01

    GPS measurements have been collected on the island of Dominica in the Lesser Antilles between 2001 and 2007, with five month-long campaigns completed in June of each year supported in part by a NSF REU Site award for the past two years. All GPS data were collected using dual-frequency, code-phase receivers and geodetic-quality antenna, primarily choke rings. Three consecutive 24 hr observation days were normally obtained for each site. Precise station positions were estimated with GIPSY-OASISII using an absolute point positioning strategy and final, precise orbits, clocks, earth orientation parameters, and x-files. All position estimates were updated to ITRF05 and a revised Caribbean Euler pole was used to place our observations in a CAR-fixed frame. Time series were created to determine the velocity of each station. Forward and inverse elastic half-space models with planar (i.e. dike) and Mogi (i.e. point) sources were investigated. Inverse modeling was completed using a downhill simplex method of function minimization. Selected site velocities were used to create appropriate models for specific regions of Dominica, which correspond to known centers of pre-historic volcanic or recent shallow, seismic activity. Because of the current distribution of GPS sites with robust velocity estimates, we limit our models to possible magmatic activity in the northern, proximal to the volcanic centers of Morne Diablotins and Morne aux Diables, and southern, proximal to volcanic centers of Soufriere and Morne Plat Pays, regions of the island. Surface deformation data from the northernmost sites may be fit with the development of a several km-long dike trending approximately northeast- southwest. Activity in the southern volcanic centers is best modeled by an expanding point source at approximately 1 km depth.

  8. Closing Remarks and Awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Van der Meer, K.; Hamilton, A.

    2015-01-01

    M. Whitaker: On behalf of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, we are grateful for the opportunity to support this symposium. The number of symposium events-presentations, posters, technical demonstrations, panel discussions, and receptions - has been completely overwhelming and truly impressive. My compliments to the IAEA organization staff for a spectacular event. I have gained a much better appreciation for why these are only once every four years. This symposium has provided an important opportunity to reengage with friends and colleagues from around the globe to discuss international safeguards topics. The theme this year is very appropriate. So much of our work relies upon people. Together we work to develop the strategies that ensure that international safeguards are effectively implemented to provide the world the assurances that they expect from us. Thank you for this opportunity to share in the organization and execution of this symposium. K. Van der Meer: It is my pleasure to give the last poster awards. We have had two award ceremonies already this week on Wednesday and Thursday to recognize the best posters in those sessions. Today it will be two parts. First we will give the award for the best posters for this morning's sessions, and then we have four special awards: Gold, Silver, Bronze and the New Generation Symposium Award. These are the awards for the best posters for the whole week. The New Generation Symposium Award is for recognition of a younger participant and the prize is also for a younger participant. The full list of award winners is available under the symposium website. The IAEA recognizes the generous donations by INMM and ESARDA of the following prizes given as awards for the best posters: · Best e-poster advertisement per session: free subscription to the ESARDA Bulletin; · Best e-poster per session: free membership in INMM; · Best poster of the week ''Bronze'': free registration for the 8th INMM

  9. Promoting sustainable excellence through diversity in research careers

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Dr. Vinkenburg, Claartje; Guinot, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Excellence is a non-negotiable in science, a necessary condition for a successful careers as well as the funding of research projects. Scientific excellence is the sole criterion used by the European Research Council (ERC) to award frontier research grants. However, statistics show that there are still persistent inequalities between men and women scientists in ERC funding success as well as other career outcomes. Dr. Claartje Vinkenburg, of the VU University of Amsterdam, will illustrate two projects commissioned by the ERC Gender Balance Working Group to uncover and address this phenomenon. The first project [ERCAREER (Vinkenburg PI, 2012-2014)] is about unconventional careers and career breaks, and studies the gendered nature of career paths of ERC applicants. Findings show that “conventional careers” in science are inextricably tied to normative beliefs about the ideal academic, mobility, independence, and excellence. Allowing unconventional careers to address the issue results in ir...

  10. NRAO Response to NSF Senior Review of Astronomy Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Astronomy Senior Review Committee report (pdf file), released today, made major recommendations for restructuring the NSF's ground-based astronomy efforts, including significant changes for the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The committee's report urged that leadership in radio astronomy, including millimeter- and submillimeter-wave observatories, "remain centered at NRAO as it is, by far, the largest radio astronomy organization in the world." The report praised the record of management of NRAO and the scientific capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). However, the report also recommended that some reductions and changes occur at the NRAO by 2011. Specifically, the report recommended that: (a) VLBA operations make a transition to a significant reliance on international funding or risk closure; (b) GBT operations costs be reduced; and (c) NRAO scientific staff costs be reduced. "The Senior Review Committee had the very difficult task of reconciling the needs of current facilities and funding new facilities for the future of astronomy. We appreciate their efforts and look forward to working with the NSF to ensure that the valuable and unique research capabilities of our NRAO telescopes continue to serve the astronomical community," said Dr. Fred K.Y. Lo, NRAO Director. The VLBA provides the greatest angular resolution, or ability to see fine detail, of any telescope in the world, greatly exceeding the capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope and the future Square Kilometre Array. The committee recognized that, "if the VLBA is closed, a unique capability would likely be lost for decades." "The VLBA is used by scientists from around the world because of its unique capabilities. It has produced landmark research milestones and the committee recognized in its

  11. The Impact of Career Boundarylessness on Subjective Career Success: The Role of Career Competencies, Career Autonomy, and Career Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colakoglu, Sidika N.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theoretical frameworks of the career enactment and the stress perspectives, this study develops and tests a model in which career boundarylessness affects subjective career success through its effect on three career competencies--knowing-why, knowing-how, and knowing-whom--and career autonomy and career insecurity. The results…

  12. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  13. NSF-Sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, S.

    2014-12-01

    The NSF-sponsored Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education made major progress toward developing a collective community vision for the geosciences. A broad spectrum of the geoscience education community, ~200 educators from research universities/four and two year colleges, focused on preparation of undergraduates for graduate school and future geoscience careers, pedagogy, use of technology, broadening participation/retention of underrepresented groups, and preparation of K-12 science teachers. Participants agreed that key concepts, competencies and skills learned throughout the curriculum were more important than specific courses. Concepts included understanding Earth as complex, dynamic system, deep time, evolution of life, natural resources, energy, hazards, hydrogeology, surface processes, Earth materials and structure, and climate change. Skills/competencies included ability to think spatially and temporally, reason inductively and deductively, make and use indirect observations, engage in complex open, coupled systems thinking, and work with uncertainty, non-uniqueness, and incompleteness, as well as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and ability to think like a scientist and continue to learn. Successful ways of developing these include collaborative, integrative projects involving teams, interdisciplinary projects, fieldwork and research experiences, as well as flipped classrooms and integration and interactive use of technology, including visualization, simulation, modeling and analysis of real data. Wider adoption of proven, effective best practices is our communities' main pedagogical challenge, and we focused on identifying implementation barriers. Preparation of future teachers in introductory and general geoscience courses by incorporating Next Generation Science Standards and using other sciences/math to solve real world geoscience problems should help increase diversity and number of future geoscientists and

  14. Transforming Research in Oceanography through Education, Ethnography and Rapidly Evolving Technologies: An NSF-INSPIRE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.; Croff Bell, K. L.; Pallant, A.; Mirmalek, Z.; Jasanoff, S.; Rajan, K.

    2014-12-01

    This paper will discuss a new NSF-INSPIRE project that brings together research conducted in the fields of Ocean Sciences, Education & Human Resources and Computer and Information Science & Engineering. Specifically, our objective is to investigate new methods by which telepresence can be used to conduct cutting edge research and provide authentic educational experiences to undergraduate students, remotely. We choose to conduct this research in an Oceanographic context for two reasons: first with the move toward smaller research ships in the national Oceanographic research fleet, we anticipate that access to berth space at sea will continue to be at a premium. Any component of traditional oceanographic research that can be ported to shore without loss of effectiveness would be of immediate benefit to the Ocean Sciences. Equally, however, we argue that any improvements to work place and/or education practices that we can identify while delivering research and education from the bottom of the deep ocean should be readily mappable to any other scientific or engineering activities that seek to make use of telepresence in less extreme remote environments. Work on our TREET project, to-date, has included recruitment of 6 early career scientists keen to take advantage of the research opportunity provided, together with two senior science mentors with experience using Telepresence and a cohort of undergraduate students at three of the ECS partner Universities, spanning 4 time zones across the continental US. Following a 12-week synchronous on-line seminar series taught in Spring-Summer 2014, the entire team joined together at the Inner Space Center in Sept-Oct 2014 to participate, virtually, in a cruise of research and exploration to the Kick'Em Jenny underwater volcano and adjacent cold seep sites, conducted by the Ocean Exploration Trust's ROV Hercules aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus. Our presentation will include preliminary results from that cruise.

  15. Institutional transformation: An analysis of change initiatives at NSF ADVANCE institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Ellen W.

    The purpose of this study was to examine how institutional culture promoted or impeded the implementation of round one and two NSF ADVANCE initiatives designed to improve academic climates for women in science and engineering. This study was conducted in two phases. In phase one, 35 participants from 18 institutions were interviewed to answer three research questions. Participants identified a policy, process, or program designed to improve academic cultures for women in science and engineering fields. Participants also identified strategies that promoted the implementation of these efforts, and discussed factors that impeded these efforts. In phase two, site visits were conducted at two institutions to answer a fourth research question. How did institutional culture shape the design and implementation of faculty search processes? Policies, processes, and programs were implemented by participants at the institutional, departmental, and individual levels and included family friendly and dual career policies at the institutional level, improved departmental faculty search and climate improvement processes, and mentoring programs and training for department heads at the individual level. Communication and leadership strategies were key to the successful implementation of policies, processes, and programs designed to achieve institutional transformation. Communication strategies involved shaping change messages to reach varied audiences often with the argument that change efforts would improve the climate for everyone not just women faculty members. Administrative and faculty leaders from multiple levels proved important to change efforts. Institutional Transformation Institutional culture shaped initiatives to improve faculty search processes. Faculty leaders in both settings used data to persuade faculty members of the need for change. At one site, data that included national availability information was critical to advancing the change agenda. At the other site

  16. Measurements on the NSF injector and analysing magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armitage, S.A.; Barker, D.; Eastham, D.A.; Kivlin, F.J.; Tait, N.R.S.

    1979-08-01

    Two 90 0 uniform field magnets are to be installed in the Nuclear Structure Facility (NSF). Their purpose and design are summarized. The effects of various field errors on the performance of a 90 0 double focusing magnet were investigated using a beam optics programme. The results were used to draw up the specification for the magnets. Subsequent checks were made on the angles β of the effective field boundaries with and without the field clamps in place and of the uniformity of the field along the beam orbit in the orbit plane. Checks were also made on radial uniformity in the orbit plane. In order to ensure reliability of calibration of the magnetic field in terms of the field at the NMR probe, reproducibility of field distributions for various excitation cycles was studied. Finally the performance of the magnets was checked directly using high quality α-sources located at the object point, detecting the image at the image point using a position sensitive surface barrier detector. The results of studies on the inflector magnet have been published. (author)

  17. 45 CFR 689.5 - Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... regulation. (c) If OIG determines that alleged research misconduct involves potential civil or criminal... FOUNDATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 689.5 Initial NSF handling of misconduct matters. (a) NSF staff who learn of... awardee institution of the alleged research misconduct and encourage it to undertake an inquiry; (2) Defer...

  18. 78 FR 69839 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy...

  19. 75 FR 57463 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  20. 77 FR 4027 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  1. 76 FR 41234 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  2. 76 FR 19986 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S...

  3. 75 FR 63450 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory...

  4. 76 FR 8358 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy.../NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86... Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown Building, 1000...

  5. Research Award: Canadian Partnerships

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  6. ATLAS Thesis Awards 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Biondi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on Thursday 25 February. The winners also presented their work in front of members of the ATLAS Collaboration. Winners: Javier Montejo Berlingen, Barcelona (Spain), Ruth Pöttgen, Mainz (Germany), Nils Ruthmann, Freiburg (Germany), and Steven Schramm, Toronto (Canada).

  7. FAQs for Research Awards

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    I am a student enrolled in a master's program. ... I am required to complete an internship in an organization selected by my university. Can ... Yes, you are responsible for obtaining a valid work permit and proper visa prior to starting your award.

  8. Global Cancer Humanitarian Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat Garcia-Gonzalez of the Max Foundation accepted the first annual NCI Global Cancer Medicine Humanitarian Award for her work in chronic myeloid leukemia at the NCI, Center for Global Health Symposium for Global Cancer Research, held in Boston on March 25, 2015.

  9. ISIAQ Academy Awards 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaroff, William W.; Clausen, Geo; Wargocki, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    The 13th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate (Indoor Air 2014) was convened in Hong Kong during the week of 7–12 July 2014. Professor Yuguo Li served as the Conference President. One of many highlights was the presentation of awards from the ISIAQ Academy of Fellows, which...

  10. Awards and honours

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS

    2009-01-01

    On the occasion of the international woman day, on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded “Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana” by the Italian President for her “scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project”.

  11. ATLAS Thesis Award 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Anthony, Katarina

    2018-01-01

    Winners of the ATLAS Thesis Award were presented with certificates and glass cubes during a ceremony on 22 February, 2018. They are pictured here with Karl Jakobs (ATLAS Spokesperson), Max Klein (ATLAS Collaboration Board Chair) and Katsuo Tokushuku (ATLAS Collaboration Board Deputy Chair).

  12. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Department of Energy - Office of Science Early Career Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, James

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Early Career Program began in FY 2010. The program objectives are to support the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in their careers and to stimulate research careers in the disciplines supported by the DOE Office of Science. Both university and DOE national laboratory early career scientists are eligible. Applicants must be within 10 years of receiving their PhD. For universities, the PI must be an untenured Assistant Professor or Associate Professor on the tenure track. DOE laboratory applicants must be full time, non-postdoctoral employee. University awards are at least 150,000 per year for 5 years for summer salary and expenses. DOE laboratory awards are at least 500,000 per year for 5 years for full annual salary and expenses. The Program is managed by the Office of the Deputy Director for Science Programs and supports research in the following Offices: Advanced Scientific and Computing Research, Biological and Environmental Research, Basic Energy Sciences, Fusion Energy Sciences, High Energy Physics, and Nuclear Physics. A new Funding Opportunity Announcement is issued each year with detailed description on the topical areas encouraged for early career proposals. Preproposals are required. This talk will introduce the DOE Office of Science Early Career Research program and describe opportunities for research relevant to the condensed matter physics community. http://science.energy.gov/early-career/

  14. The NSF Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Partnering with Arecibo Observatory to Offer Undergraduate and Faculty Extragalactic Radio Astronomy Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Joseph; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Balonek, Thomas J.; Cannon, John M.; Coble, Kimberly A.; Craig, David W.; Denn, Grant R.; Durbala, Adriana; Finn, Rose; Hallenbeck, Gregory L.; Hoffman, G. Lyle; Lebron, Mayra E.; Miller, Brendan P.; Crone-Odekon, Mary; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Olowin, Ronald Paul; Pantoja, Carmen; Pisano, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Jessica L.; Troischt, Parker; Venkatesan, Aparna; Wilcots, Eric M.; ALFALFA Team

    2017-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) is a consortium of 20 institutions across the US and Puerto Rico, founded to promote undergraduate research and faculty development within the extragalactic ALFALFA HI blind survey project and follow-up programs. The objective of the UAT is to provide opportunities for its members to develop expertise in the technical aspects of observational radio spectroscopy, its associated data analysis, and the motivating science. Partnering with Arecibo Observatory, the UAT has worked with more than 280 undergraduates and 26 faculty to date, offering 8 workshops onsite at Arecibo (148 undergraduates), observing runs at Arecibo (69 undergraduates), remote observing runs on campus, undergraduate research projects based on Arecibo science (120 academic year and 185 summer projects), and presentation of results at national meetings such as the AAS (at AAS229: Ball et al., Collova et al., Davis et al., Miazzo et al., Ruvolo et al, Singer et al., Cannon et al., Craig et al., Koopmann et al., O'Donoghue et al.). 40% of the students and 45% of the faculty participants have been women and members of underrepresented groups. More than 90% of student alumni are attending graduate school and/or pursuing a career in STEM. 42% of those pursuing graduate degrees in Physics or Astronomy are women.In this presentation, we summarize the UAT program and the current research efforts of UAT members based on Arecibo science, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS). This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, AST-121105, and AST-1637339.

  15. Career ladder program for registered nurses in ambulatory care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Joan; Sassaman, Becky; Phillips, Alison

    2008-01-01

    RN ladder programs are designed to inspire and reward clinical excellence. Kaiser Permanente Colorado's (KPCO) career ladder program emerged as a result of a labor-management partnership. Career ladder point assignments are reflective of the organization's priorities and values. KPCO's career ladder point tool awards RNs for formal and continuing education, professional presentations, organizational experience and experience as an RN, certifications and active professional memberships, leadership activities, research and publications, and nursing-related volunteer work. Participation in the RN career ladder requires that the nurse achieve a self-determined, manager-approved, measurable goal that will improve patient care. Career ladder nurses at KPCO were significantly more involved in leadership and interdisciplinary activities, quality improvement projects, and preceptorship.

  16. Career competencies for the modern career

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Marinka; Scheerens, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    Career development gains new meaning in the context of employability demands in a knowledge economy. In this context, increased mobility, a dynamic work environment, and an increased level of career support from employers are seen as characteristics of a modern career. All of these characteristics

  17. Airline Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airlines. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers in the airline industry, including salaries, working conditions, job requirements, and projected job opportunities. In the main part of the booklet, the following 22 job…

  18. Brokering technologies to realize the hydrology scenario in NSF BCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini, Enrico; Easton, Zachary; Fuka, Daniel; Pearlman, Jay; Nativi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    In the National Science Foundation (NSF) BCube project an international team composed of cyber infrastructure experts, geoscientists, social scientists and educators are working together to explore the use of brokering technologies, initially focusing on four domains: hydrology, oceans, polar, and weather. In the hydrology domain, environmental models are fundamental to understand the behaviour of hydrological systems. A specific model usually requires datasets coming from different disciplines for its initialization (e.g. elevation models from Earth observation, weather data from Atmospheric sciences, etc.). Scientific datasets are usually available on heterogeneous publishing services, such as inventory and access services (e.g. OGC Web Coverage Service, THREDDS Data Server, etc.). Indeed, datasets are published according to different protocols, moreover they usually come in different formats, resolutions, Coordinate Reference Systems (CRSs): in short different grid environments depending on the original data and the publishing service processing capabilities. Scientists can thus be impeded by the burden of discovery, access and normalize the desired datasets to the grid environment required by the model. These technological tasks of course divert scientists from their main, scientific goals. The use of GI-axe brokering framework has been experimented in a hydrology scenario where scientists needed to compare a particular hydrological model with two different input datasets (digital elevation models): - the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) dataset, v.2. - the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) dataset, v.3. These datasets were published by means of Hyrax Server technology, which can provide NetCDF files at their original resolution and CRS. Scientists had their model running on ArcGIS, so the main goal was to import the datasets using the available ArcPy library and have EPSG:4326 with the same resolution grid as the

  19. CMS Industries awarded gold, crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The CMS collaboration honoured 10 of its top suppliers in the seventh annual awards ceremony The representatives of the firms that recieved the CMS Gold and Crystal Awards stand with their awards after the ceremony. The seventh annual CMS Awards ceremony was held on Monday 13 March to recognize the industries that have made substantial contributions to the construction of the collaboration's detector. Nine international firms received Gold Awards, and General Tecnica of Italy received the prestigious Crystal Award. Representatives from the companies attended the ceremony during the plenary session of CMS week. 'The role of CERN, its machines and experiments, beyond particle physics is to push the development of equipment technologies related to high-energy physics,'said CMS Awards Coordinator Domenico Campi. 'All of these industries must go beyond the technologies that are currently available.' Without the involvement of good companies over the years, the construction of the CMS detector wouldn't be possible...

  20. Awards and honours

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    President of the Italian Republic, Giorgio Napolitano, presenting Fabiola Gianotti with her award on 7 March.On the occasion of International Woman’s Day on 7 March, Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson, was awarded "Commendatore della Repubblica Italiana" by the Italian President for her "scientific knowledge and her excellent management skills demonstrated in guiding the ATLAS project". Gianotti received the honorary title also for "her contribution to the prestige of the Italian scientific community in the field of nuclear physics." Further reading (in Italian only): http://www.quirinale.it/Comunicati/Comunicato.asp?id=38192 An article about the beginning of Gianotti’s term of office as ATLAS spokesperson is available from the latest issue of the CERN Courier: http://cerncourier.com/cws/article/cern/38709

  1. CMS Thesis Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 2003 CMS thesis award was presented to Riccardo Ranieri on 15 March for his Ph.D. thesis "Trigger Selection of WH → μ ν b bbar with CMS" where 'WH → μ ν b bbar' represents the associated production of the W boson and the Higgs boson and their subsequent decays. Riccardo received his Ph.D. from the University of Florence and was supervised by Carlo Civinini. In total nine thesis were nominated for the award, which was judged on originality, impact within the field of high energy physics, impact within CMS and clarity of writing. Gregory Snow, secretary of the awarding committee, explains why Riccardo's thesis was chosen, ‘‘The search for the Higgs boson is one of the main physics goals of CMS. Riccardo's thesis helps the experiment to formulate the strategy which will be used in that search.'' Lorenzo Foà, Chairperson of the CMS Collaboration Board, presented Riccardo with an commemorative engraved plaque. He will also receive the opportunity to...

  2. Career Issues in HRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on career issues in human resource development (HRD). "Are Careers What They Used To Be: A Factor Analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory" (Gerri Mukri, Sharon Confessore) is a statistical analysis of Schein's Career Orientations Inventory that finds the inventory to be a…

  3. Using curriculum vitae to compare some impacts of NSF research grants with research center funding

    OpenAIRE

    Monica Gaughan; Barry Bozeman

    2002-01-01

    While traditional grants remain central in US federal support of academic scientists and engineers, the role of multidisciplinary NSF Centers is growing. Little is known about how funding through these Centers affects scientific output or (as is an NSF aim) increases academic collaboration with industry. This paper tests the use of CVs to examine how Center funding affects researchers' publication rates and their obtaining industry grants. Copyright , Beech Tree Publishing.

  4. Motivation and career development

    OpenAIRE

    Flemr, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this diploma thesis is to outline various theories of work motivation, career growth and their practical application in sales team management within a sales organization. In the theoretical part the paper deals with the definition of essential terms including but not limited to motivation, work motivation, career and work career. Moreover, it focuses on selected motivational theories, basic criteria and current principles of managing the work career, career growth and de...

  5. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Anne Kinney, currently chief scientist of the Keck Observatory in Hawaii, has been chosen by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the US to lead its Mathematical and Physical Sciences (MPS) Directorate.

  6. Career anchors and career resilience: Supplementary constructs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Van Vuuren

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously the authors reported on a study in which an attempt was made at defining and measuring the construct career resilience (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998. The present article continues this investigation by reporting on the relationship between career resilience and career anchors, as defined in Scheins (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992 career anchor model. The aim of the study was to determine whether career anchor patterning could potentially inhibit or facilitate individuals' levels of career resilience. The "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 together with Scheins (1990 "Career Orientations Inventory" (COI were administered to 352 skilled employees. The findings regarding the statistical relationship between the two constructs are discussed. Opsomming Loopbaanankers en loopbaangehardheid: supplementere konstrukte? In n vorige publikasie van Fourie en Van Vuuren (1998 is die bevindinge aangaande die afbakening en meting van die konstruk, loopbaangehardheid, gerapporteer. In die huidige artikel word die ondersoek voortgesit met 'n beskrywing van die verwantskap tussen loopbaangehardheid en loopbaanankers, soos gedefinieer in die loopbaanankermodel van Schein (1975; 1978; 1990; 1992. Die doel met die studie was om te bepaal of die mate van loopbaanankerontplooiing individuele vlakke van loopbaangehardheid potensieel fasiliteer ofinhibeer. Die "Career Resilience Questionnaire" (CRQ (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998 is tesame met die "Career Orientation Inventory" (COI (Schein, 1990 op 352 geskoolde werknemers geadministreer. Die bevindinge betreffende die statistiese verwantskap tussen die twee konstrukte word bespreek.

  7. R&D 100 Awards | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    R&D 100 Awards R&D 100 Awards NREL has won 61 R&D 100 Awards. Widely recognized as the Oscars of Invention, the R&D 100 Awards are presented by R&D Magazine to identify and celebrate the top technological advances of the year. Recent R&D 100 Awards 2016 NREL engineers Chuck Booten

  8. Outstanding Student Paper Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    The following members in the Space Physics & Aeronomy Section received Outstanding Student Paper Awards at the 2003 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California. Arve Aksnes; Aroh Barjatya; Jacob Bortnik; Amir Caspi; Ruben Delgado; Galen Fowler; Paul G. Hanlon; Sid Henderson; Tara B. Hiebert; Chia-Lin Huang; Steven P. Joy; Eun-Hwa Kim; Colby Lemon; Yingjuan Ma; Elizabeth A. MacDonald; Jaco Minnie; Mitsuo Oka; Yoshitaka Okazaki; Erin J. Rigler; Ina P. Robertson; Patrick A. Roddy; Sang-Il Roh; Albert Y. Shih; Christopher Smithtro; Emma Spanswick; Maria Spasojevic; Hiroki Tanaka; Linghua Wang; Deirdre E. Wendel; Jichun Zhang>

  9. Award for Steve Myers

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Last Thursday Steve Myers, Leader of the Accelerator and Beams Division, received one of the UK Institute of Physics awards. He is the recipient of the 2003 Duddel Medal and Prize for his contributions to the development of major charged-particle accelerator projects at CERN. As head of the commissioning group for the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider, says the citation, his contributions have had «a direct impact on the results from LEP, which have reached a precision and extent far beyond expectation and are key in defining the Standard Model of particle physics».

