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  1. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Lanconelli, Nico; Petit, Steven F.

    2017-01-01

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V_9_5_% increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R_5_0 reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p [de

  2. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Petit, Steven F. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V{sub 95%} increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R{sub 50} reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p < 0.001). To render the six remaining autoVMAT plans clinically acceptable, a dosimetrist needed less than 10 min hands-on time for fine-tuning. AutoVMAT plans were also considered equivalent or better than manually optimized VMAT plans. For 6/16 patients, autoVMAT allowed tumor dose escalation of 5-10 Gy. Clinically deliverable, high-quality autoVMAT plans can be generated fully automatically for the vast majority of advanced-stage NSCLC patients. For a subset of patients, autoVMAT allowed for tumor dose escalation. (orig.) [German] Entwicklung einer vollautomatisierten, auf multiplen Kriterien basierenden volumenmodulierten Arc-Therapie-(VMAT-)Behandlungsplanung (autoVMAT) fuer kurativ behandelte Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im Stadium III/IV. Nach Konfiguration unseres auto

  3. SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique

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    Ku, E; Desai, A [Frank H Netter, MD, School of Medicine, North Haven, CT (United States); Fang, D; Lawrence, C; Iannuzzi, C; Shi, C [St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term toxicity and primary tumor changes for Stage I/II non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after treatment with lung SBRT using the modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) planning technique. Methods: Clinical and radiograph data from electronic health records of 15 NSCLC patients treated with lung SBRT utilizing the MDCA technique between October 2011 and July 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. MDCA uses a coplanar beam arrangement, patient body center for the beam isocenter, and six partial rotation conformal arcs to target the tumor. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines for treatment parameters were followed. Most patients received 5 radiation fractions (Range: 3 to 7 fractions) with 48 hours between each fraction. Median total dose was 60 Gy (range: 45 to 70 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range: 6–51 months). Median age was 72.5 years (range: 48–90 years). Post-treatment findings included fatigue (n = 5) and chronic chest wall pain (n=1). Seven patients reported respiratory symptoms, which included: cough (n = 4), dyspnea (n = 5), and hemoptysis (n = 1). No patients deaths or grade ≥4 toxicity were recorded. Radiographic scarring was seen on computed tomography (CT) imaging in 6 patients. Local control rate was 93.3% (n = 14) and 1 patient had local recurrence. Conclusion: Our results were very similar to RTOG 0236 findings reported by Timmerman et al. – our local control rate was 93.3% compared to their 3-year primary tumor control rate of 97.6%. Toxicity rates were also similar – RTOG 0236 constitutional symptoms and pulmonary/upper respiratory symptoms rates were 36.4% and 60.0%, respectively, while ours were 33.3% and 46.7%, respectively. We were limited by a small sample size and relatively short follow-up but our findings support the use of the MDCA technique for lung SBRT treatment of Stage I/II NSCLC.

  4. Chemotherapy and quality of life in NSCLC PS 2 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Strøm, Hans H; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2009-01-01

    , fatigue, dyspnea, sleeping problems and appetite loss in comparison to the PS 0/1 group. CONCLUSIONS: PS 2 NSCLC patients seem to achieve valuable HRQOL benefits from platinum-based combination therapy. Prospective clinical studies with predefined HRQOL outcomes in PS 2 patients are needed to confirm...

  5. Bevacizumab in the treatment of NSCLC: patient selection and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo AE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Alessia E Russo,1 Domenico Priolo,1 Giovanna Antonelli,1 Massimo Libra,2 James A McCubrey,3 Francesco Ferraù1 1Medical Oncology Department, San Vincenzo Hospital, Taormina (Messina, Italy; 2Laboratory of Translational Oncology & Functional Genomics, Department of Biomedical and Biotechnological Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents about 85% of all lung cancers, and more than half of NSCLCs are diagnosed at an advanced stage. Chemotherapy has reached a plateau in the overall survival curve of about 10 months. Therefore, in last decade novel targeted approaches have been developed to extend survival of these patients, including antiangiogenic treatment. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF signaling pathway plays a dominant role in stimulating angiogenesis, which is the main process promoting tumor growth and metastasis. Bevacizumab (bev; Avastin® is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that neutralizes VEGF’s biologic activity through a steric blocking of its binding with VEGF receptor. Currently, bev is the only antiangiogenic agent approved for the first-line treatment of advanced or recurrent nonsquamous NSCLC in “bev-eligible” patients. The ineligibility to receive bev is related to its toxicity. In the pivotal trials of bev in NSCLC, fatal bleeding events including pulmonary hemorrhage were observed with rates higher in the chemotherapy-plus-bev group. Therefore, in order to reduce the incidence of severe pulmonary hemorrhage, numerous exclusion criteria have been characteristically applied for bev such as central tumor localization or tumor cavitation, use of anticoagulant therapy, presence of brain metastases, age of patients (elderly. Subsequent studies designed to evaluate the safety of bev have demonstrated that this agent is safe and

  6. The Predictive Value of Germline Polymorphisms in Patients with NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Anneli Dowler; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2010-01-01

    urgently needed. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are stable markers of potential clinical value and the study aimed at evaluating their use in lung cancer patients given standard chemotherapy. Genomic DNA was extracted from a pre-treatment blood sample drawn from patients with advanced Non....... Haplotypes were estimated and analyzed when relevant. There were no significant associations between SNPs in the EGF system or the DNA-repair system and RR, PFS or OS. In contrast, the VEGF+405, VEGF-460 and VEGF-2579, heterozygous patients had a higher response rate and longer PFS than homozygous patients....... Haplotype analysis of the VEGF+405 and VEGF- 460 supported our findings. These results were, however, not confirmed in the validation cohort. Although significant results regarding VEGF related SNPs, in the primary analysis, no predictive value of a broad panel of SNPs in NSCLC was found in the validation...

  7. [Optimization of radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using 18FDG-PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Nestle, U; Walter, K; Licht, N; Ukena, D; Schnabel, K; Kirsch, C M

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most causes (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm2, after redefinition using PET 166 cm2. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectasis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation.

  8. Prediction of residual metabolic activity after treatment in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; Oberije, Cary; Ruysscher, Dirk De; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Metabolic response assessment is often used as a surrogate of local failure and survival. Early identification of patients with residual metabolic activity is essential as this enables selection of patients who could potentially benefit from additional therapy. We report on the development of a pre-treatment prediction model for metabolic response using patient, tumor and treatment factors. Methods. One hundred and one patients with inoperable NSCLC (stage I-IV), treated with 3D conformal radical (chemo)-radiotherapy were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received a pre and post-radiotherapy fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography FDG-PET-CT scan. The electronic medical record system and the medical patient charts were reviewed to obtain demographic, clinical, tumor and treatment data. Primary outcome measure was examined using a metabolic response assessment on a post-radiotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan. Radiotherapy was delivered in fractions of 1.8 Gy, twice a day, with a median prescribed dose of 60 Gy. Results. Overall survival was worse in patients with residual metabolic active areas compared with the patients with a complete metabolic response (p=0.0001). In univariate analysis, three variables were significantly associated with residual disease: larger primary gross tumor volume (GTVprimary, p=0.002), higher pre-treatment maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max , p=0.0005) in the primary tumor and shorter overall treatment time (OTT, p=0.046). A multivariate model including GTVprimary, SUV max , equivalent radiation dose at 2 Gy corrected for time (EQD2, T) and OTT yielded an area under the curve assessed by the leave-one-out cross validation of 0.71 (95% CI, 0.65-0.76). Conclusion. Our results confirmed the validity of metabolic response assessment as a surrogate of survival. We developed a multivariate model that is able to identify patients at risk of residual disease. These patients may benefit from

  9. Improved radiotherapy for locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann

    to comply with the DIBH technique. For DIBH, the patients are guided to hold their breath almost at their maximum inspiration level during imaging and treatment. This leads to reduction of the breathing motion which decreases the movement of the tumor and OARs. It also expands the lung tissue which...... be reduced by the DIBH method for the lung cancer patients. The overall aim of the clinical part of this thesis was to clarify the potential benefit of offering DIBH gating, compared to free-breathing (FB), for lung cancer patients. Particularly, the benefits for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) patients were explored. For the dosimetric part of the thesis, the dosimetric aspects of correct dose calculations in heterogeneous patient-like geometries were studied. The clinical aspects of DIBH were evaluated in three different studies, where planning and setup verification images acquired...

  10. Planning benchmark study for SBRT of early stage NSCLC. Results of the DEGRO Working Group Stereotactic Radiotherapy

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    Moustakis, Christos [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Blanck, Oliver [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Guestrow and Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Ebrahimi Tazehmahalleh, Fatemeh [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); City Hospital Dessau, Dessau (Germany); Chan, Mark ka heng [UKSH Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); German CyberKnife Center, Soest (Germany); Krieger, Thomas [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute; Heinz, Christian [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Alheit, Horst; Blank, Hilbert [Radiationtherapy Distler, Bautzen (Germany); Nestle, Ursula; Wiehle, Rolf [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Kornhuber, Christine; Ostheimer, Christian [University Halle, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Pollul, Gerhard [University Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Baus, Wolfgang; Altenstein, Georg [University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Beckers, Eric; Jurianz, Katrin [Gamma Knife Center Krefeld, Krefeld (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kretschmer, Matthias [Radiologische Allianz Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, Heinrich; Maass, Torsten [Radiationtherapy and Cyberknife Center Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Droege, Stefan [Lung Clinic Hemer, Hemer (Germany); Wolf, Ulrich [University Leipzig, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Schoeffler, Juergen [Radiationtherapy Department Boeblingen, Boeblingen (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [University Zurich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-10-15

    The aim was to evaluate stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning variability for early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with respect to the published guidelines of the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). Planning computed tomography (CT) scan and the structure sets (planning target volume, PTV; organs at risk, OARs) of 3 patients with early stage NSCLC were sent to 22 radiotherapy departments with SBRT experience: each department was asked to prepare a treatment plan according to the DEGRO guidelines. The prescription dose was 3 fractions of 15 Gy to the 65% isodose. In all, 87 plans were generated: 36 used intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT), 21 used three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), 6 used static field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (SF-IMRT), 9 used helical radiotherapy and 15 used robotic radiosurgery. PTV dose coverage and simultaneously kept OARs doses were within the clinical limits published in the DEGRO guidelines. However, mean PTV dose (mean 58.0 Gy, range 52.8-66.4 Gy) and dose conformity indices (mean 0.75, range 0.60-1.00) varied between institutions and techniques (p ≤ 0.02). OARs doses varied substantially between institutions, but appeared to be technique independent (p = 0.21). All studied treatment techniques are well suited for SBRT of early stage NSCLC according to the DEGRO guidelines. Homogenization of SBRT practice in Germany is possible through the guidelines; however, detailed treatment plan characteristics varied between techniques and institutions and further homogenization is warranted in future studies and recommendations. Optimized treatment planning should always follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. (orig.) [German] Ziel war die Untersuchung der Variabilitaet der Bestrahlungsplanung der stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (SBRT) fuer das nicht-kleinzellige Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im

  11. Prognostic value of plasma EGFR ctDNA in NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengjuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR specific mutations have been known to improve survival of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. However, whether there are any changes of EGFR mutations after targeted therapy and its clinical significance is unclear. This study was to identify the status of EGFR mutations after targeted therapy and predict the prognostic significance for NSCLC patients.A total of forty-five (45 NSCLC patients who received EGFR-TKI therapy were enrolled. We identified the changes of EGFR mutations in plasma ctDNA by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS PCR technology.In the 45 cases of NSCLC with EGFR mutations, the EGFR mutation status changed in 26 cases, in which, 12 cases (26.7% from positive to negative, and 14 cases (31.1% from T790M mutation negative to positive after TKI targeted therapy. The T790M occurance group had a shorter Progression -Free-Survival (PFS than the groups of EGFR mutation undetected and EGFR mutation turned out to have no change after EGFR-TKI therapy (p < 0.05.According to this study, it's necessary to closely monitor EGFR mutations during follow-up to predict the prognosis of NSCLC patients who are to receive the TKI targeted therapy.

  12. ERCC1 and histopathology in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicenter phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, E; Sørensen, J B

    2010-01-01

    Customized chemotherapy is likely to improve outcome in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker; however, current evidence is inadequate. Impact of ERCC1 status was evaluated among patients participa...

  13. Survival of localized NSCLC patients without active treatment or treated with SBRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, S S; Hansen, N C G; Schytte, T

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little information on the natural history of patients with localized NSCLC is available since many of the studies covering the subject lack information on pathological confirmation, staging procedures and comorbidity. No randomized studies have compared SBRT with no treatment for pati......BACKGROUND: Little information on the natural history of patients with localized NSCLC is available since many of the studies covering the subject lack information on pathological confirmation, staging procedures and comorbidity. No randomized studies have compared SBRT with no treatment...... for patients with localized NSCLC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether SBRT has influence on overall survival for patients with localized NSCLC and investigate the effect of baseline ventilatory lung function on overall survival. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 2007 to 2013, 136 patients treated...... with SBRT at Odense University Hospital were prospectively recorded. The thoracic SBRT consisted of three fractions of 15-22 Gy delivered in 9 days. For comparison, a national group of 73 untreated patients in the same time period was extracted from the Danish Lung Cancer Registry. All patients had...

  14. Fasting blood glucose level and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Chen, Yea-Jyh; Chang, Li-Jung

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes has been consistently linked to many forms of cancers, such as liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and breast cancer, however, the role of diabetes in outcome among cancer patients remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 342 inpatients newly diagnosed with NSCLC referred by a teaching hospital cancer center in southern Taiwan between 2005 and 2007 to examine the effects of fasting glucose levels at time of cancer diagnosis on overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients were followed up until the end of 2010. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival curves for patients with and without diabetes. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios for the association between diabetes, other prognostic factors and patient survival. We observed that significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival in patients with NSCLC included older age, smoking, poor performance status, advanced stage (stage IIIB or IV), and no cancer-directed surgery treatment. Particularly, we identified that diabetic state defined by fasting blood glucose level ≥126 mg/dl was another independent prognostic factor for these patients. Compared with those who had normal range of fasting glucose level (70-99 mg/dl), patients with high fasting glucose level (≥126 mg/dl) had 69% excess risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC. Diabetes as indicated by elevated fasting blood glucose was independently associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC, indicating that diabetes or hyperglycemia effectively controlled may present an opportunity for improving prognosis in NSCLS patients with abnormal glucose level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. FDG-PET/CT response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthijs; H; van; Gool; Tjeerd; S; Aukema; Koen; J; Hartemink; Renato; A; Valdés; Olmos; Houke; M; Klomp; Harm; van; Tinteren

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years,[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography acquired together with low dose computed tomography(FDG-PET/CT)has proven its role as a staging modality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).The purpose of this review was to present the evidence to use FDG-PET/CT for response evaluation in patients with NSCLC,treated with epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors(TKI).All published articles from 1November 2003 to 1 November 2013 reporting on 18FFDG-PET response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC were collected.In total 7studies,including data of 210 patients were eligible for analyses.Our report shows that FDG-PET/CT responseduring EGFR-TKI therapy has potential in targeted treatment for NSCLC.FDG-PET/CT response is associated with clinical and radiologic response and with survival.Furthermore FDG-PET/CT response monitoring can be performed as early as 1-2 wk after initiation of EGFR-TKI treatment.Patients with substantial decrease of metabolic activity during EGFR-TKI treatment will probably benefit from continued treatment.If metabolic response does not occur within the first weeks of EGFR-TKI treatment,patients may be spared(further)unnecessary toxicity of ineffective treatment.Refining FDG-PET response criteria may help the clinician to decide on continuation or discontinuation of targeted treatment.

  16. Exploration of Postoperative Follow-up Strategies for Early Staged NSCLC Patients on the Basis of Follow-up Result of 416 Stage I NSCLC Patients after Lobectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang DAI

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, there is no consensus on the follow-up strategy (follow-up time interval and content of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the world, and the relevant clinical evidence is also very limited. In this study, we aimed to summarize the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings of stage I NSCLC patients based on their follow-up data, aiming to provide a basis of follow-up time interval and content for this group of patients. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the 416 stage I NSCLC patients that underwent continuous anatomic lobectomy between Jan. 2000 to Oct. 2013 in our prospective lung cancer database. According to the recurrence/metastasis sites and timings, the long term follow-up time interval and content were explored. Results The 5-yr disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS in the whole group were 82.4% and 85.4%, respectively. There were 76 cases (18.3% had recurrence/metastasis during follow-up, among which the most frequent site was pulmonary metastasis (21 cases, 5.0%, followed by brain metastasis (20 cases, 4.8%, bone metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%, and mediastinal lymph node metastasis (12 cases, 2.9%. Among the factors that could influence recurrence/metastasis, patients with pT2a suffered from a higher recurrence/metastasis rate compared to patients with pT1 (P=0.006, with 5-yr DFS being 73.8% and 87.3%, respectively (P=0.002, and the 5-yr OS being 77.7% and 90.3%, respectively (P=0.011. Conclusion The commonest recurrence/metastasis sites of stage I NSCLC after anatomic lobectomy are lung, brain and mediastinal lymph nodes, the risk of recurrence/metastasis within 2 years were equal to that between 3 years and 5 years. The follow-up frequencies and content within 2 years could be adjusted according to T stages.

  17. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): An update of a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V 20 and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung.

  18. The Effect of Consolidation Chemotherapy for LA-NSCLC Patients Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

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    Yelda Varol

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The efficacy and safety of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT following concurrent chemoradiotherapy are not adequately established for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC. In this context, the present study aims to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of CCT.Material and Method: We retrospectively analyzed the overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS of 83 LA-NSCLC patients treated with concurrent CRT as an initial treatment with (n:20 or without CCT (n:63. All patients were cytohistologically proven to have NSCLC and diagnosed with clinical Stage III (n:48 for IIIA and n:35 for IIIB according to the staging system published by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC in 2009. All patients received curative thoracic radiotherapy with concurrent platinum doublet chemotherapy. Results: The mean age of the lung cancer patients was 59 (±7.3; 89.2% were male (n:74,and there were only 9 female patients (10.8%.When we compared the outcome of LA-NSCLC patients treated with CCT (median 10.4 months to the patients treated without CCT (median 13.8 months, the log-rank analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference for an inferior progression-free survival (p=0.046 in patients receiving CCT. However, no significant association was observed for overall survival (17.4, 21 months, respectively (p>0.05. Patients with CCT presented higher levels of hematological side effects compared with the patients without CCT (p

  19. Optimization of radiotherapy planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) by {sup 18}FDG-PET; Optimierung der Bestrahlungsplanung beim nicht-kleinzelligen bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) mit Hilfe von {sup 18}FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Nestle, U.; Kirsch, C.M. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Walter, K. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Marienkrankenhaus Amberg (Germany); Licht, N.; Schnabel, K. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ukena, D. [Innere Medizin V, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Aim: In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. Methods: The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. Results: In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most cases (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm{sup 2}, after redefinition using PET 166 cm{sup 2}. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectosis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die FDG-PET-Untersuchung hat in den vergangenen Jahren bei onkologischen Fragestellungen insbesondere beim Staging des Bronchialkarzinoms wachsende Bedeutung erlangt. In der vorliegenden retrospektiven Untersuchung wurde der Einfluss der PET auf die Strahlentherapieplanung bei Patienten mit non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) untersucht. Methoden: Die Untersuchung umfasste 39 Patienten mit

  20. Impact of tumour motion compensation and delineation methods on FDG PET-based dose painting plan quality for NSCLC radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Hannah M.; Kinahan, Paul E.; Samuel, James J.E.; Bowen, Stephen R.

    2018-01-01

    To quantitatively estimate the impact of different methods for both boost volume delineation and respiratory motion compensation of [18F] FDG PET/CT images on the fidelity of planned non-uniform ‘dose painting’ plans to the prescribed boost dose distribution. Six locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were retrospectively reviewed. To assess the impact of respiratory motion, time-averaged (3D AVG), respiratory phase-gated (4D GATED) and motion-encompassing (4D MIP) PET images were used. The boost volumes were defined using manual contour (MANUAL), fixed threshold (FIXED) and gradient search algorithm (GRADIENT). The dose painting prescription of 60 Gy base dose to the planning target volume and an integral dose of 14 Gy (total 74 Gy) was discretized into seven treatment planning substructures and linearly redistributed according to the relative SUV at every voxel in the boost volume. Fifty-four dose painting plan combinations were generated and conformity was evaluated using quality index VQ0.95–1.05, which represents the sum of planned dose voxels within 5% deviation from the prescribed dose. Trends in plan quality and magnitude of achievable dose escalation were recorded. Different segmentation techniques produced statistically significant variations in maximum planned dose (P < 0.02), as well as plan quality between segmentation methods for 4D GATED and 4D MIP PET images (P < 0.05). No statistically significant differences in plan quality and maximum dose were observed between motion-compensated PET-based plans (P > 0.75). Low variability in plan quality was observed for FIXED threshold plans, while MANUAL and GRADIENT plans achieved higher dose with lower plan quality indices. The dose painting plans were more sensitive to segmentation of boost volumes than PET motion compensation in this study sample. Careful consideration of boost target delineation and motion compensation strategies should guide the design of NSCLC dose painting

  1. Impact of tumour motion compensation and delineation methods on FDG PET-based dose painting plan quality for NSCLC radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Hannah Mary; Kinahan, Paul E; Samuel, James Jebaseelan E; Bowen, Stephen R

    2018-02-01

    To quantitatively estimate the impact of different methods for both boost volume delineation and respiratory motion compensation of [18F] FDG PET/CT images on the fidelity of planned non-uniform 'dose painting' plans to the prescribed boost dose distribution. Six locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were retrospectively reviewed. To assess the impact of respiratory motion, time-averaged (3D AVG), respiratory phase-gated (4D GATED) and motion-encompassing (4D MIP) PET images were used. The boost volumes were defined using manual contour (MANUAL), fixed threshold (FIXED) and gradient search algorithm (GRADIENT). The dose painting prescription of 60 Gy base dose to the planning target volume and an integral dose of 14 Gy (total 74 Gy) was discretized into seven treatment planning substructures and linearly redistributed according to the relative SUV at every voxel in the boost volume. Fifty-four dose painting plan combinations were generated and conformity was evaluated using quality index VQ0.95-1.05, which represents the sum of planned dose voxels within 5% deviation from the prescribed dose. Trends in plan quality and magnitude of achievable dose escalation were recorded. Different segmentation techniques produced statistically significant variations in maximum planned dose (P plan quality between segmentation methods for 4D GATED and 4D MIP PET images (P plan quality and maximum dose were observed between motion-compensated PET-based plans (P > 0.75). Low variability in plan quality was observed for FIXED threshold plans, while MANUAL and GRADIENT plans achieved higher dose with lower plan quality indices. The dose painting plans were more sensitive to segmentation of boost volumes than PET motion compensation in this study sample. Careful consideration of boost target delineation and motion compensation strategies should guide the design of NSCLC dose painting trials. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of

  2. Octogenarians with early stage NSCLC undergoing SBRT-same outcomes as younger patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, T.; Brink, C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The increase in life expectancy leads to an increased number of elderly patients (pts) diagnosed with NSCLC. Octogenarians can be a treatment challenge due to frailty and comorbidity. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) has become the standard treatment for medical inoperable...... pts with early stage NSCLC. However, it is unknown if all pts have same benefit of SBRT due to lack of randomized studies. This retrospective single-institution study reports survival and control rates for medical inoperable octogenarians vs. pts 80 and 80 and 137 were 80 and 0.05). No difference...... in comorbidity measured by Charlson Score Index was observed. SBRT was generally well tolerated. A log rank test showed a significant difference of OS between patients >80 and 80 and 80 and...

  3. Efficacy and adverse effects of icotinib in treatment of 30 NSCLC patients with brain metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hong DAI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the efficacy and adverse effects of icotinib in the treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with brain metastases. Methods  This study was performed at Tongji Hospital Cancer Center over the period between September 2011 and November 2015. Thirty cases of advanced NSCLC patients with icotinib monotherapy were enrolled, all with brain metastases, the median follow-up time being 24 months (5.5-49.0 months, with no case censored. The follow-up rate was 100%, and the data of efficacy and adverse effects were collected. Results  The intracranial progression-free survival (iPFS was 9.6 months, while no patient exhibited complete remission (CR, 8 patients showed partial remission (PR and 14 showed stable disease (SD in the intracranial foci. The intracranial disease control rate (DCR was 73.3%, and the objective remission rate (ORR was 26.7%. The extracranial progression-free survival (ePFS was 10.1 months, while no patient exhibited CR, 11 patients showed PR and 11 patients showed SD in the extracranial foci. The extracranial DCR was 73.3%, and the ORR was 36.7%. The one-year survival rate was 63.8% in all the 30 patients. Twelve (40.0% of the total 30 patients developed rash, five (16.7% developed grade 1 diarrhea, one (3.3% developed grade 2 transaminase elevation. None of the patients experienced headache, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, etc. Conclusion  Icotinib hydrochloride is effective and safe for NSCLC patients with brain metastasis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.06.11

  4. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    , tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  5. F-18-FDG-PET Confined Radiotherapy of Locally Advanced NSCLC With Concomitant Chemotherapy: Results of the PET-PLAN Pilot Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Hellwig, Dirk [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kremp, Stephanie [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Grgic, Aleksandar [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Groeschel, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine V, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Kirsch, Carl-Martin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Nestle, Ursula [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany); Clinic for Radiotherapy, University Hospital, Freiburg (Germany); Ruebe, Christian, E-mail: christian.ruebe@uks.eu [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Saarland University Medical School, Homburg (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The integration of fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the process of radiotherapy (RT) planning of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may improve diagnostic accuracy and minimize interobserver variability compared with target volume definition solely based on computed tomography. Furthermore, irradiating only FDG-PET-positive findings and omitting elective nodal regions may allow dose escalation by treating smaller volumes. The aim of this prospective pilot trial was to evaluate the therapeutic safety of FDG-PET-based RT treatment planning with an autocontour-derived delineation of the primary tumor. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stages II-III inoperable NSCLC, and simultaneous, platinum-based radiochemotherapy was indicated. FDG-PET and computed tomography acquisitions in RT treatment planning position were coregistered. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the FDG-PET-defined primary tumor, which was autodelineated with a source-to-background algorithm, plus FDG-PET-positive lymph node stations. Limited by dose restrictions for normal tissues, prescribed total doses were in the range of 66.6 to 73.8 Gy. The primary endpoint was the rate of out-of-field isolated nodal recurrences (INR). Results: As per intent to treat, 32 patients received radiochemotherapy. In 15 of these patients, dose escalation above 66.6 Gy was achieved. No Grade 4 toxicities occurred. After a median follow-up time of 27.2 months, the estimated median survival time was 19.3 months. During the observation period, one INR was observed in 23 evaluable patients. Conclusions: FDG-PET-confined target volume definition in radiochemotherapy of NSCLC, based on a contrast-oriented source-to-background algorithm, was associated with a low risk of INR. It might provide improved tumor control because of dose escalation.

  6. Treatment outcome in performance status 2 advanced NSCLC patients administered platinum-based combination chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, Nina; Aasebø, Ulf; Sundstrøm, Stein H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no consensus regarding chemotherapy to patients with advanced NSCLC (ANSCLC) and performance status (PS) 2. Using data from a national multicenter study comparing two third-generation carboplatin-based regimens in ANSCLC patients, we evaluated the outcome of PS 2 patients....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: The 123 PS 2 patients were compared to 309 PS 0/1 patients regarding survival, quality of life (QOL) and treatment toxicity. RESULTS: PS 2 patients had lower haemoglobin, lower global QOL and more pain, nausea/vomiting and dyspnea at inclusion. 68% of PS 2 patients received three...... chemotherapy courses vs. 85% in the PS 0/1 group (PPS 2 group, 4.5 vs. 8.9 months and 10% vs. 37% (PPS 2 patients needed blood transfusions (P=0.03) and hospitalization (PPS 2 patients had better relief of pain and dyspnea...

  7. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC: A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Rübe, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels.

  8. Systemic treatment in EGFR-ALK NSCLC patients: second line therapy and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and a leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide, with adenocarcinoma being the most common histological subtype. Deeper understanding of the pathobiology of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has led to the development of small molecules that target genetic mutations known to play critical roles in progression to metastatic disease and to influence response to targeted therapies. The principle goal of precision medicine is to define those patient populations most likely to respond to targeted therapies. However, the cancer genome landscape is composed of relatively few “mountains” [representing the most commonly mutated genes like KRAS, epidermal growth factor (EGFR), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)] and a vast number of “hills” (representing low frequency but potentially actionable mutations). Low-frequency lesions that affect a druggable gene product allow a relatively small population of cancer patients for targeted therapy to be selected

  9. Next-generation sequencing in NSCLC and melanoma patients: a cost and budget impact analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Amerongen, Rosa A; Retèl, Valesca P; Coupé, Veerle MH; Nederlof, Petra M; Vogel, Maartje J; van Harten, Wim H

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has reached the molecular diagnostic laboratories. Although the NGS technology aims to improve the effectiveness of therapies by selecting the most promising therapy, concerns are that NGS testing is expensive and that the ‘benefits’ are not yet in relation to these costs. In this study, we give an estimation of the costs and an institutional and national budget impact of various types of NGS tests in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and melanoma patients within The Netherlands. First, an activity-based costing (ABC) analysis has been conducted on the costs of two examples of NGS panels (small- and medium-targeted gene panel (TGP)) based on data of The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI). Second, we performed a budget impact analysis (BIA) to estimate the current (2015) and future (2020) budget impact of NGS on molecular diagnostics for NSCLC and melanoma patients in The Netherlands. Literature, expert opinions, and a data set of patients within the NKI (n = 172) have been included in the BIA. Based on our analysis, we expect that the NGS test cost concerns will be limited. In the current situation, NGS can indeed result in higher diagnostic test costs, which is mainly related to required additional tests besides the small TGP. However, in the future, we expect that the use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) will increase, for which it is expected that additional tests can be (partly) avoided. Although the current clinical benefits are expected to be limited, the research potentials of NGS are already an important advantage. PMID:27899957

  10. Fluorine F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for restaging of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): analysis of management change and survival in 63 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Binns, D.J.; Kalff, V.; Ware, R.E.; Hogg, A.; MacManus, M.P.; Ball, D.L.; Suter, M.E.; Matthews, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Following treatment with curative intent for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), assessment of disease status using conventional techniques is often difficult. We evaluated management impact and prognostic value of FDG PET in 63 consecutive patients undergoing restaging of NSCLC between 11/96 and 12/98. All patients were >6 months from primary treatment with curative intent. Salvage therapy with curative intent was being contemplated in 18 patients. Conventional imaging was abnormal 61/63 patients, two others had recurrent symptoms only. Compared to conventional restaging, 33% of patients were down-staged, and 35% were upstaged by PET. PET led to more aggressive treatment than planned in 7 patients (11%), a change from planned curative to palliative treatment in 8 patients (13%) and 17 patients (27%) thought to have recurrent disease had no further investigation or treatment after negative PET studies. Cox proportional hazards analysis indicated that a positive PET scan had a hazard ratio of 2.95 (95% CI 1.038.50, p = 0.012) compared to negative PET. Extent of active disease on PET was also prognostically significant with each incremental extent category (no disease, local recurrence, limited locoregional, extensive locoregional and systemic) having an estimated 60% increase in the rate of death (95% Cl 24% to 107%, p<0.0001). Stage of disease at initial diagnosis, primary treatment used and disease extent on conventional restaging were not predictive of survival. Thus, PET provided a high impact on management for NSCLC patients with suspected recurrence and more accurate prognostic stratification than conventional staging. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  11. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian [Saarland University Medical School, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [German] Das Potenzial der intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IMRT) soll im Rahmen der FDG-PET basierten Bestrahlungsplanung des lokal fortgeschrittenen nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinoms (LA-NSCLC) fuer 2 Zielvolumenansaetze (Involved-Field-Bestrahlung, IF) sowie elektive Nodalbestrahlung (ENI) geprueft und mit der 3-D-konformalen Strahlentherapie (3-D

  12. Influence of Vitamins on Secondary Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Sera of Patients with Resectable NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Patrice

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Singlet oxygen (1O2 oxidizes targets through the production of secondary reactive oxygen species (SOS. Cancers induce oxidative stress changing with progression, the resulting antioxidant status differing from one patient to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the oxidative status of patients with resectable Non-Small cell lung cancers (NSCLC and the potential influence of antioxidants, compared to sera from healthy donors. Materials and Methods: Serum samples from 10 women and 28 men, 19 adenocarcinomas (ADK, 15 patients N1 or M1 were submitted to a photoreaction producing 1O2. Then, samples were supplemented with vitamins (Vit C, Vit E, or glutathione (GSH. Results: Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC and metastatic SCCs induced a lower SOS rate. While Vit C increased SOS in controls as in patients with metastases, Vit E or the combination of Vit E and C strongly reduced SOS. GSH alone lightly decreased SOS in controls but had no effect in patients either alone or combined with Vit C. Conclusion: In “early” lung cancers, SOS are comparable or lower than for healthy persons. The role of Vitamins varies with gender, cancer type, and metastases. This suggests that an eventual supplementation should be performed on a per-patient basis to evidence any effect.

  13. IMRT and 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without elective nodal irradiation in locally advanced NSCLC. A direct comparison of PET-based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleckenstein, Jochen; Kremp, Katharina; Kremp, Stephanie; Palm, Jan; Ruebe, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The potential of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as opposed to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) is analyzed for two different concepts of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)-based target volume delineation in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC): involved-field radiotherapy (IF-RT) vs. elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Treatment planning was performed for 41 patients with LA-NSCLC, using four different planning approaches (3D-CRT-IF, 3D-CRT-ENI, IMRT-IF, IMRT-ENI). ENI included a boost irradiation after 50 Gy. For each plan, maximum dose escalation was calculated based on prespecified normal tissue constraints. The maximum prescription dose (PD), tumor control probability (TCP), conformal indices (CI), and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) were analyzed. IMRT resulted in statistically significant higher prescription doses for both target volume concepts as compared with 3D-CRT (ENI: 68.4 vs. 60.9 Gy, p < 0.001; IF: 74.3 vs. 70.1 Gy, p < 0.03). With IMRT-IF, a PD of at least 66 Gy was achieved for 95 % of all plans. For IF as compared with ENI, there was a considerable theoretical increase in TCP (IMRT: 27.3 vs. 17.7 %, p < 0.00001; 3D-CRT: 20.2 vs. 9.9 %, p < 0.00001). The esophageal NTCP showed a particularly good sparing with IMRT vs. 3D-CRT (ENI: 12.3 vs. 30.9 % p < 0.0001; IF: 15.9 vs. 24.1 %; p < 0.001). The IMRT technique and IF target volume delineation allow a significant dose escalation and an increase in TCP. IMRT results in an improved sparing of OARs as compared with 3D-CRT at equivalent dose levels. (orig.) [de

  14. Developing and Validating a Survival Prediction Model for NSCLC Patients Through Distributed Learning Across 3 Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Arthur; Deist, Timo M; El Naqa, Issam; Kessler, Marc; Mayo, Chuck; Reeves, Jackson; Jolly, Shruti; Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall; van Soest, Johan; Oberije, Cary; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Price, Gareth; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2017-10-01

    Tools for survival prediction for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with chemoradiation or radiation therapy are of limited quality. In this work, we developed a predictive model of survival at 2 years. The model is based on a large volume of historical patient data and serves as a proof of concept to demonstrate the distributed learning approach. Clinical data from 698 lung cancer patients, treated with curative intent with chemoradiation or radiation therapy alone, were collected and stored at 2 different cancer institutes (559 patients at Maastro clinic (Netherlands) and 139 at Michigan university [United States]). The model was further validated on 196 patients originating from The Christie (United Kingdon). A Bayesian network model was adapted for distributed learning (the animation can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDJFOxpwqEA). Two-year posttreatment survival was chosen as the endpoint. The Maastro clinic cohort data are publicly available at https://www.cancerdata.org/publication/developing-and-validating-survival-prediction-model-nsclc-patients-through-distributed, and the developed models can be found at www.predictcancer.org. Variables included in the final model were T and N category, age, performance status, and total tumor dose. The model has an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.66 on the external validation set and an AUC of 0.62 on a 5-fold cross validation. A model based on the T and N category performed with an AUC of 0.47 on the validation set, significantly worse than our model (PLearning the model in a centralized or distributed fashion yields a minor difference on the probabilities of the conditional probability tables (0.6%); the discriminative performance of the models on the validation set is similar (P=.26). Distributed learning from federated databases allows learning of predictive models on data originating from multiple institutions while avoiding many of the data-sharing barriers. We believe that

  15. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  16. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR methods for ALK rearrangement in European NSCLC patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The reported prevalence of ALK rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2%-7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proven to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse transcriptase...

  17. Severe late esophagus toxicity in NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bois, Josien de; Heuvel, Michel van den; Belderbos, José

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: We reported the incidence of severe late esophagus toxicity (LET) in locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Acute esophagus toxicity (AET) and the dose to the esophagus were analyzed for their associations with severe LET. Material and methods: Two hundred and thirty-one patients treated from 2008 to 2011 with hypofractionated IMRT (66 Gy/24 fx) and concurrent daily low dose cisplatin were included. The association between AET and severe LET (grade ⩾3 RTOG/EORTC) was tested through Cox-proportional-hazards model. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the esophagus and the volume percentage receiving more than x Gy (V x ) were applied by Lyman–Kutcher–Burman (LKB) model. Results: A total of 171 patients were eligible for this study. Severe LET was observed in 6% patients. Both the maximum grade and the recovery rate of AET were significantly associated with severe LET. In the EUD n -LKB model, the fitted values and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were TD 50 = 76.1 Gy (73.2–78.6), m = 0.03 (0.02–0.06) and n = 0.03 (0–0.08). In the V x -LKB model, the fitted values and 95% CIs were Tx 50 = 23.5% (16.4–46.6), m = 0.44 (0.32–0.60) and x = 76.7 Gy (74.7–77.5). Conclusions: Severe AET, EUD (n = 0.03) and V76.7 to the esophagus were significantly associated with severe LET. An independent validation study is required

  18. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  19. Meta-Analysis on Pharmacogenetics of Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ji-Ye; Huang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine the pharmacogenetics of platinum-based chemotherapy in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Publications were selected from PubMed, Cochrane Library and ISI Web of Knowledge. A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the association between genetic polymorphisms and platinum-based chemotherapy by checking odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Data were extracted from 24 publications, which included 11 polymorphisms in 8 genes for meta-analysis. MDR1 C3435T (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.11–3.50, P = 0.02), G2677A/T (OR = 2.61, 95% CI: 1.44–4.74, P = 0.002) and GSTP1 A313G (OR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.17–0.58, P = 0.0002) were significantly correlated with platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients. Conclusion Attention should be paid to MDR1 C3435T, G2677A/T and GSTP1 A313G for personalized chemotherapy treatment for NSCLC patients in Asian population in the future. PMID:22761669

  20. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikaedo Sueli M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT, its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. Methods In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m2, on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years, younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m2 or 90 mg/m2, and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m2 or 70 mg/m2. We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Results Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4 was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7 weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8 weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%, with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Conclusion Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions.

  1. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, José Rodrigues; Martins, Sandro J; Nikaedo, Sueli M; Ikari, Flora K

    2004-01-01

    Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT), its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 , on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years), younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m 2 or 90 mg/m 2 ), and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m 2 or 70 mg/m 2 ). We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4) was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7) weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8) weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%), with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions

  2. P13.10 Intracranial response to nivolumab in NSCLC patients with untreated or progressing CNS metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, S.; Dudnik, E.; Perlov, E.; Zer, A.; Flex, D.; Peled, N.; Siegal, T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases occur in about 30% of patients (pts) with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Local treatment strategies (e.g., radiotherapy or surgery) result in delays in systemic therapy administration and are frequently associated with neurocognitive impairment. Nivolumab is an anti-PD1 immune check-point inhibitor which has been recently approved by the FDA as a second line treatment of NSCLC. Data regarding its intracranial activity is lacking. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed efficacy and safety of nivolumab administered intravenously at a dose of 3mg/kg q2 weeks in five pts with advanced NSCLC and new or progressing intracranial metastases which were diagnosed before or within 1 month after starting the treatment. Results: Pt baseline characteristics were as follows: median age 78y (range, 52–84); 2 males; 4 smokers; ECOG PS 0/1/2 - 2 pts/1 pt/2 pts; histological subtype: adenocarcinoma/ squamous-cell carcinoma/NSCLC NOS 3 pts /1 pt/1 pt; EGFR WT/ALK neg/KRAS M all/all/2 pts. Four pts had parenchymal brain metastases, three pts had leptomeningeal disease. All pts were asymptomatic and did not require corticosteroids or immediate brain irradiation. Dramatic response in the brain was observed in two pts (including 1 pt with leptomeningeal spread demonstrating a complete response in the CNS); time-to-response comprised 5 weeks and 9 weeks; all responses are still ongoing at the time of the report (18+ weeks, 19+ weeks). In one pt stabilization of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis for 10 weeks was achieved. Systemic responses and intracranial responses were largely concordant. No treatment-related or CNS-metastases related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed. Conclusions: Nivolumab has a promising intracranial activity and favorable safety profile in pts with NSCLC and untreated/progressing CNS metastases. Nivolumab CNS activity warrants further evaluation.

  3. Chemotherapy in the management of brain metastases: the emerging role of fotemustine for patients with melanoma and NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addeo, Raffaele; Zappavigna, Silvia; Luce, Amalia; Facchini, Sergio; Caraglia, Michele

    2013-09-01

    An estimated 20 - 40% of cancer patients will develop brain metastases that are the most common intracranial tumors in adults. Patients with cerebral metastases represent a variegate group where selection of the most appropriate treatment depends on many patient- and disease-related factors. The impact of therapeutic option on overall survival is lacking and it is important to consider quality of life (QOL) when treating patients with brain metastases. A considerable proportion of patients are treated with palliative approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy was limited in the past. Recently, several chemotherapeutic agents have been identified as potentially useful. This article examines the pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety and tolerability of fotemustine (FTM) for the management of patients with cerebral metastasis from melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). FTM is a third-generation nitrosourea that has proved its efficacy on brain metastases of melanoma and showed promising results for the treatment of brain metastasis of NSCLC because of its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Association between BIM deletion polymorphism and clinical outcome of EGFR-mutated NSCLC patient with EGFR-TKI therapy: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ji-Yong; Yan, Hai-Jun; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    BIM deletion polymorphism was deemed to be associated with downregulation of BIM, resulting in a decreased apoptosis induced by epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, accumulating evidences concerning the association between BIM deletion polymorphism and efficacy of EGFR-TKI and survival in EGFR-mutation-driven NSCLC patient reported contradictory results. A meta-analysis was conducted by combing six original eligible studies including 871 NSCLC patients. Our study showed that BIM deletion polymorphism was significantly associated with poor response to EGFR-TKI therapy in mutant EGFRNSCLC patients (P(h) = 0.309, P(z) = 0.001, OR = 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.23-0.67). Disease control rate (DCR) in mutant EGFRNSCLC patient with treatment of EGFR-TKI was significantly decreased in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism comparing to patients harbored BIM wild variant (P(h) = 0.583, P(Z) = 0.007, OR = 0.46, 95%CI = 0.25-0.85). EGFR mutation-derived NSCLC patient carrying BIM deletion polymorphism had a shorter progression-free survival (PFS; P(h) deletion polymorphism might be a cause that contributes to primary EGFR-TKI resistance, and it could be used as a genetic predictor for EGFR-TKI outcome and an independent prognostic factor of EGFR mutation-driven NSCLC patient.

  5. Acute esophagitis for patients with Local-regional Advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Y.; Brink, C.; Knap, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Esophagitis are one of the acute treatment related toxicities to definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC. Most current researches about the risk factors for acute esophagitis are based on 3DCRT. The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship between esophagitis...... though multivariable logistic regression. The optimal dose metrics were chosen using Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). All models included one dose position parameter, one dosimetric parameter, gender, and institution. Dose position was defined as the average relative position (zero at start...

  6. Metabolic tumor burden as marker of outcome in advanced EGFR wild-type NSCLC patients treated with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Larsen, Anne; Fledelius, Joan; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Accurate estimation of the prognosis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is essential before initiation of palliative treatment; especially in the second and third-line setting. This study was conducted in order to evaluate tumor burden measured on an 2'-deoxy-2...... a prospectively collected cohort. An F-18-FDG-PET/CT scan was conducted prior to erlotinib treatment and tumor burden was measured in terms of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Median values of MTV and TLG were used for dichotomization of patients. Survival outcome was compared...... between groups.RESULTS: MTV and TLG could be measured in 49 patients. High values of MTV and TLG were significantly correlated with shorter PFS (p

  7. Systematic mediastinal lymphadenectomy or mediastinal lymph node sampling in patients with pathological stage I NSCLC: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Siyuan; Du, Jiang; Li, Wenya; Zhang, Shuguang; Zhong, Xinwen; Zhang, Lin

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the evidence comparing systematic mediastinal lymphadenectomy (SML) and mediastinal lymph node sampling (MLS) in the treatment of pathological stage I NSCLC using meta-analytical techniques. A literature search was undertaken until January 2014 to identify the comparative studies evaluating 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates. The pooled odds ratios (OR) and the 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) were calculated with either the fixed or random effect models. One RCT study and four retrospective studies were included in our meta-analysis. These studies included a total of 711 patients: 317 treated with SML, and 394 treated with MLS. The SML and the MLS did not demonstrate a significant difference in the 1-year survival rate. There were significant statistical differences between the 3-year (P = 0.03) and 5-year survival rates (P = 0.004), which favored SML. This meta-analysis suggests that in pathological stage I NSCLC, the MLS can get the similar outcome to the SML in terms of 1-year survival rate. However, the SML is superior to MLS in terms of 3- and 5-year survival rates.

  8. Improved progression free survival for patients with diabetes and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using metformin during concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, Krista C. J.; Belderbos, José S. A.; Dieleman, Edith M. T.; Rossi, Maddalena; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Damhuis, Ronald A. M.; Houben, Ruud M. A.; Troost, Esther G. C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the use of metformin during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improved treatment outcome. A total of 682 patients were included in this retrospective cohort study (59 metformin users, 623 control patients).

  9. TU-F-12A-05: Sensitivity of Textural Features to 3D Vs. 4D FDG-PET/CT Imaging in NSCLC Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, F; Nyflot, M; Bowen, S; Kinahan, P; Sandison, G [University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Neighborhood Gray-level difference matrices (NGLDM) based texture parameters extracted from conventional (3D) 18F-FDG PET scans in patients with NSCLC have been previously shown to associate with response to chemoradiation and poorer patient outcome. However, the change in these parameters when utilizing respiratory-correlated (4D) FDG-PET scans has not yet been characterized for NSCLC. The Objectives: of this study was to assess the extent to which NGLDM-based texture parameters on 4D PET images vary with reference to values derived from 3D scans in NSCLC. Methods: Eight patients with newly diagnosed NSCLC treated with concomitant chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. 4D PET scans were reconstructed with OSEM-IR in 5 respiratory phase-binned images and corresponding CT data of each phase were employed for attenuation correction. NGLDM-based texture features, consisting of coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity and strength, were evaluated for gross tumor volumes defined on 3D/4D PET scans by radiation oncologists. Variation of the obtained texture parameters over the respiratory cycle were examined with respect to values extracted from 3D scans. Results: Differences between texture parameters derived from 4D scans at different respiratory phases and those extracted from 3D scans ranged from −30% to 13% for coarseness, −12% to 40% for contrast, −5% to 50% for busyness, −7% to 38% for complexity, and −43% to 20% for strength. Furthermore, no evident correlations were observed between respiratory phase and 4D scan texture parameters. Conclusion: Results of the current study showed that NGLDM-based texture parameters varied considerably based on choice of 3D PET and 4D PET reconstruction of NSCLC patient images, indicating that standardized image acquisition and analysis protocols need to be established for clinical studies, especially multicenter clinical trials, intending to validate prognostic values of texture features for NSCLC.

  10. Maximal Oxygen Uptake--Risk Predictor of NSCLC Resection in Patients With Comorbid Emphysema: Lessons From NETT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makey, Ian; Berger, Robert L; Cabral, Howard J; Celli, Bartolome; Folch, Erik; Whyte, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We compared VO2 max values from ACCP Guidelines and from NETT's homogenous NULPD surrogate for predicting operative mortalities. Estimated mid and long-term non-cancer related survival in NETT's subset was also obtained. NETT and ACCP Guideline VO2 max values were similar in the "low" and "mid" risk operative mortality categories but NETT's "high" risk subset showed lower mortality (14% vs. 26%). Estimated non-cancer related survival in NETT "low", "mid" and "high" risk VO2 max categories at two and eight years were 100%, 74%, 59% and 48%, 26%, 14%, respectively. The lower predicted risk in NETT's "high- risk" subset raises the possibility of extending indications for potential curative resection in selected patients. The NETT surrogate also provides hitherto unavailable estimate on long-term non-cancer related survival after potential curative resection of NSCLC and suggests that the operation does not shorten eight-year longevity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The APPLE Trial: Feasibility and Activity of AZD9291 (Osimertinib) Treatment on Positive PLasma T790M in EGFR-mutant NSCLC Patients. EORTC 1613.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remon, Jordi; Menis, Jessica; Hasan, Baktiar; Peric, Aleksandra; De Maio, Eleonora; Novello, Silvia; Reck, Martin; Berghmans, Thierry; Wasag, Bartosz; Besse, Benjamin; Dziadziuszko, Rafal

    2017-09-01

    The AZD9291 (Osimertinib) Treatment on Positive PLasma T790M in EGFR-mutant NSCLC Patients (APPLE) trial is a randomized, open-label, multicenter, 3-arm, phase II study in advanced, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-naive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, to evaluate the best strategy for sequencing gefitinib and osimertinib treatment. Advanced EGFR-mutant NSCLC patients, with World Health Organization performance status 0-2 who are EGFR TKI treatment-naive and eligible to receive first-line treatment with EGFR TKI will be randomized to: In all arms, a plasmatic ctDNA T790M test will be performed by a central laboratory at the Medical University of Gdansk (Poland) but will be applied as a predictive marker for making treatment decisions only in arm B. The primary objective is to evaluate the best strategy for sequencing of treatment with gefitinib and osimertinib in advanced NSCLC patients with common EGFR mutations, and to understand the value of liquid biopsy for the decision-making process. The progression-free survival rate at 18 months is the primary end point of the trial. The activity of osimertinib versus gefitinib to prevent brain metastases will be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Favorable prognosis of operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring an increased expression of tumor endothelial markers (TEMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pircher, Andreas; Fiegl, Michael; Untergasser, Gerold; Heidegger, Isabel; Medinger, Michael; Kern, Johann; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Genome analyses of endothelial cells identified genes specifically expressed by tumor endothelial cells, called tumor endothelial markers (TEMs). Currently there are no data available concerning the role of TEMs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of TEMs in NSCLC in vitro and in vivo. First we evaluated the expression of various TEMs (Robo4, Clec14 and ECSCR) by qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, Calu1, Colo699) and compared them to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) and human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs). Next the expression of TEMs was measured in resected tumor tissue of NSCLC patients (n = 63) by qRT-PCR and compared to adjacent non-cancerous lung tissue (n = 52). Further, immunohistochemical analysis of Robo4 expression in tumor tissue (n = 33) and adjacent non-cancerous tissue (n = 27) was performed. We found that NSCLC cell lines and HBEpC did not express TEMs on the mRNA level compared to HUVECs (p = 0.001). In the contrary, a significant up-regulation of Robo4 and Clec14 was found in tumor samples (Robo4 p = 0.03, Clec14 p = 0.002). Both facts clearly indicate that these proteins are allocated to the tumor stromal department. Correlation with clinical data showed that increased TEM expression correlated with prolonged overall survival of operated NSCLC patients (Robo4 high 120.5 vs. Robo4 low 47.6 months, Clec14 high 108.1 vs. Clec14 low 54.5 months and ECSCR high 120.5 vs. ECSCR low 42.2 months). In summary, we found that TEMs are overexpressed in NSCLC stromal tissue and that an increased TEM expression correlated with an increased overall survival in early stage NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, J; Kirişli, H A; Fechter, T; Karnitzki, S; Oehlke, O; Nestle, U; Vermandel, M; Massoptier, L

    2016-05-01

    Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy has

  14. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolz, J.; Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L.; Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U.; Vermandel, M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  15. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolz, J., E-mail: jose.dolz.upv@gmail.com [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120, France and University Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U1189–ONCO-THAI–Image Assisted Laser Therapy for Oncology, Lille F-59000 (France); Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L. [AQUILAB, Loos-les-Lille 59120 (France); Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center, Freiburg 79106 (Germany); Vermandel, M. [Inserm Onco Thai U1189, Université Lille 2, CHRU Lille, Lille 59037 (France)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate delineation of organs at risk (OARs) on computed tomography (CT) image is required for radiation treatment planning (RTP). Manual delineation of OARs being time consuming and prone to high interobserver variability, many (semi-) automatic methods have been proposed. However, most of them are specific to a particular OAR. Here, an interactive computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs required for thoracic radiation therapy is introduced. Methods: Segmentation information (foreground and background seeds) is interactively added by the user in any of the three main orthogonal views of the CT volume and is subsequently propagated within the whole volume. The proposed method is based on the combination of watershed transformation and graph-cuts algorithm, which is used as a powerful optimization technique to minimize the energy function. The OARs considered for thoracic radiation therapy are the lungs, spinal cord, trachea, proximal bronchus tree, heart, and esophagus. The method was evaluated on multivendor CT datasets of 30 patients. Two radiation oncologists participated in the study and manual delineations from the original RTP were used as ground truth for evaluation. Results: Delineation of the OARs obtained with the minimally interactive approach was approved to be usable for RTP in nearly 90% of the cases, excluding the esophagus, which segmentation was mostly rejected, thus leading to a gain of time ranging from 50% to 80% in RTP. Considering exclusively accepted cases, overall OARs, a Dice similarity coefficient higher than 0.7 and a Hausdorff distance below 10 mm with respect to the ground truth were achieved. In addition, the interobserver analysis did not highlight any statistically significant difference, at the exception of the segmentation of the heart, in terms of Hausdorff distance and volume difference. Conclusions: An interactive, accurate, fast, and easy-to-use computer-assisted system able to segment various OARs

  16. FOCUS ON NIVOLUMAB IN NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Luigi Cortinovis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is changing the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab has demonstrated meaningful results in terms of efficacy with a good safety profile. The novel approach of treating NSCLC using immunotherapy has still unsolved questions and challenging issues in regard to the optimal selection of the patient, its role in first line of treatment, the individualization of the correct methodology of radiologic assessment and efficacy analysis, the best management of immunomediated adverse events, and how to overcome the immunoresistance.

  17. ERCC1, toxicity and quality of life in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicentre phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2010-01-01

    Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited.......Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited....

  18. Combination of paclitaxel and bevacizumab in heavily pre-treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: a case series study on 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Hadoux, Julien; Gontier, Eric; Chargari, Cyrus; Helissey, Carole; Lamand, Virginie; Tanz, Rachid; Farace, Françoise; Vedrine, Lionel; Bonardel, Gérald; Soria, Jean-Charles; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The combination of paclitaxel and bevacizumab was EMA-approved as first-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Moreover, in vitro studies showed a potential antiangiogenic synergistic effect of paclitaxel and bevacizumab. Between November 2008 and March 2010, this case series study included 15 patients with metastatic non squamous-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Those were bevacizumab eligible and received the same regimen used in metastatic breast cancer with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2), days 1, 8 and 15) and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg at days 1 and 15) after at least one prior line of chemotherapy. Efficacy was evaluated by CT-scan and PET-FDG every two months. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and circulating endothelial cells (CEC) levels were explored in a subset of patients. Median age 56 (36-75), female: 47%, never smokers: 27%, adenocarcinoma: 100%, PS 0-1: 87% and PS 3: 13%. All patients were treated with a first-line platinum-based doublet with or without bevacizumab and 70% of them with erlotinib in the second-line. No major toxicity was observed. Partial response (PR) rate was 44% (31-63%) using RECIST criteria on CT-scan, and 65% (29-88%) with PET FDG. PS improved in 33% of the cases. Median progression free survival was 4.6 months. An increase of CEC and CEP was observed in patients with NSCLC treated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab. In this retrospective series, our results suggest efficacy signal in pre-treated metastatic NSCLC and warrant further assessment in a randomized clinical trial.

  19. Evaluation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Related Events as Prognostic Factors and Surrogate Biomarkers in Advanced NSCLC Patients Receiving First-Line Systemic Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Muinelo-Romay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the prognostic value of Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC and their utility for therapy monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. A total of 43 patients newly diagnosed with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before the 1st, 2nd and 5th cycles of chemotherapy and analyzed using CellSearch technology. Both CTC and CTC-related objects (not morphological standard or broken epithelial cells were counted. At baseline 18 (41.9% patients were positive for intact CTC count and 10 (23.2% of them had ≥5 CTC, while CK positive events were found in 79.1% of patients. The group of patients with CTC ³5 at baseline presented worse PFS and OS than those with <5 CTC (p = 0.034 and p = 0.008, respectively. Additionally, high levels of total CK positive events were associated with poor prognosis in the group of patients with <5 CTC. Regarding therapy monitoring, patients presenting increased levels of CTC during the treatment demonstrated lower OS and PFS rates. All these data supported the value of CTC as a prognostic biomarker and as a surrogate indicator of chemotherapy effectiveness in advanced NSCLC patients, with the additional value of analyzing other “objects” such as apoptotic CTC or CK fragments to guide the clinical management of these patients.

  20. The effectiveness of RECIST on survival in patients with NSCLC receiving chemotherapy with or without target agents as first-line treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Zheng, Lie; Hu, Zhihuang; Zhang, Yang; Fang, Wenfeng; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Ge, Jieying; Zhao, Hongyun; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-08

    We analyzed the correlation between survival and antitumor effect evaluated by RECIST in advanced NSCLC patients with chemotherapy plus target therapy or not as first-line treatment, to examine the applicability of RECIST in this population. The patients were screened from 4 clinical trials (12621, 12006, FASTACT-I, and FASTACT-II), and those who received chemotherapy plus target therapy or chemotherapy alone were eligible. Among the 59 enrolled patients, 29 received combination therapy, while the other 30 received chemotherapy only. In the combination therapy group, patients with PR or SD had longer overall survival (OS) than those with PD (P chemotherapy alone group, compared with PD patients, either PR or SD group had no significant overall survival benefit (P = 0.690 and P = 0.528, respectively). In summary, for advanced NSCLC patients receiving chemotherapy plus target therapy as first-line treatment and evaluated by RECIST criteria, SD has the same overall survival benefit as PR, suggesting that antitumor effective evaluation by RECIST criteria cannot be translated to overall survival benefit especially for this kind of patients. Therefore, developing a more comprehensive evaluation method to perfect RECIST criteria is thus warranted for patients received target therapy in NSCLC.

  1. Evaluation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Related Events as Prognostic Factors and Surrogate Biomarkers in Advanced NSCLC Patients Receiving First-Line Systemic Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Vieito, Maria; Abalo, Alicia; Alonso Nocelo, Marta; Barón, Francisco; Anido, Urbano; Brozos, Elena; Vázquez, Francisca; Aguín, Santiago; Abal, Miguel; López López, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.lopez.lopez@sergas.es [Translational Medical Oncology, Health Research Institute of Santiago (IDIS), Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago de Compostela (SERGAS), Trav. Choupana s/n 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2014-01-21

    In the present study we investigated the prognostic value of Circulating Tumour Cells (CTC) and their utility for therapy monitoring in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 43 patients newly diagnosed with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before the 1st, 2nd and 5th cycles of chemotherapy and analyzed using CellSearch technology. Both CTC and CTC-related objects (not morphological standard or broken epithelial cells) were counted. At baseline 18 (41.9%) patients were positive for intact CTC count and 10 (23.2%) of them had ≥5 CTC, while CK positive events were found in 79.1% of patients. The group of patients with CTC ≥5 at baseline presented worse PFS and OS than those with <5 CTC (p = 0.034 and p = 0.008, respectively). Additionally, high levels of total CK positive events were associated with poor prognosis in the group of patients with <5 CTC. Regarding therapy monitoring, patients presenting increased levels of CTC during the treatment demonstrated lower OS and PFS rates. All these data supported the value of CTC as a prognostic biomarker and as a surrogate indicator of chemotherapy effectiveness in advanced NSCLC patients, with the additional value of analyzing other “objects” such as apoptotic CTC or CK fragments to guide the clinical management of these patients.

  2. Clinical features and treatment outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with uncommon or complex epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassan, Matteo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Favaretto, Adolfo; Bonanno, Laura; Polo, Valentina; Zago, Giulia; Lunardi, Francesca; Attili, Ilaria; Pavan, Alberto; Rugge, Massimo; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, PierFranco; Pasello, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent the best treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with common exon 19 deletion or exon 21 epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFRm). This is an observational study investigating epidemiology, clinical features and treatment outcome of NSCLC cases harbouring rare/complex EGFRm. Results Among 764 non-squamous NSCLC cases with known EGFRm status, 26(3.4%) harboured rare/complex EGFRm. Patients receiving first-line TKIs (N = 17) achieved median Progression Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) of 53 (IC 95%, 2–105) and 84 (CI 95%, 27–141) weeks respectively, without significant covariate impact. Response Rate and Disease Control Rate (DCR) were 47% and 65%, respectively. Uncommon exon 19 mutations achieved longer OS and PFS and higher DCR compared with exon 18 and 20 mutations. No additional gene mutation was discovered by MassARRAY analysis. TKIs were globally well tolerated. Materials and methods A retrospective review of advanced non-squamous NSCLC harbouring rare/complex EGFRm referred to our Center between 2010 and 2015 was performed. Additional molecular pathways disregulation was explored in selected cases, through MassARRAY analysis. Conclusions Peculiar clinical features and lower TKIs sensitivity of uncommon/complex compared with common EGFRm were shown. Exon 19 EGFRm achieved the best TKIs treatment outcome, while the optimal treatment of exon 18 and 20 mutations should be further clarified. PMID:28427238

  3. Treatment paradigms for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, squamous lung cancer: first, second and third-line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz eAl Farsi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the treatment algorithm applied to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the same for all histologic subtypes. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular profiles of squamous and non-squamous NSCLC have changed this perspective. Histologic subtype and the presence of specific molecular abnormalities have predictive value for response to and toxicity from therapy, as well as overall survival. For patients with squamous NSCLC, a platinum agent plus gemcitabine, or paclitaxel is recommended as first-line therapy. The role of EGFR monoclonal antibodies is uncertain. Maintenance therapy is not widely recommended, although data exist for the use of erlotinib. The standard recommendation for second-line therapy is docetaxel and erlotinib should be considered as second or third-line therapy. There is ongoing research identifying molecular targets in squamous NSCLC and many agents are in early phase clinical trials. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting programmed death 1 receptor (PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1 appear promising.

  4. Positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with survival rates of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujin; Wang, Liancong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yuezhen; Lai, Xiaojing; Li, Jianqiang

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic and predictive importance of p53, c-erbB2 and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) expression and its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins in 152 tumor samples from resected primary NSCLCs was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of proteins, survival and clinicopathological characteristics was investigated in 152 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. The positive rates of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression were 53.9 (82/152), 44.1 (67/152) and 43.4% (66/152), respectively. Overall survival rates of patients were markedly correlated with the overexpression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins. One, 2- and 3-year survival rates of patients exhibiting a positive expression of these proteins were 72.6, 54.8 and 32.2%, respectively. These rates were lower compared with those of patients with a negative expression of these proteins (92.1, 78.5 and 63.4%) (P=0.02, 0.01 or 0.00, respectively). Results of Cox's regression analysis showed that c-erbB2 expression and cell differentiation were independent prognostic factors in patients with NSCLC. These findings suggest that the positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with the survival rates of NSCLC patients. Detection of positive p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression may be a useful predictive indicator of prognosis. Positive c-erbB2 expression is an independent prognostic factor, with a potential to be used as a predictive indicator of chemotherapy efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  5. Mathematical modeling for Phase I cancer trials: A study of metronomic vinorelbine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlesi, Fabrice; Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; Tomasini, Pascale; Greillier, Laurent; Galloux, Melissa; Testot-Ferry, Albane; Garcia, Mélanie; Elharrar, Xavier; Pelletier, Annick; André, Nicolas; Mascaux, Céline; Lacarelle, Bruno; Cheikh, Raouf El; Serre, Raphaël; Ciccolini, Joseph; Barbolosi, Dominique

    2017-07-18

    Using mathematical modelling allows to select a treatment's regimen across infinite possibilities. Here, we report the phase I assessment of a new schedule for metronomic vinorelbine in treating refractory advanced NSCLC and mesothelioma patients. Overall, 13 patients were screened and 12 were treated (50% male, median age: 68yrs), including 9 NSCLC patients. All patients received at least one week (3 doses) of treatment. At data cut-off, the median length of treatment was 6.5 weeks (1-32+). All the patients presented with at least one adverse event (AE) and six patients with a severe AE (SAE). One partial response and 5 stable diseases were observed. The median OS was 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.8 to 12 months). The median and mean vinorelbine's AUC were 122 ng/ml*h and 159 ng/ml*h, respectively, with the higher plasmatic vinorelbine exposure associated with the best ORR (difference of AUC comparison between responders and non-responders, p-value 0.017). The mathematical modelling determined the administration of vinorelbine, 60 mg on Day 1, 30 mg on Day 2 and 60 mg on Day 4 weekly until progression, as the best schedule. Advanced NSCLC or mesothelioma patients progressing after standard treatment were eligible for the trial. NCT02555007. Responses with acceptable safety profile were observed in heavily pretreated NSCLC and mesothelioma patients using oral vinorelbine at this metronomic dosage based on a mathematic modeling. This study demonstrates the feasibility of this new type of approach, as mathematical modeling may help to rationally decide the better regimen to be clinically tested across infinite possibilities.

  6. Preoperative high-intensity training in frail old patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvi Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic surgery remains the better therapeutic option for non-small cell lung cancer patients that are diagnosed in early stage disease. Preoperative lung function assessment includes respiratory function tests (RFT and cardio-pulmonary exercise testing (CPET. Vo2 peak, FEV1 and DLCO as well as recognition of performance status, presence of co-morbidities, frailty indexes, and age predict the potential impact of surgical resection on patient health status and survival risk. In this study we have retrospectively assessed the benefit of a high-intensity preoperative pulmonary rehabilitation program (PRP in 14 patients with underlying lung function impairment prior to surgery. Amongst these, three patients candidate to surgical resection exhibited severe functional impairment associated with high score of frailty according CHS and SOF index, resulting in a substantial mortality risk.

  7. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Methods: Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using F-18-FDG PET/CT ...

  8. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2014-01-01

    in mediastinum, and the thorax wall. The dose was escalated using a TCP model implemented into the planning system. The difference in TCP values between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous plans were evaluated using two different TCP models. RESULTS: Dose escalation was possible for all patients. TCP values based...... to the mediastinum were observed: 2.5 Gy for aorta, 4.4 Gy for the connective tissue, 1.6 Gy for the heart, and 2.6 Gy for trachea + bronchi. CONCLUSION: Increased target doses and TCP values using inhomogeneous dose distributions could be achieved for all patients, regardless of lymph node involvement, tumour stage...

  9. Final toxicity results of a radiation-dose escalation study in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Predictors for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Arenberg, Douglas; Lyons, Susan; Turrisi, Andrew; Lichter, Allen; Fraass, Benedick; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to report the final toxicity results on a radiation-dose escalation trial designed to test a hypothesis that very high doses of radiation could be safely administered to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by quantifying the dose-volume toxicity relationship of the lung. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 patients with unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC were enrolled and treated with radiation-dose escalation (on the basis of predicted normal-lung toxicity) either alone or with neoadjuvant chemotherapy by use of 3D conformal techniques. Eighty-four patients (77%) received more than 69 Gy, the trial was stopped after the dose reached 103 Gy. Estimated median follow-up was 110 months. Results: There were 17 (14.6%) Grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis and 15 (13.8%) Grade 2 to 3 fibrosis and no Grade 4 to 5 lung toxicity. Multivariate analyses showed them to be (1) not associated with the dose prescribed to the tumor, and (2) significantly (p < 0.001) associated with lung-dosimetric parameters such as the mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung that received at least 20 Gy (V20), and the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the lung. If cutoffs are 30% for V20, 20 Gy for MLD, and 10% for NTCP, these factors have positive predictive values of 50% to 71% and negative predictive value of 85% to 89%. Conclusions: With long-term follow-up for toxicity, we have demonstrated that much higher doses of radiation than are traditionally administered can be safely delivered to a majority of patients with NSCLC. Quantitative lung dose-volume toxicity-based dose escalation can form the basis for individualized high-dose radiation treatment to maximize the therapeutic ratio in these patients

  10. Cost-effectiveness analysis of EGFR mutation testing in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Anaya, Pablo; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Polanco, Ana C

    2016-09-01

    Assess the cost-effectiveness of an EGFR-mutation testing strategy for advanced NSCLC in first-line therapy with either gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel in Mexican institutions. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a discrete event simulation (DES) model to simulate two therapeutic strategies in patients with advanced NSCLC. Strategy one included patients tested for EGFR-mutation and therapy given accordingly. Strategy two included chemotherapy for all patients without testing. All results are presented in 2014 US dollars. The analysis was made with data from the Mexican frequency of EGFR-mutation. A univariate sensitivity analysis was conducted on EGFR prevalence. Progression-free survival (PFS) transition probabilities were estimated on data from the IPASS and simulated with a Weibull distribution, run with parallel trials to calculate a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. PFS of patients in the testing strategy was 6.76 months (95 % CI 6.10-7.44) vs 5.85 months (95 % CI 5.43-6.29) in the non-testing group. The one-way sensitivity analysis showed that PFS has a direct relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence, while the ICER and testing cost have an inverse relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that all iterations had incremental costs and incremental PFS for strategy 1 in comparison with strategy 2. There is a direct relationship between the ICER and the cost of EGFR testing, with an inverse relationship with the prevalence of EGFR-mutation. When prevalence is >10 % ICER remains constant. This study could impact Mexican and Latin American health policies regarding mutation detection testing and treatment for advanced NSCLC.

  11. Small suitability of the DLEC1, MLH1 and TUSC4 mRNA expression analysis as potential prognostic or differentiating markers for NSCLC patients in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordiak, Jacek; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Antczak, Adam; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Nawrot, Ewa; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    According to the latest data, lung cancer is one of the most common cancer worldwide, men contributing nearly 21.2% and women 8.6% of all diagnosed cancers. Late detection of tumour drastically reduces the chance for a cure. Thus, it is important to search for candidate biomarkers for screening of early stage nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Tumour suppressor genes, DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1, localized on 3p21 are recognized to play a role in NSCLC carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 mRNA expression, and clinical features of NSCLC patients, tobacco addiction, and tumour histopathological characteristics. The DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression was analysed in lung tumour tissue samples obtained from 69 patients diagnosed with NSCLC: squamous cell carcinoma (n = 34), adenocarcinoma (n = 24), large cell carcinoma (n = 5), carcinoma adenosquamosum (n = 5). A decreased gene expression (RQ MLH1 in 50.7% and for TUSC4 in 26% of NSCLC samples. DLEC1 was decreased in more aggressive subtypes: large cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma-squamous cell carcinoma. The simultaneous downregulation of two of the studied genes, DLEC1 andMLH1,was observed in 30.4% of NSCLCsamples, highlighting the importance of these two genes in lung carcinogenesis. We found no correlation between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 gene expression and NSCLC patient characteristics (gender, age and smoking) or cancer histopathology. No significant differences in the gene expression among NSCLC subtypes indicate the weakness of DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression analysis as potential differentiating markers of NSCLC subtypes in the Polish population.

  12. Prevalence and clinical association of MET gene overexpression and amplification in patients with NSCLC: Results from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform (ETOP) Lungscape project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubendorf, Lukas; Dafni, Urania; Schöbel, Martin; Finn, Stephen P; Tischler, Verena; Sejda, Aleksandra; Marchetti, Antonio; Thunnissen, Erik; Verbeken, Eric K; Warth, Arne; Sansano, Irene; Cheney, Richard; Speel, Ernst Jan M; Nonaka, Daisuke; Monkhorst, Kim; Hager, Henrik; Martorell, Miguel; Savic, Spasenija; Kerr, Keith M; Tan, Qiang; Tsourti, Zoi; Geiger, Thomas R; Kammler, Roswitha; Schulze, Katja; Das-Gupta, Ashis; Shames, David; Peters, Solange; Stahel, Rolf A

    2017-09-01

    In a well-defined NSCLC cohort of the ETOP Lungscape program, we explored the epidemiology of IHC MET overexpression and amplification, their inter-correlation, and their association to outcome. Resected NSCLC were assessed for MET gene copy number (GCN) and expression using silver in-situ hybridization (SISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) on TMAs in a multicenter setting. MET amplification was defined as MET/centromere ratio≥2 (with average MET GCN≥4), high MET GCN as CGN≥5 and MET IHC+ as ≥2+ intensity in ≥50% of tumor cells. A total of 182 MET IHC+ and EGFR/KRAS WT tumors were analyzed for METex14 skipping mutation. MET IHC+ was found in 23.8% of 2432 patients, significantly associated with female gender, small tumor size, and adenocarcinoma histology. We observed a high inter-laboratory variability in IHC and SISH analysis. MET amplification prevailed in 4.6% and MET GCN≥5 in 4.1% of 1572 patients. MET amplification and MET GCN≥5 were not significantly associated with any tumor characteristics or stage. Both were significantly associated with IHC MET positivity (poverexpression, SISH MET amplification or high MET GCN was found with OS, RFS or TTR. MET overexpression is found in 23.8% of surgically resected NSCLC. MET amplification prevails in 4.6% and is associated with MET overexpression. Both have no influence on prognosis. The large inter-laboratory variability in IHC highlights the challenge of MET IHC analysis in routine practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Incidental Prophylactic Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Nodal Relapse in Inoperable Early Stage NSCLC Patients Treated With SBRT: A Case-Matched Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Louis [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hope, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Maganti, Manjula [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Giuliani, Meredith; Sun, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, B. C. John, E-mail: john.cho@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Reported rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nodal failure following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are lower than those reported in the surgical series when matched for stage. We hypothesized that this effect was due to incidental prophylactic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients from 2004 to 2010 was used to identify cases with nodal relapses. Controls were matched to cases, 2:1, controlling for tumor volume (ie, same or greater) and tumor location (ie, same lobe). Reference (normalized to equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions [EQD2]) point doses at the ipsilateral hilum and carina, demographic data, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the medical records. Univariate conditional logistical regression analyses were performed with variables of interest. Results: Cases and controls were well matched except for size. The controls, as expected, had larger gross tumor volumes (P=.02). The mean ipsilateral hilar doses were 9.6 Gy and 22.4 Gy for cases and controls, respectively (P=.014). The mean carinal doses were 7.0 Gy and 9.2 Gy, respectively (P=.13). Mediastinal nodal relapses, with and without ipsilateral hilar relapse, were associated with mean ipsilateral hilar doses of 3.6 Gy and 19.8 Gy, respectively (P=.01). The conditional density plot appears to demonstrate an inverse dose-effect relationship between ipsilateral hilar normalized total dose and risk of ipsilateral hilar relapse. Conclusions: Incidental hilar dose greater than 20 Gy is significantly associated with fewer ipsilateral hilar relapses in inoperable early stage NSCLC patients treated with SBRT.

  14. Incidental Prophylactic Nodal Irradiation and Patterns of Nodal Relapse in Inoperable Early Stage NSCLC Patients Treated With SBRT: A Case-Matched Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lao, Louis; Hope, Andrew J.; Maganti, Manjula; Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Giuliani, Meredith; Sun, Alexander; Cho, B. C. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Reported rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) nodal failure following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) are lower than those reported in the surgical series when matched for stage. We hypothesized that this effect was due to incidental prophylactic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients from 2004 to 2010 was used to identify cases with nodal relapses. Controls were matched to cases, 2:1, controlling for tumor volume (ie, same or greater) and tumor location (ie, same lobe). Reference (normalized to equivalent dose for 2-Gy fractions [EQD2]) point doses at the ipsilateral hilum and carina, demographic data, and clinical outcomes were extracted from the medical records. Univariate conditional logistical regression analyses were performed with variables of interest. Results: Cases and controls were well matched except for size. The controls, as expected, had larger gross tumor volumes (P=.02). The mean ipsilateral hilar doses were 9.6 Gy and 22.4 Gy for cases and controls, respectively (P=.014). The mean carinal doses were 7.0 Gy and 9.2 Gy, respectively (P=.13). Mediastinal nodal relapses, with and without ipsilateral hilar relapse, were associated with mean ipsilateral hilar doses of 3.6 Gy and 19.8 Gy, respectively (P=.01). The conditional density plot appears to demonstrate an inverse dose-effect relationship between ipsilateral hilar normalized total dose and risk of ipsilateral hilar relapse. Conclusions: Incidental hilar dose greater than 20 Gy is significantly associated with fewer ipsilateral hilar relapses in inoperable early stage NSCLC patients treated with SBRT

  15. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  16. A comparison of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR for measuring plasma EGFR T790M mutations of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qin; Gai, Fei; Sang, Yaxiong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Ping; Wang, Yue; Liu, Bing; Lin, Dongmei; Yu, Yang; Fang, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The AURA3 clinical trial has shown that advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR T790M mutations in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) could benefit from osimertinib. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR System platform for the detection of plasma EGFR T790M mutations in NSCLC patients, and compare the performances of 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR. A total of 119 Chinese patients were enrolled in this study. Mutant allele frequency of plasma EGFR T790M was detected by 3D Digital PCR, then 25 selected samples were verified by ARMS-PCR and four of them were verified by next generation sequencing (NGS). In total, 52.94% (69/119) had EGFR T790M mutations detected by 3D Digital PCR. In 69 positive samples, the median mutant allele frequency (AF) was 1.09% and three cases presented low concentration (AF Digital PCR) was identified as T790M- by ARMS-PCR. Four samples were identified as T790M+ by both NGS and 3D Digital PCR, and typically three samples (3/4) presented at a low ratio (AF Digital PCR is a novel method with high sensitivity and specificity to detect EGFR T790M mutation in plasma.

  17. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  18. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  19. MO19390 (SAiL): bleeding events in a phase IV study of first-line bevacizumab with chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansin, Eric; Cinieri, Saverio; Garrido, Pilar; Griesinger, Frank; Isla, Dolores; Koehler, Manfred; Kohlhaeufl, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The clinical benefit and safety profile associated with first-line bevacizumab with doublet chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was established in two large phase III studies, E4599 and AVAiL. SAiL, a single-arm phase IV study, was conducted to evaluate bevacizumab with a range of first-line chemotherapy regimens in a routine oncology practice setting. This analysis of the SAiL data was undertaken to specifically evaluate bleeding adverse events (AEs) in this study, and to explore potential associations between bleeding and baseline patient and disease characteristics. In total, 2212 patients were evaluated. Bleeding AEs (any grade) occurred in 38.2% of patients (grade ≥ 3 bleeding AEs: 3.6%). Grade ≥ 3 pulmonary hemorrhage and central nervous system bleeding events were observed in 0.7% and 0.1% of patients, respectively. The incidence of grade ≥ 3 bleeding AEs was comparable across patient subgroups defined by central tumor location, tumor cavitation, histology, concomitant anticoagulation therapy and age. The majority (88.6%) of bleeding events resolved or improved, 10.2% persisted and 1.3% led to death; 10.2% of bleeding events required bevacizumab interruption or discontinuation. This analysis from the SAiL trial reaffirms a comparable incidence of clinically significant bleeding associated with first-line bevacizumab and chemotherapy as previous phase III studies in NSCLC patients despite less stringent first-line selection criteria. Grade ≥ 3 bleeding appears to be comparable when analyzed for patient and tumor characteristics, including tumor cavitation and concomitant anticoagulation therapy. Most bleeding events resolved or improved, and interruption/discontinuation of bevacizumab was infrequent in a standard oncology practice setting. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Phase I study of icotinib hydrochloride (BPI-2009H), an oral EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced NSCLC and other solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiong; Shentu, Jianzhong; Xu, Nong; Zhou, Jianya; Yang, Guangdie; Yao, Yinan; Tan, Fenlai; Liu, Dongyang; Wang, Yingxiang; Zhou, Jianying

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the safety and tolerability of icotinib hydrochloride (BPI-2009H), a new selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR TKI), and to explore its pharmacokinetics (PK) and clinical activity in patients with advanced solid tumors, mainly those with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after the failure of the prior platinum-based chemotherapy. Different doses of oral icotinib were administered once every 8 h (Q8H) for a 28-continuous-day cycle until disease progression and or undue toxicity was observed. PK studies of subjects' blood were performed during cycle one (day 1 through 28). Patients aged ≥18 and ≤70 years with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of 0-1 and adequate organ functions eligible for the study. Tumor responses were assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). K-ras and EGFR mutations in the extracted DNA of fourteen specimens were examined using PCR-based direct sequencing assay. Thirty-six patients were enrolled in the study. PK analysis demonstrated that the mean elimination half-life of icotinib was 6 h, and the T(max) was around 2 h. The steady-state concentration of icotinib administered at a dose of 125 mg once every 8 h (Q8H) was significantly higher than that achieved by a dose of 100mg Q8H. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events (TRAEs) were an acne-like (folliculitis) rash (16/36, 44.4%), diarrhea (8/36, 22.2%) and a decrease in white blood cells (4/36, 11.1%). The maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached. Among 33 patients with NSCLC, 7 patients exhibited a partial response, 7 showed stable disease at the 24 weeks. Among 14 patients undergoing DNA sequence for K-ras and EGFR mutations, 3 with K-ras mutation presented 2 stable disease (SD) and 1 partial response (PR), 5 with EGFR exon 19 or 21 mutation 2 PR and 3 SD within 4 weeks. Oral icotinib was generally well tolerated, with manageable and

  1. Effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and borderline prognostic factors without distant metastasis: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Linh N.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; Schea, Randi A.; Milas, Luka

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and good prognostic factors (e.g., weight loss [WL] ≤5% and Karnofsky performance status [KPS] ≥70) is induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy to the primary site at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a total dose of 60-63 Gy to the target volume. Patients with poor prognostic factors usually receive radiotherapy alone, but the fractionation schedule and total dose have not been standardized. To attempt to optimize irradiation doses and schedule, we compared the effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy (ACRT) alone to 45 Gy at 3 Gy per fraction with standard radiation therapy (STRT) of 60-66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in regard to tumor response, local control, distant metastasis, toxicity, and survival. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients treated with radiation for NSCLC at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1994 were identified. All 55 patients had node-positive, and no distant metastasis (N+, M0) of NSCLC. Two cohorts were identified. One cohort (26 patients) had borderline poor prognostic factors (KPS less than 70 but higher than 50, and/or WL of more than 5%) and was treated with radiotherapy alone to 45 Gy over 3 weeks at 3 Gy/fraction (ACRT). The second cohort (29 patients) had significantly better prognostic factors (KPS ≥70 and WL ≤5%) and was treated to 60-66 Gy over 6 to 6((1)/(2)) weeks at 2 Gy per fraction (STRT) during the same period. Results: In the first cohort treated by ACRT, the distribution of patients by AJCC stage was IIB 8%, IIIA 19%, and IIIB 73%. Sixty-two percent had KPS 5%. The maximum response rate as determined by chest X-ray was 60% among 45 of 55 patients who were evaluable for response: combined complete responses (20%) and partial responses (40%). Overall survival in these patients was 13% at 2 and 5 years, with a locoregional control rate of 42% and a

  2. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

        Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity   Backgro......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity......   Background: Lung and oesophageal toxicity have been regarded as main toxicity in definitive radiotherapy (RT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas cardiac toxicity has not been offered much concern. This is probably due to the poor prognosis for patients with unresectable NSCLC. In this study we...

  3. Validation and comparison of two NGS assays for the detection of EGFR T790M resistance mutation in liquid biopsies of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollbrecht, Claudia; Lehmann, Annika; Lenze, Dido; Hummel, Michael

    2018-04-06

    Analysis of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from peripheral blood ("liquid biopsy") is an attractive alternative to identify non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with the EGFR T790M mutation eligible for 3rd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. We evaluated two PCR-based next generation sequencing (NGS) approaches, one including unique molecular identifiers (UMI), with focus on highly sensitive EGFR T790M mutation detection. Therefore, we extracted and sequenced cfDNA from synthetic plasma samples spiked with mutated DNA at decreasing allele frequencies and from 21 diagnostic NSCLC patients. Data evaluation was performed to determine the limit of detection (LoD), accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of both assays. Considering all tested reference dilutions and mutations the UMI assay performed best in terms of LoD (1% vs. 5%), sensitivity (95.8% vs. 81.3%), specificity (100% vs. 93.8%) and accuracy (96.9% vs. 84.4%). Comparing mutation status of diagnostic samples with both assays showed 81.3% concordance with primary mutation verifiable in 52% of cases. EGFR T790M was detected concordantly in 6/7 patients with allele frequencies from 0.1% to 27%. In one patient, the T790M mutation was exclusively detectable with the UMI assay. Our data demonstrate that both assays are applicable as multi-biomarker NGS tools enabling the simultaneous detection of primary EGFR driver and resistance mutations. However, for mutations with low allelic frequencies the use of NGS panels with UMI facilitates a more sensitive and reliable detection.

  4. Revisiting the relationship between tumour volume and diameter in advanced NSCLC patients: An exercise to maximize the utility of each measure to assess response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, M.; Jackman, D.M.; DiPiro, P.J.; Hatabu, H.; Jänne, P.A.; Johnson, B.E.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To revisit the presumed relationship between tumour diameter and volume in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and determine whether the measured volume using volume-analysis software and its proportional changes during therapy matches with the calculated volume obtained from the presumed relationship and results in concordant response assessment. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC with a total of 53 measurable lung lesions, treated in a phase II trial of erlotinib, were studied with institutional review board approval. Tumour volume and diameter were measured at baseline and at the first follow-up computed tomography (CT) examination using volume-analysis software. Using the measured diameter (2r) and the equation, calculated volume was obtained as (4/3)πr 3 at baseline and at the follow-up. Percent volume change was obtained by comparing to baseline for measured and calculated volumes, and response assessment was assigned. Results: The measured volume was significantly smaller than the calculated volume at baseline (median 11,488.9 mm 3 versus 17,148.6 mm 3 ; p < 0.0001), with a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) of 0.7022. At follow-up, the measured volume was once again significantly smaller than the calculated volume (median 6573.5 mm 3 versus 9198.1 mm 3 ; p = 0.0022), with a CCC of 0.7408. Response assessment by calculated versus measured volume changes had only moderate agreement (weighted κ = 0.545), with discordant assessment results in 20% (8/40) of lesions. Conclusion: Calculated volume based on the presumed relationship significantly differed from the measured volume in advanced NSCLC patients, with only moderate concordance in response assessment, indicating the limitations of presumed relationship. - Highlights: • Response assessment by measured vs calculated values has only moderate agreement. • It is important to obtain the actual measured values for tumor response

  5. The correlation between cell-free DNA and tumour burden was estimated by PET/CT in patients with advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, A D; Holdgaard, Paw; Spindler, K-L G

    2014-01-01

    Background:Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) circulating in the blood holds a possible prognostic value in malignant diseases. Under malignant conditions, the level of cfDNA increases but the biological mechanism remains to be fully understood. We aimed to examine the correlation between cfDNA and total tumour...... burden defined by positron emission tomography (PET) parameters.Methods:Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled into a prospective biomarker trial. Before treatment, plasma was extracted and the level of cfDNA was determined by qPCR. An (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...... analysis. MTV>the median was associated with a significantly shorter OS (P=0.02). There was no significant difference in OS according to TLG (P=0.08).Conclusion:Cell-free DNA may not be a simple measure of tumour burden, but seems to reflect more complex mechanisms of tumour biology, making it attractive...

  6. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image

  7. [Subgroup Analysis of the Non-interventional REASON Study: PFS and OS According to Age, Smoking History, Gender, and Histology in NSCLC Patients Treated with Gefitinib or Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, W; Eberhardt, W E E; Waller, C; Schirmacher, P; Dietel, M; Zirrgiebel, U; Radke, S; Thomas, M

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of several clinical factors on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in NSCLC patients (pts.) (stage IV) with mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRm+) treated with gefitinib (gef) or with chemotherapy (CT) under real-world conditions. 285 EGFRm+ pts. of the non-interventional REASON study treated with gef (n = 206) or CT (n = 79) as first-line therapy or with gef (n = 213) or CT (n = 61) in any line throughout the course of therapy were analyzed according to age, gender, smoking history and histology. Compared with CT, patients treated with gef showed prolongation of PFS and OS in all subgroups. PFS was significantly increased in women and non-smokers. OS was significantly increased in women, non-smokers, (ex)-smokers, patients with adenocarcinoma and elderly patients when treated with gef compared to CT. Female gender turned out to be an independent positive predictive factor for OS in patients treated with gef (HRmale: 1.74, p = 0.0009). A clinical benefit of gef was shown for all analyzed clinical subgroups of EGFRm+ pts. This was confirmed for the female gender in a multivariate analysis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. A retrospective analysis of RET translocation, gene copy number gain and expression in NSCLC patients treated with vandetanib in four randomized Phase III studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Adam; Morten, John; Ji, Qunsheng; Elvin, Paul; Womack, Chris; Su, Xinying; Donald, Emma; Gray, Neil; Read, Jessica; Bigley, Graham; Blockley, Laura; Cresswell, Carl; Dale, Angela; Davies, Amanda; Zhang, Tianwei; Fan, Shuqiong; Fu, Haihua; Gladwin, Amanda; Harrod, Grace; Stevens, James; Williams, Victoria; Ye, Qingqing; Zheng, Li; de Boer, Richard; Herbst, Roy S; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vasselli, James

    2015-03-23

    To determine the prevalence of RET rearrangement genes, RET copy number gains and expression in tumor samples from four Phase III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) trials of vandetanib, a selective inhibitor of VEGFR, RET and EGFR signaling, and to determine any association with outcome to vandetanib treatment. Archival tumor samples from the ZODIAC ( NCT00312377 , vandetanib ± docetaxel), ZEAL ( NCT00418886 , vandetanib ± pemetrexed), ZEPHYR ( NCT00404924 , vandetanib vs placebo) and ZEST ( NCT00364351 , vandetanib vs erlotinib) studies were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 944 and 1102 patients. The prevalence of RET rearrangements by FISH was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.5%) among patients with a known result. Seven tumor samples were positive for RET rearrangements (vandetanib, n = 3; comparator, n = 4). 2.8% (n = 26) of samples had RET amplification (innumerable RET clusters, or ≥7 copies in > 10% of tumor cells), 8.1% (n = 76) had low RET gene copy number gain (4-6 copies in ≥40% of tumor cells) and 8.3% (n = 92) were RET expression positive (signal intensity ++ or +++ in >10% of tumor cells). Of RET-rearrangement-positive patients, none had an objective response in the vandetanib arm and one patient responded in the comparator arm. Radiologic evidence of tumor shrinkage was observed in two patients treated with vandetanib and one treated with comparator drug. The objective response rate was similar in the vandetanib and comparator arms for patients positive for RET copy number gains or RET protein expression. We have identified prevalence for three RET biomarkers in a population predominated by non-Asians and smokers. RET rearrangement prevalence was lower than previously reported. We found no evidence of a differential benefit for efficacy by IHC and RET gene copy number gains. The low prevalence of RET rearrangements (0.7%) prevents firm conclusions regarding association of vandetanib treatment with

  9. ROMANA 3: a phase 3 safety extension study of anamorelin in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currow, D; Temel, J S; Abernethy, A; Milanowski, J; Friend, J; Fearon, K C

    2017-08-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia is a debilitating condition frequently observed in NSCLC patients, characterized by decreased body weight, reduced food intake, and impaired quality of life. Anamorelin, a novel selective ghrelin receptor agonist, has anabolic and appetite-enhancing activities. ROMANA 3 was a safety extension study of two phase 3, double-blind studies that assessed safety and efficacy of anamorelin in advanced NSCLC patients with cachexia. Patients with preserved Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≤2 after completing 12 weeks (w) on the ROMANA 1 or ROMANA 2 trials (0-12 weeks) could enroll in ROMANA 3 and continue to receive anamorelin 100 mg or placebo once daily for an additional 12w (12-24 weeks). The primary endpoint of ROMANA 3 was anamorelin safety/tolerability (12-24 weeks). Secondary endpoints included changes in body weight, handgrip strength (HGS), and symptom burden (0-24 weeks). Of the 703 patients who completed ROMANA 1 and ROMANA 2, 513 patients entered ROMANA 3 (anamorelin, N = 345, mean age 62.0 years; placebo, N = 168; mean age 62.2 years). During ROMANA 3, anamorelin and placebo groups had similar incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs; 52.2% versus 55.7%), grade ≥3 TEAEs (22.4% versus 21.6%), and serious TEAEs (12.8% versus 12.6%). There were 36 (10.5%) and 23 (13.8%) deaths in the anamorelin and placebo groups, respectively; none were drug-related. Improvements in body weight and anorexia-cachexia symptoms observed in the original trials were consistently maintained over 12-24 weeks. Anamorelin, versus placebo, significantly increased body weight from baseline of original trials at all time points (P cachexia symptoms at weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, and 16 (P < 0.05). No significant improvement in HGS was seen in either group. During the 12-24 weeks ROMANA 3 trial, anamorelin continued to be well tolerated. Over the entire 0-24w treatment period, body weight and symptom burden were improved

  10. Factors which influence quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A radiation therapy oncology group study (RTOG 89-01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.B.; Sause, W.T.; Johnson, D.; Dar, A.R.; Wasserman, T.H.; Rubin, P.; Khandekar, J.; Byhardt, R.B.; Taylor, S.; McDonald, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients with NSCLC participating in a randomized phase III study conducted by the RTOG and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Determine the factors which influence QOL during and post therapy. Materials and Methods: From (4(90)) to (4(94)) to 75 patients (pts) were randomized on RTOG 89-01 between a regimen containing radiation therapy (RT) versus a regimen containing surgery (S). All pts received induction vinblastine and cisplatin, followed by either S or RT and consolidation chemotherapy (CT). Pts were given the self-assessment QOL forms prior to the start of therapy, post induction CT, post RT or S, and periodically during follow-up. Two questionnaires were used: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for lung cancer patients (FACT-L) and Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC). The FACT-L consists of 44 questions covering 6 domains (physical, social, and emotional well-being, relationship with physician, fulfilment, and lung cancer specific concerns), FLIC contains 22 questions summing to one total score. Results: 51 pts participated in the QOL endpoint, 24 were excluded: 3 pts refused, institution did not administer QOL questionnaires in 9 pts, 3 completed QOL after start of therapy, 1 institution refused to participate, 5 questionnaires were incomplete/unusable, 1 pt could not read English, and 2 were ineligible for treatment. Participation in QOL was not predicted by any pretreatment characteristic. Women had worse pretreatment QOL (p<0.005, by FLIC) and more problems with disease-related symptoms (p<0.005, by FACT) than men. Pts with KPS 90-100 had better pretreatment QOL than pts with KPS 60-80 (p<0.025, FLIC). Neither race, marital status, education level, age, prior weight loss, nor disease symptoms statistically significantly influenced pretreatment QOL. Initial QOL did not predict overall survival. FACT-L was reported on 25 pts post induction CT. Follow-up FACT-L was available on 12 pts

  11. Phosphorylated EGFR expression may predict outcome of EGFR-TKIs therapy for the advanced NSCLC patients with wild-type EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGFR mutation is a strong predictive factor of EGFR-TKIs therapy. However, at least 10% of patients with EGFR wild-type are responsive to TKIs, suggesting that other determinants of outcome besides EGFR mutation might exist. We hypothesized that activation of phosphorylated EGFR could be a potential predictive biomarker to EGFR-TKIs treatment among patients in wild-type EGFR. Method Total of 205 stage IIIb and IV NSCLC patients, tissue samples of whom were available for molecular analysis, were enrolled in this study. The phosphorylation of EGFR at tyrosine 1068 (pTyr1068 and 1173 (pTyr1173 were assessed by immunohistochemistry, and EGFR mutations were detected by denaturing high performance liquid chromatograph (DHPLC. Results Among 205 patients assessable for EGFR mutation and phosphorylation analysis, 92 (44.9% were EGFR mutant and 165 patients (57.6% had pTyr1173 expression. Superior progression-free survival (PFS was seen after EGFR-TKIs therapy in patients with pTyr1068 expression compared to pTyr1068 negative ones (median PFS 7.0 months vs. 1.2 months, P P = 0.016. In subgroup of patients with wild-type EGFR, pTyr1068 expression positive ones had a significantly prolonged PFS (4.2 months vs.1.2 months P  Conclusion pTyr1068 may be a predictive biomarker for screening the population for clinical response to EGFR-TKIs treatment; especially for patients with wild-type EGFR.

  12. SU-F-T-451: Doses to Organs-At-Risk in the Presence and Absence of a 1.5 T Magnetic Field for NSCLC Patients Undergoing SABR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ward, S; Kim, A; McCann, C; Ruschin, M; Cheung, P; Sahgal, A; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine whether the electron return effect (ERE) has deleterious effects on lung SABR plans optimized in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. Methods: Data from five NSCLC-SABR patients were used. The Dose was modeled with a 2.5 mm dose grid in the presence and absence of a magnetic field using the Monaco (Elekta) TPS with the Monte Carlo GPUMCD (v5.1) algorithm. For each patient, two plans were generated, one using our conventional Elekta Agility linac beam model and another using the Elekta MRI Linac (MRL) model. Both plans were generated on the average CT using similar dose constraints and a 5 mm PTV. The optimization was performed using our clinic’s planning criteria, with normalization of the targets such that their V99% was equal to 99%. The OAR DVHs were compared for each patient. Results: The DVH plots revealed that there were limited differences when optimizing plans in the presence or absence of the magnetic field. The mean of the absolute differences, between the two planning types, in the equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) for the OARs were: 0.3 Gy (range of 0.0 - 1.0 Gy) for the esophagus, 0.6 Gy (range of 0.1 – 1.9 Gy) for the heart, 0.5 Gy (range of 0.2 – 0.8 Gy) for the lungs, and 0.6 Gy (range of 0.2 – 1.5 Gy) for the spinal canal. Regarding the maximum doses to the serial organs, the mean of the differences were 3.0 Gy (esophagus) and 0.9 Gy (spinal canal). No trends in the differences were observed. Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that there were no major differences between plans optimized using a conventional linac and those optimized using an MRI linac with an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field. This is attributed to the consideration of the ERE in the optimization. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.

  13. [Exon-dependent Subgroup-analysis of the Non-interventional REASON-Study: PFS and OS in EGFR-mutated NSCLC Patients Treated with Gefitinib or Chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette, W; Dietel, M; Thomas, M; Eberhardt, W; Griesinger, F; Zirrgiebel, U; Radke, S; Schirmacher, P

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the influence of the localization of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients (pts) with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with gefitinib (gef) or chemotherapy (CT) under real world conditions within the REASON study. Subgroups of pts with mutations in exon 19 (n = 141), 18/20 (n = 43), and 21 (n = 104) were analyzed for PFS and OS according to gef or CT treatment and compared using the log-rank test. Pts with mutations in exon 19 and 18/20 treated with gef as first line therapy showed increased PFS and OS compared to CT. This increase was statistically significant in pts with exon 19 mutation (11.3 vs. 6.5 months), but was not found in pts with exon 21 mutation (9.1 vs. 9.3 months). Also, OS was significantly increased in patients with mutation in exon 19 treated with gef ever over all treatment lines compared to CT (21.8 vs. 10.6 months), whereas this was not found in pts with mutation in exon 21 (14.1 vs. 13.9 months). Localization and nature of EGFR mutations influences gefitinib treatment outcomes under routine conditions and should therefore be analyzed in detail. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Multicenter Phase II Study Evaluating Two Cycles of Docetaxel, Cisplatin and Cetuximab as Induction Regimen Prior to Surgery in Chemotherapy-Naive Patients with NSCLC Stage IB-IIIA (INN06-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Hilbe

    Full Text Available Different strategies for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with early stage NSCLC have already been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of a chemoimmunotherapy when limited to two cycles.Between 01/2007 and 03/2010 41 patients with primarily resectable NSCLC stage IB to IIIA were included. Treatment consisted of two cycles cisplatin (40 mg/m2 d1+2 and docetaxel (75 mg/m2 d1 q3 weeks, accompanied by the administration of cetuximab (400 mg/m2 d1, then 250 mg weekly. The primary endpoint was radiological response according to RECIST.40 patients were evaluable for toxicity, 39 for response. The main grade 3/4 toxicities were: neutropenia 25%, leucopenia 11%, febrile neutropenia 6%, nausea 8% and rash 8%. 20 patients achieved a partial response, 17 a stable disease, 2 were not evaluable. 37 patients (95% underwent surgery and in three of them a complete pathological response was achieved. At a median follow-up of 44.2 months, 41% of the patients had died, median progression-free survival was 22.5 months.Two cycles of cisplatin/ docetaxel/ cetuximab showed promising efficacy in the neoadjuvant treatment of early-stage NSCLC and rapid operation was possible in 95% of patients. Toxicities were manageable and as expected.EU Clinical Trials Register; Eudract-Nr: 2006-004639-31.