  10. Atoms for peace awards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    In making their annual selection for 1968 the Atoms for Peace Award Trust has paid signal tribute to the Agency. Each of the three recipients has for many years contributed to its work. Sigvard Eklund, Abdus Salam and Henry DeWolf Smyth received their gold medallion and $30 000 honorarium at a ceremony in New York on 14 October this year. All of them have achieved high distinction in science, but their greatest efforts have been to make the world aware of the benefits to be gained from using nuclear knowledge for peace, health and prosperity. (author)

  11. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Gary [University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  12. Undergraduate Research as a Process for STEM Teaching and Learning Systemic Change: Lessons Learned from the Council on Undergraduate Research NSF CCLI and TUES Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Havholm, K. G.; Malachowski, M.; Osborn, J.; Karukstis, K.

    2013-12-01

    For more than seven years, the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR), the primary organization supporting programs, services, and advocacy for undergraduate research, has been working with support from the NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) to enhance, sustain, and institutionalize undergraduate research in diverse STEM disciplines and higher education settings. The Council on Undergraduate Research comprises more than 9000 individual and 670 institutional members within a divisional structure that includes geosciences, as well as 11 other thematic areas. Through its most recent grant: 'Transformational Learning through Undergraduate Research: Comprehensive Support for Faculty, Institutions, State Systems and Consortia' (NSF DUE CCLI III Award #09-20275), CUR has been collaborating with six higher education systems, each selected after a rigorous national application process in 2010 and 2011. These six systems, which collectively represent 79 individual institutions, are the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC), University of Wisconsin System (UWS), California State University System (CSU), City University of New York (CUNY), Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA), and Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). The more than 350 participants of faculty and senior-level administrators from the six systems are engaged in shared multi-faceted and multi-year professional development experiences. Teams from each system attended customized institutes facilitated by CUR experts in 2011-2012, during which the teams developed specific action plans focused on institutionalizing undergraduate research on their campus and within their system. The systems were reconvened as a group a year after the first institute, to chart progress toward achieving their goals. Based on interviews and surveys with participants, campus teams are making substantial progress toward implementation of robust undergraduate research programs, and are making

  13. Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Before a grant can be awarded and accepted, several pre-award activities must happen to formalize the partnership. Ensuring compliance with federal laws, a review of costs and a negotiation of the appropriate funding level must all happen in order to rece

  14. Connecting NSF funding to patent innovation in nanotechnology (2001-2004)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Zan; Chen Hsinchun; Li Xin; Roco, Mihail C.

    2006-01-01

    Nanotechnology research has experienced growth rapid in knowledge and innovations; it also attracted significant public funding in recent years. Several countries have recognized nanotechnology as a critical research domain that promises to revolutionize a wide range of fields of applications. In this paper, we present an analysis of the funding for nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and its implications on technological innovation (number of patents) in this field from 2001 to 2004. Using a combination of basic bibliometric analysis and content visualization tools, we identify growth trends, research topic distribution, and the evolution in NSF funding and commercial patenting activities recorded at the United States Patent Office (USPTO). The patent citations are used to compare the impact of the NSF-funded research on nanotechnology development with research supported by other sources in the United States and abroad. The analysis shows that the NSF-funded researchers and patents authored by them have significantly higher impact based on patent citation measures in the four-year period than other comparison groups. The NSF-authored patent impact is growing faster with the lifetime of a patent, indicating the long-term importance of fundamental research

  15. The last SPR dinner awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce

    1992-03-01

    Because the Solar-Planetary Relationships section of AGU has officially changed its name to Space Physics and Aeronomy (SPA), the December 10, 1991, section dinner award ceremony at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco was the last of the series. Presumably an SPA dinner award series will be started under President-elect Andy Nagy.We have followed our tradition of recognizing the special talents of section members at the annual dinner. This year we had eight awardees. These awards are given in fun and are intended to be humorous. The selection committee defining the awards (the awards are changed regularly to keep people from trying to win one) and selecting the awardees will have to remain anonymous. (The committee is similar to Skull and Bones, but we are politically correct in that we allow women as members.)

  16. Pierre Darriulat is awarded the André Lagarrigue Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Pierre Darriulat at the VATLY Laboratory in Hanoï. Former CERN Research Director, Pierre Darriulat, who is now Professor of Physics at VATLY in Hanoi (Vietnam), has won the 2008 André Lagarrigue Prize. This prize, instituted by the Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) at Orsay under the aegis of the French Physical Society, is awarded to front-line researchers who have had responsibility for machine/detector construction and derived maximum scientific benefit from such projects, performed in a French laboratory or in close collaboration with French groups. Pierre Darriulat has received the award in recognition of his outstanding career at the CEA, at LBL (Berkeley) and at CERN from 1964 onwards. At CERN he managed the experiments at the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) before taking charge of the UA2 collaboration from 1980 to 1986, which participated in decisive discoveries at the ppbar collider. In particular, in 1982, the UA2 experiment began observing high trans...

  17. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  18. Dentistry: Careers in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Dentistry e-mail Print Share Careers in Dentistry A dental education opens up a world of ... accredited training programs in your area . Careers in Dentistry Be a Dentist General Dentistry Dental Specialties Dental ...

  19. Second Careers in Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kellye

    1992-01-01

    Describes career changes and retirement choices made by outgoing "career" superintendents. Choices ranged from teaching and consulting to administering philanthropic organizations and launching a charter-boat business. (MLH)

  20. CareerConnector

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CareerConnector is USAID's premiere recruiting tool. It is powered by Monster and integrated with www.usajobs.gov. CareerConnector tracks the progression of a...

  1. Environmental Protection Agency Award Recipient Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itemized Award Phase information. Information about the Recipient's Responsibilities Upon Notification of the Award, The EPA Project Officer Responsibilities, and EPA Grant Specialists Responsibilities.

  2. Interpreting Early Career Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnatt, Joan; Gahlsdorf Terrell, Dianna; D'Souza, Lisa Andries; Jong, Cindy; Cochran-Smith, Marilyn; Viesca, Kara Mitchell; Gleeson, Ann Marie; McQuillan, Patrick; Shakman, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Career decisions of four teachers are explored through the concept of figured worlds in this qualitative, longitudinal case study. Participants were purposefully chosen for similarity at entry, with a range of career trajectories over time. Teacher career paths included remaining in one school, repeated changes in schools, attrition after…

  3. Ohio Career Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This resource is designed to provide Ohio labor market information for use with advisory committees to stimulate and inform dialogue about the current evaluation and future planning of programs. It provides reports for 23 career fields in 6 career clusters. Each report highlights careers and occupations in the field and answers these questions:…

  4. Career Commitment in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Diane L.

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, repeated-measures descriptive survey used to measure career commitment and its relationship to turnover and work performance in 320 newly employed registered nurses at one hospital found that career commitment is not a stable phenomenon. The direct association between career commitment and turnover and with job performance is weak.…

  5. BULGARIAN TEACHERS’ CAREER MOTIVATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislava Stoyanova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A review of several studies of teachers’ career motivation since Bulgarian Renaissance till nowadays is presented in this paper. 203 Bulgarian teachers in public schools were studied by means of a questionnaire created by Slavchov & Stoyanova (2007 measuring career motivational types, according to Moses’ typology (2003. The career motivational type of Authenticity seekers was the most preferred by the studied Bulgarian teachers, followed by Personal developers and Stability seekers. Career builders as a career motivational type was minor career motivator, the least preferred one by Bulgarian teachers. A lot of significant positive correlations existed between teachers’ career motivational types. Some social-demographic factors (such as gender, specialty, work experience, and age differentiated teachers’ career motivators. The type of Autonomy seekers was more preferred career motivator by male teachers than by female teachers in correspondence to the traditional stereotypes for men. Longer teachers’ work experience and teachers’ advance in age were related to more frequency of Stability seekers, but less frequency of Novelty seekers career motivator. Preschool and elementary school teachers preferred more strongly Authenticity seekers as a career motivator than teachers in natural sciences and mathematics. Establishing major career motivators for teachers may be related to opportunities for improvement of performance and work satisfaction.

  6. Awards and Honours

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Graphene collects the Nobel prize   Nobel Prize winners Andre Geim (left) and Konstantin Novoselov (right). © Sergeom, Wikimedia Commons, and University of Manchester, UK. The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2010 has been awarded to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, both from the University of Manchester, for their “groundbreaking experiments regarding the two-dimensional material graphene”. Graphene has exceptional properties that have made it a micro-laboratory for quantum physics. Not only is graphene the thinnest material ever made, it is also the strongest, as well as being an excellent conductor and almost completely transparent. At a time when many researchers believed that it was impossible for such thin materials to be stable, Geim and Novoselov extracted graphene from a piece of graphite using only normal adhesive tape. Novoselov, 36, first worked with Andre Geim, 51, as a PhD student in the Netherlands. He subsequentl...

  7. COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    The COLLIDE Pro Helvetia Award is run in partnership with Pro Helvetia, giving the opportunity to Swiss artists to do research at CERN for three months.   From left to right: Laura Perrenoud, Marc Dubois and Simon de Diesbach. The photo shows their VR Project, +2199. Fragment.In are the winning artists of COLLIDE Pro Helvetia. They came to CERN for two months in 2015, and will now continue their last month in the laboratory. Fragment.In is a Swiss based interaction design studio. They create innovative projects, interactive installations, video and game design. Read more about COLLIDE here.

  8. The NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence: Translating Identity Management and Cybersecurity into Scientific Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, V.

    2016-12-01

    Scientists care deeply about their collaborations: who is a member, who can access, produce, and correct data, and manager instruments critical to their science missions. The communities of cybersecurity and identity management professionals develop tools to support collaborations and the undertaking of trustworthy science, but there are large cultural and linguistic gaps between these communities and the scientists they service. The National Science Foundation has recently funded a NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence to help its community of projects by providing leadership and addressing the challenges of trustworthy science. A key goal of this NSF Center has been translating between the goals of the science community into requirements and risks understood by identity management and cybersecurity communities. This talk will give an update on the Center's efforts and other services it provides to the NSF community to bridge these cultures.

  9. Huss Receives 2013 Cryosphere Young Investigator Award: Citation: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    I would like to thank the AGU Cryosphere focus group for this award. Gaining such an important recognition at this stage of a scientific career is indeed both a great honor and a motivation to me. I was a little child when I first stepped onto a glacier. There was an unforgettable sensation of attraction and interest that touched me—one might call it a magic moment. Back then, I would never have imagined being a glaciologist one day. But it feels right, and I am grateful to have received the opportunity of exploring this wonderful element of nature.

  10. Robert Aymar awarded the Légion d’honneur

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

      On 24 May, Robert Aymar, CERN Director-General from 2004 to 2008, was awarded the Légion d’honneur by the French authorities in recognition of his outstanding scientific career. A renowned French physicist, he was Director of the superconducting tokamak Tore Supra from 1977 to 1988, Director of Material Sciences at the CEA in 1990 and Director of the ITER project in 1994. His term of office as CERN Director-General was marked in particular by the commissioning and start-up of the LHC machine, which he inaugurated on 21 October 2008.        

  11. Prestigious award for SOHO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    SOHO spacecraft artist's impression hi-res Size hi-res: 451 Kb Credits: ESA SOHO spacecraft SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA. SOHO's science ranges from the Sun's hot interior, through its visible surface and stormy atmosphere, and out to distant regions where the wind from the Sun battles with a breeze of atoms coming from among the stars. The award recognises both the outstanding achievements in designing, building and operating the mission, as well as the science it has performed. It is a tribute to a team that has contributed to one of the most successful space missions in history. The International Academy of Astronautics presents this award in recognition of extraordinary performance and achievement by teams of scientists, engineers and managers in the field of astronautics. This honour has been awarded only twice before - to the Russian Mir Space Station Team and the US Space Shuttle Team. Now the SOHO team joins this select group. The citation of the award for the SOHO team reads: "To the team of scientists, engineers and managers for the development and operation of a world-class mission leading to substantial advancements in understanding the Sun and the solar-terrestrial relationship." SOHO has an impressive and unique list of achievements. For instance, it produced the first ever images of the turbulent outer shell of the Sun and of the structure below sunspots. It gave the most precise measurements of the solar temperature structure, the interior rotation and the gas flows inside the Sun. It measured the acceleration of the fast and slow solar winds and discovered new solar phenomena, such as solar tornadoes. It revolutionised our ability to forecast space weather, and helped our understanding of the impact of solar variability on Earth's climate. During eight years of operation, the team has had to face several heart-stopping moments, but with extraordinary team spirit, skill and competence, they turned these

  12. NSF Support for Physics at the Undergraduate Level: A View from Inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Duncan

    2015-03-01

    NSF has supported a wide range of projects in physics that involve undergraduate students. These projects include NSF research grants in which undergraduates participate; Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) centers and supplements; and education grants that range from upper-division labs that may include research, to curriculum development for upper- and lower-level courses and labs, to courses for non-majors, to Physics Education Research (PER). The NSF Divisions of Physics, Materials Research, and Astronomy provide most of the disciplinary research support, with some from other parts of NSF. I recently retired as the permanent physicist in NSF's Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE), which supports the education grants. I was responsible for a majority of DUE's physics grants and was involved with others overseen by a series of physics rotators. There I worked in programs entitled Instrumentation and Laboratory Improvement (ILI); Course and Curriculum Development (CCD); Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI); Transforming Undergraduate STEM Education (TUES); and Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE). NSF support has enabled physics Principal Investigators to change and improve substantially the way physics is taught and the way students learn physics. The most important changes are increased undergraduate participation in physics research; more teaching using interactive engagement methods in classes; and growth of PER as a legitimate field of physics research as well as outcomes from PER that guide physics teaching. In turn these have led, along with other factors, to students who are better-prepared for graduate school and work, and to increases in the number of undergraduate physics majors. In addition, students in disciplines that physics directly supports, notably engineering and chemistry, and increasingly biology, are better and more broadly prepared to use their physics education in these fields. I will describe NSF

  13. Career Awareness, Career Planning, and Career Transition Needs among Sports Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, David

    2006-01-01

    This study is conducted with 56 recently retired full-time sports coaches to examine the importance of career awareness, postsport career planning, and career transition needs. Results indicate that the individuals do not have a high level of career awareness, have done relatively little postsport career planning during their coaching careers, and…

  14. Prevalence of NSF following intravenous gadolinium-contrast media administration in dialysis patients with endstage renal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinz-Peer, Gertraud, E-mail: gertraud.heinz@meduniwien.ac.a [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Neruda, Anita [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Watschinger, Bruno; Vychytil, Andreas [Department of Nephrology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Geusau, Alexandra [Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Haumer, Markus [Department of Internal Medicine II, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) in a patient population being at highest risk for developing this disease and to evaluate possible risk factors. Materials and methods: The radiological records of 552 patients with ESRD being on hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) were retrospectively reviewed to identify whether the patients underwent MR-examinations with or without intravenous administration of GBCA. In case of exposure to GBCA, the number of contrast injections, the benchmark and the cumulative doses of GBCA, and possible cofactors regarding pathogenesis of NSF were recorded. Diagnosis of NSF was confirmed either by deep skin biopsy or by review of medical and histopathological records. Data of NSF patients were compared with data of dialysis patients who did not develop NSF after MR-examinations. Results: 146 dialysis patients underwent MRI without i.v.-administration of GBCA. No case of NSF was observed in this patient population. 195/552 patients proved to have a total number of 325 well-documented exposures to GBCA. Seven different types of GBCA were used during these MR-examinations. NSF prevalence rate was 1.6%. One patient died of NSF. Three different types of GBCA were involved in 6 NSF cases. 4/6 proved to be confounded cases. The cumulative dose of GBCA, history of thrombosis, recent surgery, and the combination of HD and PD proved to be significant cofactors for the development of NSF (p < .05). No significant difference regarding residual renal clearance (p = .898) and residual urine volume (p = .083) was found between NSF and non-NSF patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of NSF proved to be much lower in this high risk patient group being exposed to GBCA compared to the literature. NSF was not observed in ESRD patients undergoing MRI without administration of GBCA. Our data support a positive association between cumulative dose of GBCA and development of NSF. No positive association was found

  15. Selection for Career Course and Impact on Retention of Brazilian Air Force Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    yes. Overall, a merit-based award system proved more efficient in individualistic cultures than collectivistic ones, and monetary-based incentives...17 c. Senior Employees Respond Better to NMIs ...........................17 d. Different Cultures Respond Differently to Incentives...in that Air Force culture and how they might be playing a role in this context. 1. Career Flow The career flow for the FAB’s officers is governed by

  16. 34 CFR 84.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award. 84.605 Section 84.605 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the Department of Education or...

  17. 23 CFR 635.114 - Award of contract and concurrence in award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRAFFIC OPERATIONS CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE Contract Procedures § 635.114 Award of contract and concurrence in award. (a) Federal-aid contracts shall be awarded only on the basis of the lowest responsive... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Award of contract and concurrence in award. 635.114...

  18. Institute of Physics Awards 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The IOP Physics Awards for 2002 include: Prof. M Lockwood, Univ. Southhampton and Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Chree Medal and Prize; Dr. S Myers, CERN, Duddell Medal and Prize; Dr S Langridge, Rutherford Laboratory, Charles Vernon Boys Medal and Prize.

  19. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  20. Climate Leadership Awards and Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    The seventh annual Climate Leadership Awards Dinner will be held during the 2018 Climate Leadership Conference; the event publicly recognize individuals and organizations for their outstanding leadership in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

  1. 2002 Institute of Physics awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The IOP Rutherford Medal and prize was awarded to P Dornan, W Venus and D Plane for their major contributions to the detectors and leadership of the LEP, ALEPH, OPAL and DELPHI experiments (4 paragraphs).

  2. Research Award: Employment and Growth

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... The successful candidate will allocate 50% of their time to their own research ... Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a.

  3. 2015 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  4. 2017 Gulf Guardian Award Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gulf of Mexico Program Partnership developed the Gulf Guardian awards as a way to recognize and honor the businesses, community groups, individuals, and agencies that are taking positive steps to keep the Gulf healthy, beautiful and productive.

  5. Dr. Tulga Ersal at NSF Workshop Accessible Remote Testbeds ART'15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Event Archives Dr. Tulga Ersal at NSF Workshop Accessible Remote Testbeds ART'15 On November 12th, Dr Workshop on Accessible Remote Testbeds (ART'15) at Georgia Tech. From the event website: The rationale behind the ART'15 workshop is that remote-access testbeds could, if done right, significantly change how

  6. 78 FR 58569 - Notice of Meeting; NSF Synchrotron Subcommittee of the Advisory Committee for Mathematical and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... report findings--Murray Gibson, Northeastern University 2. Importance of materials research facilities...--Patricia Dehmer, DOE 3. Biology/biomaterials talk--importance of materials research facilities--Pupa... Materials Research on its facilities portfolio including the role it and NSF should play in synchrotron...

  7. 77 FR 64799 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Department of Energy... Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770) requires... Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25...

  8. 78 FR 46330 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat... CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy...

  9. 78 FR 12043 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat... INFORMATION CONTACT: John Kogut, Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of...

  10. Development of a Consensus Standard for School Equipment: NSF/NSSEA 380

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitner, Ashlee

    2011-01-01

    For many years, the school supplies and equipment industry has investigated methods to ensure product safety and compliance across all its product categories. In early 2010, NSF International and the National School Supply and Equipment Association (NSSEA) came together to develop quality standards for products and equipment designed for use in…

  11. 77 FR 33449 - DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel AGENCY: Office of Science... High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP). The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat..., Executive Secretary; High Energy Physics Advisory Panel; U.S. Department of Energy; SC-25/ Germantown...

  12. CERN apprentice receives award

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Another CERN apprentice has received an award for the quality of his work. Stéphane Küng (centre), at the UIG ceremony last November, presided over by Geneva State Councillor Pierre-François Unger, Head of the Department of Economics and Health. Electronics technician Stéphane Küng was honoured in November by the Social Foundation of the Union Industrielle Genevoise (UIG) as one of Geneva’s eight best apprentices in the field of mechatronics. The 20-year-old Genevan obtained his Federal apprentice’s certificate (Certificat fédéral de capacité - CFC) in June 2007, achieving excellent marks in his written tests at the Centre d’Enseignement Professionnel Technique et Artisanal (CEPTA). Like more than 200 youngsters before him, Stéphane Küng spent part of his four-year sandwich course working at CERN, where he followed many practical training courses and gained valuable hands-on experience in various technical groups and labs. "It’ always very gr...

  13. Linking the GLOBE Program With NASA and NSF Large-Scale Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmer, P. E.

    2005-12-01

    NASA and the NSF, the sponsoring Federal agencies for the GLOBE Program, are seeking the participation of science teams who are working at the cutting edge of Earth systems science in large integrated Earth systems science programs. Connecting the GLOBE concept and structure with NASA and NSF's leading Earth systems science programs will give GLOBE schools and students access to top scientists, and expose them to programs that have been designated as scientific priorities. Students, teachers, parents, and their communities will be able to see how scientists of many disciplines work together to learn about the Earth system. The GLOBE solicitation released by the NSF targets partnerships between GLOBE and NSF/NASA-funded integrated Earth systems science programs. This presentation will focus on the goals and requirements of the NSF solicitation. Proponents will be expected to provide ways for the GLOBE community to interact with a group of scientists from their science programs as part of a wider joint Earth systems science educational strategy (the sponsoring agencies', GLOBE's, and the proposing programs'). Teams proposing to this solicitation must demonstrate: - A focus on direct connections with major NSF Geosciences and/or Polar Programs and/or NASA Earth-Sun research programs that are related to Earth systems science; - A demonstrable benefit to GLOBE and to NSF Geosciences and/or Polar Programs or NASA Earth-Sun education goals (providing access to program researchers and data, working with GLOBE in setting up campaigns where possible, using tested GLOBE or non-GLOBE protocols to the greatest extent possible, actively participating in the wider GLOBE community including schools, among other goals); - An international component; - How the existing educational efforts of the large science program will coordinate with GLOBE; - An Earth systems science education focus, rather than a GLOBE protocol-support focus; - A rigorous evaluation and assessment component

  14. Global nanotechnology development from 1991 to 2012: patents, scientific publications, and effect of NSF funding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsinchun [The University of Arizona, Department of Management Information Systems (United States); Roco, Mihail C. [National Science Foundation (United States); Son, Jaebong; Jiang, Shan, E-mail: jiangs@email.arizona.edu; Larson, Catherine A.; Gao, Qiang [The University of Arizona, Department of Management Information Systems (United States)

    2013-09-15

    In a relatively short interval for an emerging technology, nanotechnology has made a significant economic impact in numerous sectors including semiconductor manufacturing, catalysts, medicine, agriculture, and energy production. A part of the United States (US) government investment in basic research has been realized in the last two decades through the National Science Foundation (NSF), beginning with the nanoparticle research initiative in 1991 and continuing with support from the National Nanotechnology Initiative after fiscal year 2001. This paper has two main goals: (a) present a longitudinal analysis of the global nanotechnology development as reflected in the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO) patents and Web of Science (WoS) publications in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) for the interval 1991-2012; and (b) identify the effect of basic research funded by NSF on both indicators. The interval has been separated into three parts for comparison purposes: 1991-2000, 2001-2010, and 2011-2012. The global trends of patents and scientific publications are presented. Bibliometric analysis, topic analysis, and citation network analysis methods are used to rank countries, institutions, technology subfields, and inventors contributing to nanotechnology development. We then, examined how these entities were affected by NSF funding and how they evolved over the past two decades. Results show that dedicated NSF funding used to support nanotechnology R and D was followed by an increased number of relevant patents and scientific publications, a greater diversity of technology topics, and a significant increase of citations. The NSF played important roles in the inventor community and served as a major contributor to numerous nanotechnology subfields.

  15. Global nanotechnology development from 1991 to 2012: patents, scientific publications, and effect of NSF funding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hsinchun; Roco, Mihail C.; Son, Jaebong; Jiang, Shan; Larson, Catherine A.; Gao, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    In a relatively short interval for an emerging technology, nanotechnology has made a significant economic impact in numerous sectors including semiconductor manufacturing, catalysts, medicine, agriculture, and energy production. A part of the United States (US) government investment in basic research has been realized in the last two decades through the National Science Foundation (NSF), beginning with the nanoparticle research initiative in 1991 and continuing with support from the National Nanotechnology Initiative after fiscal year 2001. This paper has two main goals: (a) present a longitudinal analysis of the global nanotechnology development as reflected in the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO) patents and Web of Science (WoS) publications in nanoscale science and engineering (NSE) for the interval 1991–2012; and (b) identify the effect of basic research funded by NSF on both indicators. The interval has been separated into three parts for comparison purposes: 1991–2000, 2001–2010, and 2011–2012. The global trends of patents and scientific publications are presented. Bibliometric analysis, topic analysis, and citation network analysis methods are used to rank countries, institutions, technology subfields, and inventors contributing to nanotechnology development. We then, examined how these entities were affected by NSF funding and how they evolved over the past two decades. Results show that dedicated NSF funding used to support nanotechnology R and D was followed by an increased number of relevant patents and scientific publications, a greater diversity of technology topics, and a significant increase of citations. The NSF played important roles in the inventor community and served as a major contributor to numerous nanotechnology subfields

  16. Career guidance in communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rie

    for the development of a critically reflexive career guidance practice. The considerations are organised around seven elements. 1. Creating opportunity, structure and access 2. Entering a community and increasing visibility 3. Providing guidance in communities 4. Exploring potentials in guidance situations 5...... in career guidance practices as well as in the lives of the people in the communities. This paper falls into two parts: The first part considers the collective as the starting point for the development of meaningful career guidance activities. Based on previous research on career guidance in communities......The aim of this paper is to inspire practitioners and professionals to leave their offices to bring career guidance into communities that might not identify with career guidance in the first instance. By making the effort to engage with communities, practitioners may bring about a critical change...