  15. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  16. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  17. Partial response to carboplatin in an RRx-001 pretreated patient with EGFR-inhibitor-resistance and T790M-negative NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Corey A; Oronsky, Bryan; Caroen, Scott; Scicinski, Jan; Cabrales, Pedro; Degesys, Aiste; Brzezniak, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Few therapeutic options are available for T790M-negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after failure of primary epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) and chemotherapy. This report presents the case of a 71-year-old Asian female never smoker with EGFR mutated T790M negative non squamous cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pre-treated with the experimental epi-immunotherapeutic agent, RRx-001, that re-responded to single agent carboplatin after failure of platinum doublets, TKIs, pemetrexed and nivolumab. The management of advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC is briefly reviewed herein and the emerging paradigm of episensitization, which contradicts the long-standing and widely accepted tenet about the immutability of resistance and the futility of therapeutic rechallenge, is introduced as a strategy to avert treatment failure and thereby stave off deterioration and death.

  18. A comparison of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR for measuring plasma EGFR T790M mutations of NSCLC patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Q

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Qin Feng,1,* Fei Gai,2,* Yaxiong Sang,2 Jie Zhang,3 Ping Wang,1 Yue Wang,1 Bing Liu,2 Dongmei Lin,1 Yang Yu,2 Jian Fang3 1Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education, Department of Pathology, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, 2Oncology Business Division, Beijing Novogene Bioinformatics Technology Co., Ltd, 3Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education, Department of Thoracic Oncology II, Peking University Cancer Hospital & Institute, Beijing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: The AURA3 clinical trial has shown that advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with EGFR T790M mutations in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA could benefit from osimertinib.Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of QuantStudio™ 3D Digital PCR System platform for the detection of plasma EGFR T790M mutations in NSCLC patients, and compare the performances of 3D Digital PCR and ARMS-PCR.Patients and methods: A total of 119 Chinese patients were enrolled in this study. Mutant allele frequency of plasma EGFR T790M was detected by 3D Digital PCR, then 25 selected samples were verified by ARMS-PCR and four of them were verified by next generation sequencing (NGS.Results: In total, 52.94% (69/119 had EGFR T790M mutations detected by 3D Digital PCR. In 69 positive samples, the median mutant allele frequency (AF was 1.09% and three cases presented low concentration (AF <0.1%. Limited by the amount of plasma DNA, 17 samples (AF <2.5% and eight samples (T790M- were selected for verification by ARMS-PCR. Four of those samples were verified by NGS as a third verification method. Among the selected 17 positive cases, ten samples presented mutant allele frequency <0.5%, and seven samples presented intermediate mutant allele frequency (0.5%<AF<2.5%. However, only three samples (3/17 were identified as positive by ARMS-PCR, namely, P6

  19. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Bessone, Luca; Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of peripheral NSCLC SBRT using Acuros XB and AAA calculation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chloe C H; Ang, Khong Wei; Soh, Roger C X; Tin, Kah Ming; Yap, Jerome H H; Lee, James C L; Bragg, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    There is a concern for dose calculation in highly heterogenous environments such as the thorax region. This study compares the quality of treatment plans of peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using 2 calculation algorithms, namely, Eclipse Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros External Beam (AXB), for 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data from 20 anonymized patients were studied using Varian Eclipse planning system, AXB, and AAA version 10.0.28. A 3DCRT plan and a VMAT plan were generated using AAA and AXB with constant plan parameters for each patient. The prescription and dose constraints were benchmarked against Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915 protocol. Planning parameters of the plan were compared statistically using Mann-Whitney U tests. Results showed that 3DCRT and VMAT plans have a lower target coverage up to 8% when calculated using AXB as compared with AAA. The conformity index (CI) for AXB plans was 4.7% lower than AAA plans, but was closer to unity, which indicated better target conformity. AXB produced plans with global maximum doses which were, on average, 2% hotter than AAA plans. Both 3DCRT and VMAT plans were able to achieve D95%. VMAT plans were shown to be more conformal (CI = 1.01) and were at least 3.2% and 1.5% lower in terms of PTV maximum and mean dose, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference for doses received by organs at risk (OARs) regardless of calculation algorithms and treatment techniques. In general, the difference in tissue modeling for AXB and AAA algorithm is responsible for the dose distribution between the AXB and the AAA algorithms. The AXB VMAT plans could be used to benefit patients receiving peripheral NSCLC SBRT. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Patient admission planning using Approximate Dynamic Programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Mes, Martijn R.K.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.

    2016-01-01

    Tactical planning in hospitals involves elective patient admission planning and the allocation of hospital resource capacities. We propose a method to develop a tactical resource allocation and patient admission plan that takes stochastic elements into consideration, thereby providing robust plans.

  2. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aichun; Liu Jianjun; Sun Xiaoguang; Shi Yiping; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  3. NSCLC and HER2: between lights and shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Giuseppina Rosaria Rita; Russo, Alessandro; Franchina, Tindara; Ferraro, Giuseppa; Zanghì, Mariangela; Picone, Antonio; Scimone, Antonino; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    The therapeutic landscape of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has dramatically changed in the last few years with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, leading to unprecedented results in lung tumors with a paradigmatic shift from a "one size fits all" approach to an histologic and molecular-based approach. The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in NSCLC in 2004 and the marked response to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, in a small subset of patients harboring these genetic abnormalities, stimulated the study of other kinase mutants involvement in NSCLC. The incredible story of ALK rearranged tumors, with the rapid Food and Drug Administration approval of Crizotinib after only 4 years from the discovery of EML4-ALK translocation in NSCLC, has profoundly influenced the concept of drug development in NSCLC, paving the way to a novel series of molecularly selected studies with specific inhibitors. The identification of these oncogenic drivers has dramatically changed the genetic landscape of NSCLC moving away from the old concept of a large indistinct histological entity to a combination of rare clinically relevant molecular subsets. Recently, a renewed interest has been emerging on the human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) pathway. Genetic aberrations of this signaling pathway have been reported over time to be associated in NSCLC with different sensitivity to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to have a possible prognostic role and more recently HER2 amplification has been emerged as a possible mechanism in EGFR-mutated tumors of acquired resistance to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In addition, dysregulation of the HER2 pathway, in particular HER2 mutations (mostly, in-frame exon 20 insertions), may represent a possible novel therapeutic target in NSCLC, paving the way for a new generation of targeted agents in NSCLC. Since anecdotal case reports of clinical activity of anti-HER2 agents in NSCLC

  4. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Open-label, randomized study of individualized, pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided dosing of paclitaxel combined with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, M; von Pawel, J; Kraff, S; Fischer, J R; Eberhardt, W; Gauler, T C; Mueller, L; Reinmuth, N; Reck, M; Kimmich, M; Mayer, F; Kopp, H-G; Behringer, D M; Ko, Y-D; Hilger, R A; Roessler, M; Kloft, C; Henrich, A; Moritz, B; Miller, M C; Salamone, S J; Jaehde, U

    2016-10-01

    Variable chemotherapy exposure may cause toxicity or lack of efficacy. This study was initiated to validate pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided paclitaxel dosing in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to avoid supra- or subtherapeutic exposure. Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 cycles of 3-weekly carboplatin AUC 6 or cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) either with standard paclitaxel at 200 mg/m(2) (arm A) or PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel (arm B). In arm B, initial paclitaxel dose was adjusted to body surface area, age, sex, and subsequent doses were guided by neutropenia and previous-cycle paclitaxel exposure [time above a plasma concentration of 0.05 µM (Tc>0.05)] determined from a single blood sample on day 2. The primary end point was grade 4 neutropenia; secondary end points included neuropathy, radiological response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 365 patients randomly assigned, grade 4 neutropenia was similar in both arms (19% versus 16%; P = 0.10). Neuropathy grade ≥2 (38% versus 23%, P PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel does not improve severe neutropenia, but reduces paclitaxel-associated neuropathy and thereby improves the benefit-risk profile in patients with advanced NSCLC. NCT01326767 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01326767). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC with the standardized uptake value (SUV in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Michael Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with standardized uptake values (SUV derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI.38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™ 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR. During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm² was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean.A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5 mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, p<0.05 and r = -0.36, p<0.05 existed.The present data show a weak inverse correlation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  7. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Durrans

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor "activated/reprogrammed" stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7 and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value.

  8. Time and dose-related changes in lung perfusion after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Khalil, Azza A; Møller, Ditte S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine radiation-induced changes in regional lung perfusion per dose level in 58 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients receiving chemo-radiotherapy (RT) of minimum 60 Gy we...

  9. Patient Care Planning: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Prophet, Colleen M.

    1989-01-01

    The INFORMM Patient Care Planning System provides interdepartmental communication and individualized patient care plans based upon current standards of care. This interdisciplinary system facilitates the identification of patient problems and nursing diagnoses as well as patient care orders. The selected nurses' and physicians' orders are integrated and organized by care plan categories in printouts. As a system by-product, Patient Care Planning automatically generates and calculates patient ...

  10. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Rahal, Daoud [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Alloisio, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Thoracic Surgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Roncalli, Massimo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Armando [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Marchesi, Federica [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  11. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura; Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela; Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina; Rahal, Daoud; Alloisio, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Allavena, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Marchesi, Federica; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  12. Textural features in pre-treatment [F18]-FDG-PET/CT are correlated with risk of local recurrence and disease-specific survival in early stage NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, Thomas; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Mayer, Benedikt; Specht, Hanno M; Papp, Laszló; Zsótér, Norbert; Essler, Markus

    2015-04-22

    Textural features in FDG-PET have been shown to provide prognostic information in a variety of tumor entities. Here we evaluate their predictive value for recurrence and prognosis in NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT). 45 patients with early stage NSCLC (T1 or T2 tumor, no lymph node or distant metastases) were included in this retrospective study and followed over a median of 21.4 months (range 3.1-71.1). All patients were considered non-operable due to concomitant disease and referred to SBRT as the primary treatment modality. Pre-treatment FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained from all patients. SUV and volume-based analysis as well as extraction of textural features based on neighborhood gray-tone difference matrices (NGTDM) and gray-level co-occurence matrices (GLCM) were performed using InterView Fusion™ (Mediso Inc., Budapest). The ability to predict local recurrence (LR), lymph node (LN) and distant metastases (DM) was measured using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Univariate and multivariate analysis of overall and disease-specific survival were executed. 7 out of 45 patients (16%) experienced LR, 11 (24%) LN and 11 (24%) DM. ROC revealed a significant correlation of several textural parameters with LR with an AUC value for entropy of 0.872. While there was also a significant correlation of LR with tumor size in the overall cohort, only texture was predictive when examining T1 (tumor diameter 3 cm) subgroups. No correlation of the examined PET parameters with LN or DM was shown. In univariate survival analysis, both heterogeneity and tumor size were predictive for disease-specific survival, but only texture determined by entropy was determined as an independent factor in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 7.48, p = .016). Overall survival was not significantly correlated to any examined parameter, most likely due to the high comorbidity in our cohort. Our study adds to the growing evidence that tumor

  13. Textural features in pre-treatment [F18]-FDG-PET/CT are correlated with risk of local recurrence and disease-specific survival in early stage NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyka, Thomas; Bundschuh, Ralph A; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Mayer, Benedikt; Specht, Hanno M; Papp, Laszló; Zsótér, Norbert; Essler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Textural features in FDG-PET have been shown to provide prognostic information in a variety of tumor entities. Here we evaluate their predictive value for recurrence and prognosis in NSCLC patients receiving primary stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT). 45 patients with early stage NSCLC (T1 or T2 tumor, no lymph node or distant metastases) were included in this retrospective study and followed over a median of 21.4 months (range 3.1–71.1). All patients were considered non-operable due to concomitant disease and referred to SBRT as the primary treatment modality. Pre-treatment FDG-PET/CT scans were obtained from all patients. SUV and volume-based analysis as well as extraction of textural features based on neighborhood gray-tone difference matrices (NGTDM) and gray-level co-occurence matrices (GLCM) were performed using InterView Fusion™ (Mediso Inc., Budapest). The ability to predict local recurrence (LR), lymph node (LN) and distant metastases (DM) was measured using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Univariate and multivariate analysis of overall and disease-specific survival were executed. 7 out of 45 patients (16%) experienced LR, 11 (24%) LN and 11 (24%) DM. ROC revealed a significant correlation of several textural parameters with LR with an AUC value for entropy of 0.872. While there was also a significant correlation of LR with tumor size in the overall cohort, only texture was predictive when examining T1 (tumor diameter < = 3 cm) and T2 (>3 cm) subgroups. No correlation of the examined PET parameters with LN or DM was shown. In univariate survival analysis, both heterogeneity and tumor size were predictive for disease-specific survival, but only texture determined by entropy was determined as an independent factor in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 7.48, p = .016). Overall survival was not significantly correlated to any examined parameter, most likely due to the high comorbidity in our cohort. Our study adds to the growing evidence

  14. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal (18)F-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Gerald Sma; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel Jb; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry Jm

    2015-01-01

    Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using (18)F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and after 2 cycles of therapy (follow-up) data in advanced NSCLC patients. The elastix toolbox, an integrated part of the IMALYTICS workstation, was used to apply a CT-based non-linear image registration of follow-up PET/CT data using the baseline PET/CT data as reference. Lesion statistics were compared to assess the impact on therapy response assessment. Next, CT-based deformable image registration was performed anew on the deformed follow-up PET/CT data using the original follow-up PET/CT data as reference, yielding a realigned follow-up PET dataset. Performance was evaluated by determining the correlation coefficient between original and realigned follow-up PET datasets. The intra- and extra-thoracic tumors were automatically delineated on the original PET using a 41% of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) adaptive threshold. Equivalence between reference and realigned images was tested (determining 95% range of the difference) and estimating the percentage of voxel values that fell within that range. Thirty-nine patients with 191 tumor lesions were included. In 37/39 and 12/39 patients, respectively, thoracic and non-thoracic lesions were evaluable for response assessment. Using the EORTC/SUVmax-based criteria, 5/37 patients had a discordant response of thoracic, and 2/12 a discordant response of non-thoracic lesions between the reference and the realigned image. FDG uptake values of corresponding tumor voxels in the original and realigned reference PET correlated well (R

  15. SU-E-T-220: A Web-Based Research System for Outcome Analysis of NSCLC Treated with SABR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A; Yang, Y; Michalski, D; Heron, D; Huq, M

    2012-06-01

    To establish a web-based software system, an electronic patient record (ePR), to consolidate and evaluate clinical data, dose delivery and treatment outcomes for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with hypofractionated stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) across institutions. The new trend of information technology in medical imaging and informatics is towards the development of an electronic patient record (ePR), in which all health and medical information of each patient are organized under the patient's name and identification number. The system has been developed using the Wamp Server, a package of Apache web server, PHP and MySQL database to facilitate patient data input and management, and evaluation of patient clinical data and dose delivery across institution using web technology. The data of each patient to be recorded in the database include pre-treatment clinical data, treatment plan in DICOM-RT format and follow-up data. The pre-treatment data include demographics data, pathology condition, cancer staging. The follow-up data include the survival status, local tumor control condition and toxicity. The clinical data are entered to the system through the web page while the treatment plan data will be imported from the treatment planning system (TPS) using DICOM communication. The collection of data of NSCLC patients treated with SABR stored in the ePR is always accessible and can be retrieved and processed in the future. The core of the ePR is the database which integrates all patient data in one location. The web-based DICOM RT ePR system utilizes the current state-of-the-art medical informatics approach to investigate the combination and consolidation of patient data and outcome results. This will allow clinically-driven data mining for dose distributions and resulting treatment outcome in connection with biological modeling of the treatment parameters to quantify the efficacy of SABR in treating NSCLC patients. © 2012

  16. An exploratory study of volumetric analysis for assessing tumor response with (18)F-FAZA PET/CT in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Gerald S M A; Bollineni, Vikram R; Hiltermann, Thijo J N; Sijtsema, Nanna M; Fischer, Alexander; Bongaerts, Alphons H H; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M

    2016-12-01

    Hypoxia is associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is randomly distributed within malignancies. Characterization of changes in intratumoral hypoxic regions is possible with specially developed PET tracers such as (18)F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside ((18)F-FAZA) while tumor metabolism can be measured with 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). The purpose of this study was to study the effects of chemotherapy on (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG uptake simultaneously in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients At baseline and after the second chemotherapy cycle, both PET/CT with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FAZA was performed in seven patients with metastasized NSCLC. (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG scans were aligned with deformable image registration using Mirada DBx. The primary tumors were contoured, and on the (18)F-FDG scan, volumes of interest (VOI) were drawn using a 41 % adaptive threshold technique. Subsequently, the resulting VOI was transferred to the (18)F-FAZA scan. (18)F-FAZA maximum tumor-to-background (T/Bgmax) ratio and the fractional hypoxic volume (FHV) were assessed. Measurements were corrected for partial volume effects. Finally, a voxel-by-voxel analysis of the primary tumor was performed to assess regional uptake differences. In the primary tumor of all seven patients, median (18)F-FDG standard uptake value (SUVmax) decreased significantly (p = 0.03). There was no significant decrease in (18)F-FAZA uptake as measured with T/Bgmax (p = 0.24) or the FHV (p = 0.35). Additionally, volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis showed that low hypoxic tumors did not significantly change in hypoxic status between baseline and two cycles of chemotherapy, whereas highly hypoxic tumors did. Individualized volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed that hypoxia and metabolism were not associated before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Tumor hypoxia and metabolism are independent dynamic events as measured by (18)F-FAZA PET and (18)F

  17. Emerging treatments and combinations in the management of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    There remains an unmet need for effective, well-tolerated treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to alleviate the disease burden for a broad selection of patients. Nintedanib is a potent, oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast...

  18. Evaluation of NGS and RT-PCR Methods for ALK Rearrangement in European NSCLC Patients: Results from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letovanec, Igor; Finn, Stephen; Zygoura, Panagiota; Smyth, Paul; Soltermann, Alex; Bubendorf, Lukas; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Marchetti, Antonio; Nonaka, Daisuke; Monkhorst, Kim; Hager, Henrik; Martorell, Miguel; Sejda, Aleksandra; Cheney, Richard; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Verbeken, Eric; Weder, Walter; Savic, Spasenija; Di Lorito, Alessia; Navarro, Atilio; Felip, Enriqueta; Warth, Arne; Baas, Paul; Meldgaard, Peter; Blackhall, Fiona; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dienemann, Hendrik; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Vansteenkiste, Johan; O'Brien, Cathal; Geiger, Thomas; Sherlock, Jon; Schageman, Jeoffrey; Dafni, Urania; Kammler, Roswitha; Kerr, Keith; Thunnissen, Erik; Stahel, Rolf; Peters, Solange

    2018-03-01

    The reported prevalence of ALK receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK) rearrangement in NSCLC ranges from 2% to 7%. The primary standard diagnostic method is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Recently, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has also proved to be a reproducible and sensitive technique. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has also been advocated, and most recently, the advent of targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) for ALK and other fusions has become possible. This study compares anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) evaluation with all four techniques in resected NSCLC from the large European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape cohort. A total of 96 cases from the European Thoracic Oncology Platform Lungscape iBiobank, with any ALK immunoreactivity were examined by FISH, central RT-PCR, and NGS. An H-score higher than 120 defines IHC positivity. RNA was extracted from the same formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues. For RT-PCR, primers covered the most frequent ALK translocations. For NGS, the Oncomine Solid Tumour Fusion Transcript Kit (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, MA) was used. The concordance was assessed using the Cohen κ coefficient (two-sided α ≤ 5%). NGS provided results for 77 of the 95 cases tested (81.1%), whereas RT-PCR provided results for 77 of 96 (80.2%). Concordance occurred in 55 cases of the 60 cases tested with all four methods (43 ALK negative and 12 ALK positive). Using ALK copositivity for IHC and FISH as the criterion standard, we derived a sensitivity for RT-PCR/NGS of 70.0%/85.0%, with a specificity of 87.1%/79.0%. When either RT-PCR or NGS was combined with IHC, the sensitivity remained the same, whereas the specificity increased to 88.7% and 83.9% respectively. NGS evaluation with the Oncomine Solid Tumour Fusion transcript kit and RT-PCR proved to have high sensitivity and specificity, advocating their use in routine practice. For maximal sensitivity and specificity, ALK status should be

  19. Clinical decision-making and health-related quality of life during first-line and maintenance therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): findings from a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztankay, Monika; Giesinger, Johannes Maria; Zabernigg, August; Krempler, Elisabeth; Pall, Georg; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Burghuber, Otto; Hochmair, Maximilian; Rumpold, Gerhard; Doering, Stephan; Holzner, Bernhard

    2017-08-23

    Maintenance therapy (MT) with pemetrexed has been shown to improve overall and progression-free survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), without impairing patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) substantially. Comprehensive data on HRQOL under real-life conditions are necessary to enable informed decision-making. This study aims to (1) assess HRQOL during first-line chemotherapy and subsequent MT and (2) record patients' and physicians' reasons leading to clinical decisions on MT. Patients treated for NSCLC at three Austrian medical centres were included. HRQOL was assessed at every chemotherapy cycle using the EORTC QLQ-C30/+LC13 questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were conducted before MT initiation and at the time of discontinuation to evaluate patients' and physicians' reasons for treatment decisions. Longitudinal QOL analysis was based on linear mixed models. Sixty-one (73%) out of 84 patients were considered for MT. Thirty-six patients (43%) received MT and 29 (35%) discontinued therapy. Decisions on MT initiation (in 20 cases by the physician vs 4 by the patient) and discontinuation (19 vs 10) were mainly voiced by the physician. Treatment toxicity of first-line chemotherapy was the main reason for rejection of MT in patients with stable disease and was more often indicated by patients than clinicians. HRQOL data were collected from 83 patients at 422 assessment time points and indicated significantly lower symptom severity during MT compared with first-line therapy for nausea and vomiting (p = 0.006), sleep disturbances (p loss (p = 0.043), constipation (p = 0.017) and chest pain (p = 0.022), and a deterioration in emotional functioning (p = 0.023) and cognitive functioning (p = 0.044) during MT. Our results indicate that HRQOL and symptom burden improve between first-line treatment to MT in some respects, although some late toxicity persists. Discrepancies between patients' and physicians

  20. WE-FG-206-08: Pulmonary Functional Imaging Biomarkers of NSCLC to Guide and Optimize Functional Lung Avoidance Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh, Khadija; Capaldi, Dante PI; Parraga, Grace [Robarts Research Institute (Canada); Hoover, Douglas A; Palma, David A [Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Yaremko, Brian P [Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Functional lung avoidance radiotherapy promises optimized therapy planning by minimizing dose to well-functioning lung and maximizing dose to the rest of the lung. Patients with NSCLC commonly present with co-morbid COPD and heterogeneously distributed ventilation abnormalities stemming from emphysema, airways disease, and tumour burden. We hypothesized that pulmonary functional imaging methods may be used to optimize radiotherapy plans to avoid regions of well-functioning lung and significantly improve outcomes like quality-of-life and survival. To ascertain the utility of functional lung avoidance therapy in clinical practice, we measured COPD phenotypes in NSCLC patients enrolled in a randomized-controlled-clinical-trial prior to curative intent therapy. Methods: Thirty stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC patients provided written informed consent to a randomized-controlled-clinical-trial ( http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002052 ) comparing outcomes in patients randomized to standard or image-guided radiotherapy. Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI ventilation-defect-percent (VDP) (Kirby et al, Acad Radiol, 2012) as well as CT-emphysema measurements were determined. Patients were stratified based on quantitative imaging evidence of ventilation-defects and emphysema into two subgroups: 1) tumour-specific ventilation defects only (TSD), and, 2) tumour-specific and other ventilation defects with and without emphysema (TSD{sub VE}). Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves were used to characterize the performance of clinical measures as predictors of the presence of non-tumour specific ventilation defects. Results: Twenty-one out of thirty subjects (70%) had non-tumour specific ventilation defects (TSD{sub VE}) and nine subjects had ONLY tumour-specific defects (TSD). Subjects in the TSD{sub VE} group had significantly greater smoking-history (p=.006) and airflow obstruction (FEV{sub 1}/FVC) (p=.001). ROC analysis demonstrated an 87% classification rate for

  1. Second-Line Therapy for Advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jared M; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer have non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype and have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Improvements in both first-line and subsequent therapies are allowing longer survival and enhanced quality of life for these patients. The median overall survival observed in many second-line trials is approximately 9 months, and many patients receive further therapy after second-line therapy. The cytotoxic agents pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib are standard second-line therapies. For patients with EGFR mutation, a TKI is the favored second-line therapy if not already used in first-line therapy. For patients without the EGFR mutation, TKIs are an option, but many oncologists favor cytotoxic therapy. The inhibitor of the EML4/ALK fusion protein, crizotinib, has recently become a standard second-line treatment for patients with the gene rearrangement and has promise for patients with the ROS1 rearrangement.

  2. miR-151a induces partial EMT by regulating E-cadherin in NSCLC cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Iben; Sanders, K J; Idica, A

    2017-01-01

    mortality. Here, we demonstrate that miR-151a is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient specimens, as compared to healthy lung. In addition, miR-151a overexpression promotes proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces tumor cell migration and invasion of NSCLC......-cadherin in miR-151a NSCLC cell lines potently repressed miR-151a-induced partial EMT and cell migration of NSCLC cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-151a functions as an oncomiR in NSCLC by targeting E-cadherin mRNA and inducing proliferation, migration and partial EMT....

  3. Admission planning and patient mix optimisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Eijdems, M.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Beech, R.

    2005-01-01

    Admisson planning is an important area of planning hospital operations for elective patients that do not need emergency care. Its purpose is not only to admit patients according to medical priority but also to take into consideration the resource use of admitted patients in order to balance the

  4. GrB TWEAK: A Potential Novel Biologic for NSCLC Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    granzyme B, lung cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT...cost extension period we were able to test whether our therapeutic construct GrB-Fc-IT4 could inhibit NSCLC tumor growth in vivo using the NSCLC patient ...derived Fn14-positive cell line M2010-1005. The M2010-1005 line was established from a NSCLC patient with a tumor harboring the EGFRdel747-752

  5. Prognostic significance of CDH13 hypermethylation and mRNA in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ruilin Xue,1 Cuili Yang,1 Fang Zhao,2 Dejia Li1 1Global Health Institute, School of Public Health, 2Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Aberrant methylation of CpG dinucleotides is a commonly observed epigenetic modification in human cancer. Thus, detection of aberrant gene promoter methylation as a tool for diagnosis of tumors or as a prognostic marker has been widely described for many types of cancers, including nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Emerging evidence indicates that CDH13 is a candidate tumor suppressor in several types of human tumors, including NSCLC. However, the correlation between CDH13 hypermethylation and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains unclear. In the current study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of CDH13 hypermethylation on the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics. Final analysis of 803 NSCLC patients from eleven eligible studies was performed. CDH13 hypermethylation was observed to be significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, with the pooled odds ratio (OR from seven studies including 448 NSCLC and 345 normal lung tissue (OR, 7.85; 95% confidence interval, 5.12–12.03; P<0.00001. CDH13 hypermethylation was also associated with pathological types. The pooled OR was obtained from four studies, including 111 squamous cell carcinoma and 106 adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.66; P=0.001, which indicated that CDH13 hypermethylation plays a more important role in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma. NSCLC with CDH13 hypermethylation was found more frequently in poorly differentiated NSCLC patients. NSCLC patients with CDH13 hypermethylation had a lower survival rate than those without CDH13 hypermethylation. In addition, CDH13 mRNA high expression was found to correlate with better overall survival for all NSCLC patients followed for 20 years

  6. SU-F-R-45: The Prognostic Value of Radiotherapy Based On the Changes of Texture Features Between Pre-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG PET Image for NSCLC Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, China, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is investigating which texture features extracted from FDG-PET images by gray-level co-occurrence matrix(GLCM) have a higher prognostic value than the other texture features. Methods: 21 non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) patients were approved in the study. Patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scans with both pre-treatment and post-treatment. Firstly, the tumors were extracted by our house developed software. Secondly, the clinical features including the maximum SUV and tumor volume were extracted by MIM vista software, and texture features including angular second moment, contrast, inverse different moment, entropy and correlation were extracted using MATLAB.The differences can be calculated by using post-treatment features to subtract pre-treatment features. Finally, the SPSS software was used to get the Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank correlation coefficients between the change ratios of texture features and change ratios of clinical features. Results: The Pearson and Spearman rank correlation coefficient between contrast and SUV maximum is 0.785 and 0.709. The P and S value between inverse difference moment and tumor volume is 0.953 and 0.942. Conclusion: This preliminary study showed that the relationships between different texture features and the same clinical feature are different. Finding the prognostic value of contrast and inverse difference moment were higher than the other three textures extracted by GLCM.

  7. SU-F-R-45: The Prognostic Value of Radiotherapy Based On the Changes of Texture Features Between Pre-Treatment and Post-Treatment FDG PET Image for NSCLC Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is investigating which texture features extracted from FDG-PET images by gray-level co-occurrence matrix(GLCM) have a higher prognostic value than the other texture features. Methods: 21 non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) patients were approved in the study. Patients underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT scans with both pre-treatment and post-treatment. Firstly, the tumors were extracted by our house developed software. Secondly, the clinical features including the maximum SUV and tumor volume were extracted by MIM vista software, and texture features including angular second moment, contrast, inverse different moment, entropy and correlation were extracted using MATLAB.The differences can be calculated by using post-treatment features to subtract pre-treatment features. Finally, the SPSS software was used to get the Pearson correlation coefficients and Spearman rank correlation coefficients between the change ratios of texture features and change ratios of clinical features. Results: The Pearson and Spearman rank correlation coefficient between contrast and SUV maximum is 0.785 and 0.709. The P and S value between inverse difference moment and tumor volume is 0.953 and 0.942. Conclusion: This preliminary study showed that the relationships between different texture features and the same clinical feature are different. Finding the prognostic value of contrast and inverse difference moment were higher than the other three textures extracted by GLCM.

  8. Intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for resected NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Carus, Andreas; Meldgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cisplatin and vinorelbine given intravenously is a well-established adjuvant chemotherapy regimen after surgery for early-stage NSCLC. Vinorelbine can also be administered orally. However, the efficacy of orally administrated vinorelbine in adjuvant treatment of NSCLC is unknown. We...... University Hospital (Denmark) from 2005 to 2012 for adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for NSCLC. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of the 265 patients included in this study, 126 patients received i.v. and 139 received p.o. vinorelbine/cisplatin. The two groups were comparable with respect to important baseline....... In conclusion we observed that intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin after surgery for NSCLC appear equally effective in terms of overall and disease-free survival....

  9. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non–small-cell lung cancer (≥60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7–22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  10. Safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab with chemotherapy in Asian patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC: results from the phase IV MO19390 (SAiL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Ming; Au, Joseph Siu-kie; Chang, Gee-Chen; Cheng, Ashley Chi-kin; Zhou, Caicun; Wu, Yi-long

    2011-06-01

    First-line treatment with bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced, nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) in phase III clinical trials. SAiL (MO19390), an open-label, multicenter, single-arm study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in clinical practice. This report presents the results of a preplanned subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SAiL. Patients with untreated, locally advanced, metastatic or recurrent NSNSCLC received bevacizumab 7.5 or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus chemotherapy for up to six cycles, followed by single-agent bevacizumab until disease progression. Eligibility criteria for SAiL permitted enrolment of a broad patient population. The primary end point was safety; secondary end points included time to disease progression and overall survival. The Asian intent-to-treat population comprised 314 of the 2212 patients enrolled in the SAiL trial. In the Asian subanalysis, patients received a median of nine cycles of bevacizumab, and the median follow-up was 16.4 months. The incidence of clinically significant adverse events (grade ≥3) of special interest was relatively low in this population (15.6% overall); proteinuria (7.6%), hypertension (4.8%), and bleeding (2.5%) were the most common. A total of five adverse events related to bevacizumab were reported as grade 5. Disease control rate was 94.1%, median time to disease progression was 8.3 months, and median overall survival was 18.9 months. The safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in Asian patients with advanced NSNSCLC is consistent with that demonstrated in phase III studies and in the overall SAiL population. There were no new safety signals.

  11. Impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on biological target volume (BTV) definition for treatment planning for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Dean, Geoffrey; Lisbona, Robert; Parker, William; Kaufman, Chris; Podgorsak, Ervin B.

    2007-01-01

    This work represents our effort to test feasibility of FDG-based PET/CT on target volume delineation in radiotherapy treatment planning of NSCLC patients. Different methods have been developed to enable more precise target outlining using PET: Qualitative Visual Method, CTV=2.5 SUV units, linear SUV threshold function method, and CTV=40% Iso of Maximum Uptake Value. We are proposing reconstruction of three biological target volumes: necrotic BTV (same as PTV created by radiation oncologist using CT data), proliferating BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio 1:3) and hypoxic BTV (based on PET signal to background ratio of 1:19). Two IMRT plans were created and compared to the conventional treatment plan: 'conservative' IMRT plan delivers 52.5 Gy to the necrotic BTV and 65 Gy to the hypoxic BTV; 'radical' IMRT plan delivers 30 Gy to necrotic BTV, 52.5 Gy to proliferating BTV and 65 Gy to hypoxic BTV. Use of BTVs in IMRT plans is attractive because it increases dose to targets considered to need higher doses. It reduces considerably dose to heart and spinal cord, organs considered to limit dose escalation approaches in NSCLC treatment. 'Conservative' IMRT approach can be understood as a PET/CT-based concomitant boost to the tumor expressing the highest FDG uptake. 'Radical' plan implies deviation from the traditional uniform dose target coverage approach, with the intention of achieving better surrounding tissue sparing and ultimately allowing for dose escalation protocols relying on biologically based treatment planning

  12. Evaluation of setup accuracy for NSCLC patients; studying the impact of different types of cone-beam CT matches based on whole thorax, columna vertebralis, and GTV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, W.; Baker, M.; Hedman, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to evaluate the patient setup accuracy by investigating the impact of different types of CBCT matches, performed with 3 (translations only) or 6 (including rotations) degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The purpose is also to calculate and compare CTV to PTV margins based...

  13. Src mediates cigarette smoke-induced resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filosto, Simone; Baston, David S; Chung, Samuel; Becker, Cathleen R; Goldkorn, Tzipora

    2013-08-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) is a proto-oncogene commonly dysregulated in several cancers including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and, thus, is targeted for treatment using tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as erlotinib. However, despite the efficacy observed in patients with NSCLC harboring oncogenic variants of the EGFR, general ineffectiveness of TKIs in patients with NSCLC who are current and former smokers necessitates identification of novel mechanisms to overcome this phenomenon. Previously, we showed that NSCLC cells harboring either wild-type (WT) EGFR or oncogenic mutant (MT) L858R EGFR become resistant to the effects of TKIs when exposed to cigarette smoke, evidenced by their autophosphorylation and prolonged downstream signaling. Here, we present Src as a target mediating cigarette smoke-induced resistance to TKIs in both WT EGFR- and L858R MT EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells. First, we show that cigarette smoke exposure of A549 cells leads to time-dependent activation of Src, which then abnormally binds to the WT EGFR causing TKI resistance, contrasting previous observations of constitutive binding between inactive Src and TKI-sensitive L858R MT EGFR. Next, we show that Src inhibition restores TKI sensitivity in cigarette smoke-exposed NSCLC cells, preventing EGFR autophosphorylation in the presence of erlotinib. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of a dominant-negative Src (Y527F/K295R) restores TKI sensitivity to A549 exposed to cigarette smoke. Importantly, the TKI resistance that emerges even in cigarette smoke-exposed L858R EGFR-expressing NSCLC cells could be eliminated with Src inhibition. Together, these findings offer new rationale for using Src inhibitors for treating TKI-resistant NSCLC commonly observed in smokers.

  14. Does the IMRT technique allow improvement of treatment plans (e.g. lung sparing) for lung cancer patients with small lung volume: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komosinska, K.; Kepka, L.; Gizynska, M.; Zawadzka, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer any advantages in comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for patients with small lung volume (SLV). Methods: Treatment planning was performed for 10 NSCLC patients with the smallest lung volume (mean: 2241 cc) among 200 patients from our database. For each patient 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were prepared. The goal was to deliver 66 Gy/33 fractions, with dose constraints: mean lung dose (MLD) < 20 Gy, V20 < 35%; spinal cord - Dmax < 45 Gy. When the plan could not meet these criteria, total dose was reduced. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared. We investigated: prescribed dose, coverage and conformity indices, MLD, V5-V65 in the lung. Results: In 4 out of 10 plans, 3D-CRT did not allow 66 Gy to be delivered, because of predicted pulmonary toxicity. These 4 cases included 3 for which we did not reach 66 Gy with IMRT; still, for these 3 plans the total dose was increased by an average of 9 Gy with IMRT in comparison with 3D-CRT. Coverage indices were similar for both techniques. Conformity indices were better for IMRT plans. MLD was lower in five IMRT and two 3D-CRT plans if equal doses were delivered. The decrease in MLD was seen for cases with large PTV and high PTV/lung volume ratio. Lung V5 was lower for all 3D-CRT plans, 47% vs. 57% for IMRT; V15 and above were larger for 3D-CRT Conclusion: In the planning study, IMRT seems to be a promising technique for cases with SLV, especially when associated with large PT V. (authors)

  15. A dosimetric comparison between traditionally planned and inverse planned radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, V.W.C.; Sham, J.S.T.; Kwong, D.L.W.

    2003-01-01

    This study applied inverse planning in 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and evaluated its dosimetric results by comparison with the forward planning of 3DCRT and inverse planning of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). For each of the 15 NSCLC patients recruited, the forward 3DCRT, inverse 3DCRT and inverse EVIRT plans were produced using the FOCUS treatment planning system. The dosimetric results and the planner's time of all treatment plans were recorded and compared. The inverse 3DCRT plans demonstrated the best target dose homogeneity among the three planning methods. The tumour control probability of the inverse 3DCRT plans was similar to the forward plans (p 0.217) but inferior to the IMRT plans (p < 0.001). A similar pattern was observed in uncomplicated tumour control. The average planning time for the inverse 3DCRT plans was the shortest and its difference was significant compared with the forward 3DCRT plans (p < 0.001) but not with the IMRT plans (p = 0.276). In conclusion, inverse planning for 3DCRT is a reasonable alternative to the forward planning for NSCLC patients with a reduction of the planner's time. However, further dose escalation and improvement of tumour control have to rely on IMRT. Copyright (2003) Australian Institute of Radiography

  16. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes in pulmonary function after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M; Brink, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    a negative impact on FVC. Long-term FEV1 and FVC were analyzed using linear regression. Treatment year and V60 had a significant impact on loss of FEV1. V60 had a significant impact on FVC changes. CONCLUSION: In this study, early PF change reached a plateau at 6months after the start of radiotherapy......INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with early and long-term pulmonary function (PF) changes after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients. PF was measured by spirometry i.e. forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC...

  18. Applying Mathematical Models to Surgical Patient Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. van Oostrum (Jeroen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOn a daily basis surgeons, nurses, and managers face cancellation of surgery, peak demands on wards, and overtime in operating rooms. Moreover, the lack of an integral planning approach for operating rooms, wards, and intensive care units causes low resource utilization and makes patient

  19. Economic impact of tissue testing and treatments of metastatic NSCLC in the era of personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Marie Graham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A paradigm-shift in the management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has resulted in many new therapies becoming available for patients with advanced disease. Stratification of treatment by histologic and molecular subtype is recommended in order to obtain the greatest clinical benefit for patients while minimizing adverse effects of treatment. However, these advances in diagnosis and treatment of NSCLC have come at a financial cost. This review highlights the economic impact of screening for molecular abnormalities and targeted treatment for advanced NSCLC. Major determinants of cost are drug acquisition and molecular testing. As technologies advance, molecular testing costs may reduce. However, we must collaborate with payers and manufacturers to ensure that high drug costs do not limit patient accessibility to potentially beneficial treatment.

  20. FDG PET evaluation of therapeutic response and toxicity after radiotherapy for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; MacManus, M.P.; Matthews, J.P.; Rischin, D.; Binns, D.; McKenzie, A.F.; Ball, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is recognised for staging and therapeutic planning of patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung (NSCLC). The potential for this technique to be used in the assessment of therapeutic response has also been highlighted but may be limited by false positive results due to inflammatory response, particularly early after radiotherapy (RT). To evaluate the utility of FEX PET for therapeutic monitoring early (<12 weeks) after completion of radical RT we prospectively evaluated metabolic response and radiation toxicity using a standardised scoring system in 73 consecutive patients. All 73 had evaluable PET scans but 6 of the CT scan results were considered non-evaluable for therapeutic response using WHO criteria. PET therapeutic response category differed from that by CT in 40/67 (60%) cases and in 80% of such cases suggested a more marked response than suggested by CT (p 0.0002). Multifactor analysis including PET response, CT response, performance status, weight loss and stage revealed that PET response was the only significant predictor of survival (p 0.0001). Radiation toxicity scores were inversely related to therapeutic response on both PET (p = 0.022) and CT (p =0.029). In particular, more severe (grade 2 or 3) radiotoxicity scores on PET were associated with a greater proportion of partial or complete responses on both PET and CT than were lower (grade 0 and 1) scores (p =0.0044 and 0.041 respectively) consistent with the known relationship between the radiosensitivity of normal host and tumoral tissues. Early after completion of radiotherapy for NSCLC, PET response provides better prognostic stratification than CT response. PET can also identify typical radiation toxicity changes which are associated with response to treatment. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Anamorelin hydrochloride for the treatment of cancer-anorexia-cachexia in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Garcia, Jose M

    2015-06-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anamorelin is a novel, orally active ghrelin receptor agonist in clinical development for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC. The aim of this review is to summarize preclinical and clinical studies evaluating anamorelin as a potential promising treatment for CACS in NSCLC. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of anamorelin for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC were reviewed. Anamorelin administration may lead to increases in food intake, body weight and lean body mass, and a stimulatory effect on growth hormone secretion in NSCLC patients. Anamorelin is well tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicities identified to date. Targeting ghrelin receptors presents the advantage of potentially addressing multiple mechanisms of CACS simultaneously including appetite, muscle protein balance, adipose tissue metabolism, energy expenditure and inflammation. Clinical data suggest that anamorelin is well tolerated and it effectively increases appetite, body weight and lean mass in patients with advanced NSCLC. Long-term safety remains unknown at this time. The potential synergistic effects of anamorelin with nutritional support or exercise as well as its efficacy/safety in other tumor types are also unknown.

  2. Radiotherapy treatment planning for patients with non-small cell lung cancer using positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdi, Yusuf E.; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Erdi, Alev K.; Macapinlac, Homer A.; Hu, Yu-Chi; Braban, Louise E.; Humm, John L.; Squire, Olivia D.; Chui, Chen-Shou; Larson, Steven M.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receive external beam radiation therapy as part of their treatment. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) commonly uses computed tomography (CT) to accurately delineate the target lesion and normal tissues. Clinical studies, however, indicate that positron emission tomography (PET) has higher sensitivity than CT in detecting and staging of mediastinal metastases. Imaging with fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) PET in conjunction with CT, therefore, can improve the accuracy of lesion definition. In this pilot study, we investigated the potential benefits of incorporating PET data into the conventional treatment planning of NSCLC. Case-by-case, we prospectively analyzed planning target volume (PTV) and lung toxicity changes for a cohort of patients. Materials and methods: We have included 11 patients in this study. They were immobilized in the treatment position and CT simulation was performed. Following CT simulation, PET scanning was performed in the treatment position using the same body cast that was produced for CT simulation and treatment. The PTV, along with the gross target volume (GTV) and normal organs, was first delineated using the CT data set. The CT and PET transmission images were then registered in the treatment planning system using either manual or automated methods, leading to consequent registration of the CT and emission images. The PTV was then modified using the registered PET emission images. The modified PTV is seen simultaneously on both CT and PET images, allowing the physician to define the PTV utilizing the information from both data sets. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for lesion and normal organs were generated using both CT-based and PET+CT-based treatment plans. Results: For all patients, there was a change in PTV outline based on CT images versus CT/PET fused images. In seven out of 11 cases, we found an increase in PTV volume (average increase of 19%) to

  3. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Nishio, Mizuho; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Takenaka, Daisuke; Seki, Shinichiro; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others

  4. Comparison of the utility of whole-body MRI with and without contrast-enhanced Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression techniques, conventional whole-body MRI, PET/CT and conventional examination for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Nishio, Mizuho [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Takenaka, Daisuke [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Tsubakimoto, Maho [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan); Sugimura, Kazuro [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic capabilities for assessment of recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by contrast-enhanced whole-body MRI (CE-WB-MRI) with and without CE-Quick 3D and double RF fat suppression technique (DFS), FDG-PET/CT and conventional radiological examinations. Materials and methods: A total of 134 pathologically proven and completely resected NSCLC patients (78 males, 56 females; mean age: 72 years) underwent FDG-PET/CT, CE-WB-MRI with and without Quick 3D and DFS at 3 T as well as conventional radiological examinations. The probability of recurrence was assessed with a 5-point scoring system on a per-patient basis, and final diagnosis was made by consensus between two readers. The capability for overall recurrence assessment by all the methods was compared by means of ROC analysis and their sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by means of McNemar's test. Results: Although areas under the curve did not show any significant differences, specificity (100%) and accuracy (95.5%) of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS were significantly higher than those of FDG-PET/CT (specificity: 93.6%, p = 0.02; accuracy: 89.6%, p = 0.01) and conventional radiological examinations (specificity: 92.7%, p = 0.01; accuracy: 91.0%, p = 0.03). In addition, specificity of CE-WB-MRI without CE-Quick 3D and DFS (100%) was significantly higher than that of FDG-PET/CT (p = 0.02) and conventional radiological examinations (p = 0.01). Conclusion: Specificity and accuracy of CE-WB-MRI with CE-Quick 3D and DFS for assessment of recurrence in NSCLC patients are at least as high as, or higher than those of others.

  5. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  6. Recent Advances in Targetable Therapeutics in Metastatic Non-Squamous NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranshu eBansal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common subtype of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. With the discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK rearrangements and effective targeted therapies, therapeutic options are expanding for patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Here, we review novel therapies in non-squamous NSCLC, which are directed against oncogenic targets, including EGFR, ALK, ROS1, BRAF, MET, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, RET and NTRK. With the rapidly evolving molecular testing and development of new targeted agents, our ability to further personalize therapy in non-squamous NSCLC is rapidly expanding.

  7. Combined effects of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and vATPase inhibitors in NSCLC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hyeon-Ok [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung-Eun [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soon [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, 120 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143–701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Bora [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Kyung, E-mail: jklee@kirams.re.kr [KIRAMS Radiation Biobank, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul, 139–706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Despite excellent initial clinical responses of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), many patients eventually develop resistance. According to a recent report, vacuolar H + ATPase (vATPase) is overexpressed and is associated with chemotherapy drug resistance in NSCLC. We investigated the combined effects of EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors and their underlying mechanisms in the regulation of NSCLC cell death. We found that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs (erlotinib, gefitinib, or lapatinib) and vATPase inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A) enhanced synergistic cell death compared to treatments with each drug alone. Treatment with bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A led to the induction of Bnip3 expression in an Hif-1α dependent manner. Knock-down of Hif-1α or Bnip3 by siRNA further enhanced cell death induced by bafilomycin A1, suggesting that Hif-1α/Bnip3 induction promoted resistance to cell death induced by the vATPase inhibitors. EGFR TKIs suppressed Hif-1α and Bnip3 expression induced by the vATPase inhibitors, suggesting that they enhanced the sensitivity of the cells to these inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. Taken together, we conclude that EGFR TKIs enhance the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to vATPase inhibitors by decreasing Hif-1α/Bnip3 expression. We suggest that combined treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC. - Highlights: • Co-treatment with EGFR TKIs and vATPase inhibitors induces synergistic cell death • EGFR TKIs enhance cell sensitivity to vATPase inhibitors via Hif-1α downregulation • Co-treatment of these inhibitors is potentially effective for the treatment of NSCLC.

  8. GAS5 modulated autophagy is a mechanism modulating cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N; Yang, G-Q; Shao, X-M; Wei, L

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the association between lncRNA GAS5 and cisplatin (DDP) resistance in NSCLC and further studied the regulative effect of GAS5 on autophagy and DDP resistance. GAS5 expression in cancerous and adjacent normal tissues from 15 NSCLC patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and the following surgery were measured using qRT-PCR analysis. GAS5 gain-and-loss study was performed using A549 and A549/DDP cells as an in-vitro model to investigate the effect of GAS5 on autophagy and cisplatin sensitivity. NSCLC tissues had a substantially lower expression of GAS5 than adjacent normal tissues. The NSCLC tissues from patients with progressive disease (PD) had even lower GAS5 expression. GAS5 knockdown increased DDP IC50 of A549 cells, while GAS5 overexpression decreased DDP IC50 of A549/DDP cells. A549/DDP cells had significantly higher basal autophagy than A549 cells. GAS5 knockdown resulted in decreased autophagy in A549 cells, while GAS5 overexpression led to increased autophagy in A549/DDP cells. Treatment with 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, significantly decreased DDP IC50 and promoted DDP-induced cell apoptosis in A549 cells. In addition, 3-MA also partly reversed the effect of GAS5 knockdown. In A549/DDP cells, GAS5 showed the similar effect as 3-MA in reducing DPP IC50 and promoting DDP-induced apoptosis and also presented synergic effect with 3-MA. GAS5 downregulation is associated with cisplatin resistance in NSCLC. GAS5 can inhibit autophagy and therefore enhance cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC cells.

  9. Analysis of esophageal-sparing treatment plans for patients with high-grade esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua; Bluett, Jaques B; Williamson, Ryan T; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Court, Laurence E

    2013-07-08

    We retrospectively generated IMRT plans for 14 NSCLC patients who had experienced grade 2 or 3 esophagitis (CTCAE version 3.0). We generated 11-beam and reduced esophagus dose plan types to compare changes in the volume and length of esophagus receiving doses of 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 Gy. Changes in planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage were also compared. If necessary, plans were renormalized to restore 95% PTV coverage. The critical organ doses examined were mean lung dose, mean heart dose, and volume of spinal cord receiving 50 Gy. The effect of interfractional motion was determined by applying a three-dimensional rigid shift to the dose grid. For the esophagus plan, the mean reduction in esophagus V50, V55, V60, V65, and V70 Gy was 2.8, 4.1, 5.9, 7.3, and 9.5 cm(3), respectively, compared with the clinical plan. The mean reductions in LE50, LE55, LE60, LE65, and LE70 Gy were 2.0, 3.0, 3.8, 4.0, and 4.6 cm, respectively. The mean heart and lung dose decreased 3.0 Gy and 2.4 Gy, respectively. The mean decreases in 90% and 95% PTV coverage were 1.7 Gy and 2.8 Gy, respectively. The normalized plans' mean reduction of esophagus V50, V55, V60, V65, and V70 Gy were 1.6, 2.0, 2.9, 3.9, and 5.5 cm(3), respectively, compared with the clinical plans. The normalized plans' mean reductions in LE50, LE55, LE60, LE65, and LE70 Gy were 4.9, 5.2, 5.4, 4.9, and 4.8 cm, respectively. The mean reduction in maximum esophagus dose with simulated interfractional motion was 3.0 Gy and 1.4 Gy for the clinical plan type and the esophagus plan type, respectively. In many cases, the esophagus dose can be greatly reduced while maintaining critical structure dose constraints. PTV coverage can be restored by increasing beam output, while still obtaining a dose reduction to the esophagus and maintaining dose constraints.

  10. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  11. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Predictive Biomarkers in the Treatment of Non- Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinton, Cindy; Ellis, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to improvements in patient survival and quality of life. It is unclear whether molecular abnormalities associated with NSCLC cell survival, growth and proliferation are useful in predicting treatment benefit. We conducted a systematic review to establish which biomarkers contribute meaningfully to the management of NSCLC. A team of researchers searched PubMed and conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, IASLC, USCAP) using MESH terms for NSCLC and randomized trials (RCT), plus keywords for variables of interest. Evidence from multiple RCTs confirmed that histologic subtype is prognostic for survival and predictive of treatment efficacy and/or toxicity in NSCLC. Likewise, activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC and should be assessed routinely. No biomarkers to date reliably predict response to anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapies. There are inconsistent data on the role of ERCC1, BRCA, Beta tubulin III, RRM1, K-RAS, or TP-53 in treatment decisions. These tests should not be routinely used in selecting treatment at this time, whereas EML4/ALK translocations predict responses to specific targeted agents, the optimal assessment of this molecular abnormality has yet to be established. Personalized care of patients with NSCLC based on biomarkers is increasingly important to both clinical practice and research

  12. Feasibility of accelerated radiotherapy (AR) using a concomitant boost for the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Wan, Jim; Paig, Camilo U.; Kun, Larry E.; Niell, H. Barry

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The feasibility of AR using a concomitant boost in the treatment of unresectable NSCLC was prospectively tested in a phase II study. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients were enrolled to the protocol between 11/90 and 5/93. Stage distribution was as follows: Medically inoperable stage I = 5 (T 1 = 1, T 2 = 4), stage IIIA = 1, and stage IIIA(N 2 ) = 14. Planned AR delivered a total dose of 65 Gy in 45 fractions over five weeks using a 'field within a field technique'. The large field (day 1, a.m.) encompassed the primary lesion and adjacent lymph nodes to 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction (fx). A CT planned small field (day 8, >6 hours apart in p.m.) included only the primary lesion and overt nodal disease to 20 Gy at 1.0 Gy/fx. Doses were not corrected for lung inhomogeneity. Results: Median age of the 20 male enrolled patients was 68 years (range = 42-80 years). Eighteen (90%) of 20 patients completed the planned AR without any interruptions in therapy. One patient experienced a 4 day interruption due to tumor related obstructive pneumonia while the other patient missed 2 days secondary to non-treatment related small bowel obstruction. No incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis was observed. One patient experienced pneumonitis within the radiation portal 1 month post-RT which response d to corticosteroid therapy; otherwise, no late sequelae were observed. The median total delivered dose was 65 Gy (range 64.0-65.4). At a minimum follow-up interval of 30 months, the 2-year Kaplan-Meier and median survival are 15% and 13.4 months, respectively for all 20 patients. Conclusion: AR using a concomitant boost to 65 Gy in 5 weeks for unresectable NSCLC is feasible with minimal acute or long term toxicity. Median survival in our study was similar to the chemo radiation arms of CALGB 8433 and RTOG 8808 protocols. Protocols which combine AR with chemotherapy should be explored for unresectable NSCLC

  13. [Significance and mechanism of MSCT perfusion scan on differentiation of NSCLC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Kang; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Mo-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Xiong, Zeng; Xia, Yu; Chen, Wei

    2009-06-01

    To determine the significance of MSCT perfusion scan on differentiation of NSCLC and to investigate its possible mechanisms. Forty four NSCLC patients underwent CT perfusion scan by MSCT. Among them, 22 cases were selected to detected the two-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TMAP), the relationships between CT perfusion parameters (BF, BV, PEI, TIP), and the differentiation of NSCLC were analysed by using the correlation analysis and trend test. Spearman correlation analysis was used to study the relationships between CT perfusion parameters, differentiation, and 2D-TMAP. The total BF, BV and PEI decreased with decreasing differentiation of NSCLC (P<0.05). The total PEI showed a positive correlation with the total MVD (P<0.05). There were negative correlations between the surrounding area BF, the total BF, BV, and PEI, the uncomplete lumen of the surrounding area MVD, and expression of PCNA, respectively (P<0.05). There were positive correlations between degree of differentiation and the uncomplete lumen of the surrounding area MVD (P<0.05). It was the same as degree of differentiation and expression of PCNA, VEGF, respectively. There were positive correlations between the uncomplete lumen of the surrounding area MVD and expression of VEGF, ephrinB2, EphB4, and PCNA, respectively (P<0.05). Perfusion parameters reflect the difference of density of vassels with mature functional lumen. Careful evaluation of the differences of blood flow pattern in pulmonary space-occupying lesions by MSCT perfusion scan can be used to identify the degree of NSCLC differentiation.

  14. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  15. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  16. Phase II trial of second-line erlotinib and digoxin for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Kayali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fadi Kayali, Muhamad A Janjua, Damian A Laber, Donald Miller, Goetz H KloeckerUniversity of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, KY, USABackground: In vitro digoxin sensitizes cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by chemotherapy. Inhibition of the Na/K-ATPase enzyme by ouabain disturbs the intracellular ion composition of cancer cells, altering cellular homeostasis. This suggests that inhibition of the Na/K pump results in cellular sensitization of malignant but not benign cells to the induction of apoptosis. Epidemiologic studies have also shown beneficial effects of digitalis in breast cancer incidence. At ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology 2007 our group presented a Phase II study showing encouraging results by adding digoxin to biochemotherapy for melanoma. Erlotinib is one of the standard second-line treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, with a response rate (RR of 10%. This study's hypothesis was that adding digoxin to erlotinib will improve the RR and time to progression (TTP in NSCLC.Methods: Patients with progressive disease (PD after chemotherapy were enrolled if they had an ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score from 0 to 2 and good organ function. Daily erlotinib 150 mg and digoxin 0.25 mg were taken by mouth. The digoxin dose was adjusted to keep levels between 1 and 2 ng/mL. Computed tomography scans were done every 6 weeks. Treatment continued until PD or significant toxicity occurred.Results: Patient accrual lasted from March 2006 until August 2008 and was stopped early at the time of interim analysis. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled, and 24 who completed at least 6 weeks of therapy are presented here. All patients had unresectable NSCLC stage III/IV at diagnosis. Median age was 61 (34–78, 14 were female, 17 had prior radiation (not involving the target lesions, 23 had one prior chemotherapy, and one subject had two. Only one patient was a never-smoker. Histologies were

  17. Improvements in patient treatment planning systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.J.; Wessol, D.E.; Nigg, D.W.; Atkinson, C.A.; Babcock, R.; Evans, J.

    1995-01-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Radiation treatment planning environment (BNCT-Rtpe) software system is used to develop treatment planning information. In typical use BNCT-Rtpe consists of three main components: (1) Semi-automated geometric modeling of objects (brain, target, eyes, sinus) derived from MRI, CT, and other medical imaging modalities, (2) Dose computations for these geometric models with rtt-MC, the INEL Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code, and (3) Dose contouring overlaid on medical images as well as generation of other dose displays. We continue to develop a planning system based on three-dimensional image-based reconstructions using Bspline surfaces. Even though this software is in an experimental state, it has been applied for large animal research and for an isolated case of treatment for a human glioma. Radiation transport is based on Monte Carlo, however there will be implementations of faster methods (e.g. diffusion theory) in the future. The important thing for treatment planning is the output which must convey, to the radiologist, the deposition of dose to healthy and target tissue. Many edits are available such that one can obtain contours registered to medical image, dose/volume histograms and most information required for treatment planning and response assessment. Recent work has been to make the process more automatic and easier to use. The interface, now implemented for contouring and reconstruction, utilizes the Xwindowing system and the MOTIF graphical users interface for effective interaction with the planner. Much work still remains before the tool can be applied in a routine clinical setting

  18. Advance care planning: the impact of Ceiling of Treatment plans in patients with Coordinate My Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Helen Lucy; Droney, Joanne; Callender, Tom; Shaw, Amanda; Riley, Julia

    2018-03-22

    The aim of this evaluation is to describe the components and results of urgent care planning in Coordinate My Care (CMC), a digital clinical service for patients with life-limiting illness, for use if a patient is unable to make or express choices. Ceiling of treatment (CoT) plans were created detailing where the patient would like to receive their care and how aggressive medical interventions should be. A retrospective service evaluation was completed of all CMC records created between December 2015 and September 2016 (n=6854). CMC records were divided into two cohorts: those with a CoT plan and those without. The factors associated with these cohorts were reviewed including age, diagnosis, resuscitation status and preferences for place of death (PPD). Analysis of the non-mandatory free text section was carried out. Two-thirds of patients had recorded decisions about CoT. Regardless of which CoT option was chosen, for most patients, PPD was home or care home. Patients with a CoT plan were more likely to have a documented resuscitation status.Patients with a CoT were more likely to die in their PPD (82%vs71%, OR 1.79, pcare planning. Three facets of urgent care planning identified include PPD, CoT and resuscitation status. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Patient mix optimisation in hospital admission planning: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2002-01-01

    Admissions planning decides on the number of patients admitted for a specialty each day, but also on the mix of patients admitted. Within a specialty different categories of patients can be distinguished on behalf of their requirement of resources. The type of resources required for an admission may

  20. Patient mix optimisation in hospital admission planning : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2001-01-01

    Admissions planning decides on the number of patients admitted for a specialty each day, but also on the mix of patients admitted. Within a specialty different categories of patients can be distinguished on behalf of their requirement of resources. The type of resources required for an admission may

  1. Integrated Care Planning for Cancer Patients: A Scoping Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Irfan Khan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been a growing emphasis on the use of integrated care plans to deliver cancer care. However little is known about how integrated care plans for cancer patients are developed including featured core activities, facilitators for uptake and indicators for assessing impact. Methods: Given limited consensus around what constitutes an integrated care plan for cancer patients, a scoping review was conducted to explore the components of integrated care plans and contextual factors that influence design and uptake. Results: Five types of integrated care plans based on the stage of cancer care: surgical, systemic, survivorship, palliative and comprehensive (involving a transition between stages are described in current literature. Breast, esophageal and colorectal cancers were common disease sites. Multi-disciplinary teams, patient needs assessment and transitional planning emerged as key features. Provider buy-in and training alongside informational technology support served as important facilitators for plan uptake. Provider-level measurement was considerably less robust compared to patient and system-level indicators. Conclusions: Similarities in design features, components and facilitators across the various types of integrated care plans indicates opportunities to leverage shared features and enable a management lens that spans the trajectory of a patient’s journey rather than a phase-specific silo approach to care.

  2. Operational antecedents of integrated patient planning in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, Justin; van der Vaart, T.; van Donk, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - Hospitals struggle to integrate the planning from different departments; resulting in unacceptable waiting times for patients. The literature mainly addresses general, organizational factors inhibiting or enabling integration and omits important factors stemming from the care delivery

  3. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaysher, Sharon; Modi, Paul; Rahamim, Joe; Smith, Mark E; Amer, Khalid; Addis, Bruce; Poole, Matthew; Narayanan, Ajit; Gulliford, Tim J; Andreotti, Peter E; Cree, Ian A; Yiannakis, Dennis; Gabriel, Francis G; Johnson, Penny; Polak, Marta E; Knight, Louise A; Goldthorpe, Zoe; Peregrin, Katharine; Gyi, Mya

    2009-01-01

    NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA) and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer

  4. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Khalid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. Methods The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Results There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Conclusion Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer.

  5. Prognostic value and molecular correlates of a CT image-based quantitative pleural contact index in early stage NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juheon; Cui, Yi; Li, Bailiang; Wu, Jia; Gensheimer, Michael F. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Sun, Xiaoli [First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Radiotherapy Department, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Li, Dengwang [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Shandong Normal University, Shandong Province Key Laboratory of Medical Physics and Image Processing Technology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, School of Physics and Electronics, Jinan Shi (China); Loo, Billy W.; Li, Ruijiang [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford University School of Medicine, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2018-02-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value and molecular basis of a CT-derived pleural contact index (PCI) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analysed seven NSCLC cohorts. A quantitative PCI was defined on CT as the length of tumour-pleura interface normalised by tumour diameter. We evaluated the prognostic value of PCI in a discovery cohort (n = 117) and tested in an external cohort (n = 88) of stage I NSCLC. Additionally, we identified the molecular correlates and built a gene expression-based surrogate of PCI using another cohort of 89 patients. To further evaluate the prognostic relevance, we used four datasets totalling 775 stage I patients with publically available gene expression data and linked survival information. At a cutoff of 0.8, PCI stratified patients for overall survival in both imaging cohorts (log-rank p = 0.0076, 0.0304). Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling was enriched among genes associated with PCI (p = 0.0003). The genomic surrogate of PCI remained an independent predictor of overall survival in the gene expression cohorts (hazard ratio: 1.46, p = 0.0007) adjusting for age, gender, and tumour stage. CT-derived pleural contact index is associated with ECM remodelling and may serve as a noninvasive prognostic marker in early stage NSCLC. (orig.)

  6. FDG-PET-based radiotherapy planning in lung cancer. Optimum breathing protocol and patient positioning - an intraindividual comparison; FDG-PET-basierte Bestrahlungsplanung von nicht kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinomen. Optimales Atemprotokoll und Patientenpositionierung - ein intraindividueller Vergleich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grgic, A.; Schaefer-Schuler, A.; Kirsch, C.M.; Hellwig, D. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Kremp, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2008-12-15

    FDG-PET and PET / CT is increasingly used for radiotherapy (RT) planning in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The planning process is often based on separately-acquired FDG-PET / CT and planning CT. We compared intraindividual differences between PET acquired in diagnostic and radiotherapy treatment position coregistered with planning CTs acquired using different breathing protocols. Sixteen patients with NSCLC underwent two PET acquisitions (diagnostic position-D-PET, radiotherapy position-RT-PET) and three planning-CT acquisitions (expiration-EXP, inspiration-INS, mid-breathhold-MID) on the same day. All scans were rigidly coregistered resulting in six fused datasets: D-INS, D-EXP, D-MID, RT-INS, RT-EXP and RT-MID. Fusion accuracy was assessed by three readers at eight anatomical landmarks: lung apices, aortic arch, heart, spine, sternum, carina, diaphragm and tumor using an alignment score ranging from 1 (no alignment) to 5 (exact alignment). RT-PET showed better alignment with any CT than D-PET (p < 0.001). With regard to breathing, RT-MID showed the best mean alignment score (3.7 {+-} 1.0) followed by RT-EXP (3.5 {+-} 0.9) and RT-INS (3.0 {+-} 0.8), all differences being significant (p < 0.001). Comparing the alignment scores with regard to anatomical landmarks, the largest deviations were found at diaphragm, heart and apices. Overall, there was a fair agreement (? = 0.48; p < 0.001) among the three readers. Significantly better fusion of PET and planning-CT can be reached with PET acquired in RT-position. The best intraindividual fusion results are obtained with the planning-CT performed during mid-breathhold. Our data justify the acquisition of a separate planning-PET in RT-treatment position if only a diagnostic PET-scan is available. (orig.)

  7. Promoter methylation of APC and RAR-β genes as prognostic markers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hongxiang; Zhang, Zhenrong; Qing, Xin; Wang, Xiaowei; Liang, Chaoyang; Liu, Deruo

    2016-02-01

    Aberrant promoter hypermethylations of tumor suppressor genes are promising markers for lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine methylation status at APC and RAR-β promoters in primary NSCLC, and whether they have any relationship with survival. APC and RAR-β promoter methylation status were determined in 41 NSCLC patients using methylation specific PCR. APC promoter methylation was detectable in 9 (22.0%) tumor samples and 6 (14.6%) corresponding non-tumor samples (P=0.391). RAR-β promoter methylation was detectable in 13 (31.7%) tumor samples and 4 (9.8%) corresponding non-tumor samples (P=0.049) in the NSCLC patients. APC promoter methylation was found to be associated with T stage (P=0.046) and nodal status (P=0.019) in non-tumor samples, and with smoking (P=0.004) in tumor samples. RAR-β promoter methylation was found associated with age (P=0.031) in non-tumor samples and with primary tumor site in tumor samples. Patients with APC promoter methylation in tumor samples showed significantly longer survival than patients without it (Log-rank P=0.014). In a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors, APC methylation in tumor samples was an independent prognostic factor (P=0.012), as were N1 positive lymph node number (P=0.025) and N2 positive lymph node number (P=0.06). Our study shows that RAR-β methylation detected in lung tissue may be used as a predictive marker for NSCLC diagnosis and that APC methylation in tumor sample may be a useful marker for superior survival in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Efficacy of sorafenib in BRAF-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and no response in synchronous BRAF wild type-hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Chiadini, Elisa; Faloppi, Luca; Marisi, Giorgia; Delmonte, Angelo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Lucchesi, Alessandro; Oboldi, Devil; Dubini, Alessandra; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Ulivi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor with a demonstrated activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and it is currently used for the treatment of these pathologies. Ongoing clinical trials are studying its activity in other malignancies, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, no biological marker is known to define either the sensitivity or resistance to the drug. Here we report a case of a patient with two synchronous tumors, HCC and NSCLC, with metastases in the contralateral lung and bone. The patient was treated with gemcitabine as first line, with a resulting progressive disease after two months, and then with sorafenib at standard dosage in the second line setting. After 6 months of treatment CT scan showed a partial response in the primary lesion of the lung, complete response of the metastasis in the contralateral lung, and stability of HCC. The patient had progression in the lung, liver and bone after 13 months of therapy. A molecular characterization of NSCLC and HCC lesions was performed, revealing a BRAF exon 11 mutation (G469V) only in NSCLC. We hypothesize that the response observed in NSCLC lesions could be due to the presence of BRAF mutation, and that this alteration could be responsible in determining sorafenib sensitivity. Results observed in this case encourage further research on the activity of sorafenib in both HCC and NSCLC, based on the presence of BRAF mutation. This could lead to a selection of HCC patients to be treated with this drug, and could help identify a novel treatment strategy for BRAF-mutated NSCLC patients

  9. Risk of intracranial hemorrhage and cerebrovascular accidents in non-small cell lung cancer brain metastasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Geetika; Rana, Vishal; Wallace, Suzy; Taylor, Sarah; Debnam, Matthew; Feng, Lei; Suki, Dima; Karp, Daniel; Stewart, David; Oh, Yun

    2009-03-01

    Brain metastases confer significant morbidity and a poorer survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted antiangiogenic therapies (AAT) have demonstrated benefit for patients with metastatic NSCLC and are expected to directly inhibit the pathophysiology and morbidity of brain metastases, yet patients with brain metastases have been excluded from most clinical trials of AAT for fear of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The underlying risk of ICH from NSCLC brain metastases is low, but needs to be quantitated to plan clinical trials of AAT for NSCLC brain metastases. Data from MD Anderson Cancer Center Tumor Registry and electronic medical records from January 1998 to March 2006 was interrogated. Two thousand one hundred forty-three patients with metastatic NSCLC registering from January 1998 to September 2005 were followed till March 2006. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with and 1,367 patients without brain metastases were followed till death, date of ICH, or last date of study, whichever occurred first. The incidence of ICH seemed to be higher in those with brain metastasis compared with those without brain metastases, in whom they occurred as result of cerebrovascular accidents. However, the rates of symptomatic ICH were not significantly different. All ICH patients with brain metastasis had received radiation therapy for them and had been free of anticoagulation. Most of the brain metastasis-associated ICH's were asymptomatic, detected during increased radiologic surveillance. The rates of symptomatic ICH, or other cerebrovascular accidents in general were similar and not significantly different between the two groups. In metastatic NSCLC patients, the incidence of spontaneous ICH appeared to be higher in those with brain metastases compared with those without, but was very low in both groups without a statistically significant difference. These data suggest a minimal risk of clinically significant ICH for NSCLC

  10. Association of BIM Deletion Polymorphism and BIM-γ RNA Expression in NSCLC with EGFR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Kazutoshi; Kakimoto, Atsushi; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kaburaki, Kyohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Takahiro; Makino, Takashi; Otsuka, Hajime; Sano, G O; Sugino, Keishi; Sakamoto, Susumu; Takai, Yujiro; Tochigi, Naobumi; Iyoda, Akira; Homma, Sakae

    This pilot study assessed the association of BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform in patients with EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 33 patients with EGFR-positive NSCLC treated with gefitinib. BIM deletion polymorphism and BIM RNA isoform (EL/L/S/γ) were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). BIM-γ expression was significantly higher in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism than among those without BIM deletion polymorphism inside tumors (p=0.038) and around tumors (p=0.0024). Relative BIM-γ expression was significantly higher in patients with BIM deletion polymorphism than among those without BIM deletion polymorphism (p=0.0017). Patients with BIM-γ had significantly shorter progression-free survival than those without BIM-γ (median: 304 vs. 732 days; p=0.023). Expression of BIM-γ mRNA and BIM deletion polymorphism were strongly associated. BIM-γ overexpression may have a role in apoptosis related to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  11. Is IMRT Superior or Inferior to 3DCRT in Radiotherapy for NSCLC? A Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingsheng Hu

    Full Text Available There are no adequate data to determine whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is superior to three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This meta-analysis was conducted to compare the clinical outcomes of IMRT and 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.No exclusions were made based on types of study design. We performed a literature search in PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane library databases from their inceptions to April 30, 2015. The overall survival (OS and relative risk (RR of radiation pneumonitis and radiation oesophagitis were evaluated. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality and extracted data. Publication bias was evaluated by funnel plot using Egger's test results.From the literature search, 10 retrospective studies were collected, and of those, 5 (12,896 patients were selected for OS analysis, 4 (981 patients were selected for radiation pneumonitis analysis, and 4 (1339 patients were selected for radiation oesophagitis analysis. Cox multivariate proportional hazards models revealed that 3DCRT and IMRT had similar OS (HR = 0.96, P = 0.477 but that IMRT reduced the incidence of grade 2 radiation pneumonitis (RR = 0.74, P = 0.009 and increased the incidence of grade 3 radiation oesophagitis (RR = 2.47, P = 0.000.OS of IMRT for NSCLC is not inferior to that of 3DCRT, but IMRT significantly reduces the risk of radiation pneumonitis and increases the risk of radiation oesophagitis compared to 3DCRT.

  12. Patients with hip prosthesis: radiotherapy treatment planning considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, K.M.; Supe, Sanjay S.

    2000-01-01

    The number of patients with hip prosthesis undergoing radiotherapy for pelvic cancer worldwide is increasing. This might be of importance depending on the materials in the prosthesis and whether any of the treatment fields are involved in the prosthesis. Radiotherapy planning involving the pelvic region of patients having total hip prosthesis has been found to be difficult due to the effect of the prosthesis on the dose distribution. This review is intended to project dosimetric considerations and possible solutions to this uncommon problem

  13. Health-related quality-of-life in a randomized phase III first-line study of gefitinib versus carboplatin/paclitaxel in clinically selected patients from Asia with advanced NSCLC (IPASS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprasert, Sumitra; Duffield, Emma; Saijo, Nagahiro; Wu, Yi-Long; Yang, James Chih-Hsin; Chu, Da-Tong; Liao, Meilin; Chen, Yuh-Min; Kuo, Han-Pin; Negoro, Shunichi; Lam, Kwok Chi; Armour, Alison; Magill, Patrick; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Evaluation of health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) and symptom improvement were preplanned secondary objectives for the overall population and posthoc analyses for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive/negative subgroups in IPASS. HRQoL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) and Trial Outcome Index (TOI); symptom improvement by the Lung Cancer Subscale (LCS). Improvements defined as: 6 or more (FACT-L; TOI), 2 or more (LCS) points increase maintained for 21 or more days. Overall (n = 1151/1217 evaluable), HRQoL improvement rates were significantly greater with gefitinib versus carboplatin/paclitaxel; symptom improvement rates were similar for both treatments. Significantly more patients recorded improvements in HRQoL and symptoms with gefitinib in the EGFR mutation-positive subgroup (n = 259; FACT-L 70.2% versus 44.5%; odds ratio, 3.01 [95% confidence interval, 1.79-5.07]; p < 0.001; TOI 70.2% versus 38.3%; 3.96 [2.33-6.71]; p < 0.001; LCS 75.6% versus 53.9%; 2.70 [1.58-4.62]; p < 0.001), and with carboplatin/paclitaxel in the EGFR mutation-negative subgroup (n = 169; FACT-L 14.6% versus 36.3%; odds ratio, 0.31 [0.15-0.65]; p = 0.002; TOI 12.4% versus 28.8%; 0.35 [0.16-0.79]; p = 0.011; LCS 20.2% versus 47.5%; 0.28 [0.14-0.55]; p < 0.001). Median time-to-worsening (months) FACT-L score was longer with gefitinib versus carboplatin/paclitaxel for the overall population (8.3 versus 2.5) and EGFR mutation-positive subgroup (15.6 versus 3.0), and similar for both treatments in the EGFR mutation-negative subgroup (1.4 versus 1.4). Median time-to-improvement with gefitinib was 8 days in patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors who improved. HRQoL and symptom endpoints were consistent with efficacy outcomes in IPASS and favored gefitinib in patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors and carboplatin/paclitaxel in patients with EGFR mutation-negative tumors.

  14. Patient mix optimisation for inpatient planning with multiple resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, J.M.H.; Adan, I.J.B.F.; Dellaert, N.P.; Jeunet, J.; Bekkers, J.A.; Tanfani, E.; Testi, A.

    2012-01-01

    This contribution addresses the planning of admissions of surgical patients, requiring different resources such as beds and nursing capacity at wards, operating rooms and operating theatre personnel at an operating theatre, intensive care beds and intensive care nursing capacity at an intensive care

  15. Pattern of Family Planning Methods used by Antenatal Patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at assessing the pattern of family planning methods used by antenatal patients at Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. The study was conducted between December,2007 and February,2008 at the antenatal clinic of the hospital. Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ethical committee of ...

  16. Loss of tumour-specific ATM protein expression is an independent prognostic factor in early resected NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lars F; Klimowicz, Alexander C; Otsuka, Shannon; Elegbede, Anifat A; Petrillo, Stephanie K; Williamson, Tyler; Williamson, Chris T; Konno, Mie; Lees-Miller, Susan P; Hao, Desiree; Morris, Don; Magliocco, Anthony M; Bebb, D Gwyn

    2017-06-13

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is critical in maintaining genomic integrity. In response to DNA double-strand breaks, ATM phosphorylates downstream proteins involved in cell-cycle checkpoint arrest, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Here we investigate the frequency, and influence of ATM deficiency on outcome, in early-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tissue microarrays, containing 165 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded resected NSCLC tumours from patients diagnosed at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Canada, between 2003 and 2006, were analyzed for ATM expression using quantitative fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Both malignant cell-specific ATM expression and the ratio of ATM expression within malignant tumour cells compared to that in the surrounding tumour stroma, defined as the ATM expression index (ATM-EI), were measured and correlated with clinical outcome. ATM loss was identified in 21.8% of patients, and was unaffected by clinical pathological variables. Patients with low ATM-EI tumours had worse survival outcomes compared to those with high ATM-EI (p ATM-deficient patients may derive greater benefit from guideline-recommended adjuvant chemotherapy following surgical resection. Taken together, these results indicate that ATM loss seems to be an early event in NSCLC carcinogenesis and is an independent prognostic factor associated with worse survival in stage II/III patients.

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH)2D3 in NSCLC Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song; Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR high ) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR low and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located stage I NSCLC. A multicenter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schanne, Daniel H.; Nestle, Ursula; Grosu, Anca L. [Universitaetsklinik Freiburg, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Freiburg (Germany); Allgaeuer, Michael [Barmherzige Brueder, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Regensburg (Germany); Andratschke, Nicolaus; Molls, Michael [TU Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Appold, Steffen [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden (Germany); Dieckmann, Ute [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Wien, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wien (Austria); Ernst, Iris [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Muenster (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [LMU Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Muenchen (Germany); Holy, Richard [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Aachen (Germany); Nevinny-Stickel, Meinhard [Medizinischen Universitaet Innsbruck, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Innsbruck (Austria); Semrau, Sabine [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Strahlenklinik Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Wittig, Andrea [Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Marburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-08-27

    The purpose of this work is to analyze patterns of care and outcome after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located, early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to address the question of potential risk for increased toxicity in this entity. A total of 90 patients with centrally located NSCLC were identified among 613 cases in a database of 13 German and Austrian academic radiotherapy centers. The outcome of centrally located NSCLC was compared to that of cases with peripheral tumor location from the same database. Patients with central tumors most commonly presented with UICC stage IB (50 %), while the majority of peripheral lesions were stage IA (56 %). Average tumor diameters were 3.3 cm (central) and 2.8 cm (peripheral). Staging PET/CT was available for 73 and 74 % of peripheral and central tumors, respectively. Biopsy was performed in 84 % (peripheral) and 88 % (central) of cases. Doses varied significantly between central and peripheral lesions with a median BED{sub 10} of 72 Gy and 84 Gy, respectively (p < 0.001). Fractionation differed as well with medians of 5 (central) and 3 (peripheral) fractions (p < 0.001). In the Kaplan-Meier analysis, 3-year actuarial overall survival was 29 % (central) and 51 % (peripheral; p = 0.004) and freedom from local progression was 52 % (central) and 84 % (peripheral; p < 0.001). Toxicity after treatment of central tumors was low with no grade III/IV and one grade V event. Mortality rates were 0 and 1 % after 30 and 60 days, respectively. Local tumor control in patients treated with SBRT for centrally located, early-stage NSCLC was favorable, provided ablative radiation doses were prescribed. This was, however, not the case in the majority of patients, possibly due to concerns about treatment-related toxicity. Reported toxicity was low, but prospective trials are needed to resolve the existing uncertainties and to establish safe high-dose regimens for this cohort of patients. (orig.) [German] Ziel

  19. Benefit-Risk Summary of Nivolumab for Patients With Metastatic Squamous Cell Lung Cancer After Platinum-Based Chemotherapy: A Report From the US Food and Drug Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazandjian, Dickran; Khozin, Sean; Blumenthal, Gideon; Zhang, Lijun; Tang, Shenghui; Libeg, Meredith; Kluetz, Paul; Sridhara, Rajeshwari; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (SQ NSCLC) is a serious and life-threatening malignant condition with unmet medical need. In late December 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) obtained the data monitoring committee report of a planned interim analysis of a trial in second-line SQ NSCLC (CM017) that demonstrated an overall survival benefit for patients treated with nivolumab compared with docetaxel. In that trial, 272 patients with metastatic SQ NSCLC patients had been randomized to receive nivolumab (n = 135) or docetaxel (n = 137). Median overall survival was 9.2 months for patients randomized to nivolumab and 6.0 months for those randomized to docetaxel (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.44-0.79; P chemotherapy. The approval provides an important treatment option for these patients, affecting routine care and clinical trials.

  20. Optimal Diet Planning for Eczema Patient Using Integer Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen Sheng, Low; Sufahani, Suliadi

    2018-04-01

    Human diet planning is conducted by choosing appropriate food items that fulfill the nutritional requirements into the diet formulation. This paper discusses the application of integer programming to build the mathematical model of diet planning for eczema patients. The model developed is used to solve the diet problem of eczema patients from young age group. The integer programming is a scientific approach to select suitable food items, which seeks to minimize the costs, under conditions of meeting desired nutrient quantities, avoiding food allergens and getting certain foods into the diet that brings relief to the eczema conditions. This paper illustrates that the integer programming approach able to produce the optimal and feasible solution to deal with the diet problem of eczema patient.

  1. Loss of lung function after chemo-radiotherapy for NSCLC measured by perfusion SPECT/CT: Correlation with radiation dose and clinical morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Møller, Ditte S; Khalil, Azza A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to assess dose and time dependence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in regional lung function measured with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the lung and relate these changes to the symptomatic endpoint of radiation pneumonitis (RP......) in patients treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients scheduled to receive curative RT of minimum 60 Gy were included prospectively in the study. Lung perfusion SPECT/CT was performed before and three months after RT. Reconstructed SPECT/CT data were registered...

  2. Monocarboxylate transporters 1-4 in NSCLC: MCT1 is an independent prognostic marker for survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte Eilertsen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs 1-4 are lactate transporters crucial for cancers cells adaption to upregulated glycolysis. Herein, we aimed to explore their prognostic impact on disease-specific survival (DSS in both cancer and tumor stromal cells in NSCLC. METHODS: Tissue micro arrays (TMAs were constructed, representing both cancer and stromal tumor tissue from 335 unselected patients diagnosed with stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate the expression of MCT1-4. RESULTS: In univariate analyses; ↓ MCT1 (P = 0.021 and ↑ MCT4 (P = 0.027 expression in cancer cells, and ↑ MCT1 (P = 0.003, ↓ MCT2 (P = 0.006, ↓ MCT3 (P = 0.020 expression in stromal cells correlated significantly with a poor DSS. In multivariate analyses; ↓ MCT1 expression in cancer cells (HR: 1.9, CI 95%: 1.3-2.8, P = 0.001, ↓ MCT2 (HR: 2.4, CI 95%: 1.5-3.9, P<0.001, ↓ MCT3 (HR: 1.9, CI 95%: 1.1-3.5, P = 0.031 and ↑ MCT1 expression in stromal cells (HR: 1.7, CI 95%: 1.1-2.7, P = 0.016 were significant independent poor prognostic markers for DSS. CONCLUSIONS: We provide novel information of MCT1 as a candidate marker for prognostic stratification in NSCLC. Interestingly, MCT1 shows diverging, independent prognostic impact in the cancer cell and stromal cell compartments.

  3. Smoking Cessation in Cardiac Patients: The Influence of Action Plans, Coping Plans and Self-Efficacy on Quitting Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac…

  4. Age dependent prognosis in concurrent chemo-radiation of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . Material and methods. Altogether, 478 patients completed radical radiotherapy in doses of 60-66 Gy/30-33 fractions from 1995 to June 2012; 137 of the patients had concurrent chemotherapy. The data was analyzed in age groups ... specific survival the hazard ratio was related to the use of concurrent chemotherapy was 0.49 (95% CI 0.29; 0.82), 0.68 (95% CI 0.48; 0.98) and 1.01 (95% CI 0.67; 1.51) for the age groups ..., the results might be due to selection bias, thus reports from a cohort of consecutively treated patients are warranted. The current single institution study reports on the influence of age on survival of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy combined with or without concurrent chemotherapy...

  5. The impact of induction chemotherapy on the dosimetric parameters of subsequent radiotherapy: an investigation of 30 consecutive patients with locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer and modern radiation planning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Jonathan D; Sobremonte, Angela; Hillebrandt, Evangeline; Allen, Pamela K; Gomez, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influence of induction chemotherapy (ICT) on dosimetric outcomes in patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive chemoradiation (CRT). 30 patients with inoperable stage II-III NSCLC treated with 2–4 cycles of ICT followed by definitive CRT to ≥ 60 Gy were selected. Tumor response to chemotherapy was scored by RECIST criteria. Treatment plans based on tumor extent prior to chemotherapy were generated based on equivalent planning constraints and techniques as the original post-chemotherapy plans. Dosimetric parameters predictive of toxicity for lung, esophagus, heart, and spinal cord were compared amongst the pre- and post-ICT plans. The majority of patients (70%) experienced an overall reduction in GTV size between the pre-ICT imaging and the time of simulation. Comparing pre-and post-ICT diagnostic imaging, 5 patients met the RECIST criteria for response, 23 were classified as stable, and 2 experienced disease progression on diagnostic imaging. Despite a significantly reduced GTV size in the post-ICT group, no systematic improvements in normal tissue doses were seen amongst the entire cohort. This result persisted amongst the subgroup of patients with larger pre-ICT GTV tumor volumes (>100 cc 3 ). Among patients with RECIST-defined response, a significant reduction in lung mean dose (1.9 Gy absolute, median 18.2 Gy to 16.4 Gy, p = 0.04) and V 20, the percentage of lung receiving 20 Gy (3.1% absolute, median 29.3% to 26.3%, p = 0.04) was observed. In the non-responding group of patients, an increased esophageal V 50 was found post-chemotherapy (median 28.9% vs 30.1%, p = 0.02). For patients classified as having a response by RECIST to ICT, modest improvements in V 20 and mean lung dose were found. However, these benefits were not realized for the cohort as a whole or for patients with larger tumors upfront. Given the variability of tumor response to ICT, the a priori impact of induction chemotherapy to

  6. Dosimetric comparison between helical tomotherapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Ling-Ling; Feng, Lin-Chun; Wang, Yun-Lai; Dai, Xiang-Kun; Xie, Chuan-Bin

    2011-06-01

    Helical tomotherapy (HT) is a new image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. It is reported that HT plan for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can give better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the lung than IMRT plan. We compared the dosimetric characteristics of HT for NSCLC with those of conventional IMRT to observe the superiority of HT. There was a comparative case series comprising 10 patients with NSCLC. Computed tomographic (CT) images of delineated targets were transferred to the PrecisePlan planning system (IMRT) and Tomo planning system (HT). The prescription doses were 70 Gy/33F for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the visible lymph nodes (GTVnd), and 60 Gy/33F for the clinical target volume (CTV) and the clinical target volume of the visible lymph nodes (CTVnd). The dose restrictions for organs at risk were as follows: the maximum dose to spinal cord ≤ 45 Gy, V20 to the total lungs 0.05). The maximum doses to the spinal cord, heart, esophagus and trachea in the HT plan were lower than those in the IMRT plan, but the differences were not statistically significant. The HT plan provids better dose uniformity, dose gradients, and protection for the organs at risk. It can reduce the high-dose radiation volume for lung and the MLD, but may deliver a larger lung volume of low-dose radiation.

  7. Detection of EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a novel mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Huiyi; Zhao, Yanwei; Liu, Wenchao; Wu, Shiyang; He, Jiaying; Luo, Xiaodi; Zhu, Zeyao; Xu, Jiasen; Zhou, Qinghua; Ren-Heidenreich, Lifen

    2012-09-01

    We have developed and standardized a novel technology, mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL), for clinical detection of EGFR mutations. The MEL integrates a mutant-enriched PCR procedure with liquidchip technology for detections of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R mutation on both formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides and plasma samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The detection sensitivity was 0.1% of mutant DNA in the presence of its wild-type DNA. The cross-reaction rate was lower than 5%. To evaluate the MEL platform, the EGFR mutation status of 59 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with EGFRTKIs (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors) were tested on their FFPE samples. EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected in 21 patients (21/59) and 76.2% (16/21) of them had partial response to the EGFR-TKIs, while by sequencing method, only 4 (4/59) mutations were detected. Plasma samples from 627 patients with various stages of NSCLC were examined with the MEL and 22% of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected. Furthermore, in patients with advanced disease there are more mutations detected in plasma samples than in patients with less advanced disease. In conclusion, the MEL is a sensitive, stable, and robust technology for detecting EGFR DNA mutations from both FFPE and plasma samples from patients with NSCLC and is now routinely used for clinical diagnosis.

  8. CMS proposes prioritizing patient preferences, linking patients to follow-up care in discharge planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Hospital providers voice concerns about a proposed rule by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) that would require providers to devote more resources to discharge planning. The rule would apply to inpatients as well as emergency patients requiring comprehensive discharge plans as opposed to discharge instructions. CMS states that the rule would ensure the prioritization of patient preferences and goals in the discharge planning process, and also would prevent avoidable complications and readmissions. However, hospital and emergency medicine leaders worry that community resources are not yet in place to facilitate the links and follow-up required in the proposed rule, and that the costs associated with implementation would be prohibitive. The proposed rule would apply to acute care hospitals, EDs, long-term care facilities, inpatient rehabilitation centers, and home health agencies. Regardless of the setting, though, CMS is driving home the message that patient preferences should be given more weight during the discharge planning process. Under the rule, hospitals or EDs would need to develop a patient-centered discharge plan within 24 hours of admission or registration, and complete the plan prior to discharge or transfer to another facility. Under the rule, emergency physicians would determine which patients require a comprehensive discharge plan. Both the American Hospital Association and the American College of Emergency Physicians worry that hospitals will have to take on more staff, invest in training, and make changes to their electronic medical record systems to implement the provisions in the proposed rule.

  9. Therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient: safety planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarazzo, Bridget B; Homaifar, Beeta Y; Wortzel, Hal S

    2014-05-01

    This column is the fourth in a series describing a model for therapeutic risk management of the suicidal patient. Previous columns presented an overview of the therapeutic risk management model, provided recommendations for how to augment risk assessment using structured assessments, and discussed the importance of risk stratification in terms of both severity and temporality. This final column in the series discusses the safety planning intervention as a critical component of therapeutic risk management of suicide risk. We first present concerns related to the relatively common practice of using no-suicide contracts to manage risk. We then present the safety planning intervention as an alternative approach and provide recommendations for how to use this innovative strategy to therapeutically mitigate risk in the suicidal patient.

  10. Combined use of anti-ErbB monoclonal antibodies and erlotinib enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of wild-type erlotinib-sensitive NSCLC cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavazzoni Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an established target for anti-cancer treatment in different tumour types. Two different strategies have been explored to inhibit this pivotal molecule in epithelial cancer development: small molecules TKIs and monoclonal antibodies. ErbB/HER-targeting by monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and trastuzumab or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors as gefitinib or erlotinib has been proven effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results In this study we explored the potential of combining either erlotinib with cetuximab or trastuzumab to improve the efficacy of EGFR targeted therapy in EGFR wild-type NSCLC cell lines. Erlotinib treatment was observed to increase EGFR and/or HER2 expression at the plasma membrane level only in NSCLC cell lines sensitive to the drug inducing protein stabilization. The combined treatment had marginal effect on cell proliferation but markedly increased antibody-dependent, NK mediated, cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, in the Calu-3 xenograft model, the combination significantly inhibited tumour growth when compared with erlotinib and cetuximab alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that erlotinib increases surface expression of EGFR and/or HER2 only in EGFR-TKI sensitive NSCLC cell lines and, in turns, leads to increased susceptibility to ADCC both in vitro and in a xenograft models. The combination of erlotinib with monoclonal antibodies represents a potential strategy to improve the treatment of wild-type EGFR NSCLC patients sensitive to erlotinib.

  11. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. The incorporation of SPECT functional lung imaging into inverse radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; McNair, Helen A.; Cronin, Bernadette; Courbon, Frederic; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often have inhomogeneous lung perfusion. Radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans have been accurately co-registered with lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to design radiotherapy treatments which limit dose to healthy 'perfused' lung. Patients and methods: Patients with localised NSCLC had CT and SPECT scans accurately co-registered in the planning system. The SPECT images were used to define a volume of perfused 'functioning' lung (FL). Inverse planning software was used to create 3D-conformal plans, the planning objective being either to minimise the dose to whole lungs (WL) or to minimise the dose to FL. Results: Four plans were created for each of six patients. The mean difference in volume between WL and FL was 1011.7 cm 3 (range 596.2-1581.1 cm 3 ). One patient with bilateral upper lobe perfusion deficits had a 16% reduction in FLV 2 (the percentage volume of functioning lung receiving ≥20 Gy). The remaining patients had inhomogeneous perfusion deficits such that inverse planning was not able to sufficiently optimise beam angles to avoid functioning lung. Conclusion: SPECT perfusion images can be accurately co-registered with radiotherapy planning CT scans and may be helpful in creating treatment plans for patients with large perfusion deficits

  13. Effect of ABCG2/BCRP Expression on Efflux and Uptake of Gefitinib in NSCLC Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricla Galetti

    Full Text Available BCRP/ABCG2 emerged as an important multidrug resistance protein, because it confers resistance to several classes of cancer chemotherapeutic agents and to a number of novel molecularly-targeted therapeutics such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Gefitinib is an orally active, selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of patients with advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC carrying activating EGFR mutations. Membrane transporters may affect the distribution and accumulation of gefitinib in tumour cells; in particular a reduced intracellular level of the drug may result from poor uptake, enhanced efflux or increased metabolism.The present study, performed in a panel of NSCLC cell lines expressing different ABCG2 plasma membrane levels, was designed to investigate the effect of the efflux transporter ABCG2 on intracellular gefitinib accumulation, by dissecting the contribution of uptake and efflux processes.Our findings indicate that gefitinib, in lung cancer cells, inhibits ABCG2 activity, as previously reported. In addition, we suggest that ABCG2 silencing or overexpression affects intracellular gefitinib content by modulating the uptake rather than the efflux. Similarly, overexpression of ABCG2 affected the expression of a number of drug transporters, altering the functional activities of nutrient and drug transport systems, in particular inhibiting MPP, glucose and glutamine uptake.Therefore, we conclude that gefitinib is an inhibitor but not a substrate for ABCG2 and that ABCG2 overexpression may modulate the expression and activity of other transporters involved in the uptake of different substrates into the cells.

  14. Patient-specific dosimetric endpoints based treatment plan quality control in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ting; Zhou, Linghong; Staub, David; Chen, Mingli; Lu, Weiguo; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Li, Yongbao; Jiang, Steve B; Gu, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    In intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the optimal plan for each patient is specific due to unique patient anatomy. To achieve such a plan, patient-specific dosimetric goals reflecting each patient’s unique anatomy should be defined and adopted in the treatment planning procedure for plan quality control. This study is to develop such a personalized treatment plan quality control tool by predicting patient-specific dosimetric endpoints (DEs). The incorporation of patient specific DEs is realized by a multi-OAR geometry-dosimetry model, capable of predicting optimal DEs based on the individual patient’s geometry. The overall quality of a treatment plan is then judged with a numerical treatment plan quality indicator and characterized as optimal or suboptimal. Taking advantage of clinically available prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans, we built and evaluated our proposed plan quality control tool. Using our developed tool, six of twenty evaluated plans were identified as sub-optimal plans. After plan re-optimization, these suboptimal plans achieved better OAR dose sparing without sacrificing the PTV coverage, and the dosimetric endpoints of the re-optimized plans agreed well with the model predicted values, which validate the predictability of the proposed tool. In conclusion, the developed tool is able to accurately predict optimally achievable DEs of multiple OARs, identify suboptimal plans, and guide plan optimization. It is a useful tool for achieving patient-specific treatment plan quality control. (paper)

  15. Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 and -9 in NSCLC tumor and stromal cells: correlation with a favorable clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenvold, Helge; Donnem, Tom; Andersen, Sigve; Al-Saad, Samer; Al-Shibli, Khalid; Busund, Lill-Tove; Bremnes, Roy M

    2012-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are considered important players in angiogenesis and cancer progression. Several drugs developed for targeting MMPs have until now been without clinical efficacy. As both malignant cells and cells of the surrounding stroma contribute to tumor growth, we have explored the impact of MMP-2, -7 and -9 expression in both the tumor and stromal compartment of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). From 335 unselected stage I to IIIA NSCLC carcinomas, duplicate tumor and tumor-associated stromal cores were collected in tissue microarrays (TMAs). Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of MMP-2, -7 and -9 in tumor and stromal cells. In univariate analyses, high tumor cell MMP-7 expression (P=0.029) and high stromal MMP-9 expression (P=0.001) were positive prognostic factors. In the multivariate analysis, high tumor cell MMP-7 expression (HR 1.58, CI 1.08-2.32, P=0.020) and high stromal MMP-9 expression (HR 1.92, CI 1.25-2.96, P=0.003) were independent positive prognostic factors for disease-specific survival. High levels of MMP-7 in tumor cells and high levels of MMP-9 in tumor associated stroma were independent positive prognostic factors in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Next-Generation Sequencing Workflow for NSCLC Critical Samples Using a Targeted Sequencing Approach by Ion Torrent PGM™ Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanni, Irene; Coco, Simona; Truini, Anna; Rusmini, Marta; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Alama, Angela; Banelli, Barbara; Mora, Marco; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Biello, Federica; Maggioni, Claudia; Grossi, Francesco

    2015-12-03

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a cost-effective technology capable of screening several genes simultaneously; however, its application in a clinical context requires an established workflow to acquire reliable sequencing results. Here, we report an optimized NGS workflow analyzing 22 lung cancer-related genes to sequence critical samples such as DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks and circulating free DNA (cfDNA). Snap frozen and matched FFPE gDNA from 12 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, whose gDNA fragmentation status was previously evaluated using a multiplex PCR-based quality control, were successfully sequenced with Ion Torrent PGM™. The robust bioinformatic pipeline allowed us to correctly call both Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs) and indels with a detection limit of 5%, achieving 100% specificity and 96% sensitivity. This workflow was also validated in 13 FFPE NSCLC biopsies. Furthermore, a specific protocol for low input gDNA capable of producing good sequencing data with high coverage, high uniformity, and a low error rate was also optimized. In conclusion, we demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining gDNA from FFPE samples suitable for NGS by performing appropriate quality controls. The optimized workflow, capable of screening low input gDNA, highlights NGS as a potential tool in the detection, disease monitoring, and treatment of NSCLC.