  17. Effective career ladders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, B; Rabbitts, D; Shover, J; Torres, M; VanDerHeyden, B; Violand-Jones, S

    1992-01-01

    Motivation, quality improvement, productivity enhancement. These are just some of the benefits of an effective career ladder program. The key term here is effective. It is easy for laboratory personnel to stagnate professionally if they do not have a career ladder program, but it is even easier for them to become frustrated--even cynical--over a program that fails to live up to its expectations to encourage, support, and reward professional advancement. If you have been looking form some ideas to get your own career ladder program off the ground, the following responses from your colleagues may help as CLMR asks: What makes your career ladder program effective?

  18. Career in mental health still an unlikely career choice for nursing graduates: a replicated longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John; Browne, Graeme; Graham, Iain

    2013-06-01

    The lack of qualified mental health nurses is at critical level with the problem likely to worsen as the aging mental health nursing workforce retires. This study investigates the career preferences of undergraduate nursing students by comparing preferences at the start, middle, and end of the Bachelor of Nursing program. The comparison of the cohorts gave an indication of the change in preferences over the intervening years. It replicates research completed in 1992, 1997, and 2001, and develops a profile of nursing career preferences and the rationale underpinning those preferences in a cohort of students (n = 150) who began their Bachelor of Nursing studies in 2007 and completed in 2009. The main findings included that, like the previous studies, mental health nursing is one of the least desirable career choices for most nurses at the start of their course and remains so as they approach graduation. The reasons change but the outcome remains the same. The current system of using the Bachelor of Nursing award to produce mental health nurses in Australia does not encourage nurses to consider a career in mental health nursing. Which begs the question: where will mental health nurses in the future come from? © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  19. Protean career: perspectives of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litvinova Ye.Yu.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes different approaches to study of models of constructing the employment career in current environment. The changes having taken place in interrelationsbetween employees and organizations over recent 15 years led to changes in their mutual expectations including the ones concerning the career development. Boundaryless career based on career mobility and protean career based on subjective understanding of career success are regarded as alternatives to traditional careers. The main attributes of “new careers” are: an increased independence in employee-organization dyads, low level of mutual obligations, freedom of choice, self-actualization, priority of career loyalty and self-management in contrast to organization loyalty. Changes in career conceptualizing inevitably led to revision of career competences. Traditional professional competences give way to career meta-competences like adaptiveness, capacity for education, self-management, taking responsibility. At the same time empirical studies displaya prematurity of statements about the expressed loss of interest to traditional careers.

  20. The 41st Chair: Defining Careers in the Current Biomedical Research Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F. W. B.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years academic capitalism and a distancing from Mertonian scientific norms have shifted the traditional reward of academic science from peer recognition to the award of grants. With the shrinking of the NIH budget in real terms since 2003, there are increasing numbers of researchers whose careers are at risk from lack of funding. This…

  1. Recognizing mid-career productivity: the 2008 Retrovirology Prize, call for nomination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent analysis suggested a narrow age range for productivity of innovative work by researchers. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize the research of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2007 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Karen Beemon. Nominations are being solicited for the 2008 prize.

  2. Research Award: Governance and Justice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    by conflict, citizens and marginalized groups have difficulty claiming their right to live in a safe and ... Applicants should clearly outline their qualifications for this position, and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals.

  3. Clinician researcher career pathway for registered nurses and midwives: A proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheree; Gullick, Janice; Ballard, Jacqueline; Perry, Lin

    2018-06-01

    To consider clinician researcher career frameworks and propose a new pathway, integrating university and health service components to support research career progression within nursing and midwifery practice. Hospitals with research-active clinicians report fewer adverse events and better patient outcomes. Nursing clinician researcher career development is therefore an international priority, yet positions and expectations associated with this are not always well articulated, with nurses and midwives challenged to accommodate research and clinical careers. This discussion paper describes nurse/midwife clinician researcher career frameworks and a new pathway that aligns academic and nursing role descriptions. The new framework was informed by a brief literature search for international framework documents, three Australian state-based Nurses and Midwives Awards: the Australian Qualifications Framework, publically available University Academic (Research) Award schedules and academic staff descriptions, and state health department and health services publications. The implementation of research-based practice is a key element of nursing and midwifery roles and "advanced practice" position descriptions have well-defined research expectations. This paper considers structures to support their achievement. This paper provides a blueprint for clinician researcher career development. It elevates the research domain as an equal alongside clinical, managerial and educational clinical career development. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. ATLAS Award for Difficult Task

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Two Russian companies were honoured with an ATLAS Award, for supply of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure elements, last week. On 23 March the Russian company ORPE Technologiya and its subcontractor, RSP Khrunitchev, were jointly presented with an ATLAS Supplier Award. Since 1998, ORPE Technologiya has been actively involved in the development of the carbon-fibre reinforced plastic elements of the ATLAS Inner Detector barrel support structure. After three years of joint research and development, CERN and ORPE Technologiya launched the manufacturing contract. It had a tight delivery schedule and very demanding specifications in terms of mechanical tolerance and stability. The contract was successfully completed with the arrival of the last element of the structure at CERN on 8 January 2004. The delivery of this key component of the Inner Detector deserves an ATLAS Award given the difficulty of manufacturing the end-frames, which very few companies in the world would have been able to do at an ...

  5. Health Inequality and Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Structural explanations of career choice and development are well established. Socioeconomic inequality represents a powerful factor shaping career trajectories and economic outcomes achieved by individuals. However, a robust and growing body of evidence demonstrates a strong link between socioeconomic inequality and health outcomes. Work is a key…

  6. Procurement Career Management Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury, Washington, DC.

    This handbook is the result of the Treasury Department's efforts to increase professionalism among its procurement employees nationwide through its Procurement Career Management Program. First, the scope and objectives of the Procurement Career Management Program are discussed. The remaining sections of the handbook deal with the following program…

  7. Career Development of Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Anna M., Ed.; Vetter, Louise, Ed.

    The five major papers whose full texts are included address themselves to various topics that can influence the lives of women in their career choices and advancement. Federal Legislation: Impact on Women's Careers, Mary Allen Jolley, discusses sex discrimination, legal gains made over the past 10 years, sex role stereotyping, and vocational…

  8. Career Education Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Oswego. Coll. at Oswego. Dept. of Industrial Arts and Technology.

    The guide is designed primarily for industrial arts teachers at the middle school level who wish to integrate career education into their curricula. The lessons and activities attempt to establish a balance among career information, technical information, and hands-on experience. The guide contains six lesson plans which cover the topics: the…

  9. Security careers skills, compensation, and career paths

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    The third edition of Security Careers is the authoritative reference for current job descriptions and pay practices of security, compliance, ethics, environmental, health and safety occupations. The job descriptions and compensation ranges in this report are drawn from research from the Foushée Group, which has been conducting this research since 1980. Security Careers includes more than 75 job descriptions for security-related positions, which range from the entry-level security guard to the top global corporate executive. It also provides four years of compensation trend data to give a th

  10. Advancing Capabilities for Understanding the Earth System Through Intelligent Systems, the NSF Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Y.; Zanzerkia, E. E.; Munoz-Avila, H.

    2015-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) and Directorate for Computer and Information Science (CISE) acknowledge the significant scientific challenges required to understand the fundamental processes of the Earth system, within the atmospheric and geospace, Earth, ocean and polar sciences, and across those boundaries. A broad view of the opportunities and directions for GEO are described in the report "Dynamic Earth: GEO imperative and Frontiers 2015-2020." Many of the aspects of geosciences research, highlighted both in this document and other community grand challenges, pose novel problems for researchers in intelligent systems. Geosciences research will require solutions for data-intensive science, advanced computational capabilities, and transformative concepts for visualizing, using, analyzing and understanding geo phenomena and data. Opportunities for the scientific community to engage in addressing these challenges are available and being developed through NSF's portfolio of investments and activities. The NSF-wide initiative, Cyberinfrastructure Framework for 21st Century Science and Engineering (CIF21), looks to accelerate research and education through new capabilities in data, computation, software and other aspects of cyberinfrastructure. EarthCube, a joint program between GEO and the Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Division, aims to create a well-connected and facile environment to share data and knowledge in an open, transparent, and inclusive manner, thus accelerating our ability to understand and predict the Earth system. EarthCube's mission opens an opportunity for collaborative research on novel information systems enhancing and supporting geosciences research efforts. NSF encourages true, collaborative partnerships between scientists in computer sciences and the geosciences to meet these challenges.

  11. Who is looking for an internship and successful in obtaining one? Examining application data from REU programs funded through NSF GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Kelly, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) is currently funding 60 Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) sites. Each site offers opportunities for 8 to 12 undergraduates to participate in research within solid earth, oceans, atmospheric and cryosphere sciences. Because applicant data is collected at individual REU sites, the exact number of unique applicants to all REU sites, and the demographics of this national applicant pool has not been previously reported. While some sites do provide some of this information to NSF in annual reports, obtaining and combining such data is problematic because the percentage of individuals that apply to multiple programs is unknown and generally believed anecdotally to be high, especially for students traditionally underrepresented in the geosciences. Understanding both the scale and makeup of the national applicant pool is important for several reasons. First, very little is known about how the supply and geographic location of slots in REU programs compares to the demand from undergraduate STEM majors interested in research experiences. Second, research into internship programs and their role in the career development process are limited by a lack of baseline data that includes both successful and unsuccessful internship applicants across the various sub-disciplines of the Earth sciences. Finally, designing and refining efforts to engage underrepresented populations in STEM research, and measuring the impact of such efforts is difficult without baseline data for comparison. We will present aggregate application data from up to 20 GEO REU funded programs. These programs represent Oceans, Atmospheres and Earth Science research areas and includes over a thousand applicants. Preliminary analysis suggests the number of unique applicants in the pool is higher than anecdotally predicted. Similarly, unique applicants from underrepresented communities also appears higher than anticipated.

  12. Horton Grantee gets AAG Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey McDonnell, an assistant professor of forest hydrology at Utah State University, Logan, received the J. Warren Nystrom Award from the Association of American Geographers for his doctoral dissertation, “The Age, Origin and Pathway of Subsurface Stormflow in a Steep Humid Headwater Catchment.” In 1987, McDonnell was awarded AGU's Horton Research Grant for his thesis proposal.McDonnell received his Ph.D. in 1989 from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. His dissertation was supervised by I. F. Owens, Department of Geography, University of Canterbury and A. J. Pearce, New Zealand Forest Research Institute.

  13. Handman and Senson Receive 2003 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bob; Handman, Jim; Senson, Pat

    2004-03-01

    Patric Senson and James Handman received the Sullivan Award at AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The award honors ``a single article or radio/television report that makes geophysical material accessible and interesting to the general public.'' ``Jim Handman is one of the best kept secrets at CBC Radio. For more than 20 years he has been a bastion of integrity and an endless source of wit and has consistently produced award-winning programs in radio news and current affairs. ``Jim is currently the senior producer of Quirks & Quarks, our national science radio program, now in its 27th season, but this role is only one of many over the course of his extensive broadcasting career.

  14. A factor analytic study of adult career concerns, career status and career resilience

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    D. Litt. et Phil. Factor analytic techniques were used to investigate the psychometric properties of three measuring instruments, namely the Adult Career Concerns Inventory (Super, Thompson & Lindeman, 1988), the Career Attitudes and Strategies Inventory (Holland & Gottfredson, 1994), and the Career Resilience Questionnaire (Fourie & Van Vuuren, 1998). The analyses served the purpose of elucidating the conceptual meanings of the constructs of career concerns, career status and career resil...

  15. The University of Minnesota Morris - N.S.F. REU Program: Twenty years of encouraging women to participate in the Geological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J. F.

    2009-12-01

    support network that has developed among the UMM-REU alumni. Participants read publications by past UMM-REU researchers, they are encouraged to contact alumni for information and advice, and alumni are invited back to mentor participants, provide insights and interact socially. UMM-REU reunions are held on a regular basis. The UMM-REU network is growing. Ninety-three women from 30 institutions have participated in the UMM-REU program. Participants have published four papers and 75 abstracts. Initial career trajectories are good. Of the 80 UMM-REU alumni that have (to date) received a bachelor degree: 29 went directly into careers in the sciences or teaching and 46 enrolled in graduate (9 have completed Ph.D.s). Over the long term results are also good. Of the 93 UMM-REU participants only 13 are not now pursuing degrees or working in careers in the sciences. Research for this study was funded by a grant from the N.S.F.-R.E.U. Program, including NSF-EAR 9820249 and NSF-EAR 0640575.

  16. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  17. Faculty career flexibility: Why we need it and how best to achieve it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Kate

    2010-02-01

    Research conducted over the last decade provides compelling evidence that higher education institutions have a strong business case for providing flexibility for their tenure-track and tenured faculty. Flexibility constitutes an effective tool for recruiting and retaining talented faculty. Career flexibility is especially critical to retaining some of the most qualified female PhDs in academic science, engineering, and mathematics. Acquiring the best talent is essential to an institution's ability to achieve excellence and maintain its competitive advantage in a global environment. In an effort to increase the flexibility of faculty careers, the American Council on Education partnered with the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to create the Award for Faculty Career Flexibility. This presentation will address the origins of the award and share findings from the awards process. Fairly simple and cost effective strategies have been successful in accelerating the cultural change necessary to increase the flexibility of faculty careers. This presentation shares these strategies in addition to information about the types of policies and practices being adopted to support faculty work-life balance through career flexibility. )

  18. CoC Awards by Program Component

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CoC Awards by Program Component reports provide snapshots of award data broken down by eligible program component types for the year selected. The reports, which can...

  19. MedlinePlus: Awards and Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... winner of the 2005 World Summit on the Information Society Awards for e-health. Winner of the Thomas Reuters/Frank Bradway Rogers Information Advancement Award in 2014 for MedlinePlus Connect and ...

  20. CMA Announces the 1996 Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Winners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Eighteen exceptional teachers of science, chemical technology, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been selected to receive a Responsible Care Chemical Manufacturers Association's 1996 Catalyst Award. The Responsible Care Catalyst Awards Program honors individuals who have the ability to inspire students toward careers in chemistry and science-related fields through their excellent teaching ability in and out of the classroom. The program also seeks to draw public attention to the importance of quality chemistry and science teaching at the undergraduate level. Since the award was established in 1957, 502 teachers of science, chemistry, and chemical engineering have been honored. Winners are selected from a wide range of nominations submitted by colleagues, friends, and administrators. All pre-high school, high school, two and four-year college, or university teachers in the United States and Canada are eligible. Each award winner will be presented with a medal and citation. National award winners receive 5,000; regional award winners receive 2,500. National Winners. Martin N. Ackermann, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH Kenneth R. Jolls, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Suzanne Zobrist Kelly, Warren H. Meeker Elementary School, Ames, IA John V. Kenkel, Southeast Community College, Lincoln, NE George C. Lisensky, Beloit College, Beloit, WI James M. McBride, Yale University, New Haven, CT Marie C. Sherman, Ursuline Academy, St. Louis, MO Dwight D. Sieggreen, Cooke Middle School, Northville, MI Regional Winners Two-Year College. East-Georgianna Whipple-VanPatter, Central Community College, Hastings, NE West-David N. Barkan, Northwest College, Powell, WY High School. East-John Hnatow, Jr., Emmaus High School, Northampton, PA South-Carole Bennett, Gaither High School, Tampa, FL Midwest-Kenneth J. Spengler, Palatine High School, Palatine, IL West-Ruth Rand, Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM Middle School. East-Thomas P. Kelly, Grandville Public Schools, Grandville, NH West

  1. Social Cognitive Career Theory and Middle School Student Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of social cognitive career theory, social cognitive career variables, demographic variables, and the contextual variable, parent support, were examined to determine their predictive value for eighth-grade students' career exploration behavior. Results suggest that the social cognitive career variable, intentions/goals,…

  2. Understanding Career Success and Its Contributing Factors for Clinical and Translational Investigators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Georgeanna F.W.B.; Schwartz, Lisa S.; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.; Gabrilove, Janice L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To understand the factors that facilitate career success for career development awardees in clinical and translational science and to reconceptualize understanding of career success for this population. Method In 2013–2014, the authors conducted semi-structured interviews with former NIH KL2 or K12 scholars from nine Clinical and Translational Science Award-funded institutions. Participants either had or had not secured independent funding at least two years after the end of their last K award. Questions covered the factors that facilitate or hinder junior investigators’ transition to independent funding. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and the transcripts analyzed thematically. Results Forty individuals participated, with equal representation by men and women and by independently and not independently funded investigators. Personal factors that facilitated success included: networks, persistence and resilience, initiative, autonomy, and personal and professional balance. Organizational factors included: appropriate mentorship, protected research time, and institutional resources and support. Even independently funded participants described challenges regarding career direction. Five participants without independent funding modeled a broad spectrum of successful career paths, having assumed leadership positions not reliant on grant funding. Alternative definitions of career success included: improving public health, enjoying work, seeing mentees succeed, and receiving external acknowledgement of successes. Conclusions Awareness of the factors that facilitate or hinder career success can help junior faculty, mentors, and institutional leaders support career development in clinical and translational science. New definitions of career success are needed, as are career paths for faculty who want to engage in research in roles other than principal investigator. PMID:26509600

  3. Research Award: Donor Partnerships Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  4. Research Award: IDRC Challenge Fund

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generang new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspecve on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and ...

  5. Fermilab Education Office - Director's Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Search The Director's Award Exceptional Service To Fermilab's K-12 Education Programs The many successes of Fermilab's K-12 education programs depend on the talents of the over 200 employees, users, and $1,000, made possible by an anonymous donor to Fermilab Friends for Science Education, recognizes one

  6. Carter G. Woodson Book Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Presents the recipients of the 1999 Carter G. Woodson book awards that honor books focusing on ethnic minorities and race relations in a manner appropriate for young readers; the books cover topics that include the lives of Langston Hughes, Rosa Parks, and Ida B. Wells and the history of the Crow people. (CMK)

  7. Two awards for Herwig Schopper

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Former CERN Director-General Herwig Schopper has received two prestigious awards, from UNESCO and from the American Institute of Physics. Herwig Schopper receives the UNESCO Albert Einstein Gold Medal from Koïchiro Matsuura, Director-General of UNESCO. Without any great fanfare, Herwig Schopper has just received two major awards. UNESCO awarded him the Albert Einstein Gold Medal in Paris on 15 April, while on 2 May in Denver the American Institute of Physics (AIP) presented him with the Tate Medal for International Leadership in Physics (together with a USD 10 000 prize). Both awards were in recognition of Herwig Schopper's pivotal role in the construction of international scientific cooperation. Today President of the SESAME Council - the International Centre for Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (see Bulletin No. 26/2003) - Herwig Schopper was Director-General of CERN from 1981 to 1988. President of the European Physical Society from 1994 to 1996, he wa...

  8. Award Recipient Final Report Form

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    7. a) Were you in contact with other IDRC staff (aside from Centre Awards staff) during the. course of your research? Please indicate who you were in contact with and if this contact assisted you in any way. b) Please indicate the names and contact information of individuals from other organizations (departments, institutes, ...

  9. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 8. Frances Allen Wins Turing Award. Priti Shankar. Article-in-a-Box Volume 12 Issue 8 August 2007 pp ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  10. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ... Development announces the award of a cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the... Children and Families (ACF) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger...

  11. 7 CFR 3021.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.605 Award. Award means an award of financial assistance by the Department of Agriculture or other Federal...

  12. 41 CFR 105-74.605 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Award. 105-74.605 Section 105-74.605 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.605 Award. Award...

  13. Career Exploration among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Ghosh, Arpita; Chang, Wen-hsin; Figueiredo, Catia; Bachhuber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    College is a significant time for undergraduates to declare majors and choose career paths. For many undergraduates, choosing both a major and a career path is challenging. Research shows that many universities deliver career interventions through dedicated career decision-making courses (Mead & Korschgen, 1994). However, there has been…

  14. Dimensionality of Women's Career Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sandra J.; Wijting, Jan P.

    1982-01-01

    Factor analysis of data from two samples identified nine indices of women's career orientation. Two factors accounted for significant variance common to the indices: career centeredness, which reflects the importance attached to a career relative to other life activities, and career commitment, which implies a commitment to lifetime employment.…

  15. Role Induction in Career Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Chen, Yung-Lung; Novakovic, Alexandra; Guillen, Amy; Priester, Paul E.; Henry, Caroline; Terry, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Many vocational psychologists advocate addressing career as well as personal concerns in career counseling. However, some clients may have inappropriate expectations toward career counseling and may not be prepared or want to discuss personal issues. This study examined whether perceptions of the career counseling process could be modified with…

  16. Successes, Challenges and Lessons Learned for Recruiting, Engaging and Preparing a Diverse Student Population for 21st Century Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2015-12-01

    Diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce is still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines, a problem that will be only be solved by recruiting, engaging and retaining a more diverse student population. The Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates program is housed at California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB), an HSI with strong connections to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system. From this unique position, 11 sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students engage in rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two cohorts (2014, 2015) and here we present successes, challenges and lessons learned for a program designed to prepare students for 21st century Ocean Science careers.

  17. A Research Experiences for Undergraduates program (REU) Program Designed to Recruit, Engage and Prepare a Diverse Student Population for Careers in Ocean Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkston, B. E.; Garza, C.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of improving diversity within the Ocean Sciences workforce—still underperforming relative to other scientific disciplines—can only be addressed by first recruiting and engaging a more diverse student population into the discipline, then retaining them in the workforce. California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB) is home to the Monterey Bay Regional Ocean Science Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program. As an HSI with strong ties to multiple regional community colleges and other Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) in the CSU system, the Monterey Bay REU is uniquely positioned to address the crucial recruitment and engagement of a diverse student body. Eleven sophomore and junior-level undergraduate students are recruited per year from academic institutions where research opportunities in STEM are limited and from groups historically underrepresented in the Ocean Sciences, including women, underrepresented minorities, persons with disabilities, and veterans. During the program, students engage in a 10-week original research project guided by a faculty research mentor in one of four themes: Oceanography, Marine Biology and Ecology, Ocean Engineering, and Marine Geology. In addition to research, students develop scientific self-efficacy and literacy skills through rigorous weekly professional development workshops in which they practice critical thinking, ethical decision-making, peer review, writing and oral communication skills. These workshops include tangible products such as an NSF-style proposal paper, Statement of Purpose and CV modelled for the SACNAS Travel Award Application, research abstract, scientific report and oral presentation. To help retain students in Ocean Sciences, students build community during the REU by living together in the CSUMB dormitories; post-REU, students stay connected through an online facebook group, LinkedIn page and group webinars. To date, the REU has supported 22 students in two

  18. Michael Tomasello: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The APA Awards for Distinguished Scientific Contributions are presented to persons who, in the opinion of the Committee on Scientific Awards, have made distinguished theoretical or empirical contributions to basic research in psychology. One of the 2015 award winners is Michael Tomasello, who received this award for "outstanding empirical and theoretical contributions to understanding what makes the human mind unique. Michael Tomasello's pioneering research on the origins of social cognition has led to revolutionary insights in both developmental psychology and primate cognition." Tomasello's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Balancing Family and Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andam, Aba Bentil; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Horton, K. Renee; Sandow, Barbara

    2005-10-01

    In essentially all countries, responsibilities for child care, cooking, cleaning, and other homemaking tasks fall predominantly on the wife and mother. In addition, the childbearing years come during the period when a physicist must study hard, work long hours on research, and take temporary positions, often abroad. Thus, balancing family and career has long been one of the major barriers to women's participation in science and engineering fields, including physics. While many young women believe that they must choose between having children and having a science career, the fact is that the majority of women physicists in both developing and developed countries have successfully done both. This paper summarizes some ideas and recommendations raised in discussions, especially focused on easing the challenges of having children while in temporary jobs, returning to physics after a career break, the need for "family-friendly" working conditions, and the dual-career problem facing couples where both are scientists.

  20. Athletes’ careers across cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia

    This symposium will introduce a project developed under the auspices of the International Society of Sport Psychology (ISSP) in an effort to inspire and support the development of culturally sensitive theoretical frameworks and research methodologies in career studies and career assistance services...... around the world. The cultural approach to the theory and practice of sport psychological research has been recently articulated in two edited books, Cultural Sport Psychology (Schinke & Hanrahan, 2009) and The Cultural Turn in Sport Psychology (Ryba, Schinke, & Tenenbaum, 2010). The presenters...... in this symposium continue the initiated dialogue of the relevance of culture and cultural issues in their analyses of how social and cultural discourses shape career development and career transitions of athletes in different countries. Opening the foundations of sport psychological knowledge to culturally diverse...