  17. A patient-specific planning target volume used in 'plan of the day' adaptation for interfractional motion mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Wenjing; Gemmel, Alexander; Rietzel, Eike

    2013-01-01

    We propose a patient-specific planning target volume (PTV) to deal with interfractional variations, and test its feasibility in a retrospective treatment-planning study. Instead of using one planning image only, multiple scans are taken on different days. The target and organs at risk (OARs) are delineated on each images. The proposed PTV is generated from a union of those target contours on the planning images, excluding voxels of the OARs, and is denoted the PTV 'GP-OAR' (global prostate-organs at risk). The study is performed using 'plan of the day' adaptive workflow, which selects a daily plan from a library of plans based on a similarity comparison between the daily scan and planning images. The daily plans optimized for GP-OAR volumes are compared with those optimized for PTVs generated from a single prostate contour (PTV SP). Four CT serials of prostate cancer patient datasets are included in the test, and in total 28 fractions are simulated. The results show that the daily chosen GP-OAR plans provide excellent target coverage, with V95 values of the prostate mostly >95%. In addition, dose delivered to the OARs as calculated from applying daily chosen GP-OAR plans is slightly increased but comparable to that calculated from applying daily SP plans. In general, the PTV GP-OARs are able to cover possible target variations while keeping dose delivered to the OARs at a similar level to that of the PTV SPs. (author)

  18. IMRT treatment plans and functional planning with functional lung imaging from 4D-CT for thoracic cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Tzung-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Currently, the inhomogeneity of the pulmonary function is not considered when treatment plans are generated in thoracic cancer radiotherapy. This study evaluates the dose of treatment plans on highly-functional volumes and performs functional treatment planning by incorporation of ventilation data from 4D-CT. Materials and methods Eleven patients were included in this retrospective study. Ventilation was calculated using 4D-CT. Two treatment plans were generated for each case, the first one without the incorporation of the ventilation and the second with it. The dose of the first plans was overlapped with the ventilation and analyzed. Highly-functional regions were avoided in the second treatment plans. Results For small targets in the first plans (PTV  Conclusion Radiation treatments affect functional lung more seriously in large tumor cases. With compromise of dose to other critical organs, functional treatment planning to reduce dose in highly-functional lung volumes can be achieved

  19. Evaluation of plan quality assurance models for prostate cancer patients based on fully automatically generated Pareto-optimal treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yibing; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Heijmen, Ben; Petit, Steven F

    2016-06-07

    IMRT planning with commercial Treatment Planning Systems (TPSs) is a trial-and-error process. Consequently, the quality of treatment plans may not be consistent among patients, planners and institutions. Recently, different plan quality assurance (QA) models have been proposed, that could flag and guide improvement of suboptimal treatment plans. However, the performance of these models was validated using plans that were created using the conventional trail-and-error treatment planning process. Consequently, it is challenging to assess and compare quantitatively the accuracy of different treatment planning QA models. Therefore, we created a golden standard dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal IMRT plans for 115 prostate patients. Next, the dataset was used to assess the performance of a treatment planning QA model that uses the overlap volume histogram (OVH). 115 prostate IMRT plans were fully automatically planned using our in-house developed TPS Erasmus-iCycle. An existing OVH model was trained on the plans of 58 of the patients. Next it was applied to predict DVHs of the rectum, bladder and anus of the remaining 57 patients. The predictions were compared with the achieved values of the golden standard plans for the rectum D mean, V 65, and V 75, and D mean of the anus and the bladder. For the rectum, the prediction errors (predicted-achieved) were only  -0.2  ±  0.9 Gy (mean  ±  1 SD) for D mean,-1.0  ±  1.6% for V 65, and  -0.4  ±  1.1% for V 75. For D mean of the anus and the bladder, the prediction error was 0.1  ±  1.6 Gy and 4.8  ±  4.1 Gy, respectively. Increasing the training cohort to 114 patients only led to minor improvements. A dataset of consistently planned Pareto-optimal prostate IMRT plans was generated. This dataset can be used to train new, and validate and compare existing treatment planning QA models, and has been made publicly available. The OVH model was highly accurate

  20. Advance care planning for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Benjamin H; Simmons, Zachary; Hanna, Courtney; Brothers, Allyson; Lehman, Erik; Farace, Elana; Bain, Megan; Stewart, Renee; Green, Michael J

    2017-08-01

    To determine whether an advance care planning (ACP) decision-aid could improve communication about end-of-life treatment wishes between patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and their clinicians. Forty-four patients with ALS (>21, English-speaking, without dementia) engaged in ACP using an interactive computer based decision-aid. Before participants completed the intervention, and again three months later, their clinicians reviewed three clinical vignettes, and made treatment decisions (n = 18) for patients. After patients indicated their agreement with the team's decisions, concordance was calculated. The mean concordance between patient wishes and the clinical team decisions was significantly higher post-intervention (post = 91.9%, 95% CI = 87.8, 96.1, vs. pre = 52.4%, 95% CI = 41.9, 62.9; p <0.001). Clinical team members reported greater confidence that their decisions accurately represented each patient's wishes post-intervention (mean = 6.5) compared to pre-intervention (mean = 3.3, 1 = low, 10 = high, p <0.001). Patients reported high satisfaction (mean = 26.4, SD = 3.2; 6 = low, 30 = high) and low decisional conflict (mean = 28.8, SD = 8.2; 20 = low, 80 = high) with decisions about end-of-life care, and high satisfaction with the decision-aid (mean = 52.7, SD = 5.7, 20 = low, 60 = high). Patient knowledge regarding ACP increased post-intervention (pre = 47.8% correct responses vs. post = 66.3%; p <0.001) without adversely affecting patient anxiety or self-determination. A computer based ACP decision-aid can significantly improve clinicians' understanding of ALS patients' wishes with regard to end-of-life medical care.

  1. Automation of radiation treatment planning. Evaluation of head and neck cancer patient plans created by the Pinnacle"3 scripting and Auto-Planning functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, Stefan; Weiss, Alexander; Bert, Christoph; Klein, Andreas; Kober, Lukas; Yohannes, Indra

    2017-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques are now standard practice. IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allow treatment of the tumor while simultaneously sparing organs at risk. Nevertheless, treatment plan quality still depends on the physicist's individual skills, experiences, and personal preferences. It would therefore be advantageous to automate the planning process. This possibility is offered by the Pinnacle"3 treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) via its scripting language or Auto-Planning (AP) module. AP module results were compared to in-house scripts and manually optimized treatment plans for standard head and neck cancer plans. Multiple treatment parameters were scored to judge plan quality (100 points = optimum plan). Patients were initially planned manually by different physicists and re-planned using scripts or AP. Script-based head and neck plans achieved a mean of 67.0 points and were, on average, superior to manually created (59.1 points) and AP plans (62.3 points). Moreover, they are characterized by reproducibility and lower standard deviation of treatment parameters. Even less experienced staff are able to create at least a good starting point for further optimization in a short time. However, for particular plans, experienced planners perform even better than scripts or AP. Experienced-user input is needed when setting up scripts or AP templates for the first time. Moreover, some minor drawbacks exist, such as the increase of monitor units (+35.5% for scripted plans). On average, automatically created plans are superior to manually created treatment plans. For particular plans, experienced physicists were able to perform better than scripts or AP; thus, the benefit is greatest when time is short or staff inexperienced. (orig.) [de

  2. Automation of radiation treatment planning : Evaluation of head and neck cancer patient plans created by the Pinnacle3 scripting and Auto-Planning functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speer, Stefan; Klein, Andreas; Kober, Lukas; Weiss, Alexander; Yohannes, Indra; Bert, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques are now standard practice. IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allow treatment of the tumor while simultaneously sparing organs at risk. Nevertheless, treatment plan quality still depends on the physicist's individual skills, experiences, and personal preferences. It would therefore be advantageous to automate the planning process. This possibility is offered by the Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) via its scripting language or Auto-Planning (AP) module. AP module results were compared to in-house scripts and manually optimized treatment plans for standard head and neck cancer plans. Multiple treatment parameters were scored to judge plan quality (100 points = optimum plan). Patients were initially planned manually by different physicists and re-planned using scripts or AP. Script-based head and neck plans achieved a mean of 67.0 points and were, on average, superior to manually created (59.1 points) and AP plans (62.3 points). Moreover, they are characterized by reproducibility and lower standard deviation of treatment parameters. Even less experienced staff are able to create at least a good starting point for further optimization in a short time. However, for particular plans, experienced planners perform even better than scripts or AP. Experienced-user input is needed when setting up scripts or AP templates for the first time. Moreover, some minor drawbacks exist, such as the increase of monitor units (+35.5% for scripted plans). On average, automatically created plans are superior to manually created treatment plans. For particular plans, experienced physicists were able to perform better than scripts or AP; thus, the benefit is greatest when time is short or staff inexperienced.

  3. The value of physical performance measurements alongside assessment of sarcopenia in predicting receipt and completion of planned treatment in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jemima T; Noble, Simon; Chester, John; Davies, Helen E; Evans, William D; Farewell, Daniel; Lester, Jason F; Parry, Diane; Pettit, Rebecca; Byrne, Anthony

    2018-01-01

    The presence of muscle mass depletion is associated with poor outcomes and survival in cancer. Alongside muscle mass, assessment of muscle strength or physical performance is essential for the diagnosis of sarcopenia. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a prevalent form of cancer with high mortality, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status (PS) is commonly used to assess patients' suitability for treatment. However, a significant proportion of patients with good PS are unable to complete multidisciplinary team (MDT)-planned treatment. Little is known about the ability of objective measurements of physical performance in predicting patients' ability to complete MDT-planned treatment and outcomes in NSCLC. We sought to establish whether physical performance, utilising the short physical performance battery (SPPB), alongside muscle mass measurements, was able to predict receipt and completion of MDT-planned treatment, with a focus on chemotherapy in NSCLC. Participants with NSCLC treated through a single lung cancer MDT and ECOG PS 0-2 were recruited and the following assessed: body composition [bioelectrical impedance (BIA) and whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a subset], physical performance (SPPB), PS and nutritional status. We recorded receipt and completion of chemotherapy, as well as any adverse effects, hospitalisations, and treatment delays. We included a total of 62 participants with NSCLC, and in 26 of these, the MDT-planned treatment was chemotherapy. Participants with earlier stage disease and weight loss of performance by SPPB is quick and simple to do in clinical settings and may give better indication of likely chemotherapy treatment course completion than muscle mass alone and ECOG PS. In turn, this may identify specific targets for early functional intervention and impact on MDT decision-making and prudent use of resources.

  4. Monte Carlo calculations supporting patient plan verification in proton therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Viana Miranda Lima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patient’s treatment plan verification covers substantial amount of the quality assurance (QA resources, this is especially true for Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT. The use of Monte Carlo (MC simulations in supporting QA has been widely discussed and several methods have been proposed. In this paper we studied an alternative approach from the one being currently applied clinically at Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO. We reanalysed the previously published data (Molinelli et al. 2013, where 9 patient plans were investigated in which the warning QA threshold of 3% mean dose deviation was crossed. The possibility that these differences between measurement and calculated dose were related to dose modelling (Treatment Planning Systems (TPS vs MC, limitations on dose delivery system or detectors mispositioning was originally explored but other factors such as the geometric description of the detectors were not ruled out. For the purpose of this work we compared ionisation-chambers measurements with different MC simulations results. It was also studied some physical effects introduced by this new approach for example inter detector interference and the delta ray thresholds. The simulations accounting for a detailed geometry typically are superior (statistical difference - p-value around 0.01 to most of the MC simulations used at CNAO (only inferior to the shift approach used. No real improvement were observed in reducing the current delta-ray threshold used (100 keV and no significant interference between ion chambers in the phantom were detected (p-value 0.81. In conclusion, it was observed that the detailed geometrical description improves the agreement between measurement and MC calculations in some cases. But in other cases position uncertainty represents the dominant uncertainty. The inter chamber disturbance was not detected for the therapeutic protons energies and the results from the current delta threshold are

  5. Superiority of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy over helical tomotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Pyo, H.; Kim, J. [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, D.W.; Cho, K.H. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Kim, W.C. [Inha Univ. School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kim, H.J. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a variety of dosimetric and radiobiologic indexes in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with LA-NSCLC were enrolled. IMRT plans with 4-6 coplanar beams and HT plans were generated for each patient. Dose distributions and dosimetric indexes for the tumors and critical structures were computed for both plans and compared. Results: Both modalities created highly conformal plans. They did not differ in the volumes of lung exposed to > 20 Gy of radiation. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=} 30 Gy, and volume receiving {>=} 10 Gy in HT planning were 18.3 Gy, 18.5%, and 57.1%, respectively, compared to 19.4 Gy, 25.4%, and 48.9%, respectively, with IMRT (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The differences between HT and IMRT in lung volume receiving {>=} 10-20 Gy increased significantly as the planning target volume (PTV) increased. For 6 patients who had PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT for 5 patients in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. The integral dose to the entire thorax in HT plans was significantly higher than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: HT gave significantly better control of mean lung dose and volume receiving {>=} 30-40 Gy, whereas IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving {>=} 5-15 Gy and the integral dose to entire thorax. In most patients with PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. It is therefore advised that caution should be exercised when planning LA-NSCLC using HT. (orig.)

  6. Advanced care planning--empowering patients for a peaceful death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karver, Sloan B; Berger, Jessalyn

    2010-01-01

    service along with a Palliative Care Fellowship program where we work with cancer teams to provide resources to them when they are running into difficulties with their patients. Typically, we step in when first line treatments have failed, symptoms have shown no signs of decrease, or when the primary teams have exhausted their standard management options. Our hope is for the primary care teams to be able to manage basic symptoms themselves and only call on the Palliative Care team when they have surpassed their comfort zone. For example, the Palliative Care team would step in if a patients dosage of medication was out of a primary teams spectrum. Other uses of the Palliative Care team include having the end of life discussion with the patients to find out what their expectations are of their treatment, what their concerns are and what their requests are. Normally treating primary teams are very uncomfortable in having this discussion with their patients due to the feeling that they are giving up hope or the fact that they are letting patients know that the end of the road is near. The Palliative Care team can then be called upon to come in and transfer the care from the primary team to the "death team". At Moffitt we have instituted a number of strategies to make this transition acceptable and more beneficial for the patients. One of the strategies that we used is an Advanced Care Plan. By having a consultation at the time when the patient is diagnosed, we are able to speak with them about what it is that they see in terms of what would be acceptable to them. We use the Project Grace Advance Care Plan which was developed by a physician and is very simple to understand. With this tool, we are able to bring up the discussion while trying to focus in on the patients spirituality and the coping mechanism as the cancer patient. This allows the conversation of end of life treatment preferences and what the patients typical desire is for life sustaining measures.

  7. Discharge planning: "fooling ourselves?"--patient participation in conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efraimsson, Eva; Sandman, P O; Hydén, Lars-Christer; Rasmussen, Birgit H

    2004-07-01

    The aim of discharge planning conferences (DPCs) is to co-ordinate resources and to enhance patient involvement in care in connection with relocation from hospital. DPCs can be characterized as institutional conversations, and are often executed as standard procedures, but the scientific basis for the activity is weak. The aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the communication at DPCs. A purposeful and consecutive sample of eight DPCs was collected in which the future care of eight women, aged 70 years or more, was discussed. Transcribed video recordings were analysed in two steps. "The initial analysis" aimed at describing the structure and content of the communication. This description constituted the basis for an interpretation, leading to "the focused analysis" aiming at finding evidence for the assumptions made in the interpretation. The result revealed that the participation of patients was very less the DPCs. The decisions had often already been made, and the women were expected to be pleased with the decision; institutional representatives (IRs) frequently justified their actions by referring to bureaucratic praxis. The women were both encouraged and excluded from participation by the IRs. This dichotomy occurred because the IRs, as professionals, struggled to simultaneously realize their caring mission and their obligation to enforce the values and rules of the institution, i.e. efficiency and rationality. Thus, IRs and patients were equally imprisoned within the institutional system. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL RESEARCH: This result illustrates how conflicting paradigms are imbedded and reproduced by healthcare professionals in their communicative praxis. Awareness of this is a prerequisite for improvements in working procedures congruent with a caring paradigm that support patient participation.

  8. PGE2 mediates EGFR internalization and nuclear translocation via caveolin endocytosis promoting its transcriptional activity and proliferation in human NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzani, Lorenzo; Donnini, Sandra; Giachetti, Antonio; Christofori, Gerhard; Ziche, Marina

    2018-03-13

    Prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) contributes to tumor progression by promoting cancer cell growth, invasion and by creating a favorable pro-tumor microenvironment. PGE 2 has been reported to transactivate and internalize into the nucleus receptor tyrosine kinases such as Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), thereby supporting tumor progression. Here we demonstrate that in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, PGE 2 induces EGFR nuclear translocation via different dynamin-dependent endocytic pathways, promotes the formation of an EGFR-STAT3 complex, affects nuclear EGFR target gene expression and mediates tumor cell proliferation. Indeed, we find that PGE 2 induces EGFR internalization and consequent nuclear import through Clathrin- and Caveolin-mediated endocytosis and through the interaction of EGFR with Importin β1. Within the nucleus, EGFR forms a complex with STAT3, an event blocked by ablation of Clathrin Heavy Chain or Caveolin-1. The combination of EGF and PGE 2 prolongs nuclear EGFR transcriptional activity manifested by the upregulation of CCND1 , PTGS2 , MYC and NOS2 mRNA levels and potentiates nuclear EGFR-induced NSCLC cell proliferation. Additionally, NSCLC patients with high expression of a nuclear EGFR gene signature display shorter survival times than those with low expression, thus showing a putative correlation between nuclear EGFR and poor prognosis in NSCLC. Together, our findings indicate a complex mechanism underlying PGE 2 -induced EGF/EGFR signaling and transcriptional control, which plays a key role in cancer progression.

  9. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in NSCLC Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A., E-mail: pamela.hershberger@roswellpark.org [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR{sup high}) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR{sup low} and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients.

  10. Vinorelbine/carboplatin vs gemcitabine/carboplatin in advanced NSCLC shows similar efficacy, but different impact of toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbekkmo, N; Sundstrøm, S H; Aasebø, U

    2007-01-01

    This randomised phase III study in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients was conducted to compare vinorelbine/carboplatin (VC) and gemcitabine/carboplatin (GC) regarding efficacy, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and toxicity. Chemonaive patients with NSCLC stage IIIB....../IV and WHO performance status 0-2 were eligible. No upper age limit was defined. Patients received vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) or gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1 and 8 and carboplatin AUC4 on day 1 and three courses with 3-week cycles. HRQOL questionnaires were completed at baseline, before chemotherapy...... and every 8 weeks until 49 weeks. During 14 months, 432 patients were included (VC, n=218; GC, n=214). Median survival was 7.3 vs 6.4 months, 1-year survival 28 vs 30% and 2-year survival 7 vs 7% in the VC and GC arm, respectively (P=0.89). HRQOL, represented by global QOL, nausea/vomiting, dyspnoea...

  11. Tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission planning in care pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.

    Tactical planning of resources in hospitals concerns elective patient admission planning and the intermediate term allocation of resource capacities. Its main objectives are to achieve equitable access for patients, to meet production targets/to serve the strategically agreed number of patients, and

  12. Tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission planning in care processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, P.J.H.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.

    2013-01-01

    Tactical planning of resources in hospitals concerns elective patient admission planning and the intermediate term allocation of resource capacities. Its main objectives are to achieve equitable access for patients, to meet production targets/to serve the strategically agreed number of patients, and

  13. SU-F-T-419: Evaluation of PlanIQ Feasibility DVH as Planning Objectives for Skull Base SBRT Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W [School of Medicine, Qingdao University, Yantai, Shandong (China); Wang, H; Chi, P [University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: PlanIQ(Sun Nuclear Corporation) can provide feasibility measures on organs-at-risk(OARs) around the target based on depth, local anatomy density and energy of radiation beam used. This study is to test and evaluate PlanIQ feasibility DVHs as optimization objectives in the treatment planning process, and to investigate the potential to use them in routine clinical cases to improve planning efficiency. Methods: Two to three arcs VMAT Treatment plans were generated in Pinnacle based on PlanIQ feasibility DVH for six skull base patients who previously treated with SBRT. The PlanIQ feasibility DVH for each OAR consists of four zones – impossible (at 100% target coverage), difficult, challenging and probable. Constrains to achieve DVH in difficult zone were used to start plan optimization. Further adjustment was made to improve coverage. The plan DVHs were compared to PlanIQ feasibility DVH to assess the dose received by 0%(D0), 5%(D5), 10%(D10) and 50%(D50) of the OAR volumes. Results: A total of 90 OARs were evaluated for 6 patients (mean 15 OARs, range 11–18 OARs). We used >98% PTV coverage as planning goal since it’s difficult to achieve 100% target coverage. For the generated plans, 96.7% of the OARs achieved D0 or D5 within difficult zone or impossible zone (ipsilateral OARs 93.5%, contralateral OARs 100%), while 90% and 65.6% of the OARs achieved D10 and D50 within difficult zone, respectively. Seventeen of the contralateral and out of field OARs achieved DVHs in impossible zone. For OARs adjacent or overlapped with target volume, the D0 and D5 are challenging to be optimized into difficult zone. All plans were completed within 2–4 adjustments to improve target coverage and uniformity. Conclusion: PlanIQ feasibility tool has the potential to provide difficult but achievable initial optimization objectives and therefore reduce the planning time to obtain a well optimized plan.

  14. Budget Impact Analysis of Afatinib for First-Line Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Exon 19 Deletions or Exon 21 Substitution Mutations in a U.S. Health Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jonathan; Earnshaw, Stephanie; Burslem, Kate; Lim, Jonathan

    2018-06-01

    Afatinib is 1 of 3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors approved in the United States for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors have epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletions (del19) or exon 21 (L858R) substitution mutations. In clinical trials, afatinib has demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival versus standard chemotherapy and gefitinib. To analyze the impact of increases in afatinib treatment share on the cost and health outcomes in a commercial health plan in the United States. A decision model was developed to evaluate the budget impact of increases in afatinib share for the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic NSCLC with EGFR del19 or L858R substitution mutations over a 5-year time horizon. The model compared the total annual costs for a health plan with 1 million covered lives in a scenario in which afatinib share increased 5 percentage points annually to one in which all treatment shares remained constant over time. The number of patients eligible for treatment was estimated using published incidence data. Therapies included in the model were afatinib, erlotinib, gefitinib, and the chemotherapy doublet, pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin. The mean time spent by patients in progression-free and progressive disease states was based on survival data from clinical trials and a network meta-analysis. Therapy-related costs included monthly drug acquisition and administration costs and costs of managing adverse reactions. Disease management costs were also assessed in the model. Scenario analyses were performed to assess alternative scenarios of afatinib treatment share. Additionally, a one-way sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of the model, given parameter uncertainty. Using the base-case parameter assumptions and a 5-percentage-point annual increase in afatinib treatment share, we estimated the total budget increases in years 1 through 5

  15. Pyrosequencing, a method approved to detect the two major EGFR mutations for anti EGFR therapy in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Marie-Jeanne

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR mutations, especially in-frame deletions in exon 19 (ΔLRE and a point mutation in exon 21 (L858R predict gefitinib sensitivity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Several methods are currently described for their detection but the gold standard for tissue samples remains direct DNA sequencing, which requires samples containing at least 50% of tumor cells. Methods We designed a pyrosequencing assay based on nested PCR for the characterization of theses mutations on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Results This method is highly specific and permits precise characterization of all the exon 19 deletions. Its sensitivity is higher than that of "BigDye terminator" sequencing and enabled detection of 3 additional mutations in the 58 NSCLC tested. The concordance between the two methods was very good (97.4%. In the prospective analysis of 213 samples, 7 (3.3% samples were not analyzed and EGFR mutations were detected in 18 (8.7% patients. However, we observed a deficit of mutation detection when the samples were very poor in tumor cells. Conclusions pyrosequencing is then a highly accurate method for detecting ΔLRE and L858R EGFR mutations in patients with NSCLC when the samples contain at least 20% of tumor cells.

  16. A single-arm, multicenter, safety-monitoring, phase IV study of icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingsheng; Han, Baohui; Gu, Aiqin; Zhang, Yiping; Jiao, Shun Chang; Wang, Chang-Li; He, Jintao; Jia, Xueke; Zhang, Li; Peng, Jiewen; Wu, Meina; Ying, Kejing; Wang, Junye; Ma, Kewei; Zhang, Shucai; You, Changxuan; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yinxiang; Ding, Lieming; Sun, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The phase 3 ICOGEN trial established the non-inferiority of icotinib to gefitinib in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and this led to the approval of icotinib for NSCLC by the China Food and Drug Administration. A phase 4 study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of icotinib in a broad range of patients with advanced NSCLC across China. This study retrospectively analyzed data from unresectable, recurrent, and/or advanced NSCLC patients who received oral icotinib 125 mg three times per day. The primary endpoint was safety. The secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR), which were investigated overall and in subgroups such as patients with an EGFR mutation and elderly patients. Between August, 2011 and August, 2012, a total of 6087 advanced NSCLC patients were registered in this study, of which 5549 were evaluable for safety and tumor response. The median age was 63 years (range 21-95 years), and 1571 (28.3%) patients were over the age of 70. The majority of patients were non-smokers, and had adenocarcinoma and stage IV disease. The overall incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of any grade was 31.5%. The most common ADRs included rash (17.4%) and diarrhea (8.5%), and three patients experienced interstitial lung disease (ILD). The ORR and DCR were 30.0% and 80.6%, respectively, for the overall population, and 33.4% and 81.2%, 30.3% and 80.3%, and 30.4% and 89.3%, for first-line, second-line, and third-line or multiple line subsets, respectively. In 665 EGFR-mutated patients who were evaluable for tumor response, the ORR and DCR were 49.2% (327/665) and 92.3% (614/665), respectively. The data from over 6000 patients was consistent with the results of the ICOGEN study. Icotinib demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile and efficacy in the routine clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fully Automated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plan Generation for Prostate Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voet, Peter W.J.; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate fully automated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning for prostate cancer patients, avoiding manual trial-and-error tweaking of plan parameters by dosimetrists. Methods and Materials: A system was developed for fully automated generation of VMAT plans with our commercial clinical treatment planning system (TPS), linked to the in-house developed Erasmus-iCycle multicriterial optimizer for preoptimization. For 30 randomly selected patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (VMAT auto ) were compared with VMAT plans generated manually by 1 expert dosimetrist in the absence of time pressure (VMAT man ). For all treatment plans, planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of organs-at-risk were quantified. Results: All generated plans were clinically acceptable and had similar PTV coverage (V 95%  > 99%). For VMAT auto and VMAT man plans, the organ-at-risk sparing was similar as well, although only the former plans were generated without any planning workload. Conclusions: Fully automated generation of high-quality VMAT plans for prostate cancer patients is feasible and has recently been implemented in our clinic

  18. Genetic association between polymorphism of mdm2 gene and symptoms and pathological types of NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaolan; Wang Weili; Zhang Xueying; Hao Ming; Liu Linlin; Wu Zhenfeng; Jiang Hongwei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the genetic association between polymorphism of mdm2 gene and symptoms and pathological types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was used to identify mdm2 genotypes. The Pearson Chi square test and Woolf statistic method were used to analyze the relative risk and 95% confidence interval (CI) in order to find the genetic association between polymorphism of mdm2 gene and symptoms and pathological types of NSCLC. Results: In the SNP rs1196337 (a G to A base change) AA genotype showed association with cough of NSCLC (P<0.05). Conclusion: The polymorphism of mdm2 gene may be associated with symptom as cough of NSCLC. (authors)

  19. Automatic treatment planning implementation using a database of previously treated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J A; Evans, K; Yang, W; Herman, J; McNutt, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Using a database of prior treated patients, it is possible to predict the dose to critical structures for future patients. Automatic treatment planning speeds the planning process by generating a good initial plan from predicted dose values. Methods: A SQL relational database of previously approved treatment plans is populated via an automated export from Pinnacle 3 . This script outputs dose and machine information and selected Regions of Interests as well as its associated Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) and Overlap Volume Histograms (OVHs) with respect to the target structures. Toxicity information is exported from Mosaiq and added to the database for each patient. The SQL query is designed to ask the system for the lowest achievable dose for a specified region of interest (ROI) for each patient with a given volume of that ROI being as close or closer to the target than the current patient. Results: The additional time needed to calculate OVHs is approximately 1.5 minutes for a typical patient. Database lookup of planning objectives takes approximately 4 seconds. The combined additional time is less than that of a typical single plan optimization (2.5 mins). Conclusions: An automatic treatment planning interface has been successfully used by dosimetrists to quickly produce a number of SBRT pancreas treatment plans. The database can be used to compare dose to individual structures with the toxicity experienced and predict toxicities before planning for future patients.

  20. Inhibitory effect and molecular mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on NSCLC cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Mengwu; Hou, Lingling; Zhang, Jingsi; Zhao, Diandian; Hua, Jilei; Wang, Ziling; He, Jinsheng; Jiang, Hong; Hu, Honggang; Zhang, Lishu

    2018-04-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still the main threat of cancer-associated death. Current treatment of NSCLC has limited effectiveness, and unfortunately, the prognosis of NSCLC remains poor. Therefore, a novel strategy for cancer therapy is urgently needed. Stem cell therapy has significant potential for cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into various cells types exhibit the feature of homing to tumor site and immunosuppression, have been explored as a new treatment for various cancers. Studies revealed that the broad repertoire of trophic factors secreted by MSCs extensively involved in the interplay between MSCs and tumor cells. In this study, we confirmed that MSCs do have the paracrine effect on proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells (A549, NCI-H460, and SK-MES-1). Co-culture system and conditioned medium experiments results showed that soluble factors secreted by MSCs inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. The scratch assay showed that conditioned medium of MSCs could suppress the migration of NSCLC cells in vitro. Western blot results showed that the expression of proteins relevant to cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and migration was remarkably decreased via MAPK/eIF4E signaling pathway. We speculated that soluble factors secreted by MSCs might be responsible for inhibitory mechanism of NSCLC cells. By Human Gene Expression Microarray Assay and recombinant Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor 165 (VEGF165) neutralizing experiment, we verified that VEGF might be responsible for the down-regulation of proteins related to cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and migration by suppressing translation initiation factor eIF4E via MAPK signaling pathway. Taken together, our study demonstrated that a possible trophic factor secreted by MSCs could manipulate translation initiation of NSCLC cells via MAPK signaling pathway, and significantly affect the fate of tumor cells, which

  1. Care plan for the patient with a dependent personality disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Ruiz Galán

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Personality is unique for each individual and can be defined as the dynamic collection of characteristics relative to emotions, thought and behaviour.Personality trout’s only mean a Personality Disorder (PD when they are inflexible and maladjusted and cause notable functional deterioration or uneasiness.According to Bermudez personality is “the enduring organization of structural and functional features, innate and acquired under the special conditions of each one’s development that shape the particular and specific collection of behaviour to face different situations”.According to the Diagnostic a Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV, a Personality Disorder is “an enduring pattern of inner experience and behavior that deviates markedly from the expectations of the person’s culture is pervasive and an inflexible, is stable over time and leads to distress or impairment. The onset of these patterns of behaviour is the beginning of the adulthood and, in rare instances, early adolescence”.There are several types of Personality Disorders (paranoid, schizoid, borderline, antisocial, dependent…. Dependent Personality Disorder is one of the most frequent in the Mental Health Services.People who suffer from this disorder are unable to take a decision by themselves because they don’t have confidence in themselves. They need a lot of social support and affection until the point of deny their individuality by subordinating their desires to other person’s desires and permitting these persons to manage their lives. Maybe they feel desolated by separation and loss and can support any situation, even maltreatment to keep a relationship.As we a deduce this diagnosis is sensible to cultural influences. This work aims to elaborate an standarized plan of cares for the patient with Dependent Personality Disorder by using nursing Diagnosis of NANDA II, Outcomes Criteria (NOC and Interventions Criteria (NIC.

  2. The asphericity of the metabolic tumour volume in NSCLC: correlation with histopathology and molecular markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Ego, Kilian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Buchert, Ralph; Wertzel, Heinz; Achenbach, H.J.; Riedel, Sandra; Schreiber, Jens; Schultz, Meinald; Furth, Christian; Amthauer, Holger; Derlin, Thorsten; Hofheinz, Frank; Kalinski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Asphericity (ASP) is a tumour shape descriptor based on the PET image. It quantitates the deviation from spherical of the shape of the metabolic tumour volume (MTV). In order to identify its biological correlates, we investigated the relationship between ASP and clinically relevant histopathological and molecular signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 83 consecutive patients (18 women, aged 66.4 ± 8.9 years) with newly diagnosed NSCLC in whom PET/CT with 18 F-FDG had been performed prior to therapy. Primary tumour resection specimens and core biopsies were used for basic histopathology and determination of the Ki-67 proliferation index. EGFR status, VEGF, p53 and ALK expression were obtained in a subgroup of 44 patients. The FDG PET images of the primary tumours were delineated using an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding taking into account local background. In addition to ASP, SUVmax, MTV and some further descriptors of shape and intratumour heterogeneity were assessed as semiquantitative PET measures. SUVmax, MTV and ASP were associated with pathological T stage (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.001, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0005, respectively) and N stage (p = 0.017, p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Only ASP was associated with M stage (p = 0.026). SUVmax, MTV and ASP were correlated with Ki-67 index (Spearman's rho = 0.326/p = 0.003, rho = 0.302/p = 0.006 and rho = 0.271/p = 0.015, respectively). The latter correlations were considerably stronger in adenocarcinomas than in squamous cell carcinomas. ASP, but not SUVmax or MTV, showed a tendency for a significant association with the extent of VEGF expression (p = 0.058). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, ASP (p < 0.0005) and the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.023) were significantly associated with progression-free survival. ASP (p = 0.006), the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.010), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.062) were significantly associated with

  3. The asphericity of the metabolic tumour volume in NSCLC: correlation with histopathology and molecular markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolova, Ivayla; Ego, Kilian; Steffen, Ingo G. [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Buchert, Ralph [University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Wertzel, Heinz; Achenbach, H.J. [Lung Clinic Lostau GmbH, Lostau (Germany); Riedel, Sandra; Schreiber, Jens [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Pneumology, Magdeburg (Germany); Schultz, Meinald [Institute of Pathology Stendal, Stendal (Germany); Furth, Christian; Amthauer, Holger [University Hospital, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); University Medicine Charite, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Derlin, Thorsten [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Hofheinz, Frank [Helmholtz-Center Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Kalinski, Thomas [University Hospital Magdeburg, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Institute for Pathology, Magdeburg (Germany); Institute for Pathology Lademannbogen, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Asphericity (ASP) is a tumour shape descriptor based on the PET image. It quantitates the deviation from spherical of the shape of the metabolic tumour volume (MTV). In order to identify its biological correlates, we investigated the relationship between ASP and clinically relevant histopathological and molecular signatures in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 83 consecutive patients (18 women, aged 66.4 ± 8.9 years) with newly diagnosed NSCLC in whom PET/CT with {sup 18}F-FDG had been performed prior to therapy. Primary tumour resection specimens and core biopsies were used for basic histopathology and determination of the Ki-67 proliferation index. EGFR status, VEGF, p53 and ALK expression were obtained in a subgroup of 44 patients. The FDG PET images of the primary tumours were delineated using an automatic algorithm based on adaptive thresholding taking into account local background. In addition to ASP, SUVmax, MTV and some further descriptors of shape and intratumour heterogeneity were assessed as semiquantitative PET measures. SUVmax, MTV and ASP were associated with pathological T stage (Kruskal-Wallis, p = 0.001, p < 0.0005 and p < 0.0005, respectively) and N stage (p = 0.017, p = 0.003 and p = 0.002, respectively). Only ASP was associated with M stage (p = 0.026). SUVmax, MTV and ASP were correlated with Ki-67 index (Spearman's rho = 0.326/p = 0.003, rho = 0.302/p = 0.006 and rho = 0.271/p = 0.015, respectively). The latter correlations were considerably stronger in adenocarcinomas than in squamous cell carcinomas. ASP, but not SUVmax or MTV, showed a tendency for a significant association with the extent of VEGF expression (p = 0.058). In multivariate Cox regression analysis, ASP (p < 0.0005) and the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.023) were significantly associated with progression-free survival. ASP (p = 0.006), the presence of distant metastases (p = 0.010), and Ki-67 index (p = 0.062) were significantly associated with

  4. Diffusion tensor MR imaging of white matter integrity in HIV-positive patients with planning deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Diogo Goulart; Doring, Thomas M.; Wilner, Nina Ventura; Cabral, Rafael Ferracini; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro; Zimmermann, Nicolle; Fonseca, Rochele Paz; Leite, Sarah C.B.; Bahia, Paulo R.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether normal controls and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with and without planning deficits differ on white matter integrity. A total of 34 HIV-positive patients with planning deficits were compared with 13 HIV-positive patients without planning deficits and 19 gender-, age-, and education-matched control subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed along 30 noncolinear directions in a 1.5-T scanner. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis, a white matter skeleton was created, and a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations with a threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The median, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Compared with controls, HIV-positive patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and bilateral uncinate fasciculi. Compared to HIV-positive patients without planning deficits, patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and right uncinate fascicule. DTI can detect extensive white matter abnormalities in the normal-appearing white matter of HIV-positive patients with planning deficits compared with controls and HIV-positive patients without planning deficits. (orig.)

  5. Diffusion tensor MR imaging of white matter integrity in HIV-positive patients with planning deficit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Diogo Goulart; Doring, Thomas M.; Wilner, Nina Ventura; Cabral, Rafael Ferracini; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Clinica de Diagnostico por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Zimmermann, Nicolle; Fonseca, Rochele Paz [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Department of Psychology, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Leite, Sarah C.B.; Bahia, Paulo R.V. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether normal controls and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients with and without planning deficits differ on white matter integrity. A total of 34 HIV-positive patients with planning deficits were compared with 13 HIV-positive patients without planning deficits and 19 gender-, age-, and education-matched control subjects. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed along 30 noncolinear directions in a 1.5-T scanner. For tract-based spatial statistics analysis, a white matter skeleton was created, and a permutation-based inference with 5000 permutations with a threshold of p < 0.05 was used to identify abnormalities in fractional anisotropy (FA). The median, radial, and axial diffusivities were also projected onto the mean FA skeleton. Compared with controls, HIV-positive patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu and splenium of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and bilateral uncinate fasciculi. Compared to HIV-positive patients without planning deficits, patients with planning deficits had decreased FA in bilateral anterior thalamic radiations, bilateral inferior fronto-occiptal fasciculi, genu of the corpus callosum, bilateral superior longitudinal fascicule, and right uncinate fascicule. DTI can detect extensive white matter abnormalities in the normal-appearing white matter of HIV-positive patients with planning deficits compared with controls and HIV-positive patients without planning deficits. (orig.)

  6. A patient group based business planning model for a surgical specialty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.; van den Heuvel, M.N.; Wiersema, K.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Beech, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this contribution we present an approach for a business planning model for a surgical specialty, based on modelling of all patient processes as well as of the dynamics involved in planning and managing resources. An important basis of the model is the description of the processes of all patient

  7. Volumetric response analysis during chemoradiation as predictive tool for optimizing treatment strategy in locally advanced unresectable NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; Duchateau, Michael; De Ridder, Mark; Everaert, Hendrik; Tournel, Koen; Schallier, Denis; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of measuring volumetric changes in the primary tumor on megavoltage-computed tomography (MVCT) during chemoradiation and to examine the correlation with local response. Patients and methods: Fifteen consecutive patients with stage III, inoperable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated in a prospective dose escalation study protocol of concurrent chemoradiation. They were monitored for acute toxicity and evaluated with daily MVCT imaging. The volumetric changes were fitted to a negative exponential resulting in a regression coefficient (RC). Local response evaluation was done with positron emission tomography using the radio-labeled glucose analogue F18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Results: The mean volume decrease (±standard deviation) was 73% (±18%). With a mean treatment time of 42 days this treatment schedule resulted in a mean decrease of 1.74%/day. Of the 13 evaluable patients seven developed a metabolic complete remission (MCR). The mean RC of the patients with MCR is 0.050 versus a mean RC of 0.023 in non-responders (p = 0.0074). Using a proposed cut-off value for the RC of 0.03 80% of the non-responders will be detected correctly while misclassifying 16.4% of patients who will eventually achieve an MCR. The total cumulative percentage of esophageal grade 3 or more toxicity was 46.7%. Conclusion: The RC derived from volumetric analysis of daily MVCT is prognostic and predictive for local response in patients treated with chemoradiation for a locally advanced NSCLC. Because this treatment schedule is toxic in nearly half of the patient population, MVCT is a tool in the implementation of patient-individualized treatment strategies.

  8. Percutaneous microwave ablation for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the elderly: a promising outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acksteiner, Christian; Steinke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a relatively new minimally invasive treatment option for lung cancer with substantially lower morbidity and mortality than surgery. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and follow-up imaging of MWA in the elderly aged 75 years and above. Eleven percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were performed in 10 patients aged 75 years and older. All but one patient were treated with a high-powered MWA system delivering maximally 140 W. Follow-up with CT and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was carried out over a maximum period of 30 months and a median period of 12 months. There were no peri-procedural deaths or major complications. Seven patients were disease free at the time of manuscript submission. Three patients showed growth of the treated lesions, one patient aged 90 years deceased due to unknown cause after approximately 18 months. One patient presented with local progression and disseminated metastatic disease at 12 months; he is still alive. One patient showed increasing soft tissue at the ablation site 15 months post-treatment. Three consecutive core biopsies over 2 months failed to confirm tumour recurrence. MWA therapy is a promising option of treating early-stage NSCLC in the elderly with good treatment outcome and negligible morbidity. Determining successful treatment outcome may be challenging at times as local tissue increase and PET-CT positivity do not seem to necessarily correlate with recurrence of malignancy.

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE RADIATION EXPOSURE ON THE TARGET AND CRITICAL ORGANS WITH 2D AND 3D PLANNING OF RADIATION THERAPY FOR LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Various radiotherapy planning methods have been proposed to decrease normal tissue toxicity. We compared 2D-RT with 3D-RT for NSCLC. Parameters assessed included dose to PTV and organ-at-risk (OAR, multiple conformity and homogeneity indices. Material and methods. Initial and re-simulation CT images from 52 consecutive patients with IIB – IIIB NSCLC were used to quantify dosimetric differences between 2D and 3D conformal radiotherapy. Contouring was performed on both CTs, and plans (n=104 plans and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results. All plans provided comparable PTV coverage. Compared with 2D-RT, 3D-RT significantly reduced the maximum dose to heart (p<0.01, spinal cord (p<0.01, whole lung (p<0.01, esophagus (p<0.02 – Wilcoxon test.

  10. Differential effect of age on survival in advanced NSCLC in women versus men: analysis of recent Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) studies, with and without bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelee, H A; Dahlberg, S E; Brahmer, J R; Schiller, J H; Perry, M C; Langer, C J; Sandler, A B; Belani, C P; Johnson, D H

    2012-06-01

    The impact of age on prognosis in advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may differ by sex. Eligible patients (N=1590) from E1594, a 4-arm platinum-based chemotherapy trial, and E4599 (carboplatin/paclitaxel ± bevacizumab) chemotherapy arm were divided into male and female cohorts and separated into age groups of women ≥60 years old treated with chemotherapy alone on E1594 and E4599 was 11.6 months versus 9.0 months for women women (younger had greater benefit), with no age effect in men. In this unplanned, exploratory subgroup analysis of advanced stage NSCLC ECOG trials, women ≥60 years old treated with chemotherapy live longer than men and younger women. In contrast, bevacizumab survival benefit was more pronounced in men of any age and in younger women on E4599. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  12. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  13. Automation of radiation treatment planning. Evaluation of head and neck cancer patient plans created by the Pinnacle{sup 3} scripting and Auto-Planning functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speer, Stefan; Weiss, Alexander; Bert, Christoph [Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Klein, Andreas [EKS Engineering GmbH, Fuerth (Germany); Kober, Lukas [Strahlentherapie Tauber-Franken, Bad Mergentheim (Germany); Yohannes, Indra [Rinecker Proton Therapy Center, Munich (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques are now standard practice. IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) allow treatment of the tumor while simultaneously sparing organs at risk. Nevertheless, treatment plan quality still depends on the physicist's individual skills, experiences, and personal preferences. It would therefore be advantageous to automate the planning process. This possibility is offered by the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system (Philips Healthcare, Hamburg, Germany) via its scripting language or Auto-Planning (AP) module. AP module results were compared to in-house scripts and manually optimized treatment plans for standard head and neck cancer plans. Multiple treatment parameters were scored to judge plan quality (100 points = optimum plan). Patients were initially planned manually by different physicists and re-planned using scripts or AP. Script-based head and neck plans achieved a mean of 67.0 points and were, on average, superior to manually created (59.1 points) and AP plans (62.3 points). Moreover, they are characterized by reproducibility and lower standard deviation of treatment parameters. Even less experienced staff are able to create at least a good starting point for further optimization in a short time. However, for particular plans, experienced planners perform even better than scripts or AP. Experienced-user input is needed when setting up scripts or AP templates for the first time. Moreover, some minor drawbacks exist, such as the increase of monitor units (+35.5% for scripted plans). On average, automatically created plans are superior to manually created treatment plans. For particular plans, experienced physicists were able to perform better than scripts or AP; thus, the benefit is greatest when time is short or staff inexperienced. (orig.) [German] Intensitaetsmodulierte Strahlentherapie (IMRT) hat sich als Standard durchgesetzt. Mit IMRT oder volumenmodulierter Arc-Therapie (VMAT) lassen sich

  14. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-based professionally-accepted clinical nutrition indicators may be monitored, as appropriate. (3... achieve and sustain the clinically appropriate hemoglobin/hematocrit level. The patient's hemoglobin... is a change in transplant candidate status. (d) Standard: Patient education and training. The patient...

  15. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT strategies for cervical cancer patients using automated planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M; Voet, Peter W J; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mens, Jan Willem M; Hoogeman, Mischa S; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2015-03-01

    In a published study on cervical cancer, 5-beam IMRT was inferior to single arc VMAT. Here we compare 9, 12, and 20 beam IMRT with single and dual arc VMAT. For each of 10 patients, automated plan generation with the in-house Erasmus-iCycle optimizer was used to assist an expert planner in generating the five plans with the clinical TPS. For each patient, all plans were clinically acceptable with a high and similar PTV coverage. OAR sparing increased when going from 9 to 12 to 20 IMRT beams, and from single to dual arc VMAT. For all patients, 12 and 20 beam IMRT were superior to single and dual arc VMAT, with substantial variations in gain among the study patients. As expected, delivery of VMAT plans was significantly faster than delivery of IMRT plans. Often reported increased plan quality for VMAT compared to IMRT has not been observed for cervical cancer. Twenty and 12 beam IMRT plans had a higher quality than single and dual arc VMAT. For individual patients, the optimal delivery technique depends on a complex trade-off between plan quality and treatment time that may change with introduction of faster delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT strategies for cervical cancer patients using automated planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M.; Voet, Peter W.J.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a published study on cervical cancer, 5-beam IMRT was inferior to single arc VMAT. Here we compare 9, 12, and 20 beam IMRT with single and dual arc VMAT. Material and methods: For each of 10 patients, automated plan generation with the in-house Erasmus-iCycle optimizer was used to assist an expert planner in generating the five plans with the clinical TPS. Results: For each patient, all plans were clinically acceptable with a high and similar PTV coverage. OAR sparing increased when going from 9 to 12 to 20 IMRT beams, and from single to dual arc VMAT. For all patients, 12 and 20 beam IMRT were superior to single and dual arc VMAT, with substantial variations in gain among the study patients. As expected, delivery of VMAT plans was significantly faster than delivery of IMRT plans. Conclusions: Often reported increased plan quality for VMAT compared to IMRT has not been observed for cervical cancer. Twenty and 12 beam IMRT plans had a higher quality than single and dual arc VMAT. For individual patients, the optimal delivery technique depends on a complex trade-off between plan quality and treatment time that may change with introduction of faster delivery systems

  17. Radiation therapy planning of a breast cancer patient with in situ pacemaker-challenges and lessons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Dinshaw, Ketayun A [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Dayananda [Dept. of Radiation Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2008-02-15

    A postmenopausal lady with an in situ pacemaker developed a lump in the left breast and was diagnosed to have breast cancer. The patient underwent breast conservative surgery and was planned for post operative radiotherapy. The location of the tumor relative to the pacemaker provided a unique challenge in planning radiotherapy and the patient had an uneventful post radiotherapy course. A literature review revealed that modern generation pacemakers are very sensitive to radiation compared to their older counterparts. The present article makes suggestions towards reducing dose in radiotherapy planning in pacemaker patients

  18. Radiation therapy planning of a breast cancer patient with in situ pacemaker-challenges and lessons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, Anusheel; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Budrukkar, Ashwini; Jalali, Rakesh; Dinshaw, Ketayun A.; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Dayananda

    2008-01-01

    A postmenopausal lady with an in situ pacemaker developed a lump in the left breast and was diagnosed to have breast cancer. The patient underwent breast conservative surgery and was planned for post operative radiotherapy. The location of the tumor relative to the pacemaker provided a unique challenge in planning radiotherapy and the patient had an uneventful post radiotherapy course. A literature review revealed that modern generation pacemakers are very sensitive to radiation compared to their older counterparts. The present article makes suggestions towards reducing dose in radiotherapy planning in pacemaker patients

  19. Awareness of family planning amongst antenatal patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study aimed at determining the awareness about family planning amongst pregnant women presenting to the antenatal clinic of Federal Medical Centre, Owo, Ondo State, Nigeria. Methodology: The study was conducted between December, 2007 and February, 2008 at the antenatal clinic of the hospital. Ethical ...

  20. Coping planning: a patient-centred and strengths-focused approach to suicide prevention training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallman, Helen M

    2018-04-01

    Suicide is a leading cause of premature death and, despite significant investment, the prevalence rate has remained relatively stable for more than a decade. Theoretically, the use of 'safety planning' as a response to suicidality likely maintains suicide as a potential solution for vulnerable people. This paper describes a theoretically-supported paradigm shift from safety planning to 'coping planning' to improve patient outcomes and improve the confidence and competence of clinicians working with people with suicidality. Coping planning is a strategy used to support people with acute distress. Its components of 'caring', 'collaborating' and 'connecting' reinforce existing strengths, promote self-efficacy and link people with more intensive supports, as needed. Coping planning overcomes the limitations of existing approaches. It reframes suicide prevention from managing patients disclosing suicidality to ensuring patients have minimally sufficient temporary support to help them cope. This approach has the potential to promote coping self-efficacy and prevent deterioration that leads to suicide.

  1. Combined use of (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO in unresectable non-small cell lung cancer patients planned for radiotherapy: a dynamic PET/CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Thieke, Christian; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Nicolay, Nils H; Huber, Peter E; Thomas, Michael; Dimitrakopoulou, Georgia; Debus, Juergen; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate and compare, by means of dynamic and static PET/CT, the distribution patterns and pharmacokinetics of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) and of fluorine-18-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-FMISO) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients scheduled for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Thirteen patients suffering from inoperable stage III NSCLC underwent PET/CTs with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FMISO for tumor metabolism and hypoxia assessment accordingly. Evaluation of PET/CT studies was based on visual analysis, semi-quantitative (SUV) calculations and absolute quantitative estimations, after application of a two-tissue compartment model and a non-compartmental approach. (18)F-FDG PET/CT revealed all thirteen primary lung tumors as sites of increased (18)F-FDG uptake. Six patients demonstrated also in total 43 (18)F-FDG avid metastases; these patients were excluded from radiotherapy. (18)F-MISO PET/CT demonstrated 12/13 primary lung tumors with faint tracer uptake. Only one tumor was clearly (18)F-FMISO avid, (SUVaverage = 3.4, SUVmax = 5.0). Mean values for (18)F-FDG, as derived from dPET/CT data, were SUVaverage = 8.9, SUVmax = 15.1, K1 = 0.23, k2 = 0.53, k3 = 0.17, k4 = 0.02, influx = 0.05 and fractal dimension (FD) = 1.25 for the primary tumors. The respective values for (18)F-FMISO were SUVaverage = 1.4, SUVmax = 2.2, K1 = 0.26, k2 = 0.56, k3 = 0.06, k4 = 0.06, influx = 0.02 and FD = 1.14. No statistically significant correlation was observed between the two tracers. (18)F-FDG PET/CT changed therapy management in six patients, by excluding them from planned IMRT. (18)F-FMISO PET/CT revealed absence of significant tracer uptake in the majority of the (18)F-FDG avid NSCLCs. Lack of correlation between the two tracers' kinetics indicates that they reflect different molecular mechanisms and implies the discordance between increased glycolysis and hypoxia in the malignancy.

  2. Experiences of care planning in England: interviews with patients with long term conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newbould Jenny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence and impact of long term conditions continues to rise. Care planning for people with long term conditions has been a policy priority in England for chronic disease management. However, it is not clear how care planning is currently understood, translated and implemented in primary care. This study explores experience of care planning in patients with long term conditions in three areas in England. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 predominantly elderly patients with multiple long term conditions. The interviews were designed to explore variations in and emergent experiences of care planning. Qualitative analysis of interview transcripts involved reflexively coding and re-coding data into categories and themes. Results No participants reported experiencing explicit care planning discussions or receiving written documentation setting out a negotiated care plan and they were unfamiliar with the term ‘care planning’. However, most described some components of care planning which occurred over a number of contacts with health care professionals which we term”reactive” care planning. Here, key elements of care planning including goal setting and action planning were rare. Additionally, poor continuity and coordination of care, lack of time in consultations, and patient concerns about what was legitimate to discuss with the doctor were described. Conclusions Amongst this population, elements of care planning were present in their accounts, but a structured, comprehensive process and consequent written record (as outlined in English Department of Health policy was not evident. Further research needs to explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to care planning for different patient groups.

  3. Comparison of KVCBCT based on deformable image registration of adaptive planning and static 3DCRT planning for patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Yong; Yin Yong; Wang Pengcheng; Ma Chengsheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To comparison of kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (KVCBCT) deformable image registration of adaptive planning and static planning for patients with lung cancer,and evaluate their characters. Methods: Five patients with lung cancer were in the study. Two sets image were acquired every three days and were concatenated to one set. Ten sets CBCT image and planning CT image were transferred a commercial deformable image registration software. The planning CT was deformed to each set CBCT and the contours delineated, the new contour were labeled CBCT f1 -CBCT f10 . Transfer of each deformed planning CT and CBCT f1 -CBCT f10 back into the treatment planning system enable re-calculation of actual dose distribution, then we obtain CT planning and fractional CBCT contour planning, the CBCT planning were labeled CBCT p1 -CBCT p10 . Ten times CBCT planning of every patient were added to acquire a total dose accumulation planning (DA plan), comparison of dose distribution and dose-volume histogram in CT plan and DA plan for fractionation dose and accumulation dose of left, right, total lung, PTV and spinal-cord. The difference of two plan was analyzed by Wilcoxson's sign rank test. Results: The max and min dose of PTV, the left, right, total lung V 5 , V 10 , V 20 , V 30 , V 50 , spinal-cord max dose, and the left,right and total lung mean dose in DA plan were smaller than in CT plan (z=-2.02 - -2.03, P 95 in DA plan was as well as in CT plan (z=-1.48, -1.21, P=0.138, 0.225). Conclusions: KVCBCT based deformable image registration of adaptive planning reduce the dose of lung and spinal-cord, and enhance the dose of PTV. This provides a tool for exploring adaptive radiotherapy strategies. (authors)

  4. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    OpenAIRE

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis, whether therapeutic action is necessary, and which post-therapeutic trajectory is to be followed. All these bedside decisions are related to each other, and the whole task of clinical patient management ca...

  5. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) as a molecular marker of hypoxia in non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathmaraj, K.; Foo, S.; Sachinidis, J.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: FMISO is a hypoxic marker with the potential ability to predict tumour resistance to chemoradiation. We present preliminary findings from pilot studies to determine the significance of FMISO Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in NSCLC. We are currently studying 2 cohorts of patients with NSCLC and a case study will be presented from each cohort. Patients in the first cohort have surgically resectable tumours: we aim to evaluate the extent of intratumoural hypoxia preoperatively and then validate and correlate this at a molecular level. Patients in the second cohort have locally advanced disease being treated with radiotherapy and will have pretreatment and sequential FMISO-PET scans. Mr GH, a 51 year old man presented with a suspicious lesion in the right upper lobe of the lung. Biopsy was non diagnostic and a FDG-PET scan showed a hypermetabolic focus in the right upper lobe highly indicative of malignancy. The FMISO-PET scan showed a small hypoxic area in the right upper lobe of the lung. The FDG-PET and FMISO-PET images were coregistered and the hypoxic focus correlated well with the hypermetabolic FDG focus. Wedge resection demonstrated moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Mr JS was a 61-year-old male with stage III inoperable NSCLC. CT scan showed extensive disease around the left lung hilum with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The FDG-PET scan showed metabolic findings consistent with a large necrotic malignancy in the left lung with left hilar and mediastinal nodal involvement. FMISO uptake was observed in the left lung hilum corresponding to the areas of FDG uptake. A subsequent FMISO-PET study midway through his radiotherapy showed decreased tracer concentration in the left hilar region with a suggestion of cystic changes inferiorly to the hilum. To our knowledge, there has been no correlation of FMISO-PET studies with molecular markers of hypoxia. This pilot study will be important in confirming FMISO-PET studies as a feasible non invasive

  6. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohri, Chandra M; Shikotra, Aarti; Green, Ruth H; Waller, David A; Bradding, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM) expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+) macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14), or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF) were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES) (median 92.7 months) and 20 patients with poor survival (PS) (median 7.7 months). The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.02) was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (pMRP 8/14 (p = 0.01) expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR pMRP 8/14 p = 0.04), as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41) and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001). Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  7. TrkB is highly expressed in NSCLC and mediates BDNF-induced the activation of Pyk2 signaling and the invasion of A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Siyang; Guo, Dawei; Luo, Wenting; Zhang, Qingfu; Zhang, Ying; Li, Chunyan; Lu, Yao; Cui, Zeshi; Qiu, Xueshan

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant regulation in the invasion of cancer cells is closely associated with their metastatic potentials. TrkB functions as a receptor tyrosine kinase and is considered to facilitate tumor metastasis. Pyk2 is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase and integrates signals in cell invasion. However, little is known about the expression of TrkB in NSCLC and whether Pyk2 is involved in TrkB-mediated invasion of A549 cells. The expression of TrkB was investigated in NSCLC by immunohistochemical staining. Both HBE and A549 cells were treated with BDNF. The expression of TrkB, Pyk2 and ERK phosphorylations were assessed by western blot. Besides, A549 cells were transfected with TrkB-siRNA or Pyk2-siRNA, or treated with ERK inhibitor where indicated. Transwell assay was performed to evaluate cell invasion. 40 cases (66.7%) of NSCLC were found higher expression of TrkB and patients with more TrkB expression had significant metastatic lymph nodes (p = 0.028). BDNF facilitated the invasion of A549 cells and the activations of Pyk2 in Tyr402 and ERK. However, the effects of BDNF were not observed in HBE cells with lower expression of TrkB. In addition, the increased Pyk2 and ERK activities induced by BDNF were significantly inhibited by blocking TrkB expression, so was the invasion of A549 cells. Knockdown studies revealed the essential role of Pyk2 for BDNF-induced cell invasion, since the invasion of A549 cells was abolished by Pyk2-siRNA. The application of ERK inhibitor also showed the suppressed ERK phosphorylation and cell invasion. These data indicated that higher expression of TrkB in NSCLC was closely correlated with lymph node metastasis, and BDNF probably via TrkB/Pyk2/ERK promoted the invasion of A549 cells

  8. Decision-theoretic planning of clinical patient management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, Niels Bastiaan

    2000-01-01

    When a doctor is treating a patient, he is constantly facing decisions. From the externally visible signs and symptoms he must establish a hypothesis of what might be wrong with the patient; then he must decide whether additional diagnostic procedures are required to verify this hypothesis,

  9. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  10. Improvement of Radiation-Mediated Immunosuppression of Human NSCLC Tumour Xenografts in a Nude Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Tokalov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model have consistently been used as an essential part of preclinical studies for anticancer drugs activity in human. Commonly, these animals receive whole body irradiation to assure immunosuppression. But whole body dose delivery might be inhomogeneous and the resulting incomplete bone marrow depletion may modify tumour behaviour. To improve irradiation-mediated immunosuppression of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model irradiation (2 + 2 Gy from opposite sides of animals has been performed using a conventional X-ray tube. The described modification of whole body irradiation improves growth properties of human NSCLC xenografts in a nude rat model. The design of the whole body irradiation mediated immunosuppression described here for NSCLC xenografts may be useful for research applications involving other types of human tumours.

  11. Pilot study on virtual imaging for patient information on radiotherapy planning and delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulé-Suso, J.; Finney, S.; Bisson, J.; Hammersley, S.; Jassel, S.; Knight, R.; Hicks, C.; Sargeant, S.; Lam, K.-P.; Belcher, J.; Collins, D.; Bhana, R.; Adab, F.; O'Donovan, C.; Moloney, A.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that health professionals might sometimes underestimate cancer patients' needs for information on the complex process of radiotherapy (RT) planning and delivery. Furthermore, relatives might also feel excluded from the treatment of their loved ones. This pilot study was carried out in order to assess whether both patients and their relatives would welcome further information on RT planning and delivery using the virtual reality (VR) system VERT. One hundred and fifty patients with different types of cancer receiving radical RT were included in the study. Patients and relatives were shown using VERT on a one-to-one basis with an oncologist or a radiographer, a standard room where RT is given, a linear accelerator, and how RT is planned and delivered using their own planning CT Scans. Patients welcomed this information as it helped them to reduce their fears about RT. Relatives felt also more involved in the treatment of their loved one. The results obtained in this pilot study show that VR aids could become an important tool for delivering information on RT to both patients and relatives. - Highlights: • Virtual imaging helps patients to better understand RT planning and delivery. • Virtual imaging reduces the fear factor. • Virtual imaging improves patients and relatives satisfaction

  12. Using a knowledge-based planning solution to select patients for proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Alexander R; Dahele, Max; Tol, Jim P; Kuijper, Ingrid T; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2017-08-01

    Patient selection for proton therapy by comparing proton/photon treatment plans is time-consuming and prone to bias. RapidPlan™, a knowledge-based-planning solution, uses plan-libraries to model and predict organ-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume-histograms (DVHs). We investigated whether RapidPlan, utilizing an algorithm based only on photon beam characteristics, could generate proton DVH-predictions and whether these could correctly identify patients for proton therapy. Model PROT and Model PHOT comprised 30 head-and-neck cancer proton and photon plans, respectively. Proton and photon knowledge-based-plans (KBPs) were made for ten evaluation-patients. DVH-prediction accuracy was analyzed by comparing predicted-vs-achieved mean OAR doses. KBPs and manual plans were compared using salivary gland and swallowing muscle mean doses. For illustration, patients were selected for protons if predicted Model PHOT mean dose minus predicted Model PROT mean dose (ΔPrediction) for combined OARs was ≥6Gy, and benchmarked using achieved KBP doses. Achieved and predicted Model PROT /Model PHOT mean dose R 2 was 0.95/0.98. Generally, achieved mean dose for Model PHOT /Model PROT KBPs was respectively lower/higher than predicted. Comparing Model PROT /Model PHOT KBPs with manual plans, salivary and swallowing mean doses increased/decreased by <2Gy, on average. ΔPrediction≥6Gy correctly selected 4 of 5 patients for protons. Knowledge-based DVH-predictions can provide efficient, patient-specific selection for protons. A proton-specific RapidPlan-solution could improve results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-02-04

    To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and planning parameters. The resulting dose volume histograms were compared. The orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) reconstruction tool for kVCT images and different MVCT options were investigated with a water tank fit with double hip prostheses. Treatment plans were created for all imaging options and calculated dose was compared with the one measured by a pin-point ion chamber. On average for three patients, the D35% for the bladder was 8% higher in plans based on MVCT images and 7% higher in plans based on hybrid images, compared to the plans based on kVCT images alone. Likewise, the D35% for the rectum was 3% higher than the kVCT based plan for both hybrid and MVCT plans. The average difference in planned D99% in the PTV compared to kVCT plans was 0.9% and 0.1% for MVCT and hybrid plans, respectively. For the water tank with hip prostheses phantom, the kVCT plan with O-MAR correction applied showed better agreement between the measured and calculated dose than the original image set, with a difference of -1.9% compared to 3.3%. The measured doses for the MVCT plans were lower than the calculated dose due to image size limitations. The best agreement was for the kVCT/MVCT hybrid plans with the difference between calculated and measured dose around 1%. MVCT image provides better visualization of patient anatomy and hybrid kVCT/MVCT study enables more accurate calculations using updated MVCT relative electron density calibration.

  14. Optimization of tomotherapy treatment planning for patients with bilateral hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, David; Smith, Shaun; Barnett, Rob; Bauman, Glenn; Yartsev, Slav

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effect of different imaging options and the most efficient imaging strategy for treatment planning of patients with hip prostheses. The planning kilovoltage CT (kVCT) and daily megavoltage CT (MVCT) studies for three prostate cancer patients with bilateral hip prostheses were used for creating hybrid kVCT/MVCT image sets. Treatment plans were created for kVCT images alone, hybrid kVCT/MVCT images, and MVCT images alone using the same dose prescription and planning parameters. The resulting dose volume histograms were compared. The orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) reconstruction tool for kVCT images and different MVCT options were investigated with a water tank fit with double hip prostheses. Treatment plans were created for all imaging options and calculated dose was compared with the one measured by a pin-point ion chamber. On average for three patients, the D 35% for the bladder was 8% higher in plans based on MVCT images and 7% higher in plans based on hybrid images, compared to the plans based on kVCT images alone. Likewise, the D 35% for the rectum was 3% higher than the kVCT based plan for both hybrid and MVCT plans. The average difference in planned D99% in the PTV compared to kVCT plans was 0.9% and 0.1% for MVCT and hybrid plans, respectively. For the water tank with hip prostheses phantom, the kVCT plan with O-MAR correction applied showed better agreement between the measured and calculated dose than the original image set, with a difference of -1.9% compared to 3.3%. The measured doses for the MVCT plans were lower than the calculated dose due to image size limitations. The best agreement was for the kVCT/MVCT hybrid plans with the difference between calculated and measured dose around 1%. MVCT image provides better visualization of patient anatomy and hybrid kVCT/MVCT study enables more accurate calculations using updated MVCT relative electron density calibration

  15. A phase I, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic study of panobinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, combined with erlotinib in patients with advanced aerodigestive tract tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jhanelle E; Haura, Eric; Chiappori, Alberto; Tanvetyanon, Tawee; Williams, Charles C; Pinder-Schenck, Mary; Kish, Julie A; Kreahling, Jenny; Lush, Richard; Neuger, Anthony; Tetteh, Leticia; Akar, Angela; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael J; Bepler, Gerold; Altiok, Soner

    2014-03-15

    Panobinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, enhances antiproliferative activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines when combined with erlotinib. We evaluated this combination in patients with advanced NSCLC and head and neck cancer. Eligible patients were enrolled in a 3+3 dose-escalation design to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of twice weekly panobinostat plus daily erlotinib at four planned dose levels (DL). Pharmacokinetics, blood, fat pad biopsies (FPB) for histone acetylation, and paired pre and posttherapy tumor biopsies for checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1) expression were assessed. Of 42 enrolled patients, 33 were evaluable for efficacy. Dose-limiting toxicities were prolonged-QTc and nausea at DL3. Adverse events included fatigue and nausea (grades 1-3), and rash and anorexia (grades 1-2). Disease control rates were 54% for NSCLC (n = 26) and 43% for head and neck cancer (n = 7). Of 7 patients with NSCLC with EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, 3 had partial response, 3 had stable disease, and 1 progressed. For EGFR-mutant versus EGFR wild-type patients, progression-free survival (PFS) was 4.7 versus 1.9 months (P = 0.43) and overall survival was 41 (estimated) versus 5.2 months (P = 0.39). Erlotinib pharmacokinetics was not significantly affected. Correlative studies confirmed panobinostat's pharmacodynamic effect in blood, FPB, and tumor samples. Low CHK1 expression levels correlated with PFS (P = 0.006) and response (P = 0.02). We determined MTD at 30 mg (panobinostat) and 100 mg (erlotinib). Further studies are needed to further explore the benefits of HDAC inhibitors in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC, investigate FPB as a potential surrogate source for biomarker investigations, and validate CHK1's predictive role. ©2014 AACR.

  16. Care Planning for Prostate Cancer Patients on Active Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    decisions to opt for AS include trust in the physician’s expertise, good intentions, and skills in detecting cancer progression in a timely manner, and... common AS patient needs and how to appropriately discuss them with patients. Phase II results, when they are available, will inform a future, large-scale...Project Role: Principal Investigator Researcher Identifier: NIHALM (eRA Commons ) Nearest person month worked: 80 hours Contribution to Project: Dr

  17. Patient Communication, Satisfaction, and Trust Before and After Use of a Standardized Birth Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Clare-Marie; Monardo, Rosie; Soon, Reni; Lum, Jennifer; Tschann, Mary; Kaneshiro, Bliss

    2017-11-01

    The birth plan was developed as a way for pregnant women to communicate their desires and expectations for labor and delivery. Standardized birth plans have been used by some birth facilities as a communication tool. In this quality improvement project, we sought to describe communication, trust, and satisfaction scores after delivery in a group of patients who used a standardized birth plan. All pregnant women at 24 or more weeks of gestation were asked to complete a short, standardized birth plan. Communication, trust, and satisfaction were assessed before and after delivery. Descriptive analyses showed that communication, trust, and satisfaction scores were high following delivery. Scores for all three factors increased significantly following delivery though increases were modest. Most patients (84%) indicated they would use a birth plan with a subsequent delivery.

  18. Serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA-125 are associated with worse prognosis in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrés, Susana; Nuñez, Isaac; Longo, Marina; Martinez, Pablo; Checa, Eva; Torrejón, Davis; Felip, Enriqueta

    2011-05-01

    Serum tumor markers are considered a negative prognostic factor in early-stages NSCLC but its role in advanced disease is controversial. The aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic value of tumor markers in advanced NSCLC. Two hundred and seventy seven patients diagnosed in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline prognostic factors analyzed were gender, histology and brain metastases. Baseline patients characteristics: median age 63 years (30-81 years); males 84.4%, stage IV: 61.7%; adenocarcinoma 38.6%, squamous carcinoma 22.4%. High levels of CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 levels were detected in 179 (55.9%), 119 (65%), and 129 (46.6%) patients respectively. Significant higher levels of CEA and CA125 at baseline were present in adenocarcinoma (P CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 was 5.3 months (m), 3.5 m and 4.6 m versus 7.4 m, 6.2 m and 7.5 m in patients with normal levels (P tumor markers was 10.0 m vs 14.0 m (P = 0.085) for CEA; 5.6 vs 12.1 m for CYFRA21-1 (P = .002), and 8.7 vs 14.0 (P = .03) for CA125. In the multivariate analysis high levels of tumor markers, histology and clinical stage were significant correlated with worse prognostic. Patients with all the tumor markers elevated presented the worst prognosis (3.6 m for PFS and 7.1 m for OS, P tumor markers at baseline are correlated with worse survival in stage III-IV NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. (18)F-FDG PET-CT simulation for non-small-cell lung cancer: effect in patients already staged by PET-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Gerard G; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J; Stewart, David P; Cosgrove, Vivian P; Eakin, Ruth L; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H; Young, V A Linda; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Hounsell, Alan R

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV(CT) to GTV(FUSED) was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  20. 18F-FDG PET-CT Simulation for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Effect in Patients Already Staged by PET-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, Gerard G.; McAleese, Jonathan; Carson, Kathryn J.; Stewart, David P.; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Zatari, Ashraf; Lynch, Tom; Jarritt, Peter H.; Young, V.A. Linda D.C.R.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET), in addition to computed tomography (CT), has an effect in target volume definition for radical radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In previously PET-CT staged patients with NSCLC, we assessed the effect of using an additional planning PET-CT scan for gross tumor volume (GTV) definition. Methods and Materials: A total of 28 patients with Stage IA-IIIB NSCLC were enrolled. All patients had undergone staging PET-CT to ensure suitability for radical RT. Of the 28 patients, 14 received induction chemotherapy. In place of a RT planning CT scan, patients underwent scanning on a PET-CT scanner. In a virtual planning study, four oncologists independently delineated the GTV on the CT scan alone and then on the PET-CT scan. Intraobserver and interobserver variability were assessed using the concordance index (CI), and the results were compared using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: PET-CT improved the CI between observers when defining the GTV using the PET-CT images compared with using CT alone for matched cases (median CI, 0.57 for CT and 0.64 for PET-CT, p = .032). The median of the mean percentage of volume change from GTV CT to GTV FUSED was -5.21% for the induction chemotherapy group and 18.88% for the RT-alone group. Using the Mann-Whitney U test, this was significantly different (p = .001). Conclusion: PET-CT RT planning scan, in addition to a staging PET-CT scan, reduces interobserver variability in GTV definition for NSCLC. The GTV size with PET-CT compared with CT in the RT-alone group increased and was reduced in the induction chemotherapy group.

  1. Patient performance–based plan parameter optimization for prostate cancer in tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yuan Jie; Lee, Suk, E-mail: sukmp@korea.ac.kr; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Shim, Jang Bo; Kim, Kwang Hyeon; Park, Young Je; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of treatment-planning parameters on the quality of treatment plans in tomotherapy and to find the optimized planning parameter combinations when treating patients with prostate cancer under different performances. A total of 3 patients with prostate cancer with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or 3 were included in this study. For each patient, 27 treatment plans were created using a combination of planning parameters (field width of 1, 2.5, and 5 cm; pitch of 0.172, 0.287, and 0.43; and modulation factor of 1.8, 3, and 3.5). Then, plans were analyzed using several dosimetrical indices: the prescription isodose to target volume (PITV) ratio, homogeneity index (HI), conformity index (CI), target coverage index (TCI), modified dose HI (MHI), conformity number (CN), and quality factor (QF). Furthermore, dose-volume histogram of critical structures and critical organ scoring index (COSI) were used to analyze organs at risk (OAR) sparing. Interestingly, treatment plans with a field width of 1 cm showed more favorable results than others in the planning target volume (PTV) and OAR indices. However, the treatment time of the 1-cm field width was 3 times longer than that of plans with a field width of 5 cm. There was no substantial decrease in treatment time when the pitch was increased from 0.172 to 0.43, but the PTV indices were slightly compromised. As expected, field width had the most significant influence on all of the indices including PTV, OAR, and treatment time. For the patients with good performance who can tolerate a longer treatment time, we suggest a field width of 1 cm, pitch of 0.172, and modulation factor of 1.8; for the patients with poor performance status, field width of 5 cm, pitch of 0.287, and a modulation factor of 3.5 should be considered.

  2. Concept for individualized patient allocation: ReCompare—remote comparison of particle and photon treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lühr, Armin; Baumann, Michael; Löck, Steffen; Roth, Klaus; Helmbrecht, Stephan; Jakobi, Annika; Petersen, Jørgen B; Just, Uwe; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Identifying those patients who have a higher chance to be cured with fewer side effects by particle beam therapy than by state-of-the-art photon therapy is essential to guarantee a fair and sufficient access to specialized radiotherapy. The individualized identification requires initiatives by particle as well as non-particle radiotherapy centers to form networks, to establish procedures for the decision process, and to implement means for the remote exchange of relevant patient information. In this work, we want to contribute a practical concept that addresses these requirements. We proposed a concept for individualized patient allocation to photon or particle beam therapy at a non-particle radiotherapy institution that bases on remote treatment plan comparison. We translated this concept into the web-based software tool ReCompare (REmote COMparison of PARticlE and photon treatment plans). We substantiated the feasibility of the proposed concept by demonstrating remote exchange of treatment plans between radiotherapy institutions and the direct comparison of photon and particle treatment plans in photon treatment planning systems. ReCompare worked with several tested standard treatment planning systems, ensured patient data protection, and integrated in the clinical workflow. Our concept supports non-particle radiotherapy institutions with the patient-specific treatment decision on the optimal irradiation modality by providing expertise from a particle therapy center. The software tool ReCompare may help to improve and standardize this personalized treatment decision. It will be available from our website when proton therapy is operational at our facility

  3. MMCTP: a radiotherapy research environment for Monte Carlo and patient-specific treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A; DeBlois, F; Stroian, G; Al-Yahya, K; Heath, E; Seuntjens, J

    2007-01-01

    Radiotherapy research lacks a flexible computational research environment for Monte Carlo (MC) and patient-specific treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to develop a flexible software package on low-cost hardware with the aim of integrating new patient-specific treatment planning with MC dose calculations suitable for large-scale prospective and retrospective treatment planning studies. We designed the software package 'McGill Monte Carlo treatment planning' (MMCTP) for the research development of MC and patient-specific treatment planning. The MMCTP design consists of a graphical user interface (GUI), which runs on a simple workstation connected through standard secure-shell protocol to a cluster for lengthy MC calculations. Treatment planning information (e.g., images, structures, beam geometry properties and dose distributions) is converted into a convenient MMCTP local file storage format designated, the McGill RT format. MMCTP features include (a) DICOM R T, RTOG and CADPlan CART format imports; (b) 2D and 3D visualization views for images, structure contours, and dose distributions; (c) contouring tools; (d) DVH analysis, and dose matrix comparison tools; (e) external beam editing; (f) MC transport calculation from beam source to patient geometry for photon and electron beams. The MC input files, which are prepared from the beam geometry properties and patient information (e.g., images and structure contours), are uploaded and run on a cluster using shell commands controlled from the MMCTP GUI. The visualization, dose matrix operation and DVH tools offer extensive options for plan analysis and comparison between MC plans and plans imported from commercial treatment planning systems. The MMCTP GUI provides a flexible research platform for the development of patient-specific MC treatment planning for photon and electron external beam radiation therapy. The impact of this tool lies in the fact that it allows for systematic, platform

  4. Human applications of the INEL patient treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, F.; Wessol, D.; Atkinson, C.; Nigg, D.

    1995-01-01

    During the past few years, murine and large animal research, as well as human studies have provided data to the point where human clinical trials have been initiated at the BMRR using BPA-F for gliomas and at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) using BPA for melanomas of the extremeties. It is expected that glioma trials using BSH will proceed soon at the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR) in the Netherlands. The first human glioma epithermal boron neutron capture therapy application was performed at the BMRR in the fall of 1994. This was a collaborative effort by BNL, Beth Israel Manhattan hospital, and INEL. The INEL planning system was chosen to perform dose predictions for this application

  5. From planning to realisation of an electronic patient record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K-L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the neccessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occured during this process.

  6. [From planning to realization of an electronic patient record].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the necessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occurred during this process.

  7. Gefitinib inhibits invasive phenotype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in drug-resistant NSCLC cells with MET amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia La Monica

    Full Text Available Despite the initial response, all patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs. The EGFR-T790M secondary mutation is responsible for half of acquired resistance cases, while MET amplification has been associated with acquired resistance in about 5-15% of NSCLCs. Clinical findings indicate the retained addiction of resistant tumors on EGFR signaling. Therefore, we evaluated the molecular mechanisms supporting the therapeutic potential of gefitinib maintenance in the HCC827 GR5 NSCLC cell line harbouring MET amplification as acquired resistance mechanism. We demonstrated that resistant cells can proliferate and survive regardless of the presence of gefitinib, whereas the absence of the drug significantly enhanced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, the continuous exposure to gefitinib prevented the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT with increased E-cadherin expression and down-regulation of vimentin and N-cadherin. Importantly, the inhibition of cellular migration was correlated with the suppression of EGFR-dependent Src, STAT5 and p38 signaling as assessed by a specific kinase array, western blot analysis and silencing functional studies. On the contrary, the lack of effect of gefitinib on EGFR phosphorylation in the H1975 cells (EGFR-T790M correlated with the absence of effects on cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings suggest that certain EGFR-mutated patients may still benefit from a second-line therapy including gefitinib based on the specific mechanism underlying tumor cell resistance.

  8. Recruiting patients for postgraduate medical training in a community family planning clinic: how do patients want to be asked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    To look at patients' views about the way in which they are recruited to assist with postgraduate medical training (i.e. Who is the best person to ask patients to participate? When is the best time for patients to be asked?) and to compare these with clinical practice. Questionnaire surveys of 103 female family planning clinic (FPC) patients and 40 Diploma of the Faculty of Family Planning (DFFP) instructing doctors. Patients were recruited from the waiting room of a community FPC, and DFFP instructing doctors from the North West of England were recruited at an updating meeting. Patients preferred to be recruited by non-medical staff (i.e. receptionist and nurses). Few patients wanted to be asked by the training doctor. Only 9% would find it difficult to refuse a receptionist, 47% would find it difficult to refuse the instructing doctor and 65% would find it difficult to refuse the training doctor. In practice, the commonest person to recruit patients is the instructing doctor. Patients wanted to be given some time to consider the request; this was not always given. Patients may feel coerced into seeing training doctors because they find it difficult to refuse requests, particularly when they are being recruited by doctors. Non-medical staff may be more appropriate for the initial recruitment of patients. Patients need time to consider their involvement. The provision of written information may be useful. Further research is indicated to empower patients' decision-making and reduce the likelihood of coercion.

  9. Is it possible for knowledge-based planning to improve intensity modulated radiation therapy plan quality for planners with different planning experiences in left-sided breast cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juanqi; Hu, Weigang; Yang, Zhaozhi; Chen, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhiqiang; Yu, Xiaoli; Guo, Xiaomao; Lu, Saiquan; Li, Kaixuan; Yu, Gongyi

    2017-05-22

    Knowledge-based planning (KBP) is a promising technique that can improve plan quality and increase planning efficiency. However, no attempts have been made to extend the domain of KBP for planners with different planning experiences so far. The purpose of this study was to quantify the potential gains for planners with different planning experiences after implementing KBP in intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer patients. The model libraries were populated with 80 expert clinical plans from treated patients who previously received left-sided breast-conserving surgery and IMRT with simultaneously integrated boost. The libraries were created on the RapidPlan TM . 6 planners with different planning experiences (2 beginner planners, 2 junior planners and 2 senior planners) generated manual and KBP optimized plans for additional 10 patients, similar to those included in the model libraries. The plan qualities were compared between manual and KBP plans. All plans were capable of achieving the prescription requirement. There were almost no statistically significant differences in terms of the planning target volume (PTV) coverage and dose conformality. It was demonstrated that the doses for most of organs-at-risk (OARs) were on average lower or equal in KBP plans compared to manual plans except for the senior planners, where the very small differences were not statistically significant. KBP data showed a systematic trend to have superior dose sparing at most parameters for the heart and ipsilateral lung. The observed decrease in the doses to these OARs could be achieved, particularly for the beginner and junior planners. Many differences were statistically significant. It is feasible to generate acceptable IMRT plans after implementing KBP for left-sided breast cancer. KBP helps to effectively improve the quality of IMRT plans against the benchmark of manual plans for less experienced planners without any manual intervention. KBP

  10. The challenge of NSCLC diagnosis and predictive analysis on small samples. Practical approach of a working group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunnissen, Erik; Kerr, Keith M; Herth, Felix J F

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the division of pulmonary carcinomas into small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was adequate for therapy selection. Due to the emergence of new treatment options subtyping of NSCLC and predictive testing have become mandatory. A practical approach to...

  11. Sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy plans to changes in patient weight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albertini, Francesca; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Rutz, Hans Peter; Timmerman, Beate; Goitein, Gudrun

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study to investigate the sensitivity of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to changes in body weight occurring during the course of radiotherapy for patients treated in the sacral region. Materials and methods: During therapy, important weight gain and loss were observed for two patients treated to para-spinal tumors, which resulted in both patients being re-scanned and re-planned. Both patients were treated as part of their therapy, with a narrow-angle IMPT (NA-IMPT) plan delivering a 'dose hole' around the cauda equina (CE), which was mainly formed through modulation of Bragg peaks in depth. To investigate the impact of these weight changes on the proton range and delivered dose, the nominal fields were re-calculated on the new CT data sets. Results were analyzed by comparing these new plans with those originally delivered and by calculating changes in range and delivered doses in target volumes and normal tissues. Results: Maximum differences in proton range in the CE region of up to +8 mm and -13 mm, respectively, for the patient who gained weight and for the patient who lost weight, increased the maximum dose to the CE by only 2%. This indicates that both IMPT plans were relatively insensitive to substantial range uncertainties. Even greater differences in range (16 mm) in the planning target volume only slightly affected its dose homogeneity (differences in V 90% of 6% in the worst case). Nevertheless, some large undesired local dose differences were observed. Conclusions: We demonstrated, that, at least for the two analyzed cases, NA-IMPT plans are less sensitive to weight variations than one may expect. Still, we would advise to calculate new plans in case of substantial change in weight for patients treated in the sacral region, primarily due to the presence of new hot/cold area

  12. Patient dose simulation in X-ray CT using a radiation treatment-planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, Yasuo; Oda, Masahiko; Minamoto, Takahiro

    2003-01-01

    Medical irradiation dosage has been increasing with the development of new radiological equipment and new techniques like interventional radiology. It is fair to say that patient dose has been increased as a result of the development of multi-slice CT. A number of studies on the irradiation dose of CT have been reported, and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) is now used as a general means of determining CT dose. However, patient dose distribution in the body varies with the patient's constitution, bowel gas in the body, and conditions of exposure. In this study, patient dose was analyzed from the viewpoint of dose distribution, using a radiation treatment-planning computer. Percent depth dose (PDD) and the off-center ratio (OCR) of the CT beam are needed to calculate dose distribution by the planning computer. Therefore, X-ray CT data were measured with various apparatuses, and beam data were sent to the planning computer. Measurement and simulation doses in the elliptical phantom (Mix-Dp: water equivalent material) were collated, and the CT irradiation dose was determined for patient dose simulation. The rotational radiation treatment technique was used to obtain the patient dose distribution of CT, and patient dose was evaluated through simulation of the dose distribution. CT images of the thorax were sent to the planning computer and simulated. The result was that the patient dose distribution of the thorax was obtained for CT examination. (author)

  13. Tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission planning in care processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Peter J H; Boucherie, Richard J; Hans, Erwin W; Hurink, Johann L

    2013-06-01

    Tactical planning of resources in hospitals concerns elective patient admission planning and the intermediate term allocation of resource capacities. Its main objectives are to achieve equitable access for patients, to meet production targets/to serve the strategically agreed number of patients, and to use resources efficiently. This paper proposes a method to develop a tactical resource allocation and elective patient admission plan. These tactical plans allocate available resources to various care processes and determine the selection of patients to be served that are at a particular stage of their care process. Our method is developed in a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) framework and copes with multiple resources, multiple time periods and multiple patient groups with various uncertain treatment paths through the hospital, thereby integrating decision making for a chain of hospital resources. Computational results indicate that our method leads to a more equitable distribution of resources and provides control of patient access times, the number of patients served and the fraction of allocated resource capacity. Our approach is generic, as the base MILP and the solution approach allow for including various extensions to both the objective criteria and the constraints. Consequently, the proposed method is applicable in various settings of tactical hospital management.

  14. Functional image-guided stereotactic body radiation therapy planning for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsegmed, Uranchimeg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakashima, Takeo [Division of Radiation Therapy, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan); Nakamura, Yuko; Higaki, Toru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Imano, Nobuki; Doi, Yoshiko; Kenjo, Masahiro; Ozawa, Shuichi; Murakami, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Awai, Kazuo [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the current planning study is to evaluate the ability of gadoxetate disodium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (EOB-MRI)–guided stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) planning by using intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques in sparing the functional liver tissues during SBRT for hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, 20 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma were enrolled. Functional liver tissues were defined according to quantitative liver-spleen contrast ratios ≥ 1.5 on a hepatobiliary phase scan. Functional images were fused with the planning computed tomography (CT) images; the following 2 SBRT plans were designed using a “step-and-shoot” static IMRT technique for each patient: (1) an anatomical SBRT plan optimization based on the total liver; and (2) a functional SBRT plan based on the functional liver. The total prescribed dose was 48 gray (Gy) in 4 fractions. Dosimetric parameters, including dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV D{sub 95%}), percentages of total and functional liver volumes, which received doses from 5 to 30 Gy (V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30), and mean doses to total and functional liver (MLD and fMLD, respectively) of the 2 plans were compared. Compared with anatomical plans, functional image-guided SBRT plans reduced MLD (mean: plan A, 5.5 Gy; and plan F, 5.1 Gy; p < 0.0001) and fMLD (mean: plan A, 5.4 Gy; and plan F, 4.9 Gy; p < 0.0001), as well as V5 to V30 and fV5 to fV30. No differences were noted in PTV coverage and nonhepatic organs at risk (OARs) doses. In conclusion, EOB-MRI–guided SBRT planning using the IMRT technique may preserve functional liver tissues in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

  15. Patient with stroke: hospital discharge planning, functionality and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique José Mendes Nunes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Stroke still causes high levels of human inability and suffering, and it is one of the main causes of death in developed countries, including Portugal. Objective: analyze the strategies of hospital discharge planning for these patients, increasing the knowledge related to hospitalhome transition, discharge planning processes and the main impact on the quality of life and functionality. Method: integrative literature review using the PICOD criteria, with database research. Results: 19 articles were obtained, using several approaches and contexts. For quality of life, the factors related to the patient satisfaction with care and the psychoemotional aspects linked with functionality are the most significant. Conclusion: during the hospitalization period, a careful hospital discharge planning and comprehensive care to patients and caregivers - in particular the functional and psychoemotional aspects - tend to have an impact on the quality of life of patients.

  16. Therapeutic value of EGFR inhibition in CRC and NSCLC: 15 years of clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiani, Teresa; Napolitano, Stefania; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Martini, Giulia; Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a key role in tumour evolution, proliferation and immune evasion, and is one of the most important targets for biological therapy, especially for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and colorectal cancer (CRC). In the past 15 years, several EGFR antagonists have been approved for the treatment of NSCLC and metastatic CRC (mCRC). To optimise the use of anti-EGFR agents in clinical practice, various clinical and molecular biomarkers have been investigated, thus moving their indication from unselected to selected populations. Nowadays, anti-EGFR drugs represent a gold-standard therapy for metastatic NSCLC harbouring EGFR activating mutation and for RAS wild-type mCRC. Their clinical efficacy is limited by the presence of intrinsic resistance or the onset of acquired resistance. In this review, we provide an overview of the antitumour activity of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC and CRC and of mechanisms of resistance, focusing on the development of a personalised approach through 15 years of preclinical and clinical research.

  17. Chromosome 5p Region SNPs Are Associated with Risk of NSCLC among Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyke, A. L. V.

    2009-01-01

    In a population-based case-control study, we explored the associations between 42 polymorphisms in seven genes in this region and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) risk among Caucasian (364 cases; 380 controls) and African American (95 cases; 103 controls) women. Two TERT region SNPs, rs2075786 and rs2853677, conferred an increased risk of developing NSCLC, especially among African American women, and TERT-rs2735940 was associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer among African Americans. Five of the 20 GHR polymorphisms and SEPP1-rs6413428 were associated with a marginally increased risk of NSCLC among Caucasians. Random forest analysis reinforced the importance of GHR among Caucasians and identified AMACR, TERT, and GHR among African Americans, which were also significant using gene-based risk scores. Smoking-SNP interactions were explored, and haplotype in TERT and GHR associated with NSCLC risk were identified. The roles of TERT, GHR, AMACR and SEPP1 genes in lung carcinogenesis warrant further exploration

  18. NOTE: Patient-specific planning for prevention of mechanical collisions during radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nioutsikou, Elena; Bedford, James L.; Webb, Steve

    2003-11-01

    A common unwanted difficulty in treatment planning, especially in non-coplanar radiotherapy set-ups, is the potential collision of the rotating gantry with the couch and/or the patient's body. A technique and computer program that detects these and signals avoidance of such beam directions is presented. The problem was approached using analytical geometry. The separate components within the treatment room have either been measured and modelled for an Elekta linear accelerator, or read out from a Pinnacle3 treatment planning system and are represented as an integer grid of points in three-dimensional (3D) space. The module is attached to the treatment planning system and can provide rejection or acceptance of unwanted beam directions in a plan. In contrast to previous work that has only used patient models, each individual patient's outlines are considered here in their actual treatment position inclusive of any immobilization device. The extremities of the patient superiorly and inferiorly to the scanned region are simulated by an expanded version of the RANDO phantom. In this way, 'potential' collisions can be detected in addition to the certain ones. Patient position is not a limiting factor for the accuracy of the collision detection anymore, as each set-up is always created around the isocentre. Maps of allowed and forbidden zones within the treatment suite have been created by running the code for all possible gantry and couch angles for three commonly arising cases: a head and neck plan utilizing a small stereotactic collimator, a prostate plan with multileaf collimators and an abdominal plan with the lead tray attached. In the last case, the 3D map permitted significantly fewer set-up combinations. Good agreement between prediction and experiment confirmed the capability of the program and introduces a promising add-on for treatment planning.

  19. Combination of EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy as first-line therapy for advanced NSCLC: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OuYang, Pu-Yun; Su, Zhen; Mao, Yan-Ping; Deng, Wuguo; Xie, Fang-Yun

    2013-01-01

    The impact of combining epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) and chemotherapy as first-line therapy for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. Therefore, randomized trials that compared this combined regimen with chemotherapy or EGFR-TKIs monotherapy were included for this meta-analysis. We used published hazard ratios (HRs), if available, or derived treatment estimates from other survival data. Pooled estimates of treatment efficacy of the combined regimen in the entire unselected population and selected patients by EGFR-mutation status and smoking history were calculated. Eight trials eventually entered into this meta-analysis, including 4585 patients. Overall, the combined regimen significantly delayed disease progression (HR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.69-0.95, P = 0.01); subgroup analysis showed significantly higher progression free survival advantages in Asian patients (Pchemotherapy (P = 0.02). In selected patients by EGFR-mutation, both mutation positive (HR = 0.48, 95% CI 0.28-0.83, P = 0.009) and negative (HR = 0.84, 95% CI 0.72-0.98, P = 0.02) patients gained progression free survival benefit from the combined regimen, albeit the magnitude of benefit was marginally larger in mutation positive patients (P = 0.05). In selected patients by smoking history, never/light smokers achieved a great progression free survival benefit from the combined regimen (HR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.35-0.74, P = 0.0004). Unfortunately, the combined regimen had no significant impact on overall survival, irrespective of ethnicity, dose schedules or EGFR-mutation status. Severe anorexia (RR = 2.01, 95% CI 1.11-3.63; P = 0.02) and diarrhea (RR = 2.70, 95% CI 1.94-3.76; Pchemotherapy deserved to be considered in the future, although it is not approved for advanced NSCLC at the moment.

  20. SU-E-J-172: A Quantitative Assessment of Lung Tumor Motion Using 4DCT Imaging Under Conditions of Controlled Breathing in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohatt, D; Gomez, J; Singh, A; Malhotra, H [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using the CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)

  1. Planned second look endoscopy in patients with bleeding duodenal or gastric ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trap, R; Skarbye, M; Rosenberg, J

    2000-01-01

    1998. Planned second look endoscopy and repeated sclerotherapy were standard care. The effects were evaluated by comparing the expected number of rebleeders with actual rebleeders. At the same time we assessed predicting factors for rebleeding. RESULTS: Fifteen of the admitted seventy patients were...... found to rebleed after initial sclerotherapy. The overall success rate of endoscopic therapy was 63/70 patients (90%). Six patients (9%) had to undergo surgery to obtain haemostasis, and one patient died suddenly after the second endoscopic sclerotherapy. Perforation was seen in two patients (3...... of the present study suggests a beneficial effect on rebleeding rate of patients treated with planned second look endoscopy. Future controlled trails should verify this hypothesis....

  2. Role of RENAL nephrometry scoring system in planning surgical intervention in patients with localized renal mas

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Samir Shaaban; Tamer Mohammed Abou Youssif; Ahmed Mostafa; Hossam Eldin Hegazy; Mohammed Adel Atta

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The study was designed to validate the value of preoperative planning using RENAL nephrometry scoring system in patients having organ confined renal tumors and undergoing surgical intervention and to assess its correlation with the surgical technique. Patient and methods: Forty patients with organ-confined renal masses underwent RENAL nephrometry scoring which was correlated with the surgical technique either radical or nephron-sparing surgery. Result: RENAL nephrometry scoring...

  3. Can Laws Be a Potential PET Image Texture Analysis Approach for Evaluation of Tumor Heterogeneity and Histopathological Characteristics in NSCLC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacavus, Seyhan; Yılmaz, Bülent; Tasdemir, Arzu; Kayaaltı, Ömer; Kaya, Eser; İçer, Semra; Ayyıldız, Oguzhan

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the association between the textural features obtained from 18 F-FDG images, metabolic parameters (SUVmax , SUVmean, MTV, TLG), and tumor histopathological characteristics (stage and Ki-67 proliferation index) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The FDG-PET images of 67 patients with NSCLC were evaluated. MATLAB technical computing language was employed in the extraction of 137 features by using first order statistics (FOS), gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), gray-level run length matrix (GLRLM), and Laws' texture filters. Textural features and metabolic parameters were statistically analyzed in terms of good discrimination power between tumor stages, and selected features/parameters were used in the automatic classification by k-nearest neighbors (k-NN) and support vector machines (SVM). We showed that one textural feature (gray-level nonuniformity, GLN) obtained using GLRLM approach and nine textural features using Laws' approach were successful in discriminating all tumor stages, unlike metabolic parameters. There were significant correlations between Ki-67 index and some of the textural features computed using Laws' method (r = 0.6, p = 0.013). In terms of automatic classification of tumor stage, the accuracy was approximately 84% with k-NN classifier (k = 3) and SVM, using selected five features. Texture analysis of FDG-PET images has a potential to be an objective tool to assess tumor histopathological characteristics. The textural features obtained using Laws' approach could be useful in the discrimination of tumor stage.

  4. Biological-based and physical-based optimization for biological evaluation of prostate patient's plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhikh, E.; Sheino, I.; Vertinsky, A.

    2017-09-01

    Modern modalities of radiation treatment therapy allow irradiation of the tumor to high dose values and irradiation of organs at risk (OARs) to low dose values at the same time. In this paper we study optimal radiation treatment plans made in Monaco system. The first aim of this study was to evaluate dosimetric features of Monaco treatment planning system using biological versus dose-based cost functions for the OARs and irradiation targets (namely tumors) when the full potential of built-in biological cost functions is utilized. The second aim was to develop criteria for the evaluation of radiation dosimetry plans for patients based on the macroscopic radiobiological criteria - TCP/NTCP. In the framework of the study four dosimetric plans were created utilizing the full extent of biological and physical cost functions using dose calculation-based treatment planning for IMRT Step-and-Shoot delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in prostate case (5 fractions per 7 Gy).

  5. CT-guided conformal cryoablation for peripheral NSCLC: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiao; Tian, Jinlin; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Bin; Kacher, Daniel S.; Ma, Xuyang; Liu, Shurong; Ren, Chao; Xiao, Yue-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of CT-guided and monitored percutaneous conformal cryoablation of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer for patients who are not suitable for surgical resection. Materials and method: CT-guided percutaneous conformal cryoablation was performed on 46 patients with peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Patients with tumor sizes less than 3 cm in diameter were treated with double-needle clamping cryoablation, while the patients with 3–5 cm tumor sizes were treated with multiple-needle conformal cryoablation. CT was used to monitor the extent of cryoablation during the procedures. At month 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 post-procedure, enhanced CT scans and/or PET-CT scans were performed to evaluate the impact of the therapy. Results: The average tumor CT values were 32 ± 10 HU and −21 ± 8 HU before and after cryoablation, respectively. The largest diameters of the lesions at month 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 post-procedure were 2.63 ± 0.56 cm, 1.93 ± 0.51 cm, 1.55 ± 0.39 cm, 1.43 ± 0.40 cm, and 1.38 ± 0.38 cm, respectively, in patients with tumor diameter less than 3 cm, and 3.63 ± 0.39 cm, 2.98 ± 0.31 cm, 2.62 ± 0.32 cm, 2.54 ± 0.34 cm, and 2.56 ± 0.37 cm respectively in patients with the tumor diameters between 3 and 5 cm. At the 24th month, there were 36 cases of complete response (83.7%), 7 cases of partial response (16.3%), and no cases of stable disease or progressive disease. 3 patients died due to multiple metastases. Conclusion: CT-guided percutaneous conformal cryoablation is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive therapeutic method for peripheral lung cancer.