  1. Insights on STEM Careers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    This presentation will provide career advice for individuals seeking to go beyond just having a job to building a successful career in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Careful planning can be used to turn a job into a springboard for professional advancement and personal satisfaction. Topics to be addressed include setting priorities, understanding career ladders, making tough choices, overcoming stereotypes and assumptions by others, networking, developing a professional identify, and balancing a career with family and other personal responsibilities. Insights on the transition from individual technical work to leadership will also be provided. The author will draw upon experiences gained in academic, industrial, and government laboratory settings, as well as extensive professional service and community involvement.

  2. Composing and Arranging Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Elliott; And Others

    1977-01-01

    With the inspiration, the originality, the skill and craftsmanship, the business acumen, the patience, and the luck, it's possible to become a classical composer, pop/rock/country composer, jingle composer, or educational composer. Describes these careers. (Editor/RK)

  3. A smashing career choice

    CERN Multimedia

    Battersby, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    "There's more diversity in physics careers than you might think. Stephen Battersby talks to three very different phsicists, all doing their bit to help us learn more about the world we live in." (2 pages)

  4. Future Careers in Geoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vink, G. E.; van der Vink, G. E.

    2001-05-01

    A new generation of Geoscientists are abandoning the traditional pathways of oil exploration and academic research to pursue careers in public policy, international affairs, business, education and diplomacy. They are using their backgrounds in Geoscience to address challenging, multi-disciplinary problems of societal concern. To prepare for such careers, students are developing a broad understanding of science and a basic literacy in economics, international affairs, and policy-making.

  5. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  6. NSF Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities (LAOF) in support of science and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeuerle, B.; Rockwell, A.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers, students and teachers who want to understand and describe the Earth System require high quality observations of the atmosphere, ocean, and biosphere. Making these observations requires state-of-the-art instruments and systems, often carried on highly capable research platforms. To support this need of the geosciences community, the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences (AGS) provides multi-user national facilities through its Lower Atmospheric Observing Facilities (LAOF) Program at no cost to the investigator. These facilities, which include research aircraft, radars, lidars, and surface and sounding systems, receive NSF financial support and are eligible for deployment funding. The facilities are managed and operated by five LAOF partner organizations: the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Colorado State University (CSU); the University of Wyoming (UWY); the Center for Severe Weather Research (CSWR); and the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). These observational facilities are available on a competitive basis to all qualified researchers from US universities, requiring the platforms and associated services to carry out various research objectives. The deployment of all facilities is driven by scientific merit, capabilities of a specific facility to carry out the proposed observations, and scheduling for the requested time. The process for considering requests and setting priorities is determined on the basis of the complexity of a field campaign. The poster will describe available observing facilities and associated services, and explain the request process researchers have to follow to secure access to these platforms for scientific as well as educational deployments. NSF/NCAR GV Aircraft

  7. Photoelastic examination of borosilicate glass discs used in the insulating legs for the NSF tandem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, W.J.; Cundy, D.

    1981-04-01

    The results are presented of a photoelastic stress analysis carried out to establish the effect of re-annealing borosilicate glass discs used in the insulating legs of the 30 MV tandem van de Graaff accelerator of the NSF. The results show that re-annealing of the glass discs has no measurable effect on reducing the high stress at inclusions and re-emphasise the need to exercise great care in selecting suitable discs for use in the insulating legs. (U.K.)

  8. New awards for CERN science

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Earlier this week, the European Physical Society (EPS) announced its High Energy and Particle Physics prizes for 2013, and I’m pleased to say that the LHC featured highly. With all that has been happening in the last few years, that’s perhaps not too surprising, but these awards nevertheless constitute a great honour for our community.   The High Energy and Particle Physics Prize went to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations “for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism”, and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni and Tejinder Virdee “for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments”. Among the other awards, the Young Experimental Physicist Prize went to Diego Martinez Santos “for his outstanding contributions to the trigger and commissioning of the LHCb experiment, and the analyses leading to first evidence for the rare decay B0s→ ...

  9. FINAL REPORT. DOE Grant Award Number DE-SC0004062

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiesa, Luisa [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    With the support of the DOE-OFES Early Career Award and the Tufts startup support the PI has developed experimental and analytical expertise on the electromechanical characterization of Low Temperature Superconductor (LTS) and High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) for high magnetic field applications. These superconducting wires and cables are used in fusion and high-energy physics magnet applications. In a short period of time, the PI has built a laboratory and research group with unique capabilities that include both experimental and numerical modeling effort to improve the design and performance of superconducting cables and magnets. All the projects in the PI’s laboratory explore the fundamental electromechanical behavior of superconductors but the types of materials, geometries and operating conditions are chosen to be directly relevant to real machines, in particular fusion machines like ITER.

  10. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50 th anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  11. 1986 James B. Macelwane Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyllie, Peter J.; Stolper, Edward M.

    I can think of few things more pleasurable than introducing a young scientist whose research has enhanced his visibility to such an extent that his or her image is clearly distinguishable from among the large number of young scientists publishing excellent research these days.Normally, the recipient of a young scientist award is in a state approaching shock, with mixed feelings of pride and humility and appreciation for all those who guided him or her on the way. For Ed Stolper, however, the situation is different, and he is sitting here quite calmly. Although he is only 33 years old, his image shines brightly enough that it has received attention previously—He was awarded the Clarke Medal of the Geochemical Society in 1985, and he shared the Newcomb Cleveland Prize in 1985 with Sally Rigden and Tom Ahrens for the best 1984 paper in Science. Today it is the Macelwane Award of the American Geophysical Union, and there are still several tomorrows before his age disqualifies him as a young scientist, making it necessary for him to start getting down to serious, mature research.

  12. Career Self-Efficacy Expectations and Perceived Range of Career Options in Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotberg, Heidi L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored the relation of socioeconomic status (SES), race, gender, career self-efficacy, career interests, and sex role orientation to career-choice range in female-male and non-gender-dominated careers and career self-efficacy. Career interest and career self-efficacy expectations significantly predicted range of perceived career options. Career…

  13. An iconoclast's career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip

    2013-03-01

    The "maverick genius" referred to in the title of Phillip Schewe's book is Freeman Dyson: a truly great mathematical physicist, bestselling author, longest-serving member of the US military's JASON advisory group, and occupant of the "fourth chair" when the Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded for quantum electrodynamics (QED) - among many other distinctions.

  14. The impact of intramural grants on educators' careers and on medical education innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Shelley R; Chang, Anna; Loeser, Helen; Cooke, Molly; Wang, Jason; Teherani, Arianne

    2015-06-01

    The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educators Innovations Funding program awards competitive grants to create novel curricula and faculty development programs, compare pedagogical approaches, and design learner assessment methods. The authors examined the principal investigators' (PIs') perceptions of the impact of these intramural grants on their careers and on medical education innovation. At 12 months (project completion) and 24 months (follow-up), PIs submit a progress report describing the impact of their grant on their careers, work with collaborators, subsequent funding, project dissemination, and the UCSF curriculum. The authors analyzed these reports using qualitative thematic analysis and achieved consensus in coding and interpretation through discussion. From 2001 to 2012, the program funded 77 PIs to lead 103 projects, awarding over $2.2 million. The authors analyzed reports from 88 grants (85.4%) awarded to 68 PIs (88.3%). PIs noted that the funding led to accelerated promotion, expanded networking opportunities, enhanced knowledge and skills, more scholarly publications and presentations, extramural funding, and local and national recognition. They also reported that the funding improved their status in their departments, enhanced their careers as medical educators, laid the foundation for subsequent projects, and engaged an array of stakeholders, including trainees and junior faculty. These modest intramural education grants not only created innovative, enduring programs but also promoted educators' professional identity formation, fostered collaborations, supported junior faculty in finding their desired career paths, provided advancement opportunities, and raised the local and national profiles of recipients.

  15. Bethe, Oppenheimer, Teller and the Fermi Award: Norris Bradbury Speaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, Roger Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-28

    In 1956 the Enrico Fermi Presidential Award was established to recognize scientists, engineers, and science policymakers who gave unstintingly over their careers to advance energy science and technology. The first recipient was John von Neumann. .1 Among those scientists who were thought eligible for the award were Hans Bethe, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and Edward Teller. In 1959 Norris Bradbury was asked to comment on the relative merits of each these three men, whom he knew well from their affiliation with Los Alamos. Below is a reproduction of the letter Bradbury sent to Dr. Warren C. Johnson of the AEC’s General Advisory Committee(GAC) containing his evaluation of each man. The letter might surprise those not accustomed to Bradbury’s modus operandi of providing very detailed and forthright answers to the AEC. The letter, itself, was found in cache of old microfilm. Whether because of the age of the microfilm or the quality of the filming process, portions of the letter are not legible. Where empty brackets appear, the word or words could not be read or deduced. Words appearing in brackets are guesses that appear, from the image, to be what was written. These guesses, of course, are just that – guesses.

  16. Organizational Careers: A forward theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barney G. Glaser, Ph.D., Hon. Ph.D.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In general, organizations obtain work from people by offering them some kind of career within their structures. The operation of organizations, therefore, depends on people’s assuming a career orientation toward them. To generate this orientation, organizations distribute rewards, working conditions, and prestige to their members according to career level; thus these benefits are properties of the organizational career. To advance in this career is to receive more or better of all or some of these benefits. Generally speaking, therefore, people work to advance their organizational careers. But also, generally speaking, people do not like to talk about their careers or to be asked about them in everyday conversations with many or unknown people. In this sense, a person’s own organizational career is a sensitive or “taboo topic.” Discussions with others about one’s career occur only under the most private, discreet conditions. As a result, while people may talk abstractly and generally about careers, these discussions are typically based on a combination of the little they know of their own career and much speculation. They often have very little particular or general knowledge based on actual careers. These observations apply also to a large sector or the sociological community, as indicated by a brief perusal of the table of contents of sociological monographs and readers on organizations. The topic of careers is seldom discussed and almost never concertedly focused upon.

  17. Career patterns of healthcare executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, D F; Myrtle, R C

    2001-02-01

    This research examines the job and career changes of healthcare executives and managers working in different segments of the healthcare industry in the western United States. The results suggest that the job and career patterns in the healthcare delivery sector are undergoing significant transformation. One third of the respondents reports that at least one of their last four job changes was involuntary or unplanned. One half of those attempted to make a career change. This study identifies four different executive and management career patterns. The most common was one of multiple career changes. The second pattern was that of a single career change, followed by a 'traditional' career in which one did not seek a career change. The final pattern was characterized as a movement back and forth between two different segments of the healthcare industry. Age, gender, marital status and education were not associated with any specific career pattern. The need to achieve results early in the respondent's career had a strong influence on career patterns. This study confirms the fluidity of career movement and the changing permeability between the various segments of the healthcare industry. It also suggests that career success increasingly will require broad management experience in those different segments.

  18. Education and Career Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Brečko

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The author has been represented four basic domains, which we should include in the career development of new employers; individual, people/employees, organisation and work task. Each of these domains includes three subordinate or learning tasks, which are very important for balancing the educational plan of new employees. The author warns about the most important role of the work organisation. Twelve learning tasks, suggested in the system of the new employee career development bring new challenges for educational organisations but also limits. The author is also quite sure career development programs must become part of the regular school curriculum especially at the end of schooling and before entry into the work organisation.

  19. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonjoo Park, RN, PhD

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students.

  20. Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Excellence in GHG Management (Goal Achievement Award), which publicly recognizes organizations that achieve publicly-set aggressive greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals.

  1. Notification: Evaluation of EPA's Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and Use of Data from the Award Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OPE-FY18-0003, January 9, 2018. The OIG plans to begin preliminary research to evaluate the agency's Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards and how the agency uses the data from the award nominations.

  2. Career Practitioners' Conceptions of Social Media in Career Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Sampson, James P., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the outcomes of a study, undertaken from a phenomenographic perspective, of career practitioners' conceptions of social media usage in career services. Fifteen Finnish career practitioners--representing comprehensive, secondary and higher education as well as public employment services--were interviewed in focus groups. The…

  3. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, Frans; Kuijpers, Marinka

    2018-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  4. Career learning and career learning environment in Dutch higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinka Kuijpers; dr. Frans Meijers

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the effects of career development and guidance among students (age 17-23) enrolled in higher education in The Netherlands. First the paper explores whether the development of career competencies contribute to career identity, learning motivation,

  5. Effects of Career Choice Intervention on Components of Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Petri; Vinokur, Amiram D.; Vuori, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    This randomized experimental study (N = 1,034) examines both the direct and the indirect effects of the Towards Working Life intervention on 2 components of adolescents' career preparation: preparedness for career choice and attitude toward career planning. The intervention comprised a 1-week workshop program, the proximal goals of which were to…

  6. Career Development Theory and Its Application. Career Knowledge Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Career Development Association, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Covers career development theory, models, and techniques and how to apply them; understand the steps in the career development process and why career choice and development theory is important as well as limitations. Presents the assumptions that underlie four different types of theories; trait and factor, learning, developmental, and transition…

  7. Overconfidence and Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jonathan F; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in.

  8. Wind Power Career Chat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Flowers

    2011-01-01

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  9. Overconfidence and Career Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jonathan F.; Thöni, Christian

    2016-01-01

    People self-assess their relative ability when making career choices. Thus, confidence in their own abilities is likely an important factor for selection into various career paths. In a sample of 711 first-year students we examine whether there are systematic differences in confidence levels across fields of study. We find that our experimental confidence measures significantly vary between fields of study: While students in business related academic disciplines (Political Science, Law, Economics, and Business Administration) exhibit the highest confidence levels, students of Humanities range at the other end of the scale. This may have important implications for subsequent earnings and professions students select themselves in. PMID:26808273

  10. Career Education: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaska, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    Career education, which is designed to promote cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills at all educational levels, is especially important for exceptional children. A comprehensive approach to career development is needed by school districts, along with feedback from former students. (SEW)

  11. Daily Public Assistance Grants Award Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Daily activity of Public Assistance Grant Awards, including FEMA Region, State, Disaster Declaration Number, Event description, Mission Assigned agency, Assistance...

  12. Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Organizational Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations for their comprehensive greenhouse gas inventories and aggressive emissions reduction goals.

  13. Parimad suhtekorraldusteod konkursil Baltic PR Awards

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2012-01-01

    Balti riikide suhtekorraldusliidud koostöös Rahvusvahelise Avalike Suhete Assotsiatsiooniga (IPRA) korraldavad 2001. aastast iga aasta kommunikatsioonijuhtimisalast auhinnakonkurssi Baltic PR Awards

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2009 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2009 award winner, Professor Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, developed Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization to make polymers with copper catalysts and environmentally friendly reducing agents.

  15. Ocean FEST and TECH: Inspiring Hawaii's Students to Pursue Ocean, Earth and Environmental Science Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Wren, J. L.; Ayau, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean TECH (Technology Expands Career Horizons) is a new initiative funded by NSF/GeoEd to stimulate interest in ocean, earth and environmental science careers - and the college majors that lead to such careers - among Hawaii's underrepresented students in grades 6-14. The Ocean TECH project features hands-on ocean science and technology and interactions with career professionals. Ocean TECH builds upon Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together), a previous NSF/OEDG project aimed at teaching fun hands-on science in culturally and locally relevant ways to Hawaii's elementary school students and their families. Ocean FEST was rigorously evaluated (including cognitive pre-testing developed in partnership with external evaluators) and shown to be successful both in teaching science content and changing attitudes toward ocean, earth and environmental science careers. Over the course of the four-year grant, Ocean FEST reached 20,99 students and adults, including 636 classroom teachers and other volunteers who assisted with program delivery, most of whom were from underrepresented groups. For more info on Ocean FEST: http://oceanfest.soest.hawaii.edu/ Ocean TECH events have various formats, but common themes include: (1) Using technology as a hook to engage students in ocean, earth and environmental science. (2) Bringing middle school through community college students to college campuses, where they engage in hands-on science activities and learn about college majors. (3) Drawing direct links between the students' hands-on science activities and the research currently occurring at the UH Manoa's School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), such as C-MORE and HOT research. (4) Respecting and valuing students' local knowledge and experiences. (5) Explicitly showing, through concrete examples, how becoming an ocean, earth or environmental scientist addresses would beneit Hawaii (6) Having graduate students from diverse backgrounds serve as instructors and

  16. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  17. Effects of Discipline-based Career Course on Nursing Students' Career Search Self-efficacy, Career Preparation Behavior, and Perceptions of Career Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonjoo

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a discipline-based career course on perceptions of career barriers, career search self-efficacy, and career preparation behavior of nursing students. Differences in career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior by the students' levels of career barriers were also examined. The study used a modified one-group, pretest-posttest design. The convenience sample consisted of 154 undergraduate nursing students in a university. The discipline-based career course consisted of eight sessions, and was implemented for 2 hours per session over 8 weeks. The data were collected from May to June in 2012 and 2013 using the following instruments: the Korean Career Indecision Inventory, the Career Search Efficacy Scale, and the Career Preparation Behavior Scale. Descriptive statistics, paired t test, and analysis of covariance were used to analyze the data. Upon the completion of the discipline-based career course, students' perceptions of career barriers decreased and career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased. Career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior increased in students with both low and high levels of career barriers. The difference between the low and high groups was significant for career search self-efficacy but not for career preparation behavior. The discipline-based career course was effective in decreasing perceptions of career barriers and increasing career search self-efficacy and career preparation behavior among nursing students. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Borders of "the boundarlyless career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutaiba, Sami Stephan; Sommerlund, Julie

    2007-01-01

    , the methodology can inspire scholars to explore the findings observed in this paper. Practical implications – The idealization of the boundaryless career is problematic, as it poses problems to those concerned with the career. A more flexible ideal of careers would be preferable to researchers and organisational...

  19. Application of water quality indices NSF, DINIUS and BMWP to Ayura Creek, Antioquia, Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Melendez, Viky; Caicedo Quintero, Orlando; Aguirre Ramirez, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    This investigation evaluates the quality of water in the creek The Ayura (municipality of Envigado, Antioquia, Colombia), through application of the National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) and Dinius quality indexes, and the biotic index BMWP/Col. the estimate of these indexes was conducted with data collected in three sites and three moments. Physicochemical and microbiological variables were determinate; we also performed a qualitative and quantitative sampling of aquatic macroinvertebrates. Using this methodology the behavior of physical-chemical and biological community in the different sites was studied. The physicochemical and aquatic macroinvertebrate indexes results showed that site 1 provides a good quality of water and the sites 2 and 3 a middle deteriorated water quality.

  20. Structural analysis of wind turbine rotors for NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary estimates are presented of vibratory loads and stresses in hingeless and teetering rotors for the proposed NSF-NASA Mod-0 wind power system. Preliminary blade design utilizes a tapered tubular aluminum spar which supports nonstructural aluminum ribs and skin and is joined to the rotor hub by a steel shank tube. Stresses in the shank of the blade are calculated for static, rated, and overload operating conditions. Blade vibrations were limited to the fundamental flapping modes, which were elastic cantilever bending for hingeless rotor blades and rigid-body rotation for teetering rotor blades. The MOSTAB-C computer code was used to calculate aerodynamic and mechanical loads. The teetering rotor has substantial advantages over the hingeless rotor with respect to shank stresses, fatigue life, and tower loading. The hingeless rotor analyzed does not appear to be structurally stable during overloads.

  1. Proceedings: Joint DOE/NSF Workshop on flow of particulates and fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    These proceedings are the result of the Fifth DOR-NSF Workshop on fundamental research in the area of particulate two-phase flow and granular flow. The present collection of twenty contributions from universities and national laboratories is based on research projects sponsored by either the Department of Energy or the National Science Foundation. These papers illustrate some of the latest advances in theory, simulations, and experiments. The papers from the Workshop held September 29--October 1, 1993 have been separated into three basic areas: experiments, theory, and numerical simulations. A list of attendees at the workshop is included at the end of the proceedings. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  2. Monitoring the consequences of decreased ozone protection: The NSF ultraviolet radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of decreased protection from ultraviolet radiation are as troubling as the continuing depletion of stratospheric ozone. Evidence exists to clearly link ozone depletion to changes in the antarctic marine environment. Results of two 1992 papers are summarized here. Enhanced exposure to mid-range UV radiation was found to be affecting marine ecosystems with a recorded 6-12 percent reduction in primary productivity directly related to the ozone layer depletion. In another experiment, a model was developed indicating that the ozone hole could reduce near-surface photosynthesis by as much as 12-15 percent. The NSF UV monitoring system in place for these and other experiments uses a spectroradiometer, making hourly, high-resolution measurements of the distribution of UV surface irradiance

  3. Improving Science Teacher Preparation through the APS PhysTEC and NSF Noyce Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tasha; Tyler, Micheal; van Duzor, Andrea; Sabella, Mel

    2013-03-01

    Central to the recruitment of students into science teaching at a school like CSU, is a focus on the professional nature of teaching. The purpose of this focus is twofold: it serves to change student perceptions about teaching and it prepares students to become teachers who value continued professional development and value the science education research literature. The Noyce and PhysTEC programs at CSU place the professional nature of teaching front and center by involving students in education research projects, paid internships, attendance at conferences, and participation in a new Teacher Immersion Institute and a Science Education Journal Reading Class. This poster will focus on specific components of our teacher preparation program that were developed through these two programs. In addition we will describe how these new components provide students with diverse experiences in the teaching of science to students in the urban school district. Supported by the NSF Noyce Program (0833251) and the APS PhysTEC Program.

  4. Unmet needs for analyzing biological big data: A survey of 704 NSF principal investigators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Barone

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a 2016 survey of 704 National Science Foundation (NSF Biological Sciences Directorate principal investigators (BIO PIs, nearly 90% indicated they are currently or will soon be analyzing large data sets. BIO PIs considered a range of computational needs important to their work, including high performance computing (HPC, bioinformatics support, multistep workflows, updated analysis software, and the ability to store, share, and publish data. Previous studies in the United States and Canada emphasized infrastructure needs. However, BIO PIs said the most pressing unmet needs are training in data integration, data management, and scaling analyses for HPC-acknowledging that data science skills will be required to build a deeper understanding of life. This portends a growing data knowledge gap in biology and challenges institutions and funding agencies to redouble their support for computational training in biology.

  5. Unmet needs for analyzing biological big data: A survey of 704 NSF principal investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Lindsay; Williams, Jason; Micklos, David

    2017-10-01

    In a 2016 survey of 704 National Science Foundation (NSF) Biological Sciences Directorate principal investigators (BIO PIs), nearly 90% indicated they are currently or will soon be analyzing large data sets. BIO PIs considered a range of computational needs important to their work, including high performance computing (HPC), bioinformatics support, multistep workflows, updated analysis software, and the ability to store, share, and publish data. Previous studies in the United States and Canada emphasized infrastructure needs. However, BIO PIs said the most pressing unmet needs are training in data integration, data management, and scaling analyses for HPC-acknowledging that data science skills will be required to build a deeper understanding of life. This portends a growing data knowledge gap in biology and challenges institutions and funding agencies to redouble their support for computational training in biology.

  6. Career Issues in Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on career issues in organizations. "Learning During Downsizing: Stories from the Survivors" (Sharon J. Confessore) describes a study to demonstrate that survivors of corporate downsizings undertake learning activities and use many resources to accomplish the learning tasks.…

  7. Careers in Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Sandra

    Trends in the current job market in the field of dance are identified, and aspects, such as personal qualifications, training requirements, income potential, and employment possibilities, are discussed. Employment opportunities in the professional world, the field of education, and the corporate environment are explored. Career opportunities for…

  8. Careers in biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, R E; Rotger, V I; Herrera, M C

    2010-01-01

    Although biomedical engineering was started in Argentina about 35 years ago, it has had a sustained growth for the last 25 years in human resources, with the emergence of new undergraduate and postgraduate careers, as well as in research, knowledge, technological development, and health care.

  9. My Career: Composer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganelli, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about his career as a composer and offers some advice for aspiring composers. The author works as a composer in the movie industry, creating music that supports a film's story. Other composers work on television shows, and some do both television and film. The composer uses music to tell the audience what kind of…

  10. Careers | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    community. Learn More » Life at Argonne Our diverse community values work-life balance. Find your niche ; enjoy life at work! Learn More » Back to top Twitter Flickr Facebook Linked In YouTube Pinterest Google National Security User Facilities Science Work with Us About Safety News Careers Apply for a Job External

  11. Manufacturing and Merchandising Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Peter J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Anyone with a flair for business, product development, or promotion might consider a manufacturing or merchandising occupation. The music industry offers many career opportunities for administrators, salespersons, marketing specialists--the record industry offers positions from promotion manager to rack jobber. Describes instrument company…

  12. Expanding career options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Rineke

    2009-01-01

    The musical landscape in Europe shows a complex picture. Societal change leads to change in the careers of artists. We see an increasing number of unstable jobs in the music profession. It no longer offers many opportunities for full-time, long-term contract work, but is often more project-based,

  13. Clifford Geertz: A career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošković Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some concepts of the recently deceased American anthropologist Clifford Geertz, putting them into the specific context of his rich and interesting career, influences that he had, as well as some reactions to his ideas. A particular attention is placed upon the concept of culture, as the key concept in the 20th century American anthropology.

  14. Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgeons Achieve High Rates of K-Award Conversion Into R01 Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, Adishesh K; Mehaffey, J Hunter; Hawkins, Robert B; Baderdinni, Pranav K; Chandrabhatla, Anirudha S; Tribble, Curtis G; Kron, Irving L; Roeser, Mark E; Walters, Dustin M; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2018-03-14

    Obtaining National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 funding remains extremely difficult. The utility of career development grants (K awards) for achieving the goal of R01 funding remains debated, particularly for surgeon-scientists. We examined the success rate for cardiothoracic and vascular (CTV) surgeons compared to other specialties in converting K-level grants into R01 equivalents. All K (K08 and K23) grants awarded to surgeons by the NIH between 1992-2017 were identified through NIH RePORTER, an online database combining funding, publications, and patents. Only grants awarded to CTV surgeons were included. Grants active within the past year were excluded. Mann-Whitney U-tests and Chi-squared tests were used to compare groups. A total of 62 K grants awarded to CTV surgeons were identified during this period. Sixteen grants were still active within the last year and excluded from analysis. Twenty-two (48%) of the remaining K awardees successfully transitioned to an R01 or equivalent grant. Awardees with successful conversion published 9 publications per K grant compared to 4 publications for those who did not convert successfully (p=0.01). The median time for successful conversion to an R grant was 5.0 years after the K award start date. Importantly, the 10-year conversion rate to R01 was equal for CTV surgeons compared to other clinician-investigators (52.6% vs 42.5%). CTV surgeons have an equal 10-year conversion rate to first R01 award compared to other clinicians. These data suggest that NIH achieves a good return on investment when funding CTV surgeon-scientists with K-level funding. Copyright © 2018 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rheumatology Research Foundation Clinician Scholar Educator Award: Fifteen Years Promoting Rheumatology Educators and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Jessica R; O'Rourke, Kenneth S; Kolasinski, Sharon L; Aizer, Juliet; Wheatley, Mary J; Battistone, Michael J; Siaton, Bernadette C; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa; Pillinger, Michael H; Lazaro, Deana M

    2016-11-01

    The Rheumatology Research Foundation's Clinician Scholar Educator (CSE) award is a 3-year career development award supporting medical education research while providing opportunities for mentorship and collaboration. Our objective was to document the individual and institutional impact of the award since its inception, as well as its promise to strengthen the subspecialty of rheumatology. All 60 CSE Award recipients were surveyed periodically. Fifty-six of those 60 awardees (90%) responded to requests for survey information that included post-award activities, promotions, and further funding. Data were also collected from yearly written progress reports for each grant. Of the total CSE recipients to date, 48 of 60 (80%) are adult rheumatologists, 11 of 60 (18%) are pediatric rheumatologists, and 1 is an adult and pediatric rheumatologist. Two-thirds of survey respondents spend up to 30% of their total time in educational activities, and one-third spend greater than 30%. Thirty-one of the 60 CSE recipients (52%) have published a total of 86 medical education papers. Twenty-six of 52 (50%) had received an academic promotion following the award. Eleven awardees earned advanced degrees. We describe the creation and evolution of a grant program from a medical subspecialty society foundation and the impact on producing education research, individual identity formation, and ongoing support for educators. This community of rheumatology scholar educators now serves as an important resource at the national level for the American College of Rheumatology and its membership. We believe that this grant may serve as a model for other medical societies that want to promote education scholarship and leadership within their specialties. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. 42 CFR 52.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... grant to those applicants whose approved projects will in the Secretary's judgment best promote the..., the grant will initially be for one year and subsequent continuation awards will also be for one year... application nor the award of any grant commits or obligates the United States in any way to make any...

  17. A Herdswoman Awarded with Global Medal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FLORA; CHANG

    1998-01-01

    SEPTEMBER 8, 1995 was an unforgettable day for Lai Xiao. On that morning, she was awarded with the "Global Rural Women Creation of Life Award" by the NGO Forum of the UN Fourth World Conference on Women, in Huairou, Beijing. Wearing sapphire-blue Mongolian attire,

  18. Innovative Catalytic Converter Wins National Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    emissions and urban air pollution has been named one of the years most important technological breakthroughs National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Benteler Industries Inc. of Grand Rapids, Mich.—to receive one of its prestigious 1996 R&D 100 awards. The annual awards recognize the years 100 most

  19. 2 CFR 175.15 - Award term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... iii. Use forced labor in the performance of the award or subawards under the award. 2. We as the... cost sharing or matching requirements. 2. “Forced labor” means labor obtained by any of the following methods: the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for labor or...

  20. NOTE receives the prestigious ALICE Industrial Award

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "NOTE Lund has been given the ALICE Industrial Award due to good co-operation, great capacity for innovation and high quality of work, as a PCB manufacturer in the CERN project ALICE. Only a small number of awards have so far been conferred to a select number of companies."

  1. Tables Summarizing Awards Supported by IDRC

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Carole Labrie

    2013-04-04

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC). A. Awards Granted Through Competitions. Updated April 4, 2013. Award Type. University Level. Who can apply. Description. Frequency & ... Explore a problem common to First Nations or Inuit. Communities of Canada ... reporting in one or more developing countries.

  2. Integrating Professional Development into STEM Graduate Programs: Student-Centered Programs for Career Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, L.; McCay, D.; Driscoll, C. T.; Glas, R. L.; Gutchess, K. M.; Johnson, A.; Millard, G.

    2017-12-01

    Recognizing that over half of STEM Ph.D. graduates are finding work outside of academia, a new, NSF-funded program at Syracuse University, EMPOWER (or Education Model Program on Water-Energy Research) is encouraging its graduate students to take ownership of their graduate program and design it to meet their anticipated needs. Launched in 2016, EMPOWER's goal is to prepare graduate students for careers in the water-energy field by offering targeted workshops, professional training coursework, a career capstone experience, a professional development mini-grant program, and an interdisciplinary "foundations" seminar. Through regular student feedback and program evaluation, EMPOWER has learned some important lessons this first year: career options and graduate students' interests are diverse, requiring individualized programs designed to meet the needs of prospective employers and employees; students need exposure to the range of careers in their field to provide a roadmap for designing their own graduate school experience; effective programs nurture a culture that values professional development thereby giving students permission to pursue career paths and professional development opportunities that meet their own needs and interests; and existing university resources support the effective and efficient integration of professional development activities into graduate programs. Many of the positive outcomes experienced by EMPOWER students may be achieved in departmental graduate programs with small changes to their graduate curricula.

  3. Daniel Landis: Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Presents a short biography of one of the co-recipients of the American Psychological Association's Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology. One of the 2012 winners is Daniel Landis for his unparalleled contribution to the field of intercultural research in a distinguished academic career spanning almost half a century. Landis has shaped the field of intercultural research through scholarship of the highest order, reflected in his publications on cross-cultural training and research, the measurement of equal opportunity climate, individual-differences research and methodology, evaluation of social programs, development of theory in social psychology, and cross-cultural aspects of human sexuality. He is the founding editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Intercultural Relations and has edited three editions of the Handbook of Intercultural Training (1983, 1996, 2004). Landis' Award citation and a selected bibliography are also presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Nelson, David E; Izmirlian, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP) alumni (n = 114), and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32) postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140) completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69) and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90) were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82) or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94) had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively), as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98). These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  5. Career Satisfaction and Perceived Salary Competitiveness among Individuals Who Completed Postdoctoral Research Training in Cancer Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Faupel-Badger

    Full Text Available Studies examining career satisfaction of biomedical scientists are limited, especially in the context of prior postdoctoral training. Here we focused on career satisfaction defined as satisfaction with one's career trajectory and perceived salary competitiveness among a predominantly Ph.D.-trained population of scientists who completed cancer prevention-related postdoctoral training between 1987-2011. National Cancer Institute (NCI Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program (CPFP alumni (n = 114, and previous recipients of NCI-sponsored Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA/F32 postdoctoral fellowships (n = 140 completed online surveys. Associations of career satisfaction and perception of salary competitiveness with demographic, training, and employment-related factors were examined using logistic regression. Overall, 61% reported high levels of satisfaction with their career trajectory to-date. Higher salary (odds ratio [OR] = 2.86, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.07-7.69 and having more leadership roles (OR = 2.26, 95% CI:1.04-4.90 were independently associated with higher career satisfaction. Persons with race/ethnicity other than white (OR = 0.40, 95% CI: 0.20-0.82 or age ≥ 50 (OR = 0.40, 95%CI: 0.17-0.94 had lower career satisfaction levels. There were no statistically significant differences in career satisfaction levels by gender, scientific discipline, or employment sector. 74% perceived their current salary as competitive, but persons with 5-9, or ≥10 years in their current position reported lower levels (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15-0.65; and OR = 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16-0.87, respectively, as did individuals in government positions (OR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.11-0.98. These data add to the understanding of career satisfaction of those with advanced training in biomedical research by examining these measures in relation to prior postdoctoral research training and across multiple career sectors.

  6. Career anchors and values from different career management perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cunha da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – To analyze the relationships between career anchors and young Generation Y professionals’ values, from the career concept perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Research concerning the proposed objective was carried out through quantitative research involving 189 Business Administration majors from a Catholic university in São Paulo, Brazil. We used two instruments to identify the career anchors and values of respondents: Schein (1990 and Schwartz (1994, respectively. We used statistical techniques to explore the relationships between career anchors and values. Findings – Among the results, mention should be made to the statistical relationships found between analyzed career anchors and values. It is also important to stress that, although the Lifestyle career anchor was predominantly present in the conglomerate division, this anchor was the predominant characteristic in the differentiation of the smaller group of respondents, the new career group. The General Management Career Anchor, which presents a lower incidence, is the predominant characteristic of the larger group, referring to organizational careers. As well as the Lifestyle career anchor, the Hedonism value was predominant among respondents. Originality/value – The need to consider the following was found: Generation Y presents generational characteristics that drive people management to propose work structures that offer activities to generate learning, pleasure, self-fulfillment and conciliation between work and personal life.

  7. QUALITY AWARDS: AN IMAGE OF BUSINESS EXCELLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilies Liviu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, increasingly more governmental organizations and industrial are doing everything possible to promote quality and to survive, the basic principle remains customer satisfaction and even more than that, it speaks of the principle of customer delight. In this sense, quality has become the source of sustained competitive advantage that provides organizations the supremacy of the global markets characterized by competition which becoming more and more intensified. Juran, one of the highest quality gurus say that “just as the twentieth century was the century of productivity, the twenty-first century will be the quality century” which is a very relevant and comprehensive statement of the economic reality of the past and a profound forecast for future business of the twenty-first century. In this regard, in order to achieve this competitive advantage, quality must be managed and this is accomplished through Total Quality Management (TQM. Quality awards models are instruments of total quality management through which quality can be assessed and improved, thus, knowing the quality awards models is critical for findings the new ways to improve the quality and performance of the organizations. The present paper aims to illustrate the best practices on quality improvement in this respect we intend to present the general framework of the quality awards for business excellence. In this sense we present the most important international quality awards, namely: "Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award", "European Quality Award" and “Romanian Quality Award J. M. Juran". For this purpose we used as main sources of analyzing the structure and the operation mode of these three important quality awards, Juran's work (which is probably the most important work in the field of quality and other relevant sources in total quality management which treats issues related to quality awards and also we used as sources of updated information the official

  8. NRAO Astronomer Wins Max-Planck Research Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    Dr. Christopher Carilli, a National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) astronomer in Socorro, New Mexico, has been chosen to receive the prestigious Max Planck Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and the Max Planck Society in Germany. Christopher Carilli Dr. Christopher Carilli Click on image for more photos CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF Carilli, a radio astronomer, and German particle physicist Christof Wetterich are the 2005 recipients of the award, conferred on "one researcher working in Germany and one working abroad who have already gained an international reputation and who are expected to produce outstanding achievements in the framework of international collaboration," according to an announcement from the Humboldt Foundation. "This is a great honor for Chris, and we are proud to see him receive such important international recognition for the excellence of his research," said NRAO Director Fred K.Y. Lo. Carilli's research has focused on studying very distant galaxies in the early Universe, and a quest to find the first luminous objects, such as stars or galaxies, to emerge. His most recent interests focus on unveiling the mysteries of what cosmologists call the "Epoch of Reionization," when the first stars and galaxies ionized the neutral hydrogen that pervaded the young Universe. Carilli and his research colleagues have used NRAO's Very Large Array and other radio telescopes to discover that the molecular raw material for star formation already was present in a galaxy seen as it was about 800 million years after the Big Bang, less than 1/16 the current age of the Universe. The Max Planck Research Award provides 750,000 Euros (currently about $900,000), to be used over five years, for research. The funding is provided by the German Ministry of Education and Research. Carilli will use the funding to support young researchers and to build scientific instrumentation, with a focus on fostering radio studies of cosmic reionization and the first

  9. Career development from the organizational perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Miková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis introduces a topic of career development in organizational context. The aim of this work was to present the concept of career development from organizational perspective and to outline the contrast between the traditional career and the contemporary career concepts with the new psychological contract taken into consideration. The contemporary view of career also changes the organizational approach towards the career planning and career management of its employees. The majo...

  10. We won a National award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meciarova, A.; Cicova, V.

    2011-01-01

    On the occasion of the 43 rd conference for water management in the industry results of the 3 rd competition were announced for the National Business Award for Environment in the Slovak Republic 2011 organized by the Association of Industrial Ecology in Slovakia (ASPEK). The first prize in the category 'product; went to the hands of Slovenske elektrarne representatives for providing the energy self-sufficiency of Tery Chalet, High Tatras, all year round with installing photovoltaic system. 'We have a complex programme of five energies through which we support culture, sports, humanity, education and environmental protection. Hence we try to support constant sustainability of biodiversity,' underlined Alena Meciarova, Manager of Environment at Slovenske elektrarne. (author)

  11. Voting for a Career

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Benjamin Carl Krag

    effects depending on the senator's career ambitions. While retiring senators are no longer accountable to anyone but themselves, revolving door politicians will be accountable to their future employers, because they depend on them for post-elective employment. During their final Congress, this should lead......I investigate how the revolving door affects voting in the Senate. The literature on final-term problems suggests that senators should become more extreme before they leave office, because they no longer are accountable to voters. Lack of electoral accountability could, however, have different...... revolving door senators to moderate themselves, while retiring ones should grow more partisan. Using data on post-elective career trajectories from 102nd to the 113th Senate, I present fixed effects estimates that back this claim. I show that the effect is driven by senators, who choose to resign...

  12. Cannabis careers revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, Margaretha; Ravn, Signe

    2014-01-01

    A considerable part of today's sociological research on recreational drug use is (explicitly or implicitly) inspired by Howard Becker's classical model of deviant careers. The aim of the present paper is to directly apply Becker's theory to empirical data on present-day cannabis use and to suggest...... in treatment for cannabis problems in Copenhagen, Denmark. We suggest a revision of Becker's career model in relation to four aspects: initiation of cannabis use, differentiation between socially integrated and individualised, disintegrated use, social control from non-users, and the users' moral stance...... on cannabis. A central point of the paper is that social interaction may both motivate cannabis use, as Becker proposed, and serve as a protective factor against extensive, problematic use....

  13. Exploration of NSF-ATE Projects Approaches in the Integration of Technology and Engineering Education at the K-12 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Johannes; Mendoza Díaz, Noemi V.

    2012-01-01

    Access to post-secondary education, specifically in the technical, two-year institution area, is a topic of growing interest in the country. Funding agencies, such as NSF, via the Advanced Technological Education Program (ATE), are supporting initiatives and research aimed at increasing the number of technicians and engineers and improving…

  14. Cryptosporidium sebagai Indikator Biologi dan Indeks Nsf-Wqi untuk Mengevaluasi Kualitas Air (Studi Kasus: Hulu Sungai Citarum, Kabupaten Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tastaptyani Kurnia Nufutomo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Kualitas air yang menurun di Hulu Sungai Citarum dapat disebabkan oleh banyak faktor. Faktor-faktor tersebut dapat diketahui dari parameter fisika, kimia dan biologi. Parameter biologi yang digunakan untuk mengevaluasi kualitas air adalah  mikroorganisme patogen yang menimbulkan penyakit di sistem pencernaan seperti diare akut, yaitu Coliform dan Cryptosporidium. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui status kualitas air di Hulu Sungai Citarum dengan indeks kualitas air NSF-WQI, mengetahui hubungan dan pengaruh parameter fisik dan kimia air terhadap parameter biologi, menentukan faktor utama dari parameter air yang paling berpengaruh dan mengetahui hubungan serta pengaruh faktor utama tersebut terhadap Cryptosporidium. Metode yang digunakan adalah  mengambil sampel di tiap stasiun dengan composite, mengidentifikasi dan analisis Coliform dengan MPN dan identifikasi Crytosporidium dengan Ziehl Neelsen staining, kemudian menganalisis parameter kimia dan fisika dengan indeks NSF-WQI, lalu data tersebut diolah menggunakan metode statistik PCA. Hasil pengukuran kualitas air berdasarkan NSF-WQI adalah kualitas air di Hulu Sungai Citarum termasuk kategori buruk dan medium. Keberadaan Cryptosporidium di Hulu Sungai Citarum disebabkan oleh 2 (dua faktor utama, yaitu faktor pertama terdiri dari DO, turbiditas, NO2, NH4 dan total Colifom, sedangkan faktor kedua terdiri dari TSS, COD dan PO4. Kedua faktor tersebut tidak signifikan dengan keberadaan Cryptosporidium di Hulu Sungai Citarum. Kata kunci: Cryptosporidium, Hulu Sungai Citarum, Indeks NSF-WQI, Kualitas Air

  15. Year-Long Peer Mentoring Activity to Enhance the Retention of Freshmen STEM Students in a NSF Scholarship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The last year of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded scholarship program was used to provide pseudo-formal peer mentoring activities to engineering, mathematics, and science undergraduates. A one-credit class was used to afford time for peer mentors and mentees to interact. During the fall semester, seniors augmented each week's topics with…

  16. Evaluation of NSF's Program of Grants and Vertical Integration of Research and Education in the Mathematical Sciences (VIGRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In 1998, the National Science Foundation (NSF) launched a program of Grants for Vertical Integration of Research and Education in the Mathematical Sciences (VIGRE). These grants were designed for institutions with PhD-granting departments in the mathematical sciences, for the purpose of developing high-quality education programs, at all levels,…

  17. Career Concerns in Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Auriol, Emmanuelle; Friebel, Guido; Pechlivanos, Lambros

    2002-01-01

    We investigate how changes in the commitment power of a principal affect cooperation among agents who work in a team. When the principal and her agents are symmetrically uncertain about the agents' innate abilities, workers have career concerns. Then, unless the principal can commit herself to long-term wage contracts, an implicit sabotage incentive emerges. Agents become reluctant to help their teammates. Anticipating this risk, and in order to induce the desired level of cooperation, the pr...

  18. Career age peaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polozov Andrey Anatolievich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Most researchers seem career as translational motion the steps to the top. However, very similar to that on the ladder just two steps – in 25 and 39 years. At age 25, the largest value reaches the value of the index of intelligence, and at the age of 39 years – management experience. Best results have revealed 6 years after the beginning of its profile.

  19. Careers in Culinary Arts

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation was to give individuals interested in pursuing a career in culinary arts the advice and access to education surrounding this field. Culinary arts covers the multidisciplinary field and areas of practice and study which includes culinary performing arts (cooking), gastronomy (food studies), bakery and pastry arts, food and beverage studies (bar, restaurant, barista), wine studies , food product development and health, hygiene and nutrition. So many individuals ...

  20. The U.S. NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative: A Modern Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orcutt, John; Vernon, Frank; Peach, Cheryl; Arrott, Matthew; Graybeal, John; Farcas, Claudiu; Farcas, Emilia; Krueger, Ingolf; Meisinger, Michael; Chave, Alan

    2010-05-01

    The NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) began a five-year construction period in October 2009. The Consortium on Ocean Leadership (COL) manages the overall program with Implementing Organizations for Coastal/Global Scale Nodes (CGSN) at Woods Hole, Oregon State and Scripps; the Regional Cabled Network (RCN) at U of Washington and Cyberinfrastructure (CI) at UCSD and more than ten subcontractors. The NSF has made a commitment to support the observatory operations and maintenance for a 30-year period; a minimal period of time to measure physical, chemical and biological data over a length of time possibly sufficient to measure secular changes associated with climate and geodesy. The CI component is a substantial departure from previous approaches to data distribution and management. These innovations include the availability of data in near-real-time with latencies of seconds, open access to all data, analysis of the data stream for detection and modeling, use of the derived knowledge to modify the network with minimal or no human interaction and maintenance of data provenance through time as new versions of the data are created through QA/QC processes. The network architecture is designed to be scalable so that addition of new sensors is straightforward and inexpensive with costs increasing linearly at worst. Rather than building new computer infrastructure (disk farms and computer clusters), we are presently exploiting Amazon's Extensible Computing Cloud (EC2) and Simple Storage System (S3) to reduce long-term commitments to hardware and maintenance in order to minimize operations and maintenance costs. The OOI CI is actively partnering with other organizations (e.g. NOAA's IOOS) to integrate existing data systems using many of the same technologies to improve broad access to existing and planned observing systems, including those that provide critical climate data. Because seasonal and annual variability of most measureable parameters is so large, the

  1. Calibration and Field Deployment of the NSF G-V VCSEL Hygrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGangi, J. P.; O'Brien, A.; Diao, M.; Hamm, C.; Zhang, Q.; Beaton, S. P.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Cloud formation and dynamics have a significant influence on the Earth's radiative forcing budget, which illustrates the importance of clouds with respect to global climate. Therefore, an accurate understanding of the microscale processes dictating cloud formation is crucial for accurate computer modeling of global climate change. A critical tool for understanding these processes from an airborne platform is an instrument capable of measuring water vapor with both high accuracy and time, thus spatial, resolution. Our work focuses on an open-path, compact, vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) absorption-based hygrometer, capable of 25 Hz temporal resolution, deployed on the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream-V aircraft platform. The open path nature of our instrument also helps to minimize sampling artifacts. We will discuss our efforts toward achieving within 5% accuracy over 5 orders of magnitude of water vapor concentrations. This involves an intercomparison of five independent calibration methods: ice surface saturators using an oil temperature bath, solvent slush baths (e.g. chloroform/LN2, water/ice), a research-grade frost point hygrometer, static pressure experiments, and Pt catalyzed hydrogen gas. This wide variety of available tools allows us to accurately constrain the calibrant water vapor concentrations both before and after the VCSEL hygrometer sampling chamber. For example, the mixing ratio as measured by research-grade frost point hygrometer after the VCSEL hygrometer agreed within 2% of the mixing ration expected from the water/ice bubbler source before the VCSEL over the temperature range -50°C to 20°C. Finally, due to the compact nature of our instrument, we are able to perform these calibrations simultaneously at the same temperatures (-80°C to 30°C) and pressures (150 mbar to 760 mbar) as sampled ambient air during a flight. This higher accuracy can significantly influence the science utilizing this data, which we will illustrate using

  2. ANALISIS PERBANDINGAN PENGHARGAAN KUALITAS MALCOLM BALDRIGE NATIONAL QUALITY AWARD DENGAN EUROPEAN QUALITY AWARD (MBNQA vs EQA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfan Bakhtiar Amalia

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Persaingan bisnis global saat ini makin ketat. Dengan adanya Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA dan juga European Quality Award (EQA diharapkan mampu mendorong dan memotivasi perusahaan-perusahaan, baik yang sudah sukses maupun yang sedang berkembang, untuk selalu meningkatkan mutu dan kinerja, serta sebagai kunci daya saing. Dalam makalah ini, kita akan membahas penghargaan kualitas mengenai tujuan, manfaat dan perkembangan, dan trend saat ini, terutama untuk MBNQA dan EQM (European Quality Model. Kita akan membandingkan antara MBNQA dan EQM melalui pengertian, latar belakang, metode-metode, dan kriteria-kriteria, serta aplikasinya, sehingga dapat kita lakukan analisa perbandingan untuk keduanya. Kata Kunci  : Penghargaan Kualitas, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA   Emulation of global business in this time more and more to tighten. With existence of Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA as well as European Quality Award (EQA expected can push and motivate companies, both for have successful and also which is expanding, to always increase the quality and performance, and also as competitiveness key. In this paper, we will discuss about national quality award concerning target, benefit, growth, and trend in this time, especially MBNQA and EQM (European Quality Model. We will compare between MBNQA and EQM through congeniality, background, method, and criterions, and also its application,  so that earn us to analyse comparison to both of its. Keyword        : Quality Award, Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA, European Quality Award (EQA

  3. The Roles of Negative Career Thinking and Career Problem-Solving Self-Efficacy in Career Exploratory Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Katz, Sheba P.; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The respective roles of social cognitive career theory and cognitive information processing in career exploratory behavior were analyzed. A verified path model shows cognitive information processing theory's negative career thoughts inversely predict social cognitive career theory's career problem-solving self-efficacy, which predicts career…

  4. Preparing Students for Careers in Science and Industry with Computational Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florinski, V. A.

    2011-12-01

    Funded by NSF CAREER grant, the University of Alabama (UAH) in Huntsville has launched a new graduate program in Computational Physics. It is universally accepted that today's physics is done on a computer. The program blends the boundary between physics and computer science by teaching student modern, practical techniques of solving difficult physics problems using diverse computational platforms. Currently consisting of two courses first offered in the Fall of 2011, the program will eventually include 5 courses covering methods for fluid dynamics, particle transport via stochastic methods, and hybrid and PIC plasma simulations. The UAH's unique location allows courses to be shaped through discussions with faculty, NASA/MSFC researchers and local R&D business representatives, i.e., potential employers of the program's graduates. Students currently participating in the program have all begun their research careers in space and plasma physics; many are presenting their research at this meeting.