  6. Planning Study Comparison of Real-Time Target Tracking and Four-Dimensional Inverse Planning for Managing Patient Respiratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Yan Di

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time target tracking (RT-TT) and four-dimensional inverse planning (4D-IP) are two potential methods to manage respiratory target motion. In this study, we evaluated each method using the cumulative dose-volume criteria in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Respiration-correlated computed tomography scans were acquired for 4 patients. Deformable image registration was applied to generate a displacement mapping for each phase image of the respiration-correlated computed tomography images. First, the dose distribution for the organs of interest obtained from an idealized RT-TT technique was evaluated, assuming perfect knowledge of organ motion and beam tracking. Inverse planning was performed on each phase image separately. The treatment dose to the organs of interest was then accumulated from the optimized plans. Second, 4D-IP was performed using the probability density function of respiratory motion. The beam arrangement, prescription dose, and objectives were consistent in both planning methods. The dose-volume and equivalent uniform dose in the target volume, lung, heart, and spinal cord were used for the evaluation. Results: The cumulative dose in the target was similar for both techniques. The equivalent uniform dose of the lung, heart, and spinal cord was 4.6 ± 2.2, 11 ± 4.4, and 11 ± 6.6 Gy for RT-TT with a 0-mm target margin, 5.2 ± 3.1, 12 ± 5.9, and 12 ± 7.8 Gy for RT-TT with a 2-mm target margin, and 5.3 ± 2.3, 11.9 ± 5.0, and 12 ± 5.6 Gy for 4D-IP, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 4D-IP can achieve plans similar to those achieved by RT-TT. Considering clinical implementation, 4D-IP could be a more reliable and practical method to manage patient respiration-induced motion

  7. A study of the performance of patients with frontal lobe lesions in a financial planning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, V; Grafman, J; Tajik, J; Gana, S; Danto, D

    1997-10-01

    It has long been argued that patients with lesions in the prefrontal cortex have difficulties in decision making and problem solving in real-world, ill-structured situations, particularly problem types involving planning and look-ahead components. Recently, several researchers have questioned our ability to capture and characterize these deficits adequately using just the standard neuropsychological test batteries, and have called for tests that reflect real-world task requirements more accurately. We present data from 10 patients with focal lesions to the prefrontal cortex and 10 normal control subjects engaged in a real-world financial planning task. We also introduce a theoretical framework and methodology developed in the cognitive science literature for quantifying and analysing the complex data generated by problem-solving tasks. Our findings indicate that patient performance is impoverished at a global level but not at the local level. Patients have difficulty in organizing and structuring their problem space. Once they begin problem solving, they have difficulty in allocating adequate effort to each problem-solving phase. Patients also have difficulty dealing with the fact that there are no right or wrong answers nor official termination points in real-world planning problems. They also find it problematic to generate their own feedback. They invariably terminate the session before the details are fleshed out and all the goals satisfied. Finally, patients do not take full advantage of the fact that constraints on real-world problems are negotiable. However, it is not necessary to postulate a 'planning' deficit. It is possible to understand the patients' difficulties in real world planning tasks in terms of the following four accepted deficits: inadequate access to 'structured event complexes', difficulty in generalizing from particulars, failure to shift between 'mental sets', and poor judgment regarding adequacy and completeness of a plan.

  8. Patient-reported denials, appeals, and complaints: associations with overall plan ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Denise D; Haviland, Amelia M; Dembosky, Jacob W; Klein, David J; Elliott, Marc N

    2018-03-01

    To assess whether Medicare patients' reports of denied care, appeals/complaints, and satisfactory resolution were associated with ratings of their health plan or care. Retrospective analysis of 2010 Medicare Advantage Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey data. Multivariate linear regression of data from 154,766 respondents (61.1% response rate) tested the association of beneficiary ratings of plan and care with beneficiary reports of denied care, appeals, complaints, and complaint resolution, adjusting for beneficiary demographics. Beneficiaries who reported being denied needed care rated their plans and care significantly less positively, by 17.2 points (on a 100-point scale) and 9.1 points, respectively. Filing an appeal was not statistically significantly associated with further lower ratings. Beneficiaries who filed a complaint that was satisfactorily resolved gave slightly lower ratings of plans (-3.4 points) and care (-2.5 points) than those not filing a complaint (P plans. Our results suggest that beneficiaries may attribute the actions that lead to complaints or denials to plans more than to the care they received. Successful complaint resolution and utilization management review might eliminate most deficits associated with complaints and denied care, consistent with the service recovery paradox. High rates of complaints and denied care might identify areas that need improved utilization management review, customer service, and quality improvement. Among those reporting being denied care, filing an appeal was not associated with lower patient ratings of plan or care.

  9. Patient geometry-driven information retrieval for IMRT treatment plan quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Binbin; Ricchetti, Francesco; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Kazhdan, Misha; Simari, Patricio; Chuang Ming; Taylor, Russell; Jacques, Robert; McNutt, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan quality depends on the planner's level of experience and the amount of time the planner invests in developing the plan. Planners often unwittingly accept plans when further sparing of the organs at risk (OARs) is possible. The authors propose a method of IMRT treatment plan quality control that helps planners to evaluate the doses of the OARs upon completion of a new plan. Methods: It is achieved by comparing the geometric configurations of the OARs and targets of a new patient with those of prior patients, whose plans are maintained in a database. They introduce the concept of a shape relationship descriptor and, specifically, the overlap volume histogram (OVH) to describe the spatial configuration of an OAR with respect to a target. The OVH provides a way to infer the likely DVHs of the OARs by comparing the relative spatial configurations between patients. A database of prior patients is built to serve as an external reference. At the conclusion of a new plan, planners search through the database and identify related patients by comparing the OAR-target geometric relationships of the new patient with those of prior patients. The treatment plans of these related patients are retrieved from the database and guide planners in determining whether lower doses delivered to the OARs in the new plan are feasible. Results: Preliminary evaluation is promising. In this evaluation, they applied the analysis to the parotid DVHs of 32 prior head-and-neck patients, whose plans are maintained in a database. Each parotid was queried against the other 63 parotids to determine whether a lower dose was possible. The 17 parotids that promised the greatest reduction in D 50 (DVH dose at 50% volume) were flagged. These 17 parotids came from 13 patients. The method also indicated that the doses of the other nine parotids of the 13 patients could not be reduced, so they were included in the replanning process as

  10. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  11. A Screening Method for the ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer research has recently made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer and in developing treatments for it. Such achievements are directly utilized in clinical practice. Indeed, the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was first described in non-small cell lung cancer in 2007, and a molecularly targeted drug against the fusion was approved in 2011. However, lung cancer with the ALK fusion constitutes only a small fraction of lung cancers; therefore, efficient patient selection is crucial for successful treatment using the ALK inhibitor. Currently, RT-PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry are commonly used to detect the ALK fusion. Although FISH is currently the gold standard technique, there are no perfect methods for detecting these genetic alterations. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and the possible criteria for selecting patients who are more likely to have the ALK fusion. If we can successfully screen patients, then ALK inhibitor treatment will be the best example of personalized therapy in terms of selecting patients with an uncommon genotype from a larger group with the same tumor phenotype. In other words, the personalized therapy may offer a new challenge for current clinical oncology.

  12. [Care plan for patients in prone decubitus. An experience from practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Torras, E; Subirana Casacuberta, M; Sebastià, M P; Jover Sancho, C; Solà Solé, N

    1995-01-01

    Offering a specific integral attention to patients with SDRA in prone decubitus positions makes us establish a performance plan with the aim to know the problems derived from the change in position, the time staying in prone decubitus and to standardize a care plan. We review the clinic records of the patients admitted in our unit from March '93 to March '95 who were positioned in prone decubitus. Taking as a base the nursing care model of V. Henderson and the taxonomy of NANDA, we analyse the needs which have been altered, and determine the nursing diagnosis, complications and most frequent interdependent problems establishing the aim to accomplish, planning the performance and rationalization. Five patients were positioned in prone decubitus before planning the performance and four more afterwards. All the patients tolerated SNG diet keeping a correct bowel transit. One patient showed an ulcera at frontal level. There were neither comeal ulceras nor alterations in the oral mucossa. The vascular accesses remained permeable. DP caused facial and periorbital edema in all the patients. We did not observe any increase in the amount of bronchial secretions. The eight patients who tolerated the change in position stayed in prone decubitus for an average of 77 hours, with a range of 10 to 216 hours. Four patients were discharged from the hospital, two of whom showed movility alterations, independently of the time staying in prone decubitus. We state explicitly the nursing care, determine five nursing diagnosis, one problem and seven interdependent complications. Establishing the nursing care from the experience and review of the records has allowed us to be more specific and objective. Standardizing the specific care plans makes the nursing care easier when dealing with real problems as well as with the care of complications derived from this situation.

  13. Sarcopenia is a novel poor prognostic factor in male patients with pathological Stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Toda, Michihito; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, and has a risk of adverse outcomes such as disability, poor quality of life and death. As prognosis depends not only on disease aggressiveness, but also on a patient's physical condition, sarcopenia can predict survival in patients with various cancer types. However, its effects on postoperative prognosis in patients with localized non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have never been reported. We retrospectively investigated 215 male patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC. L3 muscle index is defined as the cross-section area of muscle at the third lumbar vertebra level, normalized for height, and is a clinical measurement of sarcopenia. We then investigated the effect of preoperative sarcopenia on their postoperative prognosis. Our 215 subjects included 30 patients with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with body mass index, nutritional condition, serum CYFRA 21-1 level and pathological stage, but not with preoperative respiratory function or performance status. Frequency of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage period or causes of death were not correlated with the presence of sarcopenia. The sarcopenia group had a significantly shorter median overall survival (32 months) than the no-sarcopenia group. Sarcopenia might not affect short-term outcomes in patients with early-stage lung cancer. Sarcopenia was a predictor of poor prognosis in male patients with Stage I NSCLC. As sarcopenic patients with NSCLC patients are at risk for significantly worse outcomes, their treatments require careful planning, even for those with Stage I disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Comparing Written and Planned Training On Anxiety among Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam tolyat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The prevalence of preoperative state anxiety is an unavoidable complication. Aside from its type and scope, the surgical operation is considered as a severe stressful situation for patients. Considering the importance of reducing the state anxiety in patients undergoing surgery, there are different methods, one of which is patient education; therefore the aim of the current study was compare the effect of written and planned training on the state anxiety among patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. Method: In this study, 81 patients candidate for orthopedic surgery were selected using convenience sampling and were randomly divided into 3 groups, including planned training, pamphlet and control groups. All patients answered 20 questions-State-Traits Anxiety Inventory (STAI Questionnaire the day before surgery and the intervention was later carried out in the planned training and pamphlet groups. Then the effect of preoperative state anxiety was re-evaluated about half an hour after training in three groups. For data analysis, in addition to mean and standard deviation, independent t-test and ANOVA were used in Spss16. Results: The results of comparing pre- and post-training mean score of the state anxiety in three groups showed that the mean score of state anxiety reached from 50.41 to 41.03, 52.41 to 44.37 and 45.04 to 50.56 in planned, pamphlet and control groups, respectively. ANOVA test showed that there is a significant difference in this comparison. The results of Tukey's test also revealed that the mean score of state anxiety in the planned and pamphlet groups was lower significantly than the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Based on research findings, the planned training method was more effective in decreasing state anxiety among patients compared to the pamphlet group before orthopedic surgery. Therefore, considering the fact that nurses play an important role in examining and relieving the state anxiety

  15. Dental management for head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy: comprehensive patient based planning--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Paola; Quek, Samuel; Cohen, Harold V

    2009-01-01

    Medical management of the head and neck cancer patient (HNCP) most often will include radiation therapy to the head and neck region. HNCPs with malignant disease require judicious dental treatment planning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy. RT can result in a multitude of adverse effects, both reversible and irreversible. We report a case of a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the throat above the larynx (supraglottic), who did not adhere to dental treatment recommendations for both pre- and post radiation dental management. The focus of this case report is to create awareness within the clinician that, in addition to evaluating the patient for the disease related issues that may affect the oral cavity and dentition, a total management plan should include factors beyond the structural oral problems related to the cancer. Final treatment plans for the HNCP should include medical assessment of past dental history, oral hygiene, potential compliance, or lack of, to dental care recommendations, the emotional state of the patient, socio-economic status of the patient (lifestyle, cost of care), future quality of life, the medical and/or life prognosis of the patient.

  16. Physical activity: The importance of the extended theory of planned behavior, in type 2 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Gabriela; Pereira, M Graça

    2017-09-01

    This study focused on the contribution of the extended theory of planned behavior regarding intention to perform physical activity, adherence to physical activity, and its mediator role in the relationship between trust in the physician and adherence to physical activity, in a sample of 120 patients with type 2 diabetes. The results revealed that positive attitudes and perception of control predicted a stronger intention to do physical activity. The intention to do physical activity was the only predictor of adherence to physical activity. Planning mediated the relationship between trust in the physician and adherence. Implications for patients with type 2 diabetes are discussed.

  17. New modalities of cancer treatment for NSCLC: focus on immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of immunology and antitumor immune responses have led to the development of new immunotherapies, including vaccination approaches and monoclonal antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoint pathways. These strategies have shown activity in melanoma and are now being tested in lung cancer. The antibody drugs targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein-1 immune checkpoint pathways work by restoring immune responses against cancer cells, and are associated with unconventional response patterns and immune-related adverse events as a result of their mechanism of action. As these new agents enter the clinic, nurses and other health care providers will require an understanding of the unique efficacy and safety profiles with immunotherapy to optimize potential patient benefits. This paper provides a review of the new immunotherapeutic agents in development for lung cancer, and strategies for managing patients on immunotherapy

  18. A case study of radiotherapy planning for a bilateral metal hip prosthesis prostate cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Andy; Reft, Chester; Rash, Carla; Price, Jennifer; Jani, Ashesh B.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to communicate the observed advantage of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in a patient with bilateral metallic hip prostheses. In this patient with early-stage low-risk disease, a dose of 74 Gy was planned in two phases-an initial 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles and an additional 24 Gy to the prostate alone. Each coplanar beam avoided the prosthesis in the beam's eye view. Using the same target expansions for each phase, IMRT and 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT) plans were compared for target coverage and inhomogeneity as well as dose to the bladder and rectum. The results of the analysis demonstrated that IMRT provided superior target coverage with reduced dose to normal tissues for both individual phases of the treatment plan as well as for the composite treatment plan. The dose to the rectum was significantly reduced with the IMRT technique, with a composite V80 of 35% for the IMRT plan versus 70% for 3D-CRT plan. Similarly, the dose to the bladder was significantly reduced with a V80 of 9% versus 20%. Overall, various dosimetric parameters revealed the corresponding 3D-CRT plan would not have been acceptable. The results indicate significant success with IMRT in a clinical scenario where there were no curative alternatives for local treatment other than external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, definitive external beam radiation of prostate cancer patients with bilateral prosthesis is made feasible with IMRT. The work described herein may also have applicability to other groups of patients, such as those with gynecological or other pelvic malignancies

  19. The effects of crisis plans for patients with psychotic and bipolar disorders: a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosenschoon BJ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Crises and (involuntary admissions have a strong impact on patients and their caregivers. In some countries, including the Netherlands, the number of crises and (involuntary admissions have increased in the last years. There is also a lack of effective interventions to prevent their occurrence. Previous research has shown that a form of psychiatric advance statement – joint crisis plan – may prevent involuntary admissions, but another study showed no significant results for another form. The question remains which form of psychiatric advance statement may help to prevent crisis situations. This study examines the effects of two other psychiatric advance statements. The first is created by the patient with help from a patient's advocate (Patient Advocate Crisis Plan: PACP and the second with the help of a clinician only (Clinician facilitated Crisis Plan: CCP. We investigate whether patients with a PACP or CCP show fewer emergency visits and (involuntary admissions as compared to patients without a psychiatric advance statement. Furthermore, this study seeks to identify possible mechanisms responsible for the effects of a PACP or a CCP. Methods/Design This study is a randomised controlled trial with two intervention groups and one control condition. Both interventions consist of a crisis plan, facilitated through the patient's advocate or the clinician respectively. Outpatients with psychotic or bipolar disorders, who experienced at least one psychiatric crisis during the previous two years, are randomly allocated to one of the three groups. Primary outcomes are the number of emergency (after hour visits, (involuntary admissions and the length of stay in hospital. Secondary outcomes include psychosocial functioning and treatment satisfaction. The possible mediator variables of the effects of the crisis plans are investigated by assessing the patient's involvement in the creation of the crisis plan, working alliance

  20. Factors that enable nurse-patient communication in a family planning context: a positive deviance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mi; Heerey, Michelle; Kols, Adrienne

    2008-10-01

    Family planning programmes in developing countries need a better understanding of nurse-patient communication in order to improve the quality of counselling. To identify factors in the clinic and in the community that enable nurses and patients to communicate effectively with one another. The study explored the personal experiences of nurses and patients who communicate especially effectively during family planning consultations (so-called "positive deviants"). Sixty-four randomly selected public clinics located in East Java, Indonesia. Seven positive deviant nurses and 32 positive deviant patients were identified from among 64 nurses and 768 patients who participated in an earlier patient coaching study. Flooding prevented 5 patients from participating in the study, reducing their number to 27. Investigators conducted: (1) a content analysis of qualitative data collected by structured in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions (FGDs) with positive deviant nurses and patients, and (2) analyses of variance (ANOVA) of quantitative data on clinic, nurse, and patient characteristics. Positive deviant nurses identified four factors, listed in rough order of importance, that helped them communicate effectively: independent study to strengthen their knowledge and skills; communication aids; feedback from colleagues; and motivation stemming from a desire to help people, patients' appreciation, husband's support, and increased income. Positive deviant patients identified five enabling factors: motivation due to their need for a service; confidence in their own communication skills; positive feedback from nurses; belief in patients' right and responsibility to communicate with nurses; and communication aids. Insights from positive deviant nurses and patients suggest that efforts to improve nurse-patient communication should go beyond conventional communication skills training. Managers should consider a mix of clinic-based interventions (such as peer feedback

  1. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS

  2. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guangjun [Radiation Physics Center, Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Wu, Kui [Department of Radiotherapy, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie [Radiation Physics Center, Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Bai, Sen, E-mail: baisen@scu.edu.cn [Radiation Physics Center, Cancer Center and State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan (China)

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS.

  3. A retrospective analysis for patient-specific quality assurance of volumetric-modulated arc therapy plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangjun; Wu, Kui; Peng, Guang; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is now widely used clinically, as it is capable of delivering a highly conformal dose distribution in a short time interval. We retrospectively analyzed patient-specific quality assurance (QA) of VMAT and examined the relationships between the planning parameters and the QA results. A total of 118 clinical VMAT cases underwent pretreatment QA. All plans had 3-dimensional diode array measurements, and 69 also had ion chamber measurements. Dose distribution and isocenter point dose were evaluated by comparing the measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. In addition, the relationship between QA results and several planning parameters, such as dose level, control points (CPs), monitor units (MUs), average field width, and average leaf travel, were also analyzed. For delivered dose distribution, a gamma analysis passing rate greater than 90% was obtained for all plans and greater than 95% for 100 of 118 plans with the 3%/3-mm criteria. The difference (mean ± standard deviation) between the point doses measured by the ion chamber and those calculated by TPS was 0.9% ± 2.0% for all plans. For all cancer sites, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and gastric cancer have the lowest and highest average passing rates, respectively. From multivariate linear regression analysis, the dose level (p = 0.001) and the average leaf travel (p < 0.001) showed negative correlations with the passing rate, and the average field width (p = 0.003) showed a positive correlation with the passing rate, all indicating a correlation between the passing rate and the plan complexity. No statistically significant correlation was found between MU or CP and the passing rate. Analysis of the results of dosimetric pretreatment measurements as a function of VMAT plan parameters can provide important information to guide the plan parameter setting and optimization in TPS. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by

  4. The Efficacy of Synchronous Combination of Chemotherapy and EGFR TKIs for the First-Line Treatment of NSCLC: A Systematic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Yan

    Full Text Available The combination of chemotherapy and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs currently has become the hotspot issue in the treatment of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC. This systematic review was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of the synchronous combination of these two treatments with EGFR TKIs or chemotherapy alone in advanced NSCLC.EMBASE, PubMed, the Central Registry of Controlled Trials in the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL, Chinese biomedical literature database (CNKI and meeting summaries were searched. The Phase II/III randomized controlled trials were selected by which patients with advanced NSCLC were randomized to receive a combination of EGFR TKIs and chemotherapy by synchronous mode vs. EGFR TKIs or chemotherapy alone.A total of six randomized controlled trials (RCTs including 4675 patients were enrolled in the systematic review. The meta-analysis demonstrated that the synchronous combination group of chemotherapy and EGFR TKIs did not reach satisfactory results; there was no significant difference in overall survival (OS, time to progression (TTP and objective response rate (ORR, compared with monotherapy (OS: HR = 1.05, 95%CI = 0.98-1.12; TTP: HR = 0.94, 95%CI = 0.89-1.00; ORR: RR = 1.07, 95%CI = 0.98-1.17, and no significant difference in OS and progression-free survival (PFS, compared with EGFR TKIs alone (OS: HR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.83-1.46; PFS: HR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.67-1.10. The patients who received synchronous combined therapy presented with increased incidences of grade 3/4 anemia (RR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.10-1.79 and rash (RR = 7.43, 95% CI = 4.56-12.09, compared with chemotherapy, grade 3/4 anemia (RR = 6.71, 95% CI = 1.25-35.93 and fatigue (RR = 9.60, 95% CI = 2.28-40.86 compared with EGFR TKI monotherapy.The synchronous combination of chemotherapy and TKIs is not superior to chemotherapy or EGFR TKIs alone for the first-line treatment of NSCLC.

  5. New modalities of cancer treatment for NSCLC: focus on immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marianne Davies Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Recent advances in the understanding of immunology and antitumor immune responses have led to the development of new immunotherapies, including vaccination approaches and monoclonal antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoint pathways. These strategies have shown activity in melanoma and are now being tested in lung cancer. The antibody drugs targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein-1 immune checkpoint pathways work by restoring immune responses against cancer cells, and are associated with unconventional response patterns and immune-related adverse events as a result of their mechanism of action. As these new agents enter the clinic, nurses and other health care providers will require an understanding of the unique efficacy and safety profiles with immunotherapy to optimize potential patient benefits. This paper provides a review of the new immunotherapeutic agents in development for lung cancer, and strategies for managing patients on immunotherapy. Keywords: immunotherapy, lung cancer, vaccination, nivolumab, ipilimumab, nursing

  6. REHABILITATION NEEDS AND PLANS AMONG PATIENTS WITH CANCER, ASSESSED AT HOSPITALS AND WHEN REHABILITATION BEGINS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Maribo, Thomas; Jensen, Charlotte Maria

    and the specifics of needs and plans facilitates targeted rehabilitation interventions. Implications: Systematic needs assessment in cancer rehabilitation unveil the requirement of physical rehabilitation. Supervised physical activity renders an intervention possible tailored the special needs cancer patients have......Background: Systematic assessment of rehabilitation needs is prerequisite for sufficient rehabilitation, but little is known about patients' needs. Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe specific stated rehabilitation needs and plans among patients with cancer at hospitals when diagnosed...... and when municipal rehabilitation begins. Methods: Needs-assessment-forms for rehabilitation from 188 cancer patients from two hospitals and two municipal cancer rehabilitation programmes were analysed. The forms included 1) stated needs: 58 fixed areas categorised in six domains and 2) an area to document...

  7. Effect of eliminating administrative radiographs on patient exposure and accuracy of provisional treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M.L.; Slome, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Published reports and recommendations suggest that radiographs are often ordered because of administrative policies during the screening and selection of patients for dental school clinics. This study examined the prescription of radiographs for two groups of patients: those who were radiographically examined according to an administrative policy and those whose radiographic needs were determined by a clinical examination. The provisional treatment needs assessment based on the screening examination was compared to the final treatment plan based on a complete diagnostic workup for both groups of patients to assess the effect of a change in school policy. Clinicians ordered half the number of panoramic radiographs as would have been ordered by administrative policy. There was no significant difference in the agreement between the provisional and final treatment plans under the two policies. These results suggest that dental schools can comply with federal recommendations against administrative radiographs without compromising patient selection

  8. Informal work and formal plans: articulating the active role of patients in cancer trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Juul Dalsted

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Formal pathways models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories.  Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included.  Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their treatment and care. They initiated processes in the trajectories, and acquired information, which they used to form their trajectories.  Patients presented problems to the healthcare professionals in order to get proper help when needed.  Discussion: Work done by patients was invisible and not perceived as work. The patients' requests were not sufficiently supported in the professional organisation of work or formal planning. Patients' insertion and use of information in their trajectories challenged professional views and working processes. And the design of the formal pathway models limits the patients´ active participation. When looking at integrated care from the perspective of patients, the development of a more holistic and personalized approach is needed. Introduction: Formal pathway models outline that patients should receive information in order to experience a coherent journey but do not describe an active role for patients or their relatives. The aim of this is paper is to articulate and discuss the active role of patients during their cancer trajectories. Methods and theory: An in-depth case study of patient trajectories at a Danish hospital and surrounding municipality using individual interviews with patients. Theory about trajectory and work by Strauss was included. Results: Patients continuously took initiatives to organize their

  9. Predicting objective function weights from patient anatomy in prostate IMRT treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taewoo; Hammad, Muhannad; Chan, Timothy C. Y.; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning typically combines multiple criteria into a single objective function by taking a weighted sum. The authors propose a statistical model that predicts objective function weights from patient anatomy for prostate IMRT treatment planning. This study provides a proof of concept for geometry-driven weight determination. Methods: A previously developed inverse optimization method (IOM) was used to generate optimal objective function weights for 24 patients using their historical treatment plans (i.e., dose distributions). These IOM weights were around 1% for each of the femoral heads, while bladder and rectum weights varied greatly between patients. A regression model was developed to predict a patient's rectum weight using the ratio of the overlap volume of the rectum and bladder with the planning target volume at a 1 cm expansion as the independent variable. The femoral head weights were fixed to 1% each and the bladder weight was calculated as one minus the rectum and femoral head weights. The model was validated using leave-one-out cross validation. Objective values and dose distributions generated through inverse planning using the predicted weights were compared to those generated using the original IOM weights, as well as an average of the IOM weights across all patients. Results: The IOM weight vectors were on average six times closer to the predicted weight vectors than to the average weight vector, usingl 2 distance. Likewise, the bladder and rectum objective values achieved by the predicted weights were more similar to the objective values achieved by the IOM weights. The difference in objective value performance between the predicted and average weights was statistically significant according to a one-sided sign test. For all patients, the difference in rectum V54.3 Gy, rectum V70.0 Gy, bladder V54.3 Gy, and bladder V70.0 Gy values between the dose distributions generated by the

  10. After you: conversations between patients and healthcare professionals in planning for end of life care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almack Kathryn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study explores with patients, carers and health care professionals if, when and how Advance Care Planning conversations about patients’ preferences for place of care (and death were facilitated and documented. Methods The study adopted an exploratory case study design using qualitative interviews, across five services delivering palliative care to cancer and non-cancer patients within an urban and rural English region. The study recruited 18 cases made up of patients (N = 18; 10 men; 8 women; median age 75; nominated relatives (N = 11; 7 women; 4 men; median age 65 and healthcare professionals (N = 15 caring for the patient. Data collection included: 18 initial interviews (nine separate interviews with patients and 9 joint interviews with patients and relatives and follow up interviews in 6 cases (involving a total of 5 patients and 5 relatives within one year of the first interview. Five group interviews were conducted with 15 healthcare professionals; 8 of whom also participated in follow up interviews to review their involvement with patients in our study. Results Patients demonstrated varying degrees of reticence, evasion or reluctance to initiate any conversations about end of life care preferences. Most assumed that staff would initiate such conversations, while staff were often hesitant to do so. Staff-identified barriers included the perceived risks of taking away hope and issues of timing. Staff were often guided by cues from the patient or by intuition about when to initiate these discussions. Conclusions This study provides insights into the complexities surrounding the initiation of Advance Care Planning involving conversations about end of life care preferences with patients who are identified as having palliative care needs, in particular in relation to the risks inherent in the process of having conversations where mortality must be acknowledged. Future research is needed to examine how to

  11. SU-F-J-207: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Survival Prediction with Quantitative Tumor Textures Analysis in Baseline CT

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    Wu, Y; Zou, J; Murillo, P; Nosher, J; Amorosa, J; Bramwit, M; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Foran, D [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) is widely used in treating patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Determination of the likelihood of patient response to treatment and optimization of treatment regime is of clinical significance. Up to date, no imaging biomarker has reliably correlated to NSCLC patient survival rate. This pilot study is to extract CT texture information from tumor regions for patient survival prediction. Methods: Thirteen patients with stage II-III NSCLC were treated using CRT with a median dose of 6210 cGy. Non-contrast-enhanced CT images were acquired for treatment planning and retrospectively collected for this study. Texture analysis was applied in segmented tumor regions using the Local Binary Pattern method (LBP). By comparing its HU with neighboring voxels, the LBPs of a voxel were measured in multiple scales with different group radiuses and numbers of neighbors. The LBP histograms formed a multi-dimensional texture vector for each patient, which was then used to establish and test a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model to predict patients’ one year survival. The leave-one-out cross validation strategy was used recursively to enlarge the training set and derive a reliable predictor. The predictions were compared with the true clinical outcomes. Results: A 10-dimensional LBP histogram was extracted from 3D segmented tumor region for each of the 13 patients. Using the SVM model with the leave-one-out strategy, only 1 out of 13 patients was misclassified. The experiments showed an accuracy of 93%, sensitivity of 100%, and specificity of 86%. Conclusion: Within the framework of a Support Vector Machine based model, the Local Binary Pattern method is able to extract a quantitative imaging biomarker in the prediction of NSCLC patient survival. More patients are to be included in the study.

  12. SU-F-J-207: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient Survival Prediction with Quantitative Tumor Textures Analysis in Baseline CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y; Zou, J; Murillo, P; Nosher, J; Amorosa, J; Bramwit, M; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Foran, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Chemo-radiation therapy (CRT) is widely used in treating patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Determination of the likelihood of patient response to treatment and optimization of treatment regime is of clinical significance. Up to date, no imaging biomarker has reliably correlated to NSCLC patient survival rate. This pilot study is to extract CT texture information from tumor regions for patient survival prediction. Methods: Thirteen patients with stage II-III NSCLC were treated using CRT with a median dose of 6210 cGy. Non-contrast-enhanced CT images were acquired for treatment planning and retrospectively collected for this study. Texture analysis was applied in segmented tumor regions using the Local Binary Pattern method (LBP). By comparing its HU with neighboring voxels, the LBPs of a voxel were measured in multiple scales with different group radiuses and numbers of neighbors. The LBP histograms formed a multi-dimensional texture vector for each patient, which was then used to establish and test a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model to predict patients’ one year survival. The leave-one-out cross validation strategy was used recursively to enlarge the training set and derive a reliable predictor. The predictions were compared with the true clinical outcomes. Results: A 10-dimensional LBP histogram was extracted from 3D segmented tumor region for each of the 13 patients. Using the SVM model with the leave-one-out strategy, only 1 out of 13 patients was misclassified. The experiments showed an accuracy of 93%, sensitivity of 100%, and specificity of 86%. Conclusion: Within the framework of a Support Vector Machine based model, the Local Binary Pattern method is able to extract a quantitative imaging biomarker in the prediction of NSCLC patient survival. More patients are to be included in the study.

  13. Pre-operative planning for mandibular reconstruction - A full digital planning workflow resulting in a patient specific reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reconstruction of large mandiblular defects following ablative oncologic surgery could be done by using vascularized bone transfer or, more often, primarily with simultaneous or delayed bone grafting, using load bearing reconstruction plates. Bending of these reconstruction plates is typically directed along the outer contour of the original mandible. Simultaneously or in a second operation vascularized or non-vascularized bone is fixed to the reconstruction plate. However, the prosthodontic-driven backward planning to ease bony reconstruction of the mandible in terms of dental rehabilitation using implant-retained overdentures might be an eligible solution. The purpose of this work was to develop, establish and clinically evaluate a novel 3D planning procedure for mandibular reconstruction. Materials and methods Three patients with tumors involving the mandible, which included squamous cell carcinoma in the floor of the mouth and keratocystic odontogenic tumor, were treated surgically by hemimandibulectomy. Results In primary alloplastic mandible reconstruction, shape and size of the reconstruction plate could be predefined and prebent prior to surgery. Clinical relevance This study provides modern treatment strategies for mandibular reconstruction. PMID:21968330

  14. Impact of partial participation in integrated family planning training on medical knowledge, patient communication and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinauer, Jody E; Turk, Jema K; Preskill, Felisa; Devaskar, Sangita; Freedman, Lori; Landy, Uta

    2014-04-01

    Obstetrics and gynecology residency programs are required to provide access to abortion training, but residents can opt out of participating for religious or moral reasons. Quantitative data suggest that most residents who opt out of doing abortions participate and gain skills in other aspects of the family planning training. However, little is known about their experience and perspective. Between June 2010 and June 2011, we conducted semistructured interviews with current and former residents who opted out of some or all of the family planning training at ob-gyn residency programs affiliated with the Kenneth J. Ryan Residency Training Program in Abortion and Family Planning. Residents were either self-identified or were identified by their Ryan Program directors as having opted out of some training. The interviews were transcribed and coded using modified grounded theory. Twenty-six physicians were interviewed by telephone. Interviewees were from geographically diverse programs (35% Midwest, 31% West, 19% South/Southeast and 15% North/Northeast). We identified four dominant themes about their experience: (a) skills valued in the family planning training, (b) improved patient-centered care, (c) changes in attitudes about abortion and (d) miscommunication as a source of negative feelings. Respondents valued the ability to partially participate in the family planning training and identified specific aspects of their training which will impact future patient care. Many of the effects described in the interviews address core competencies in medical knowledge, patient care, communication and professionalism. We recommend that programs offer a spectrum of partial participation in family planning training to all residents, including residents who choose to opt out of doing some or all abortions. Learners who morally object to abortion but participate in training in family planning and abortion, up to their level of comfort, gain clinical and professional skills. We

  15. Discharge planning for a patient with a new ostomy: best practice for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Anita; Colwell, Janice C; Cross, Heidi H; Mantel, Janet; Perkins, Jacqueline; Walker, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive discharge plan for a patient with a new stoma is needed to ensure the individual receives the necessary ostomy education prior to discharge. The plan should include teaching basic skills and providing information about how to manage the ostomy (ie, emptying and changing the pouch, how to order supplies, available manufacturers, dietary/fluid guidelines, potential complications, medications, and managing gas and odor), assisting with transitions in care, and providing information about resources for support and assistance. The purpose of this best practice guideline is to provide clinicians with a brief overview of the essential elements that should be included in the discharge plan to facilitate patient education and the transition of care from hospital to home.

  16. Home health nurse decision-making regarding visit intensity planning for newly admitted patients: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Elliane; Hirschman, Karen B; Cacchione, Pamela Z; Bowles, Kathryn H

    2018-04-13

    Despite patients referred to home health having diverse and complex needs, it is unknown how nurses develop personalized visit plans. In this qualitative descriptive study, we interviewed 26 nurses from three agencies about their decision-making process to determine visit intensity and analyzed data using directed content analysis. Following a multifactorial assessment of the patient, nurses relied on their experience and their agency's protocols to develop the personalized visit plan. They revised the plan based on changes in the patient's clinical condition, engagement, and caregiver availability. Findings suggest strategies to improve visit planning and positively influence outcomes of home health patients.

  17. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  18. Vinorelbine and gemcitabine vs vinorelbine and carboplatin as first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. A phase III randomised controlled trial by the Norwegian Lung Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløtten, Ø; Grønberg, B H; Bremnes, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but earlier studies have suggested that non-platinum combinations are equally effective and better tolerated. We conducted a national, randomised study to compare...... a non-platinum with a platinum combination. METHODS: Eligible patients had stage IIIB/IV NSCLC and performance status (PS) 0-2. Patients received up to three cycles of vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o.+gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) i.v. day 1 and 8 (VG) or vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o. day 1 and 8+carboplatin...... was 65 years, 58% were men and 25% had PS 2. Median survival was VG: 6.3 months; VC: 7.0 months, P=0.802. Vinorelbine plus carboplatin patients had more grade III/IV nausea/vomiting (VG: 4%, VC: 12%, P=0.008) and grade IV neutropenia (VG: 7%, VC: 19%, P

  19. Role of Radiotherapy in Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has had important role in the palliation of NSCLC. Randomized trials tend to suggest that, in general, short regimens give similar palliation and toxicity compared to longer regimens. The benefit of combining chemotherapy to radiosensitize the palliative radiation treatment is an open question, but so far it has not been proved to be very useful in NSCLC. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants careful consideration for every single case and probably should not be used as a routine management.Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT are modern techniques being used each time more frequently in the treatment of single or oligometastases. In general, they offer good tumour control with little toxicity (with a more expensive cost compared to the traditionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens.

  20. PET/MRI for Preoperative Planning in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft Jakobsen, Annika; Jensen, Karl Erik; L�fgren, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Clinical positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) acquisition protocols may improve the evaluation of soft tissue sarcomas (STS) prior to surgical planning. We examined two patients with lower extremity STS using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MRI scanner and the glucose...

  1. Palliative medicine consultation for preparedness planning in patients receiving left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Freeman, Monica R; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; Carter, Kari A; Boilson, Barry A; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Park, Soon J; Mueller, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    To assess the benefit of proactive palliative medicine consultation for delineation of goals of care and quality-of-life preferences before implantation of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy (DT). We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients who received DT between January 15, 2009, and January 1, 2010. Of 19 patients identified, 13 (68%) received proactive palliative medicine consultation. Median time of palliative medicine consultation was 1 day before DT implantation (range, 5 days before to 16 days after). Thirteen patients (68%) completed advance directives. The DT implantation team and families reported that preimplantation discussions and goals of care planning made postoperative care more clear and that adverse events were handled more effectively. Currently, palliative medicine involvement in patients receiving DT is viewed as routine by cardiac care specialists. Proactive palliative medicine consultation for patients being considered for or being treated with DT improves advance care planning and thus contributes to better overall care of these patients. Our experience highlights focused advance care planning, thorough exploration of goals of care, and expert symptom management and end-of-life care when appropriate.

  2. Patient-specific cardiac phantom for clinical training and preprocedure surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Justin; Moore, John; Vassallo, Reid; Bainbridge, Daniel; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedures including MitraClip ® are becoming increasingly common. For cases of complex or diseased anatomy, clinicians may benefit from using a patient-specific cardiac phantom for training, surgical planning, and the validation of devices or techniques. An imaging compatible cardiac phantom was developed to simulate a MitraClip ® procedure. The phantom contained a patient-specific cardiac model manufactured using tissue mimicking materials. To evaluate accuracy, the patient-specific model was imaged using computed tomography (CT), segmented, and the resulting point cloud dataset was compared using absolute distance to the original patient data. The result, when comparing the molded model point cloud to the original dataset, resulted in a maximum Euclidean distance error of 7.7 mm, an average error of 0.98 mm, and a standard deviation of 0.91 mm. The phantom was validated using a MitraClip ® device to ensure anatomical features and tools are identifiable under image guidance. Patient-specific cardiac phantoms may allow for surgical complications to be accounted for preoperative planning. The information gained by clinicians involved in planning and performing the procedure should lead to shorter procedural times and better outcomes for patients.

  3. [Application and evalauation of care plan for patients admitted to Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzco Cabellos, C; Guasch Pomés, N

    2015-01-01

    Assess whether the use of the nursing care plans improves outcomes of nursing care to patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The study was conducted in a University Hospital of Barcelona in Spain, using a pre- and post-study design. A total of 61 patient records were analysed in the pre-intervention group. A care plan was applied to 55 patients in the post-intervention group. Specific quality indicators in a medical intensive care unit to assess the clinical practice of nursing were used. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the degree of association between quality indicators in the two groups. A total of 116 records of 121 patients were evaluated: 61 pre-intervention and 55 post-intervention. Fisher test: The filling of nursing records, p=.0003. Checking cardiorespiratory arrest equipment, p <.001. Central vascular catheter related bacteraemia (B-CVC) p=.622. Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) p=.1000. Elevation of the head of the bed more than 30° p=.049, and the pain management in non-sedated patients p=.082. The implementation of nursing care plans in patients admitted to the intensive care area may contribute to improvement in the outcomes of nursing care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Planning for chronic disease medications in disaster: perspectives from patients, physicians, pharmacists, and insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carameli, Kelley A; Eisenman, David P; Blevins, Joy; d'Angona, Brian; Glik, Deborah C

    2013-06-01

    Recent US disasters highlight the current imbalance between the high proportion of chronically ill Americans who depend on prescription medications and their lack of medication reserves for disaster preparedness. We examined barriers that Los Angeles County residents with chronic illness experience within the prescription drug procurement system to achieve recommended medication reserves. A mixed methods design included evaluation of insurance pharmacy benefits, focus group interviews with patients, and key informant interviews with physicians, pharmacists, and insurers. Most prescriptions are dispensed as 30-day units through retail pharmacies with refills available after 75% of use, leaving a monthly medication reserve of 7 days. For patients to acquire 14- to 30-day disaster medication reserves, health professionals interviewed supported 60- to 100-day dispensing units. Barriers included restrictive insurance benefits, patients' resistance to mail order, and higher copay-ments. Physicians, pharmacists, and insurers also varied widely in their preparedness planning and collective mutual-aid plans, and most believed pharmacists had the primary responsibility for patients' medication continuity during a disaster. To strengthen prescription drug continuity in disasters, recommendations include the following: (1) creating flexible drug-dispensing policies to help patients build reserves, (2) training professionals to inform patients about disaster planning, and (3) building collaborative partnerships among system stakeholders.

  5. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  6. Split and Splice Approach for Highly Selective Targeting of Human NSCLC Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    development and implementation of the “split-and- spice ” approach required optimization of many independent parameters, which were addressed in parallel...verify the feasibility of the “split and splice” approach for targeting human NSCLC tumor cell lines in culture and prepare the optimized toxins for...for cultured cells (months 2- 8). 2B. To test the efficiency of cell targeting by the toxin variants reconstituted in vitro (months 3-6). 2C. To

  7. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  8. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy in postprostatectomy radiotherapy patients: A planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forde, Elizabeth; Kneebone, Andrew; Bromley, Regina; Guo, Linxin; Hunt, Peter; Eade, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postprostatectomy planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with both single arc (SA) and double arcs (DA) against dynamic sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten cases were planned with IMRT, SA VMAT, and DA VMAT. All cases were planned to achieve a minimum dose of 68 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and goals to limit rectal volume >40 Gy to 35% and >65 Gy to 17%, and bladder volumes >40 Gy to 50% and >65 Gy to 25%. Plans were averaged across the 10 patients and compared for mean dose, conformity, homogeneity, rectal and bladder doses, and monitor units. The mean dose to the clinical target volume and PTV was significantly higher (p<0.05) for SA compared with DA or IMRT. The homogeneity index was not significantly different: SA = 0.09; DA = 0.08; and IMRT = 0.07. The rectal V40 was lowest for the DA plan. The rectal V20 was significantly lower (p<0.05) for both the VMAT plans compared with IMRT. There were no significant differences for bladder V40 or rectal and bladder V65. The IMRT plans required 1400 MU compared with 745 for DA and 708 for SA. This study shows that for equivalent dose coverage, SA and DA VMAT plans result in higher mean doses to the clinical target volume and PTV. This greater dose heterogeneity is balanced by improved low-range rectal doses and halving of the monitor units

  9. Volumetric-modulated arc therapy in postprostatectomy radiotherapy patients: A planning comparison study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forde, Elizabeth, E-mail: eforde@tcd.ie [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Bromley, Regina [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Guo, Linxin; Hunt, Peter [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Radiation Oncology Department, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, St Leonards, New South Wales (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postprostatectomy planning for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with both single arc (SA) and double arcs (DA) against dynamic sliding window intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten cases were planned with IMRT, SA VMAT, and DA VMAT. All cases were planned to achieve a minimum dose of 68 Gy to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) and goals to limit rectal volume >40 Gy to 35% and >65 Gy to 17%, and bladder volumes >40 Gy to 50% and >65 Gy to 25%. Plans were averaged across the 10 patients and compared for mean dose, conformity, homogeneity, rectal and bladder doses, and monitor units. The mean dose to the clinical target volume and PTV was significantly higher (p<0.05) for SA compared with DA or IMRT. The homogeneity index was not significantly different: SA = 0.09; DA = 0.08; and IMRT = 0.07. The rectal V40 was lowest for the DA plan. The rectal V20 was significantly lower (p<0.05) for both the VMAT plans compared with IMRT. There were no significant differences for bladder V40 or rectal and bladder V65. The IMRT plans required 1400 MU compared with 745 for DA and 708 for SA. This study shows that for equivalent dose coverage, SA and DA VMAT plans result in higher mean doses to the clinical target volume and PTV. This greater dose heterogeneity is balanced by improved low-range rectal doses and halving of the monitor units.

  10. 18F-FAZA PET/CT in the Preoperative Evaluation of NSCLC: Comparison with 18F-FDG and Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapelli, Paola; Bettinardi, Valentino; Fallanca, Federico; Incerti, Elena; Compierchio, Antonia; Rossetti, Francesca; Coliva, Angela; Savi, Annarita; Doglioni, Claudio; Negri, Giampiero; Gianolli, Luigi; Picchio, Maria

    2018-01-01

    To assess the capability of 18F-FAZA PET/CT in identifying intratumoral hypoxic areas in early and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and to compare 18FFAZA PET/CT with 18F-FDG PET/CT and histopathological biomarkers and to investigate whether the assessment of tumour to blood (T/B) and tumour to muscle (T/M) ratios provide comparable information regarding the hypoxic fractions of the tumour. Seven patients with NSCLC were prospectively enrolled (3 men, 4 women; median age: 71 years; range 63-80). All patients underwent to 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-FAZA PET/CT before surgery. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was used to evaluate 18FFDG PET/CT images, while 18F-FAZA PET/CT images have been interpreted by using tumour-toblood (T/B) and tumour-to-muscle (T/M) ratio. Surgery was performed in all patients; immunohistochemical analysis for hypoxia biomarkers was performed on histologic tumor samples. All lung lesions showed intense 18F-FDG uptake (mean SUVmax: 7.35; range: 2.35-25.20). A faint 18F-FAZA uptake was observed in 6/7 patients (T/B < 1.2) while significant uptake was present in the remaining 1/7 (T/B and T/M=2.24). On both 2 and 4 h imaging after injection, no differences were observed between T/M and T/B (p=0.5), suggesting that both blood and muscle are equivalent in estimating the background activity for image analysis. Immunohisotchemical analysis showed low or absent staining for hypoxia biomarkers in 3 patients (CA-IX and GLUT-1: 0%; HIF-1α: mean 3.3%; range 0-10). Two patients showed staining for HIF-1α of 5%, with CA-IX being 60% and 30%, respectively and GLUT-1 being 30% and 80%, respectively; in 1/7 HIF-1α was 10%, CA-IX was 50% and GLUT-1 was 90%. In one patient a higher percentage of HIF-1α and CA-IX (20% and 70%, respectively) positive cells was present, with GLUT-1 being 30%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper assessing hypoxia and glucose metabolism in comparison with immunohistochemistry

  11. Vorinostat and metformin sensitize EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells via BIM-dependent apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hengyi; Wang, Yubo; Lin, Caiyu; Lu, Conghua; Han, Rui; Jiao, Lin; Li, Li; He, Yong

    2017-11-07

    There is a close relationship between low expression of BIM and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI). Vorinostat is a pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that augments BIM expression in various types of tumor cells, however, this effect is attenuated by the high expression of anti-apoptotic proteins in EGFR-TKI resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Vorinostat in combination with metformin - a compound that can inhibit anti-apoptotic proteins expression, might cooperate to activate apoptotic signaling and overcome EGFR-TKI resistance. This study aimed to investigate the cooperative effect and evaluate possible molecular mechanisms. The results showed that vorinostat combined with gefitinib augmented BIM expression and increased the sensitivity of EGFR-TKI resistant NSCLC cells to gefitinib, adding metformin simultaneously could obviously inhibit the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, and further increased expression levels of BIM and BAX, and as a result, further improved the sensitivity of gefitinib both on the NSCLC cells with intrinsic and acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI. In addition, autophagy induced by gefitinib and vorinostat could be significantly suppressed by metformin, which might also contribute to enhance apoptosis and improve sensitivity of gefitinib. These results suggested that the combination of vorinostat and metformin might represent a novel strategy to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance associated with BIM-dependent apoptosis in larger heterogeneous populations.

  12. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  13. Effects of a Patient-Provider, Collaborative, Medication-Planning Tool: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Graumlich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among patients with various levels of health literacy, the effects of collaborative, patient-provider, medication-planning tools on outcomes relevant to self-management are uncertain. Objective. Among adult patients with type II diabetes mellitus, we tested the effectiveness of a medication-planning tool (Medtable™ implemented via an electronic medical record to improve patients’ medication knowledge, adherence, and glycemic control compared to usual care. Design. A multicenter, randomized controlled trial in outpatient primary care clinics. 674 patients received either the Medtable tool or usual care and were followed up for up to 12 months. Results. Patients who received Medtable had greater knowledge about indications for medications in their regimens and were more satisfied with the information about their medications. Patients’ knowledge of drug indication improved with Medtable regardless of their literacy status. However, Medtable did not improve patients’ demonstrated medication use, regimen adherence, or glycemic control (HbA1c. Conclusion. The Medtable tool supported provider/patient collaboration related to medication use, as reflected in patient satisfaction with communication, but had limited impact on patient medication knowledge, adherence, and HbA1c outcomes. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01296633.

  14. 77 FR 22691 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-17

    ... 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes... certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of certain self-insured health plans to fund the... health insurance policies) or R. Lisa Mojiri-Azad at (202) 622-6080 (regarding self- insured health...