  5. Genetic modifiers of comatose mutations in Drosophila: insights into neuronal NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion factor) functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Subhabrata; Krishnan, K S

    2012-09-01

    By the middle of the 20th century, development of powerful genetic approaches had ensured that the fruit fly would remain a model organism of choice for genetic and developmental studies. But in the 1970s, a few pioneering groups turned their attention to the prospect of using the fly for neurophysiological experiments. They proposed that in a poikilothermic organism such as Drosophila, temperature-sensitive or "ts" mutations in proteins that controlled nerve function would translate to a "ts" paralytic phenotype. This was by no means an obvious or even a likely assumption. However, following directed screens these groups soon reported dramatic demonstrations of reversible ts paralysis in fly mutants. Resultantly, these "simple" experiments led to the isolation of a number of conditional mutations including shibire, paralytic, and comatose. All have since been cloned and have enabled deep mechanistic insights into synaptic transmission and nerve conduction. comatose (comt) mutations, for example, were found to map to missense changes in dNSF1, a neuron-specific fly homolog of mammalian NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion factor). Studies on comt were also some of the first to discriminate between nuanced models of NSF function during presynaptic transmitter release that have since been borne out by experiments in multiple preparations. Here, the authors present an overview of NSF function as it is understood today, with an emphasis on contributions from Drosophila beginning with experiments carried out by Obaid Siddiqi in the Benzer laboratory. The authors also outline initial results from a genetic screen for phenotypic modifiers of comt that hold the promise of further elucidating NSF function at the synapse. Over the years, the neuromuscular system of Drosophila has served as a uniquely accessible model to unravel mechanisms underlying synaptic transmission. To this day, ts paralysis remains one of the most emphatic demonstrations of nerve function in an

  6. Mediating Role of Career Commitment in the Relationship of Promotional Opportunities, Rewards and Career Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tisman Pasha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to investigate the mediating role of career commitment between career development practices and career success of employee in insurance sector of Pakistan. Survey method was adopted to collect the data form 374 employees working in insurance sector systematic sampling. PLS-SEM technique was used using Smart PLS 2.0 to analyze the data. Findings of the study suggests that employees’ career development practices have positive relationship with career commitment and career success. Career commitment also have a positive relation with career success. Finally, career commitment mediates the positive role between career development practices and career of insurance sector employees. The effect of career development practices on career commitment and effect of career development practices on career success has been checked in past studies but the mediating role of career commitment particularly for the employees of insurance sector has not been checked before.

  7. Career Orientations and Career Route Preferences in R&D Organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroni, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 151 Italian scientists and engineers and case studies of a career development system for technical professionals revealed that career orientation (as measured by Schein's career anchors) is a useful predictor of career route preferences. (Author/JOW)

  8. CAREER GUIDANCE EXPERIENCE ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey N. Tolstoguzov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe the experience of careeroriented activities carried out with students of schools in developed and developing countries. Career Guidance in Russia, despite the vast experience of its implementation, is experiencing serious difficulties. In this regard, it is important to take into account the international experience career-oriented activities, such as in the developed countries of North America and the European Union as well as in several Asian countries with rapidly growing economies and a large demographic potential, taking into account the best variants for the Russian education system. Methods. The experience of career-oriented work undertaken with pupils of the USA, Canada, Israel, France, UK, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Japan, Singapore, China and India is shown on the basis of the comparative analysis of different publications and information sources. The author has made an attempt to generalize the principles of psycho-pedagogical and administrative assistance in professional self-determination of senior pupils abroad. Scientific novelty. The approaches to career-oriented activities in countries with different levels of economic development are compared for the first time. Some principles are revealed. Firstly, the higher the income level per capita in the country, the greater attention is given to vocational guidance. The politics in the developed countries is based on interests of the individual: children’s acquaintance with the world of professions begins already at younger school and the moment of definitive selfdetermination is postponed till the end of their senior stage of education; the possibility of direction change of professional preparation in case of detection of discrepancy of qualities of the pupil to originally selected profile is provided. Career-oriented activity in developing countries, on the contrary, is rigidly coordinated to requirements of economy and a labour market

  9. Cybersecurity Implications for Industry, Academia, and Parents: A Qualitative Case Study in NSF STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Gregory V.

    Rationale: Former President Barack Obama's 3.9 trillion for the 2015 fiscal year budget request included a 2.9 billion investment in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) education. Research then showed that the national spending for cybersecurity has exceeded $10.7 billion in the 2015 fiscal year. Nonetheless, the number of cyberattacks has risen year after year since 2012, potentially due to the lack of education and training in cybersecurity. Methodology: A qualitative case study research was conducted to explore and investigate the lived professional experiences of experts from San Antonio Texas whose efforts were aligned to increase the number of qualified cybersecurity professionals. To qualify the organizational needs for cybersecurity professionals, the study gathered expert opinions by surveying human resource managers pertaining to the needs of cybersecurity education. To refine and further validate data collection efforts, the study involved researcher observations and a survey of a narrow cohort to perform analytic induction to eliminate bias and exhaust the exploratory research (Maxwell, 2005). Result: The findings of the case study will: 1) help augment the importance of cybersecurity education in pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, 2) be utilized as a single guide for school leaders in the process of developing cybersecurity education strategies, and 3) in the longer term, be used by the National Sciences Foundation (NSF) as an effective model to institute cybersecurity education practices nationwide and thereby reduce the existing trouble of the nation by criminal cyber actors.

  10. Special awards lighten up SPR banquet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwickl, Ron; Baker, Dan; Reiff, Pat

    On December 8, 1982, Marcia Neugebauer, then president of the Solar and Planetary Relationships section, held the “First Occasional Awards Ceremony” in conjunction with the annual dinner banquet at the Fall AGU meeting. These awards were an attempt to add a little humor to our usually somber gatherings. This year we reincarnated Neugebauer's successful concept and presented a number of new and novel awards to our fellow scientists at the Fall AGU SPR dinner. Summarized for your enjoyment are the categories and the official winners, as announced at the December 6 banquet.

  11. Banking, Technology Workers and Their Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Lesley; West, Jim

    2001-01-01

    An Australian bank developed a four-stage career development strategy for information technology workers: (1) career coaching sessions with executives; (2) career coaching seminars for line managers and team leaders; (3) staff career planning workshops; and (4) online career development support. The program resulted in increased satisfaction,…

  12. The Career Development of 10 Year Olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Examined career development of 24 preadolescents and assessed how career development was related to their perceptions of their family, self-image, career awareness, interests, and work/family aspirations. Findings suggest that, by age 10, children have thought about their future and can articulate their career and family aspirations. Career goals…

  13. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  14. Career boundarylessness and career success : a review, integration and guide to future research.

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Y.; Arthur, M. B.; Khapova, S. N.; Hall, R.; Lord, R.

    2018-01-01

    The concept of boundaryless careers characterizes emerging career patterns that are less dependent on traditional organizational career management. Based on an evidence-based review of literature on the relationship between career boundarylessness and career success published from 1994 to 2018, we found that boundaryless careers have mixed effects on the various indictors of career success, and these effects depend on the operationalization of career boundarylessness, the motives (voluntary v...

  15. Climate Wise Achievement Awards: A profile of the award winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, K.; Milmoe, P.H.; Haydel, J.

    1999-01-01

    Climate Wise is a partnership initiative sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency designed to stimulate the voluntary reduction of greenhouse gas emissions among participating manufacturing companies. Because energy use in the manufacturing sectors accounts for nearly 30% of total US anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, industrial energy-efficiency actions can have a significant effect on reducing these emissions. Climate Wise works with US manufacturers to help them take advantage of the environmental and economic benefits of energy-efficiency improvements. The Climate Wise Partnership, Representing 13% of total US industrial energy use, currently has more than 500 partners that are saving money and energy by implementing a wide range of efficiency and waste reduction projects. In November of 1998, Climate Wise held its first annual partner Achievement Awards, recognizing its leading partners for their exceptional achievements in the areas of Leadership, Innovation, Action Planning, and Results. Fourteen companies were recognized for overall environmental performance, and three others were acknowledged for special achievement in specific areas. This paper summarizes the achievements of the Climate Wise partners recognized for their outstanding accomplishments. These case studies highlight their corporate climate goals and strategies, specific energy-efficiency actions implemented, and the anticipated financial benefits, fuel savings, and environmental impacts of these actions

  16. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadman, Victoria

    2017-11-01

    'What's the point in doing that?' This is often the response given to those saying they are undertaking education outside of work hours. Many do not see their role in theatre as just a job, but now want a career which means extra studying. Ideally this needs to be in advance so they are one step ahead for when an opportunity arises. Career opportunities and education go hand in hand together, and so it is difficult to discuss one without mentioning the other to some degree. We need education to access career opportunities, but we also need career routes to help drive education forward.

  17. Borders of the "Boundaryless Career"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommerlund, Julie; Boutaiba, Sami

    2007-01-01

    : a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings - The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise of the notion of the boundaryless career, namely that modern careers amount to a higher level of personal freedom. This empirical...... of careers makes both "new" and "old" types of careers possible. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is twofold: a theoretical argument, and a qualitative ethnographic study, involving observations and interviews. Findings - The theoretical argument questions the underlying premise and promise...

  18. 12 CFR 1806.204 - Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applications for Bank Enterprise Awards. 1806... OF THE TREASURY BANK ENTERPRISE AWARD PROGRAM Awards § 1806.204 Applications for Bank Enterprise... Enterprise Awards in accordance with this section and the applicable NOFA. After receipt of an application...

  19. 22 CFR 226.14 - Special award conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special award conditions. 226.14 Section 226.14 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-award Requirements § 226.14 Special award conditions. If an applicant or...

  20. 22 CFR 226.11 - Pre-award policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pre-award policies. 226.11 Section 226.11 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION OF ASSISTANCE AWARDS TO U.S. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS Pre-award Requirements § 226.11 Pre-award policies. (a) Use of grants and...

  1. 28 CFR 523.16 - Lump sum awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... satisfactory performance of an unusually hazardous assignment; (c) An act which protects the lives of staff or... TRANSFER COMPUTATION OF SENTENCE Extra Good Time § 523.16 Lump sum awards. Any staff member may recommend... award is calculated. No seniority is accrued for such awards. Staff may recommend lump sum awards of...

  2. 48 CFR 1552.216-77 - Award term incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... award term incentive periods] years. (c) Right not to grant or cancel the award term incentive. (1) The Government has the unilateral right not to grant or to cancel award term incentive periods and the associated... the award term incentive is cancelled, a unilateral modification will cite this clause as the...

  3. 48 CFR 452.216-70 - Award Fee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Award Fee. 452.216-70... SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 452.216-70 Award Fee. As prescribed in 416.405, insert a clause substantially as follows: Award Fee (FEB 1988) The amount of award fee...

  4. The Influence of Teachers' Career Guidance Profiles on Students' Career Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittendorff, Kariene; Beijaard, Douwe; den Brok, Perry; Koopman, Maaike

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine the relationship between different career guidance styles of vocational education teachers and vocational education students' career competencies (i.e. career reflection, career exploration and networking). Questionnaires on students' perceptions of the career guidance of their teachers during career conversations, and…

  5. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Small Business Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, UniEnergy,improved a vanadium redox flow battery to double the energy density, have a broader operating temperature range, a smaller footprint, reduced chemical usage, and very little capacity degradation.

  6. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This document describes the data structures to be implemented to provide the A59 Waste Repackaging Database (AWARD); a Computer System for the in-cave Bertha waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations in A59. (Author)

  7. Research Award: CommunicaƟons Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    The Communicaons Research Award focuses on corporate and research communicaon ... social media strategies, as well as other outreach programs. ... enrolled at a recognized university at the master's or doctoral level or have completed a.

  8. Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Awards Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences & Engineering DOE Logo CSE Home About CSE Argonne Home > Chemical Sciences & Engineering > Fundamental Interactions Catalysis & Energy Computational Postdoctoral Fellowships Contact Us CSE Intranet Awards Argonne's Chemical Sciences and

  9. Green Chemistry Challenge: 2017 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green Chemistry Challenge 2017 award winner, Professor Schelter, developed a new, targeted approach for separating mixtures of rare earth metals obtained from consumer waste streams comprising mixtures of Nd/Dy and Eu/Y

  10. National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Asthma Awards recognizes health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action that demonstrate an environmental component to address asthma triggers, collaborate with others and save healthcare dollars with their programming.

  11. Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... Research Award: Ecosystems and Human Health (Ecohealth) ... Your proposal should demonstrate an understanding of the ... demonstrated ability to work independently, and strong written and oral communications skills are ...

  12. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  13. And the winners were... Innovation Awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The winners of the 2003 Economist innovation awards included Tim Berners-Lee for the WWW and Dr. Damadian for his suggestion that NMR could be used as a medical detection device for cancer (1/2 page).

  14. 48 CFR 922.608-5 - Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICATION OF LABOR LAWS TO GOVERNMENT ACQUISITION Walsh-Healey Public Contracts Act 922.608-5 Award. The... Office in which the contractors place of business is located. Regional Office locations are specified at...

  15. Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apply to the Climate Leadership Award for Supply Chain Leadership, which publicly recognizes organizations that are are at the leading edge of managing greenhouse gas emissions in their organizational supply chains.

  16. Institutionalizing the Ecohealth Approach : Training and Awards ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The program will comprise three elements: a region-wide training and awards ... of the Ecohealth approach within INSP's graduate program; and a co-financing strategy to ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  17. Global pest management program wins international award

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    An agricultural research program managed at Virginia Tech has won an international award for its work with pest-management practices that show economic benefits with minimal impact on health and the environment.

  18. 42 CFR 52d.6 - Grant awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... objectives are designed to aid students: (i) To acquire a basic understanding of fundamental principles of... awards will be made after consideration of such factors as the grantee's progress and management...

  19. Research Award: Think Tank Initiative | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program ... Strong writing and communication skills in English;; Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

  20. Research Award: Donor Partnership Division | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the division through a variety of ... Strong research, analytical, and writing skills, and familiar with website applications.

  1. Research award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... In the remaining 50% of the time, the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, general public); ...

  2. Research Award: Governance and Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... In the remaining 50% of their time, the Research Award Recipient will contribute to the management of the program through a ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, general ...

  3. IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2017 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    At this time, however, we do not offer awards for research that involves the following ... Overall appropriateness, completeness, quality, and clarity of the research ... the proposed research, including academic training, local language capacity, ...

  4. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-14

    Jan 14, 2018 ... We offer a number of research awards providing a unique ... What frameworks and methodologies present opportunities for ... How are governments and organizations identifying and addressing critical research gaps in ...

  5. Research award: Policy and Evaluation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to ... What frameworks and methodologies present opportunities for strengthening the ... and organizations identifying and addressing critical research gaps in relation to the ...

  6. Research award: Governance and Justice 2019 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... as well as initiatives that eliminate impunity for Sexual and Gender-Based Violence, ... Applicants should clearly outline their qualifications for this position, and ... in the IDRC Research Awards 2019 Call page and, for this particular position, ...

  7. Engineers win award for Swiss tunnel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A Derby engineering consultancy has won the Tunnelling Industry Award 2003 for Excellence in Tunnel Design, offered by the British Tunnelling Society, for its work on the LHC in Geneva, Switzerland (1/2 page).

  8. Research award: Food, Environment, and Health | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... ... skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. ... food systems research and interventions in low- and middle-income countries. ... the research award recipient will contribute to the management of the ...

  9. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1999 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1999 award winner, Professor Terry Collins, developed a series of TAML oxidant activators that work with hydrogen peroxide to replace chlorine bleaches for paper making and laundry.

  10. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1997 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1997 award winner, Professor Joseph M. DeSimone, developed surfactants that allow carbon dioxide to be a solvent for chemical manufacturing, replacing hazardous chemical solvents.

  11. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2007 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2007 award winner, Professor Michael J. Krische, developed selective C-C bond-forming hydrogenation without organometallic reagents, eliminating hazardous reagents and hazardous waste.

  12. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2011 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2011 award winner, Professor Bruce H. Lipshutz, designed a novel, second-generation surfactant called TPGS-750-M. It is a designer surfactant composed of safe, inexpensive ingredients.

  13. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2006 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2006 award winner, Professor Galen J. Suppes, developed a process to convert waste glycerin from biodiesel production into propylene glycol to replace ethylene glycol in antifreeze.

  14. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2004 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2004 award winners, Professors Charles A. Eckert and Charles L. Liotta, use supercritical CO2 as a solvent to combine reactions and separations, improve efficiency, and reduce waste.

  15. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2005 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2005 award winner, Professor Robin D. Rogers, used ionic liquids to dissolve and process cellulose from wood, cloth, or paper to make new biorenewable or biocompatible materials.

  16. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 1996 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 1996 award winner, Professor Mark Holtzapple, developed methods to convert waste biomass (e.g., sewage sludge, agricultural wastes), into animal feed, industrial chemicals, or fuels.

  17. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2008 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2008 award winners, Professors Robert E. Maleczka, Jr. and Milton R. Smith, III, developed halogen-free, catalytic C-H activation/borylation to make aryl and heteroaryl boronic esters.

  18. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2016 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2016 award winner, Professor Chirik, discovered a class of catalysts used to produce silicones for consumer goods without using hard-to-mine platinum (less mining, reduces costs, greenhouse gas emissions, and waste).

  19. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2003 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2003 award winner, Professor Richard A. Gross, developed a transesterification to make polyol-containing polyesters using lipase, replacing heavy metal catalysts and hazardous solvents.

  20. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2001 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2001 award winner, Professor Chao-Jun Li, uses metal catalysts in water to carry out chemical reactions that used to need both an oxygen-free atmosphere and hazardous organic solvents.

  1. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2000 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2000 award winner, Professor Chi-Huey Wong, developed reactions with enzymes and safer solvents that can replace traditional reactions done with toxic metals and hazardous solvents.

  2. Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge: 2013 Academic Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge 2013 award winner, Prof Richard P. Wool of the University of Delaware, created high-performance materials using vegetable oils, feathers, and flax. Can be used as adhesives, composites, foams, and circuit boards.

  3. ACC International Academic Collaborative receives special award

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Coast Conference's new International Academic Collaborative (ACC/IAC) has been singled out by the New York-based Institute of International Education (IIE) for a special award for innovation in international education.

  4. ALICE gives its first thesis awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    For the first time the ALICE collaboration has given two of its doctoral students awards for their outstanding theses. Winners Christian Holm Christensen and Zaida Conesa del Valle holding their awards.On 29 October the ALICE collaboration honoured two students for their outstanding theses at a ceremony held at CERN. The two awards, one of which was given for a physics thesis and the other for a technical thesis, went to Zaida Conesa Del Valle (Laboratoire de physique subatomique et des technologies associées) and Christian Holm Christensen (Niels Bohr Institute) respectively. "It is very gratifying to see that the collaboration appreciates our work," said Zaida Conesa del Valle, winner of the physics award for her thesis: Performance of the ALICE Muon Spectrometer. Weak Boson Production and Measurement in Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC. "I also feel specially thankful to all the people who worked with me," she added. "It was pl...

  5. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-07-01

    This document describes the operation of each of the components of the AWARD system. This document provides a simple reference guide for all users of the system and assumes a minimum degree of computer literacy. (Author)

  6. Research Award: Corporate Strategy and Evaluaon Division

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship allow award ... and developmental evaluaon, to assess and adjust their program strategies? ... Be either currently enrolled at a recognized university at the master's or ...

  7. Two executives, one career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Cynthia R; Murray, Shelley S

    2005-02-01

    For six years, Cynthia Cunningham and Shelley Murray shared an executive job at Fleet Bank. One desk, one chair, one computer, one telephone, and one voice-mail account. To their clients and colleagues, they were effectively one person, though one person with the strengths and ideas of two, seamlessly handing projects back and forth. Although their department was dissolved after the bank merged with Bank of America, the two continue to consider themselves a package-they have one resume, and they are seeking their next opportunity together. Their choice to share a job was not only a quality-of-life decision but one intended to keep their careers on course: "Taking two separate part-time jobs would have thrown us completely off track" they write in this first-person account."We're both ambitious people, and neither of us wanted just a job. We wanted careers" In this article, the two highly motivated women reveal their determination to manage the demands of both family and career. Flextime,telecommuting, and compressed workweeks are just some of the options open to executives seeking greater work/ life balance, and the job share, as described by Cunningham and Murray, could well be the next solution for those wishing to avoid major trade-offs between their personal and professional lives. Cunningham and Murray describe in vivid detail how they structured their unusual arrangement, how they sold themselves to management, and the hurdles they faced along the way. Theirs is a win-win story, for the company and for them.

  8. Influence of career self-efficacy beliefs on career exploration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The career self-efficacy has positive and strong statistically significant association with past performances accomplishment of the students (r= .752, P< .01). However, it was statistically significant and has weak relationship with career exploration behaviour (r= .214, P<.05).Verbal persuasion is more significant association (r ...

  9. Career Engagement: Bridging Career Counseling and Employee Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a model of career engagement that helps bridge the gap between career counselors' focus on supporting individuals to find meaningful work and employers' desire for an engaged, productive, and committed workforce. They briefly review highlights of the employee engagement literature, introduce the Career…

  10. Career Trajectories of Older Women: Implications for Career Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimrose, Jenny; McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    As work and employment transitions become more frequent and difficult, the demand for formal career guidance increases. Women are likely to experience structural labour market disadvantage and may benefit from formal support that is sympathetic to their particular needs. Yet the traditional psychological paradigms that dominate career guidance…

  11. Choosing the right career: What approach? Implications for career ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presentation made here accepts the thesis that the choice of career is not a simple matter. In fact, it asserts that more than ever before, the choice of a career on a training programme now requires a lot of thinking as well as taking into consideration several factors before choosing, planning and entering into a particular ...

  12. LHC suppliers win Golden Hadron awards

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    In a ceremony on 30 July, three of the 200 suppliers for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) were presented with Golden Hadron awards. It is the third year that the awards have been presented to suppliers, not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. This year the three companies are all involved in the supplies for the LHC's main magnet system.

  13. A59 waste repackaging database (AWARD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keel, A.

    1993-06-01

    This paper sets out the requirements for AWARD (the A59 Waste Repackaging Database); a computer-based system to record LLW sorting and repacking information from the North Cave Line in A59. A solution will be developed on the basis of this document. AWARD will record and store details entered from waste sorting and LLW repackaging operations. This document will be used as the basis of the development of the host computer system. (Author)

  14. Scholarly productivity and professional advancement of junior researchers receiving KL2, K23, or K08 awards at a large public research institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K; Louden, Diana K N; McKinney, Christy; Rich, Joanne; Long-Genovese, Stacy; Disis, Mary L

    2017-04-01

    How the productivity and careers of KL2 scholars compare with scholars receiving individual K-awards is unknown. The productivity of KL2 scholars (n=21) at our institution was compared with that of K08 (n=34) and K23 (n=26) scholars. KL2 and K23 scholars had greater productivity than K08 scholars ( p =0.01). Professional advancement was similar among groups. At our institution, scholarly productivity and professional advancement did not differ by type of K-award.

  15. Career opportunities in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, L

    Oncology nursing offers nurses a wide range of opportunities. Nurses need a wide range of skills in order to care for patients who may have acute oncological illnesses or require palliative care. The nature of the nurse/patient relationship can be intense. Nurses generally find this enhances job satisfaction. The pressures exerted on nurses working in oncology can be immense. Oncology nursing is rewarding but very demanding and therefore the nurse has to be resourceful. Early career planning is advisable to take advantage of the opportunities that are currently available.

  16. ATLAS Award for Shield Supplier

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS technical coordinator Dr. Marzio Nessi presents the ATLAS supplier award to Vojtech Novotny, Director General of Skoda Hute.On 3 November, the ATLAS experiment honoured one of its suppliers, Skoda Hute s.r.o., of Plzen, Czech Republic, for their work on the detector's forward shielding elements. These huge and very massive cylinders surround the beampipe at either end of the detector to block stray particles from interfering with the ATLAS's muon chambers. For the shields, Skoda Hute produced 10 cast iron pieces with a total weight of 780 tonnes at a cost of 1.4 million CHF. Although there are many iron foundries in the CERN member states, there are only a limited number that can produce castings of the necessary size: the large pieces range in weight from 59 to 89 tonnes and are up to 1.5 metres thick.The forward shielding was designed by the ATLAS Technical Coordination in close collaboration with the ATLAS groups from the Czech Technical University and Charles University in Prague. The Czech groups a...

  17. Career Development at Nova Southeastern University

    Science.gov (United States)

    . Continuing Education Financial Aid Career Development Regional Campuses International Affairs Veterans Development Skip secondary navigation Menu Overview About Us Our Staff Peer Advisor Program Career Ambassadors Handshake Internships Student Testimonials Veterans Alumni Career Services Volunteer Opportunities Handshake

  18. Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech Nuclear Fusion Award 2010 speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2011-01-01

    Alex Ince-Cushman, John deGrassie, Lars-Goran Eriksson, Yoshiteru Sakamoto, Andrea Scarabosio and Yuri Podpaly, as well as the other coauthors. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to Earl Marmar, Martin Greenwald and Miklos Porkolab at MIT for continued support of this work, as well as to the entire C-Mod team. This award was made possible due to the insight of Mitsuru Kikuchi and the support of the IAEA through Werner Burkhart, and I am truly grateful to both of them. Many thanks as well to the outstanding staff at Nuclear Fusion. It is a distinct honor to be included in the group of previous winners: Tim Luce, Clemente Angioni, Todd Evans and Steve Sabbagh. It is also a great honor to be considered alongside the 2010 nominees: Phil Snyder, Sibylle Guenter, Maiko Yoshida, Hajime Urano, Fulvio Zonca, Erik Garcia, Costanza Maggi, Hartmut Zohm, Thierry Loarer and Bruce Lipschultz. Finally, I would like to thank the readers of Nuclear Fusion for the many citations. John Rice 2010 Nuclear Fusion Award winner Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA

  19. Sustaining professional development gains after the NSF-CCLI grant ends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, K.; Dekens, P. S.; Dempsey, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    At San Francisco State University we aimed to transform our freshman-level courses in geology, oceanography, and meteorology using funding from a NSF-CCLI grant—"Creating an academic community to foster curiosity and discovery in introductory Geoscience classes" (2010-2012). In addition to creating a new laboratory space and new laboratory materials, we focused on the professional development of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) and other departmental instructors. Previously, GTAs were given little support to gain teaching skills and present interesting labs, and there was little communication among the various instructors of the introductory courses. We aimed to change the tenor of the department by infusing discussions about effective teaching practices into the daily academic lives of faculty and GTAs and by creating institutional structures to ensure that innovations continued beyond the life of the NSF grant. We entitled this function of the department a Teaching and Learning Community (TLC). An essential element of the TLC, and the institutionalization of project activities, was to create a new graduate seminar course—"Our Dynamic Classroom"—that is offered every semester. This course was created to provide a mechanism for instructors to meet each week to discuss aspects of teaching pedagogy and to share classroom experiences. Each week a GTA or faculty member leads the discussion. Typical weekly topics include: what is inquiry-based learning, understanding students' misconceptions, teaching quantitative skills, what is the affective domain, improving students' writing skills. In response to participant feedback, the course now focuses more on the needs of specific instructors teaching specific courses. For example, in Spring 2012, seminar participants identified several issues GTAs were encountering, such as students failing to read instructions for labs before executing them, and some members of small collaborative groups not actively participating

  20. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Amy L; Pribbenow, Christine M

    2016-05-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation) Biology Scholars Program (BSP) to promote undergraduate education reform by 1) supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2) engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists' leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3) participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) to more than 270 participants ("scholars") from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER). To identify the BSP's long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program's 2010-2014 scholars (n = 127) and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life sciences and helps

  1. The ASM-NSF Biology Scholars Program: An Evidence-Based Model for Faculty Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The American Society for Microbiology (ASM established its ASM-NSF (National Science Foundation Biology Scholars Program (BSP to promote undergraduate education reform by 1 supporting biologists to implement evidence-based teaching practices, 2 engaging life science professional societies to facilitate biologists’ leadership in scholarly teaching within the discipline, and 3 participating in a teaching community that fosters disciplinary-level science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM reform. Since 2005, the program has utilized year-long residency training to provide a continuum of learning and practice centered on principles from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL to more than 270 participants (“scholars” from biology and multiple other disciplines. Additionally, the program has recruited 11 life science professional societies to support faculty development in SoTL and discipline-based education research (DBER. To identify the BSP’s long-term outcomes and impacts, ASM engaged an external evaluator to conduct a study of the program’s 2010­–2014 scholars (n = 127 and society partners. The study methods included online surveys, focus groups, participant observation, and analysis of various documents. Study participants indicate that the program achieved its proposed goals relative to scholarship, professional society impact, leadership, community, and faculty professional development. Although participants also identified barriers that hindered elements of their BSP participation, findings suggest that the program was essential to their development as faculty and provides evidence of the BSP as a model for other societies seeking to advance undergraduate science education reform. The BSP is the longest-standing faculty development program sponsored by a collective group of life science societies. This collaboration promotes success across a fragmented system of more than 80 societies representing the life

  2. Career exploration behavior of Korean medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Hyejin An; Seung-Hee Lee

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study is to analyze the effects of medical students? social support and career barriers on career exploration behavior mediated by career decision-making self-efficacy. Methods We applied the t-test to investigate the difference among the variables based on gender and admission types. Also, we performed path analysis to verify the effect of perceived career barriers and social support on career exploration behavior with career decision efficacy as a mediator. Results First, we no...

  3. Career Planning Trends in Japanese Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning trends in Japanese companies. Research on career development in Japan is first reviewed. Career planning practices in Japanese companies are examined. Factors influencing career planning choice are then discussed. It was found that there appears to be a change occurring in the career planning practices, specifically the shifting of responsibility for an employees' career from the employer to the employee. (JEL Classifi-cation: M12, M54

  4. Educational activities of CAREER: Crystallization Kinetics in Volcanology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Professional development of teachers is recognized as critical for improving student learning outcomes. The major outreach initiative of my CAREER award was to develop a teacher professional development program for middle school (grades 6-8) teachers that would improve teacher's mastery of geoscience and basic science skills and practices and expose them to an authentic research environment. The explicit objectives of the Research Experience for Teachers in Volcano-Petrology (RET/V-P) were for teachers to (1) master technical skills for safe and productive laboratory work, (2) deepen understanding of science content, (3) develop scientific "habits of the mind" as outlined in the National Science Standards, and (4) hone science communication skills. Six teachers, one undergraduate, and two graduate students participated in the teacher professional development program during the summers of the CAREER award period. A subsequent EAR award now supports the program, and summer 2011 saw the participation of five additional teachers. The teachers span a wide range of educational backgrounds, prior exposure to geoscience, and teaching assignments at public and private schools. Each year, the program was modified using formative and summative evaluation tools to better serve the scheduling needs and content preferences. In general, the program has evolved from an emphasis on research exposure to an emphasis on imparting basic geoscience concepts. A myriad of approaches including field trips to local outcrops, lecture tutorials and lecture-based active engagement exercises (such as iclicker delivery of Geoscience Concept Inventory questions), with a taste of laboratory work (crystal growth experiments, optics primer), has emerged as the most successful means of achieving objectives 1-4, above. The first summer I advertised the RET/V-P, no teachers applied. (This challenge was overcome in subsequent years by targeting the solicitation using teacher list serves, the Hawaii

  5. Careers and people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Simulation experts win Dirac Medal Condensed-matter theorists Roberto Car of Princeton University in the US and Michele Parrinello of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) have won the 2009 Dirac Medal for their work on numerical-simulation techniques. The pair began developing new methods of modelling molecular dynamics in the mid-1980s, using elements of density functional theory and Newtonian molecular dynamics to calculate the mechanical motion of atoms and molecules in real time. Now known as the Car-Parrinello method, their technique has become a standard tool in computational physics and chemistry. The award, which is announced each year on 8August, Dirac's birthday, carries a cash prize of 5000 and is sponsored by the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy.

  6. Qualifying for Career Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kovač

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for education in various spheres of life, which allows a person to fully develop his/her personality, is more and more presen t also in our society. The discussed educational programme Discovering Vocational Goals and Forming Strategies· to Realize them qualifies people for autonomous career planning by offer­ ing them one of the possible ways of making decisions in relation to profession and job. In the course of the realization of the programme the participants are given the chance to think about the kind of work that would suit their interests, capabilities and individual characteristics as weel as the needs in certain environments (possible employers. They are encouraged to make an actual plan, stating how and when the desired objective will be reached. In 1995 the pro­ gramme was being carried out within nine semi­ nars organized at the Employment Offices in Maribor and Ptuj. During that time the pro­ gramme has also been evaluated by Doba - Education Office, which was funded by the Ministry of Work, Family and Social Matters. The paper includes the content of the programme as well as the assessments of the research project. The presented data show that the participants learned the method of career planning and acqu­ired greater self-confidence and motivation to solve their job problem actively.

  7. Organizational Downsizing and Career Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozionelos, Nikos

    2001-01-01

    A study of 123 "survivors" of corporate downsizing and 13 senior managers indicated that the organization lacked a coherent career development plan and the performance management/appraisal process was inadequate. Managers perceived lateral transfers as effective; some employees felt they undermined career progression. Employees thought…

  8. Career Satisfaction Following Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Betty Manager

    2011-01-01

    The effect of career and technical education in the Caribbean is an area of intervention research that needs more attention. This present research is the first of its kind within the region. The study benefits from a large sample size (N = 500) conducted among a non-traditional population in the field of career development. This paper reports on…

  9. Aligning Career and Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Ed; Stubbs, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    The issues and concerns facing Kentucky Career and Technical Teacher Education (KY CTTE), university teacher educators and state department Career and Technical Education (CTE) leaders in providing and preparing the best CTE teachers possible are not unique to Kentucky. In an effort to better understand these issues and concerns a team of state…

  10. College and Career Development Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    National High School Center, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The National High School Center has created a college and career development organizer to synthesize and organize an increasingly complicated and crowded field of college and career readiness initiatives. The organizer, composed of three strands, can be used to map the efforts of state education agencies (SEAs) and local education agencies (LEAs)…

  11. Career conversations in vocational schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mittendorff, K.M.; Brok, den P.J.; Beijaard, D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career conversations between teachers and students in competence-based vocational education in the Netherlands. A total of 32 career conversations were observed and analysed with respect to four elements: content, teacher activities, student activities and

  12. Teachers' Careers: The Objective Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evetts, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Analyzes the objective dimension of teachers' careers showing how 530 British male/female teachers are distributed throughout the pay scale and promotions making up the formal structure of teaching. Indicates length of experience is the rewarding but not the sole factor in bureaucratic structure and differential male/female career achievements.…

  13. Positive Psychology and Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Peter J.

    2018-01-01

    Positive psychology has been an influential movement within psychology in the early years of the twenty-first century. It is now timely to assess the value of its contribution to career education and guidance. This paper provides a critique of this perspective. Positive psychology can enrich approaches to career development. It can provide a…

  14. Planning Guide for Career Academies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Charles

    2010-01-01

    A career academy is a small learning community within a high school, which selects a subset of students and teachers for a two-, three-, or four-year period. Students enter through a voluntary process; they must apply and be accepted, with parental knowledge and support. A career academy involves teachers from different subjects working together…

  15. PATERNAL INFLUENCE ON CAREER CHOICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WERTS, CHARLES E.

    FATHER'S OCCUPATION WAS COMPARED WITH SON'S CAREER CHOICE FOR A SAMPLE OF 76,015 MALE, COLLEGE FRESHMEN. RESULTS INDICATED THAT CERTAIN TYPES OF FATHERS' OCCUPATIONS WERE ASSOCIATED WITH SIMILAR TYPES OF CAREER CHOICES BY SONS. BOYS WHOSE FATHERS WERE IN SCIENTIFIC OCCUPATIONS (ENGINEERS, MILITARY OFFICERS, ARCHITECTS, BIOLOGISTS, CHEMISTS, AND…

  16. Success and Women's Career Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joyce E. A.; Burgess, Jennifer R. D.

    1998-01-01

    Women still face barriers to career success and satisfaction: stereotypes, assumptions, organizational culture, human resource practices, and lack of opportunities. Despite individual and organizational strategies, many women leave to become entrepreneurs. There is a need to investigate how women define career success. (SK)

  17. The Chaos Theory of Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Jim E. H.; Pryor, Robert G. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Chaos Theory of Careers (CTC; Pryor & Bright, 2011) construes both individuals and the contexts in which they develop their careers in terms of complex dynamical systems. Such systems perpetually operate under influences of stability and change both internally and in relation to each other. The CTC introduces new concepts to account for…

  18. Career management: understanding the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackowiak, J; Eckel, F M

    1985-02-01

    This article is the first of a three-part series on career management for hospital pharmacists. Work attitudes, life cycles, needs, and career trends are discussed. Three basic work attitudes exist. Some see work as punishment. Others believe work in itself is good, i.e., they have a strong work ethic. Some view work as a means to satisfy, at least partially, a range of needs. Attitudinal transition points are likely to occur at specific times in the adult life cycle. The stages of the life cycle can be labeled as leaving, reaching out, questioning, midlife crisis, settling down, and mellowing. A progression through each of these stages is required for normal adult psychological development. Every individual exhibits a blend of needs that changes throughout life. Jobs can fulfill existence, relatedness, and growth needs. Relatedness needs include the need for love, affiliation, social esteem, and power, and growth needs include the need for self-esteem, competence, achievement, and autonomy. Three important career trends are the changing opportunities for advancement, women in careers, and dual-career couples. The number of women pharmacists is increasing as is the number of two-career couples. Tips for managing two-career relationships are presented. Pharmacists can manage their careers more effectively by understanding their needs, identifying their basic attitude toward work, and being aware of the trends occurring in pharmacy.

  19. Inked Careers: Tattooing Professional Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela DeLuca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of career has an interdisciplinary and historical constitution, which includes persons, groups, organizations and society. Given that, we aim to deepen the interactionist notion of career from the understanding of a deviant path, supported by a theory and a method appropriated to the cited call for interdisciplinary approaches. Dilemmas (Hughes, 1958 and conflicts (Hughes, 1937 emerged as important analytical categories. Although necessary, these two concepts were not sufficient to contemplate analyses in their entirety. For this reason we conceptualized a third possibility of controversy during a career: the inquiries. The study followed the Narrative method to analyze objective and subjective changes during a tattoo artist’s career through interviews and informal conversations carried out over 22 months. The discussion presents three main contributions. Theoretically, a new understanding of the concept of careers, linking past, present and future and the idea of non-linearity of experienced and envisioned careers. Methodologically, suggesting orientations for future career studies such as the use of turning points as a methodological tool and the investigation of deviant fields. Finally, our defense of the interactionist perspective as suitable for career studies, since it allows the investigation of deviant elements.

  20. Career Mobility: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rose R.

    1992-01-01

    A study examined attitudes of 95 women biomedical researchers in dual-career relationships toward mobility for enhancing occupational advancement. The women and spouses were surveyed concerning use of time, income, job satisfaction, willingness to move, and general career and marital satisfaction. Results indicate changes in gender effects on…

  1. Human capital and career success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Kato, Takao

    capital formally through schooling for career success, as well as the gender gap in career success rates. Second, broadening the scope of human capital by experiencing various occupations (becoming a generalist) is found to be advantageous for career success. Third, initial human capital earned through......Denmark’s registry data provide accurate and complete career history data along with detailed personal characteristics (e.g., education, gender, work experience, tenure and others) for the population of Danish workers longitudinally. By using such data from 1992 to 2002, we provide rigorous...... formal schooling and subsequent human capital obtained informally on the job are found to be complements in the production of career success. Fourth, though there is a large body of the literature on the relationship between firm-specific human capital and wages, the relative value of firm-specific human...

  2. The impact of gender and nationality on winning a professional society award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; McKenzie, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Women are under-represented for science awards and fellow status in professional science societies (accounting for career stage) and are over-represented for teaching and service awards (Ball et al., 2015; Lincoln et al., 2012; Holmes et al., 2011). In addition, for the American Geophysical Union, non-U.S. members are under-represented among all awardees. Gender bias in evaluation processes are well-documented (e.g., Valian, 1999), and cultural differences are at play in the under-representation of non U.S. members. U.S. members are more likely to nominate their peers for awards, and to write effusive letters to support the nomination (Ball et al., 2015). There are effective mechanisms to reduce bias in both nomination and evaluation processes, a few of which are: 1) separate the nomination and evaluation processes by creating nomination committees of a diverse group of people who actively seek potential nominees and promote their nominations; this expands the pool of nominees; 2) educate nomination and evaluation committees on the research that demonstrates the impact of implicit bias on nomination and selection processes (e.g., http://www.enei.org.uk/pages/unconscious-bias.html; http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/bias.php); 3) minimize use of simple bibliometric indices, which are known to exhibit gender bias (men self-cite more than women; Maliniak et al., 2013) and nationality bias (papers in English language journals are more likely to be cited than non-English journals (Bornmann et al., 2012; González-Alcaide et al., 2012); 4) members of the selection committee should understand the effects of gender on the quality of letters written for women (Trix and Psenka, 2003); 5) establish and follow clear criteria for the award. Professional societies can promote fairness and inclusion by self-study: find and compile the data on the gender, race, ethnicity and nationality of members who are nominated for and win awards, as well as on who is doing the nominating. Compare

  3. Deconstructing career myths and cultural stereotypes in a context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deconstructing career myths and cultural stereotypes in a context of low resourced ... in low socio-economic communities and negatively influence career opportunities. ... Keywords: career beliefs; career decision-making; career development; ...

  4. Career-success scale – a new instrument to assess young physicians' academic career steps

    OpenAIRE

    Buddeberg-Fischer, B; Stamm, M; Buddeberg, C; Klaghofer, R

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Within the framework of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates, a Career-Success Scale (CSS) was constructed in a sample of young physicians choosing different career paths in medicine. Furthermore the influence of personality factors, the participants' personal situation, and career related factors on their career success was investigated. Methods 406 residents were assessed in terms of career aspired to, and their career progress. The Career-Success...

  5. NSF GK-12 Fellows as Mentors for K-12 Teachers Participating in Field Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Perry, E.

    2005-12-01

    by the GK-12 Fellows was important in helping teachers transfer components of a challenging field research experience to their students. Participating research scientists were able to convey the importance of their science to a wider audience. NSF GK-12 Fellows gained valuable experience in communicating scientific knowledge and field skills to K-12 teachers and students, became more knowledgeable about K-12 science education and were exposed to advances in pedagogy.

  6. NSF Workshop Report: Discovering General Principles of Nervous System Organization by Comparing Brain Maps across Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striedter, Georg F.; Belgard, T. Grant; Chen, Chun-Chun; Davis, Fred P.; Finlay, Barbara L.; Güntürkün, Onur; Hale, Melina E.; Harris, Julie A.; Hecht, Erin E.; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofmann, Hans A.; Holland, Linda Z.; Iwaniuk, Andrew N.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Karten, Harvey J.; Katz, Paul S.; Kristan, William B.; Macagno, Eduardo R.; Mitra, Partha P.; Moroz, Leonid L.; Preuss, Todd M.; Ragsdale, Clifton W.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Stevens, Charles F.; Stüttgen, Maik C.; Tsumoto, Tadaharu; Wilczynski, Walter

    2014-01-01

    supported, at least in part, through existing mechanisms at NSF, NIH, and other agencies. It will also be important to develop new integrated software and database systems for cross-species data analyses. Multidisciplinary efforts to develop such analytical tools should be supported financially. Finally, training opportunities should be created to stimulate multidisciplinary, integrative research into brain structure, function, and evolution. PMID:24603302

  7. Relationships among Career and Life Stress, Negative Career thoughts, and Career Decision State: A Cognitive Information Processing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock-Yowell, Emily; Peterson, Gary W.; Reardon, Robert C.; Leierer, Stephen J.; Reed, Corey A.

    2011-01-01

    According to cognitive information processing theory, career thoughts mediate the relationship between career and life stress and the ensuing career decision state. Using a sample of 232 college students and structural equation modeling, this study found that an increase in career and life stress was associated with an increase in negative career…

  8. Evaluating Career Development Resources: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, M.; Laursen, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    Retention of geoscientists throughout the professional pipeline is especially challenging in the case of groups that are already underrepresented in science, including racial minorities and women. The Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) is a professional network of early-career female geoscientists that provides its members with a variety of career resources, through both informal, online and in-person networking and formal career development workshops. The group’s members are of diverse nationalities and racial/ethnic backgrounds, of various age cohorts and career stages, but primarily graduate students, postdocs, and early-career researchers. With funding from an NSF ADVANCE grant to ESWN, we have conducted a detailed survey of ESWN members as part of an evaluation-with-research study that aims to determine the career needs of young geoscientists. The survey data provide information about members’ personal and professional situations, their professional development needs, and obstacles they face as young women scientists. ESWN members indicated a variety of areas of professional growth that would advance their scientific careers, but at all career stages, members chose expanding their professional networks as among their top career needs. Professional networking has established benefits for retention of people from groups underrepresented in science, including women: it introduces young scientists to career best practices and advancement opportunities, provides access to role models, and creates a sense of community. ESWN members strongly indicate that their professional networks benefited from their involvement with the Network. The community aspect of network-building is especially important for people from underrepresented groups, as they often feel alone due to the lack of role models. The intimate character of the ESWN discussion list greatly contributes to its members’ sense of community. Moreover, personal concerns and professional success are

  9. The Arctic Cooperative Data and Information System: Data Management Support for the NSF Arctic Research Program (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.; Serreze, M. C.; Middleton, D.; Ramamurthy, M. K.; Yarmey, L.

    2013-12-01

    The NSF funds the Advanced Cooperative Arctic Data and Information System (ACADIS), url: (http://www.aoncadis.org/). It serves the growing and increasingly diverse data management needs of NSF's arctic research community. The ACADIS investigator team combines experienced data managers, curators and software engineers from the NSIDC, UCAR and NCAR. ACADIS fosters scientific synthesis and discovery by providing a secure long-term data archive to NSF investigators. The system provides discovery and access to arctic related data from this and other archives. This paper updates the technical components of ACADIS, the implementation of best practices, the value of ACADIS to the community and the major challenges facing this archive for the future in handling the diverse data coming from NSF Arctic investigators. ACADIS provides sustainable data management, data stewardship services and leadership for the NSF Arctic research community through open data sharing, adherence to best practices and standards, capitalizing on appropriate evolving technologies, community support and engagement. ACADIS leverages other pertinent projects, capitalizing on appropriate emerging technologies and participating in emerging cyberinfrastructure initiatives. The key elements of ACADIS user services to the NSF Arctic community include: data and metadata upload; support for datasets with special requirements; metadata and documentation generation; interoperability and initiatives with other archives; and science support to investigators and the community. Providing a self-service data publishing platform requiring minimal curation oversight while maintaining rich metadata for discovery, access and preservation is challenging. Implementing metadata standards are a first step towards consistent content. The ACADIS Gateway and ADE offer users choices for data discovery and access with the clear objective of increasing discovery and use of all Arctic data especially for analysis activities

  10. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kashou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine’s summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008∼2013, interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine’s summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA. This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program.

  11. Insights into an Award-Winning Summer Internship Program: The First Six Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashou, Anthony; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-04-01

    Since its inception in 2008, the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program in reproductive research and writing has trained 114 students from 23 states within the United States and 10 countries worldwide. Its fundamental goal is to inspire pre-medical and medical students to embrace a career as a physician-scientist. During this intensive course, established scientists and clinicians train interns in the essential principles and fundamental concepts of bench research and scientific writing. Over the first six years (2008~2013), interns have collectively published 98 research articles and performed 12 bench research projects on current and emerging topics in reproductive medicine. Interns have also developed and honed valuable soft skills including time management, communication and presentation skills, as well as life values, which all enhance personal and professional satisfaction. Program graduates are able to recognize the value of medical research and its potential to impact patient care and gain insight into their own career pathway. Between 2011 and 2014, the internship program was thrice awarded a Scholarship in Teaching Award by Case Western Reserve School of Medicine for its innovative teaching approach and positive impact on medical education and student careers. This report highlights the demographics, logistics, implementation, feedback, and results of the first six years of the American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship program at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH, USA). This may be helpful to other research and academic institutions considering implementing a similar program. In addition, it creates awareness among potential physician-scientists of what the world of research has to offer in both scientific writing and bench research. Finally, it may stimulate further discussion regarding narrowing the gap between physicians and scientists and refinement of the current program.

  12. Research Award: Employment and Growth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... This is growth that enhances access of the poor to opportunities and ... and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals. ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, ...

  13. Research award: Employment and Growth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... The program's flagship is the Growth and Economic Opportunities for ... and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals. ... Strong research, analysis, and writing skills for different audiences (academic, policy, ...

  14. Research award: Foundations for Innovation | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... academic/non-academic partnerships in support of social or economic ... for scaling-up new, development-oriented technologies in LMICs. ... for this position, and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals.

  15. Research Award: Governance, Security, and Justice

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    and marginalized groups have difficulty claiming their right to live in a safe and prosperous environment. ... Applicants should clearly outline their qualifications for this position, and explain how this opportunity will advance their career goals.

  16. Graduates beliefs about career management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babić Lepa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Career management is increasingly becoming an individuals' matter, despite the various activities organized by the different institutions to support career development and planning. An exploratory survey was conducted to determine what kind of beliefs graduates have about career management. Results indicate that graduates are aware of the importance of university knowledge for getting a job, the importance of knowledge and investment in education for positioning in the labor market, so they give priority to development opportunities that business brings opposed to the material rewards.

  17. Psychological career resources as predictors of working adults’ career anchors: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the relationship between the psychological career resources and career anchors of a sample of 2 997 working adults at predominantly managerial and supervisory levels in the service industry. The Psychological Career Resources Inventory and the Career Orientations Inventory were applied. Stepwise regression analyses indicated dimensions of psychological career resources as significant predictors of  participants’ career anchors. The findings add valuable new knowledge that can be used to inform organisational career development support practices as well as career counselling and guidance services concerned with promoting individuals’ employability and experiences of intrinsic career success.

  18. Utah Delivers Opportunities for Career Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Kristine; Fischio, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    Providing information and resources to support career exploration is key to the mission of career and technical education (CTE) in Utah. Utah CTE has responded in a variety of ways to meet the career exploration needs of students of all ages. This article discusses how the career and technical education in Utah delivers opportunities for career…

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Special Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Program Master's Fellowship Program Wounded Warrior Career Development Program Careers Special Programs Special career opportunities for select individuals Join Sandia's workforce while receiving support and Laboratories' Affirmative Action Plan. Learn more about MFP. Wounded Warrior Career Development Program U.S

  20. The Changing Career Strategies of Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Tony; Davies, Goronwy

    1999-01-01

    Faced with reduced employment security, managers are redefining careers to include work/personal life balance. Changes in any area can cause revision of career strategies. Depending on how they define careers, managers recognize career development as an individual, not an organizational, responsibility. (SK)

  1. Career Development of Diverse Populations. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerka, Sandra

    Career development theories and approaches have been criticized for lack of applicability to diverse populations. Traditional career development theories and models assume that: everyone has a free choice among careers; career development is a linear, progressive, rational process; and individualism, autonomy and centrality of work are universal…

  2. Junior High Career Planning: What Students Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardick, Angela D.; Bernes, Kerry B.; Magnusson, Kris C.; Witko, Kim D.

    2004-01-01

    This research used "The Comprehensive Career Needs Survey" to assess the career counselling needs of 3,562 junior high students in Southern Alberta. This article examines junior high students' responses regarding their perceptions of (a) the relevance of career planning, (b) who they would approach for help with career planning, and (c)…

  3. A Study of Career Planning Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Firkola, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of career planning assessments. Background on key career concepts is first introduced. A number of career planning assessments are then examined. These assessments included reviewing ones personal history, interest inventories, values assessments, personality assessments, and aptitude tests. The importance and limitations of these career assessments is then discussed.

  4. Career Cruiser: A Career and Education Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Life is a journey filled with many twists and turns. While the journey can be exciting, it is a good idea to know where you are going so you can decide how to get there. Career development is all about getting the knowledge and skills you need to make more informed career decisions. Right now is an excellent time to develop skills that will help…

  5. CERN Press Office receives award from Euroscience

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Communication group has received an award for its efforts in communicating the LHC first beam to the media and the public. James Gillies, head of the Communication group was presented the AlphaGalileo Research Public Relations Award on Wednesday, 14 October during the Euroscience Media Award Ceremony in Hannover. "It’s great to receive this recognition," said Gillies. "Of course, we had great material to work with: the LHC is a fantastic story and one that is going to get even better. Angels, Demons and black holes also had their roles to play, but behind the media interest there’s been a lot of hard work by my team. This is for them." The CERN Communication group also works with communication professionals in all the CERN Member States and major physics labs around the world through the European Particle Physics Communication Network, and the InterAction collaboration. "Without them," says Gillies, &am...

  6. Prestigious US awards for CERN computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    On 4 June in the distinguished surroundings of Washington's National Building Museum, IT Deputy Division Leader Les Robertson accepted a 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program on behalf of CERN. This prestigious award was made to CERN for its innovative application of information technology to the benefit of society. Members of the team that initiated the SHIFT project with the Computerworld trophy. The team was a collaboration between the Information Technology Division, the OPAL experiment and Indiana University. From left to right, Ben Segal, Matthias Schroeder, Gail Hanson, Bernd Panzer, Jean-Philippe Baud, Les Robertson and Frédéric Hemmer. CERN's award followed the Laboratory's nomination by Lawrence Ellison, Chairman and CEO of the Oracle Corporation. Ellison nominated CERN in recognition of 'pioneering work in developing a large scale data warehouse' - an innovative computing architecture that responds precisely to the global particle physics commun...

  7. Gold awards for CERN's top suppliers!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's awards to the LHC project's best suppliers are now into their second year. Three companies received 'Golden Hadrons' for 2003. The Golden Hadron awards were presented to the delighted representatives of the winning firms by LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans on Friday 16 May. Only three out of the LHC's four hundred suppliers were lucky enough to receive a gold award. The consortium IHI (Japan)-Linde Kryotechnik (Switzerland), the Belgian company JDL Technologies and the Japanese firm Furukawa Electric Company were rewarded not only for their technical and financial achievements but also for their compliance with contractual deadlines. The 2003 Golden Hadron winners with Lyn Evans. From left to right: Armin Senn, Thomas Voigt, Kirkor Kurtcuoglu of LINDE KRYOTECHNIK ; Tadaaki Honda, Project Leader and Motoki Yoshinaga, Associate Director of IHI Corporation ; Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader; Shinichiro Meguro, Managing Director of FURUKAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY ; Nobuyoshi Saji, Consulting Engineer of IHI Corporatio...

  8. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  9. Measuring Change in Career Counseling: Validation of the "Career Futures Inventory-Revised"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottinghaus, Patrick J.; Eshelman, Alec; Gore, Jonathan S.; Keller, Kari J.; Schneider, Madalyn; Harris, Kristine L.

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective chart review study examined the factor structure of the "Career Futures Inventory-Revised" (CFI-R; Rottinghaus et al. in "J Career Assess" 20:123-139, 2012) and its utility as a career counseling outcome measure using a sample of 332 clients from a university career center. The CFI-R examines career agency…

  10. Career Adaptability as a Strategic Competence for Career Development: An Exploratory Study of Its Key Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocciardi, Federica; Caputo, Andrea; Fregonese, Chiara; Langher, Viviana; Sartori, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In the current labour market, the competence to adapt is becoming significantly relevant for career development and career success. The construct of career adaptability, i.e. the capability to adapt to changing career-related circumstances and predict advancement in career development, seems to provide a fruitful scientific base for…

  11. Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Providing resources and support for new faculty to succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Beane, R. J.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Yuretich, R.; Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A vital strategy to educate future geoscientists is to support faculty at the beginning of their careers, thus catalyzing a career-long impact on the early-career faculty and on their future students. New faculty members are at a pivotal stage in their careers as they step from being research-focused graduate students and post-doctoral scholars, under the guidance of advisors, towards launching independent careers as professors. New faculty commonly, and not unexpectedly, feel overwhelmed as they face challenges to establish themselves in a new environment, prepare new courses, begin new research, and develop a network of support. The workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career has been offered annually in the U.S. since 1999. The workshop is currently offered through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers On the Cutting Edge professional development program with support from the NSF, AGU and GSA. This five-day workshop, with associated web resources, offers guidance for incorporating evidence-based teaching practices, developing a research program, and managing professional responsibilities in balance with personal lives. The workshop design includes plenary and concurrent sessions, individual consultations, and personalized feedback from workshop participants and leaders. Since 1999, more than 850 U.S. faculty have attended the Early Career Geoscience Faculty workshop. Participants span a wide range of geoscience disciplines, and are in faculty positions at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, comprehensive universities and research universities. The percentages of women (~50%) and underrepresented participants (~8%) are higher than in the general geoscience faculty population. Multiple participants each year are starting positions after receiving all or part of their education outside the U.S. Collectively, participants report that they are better prepared to move forward with their careers as a result of

  12. Management and Stewardship of Airborne Observational Data for the NSF/NCAR HIAPER (GV) and NSF/NCAR C-130 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, J.

    2014-12-01

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) provides the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) funding for the operation, maintenance and upgrade of two research aircraft: the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) Gulfstream V and the NSF/NCAR Hercules C-130. A suite of in-situ and remote sensing airborne instruments housed at the EOL Research Aviation Facility (RAF) provide a basic set of measurements that are typically deployed on most airborne field campaigns. In addition, instruments to address more specific research requirements are provided by collaborating participants from universities, industry, NASA, NOAA or other agencies. The data collected are an important legacy of these field campaigns. A comprehensive metadata database and integrated cyber-infrastructure, along with a robust data workflow that begins during the field phase and extends to long-term archival (current aircraft data holdings go back to 1967), assures that: all data and associated software are safeguarded throughout the data handling process; community standards of practice for data stewardship and software version control are followed; simple and timely community access to collected data and associated software tools are provided; and the quality of the collected data is preserved, with the ultimate goal of supporting research and the reproducibility of published results. The components of this data system to be presented include: robust, searchable web access to data holdings; reliable, redundant data storage; web-based tools and scripts for efficient creation, maintenance and update of data holdings; access to supplemental data and documentation; storage of data in standardized data formats; comprehensive metadata collection; mature version control; human-discernable storage practices; and procedures to inform users of changes. In addition, lessons learned, shortcomings, and desired upgrades

  13. Clinician-scientists in Canada: barriers to career entry and progress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryn Lander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinician-scientists play an important role in translating between research and clinical practice. Significant concerns about a decline in their numbers have been raised. Potential barriers for career entry and progress are explored in this study. METHODS: Case-study research methods were used to identify barriers perceived by clinician-scientists and their research teams in two Canadian laboratories. These perceptions were then compared against statistical analysis of data from Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR databases on grant and award performance of clinician-scientists and non-clinical PhDs for fiscal years 2000 to 2008. RESULTS: Three main barriers were identified through qualitative analysis: research training, research salaries, and research grants. We then looked for evidence of these barriers in the Canada-wide statistical dataset for our study period. Clinician-scientists had a small but statistically significant higher mean number of degrees (3.3 than non-clinical scientists (3.2, potentially confirming the perception of longer training times. But evidence of the other two barriers was equivocal. For example, while overall growth in salary awards was minimal, awards to clinician-scientists increased by 45% compared to 6.3% for non-clinical PhDs. Similarly, in terms of research funding, awards to clinician-scientists increased by more than 25% compared with 5% for non-clinical PhDs. However, clinician-scientist-led grants funded under CIHR's Clinical thematic area decreased significantly from 61% to 51% (p-value<0.001 suggesting that clinician-scientists may be shifting their attention to other research domains. CONCLUSION: While clinician-scientists continue to perceive barriers to career entry and progress, quantitative results suggest improvements over the last decade. Clinician-scientists are awarded an increasing proportion of CIHR research grants and salary awards. Given the translational importance of

  14. Building blocks for career advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomall, Thomas; Snyder, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    After attaining IAHSS certification, protective services officers at CCHMC continue on a Career Ladder Program designed to improve knowledge and performance and improve the chances of officer retention. That program is described in detail in this article.

  15. Science Careers and Disabled Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Sue; Cremer, Bob

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes proceedings and student experiences at the 1980 Science Career Workshop for Physically Disabled Students at the Lawrence Hall of Science (University of California). Includes a description of the key-note speaker's topics, and other workshop activities. (DS)

  16. Defense Threat Reduction Agency > Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Integration Command Senior Enlisted Leader Media News News Archive Strategic Plan Videos Mission Research Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current Justifications & Approvals Careers Who We Are Our Values Strategic Recruiting Programs Professional

  17. Career Opportunities for Theatre Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Susan

    2017-07-01

    Never have there been such a vast number of career opportunities for all levels of staff within the perioperative environment including healthcare support workers, operating department practitioners and nurses.

  18. NASA Procurement Career Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Procurement Career Development Program establishes an agency-wide framework for the management of career development activity in the procurement field. Within this framework, installations are encouraged to modify the various components to meet installation-specific mission and organization requirements. This program provides a systematic process for the assessment of and planning for the development, training, and education required to increase the employees' competence in the procurement work functions. It includes the agency-wide basic knowledge and skills by career field and level upon which individual and organizational development plans are developed. Also, it provides a system that is compatible with other human resource management and development systems, processes, and activities. The compatibility and linkage are important in fostering the dual responsibility of the individual and the organization in the career development process.

  19. Widening opportunities for career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo Klindt; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses research circles as a way of organising collaboration between career guidance researchers and practitioners. Such collaboration, it is argued, helps resist neoliberal governance mechanisms and supports social justice perspectives among teachers involved in the provision...... of career education in Danish schools. Based on a research and development project on career education, case analysis is used to explore research circles as a means for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. This analysis shows that research circles provide teachers with a space to reflect...... both in and on action. Career education is the key focus of the case presented in this chapter and it is argued that, in order to increase social mobility through education, there is a need to widen opportunities through experience-based activities among pupils in Danish schools. The chapter contends...

  20. Widening opportunities for career guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Bo Klindt; Skovhus, Randi Boelskifte; Thomsen, Rie

    2018-01-01

    This chapter discusses research circles as a way of organising collaboration between career guidance researchers and practitioners. Such collaboration, it is argued, helps resist neoliberal governance mechanisms and supports social justice perspectives among teachers involved in the provision...... of career education in Danish schools. Based on a research and development project on career education, case analysis is used to explore research circles as a means for collaboration between researchers and practitioners. This analysis shows that research circles provide teachers with a space to reflect...... both in and on action. Career education is the key focus of the case presented in this chapter and it is argued that, in order to increase social mobility through education, there is a need to widen opportunities through experience-based activities among pupils in Danish schools. The chapter contends...

  1. Early Career Mentoring for Translational Researchers: Mentee Perspectives on Challenges and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Thomas E.; Collier, Peter J.; Blakeslee, Jennifer E.; Logan, Kay; McCracken, Karen; Morris, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background and purposes The education and training of early career biomedical translational researchers often involves formal mentoring by more experienced colleagues. This study investigated the nature of these mentoring relationships from the perspective of mentees. The objective was to understand the challenges and issues encountered by mentees in forming and maintaining productive mentoring relationships. Method Three focus groups (n=14) were conducted with early career researchers who had mentored career development awards. Thematic analysis identified, categorized, and illustrated the challenges and issues reported by mentees. Results The range of mentee challenges was reflected in five major categories: 1) network—finding appropriate mentors to meet various needs; 2) access—structuring schedules and opportunities to receive mentoring; 3) expectations—negotiating the mechanics of the mentoring relationship and its purpose; 4) alignment—managing mentor-mentee mismatches regarding interests, priorities, and goals; and 5) skills and supports—developing the institutional supports to be successful. Conclusions Mentoring relationships created for academic training and career development contend with tasks common to many other relationships, namely recognizing compatibility, finding time, establishing patterns, agreeing to goals, and achieving aims. Identifying challenges faced by mentees can facilitate the development of appropriate trainings and supports to foster mentoring relationships in academic and career settings. PMID:25010230

  2. Career development from the employee perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Beranová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    1 Abstract The theoretical part of the bachelor thesis focuses on the definition of career from its traditional concept to the present and on the issue of career development. Attention is paid to the developmental aspects of career and the theories of career stages. An important part of the thesis is formed by the presentation of factors influencing the career development, including the personality traits and other individual factors, for example gender and age perspective, intercultural cont...

  3. Female surgeons' mentoring experiences and success in an academic career in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderli, Reto; Muff, Brigitte; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Businger, Adrian

    2011-07-18

    An increasing proportion of women are working in medicine, although only very few choose surgical specialties and the interest in an academic pursuit is generally smaller among women compared to their male colleagues. The aim of the present study was to analyse factors critical for a successful academic career for female surgeons in Switzerland and to assess the value of mentor-mentee relationships in this context. An anonymous national survey among board-certified female surgeons and female residents was conducted in Switzerland during spring 2008. The support in career advancement was investigated with five scales: networking, career planning, coaching, role model and emotional support scale. Career development was assessed based on the following criteria: number of talks at scientific conferences, number of peer-reviewed publications, participation in research projects, months of research as a fulltime activity, amount of awarded scholarships, amount of obtained third-party funds and number of research awards obtained. In total, 189/318 (59.4%) questionnaires were returned. Mentor-mentee relationships were reported by 109/189 (58%) respondents. The bivariate analysis showed a positive influence on the sum score regarding the respondents who were in a mentor-mentee relationship or who had support in doing household work (p = 0.09). A supporting network, especially in terms of a mentor, is crucial so that female physicians interested in an academic career get the opportunity to accomplish their purpose. There is considerable potential for improvement as almost half of the respondents did not have a mentor in this survey.

  4. Careers of young Polish chemists

    OpenAIRE

    Kosmulski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Typical young Polish scientist is an alumnus of doctoral studies at the same university and department where he/she completed his/her Master degree. The career is continued by receiving a habilitation at the same university and department. Then a holder of habilitation is promoted to a tenured position at the same university and department. Detailed analysis of scientific careers of 154 recent Ph.D. recipients and of 16 habilitation candidates in chemistry from University of Warsaw is present...

  5. Involving Minority High School Students in Cutting Edge Research through C-DEBI, an NSF-National Science and Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) was established as a National Science and Technology Center (NTC) funded by NSF in 2009. Its mission is to explore life beneath the seafloor and make transformative discoveries that advance science, benefit society, and inspire people of all ages and origins. Thanks to the multi-institutional character of C-DEBI, the Center has not only started a collaborative framework for experimental and exploratory research, but also targets education programs at the K-12, undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral levels involving biogeochemists, microbiologists, geochemists and geologists. An example for this is the introduction of deep biosphere research into the K-12 classroom. In this context, C-DEBI has collaborated with teachers from the Animo Leadership High School in Inglewood, which is ranked 27th within California and has a total minority enrollment of 99%, to adapt Marine Biology classes and introduce latest Deep Biosphere Science discoveries. Three high school students participated in a pilot project over 6 months to gain hands-on experience in an ongoing study in a Marine Microbiology laboratory at University of Southern California. Graduate and postdoctoral students from the Departments of Biological and Earth Sciences supervised theory, praxis and project design, which was aimed at culturing strains of Marinobacter, one of the most ubiquitous marine microbial genera, and preparing extracted DNA for sequencing using the latest Ion Torrent Technology. Students learned about the interdisciplinary global context of the study and gained experience in laboratory procedures, including basic aseptical techniques, molecular biology methods, and cutting-edge sequencing Technology, as well as problem-solving and creative thinking in project preparation and conduction. This hands-on training included discussions about the 'Whys' and 'Hows' in today's research with respect to their specific project, but also from a

  6. IEEE Honors DeBlasio with Steinmetz Award | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    professional association, with the 2010 Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award. The award will be presented on Dec. 5 with the U.S. Department of the Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will be honored

  7. Research Brief. Punitive Damage Awards in Financial Injury Verdicts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moller, E

    1997-01-01

    .... While punitive damages are awarded in less than 4 percent of all civil jury verdicts, there is a 1-in-7 chance of a punitive award in disputes arising from contractual or commercial relationships...

  8. CMS rewards its best suppliers with the Crystal Award

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    A. Ingman of the Finnish company Outokumpu Pori Oy, F. Krähenbuhl of the Swiss firm Nexans Suisse and M. Niemerski of the American company Plascore receive the highest distinction in the CMS supplier awards - the Crystal Award.

  9. Audit of Cost-Plus-Award-Fee Contracts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The audit objectives were to determine whether award fees contain adequate incentive amounts for contractors to reduce costs and whether the DoD contracting officers were effectively using cost-plus-award-fee contracts...

  10. NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board | News | NREL NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board February 16, 2018 Fuel stability research advances innovation and bolsters industry confidence in biodiesel. Scott

  11. General FAQs regarding the IDRC Doctoral Research Awards 2018 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This award covers field research expenses for advanced doctoral students who intend ... serious security challenges, IDRC may ask you to delay your field research, .... Women candidates applying to IDRC Doctoral Research Awards calls in ...

  12. Career exploration behavior of Korean medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyejin An

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose This study is to analyze the effects of medical students’ social support and career barriers on career exploration behavior mediated by career decision-making self-efficacy. Methods We applied the t-test to investigate the difference among the variables based on gender and admission types. Also, we performed path analysis to verify the effect of perceived career barriers and social support on career exploration behavior with career decision efficacy as a mediator. Results First, we noted statistically significant gender and admission type difference in social support, career barriers and career exploration behaviors. Second, social support and career barriers were found to influence career exploration behavior as a mediating variable for career decision-making self-efficacy. Conclusion Social support and career barriers as perceived by medical students influenced their career exploration behavior, with their decision-making self-efficacy serving as a full mediator. Therefore, this study has educational implications for career program development and educational training for career decision-making self-efficacy.

  13. Career exploration behavior of Korean medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hyejin; Lee, Seung-Hee

    2017-09-01

    This study is to analyze the effects of medical students' social support and career barriers on career exploration behavior mediated by career decision-making self-efficacy. We applied the t-test to investigate the difference among the variables based on gender and admission types. Also, we performed path analysis to verify the effect of perceived career barriers and social support on career exploration behavior with career decision efficacy as a mediator. First, we noted statistically significant gender and admission type difference in social support, career barriers and career exploration behaviors. Second, social support and career barriers were found to influence career exploration behavior as a mediating variable for career decision-making self-efficacy. Social support and career barriers as perceived by medical students influenced their career exploration behavior, with their decision-making self-efficacy serving as a full mediator. Therefore, this study has educational implications for career program development and educational training for career decision-making self-efficacy.

  14. Career development: graduate nurse views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan; Muthulakshmi, Paulpandi; Happell, Brenda; Hunt, Glenn E

    2013-09-01

    To explore recent Singapore nursing graduates' experience of and views about their career development and progress. The recruitment and retention of an adequate number of registered nurses is a continuing workforce issue in Singapore and other major cities. Survey of recent nursing graduates. Recent nursing graduates from the Bachelor programme (n = 147) were sent an individual survey; a response rate of 54% was achieved. Findings show that nurses rated their self-concept in a positive manner and were most satisfied (moderately to very) with helping patients and providing effective care, and the level of patient involvement. They were least satisfied (moderately to only a little) with prestige among the general medical community and the general public, hours of work, lifestyle factors and research opportunities. The following four factors were identified as significant impediments to career development; lack of support in the work place; perceived insufficient clinical career development opportunities; excessive work hours; and limited access to merit-based places in further education. Suggestions made to overcome perceived career development barriers are as follows: broad multifactorial healthcare system changes; decreased and more flexible working hours; and fairer access to further clinical and higher education. Results highlight the value clinical nurses place on having access to career development opportunities, merit-based further education and work place supports. These factors also have the potential to influence patient care and impact on the retention of nurses in their present job and satisfaction with their nursing career. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion is required for nuclear envelope formation and completion of nuclear pore complex assembly in Xenopus laevis egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Tina; Ramadan, Kristijan; Schlundt, Andreas; Kartenbeck, Jürgen; Meyer, Hemmo H

    2007-08-15

    Despite the progress in understanding nuclear envelope (NE) reformation after mitosis, it has remained unclear what drives the required membrane fusion and how exactly this is coordinated with nuclear pore complex (NPC) assembly. Here, we show that, like other intracellular fusion reactions, NE fusion in Xenopus laevis egg extracts is mediated by SNARE proteins that require activation by NSF. Antibodies against Xenopus NSF, depletion of NSF or the dominant-negative NSF(E329Q) variant specifically inhibited NE formation. Staging experiments further revealed that NSF was required until sealing of the envelope was completed. Moreover, excess exogenous alpha-SNAP that blocks SNARE function prevented membrane fusion and caused accumulation of non-flattened vesicles on the chromatin surface. Under these conditions, the nucleoporins Nup107 and gp210 were fully recruited, whereas assembly of FxFG-repeat-containing nucleoporins was blocked. Together, we define NSF- and SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events as essential steps during NE formation downstream of Nup107 recruitment, and upstream of membrane flattening and completion of NPC assembly.

  16. 78 FR 13030 - Applications for New Awards; Native American Career and Technical Education Program (NACTEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... children and students who are living in poverty, who are English learners, who are far below grade level or... ``Johnson-O'Malley Act'' that authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to enter into contracts for the... or below the national poverty level according to the latest available data from the U.S. Department...

  17. Competencies for the Contemporary Career: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Career Competencies Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Huibers, M.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2013-01-01

    A new and promising area of research has recently emerged in the field of career development: career competencies. The present article provides a framework of career competencies that integrates several perspectives from the literature. The framework distinguishes between reflective, communicative,

  18. Competencies for the contemporary career: Development and preliminary validation of the Career Competencies Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Huibers, M.; Blonk, R.W.B.

    2013-01-01

    A new and promising area of research has recently emerged in the field of career development: career competencies. The present article provides a framework of career competencies that integrates several perspectives from the literature. The framework distinguishes between reflective, communicative,

  19. Career Preparation: A Longitudinal, Process-Oriented Examination

    OpenAIRE

    Stringer, Kate; Kerpelman, Jennifer; Skorikov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Preparing for an adult career through careful planning, choosing a career, and gaining confidence to achieve career goals is a primary task during adolescence and early adulthood. The current study bridged identity process literature and career construction theory (Savickas, 2005) by examining the commitment component of career adaptability, career preparation (i.e., career planning, career decision-making, and career confidence), from an identity process perspective (Luyckx, Goossens, & Soen...

  20. NSF-supported education/outreach program takes young researchers to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Walsh, J. E.; Hock, R.; Kaden, U.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Kholodov, A. L.; Bret-Harte, M. S.; Sparrow, E. B.

    2015-12-01

    Today, more than ever, an integrated cross-disciplinary approach is necessary to explain changes in the Arctic and understand their implications for the human environment. Advanced training and active involvement of early-career scientists is an important component of this cross-disciplinary approach. This effort led by the International Arctic Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) started in 2003. The newly supported project in 2013 is planning four summer schools (one per year) focused on four themes in four different Arctic locations. It provides the participants with an interdisciplinary perspective on Arctic change and its impacts on diverse sectors of the North. It is linked to other ongoing long-term observational and educational programs (e.g. NABOS, Nansen and Amundsen Basins Observational System; LTER, Long Term Environmental Research) and targets young scientists by using the interdisciplinary and place-based setting to broaden their perspective on Arctic change and to enhance their communication skills. Each course for 15-20 people consists of classroom and hands-on components and work with a multidisciplinary group of mentors on projects devoted to themes exemplified by the location. A specialist from the School of Education at UAF evaluates student's progress during the summer schools. Lessons learned during the 12 years of conducting summer schools, methods of attracting in-kind support and approaches to teaching students are prominently featured in this study. Activities during the most recent school, conducted in Fairbanks and LTER Toolik Lake Field Station in 2015 are the focus of this presentation.