  15. The effects of patients initiated aggression on Chinese medical students' career planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhonghui; Li, Jing; Chen, Yuhua; Cui, Kaijun

    2017-12-28

    Patient initiated aggression is common among Chinese health-care workers, reaching over 10,000 incidents annually (Jinyang web. http://6d.dxy.cn/article/55497 . 2013), and the tense doctor-patient relationship generates stress among medical students. Because of the paucity of data (few surveys pay attention to the effects of violence perpetrated by patients on medical students), this study aimed to characterize patient initiated aggression against medical students. In this cross-sectional survey conducted at a medical school in West China in 2015, 157 medical students completed a self-administered questionnaire and the Short Form-36, which assesses quality of life. The associations between patient initiated aggression exposure and medical students' career planning or quality of life were assessed using a chi-square test. Of the 157 medical students, 48 (30.6%) reported having suffered patient initiated aggression at least once during the previous year in the form of mental abuse (20.4%), offensive threat (14.6%), physical violence (8.3%), sexual harassment (verbal: 8.3% or physical: 1.6%), and extreme violence (physical violence leading to surgical treatment or hospitalization) (0.6%). Insufficient communication was the primary reason cited (27.2%). Emotional attack (mental abuse and offensive threat) occurrence differed among age groups (χ 2  = 9.786, P = 0.020) and was ubiquitous among those aged >30 years old. Women were more likely than men to suffer physical violence (χ 2  = 6.796, P = 0.009). Patient initiated aggression was not significantly associated with medical students' career planning or quality of life. In this study, patient initiated aggression, albeit common, as in the rest of China, did not appear to be associated with medical students' career planning or quality of life. However, the characteristics described can inform policymaking and the design of programs to minimize patient initiated aggression occurrence.

  16. Quality control in health care: an experiment in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holli, Kaija; Laippala, Pekka; Ojala, Antti; Pitkaenen, Maunu

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The importance of evaluating and improving quality in clinical practice is now generally acknowledged. In this study we estimated different sources of variation in radiotherapy planning for breast cancer patients after mastectomy and sought to test the applicability of a reproducibility and repeatability (R and R) study in a clinical context. Methods: Eleven radiation oncologists planned radiotherapy three times for three different kinds of breast cancer patients without knowing they were handling the same patient three times. Variation was divided into different components: physicians as operators, patients as parts, and repeated measurements as trials. Variation due to difference across trials (repeatability), that across the physicians (reproducibility), and that across the patients (variability) were estimated, as well as interactions between physicians and patients. Calculation was based on the sum of squares, and analysis was supported by various graphical presentations such as range charts and box plots. Results: Some parts of the planning process were characterized by higher and different kinds of variation than the others. Interphysician variation (i.e., reproducibility) was not high but there were some clearly outlying physicians. The highest variation was in repeatability (intraphysician variation). The major part of the variation was, however, that from patient to patient: 33% of the total in Parameter 1 and 85% of the total in Parameter 2. Conclusions: R and R studies are applicable and are needed to evaluate and improve quality in clinical practice. This kind of analysis provides opportunities to establish which kinds of patients require particularly careful attention, which points in the process are most critical for variation, which are the most difficult aspects for each physician and call for more careful description in documents, and which physicians need further training

  17. The influence of CT control examinations on the irradiation planning for patients with cerebral metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haumann, S.

    1986-01-01

    The thesis is aimed at reviewing a therapy plan worked out previously for the treatment of patients with cerebral metastases, and at studying computerized tomography for its potential benefit in the planning and implementation of radiotherapy. 61 patients were irradiated and examined neurologically and by CT before, during and after treatment, thus allowing a thorough-going analysis of the findings. CT evaluations differentiated between the change of volume and the number of metastases as well as the change of the extension of perifocal oedema. Our experience shows a dose of 30 Gy related to the centre of the skull to be sufficient, on the one hand, in order to determine by CT whether or not the existing intracerebral tumour metastases of the patient concerned will be accessible by radiotherapy at all, and, on the other hand, to destroy metastases smaller than 5 mm which cannot be detected by CT. (orig./MG) [de

  18. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  19. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  20. Study of percutaneous 125I seeds implantation guided by CT in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Mingyao; Yong Yazhi; Luo Bingqing; Wu Xuemei; Chen Lingling; Xie Hongqi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy, feasibility and safety of CT guided percutaneous 125 I seeds implantation in elderly patients of stage I peripheral non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Clinical data of 16 elderly peripheral stage I NSCLC patients (10 squamous carcinoma and 6 adenocarcinoma; 13 stage I A and 3 stage I B ) who received radioactive 125 I seeds implantation because of refusal or being unsuited to operation or external radiotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. Prescribed dose was 140 - 160 Gy. Under CT guidance, 125 I seeds were implanted percutaneously into tumors for interstitial radiotherapy according to treatment plan system. Results: Mean number of 125 I seeds each patient received was 21.1. 12 complete response (CR) and 4 partial response (PR) were achieved. Total response rate (CR + PR) was 100%. 100% patients completed 10 to 56 months of follow-up, 15, 13, 8 and 6 patients completed 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-years' follow-up, respectively. The median local progression free time was 14 months. The 1-, 2-, 3-and 4-year overall survival rate were 60%, 54%, 50% and 33%, respectively (median : 14 months). 7 cases died of non-tumor disease and 5 died of metastasis. No severe complications were observed. Conclusions: CT guided 125 I seeds implantation is a safe, reliable and effective radical treatment method for elderly stage I peripheral NSCLC patients, who refuse to or are unsuitable to operation or external radiotherapy. (authors)

  1. Toward optimizing patient-specific IMRT QA techniques in the accurate detection of dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable patient plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Elizabeth M; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Jones, Jimmy; Followill, David S; Kry, Stephen F

    2014-12-01

    The authors investigated the performance of several patient-specific intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) dosimeters in terms of their ability to correctly identify dosimetrically acceptable and unacceptable IMRT patient plans, as determined by an in-house-designed multiple ion chamber phantom used as the gold standard. A further goal was to examine optimal threshold criteria that were consistent and based on the same criteria among the various dosimeters. The authors used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to determine the sensitivity and specificity of (1) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with field-by-field evaluation, (2) a 2D diode array undergoing anterior irradiation with composite evaluation, (3) a 2D diode array using planned irradiation angles with composite evaluation, (4) a helical diode array, (5) radiographic film, and (6) an ion chamber. This was done with a variety of evaluation criteria for a set of 15 dosimetrically unacceptable and 9 acceptable clinical IMRT patient plans, where acceptability was defined on the basis of multiple ion chamber measurements using independent ion chambers and a phantom. The area under the curve (AUC) on the ROC curves was used to compare dosimeter performance across all thresholds. Optimal threshold values were obtained from the ROC curves while incorporating considerations for cost and prevalence of unacceptable plans. Using common clinical acceptance thresholds, most devices performed very poorly in terms of identifying unacceptable plans. Grouping the detector performance based on AUC showed two significantly different groups. The ion chamber, radiographic film, helical diode array, and anterior-delivered composite 2D diode array were in the better-performing group, whereas the anterior-delivered field-by-field and planned gantry angle delivery using the 2D diode array performed less well. Additionally, based on the AUCs, there was no significant difference

  2. Features of high quality discharge planning for patients following acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlin, Emily J; Curry, Leslie A; Thompson, Jennifer W; Greysen, S Ryan; Spatz, Erica; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2013-03-01

    Hospital discharge planning is required as a Medicare Condition of Participation (CoP), and is essential to the health and safety for all patients. However, there have been no studies examining specific hospital discharge processes, such as patient education and communication with primary care providers, in relation to hospital 30-day risk standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). To identify hospital discharge processes that may be associated with better performance in hospital AMI care as measured by RSMR. We conducted a qualitative study of U.S. Hospitals, which were selected based on their RSMR reported by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Hospital Compare website for the most recent data available (January 1, 2005 - December 31, 2007). We selected hospitals that ranked in the top 5 % and the bottom 5 % of RSMR for the two consecutive years. We focused on hospitals at the extreme ends of the range in RSMR, known as deviant case sampling. We excluded hospitals that did not have the ability to perform percutaneous coronary intervention in order to decrease the heterogeneity in our sample. Participants included key hospital clinical and administrative staff most involved in discharge planning for patients admitted with AMI. We conducted 14 site visits and 57 in-depth interviews using a standard discussion guide. We employed a grounded theory approach and used the constant comparative method to generate recurrent and unifying themes. We identified five broad discharge processes that distinguished higher and lower performing hospitals: 1) initiating discharge planning upon patient admission; 2) using multidisciplinary case management services; 3) ensuring that a follow-up plan is in place prior to discharge; 4) providing focused education sessions for both the patient and family; and 5) contacting the primary care physician regarding the patient's hospitalization and follow-up care plan

  3. Texture analysis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography: prediction of the response to the first-line chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Davide; Morassi, Mauro; Maroldi, Roberto; Roca, Elisa; Tassi, Gianfranco; Cavalleri, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether tumour heterogeneity, quantified by texture analysis (TA) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT), can predict response to chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty-three CECT studies of patients with advanced NSCLC who had undergone first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated according to RECIST1.1. Tumour uniformity was assessed by a TA method based on Laplacian of Gaussian filtering. The resulting parameters were correlated with treatment response and overall survival by multivariate analysis. Thirty-one out of 53 patients were non-responders and 22 were responders. Average overall survival was 13 months (4-35), minimum follow-up was 12 months. In the adenocarcinoma group (n = 31), the product of tumour uniformity and grey level (GL*U) was the unique independent variable correlating with treatment response. Dividing the GL*U (range 8.5-46.6) into tertiles, lesions belonging to the second and the third tertiles had an 8.3-fold higher probability of treatment response compared with those in the first tertile. No association between texture features and response to treatment was observed in the non-adenocarcinoma group (n = 22). GL*U did not correlate with overall survival. TA on CECT images in advanced lung adenocarcinoma provides an independent predictive indicator of response to first-line chemotherapy. (orig.)

  4. Strategic level proton therapy patient admission planning: a Markov decision process modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Ridvan; Zhang, Shengfan; Rainwater, Chase

    2017-06-01

    A relatively new consideration in proton therapy planning is the requirement that the mix of patients treated from different categories satisfy desired mix percentages. Deviations from these percentages and their impacts on operational capabilities are of particular interest to healthcare planners. In this study, we investigate intelligent ways of admitting patients to a proton therapy facility that maximize the total expected number of treatment sessions (fractions) delivered to patients in a planning period with stochastic patient arrivals and penalize the deviation from the patient mix restrictions. We propose a Markov Decision Process (MDP) model that provides very useful insights in determining the best patient admission policies in the case of an unexpected opening in the facility (i.e., no-shows, appointment cancellations, etc.). In order to overcome the curse of dimensionality for larger and more realistic instances, we propose an aggregate MDP model that is able to approximate optimal patient admission policies using the worded weight aggregation technique. Our models are applicable to healthcare treatment facilities throughout the United States, but are motivated by collaboration with the University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (UFPTI).

  5. The tissue microlocalisation and cellular expression of CD163, VEGF, HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14 is correlated to clinical outcome in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra M Ohri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously investigated the microlocalisation of M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. This study investigated the non-macrophage (NM expression of proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages in NSCLC. METHODS: Using immunohistochemistry, CD68(+ macrophages and proteins associated with either a cytotoxic M1 phenotype (HLA-DR, iNOS, and MRP 8/14, or a non-cytotoxic M2 phenotype (CD163 and VEGF were identified. NM expression of the markers was analysed in the islets and stroma of surgically resected tumours from 20 patients with extended survival (ES (median 92.7 months and 20 patients with poor survival (PS (median 7.7 months. RESULTS: The NM expression of NM-HLA-DR (p<0.001, NM-iNOS (p = 0.02 and NM-MRP 8/14 (p = 0.02 was increased in ES compared to PS patients in the tumour islets. The tumour islet expression of NM-VEGF, was decreased in ES compared to PS patients (p<0.001. There was more NM-CD163 expression (p = 0.04 but less NM-iNOS (p = 0.002 and MRP 8/14 (p = 0.01 expression in the stroma of ES patients compared with PS patients. The 5-year survival for patients with above and below median NM expression of the markers in the islets was 74.9% versus 4.7% (NM-HLA-DR p<0.001, 65.0% versus 14.6% (NM-iNOS p = 0.003, and 54.3% versus 22.2% (NM-MRP 8/14 p = 0.04, as opposed to 34.1% versus 44.4% (NM-CD163 p = 0.41 and 19.4% versus 59.0% (NM-VEGF p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cell proteins associated with M1 and M2 macrophages are also expressed by other cell types in the tumour islets and stroma of patients with NSCLC. Their tissue and cellular microlocalisation is associated with important differences in clinical outcome.

  6. Metastatic squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC: disrupting the drug treatment paradigm with immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Scarpace

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Unlike non-squamous NSCLC, squamous NSCLC rarely harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK mutations for which there are directed therapies, and until the recent approval of immunotherapies for squamous NSCLC, a limited number of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs have been FDA-approved for use in the treatment of advanced and metastatic squamous NSCLC. Immunotherapies directed at the programmed cell death-1 receptor (PD-1 or its ligand (PD-L1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab have demonstrated efficacy in both nonsquamous and squamous cell NSCLC. Because of their similar mechanism of action against the PD-L1/PD-1 pathway, both drugs have similar toxicity profiles related to immune-mediated adverse reactions that can generally be monitored and managed with oral corticosteroids. This paper provides an overview of drug therapy options for squamous cell NSCLC with a focus on the evidence and clinical application of the anti-PD1 therapies. A comparison of the dosing, administration, indications, and differences in the measurement of PD-L1 expression in the clinical trials of nivolumab and pembrolizumab is also provided.

  7. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. Methods: We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Results: Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Conclusions: Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients.

  8. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-05-01

    Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Health related quality of life in locally advanced NSCLC treated with high dose radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy or cetuximab – Pooled results from two prospective clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallqvist, Andreas; Bergman, Bengt; Nyman, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage III, data on patient reported health-related quality of life (HRQL) are scarce, especially regarding concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Aims: To evaluate HRQL in patients treated with high dose radiotherapy combined with concurrent chemotherapy or the antibody cetuximab. Methods: The study population comprised all patients enroled in either of two phase II trials in locally advanced NSCLC performed in Sweden 2002–2007. The RAKET trial investigated three different ways of increasing local control (accelerated hyperfractionated treatment or concurrent daily or weekly chemotherapy). The Satellite trial evaluated the addition of cetuximab to thoracic irradiation. HRQL was measured at four time points: At baseline, before radiotherapy, 4–6 weeks after radiotherapy and at 3 months follow-up, using the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC14 set of questionnaires. Results: 154/220 patients (65%) who completed HRQL assessments at all time points were included in the longitudinal study. There was a significant decline over time regarding most functioning measures. Dyspnoea and fatigue gradually deteriorated without recovery after completed treatment. Chemotherapy related symptoms showed a transient deterioration, whereas radiotherapy related esophagitis had not fully recovered at 3 months. Patients with stage IIIA disease tended to recover better regarding global QL, fatigue and dyspnoea compared to patients with stage IIIB. Patients with WHO performance status (PS) 0 reported improved global QL and less fatigue over time compared with PS 1. Concurrent chemotherapy was associated with more pronounced fatigue and dysphagia, and worse global QL compared with concurrent cetuximab. Baseline physical functioning was an independent predictor of overall survival. Conclusion: Patients undergoing high dose thoracic radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy or cetuximab reported a gradual deterioration in functioning, dyspnoea and fatigue, while

  10. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy by delineations on CT-based simulation in different respiratory phases for the treatment of senile patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weifeng; Yuan, Feng; Wang, Guoping; Lin, Zhiren; Pan, Yanling; Chen, Longhua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the application of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) based on computed tomography (CT) simulations in different respiratory phases. A total of 64 patients aged >70 years old with NSCLC were treated by 3D-CRT using CT images in different respiratory phases. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) at the end of inspiration and end of expiration were combined to obtain the total GTV, which was close to the motional range of tumors during respiration, and no additional expansion of the clinical target volume (CTAV) to planning target volume (PTV) (CTAV:PTV) was included during the recording of respiratory movements. Patients were also planned according to the classic 3D-CRT approach. Efficacy, prognostic factors, and side effects were evaluated. Compared with the classic approach, the average PTV was 18.9% lower (median: 17.3%), and the average lung volume receiving a prescribed dose for a tumor was 22.4% lower (median: 20.9%). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 70.6%, 54.9%, and 29.4%, respectively, with an overall tumor response rate of 79.7%. The Karnofsky performance status and N stage were independent prognostic factors, whereas age was not. Without affecting therapeutic effects, CT simulations in different respiratory phases were well-tolerated in elderly patients with NSCLC, could effectively reduce PTV, and could improve the quality of life.

  11. LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT: Early relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found after CNS-symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Jeppesen, Stefan S.

    2016-01-01

    whether the introduction in 2010 of follow-up by CT of thorax and upper abdomen every three months has reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms.Results: All 827 NSCLC patients from Funen completing curative treatment from 2005 to 2013 were included. The total number of relapses found...... or III were found.Conclusion: CT-based follow-up has not reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms in stage II-IV, and therefore we suggest routine MR of the brain before curative treatment for this group of patients.Number, fractions(%), and [95%CI]Jan. 2005 - June 2010July 2010 - Dec...... after symptoms within 24 months decreased in the 3½ years after the introduction of CT-based follow-up, p < 0,001 (table), but the total fraction presenting with CNS-symptoms did not change, p = 0.296. Relapses after stage I cancer decreased (p = 0.025), while no differences or changes for stages II...

  12. 77 FR 72721 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes... Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan... arrangements) or Rebecca L. Baxter at (202) 622-3970 (regarding health insurance policies). SUPPLEMENTARY...

  13. Towards automatic patient positioning and scan planning using continuously moving table MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koken, Peter; Dries, Sebastian P M; Keupp, Jochen; Bystrov, Daniel; Pekar, Vladimir; Börnert, Peter

    2009-10-01

    A concept is proposed to simplify patient positioning and scan planning to improve ease of use and workflow in MR. After patient preparation in front of the scanner the operator selects the anatomy of interest by a single push-button action. Subsequently, the patient table is moved automatically into the scanner, while real-time 3D isotropic low-resolution continuously moving table scout scanning is performed using patient-independent MR system settings. With a real-time organ identification process running in parallel and steering the scanner, the target anatomy can be positioned fully automatically in the scanner's sensitive volume. The desired diagnostic examination of the anatomy of interest can be planned and continued immediately using the geometric information derived from the acquired 3D data. The concept was implemented and successfully tested in vivo in 12 healthy volunteers, focusing on the liver as the target anatomy. The positioning accuracy achieved was on the order of several millimeters, which turned out to be sufficient for initial planning purposes. Furthermore, the impact of nonoptimal system settings on the positioning performance, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was investigated. The present work proved the basic concept of the proposed approach as an element of future scan automation. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. LVAD patients' and surrogates' perspectives on SPIRIT-HF: An advance care planning discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Maureen; Song, Mi-Kyung; Devane-Johnson, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    To describe LVAD patients' and surrogates' experiences with, and perspectives on SPIRIT-HF, an advance care planning (ACP) intervention. ACP is important for patients with LVAD, yet little is known about their experiences or those of their surrogates who have participated in ACP discussions. We used qualitative content analysis techniques to conduct a secondary analysis of 28 interviews with patients with LVAD (n = 14) and their surrogates (n = 14) who had participated in an RCT pilot study of SPIRIT-HF. Main themes from the data include: 1) sharing their HF stories was very beneficial; 2) participating in SPIRIT-HF led to greater peace of mind for patients and surrogates; 3) "one size does not fit all" when it comes to timing of ACP discussions. An understanding patient and surrogate perspectives may inform clinicians' approach to ACP discussions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. CT images and radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with breast cancer: A dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rezaei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented here were originally collected for the research project “CT-Scan processing and analysis in patient with breast cancer after radiotherapy”. Also, it reported in our study “Prediction of Lung Tissue Damage by Evaluating Clinical and Dosimetric Parameters in Breast Cancer Patients” (Hasanabdali et al., 2016 [1]. This article describes and directly links to 52 subjects referred to Mahdieh Oncology and Radiotherapy Center from February to August 2015. Treatment planning was done for delivering 50 Gy dose to PTV in 25 fractions. the lungs and heart objects were extracted from CT images along with compliance Dose plan. Dose-volume histogram (DVH and Dose-mass histogram (DMH extracted using CT images and dose plan matrix. Moreover, the complete clinical and dosimetric specifications of subjects is attached.

  16. Effect of patient setup errors on simultaneously integrated boost head and neck IMRT treatment plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Keall, Paul J.; Wu Qiuwen; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Schmidt-Ullrich, Rupert K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine dose delivery errors that could result from random and systematic setup errors for head-and-neck patients treated using the simultaneous integrated boost (SIB)-intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients who participated in an intramural Phase I/II parotid-sparing IMRT dose-escalation protocol using the SIB treatment technique had their dose distributions reevaluated to assess the impact of random and systematic setup errors. The dosimetric effect of random setup error was simulated by convolving the two-dimensional fluence distribution of each beam with the random setup error probability density distribution. Random setup errors of σ = 1, 3, and 5 mm were simulated. Systematic setup errors were simulated by randomly shifting the patient isocenter along each of the three Cartesian axes, with each shift selected from a normal distribution. Systematic setup error distributions with Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis were simulated. Combined systematic and random setup errors were simulated for σ = Σ = 1.5 and 3.0 mm along each axis. For each dose calculation, the gross tumor volume (GTV) received by 98% of the volume (D 98 ), clinical target volume (CTV) D 90 , nodes D 90 , cord D 2 , and parotid D 50 and parotid mean dose were evaluated with respect to the plan used for treatment for the structure dose and for an effective planning target volume (PTV) with a 3-mm margin. Results: Simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT head-and-neck treatment plans were found to be less sensitive to random setup errors than to systematic setup errors. For random-only errors, errors exceeded 3% only when the random setup error σ exceeded 3 mm. Simulated systematic setup errors with Σ = 1.5 mm resulted in approximately 10% of plan having more than a 3% dose error, whereas a Σ = 3.0 mm resulted in half of the plans having more than a 3% dose error and 28% with a 5% dose error

  17. Readiness to participate in advance care planning: A qualitative study of renal failure patients, families and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Lauren A; Raffin-Bouchal, Donna S; Syme, Charlotte A; Biondo, Patricia D; Simon, Jessica E

    2017-09-01

    Objectives Advance care planning is the process by which people reflect upon their wishes and values for healthcare, discuss their choices with family and friends and document their wishes. Readiness represents a key predictor of advance care planning participation; however, the evidence for addressing readiness is scarce within the renal failure context. Our objectives were to assess readiness for advance care planning and barriers and facilitators to advance care planning uptake in a renal context. Methods Twenty-five participants (nine patients, nine clinicians and seven family members) were recruited from the Southern Alberta Renal Program. Semi-structured interviews were recorded, transcribed and then analyzed using interpretive description. Results Readiness for advance care planning was driven by individual values perceived by a collaborative encounter between clinicians and patients/families. If advance care planning is not valued, then patients/families and clinicians are not ready to initiate the process. Patients and clinicians are delaying conversations until "illness burden necessitates," so there is little "advance" care planning, only care planning in-the-moment closer to the end of life. Discussion The value of advance care planning in collaboration with clinicians, patients and their surrogates needs reframing as an ongoing process early in the patient's illness trajectory, distinguished from end-of-life decision making.

  18. SU-F-T-272: Patient Specific Quality Assurance of Prostate VMAT Plans with Portal Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darko, J; Osei, E [Grand River Cancer Centre @ Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Badu, S; Grigorov, G; Fleck, A [Grand River Cancer Centre @ Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of using the Portal Dosimetry (PD) method for patient specific quality assurance of prostate VMAT plans. Methods: As per institutional protocol all VMAT plans were measured using the Varian Portal Dosimetry (PD) method. A gamma evaluation criterion of 3%-3mm with a minimum area gamma pass rate (gamma <1) of 95% is used clinically for all plans. We retrospectively evaluated the portal dosimetry results for 170 prostate patients treated with VMAT technique. Three sets of criterions were adopted for re-evaluating the measurements; 3%-3mm, 2%-2mm and 1%-1mm. For all criterions two areas, Field+1cm and MLC-CIAO were analysed.To ascertain the effectiveness of the portal dosimetry technique in determining the delivery accuracy of prostate VMAT plans, 10 patients previously measured with portal dosimetry, were randomly selected and their measurements repeated using the ArcCHECK method. The same criterion used in the analysis of PD was used for the ArcCHECK measurements. Results: All patient plans reviewed met the institutional criteria for Area Gamma pass rate. Overall, the gamma pass rate (gamma <1) decreases for 3%-3mm, 2%-2mm and 1%-1mm criterion. For each criterion the pass rate was significantly reduced when the MLC-CIAO was used instead of FIELD+1cm. There was noticeable change in sensitivity for MLC-CIAO with 2%-2mm criteria and much more significant reduction at 1%-1mm. Comparable results were obtained for the ArcCHECK measurements. Although differences were observed between the clockwise verses the counter clockwise plans in both the PD and ArcCHECK measurements, this was not deemed to be statistically significant. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that Portal Dosimetry technique can be effectively used for quality assurance of VMAT plans. Results obtained show similar sensitivity compared to ArcCheck. To reveal certain delivery inaccuracies, the use of a combination of criterions may provide an effective way in improving

  19. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Patient safety in the care of mentally ill people in Switzerland: Action plan 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Aline; Mascherek, Anna C; Schwappach, David L B

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patient safety in mental healthcare has not attracted great attention yet, although the burden and the prevalence of mental diseases are high. The risk of errors with potential for harm of patients, such as aggression against self and others or non-drug treatment errors is particularly high in this vulnerable group. Aim: To develop priority topics and strategies for action to foster patient safety in mental healthcare. Method: The Swiss patient safety foundation together with experts conducted round table discussions and a Delphi questionnaire to define topics along the treatment pathway, and to prioritise these topics. Finally, fields of action were developed. Results: An action plan was developed including the definition and prioritization of 9 topics where errors may occur. A global rating task revealed errors concerning diagnostics and structural errors as most important. This led to the development of 4 fields of action (awareness raising, research, implementation, and education and training) including practice-oriented potential starting points to enhance patient safety. Conclusions: The action plan highlights issues of high concern for patient safety in mental healthcare. It serves as a starting point for the development of strategies for action as well as of concrete activities.

  1. A patient centred approach to care planning for patients with chronic genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair Kent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay proposes seven pre-requisites for the creation of effective programmes of care and support for patients living with the consequences of chronic genetic diseases. It then goes on to discuss the role of patient organisations and other stakeholders in bringing about the development and implementation of these.

  2. Interprofessional collaboration regarding patients' care plans in primary care: a focus group study into influential factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Jerôme Jean Jacques; Lenzen, Stephanie Anna; van Bokhoven, Marloes Amantia; Daniëls, Ramon; van der Weijden, Trudy; Beurskens, Anna

    2016-05-28

    The number of people with multiple chronic conditions demanding primary care services is increasing. To deal with the complex health care demands of these people, professionals from different disciplines collaborate. This study aims to explore influential factors regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development in primary care. A qualitative study, including four semi-structured focus group interviews (n = 4). In total, a heterogeneous group of experts (n = 16) and health care professionals (n = 15) participated. Participants discussed viewpoints, barriers, and facilitators regarding interprofessional collaboration related to care plan development. The data were analysed by means of inductive content analysis. The findings show a variety of factors influencing the interprofessional collaboration in developing a care plan. Factors can be divided into 5 key categories: (1) patient-related factors: active role, self-management, goals and wishes, membership of the team; (2) professional-related factors: individual competences, domain thinking, motivation; (3) interpersonal factors: language differences, knowing each other, trust and respect, and motivation; (4) organisational factors: structure, composition, time, shared vision, leadership and administrative support; and (5) external factors: education, culture, hierarchy, domain thinking, law and regulations, finance, technology and ICT. Improving interprofessional collaboration regarding care plan development calls for an integral approach including patient- and professional related factors, interpersonal, organisational, and external factors. Further, the leader of the team seems to play a key role in watching the patient perspective, organising and coordinating interprofessional collaborations, and guiding the team through developments. The results of this study can be used as input for developing tools and interventions targeted at executing and improving interprofessional

  3. Dosimetric Changes Resulting From Patient Rotational Setup Errors in Proton Therapy Prostate Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejpal, Samir V.; Amos, Richard A.; Bluett, Jaques B.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer; Choi, Seungtaek; Lee, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dose changes to the target and critical structures from rotational setup errors in prostate cancer patients treated with proton therapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 70 plans were analyzed for 10 patients treated with parallel-opposed proton beams to a dose of 7,600 60 Co-cGy-equivalent (CcGE) in 200 CcGE fractions to the clinical target volume (i.e., prostate and proximal seminal vesicles). Rotational setup errors of +3 o , -3 deg., +5 deg., and -5 deg. (to simulate pelvic tilt) were generated by adjusting the gantry. Horizontal couch shifts of +3 deg. and -3 deg. (to simulate longitudinal setup variability) were also generated. Verification plans were recomputed, keeping the same treatment parameters as the control. Results: All changes shown are for 38 fractions. The mean clinical target volume dose was 7,780 CcGE. The mean change in the clinical target volume dose in the worse case scenario for all shifts was 2 CcGE (absolute range in worst case scenario, 7,729-7,848 CcGE). The mean changes in the critical organ dose in the worst case scenario was 6 CcGE (bladder), 18 CcGE (rectum), 36 CcGE (anterior rectal wall), and 141 CcGE (femoral heads) for all plans. In general, the percentage of change in the worse case scenario for all shifts to the critical structures was <5%. Deviations in the absolute percentage of volume of organ receiving 45 and 70 Gy for the bladder and rectum were <2% for all plans. Conclusion: Patient rotational movements of 3 deg. and 5 deg. and horizontal couch shifts of 3 deg. in prostate proton planning did not confer clinically significant dose changes to the target volumes or critical structures.

  4. Comparison of provincial prescription drug plans and the impact on patients' annual drug expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Virginie; Melo, Magda; Jackevicius, Cynthia; Cox, Jafna; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Rinfret, Stéphane; Humphries, Karin H; Johansen, Helen; Tu, Jack V; Pilote, Louise

    2008-02-12

    Reimbursement for outpatient prescription drugs is not mandated by the Canada Health Act or any other federal legislation. Provincial governments independently establish reimbursement plans. We sought to describe variations in publicly funded provincial drug plans across Canada and to examine the impact of this variation on patients' annual expenditures. We collected information, accurate to December 2006, about publicly funded prescription drug plans from all 10 Canadian provinces. Using clinical scenarios, we calculated the impact of provincial cost-sharing strategies on individual annual drug expenditures for 3 categories of patients with different levels of income and 2 levels of annual prescription burden ($260 and $1000). We found that eligibility criteria and cost-sharing details of the publicly funded prescription drug plans differed markedly across Canada, as did the personal financial burden due to prescription drug costs. Seniors pay 35% or less of their prescription costs in 2 provinces, but elsewhere they may pay as much as 100%. With few exceptions, nonseniors pay more than 35% of their prescription costs in every province. Most social assistance recipients pay 35% or less of their prescription costs in 5 provinces and pay no costs in the other 5. In an example of a patient with congestive heart failure, his out-of-pocket costs for a prescription burden of $1283 varied between $74 and $1332 across the provinces. Considerable interprovincial variation in publicly funded prescription drug plans results in substantial variation in annual expenditures by Canadians with identical prescription burdens. A revised pharmaceutical strategy might reduce these major inequities.

  5. Integrating family planning and HIV services in western Kenya: the impact on HIV-infected patients' knowledge of family planning and male attitudes toward family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onono, Maricianah; Guzé, Mary A; Grossman, Daniel; Steinfeld, Rachel; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Shade, Starley; Cohen, Craig R; Newmann, Sara J

    2015-01-01

    Little information exists on the impact of integrating family planning (FP) services into HIV care and treatment on patients' familiarity with and attitudes toward FP. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial in 18 public HIV clinics with 12 randomized to integrated FP and HIV services and 6 to the standard referral-based system where patients are referred to an FP clinic. Serial cross-sectional surveys were done before (n = 488 women, 486 men) and after (n = 479 women, 481 men) the intervention to compare changes in familiarity with FP methods and attitudes toward FP between integrated and nonintegrated (NI) sites. We created an FP familiarity score based on the number of more effective FP methods patients could identify (score range: 0-6). Generalized estimating equations were used to control for clustering within sites. An increase in mean familiarity score between baseline (mean = 5.16) and post-intervention (mean = 5.46) occurred with an overall mean change of 0.26 (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 0.09, 0.45; p = 0.003) across all sites. At end line, there was no difference in increase of mean FP familiarity scores at intervention versus control sites (mean = 5.41 vs. 5.49, p = 0.94). We observed a relative decrease in the proportion of males agreeing that FP was "women's business" at integrated sites (baseline 42% to end line 30%; reduction of 12%) compared to males at NI sites (baseline 35% to end line 42%; increase of 7%; adjusted odds ration [aOR] = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.22, 0.85). Following FP-HIV integration, familiarity with FP methods increased but did not differ by study arm. Integration was associated with a decrease in negative attitudes toward FP among men.

  6. FDG-PET-Detected Extracranial Metastasis in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Staging for Surgery or Radical Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macmanus, Michael P.; Hicks, Rodney; Fisher, Richard; Rischin, Danny; Michael, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David L. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Inst., Melbourne (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2003-03-01

    The prognostic significance of extracranial distant metastasis detected by positron emission tomography (PET) was investigated in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Forty-two patients staged with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET-detected distant metastasis before planned surgery (n=7) or radical radiotherapy (RT)/chemoradiotherapy (n=35) for NSCLC were identified from a prospective database. The influence of metastasis number and other prognostic factors was investigated using Cox's regression analysis. Treatment after PET included surgery (n=2), radical RT (n =5), palliative RT (n=25), chemotherapy (n=8) or supportive care (n=2). All but 4 patients had died by the last follow-up. Median survival was 9 months overall, 12 months for 27 patients with single PET-detected metastasis and 5 months for 15 patients with >1 metastasis (p=0.009). It was found that the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (p=0.027) but not pre-PET stage, weight loss or metastasis site correlated with survival. PET-detected metastatic tumor burden appeared to influence survival and should be evaluated as a prognostic factor in NSCLC.

  7. Choice of Surgical Procedure for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer ≤ 1 cm or > 1 to 2 cm Among Lobectomy, Segmentectomy, and Wedge Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Chenyang; Shen, Jianfei; Ren, Yijiu

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: According to the lung cancer staging project, T1a (≤ 2 cm) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should be additionally classified into ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm groups. This study aimed to investigate the surgical procedure for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. METHODS: We identified 15...... multiple prognostic factors. RESULTS: OS and LCSS favored lobectomy compared with segmentectomy or wedge resection in patients with NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. Multivariable analysis showed that segmentectomy and wedge resection were independently associated with poorer OS and LCSS than lobectomy...... for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. With sublobar resection, lower OS and LCSS emerged for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm after wedge resection, whereas similar survivals were observed for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm. Multivariable analyses showed that wedge resection is an independent risk factor of survival for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm...

  8. SU-F-T-564: 3 Year Experience of Treatment Plan QualityAssurance for Vero SBRT Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Z; Li, Z; Mamalui, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To verify treatment plan monitor units from iPlan treatment planning system for Vero Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment using both software-based and (homogeneous and heterogeneous) phantom-based approaches. Methods: Dynamic conformal arcs (DCA) were used for SBRT treatment of oligometastasis patients using Vero linear accelerator. For each plan, Monte Carlo calculated treatment plans MU (prescribed dose to water with 1% variance) is verified first by RadCalc software with 3% difference threshold. Beyond 3% differences, treatment plans were copied onto (homogeneous) Scanditronix phantom for non-lung patients and copied onto (heterogeneous) CIRS phantom for lung patients and the corresponding plan dose was measured using a cc01 ion chamber. The difference between the planed and measured dose was recorded. For the past 3 years, we have treated 180 patients with 315 targets. Out of these patients, 99 targets treatment plan RadCalc calculation exceeded 3% threshold and phantom based measurements were performed with 26 plans using Scanditronix phantom and 73 plans using CIRS phantom. Mean and standard deviation of the dose differences were obtained and presented. Results: For all patient RadCalc calculations, the mean dose difference is 0.76% with a standard deviation of 5.97%. For non-lung patient plan Scanditronix phantom measurements, the mean dose difference is 0.54% with standard deviation of 2.53%; for lung patient plan CIRS phantom measurements, the mean dose difference is −0.04% with a standard deviation of 1.09%; The maximum dose difference is 3.47% for Scanditronix phantom measurements and 3.08% for CIRS phantom measurements. Conclusion: Limitations in secondary MU check software lead to perceived large dose discrepancies for some of the lung patient SBRT treatment plans. Homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms were used in plan quality assurance for non-lung patients and lung patients, respectively. Phantom based QA showed the relative

  9. SU-F-T-564: 3 Year Experience of Treatment Plan QualityAssurance for Vero SBRT Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Z; Li, Z [University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Mamalui, M [University of Florida/Radiation Oncology, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To verify treatment plan monitor units from iPlan treatment planning system for Vero Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment using both software-based and (homogeneous and heterogeneous) phantom-based approaches. Methods: Dynamic conformal arcs (DCA) were used for SBRT treatment of oligometastasis patients using Vero linear accelerator. For each plan, Monte Carlo calculated treatment plans MU (prescribed dose to water with 1% variance) is verified first by RadCalc software with 3% difference threshold. Beyond 3% differences, treatment plans were copied onto (homogeneous) Scanditronix phantom for non-lung patients and copied onto (heterogeneous) CIRS phantom for lung patients and the corresponding plan dose was measured using a cc01 ion chamber. The difference between the planed and measured dose was recorded. For the past 3 years, we have treated 180 patients with 315 targets. Out of these patients, 99 targets treatment plan RadCalc calculation exceeded 3% threshold and phantom based measurements were performed with 26 plans using Scanditronix phantom and 73 plans using CIRS phantom. Mean and standard deviation of the dose differences were obtained and presented. Results: For all patient RadCalc calculations, the mean dose difference is 0.76% with a standard deviation of 5.97%. For non-lung patient plan Scanditronix phantom measurements, the mean dose difference is 0.54% with standard deviation of 2.53%; for lung patient plan CIRS phantom measurements, the mean dose difference is −0.04% with a standard deviation of 1.09%; The maximum dose difference is 3.47% for Scanditronix phantom measurements and 3.08% for CIRS phantom measurements. Conclusion: Limitations in secondary MU check software lead to perceived large dose discrepancies for some of the lung patient SBRT treatment plans. Homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms were used in plan quality assurance for non-lung patients and lung patients, respectively. Phantom based QA showed the relative

  10. Individual care plans for chronically ill patients within primary care in the Netherlands: Dissemination and associations with patient characteristics and patient-perceived quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Daphne L; Heijmans, Monique; Rijken, Mieke

    2015-06-01

    To examine the use of individual care plans (ICPs) within primary chronic illness care in the Netherlands, and to explore the relationships between ICP use, patient characteristics, and patient-perceived quality of care. Cross-sectional study using survey data from a panel of chronically ill patients and medical registration data provided by their general practices. A sample of 1377 patients with somatic chronic disease(s) randomly selected in general practices throughout the Netherlands, supplemented with a sample of 225 COPD patients, also recruited from general practices. (i) Percentage of ICP use based on self-report by chronically ill patients, and (ii) patient-perceived quality of care as assessed using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC). ICP use among the total generic sample was low (9%), but slightly higher (13%) among patients diagnosed with diabetes or COPD, diseases for which disease management programmes have been set up in the Netherlands. Patients with a low educational level and patients with poor(er) self-rated health were more likely to have an ICP. Compared with patients without an ICP, patients with an ICP more often reported that the care they received was patient-centred, proactive, planned, and included collaborative goal setting, problem-solving, and follow-up support. Findings reveal a discrepancy between practice and policy aspirations regarding ICP use in primary chronic illness care. More research is needed to gain insight into the effectiveness of ICPs to improve the quality of chronic illness care in various patient populations.

  11. Patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmouche, Rola; Cheriet, Farida; Labelle, Hubert; Dansereau, Jean

    2013-03-01

    A method for the construction of a patient-specific model of a scoliotic torso for surgical planning via inter-patient registration is presented. Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of a generic model are registered to surface topography (TP) and X-ray data of a test patient. A partial model is first obtained via thin-plate spline registration between TP and X-ray data of the test patient. The MRIs from the generic model are then fit into the test patient using articulated model registration between the vertebrae of the generic model's MRIs in prone position and the test patient's X-rays in standing position. A non-rigid deformation of the soft tissues is performed using a modified thin-plate spline constrained to maintain bone rigidity and to fit in the space between the vertebrae and the surface of the torso. Results show average Dice values of 0:975 +/- 0:012 between the MRIs following inter-patient registration and the surface topography of the test patient, which is comparable to the average value of 0:976 +/- 0:009 previously obtained following intra-patient registration. The results also show a significant improvement compared to rigid inter-patient registration. Future work includes validating the method on a larger cohort of patients and incorporating soft tissue stiffness constraints. The method developed can be used to obtain a geometric model of a patient including bone structures, soft tissues and the surface of the torso which can be incorporated in a surgical simulator in order to better predict the outcome of scoliosis surgery, even if MRI data cannot be acquired for the patient.

  12. Survivorship Care Plan Information Needs: Perspectives of Safety-Net Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Nancy J; Napoles, Tessa M; Banks, Priscilla J; Orenstein, Fern S; Luce, Judith A; Joseph, Galen

    2016-01-01

    Despite the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) 2005 recommendation, few care organizations have instituted standard survivorship care plans (SCPs). Low health literacy and low English proficiency are important factors to consider in SCP development. Our study aimed to identify information needs and survivorship care plan preferences of low literacy, multi-lingual patients to support the transition from oncology to primary care and ongoing learning in survivorship. We conducted focus groups in five languages with African American, Latina, Russian, Filipina, White, and Chinese medically underserved breast cancer patients. Topics explored included the transition to primary care, access to information, knowledge of treatment history, and perspectives on SCPs. Analysis of focus group data identified three themes: 1) the need for information and education on the transition between "active treatment" and "survivorship"; 2) information needed (and often not obtained) from providers; and 3) perspectives on SCP content and delivery. Our data point to the need to develop a process as well as written information for medically underserved breast cancer patients. An SCP document will not replace direct communication with providers about treatment, symptom management and transition, a communication that is missing in participating safety-net patients' experiences of cancer care. Women turned to peer support and community-based organizations in the absence of information from providers. "Clear and effective" communication of survivorship care for safety-net patients requires dedicated staff trained to address wide-ranging information needs and uncertainties.

  13. Patient-focused goal planning process and outcome after spinal cord injury rehabilitation: quantitative and qualitative audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Michelle; Beilby, Janet; Ray, Patricia; McLennan, Renee; Ker, John; Schug, Stephan

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the process and outcome of a multidisciplinary inpatient goal planning rehabilitation programme on physical, social and psychological functioning for patients with spinal cord injury. Clinical audit: quantitative and qualitative analyses. Specialist spinal injury unit, Perth, Australia. Consecutive series of 100 newly injured spinal cord injury inpatients. MAIN MEASURE(S): The Needs Assessment Checklist (NAC), patient-focused goal planning questionnaire and goal planning progress form. The clinical audit of 100 spinal cord injured patients revealed that 547 goal planning meetings were held with 8531 goals stipulated in total. Seventy-five per cent of the goals set at the first goal planning meeting were achieved by the second meeting and the rate of goal achievements at subsequent goal planning meetings dropped to 56%. Based on quantitative analysis of physical, social and psychological functioning, the 100 spinal cord injury patients improved significantly from baseline to discharge. Furthermore, qualitative analysis revealed benefits consistently reported by spinal cord injury patients of the goal planning rehabilitation programme in improvements to their physical, social and psychological adjustment to injury. The findings of this clinical audit underpin the need for patient-focused goal planning rehabilitation programmes which are tailored to the individual's needs and involve a comprehensive multidisciplinary team.

  14. SU-E-T-619: Planning 131I Thyroid Treatments for Patients Requiring Hemodialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroud, D [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles Ca, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Treatment of 131I thyroid cancer patients who also require regular hemodialysis (HD) treatments requires consideration of the administered activity and the HD schedule. In this work the red bone marrow is considered the dose limiting organ and the treatment plan optimized the HD schedule with the amount of radioactivity administered. Methods: The ‘Safe’ dose was considered to be 2 Gy (200 rad) to the red bone marrow.1 131Iodine doses of 50 mCi to 100 mCi were modeled and found to require a range of HD schedules. In order to achieve the safe dose to the red marrow, more aggressive HD schedules are required. 100 mCi required an aggressive HD treatment of every 24 hours for at least one week to achieve the ‘safe’ dose and an exposure appropriate for release from the hospital. A more normal schedule of HD beginning at 18 hours then every 48 hours allowed for up to 60 mCi administered dose allowed for a safe dose and expected release after less than one week.2In addition room was equipped with video cameras cameras for monitoring the patient and their vital signs from an adjacent room during HD. In this way the dialysis nurses were able to monitor the patient closely from an adjoining room. Results: Two HD patients were administered adjusted doses of about 50 mCi. The medical and nursing staff were exposed to no more than 4 mR for the entire treatment. The residual Iodine in the patient appeared to be normal after 4 to 6 days when the patient was released. Conclusion: With careful treatment planning 131Iodine treatments can be performed safely for patients needing HD and treatments appear to be as effective as those for patients with normal renal function.

  15. SU-E-T-619: Planning 131I Thyroid Treatments for Patients Requiring Hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroud, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment of 131I thyroid cancer patients who also require regular hemodialysis (HD) treatments requires consideration of the administered activity and the HD schedule. In this work the red bone marrow is considered the dose limiting organ and the treatment plan optimized the HD schedule with the amount of radioactivity administered. Methods: The ‘Safe’ dose was considered to be 2 Gy (200 rad) to the red bone marrow.1 131Iodine doses of 50 mCi to 100 mCi were modeled and found to require a range of HD schedules. In order to achieve the safe dose to the red marrow, more aggressive HD schedules are required. 100 mCi required an aggressive HD treatment of every 24 hours for at least one week to achieve the ‘safe’ dose and an exposure appropriate for release from the hospital. A more normal schedule of HD beginning at 18 hours then every 48 hours allowed for up to 60 mCi administered dose allowed for a safe dose and expected release after less than one week.2In addition room was equipped with video cameras cameras for monitoring the patient and their vital signs from an adjacent room during HD. In this way the dialysis nurses were able to monitor the patient closely from an adjoining room. Results: Two HD patients were administered adjusted doses of about 50 mCi. The medical and nursing staff were exposed to no more than 4 mR for the entire treatment. The residual Iodine in the patient appeared to be normal after 4 to 6 days when the patient was released. Conclusion: With careful treatment planning 131Iodine treatments can be performed safely for patients needing HD and treatments appear to be as effective as those for patients with normal renal function

  16. SU-E-J-244: Development and Validation of a Knowledge Based Planning Model for External Beam Radiation Therapy of Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Z; Kennedy, A [Sarah Cannon, Nashville, TN (United States); Larsen, E; Hayes, C; Grow, A [North Florida Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Bahamondes, S.; Zheng, Y; Wu, X [JFK Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Lake Worth, FL (United States); Choi, M; Pai, S [Good Samaritan Hospital, Los Gatos, CA (United States); Li, J [Doctors Hospital of Augusta, Augusta, GA (United States); Cranford, K [Trident Medical Center, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The study aims to develop and validate a knowledge based planning (KBP) model for external beam radiation therapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods: RapidPlan™ technology was used to develop a lung KBP model. Plans from 65 patients with LA-NSCLC were used to train the model. 25 patients were treated with VMAT, and the other patients were treated with IMRT. Organs-at-risk (OARs) included right lung, left lung, heart, esophagus, and spinal cord. DVH and geometric distribution DVH were extracted from the treated plans. The model was trained using principal component analysis and step-wise multiple regression. Box plot and regression plot tools were used to identify geometric outliers and dosimetry outliers and help fine-tune the model. The validation was performed by (a) comparing predicted DVH boundaries to actual DVHs of 63 patients and (b) using an independent set of treatment planning data. Results: 63 out of 65 plans were included in the final KBP model with PTV volume ranging from 102.5cc to 1450.2cc. Total treatment dose prescription varied from 50Gy to 70Gy based on institutional guidelines. One patient was excluded due to geometric outlier where 2.18cc of spinal cord was included in PTV. The other patient was excluded due to dosimetric outlier where the dose sparing to spinal cord was heavily enforced in the clinical plan. Target volume, OAR volume, OAR overlap volume percentage to target, and OAR out-of-field volume were included in the trained model. Lungs and heart had two principal component scores of GEDVH, whereas spinal cord and esophagus had three in the final model. Predicted DVH band (mean ±1 standard deviation) represented 66.2±3.6% of all DVHs. Conclusion: A KBP model was developed and validated for radiotherapy of LA-NSCLC in a commercial treatment planning system. The clinical implementation may improve the consistency of IMRT/VMAT planning.

  17. Dendrimer-Based Selective Proteostasis-Inhibition Strategy to Control NSCLC Growth and Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Walworth

    Full Text Available Elevated valosin containing protein (VCP/p97 levels promote the progression of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Although many VCP inhibitors are available, most of these therapeutic compounds have low specificity for targeted tumor cell delivery. Hence, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of dendrimer-encapsulated potent VCP-inhibitor drug in controlling non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC progression. The VCP inhibitor(s (either in their pure form or encapsulated in generation-4 PAMAM-dendrimer with hydroxyl surface were tested for their in vitro efficacy in modulating H1299 (NSCLC cells proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. Our results show that VCP inhibition by DBeQ was significantly more potent than NMS-873 as evident by decreased cell proliferation (p<0.0001, MTT-assay and migration (p<0.05; scratch-assay, and increased apoptosis (p<0.05; caspase-3/7-assay as compared to untreated control cells. Next, we found that dendrimer-encapsulated DBeQ (DDNDBeQ treatment increased ubiquitinated-protein accumulation in soluble protein-fraction (immunoblotting of H1299 cells as compared to DDN-control, implying the effectiveness of DBeQ in proteostasis-inhibition. We verified by immunostaining that DDNDBeQ treatment increases accumulation of ubiquitinated-proteins that co-localizes with an ER-marker, KDEL. We observed that proteostasis-inhibition with DDNDBeQ, significantly decreased cell migration rate (scratch-assay and transwell-invasion as compared to the control-DDN treatment (p<0.05. Moreover, DDNDBeQ treatment showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation (p<0.01, MTT-assay and increased caspase-3/7 mediated apoptotic cell death (p<0.05 as compared to DDN-control. This was further verified by cell cycle analysis (propidium-iodide-staining that demonstrated significant cell cycle arrest in the G2/M-phase (p<0.001 by DDNDBeQ treatment as compared to control

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  19. The superiority of hybrid-volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) technique over double arcs VMAT and 3D-conformal technique in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer – A planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Oscar S.H.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Hung, Albert W.M.; Chang, Amy T.Y.; Yeung, Rebecca M.W.; Lee, Anne W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of three different treatment techniques – conformal radiotherapy (CRT), double arcs volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc, RA) and Hybrid-RapidArc (H-RA) for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: CRT, RA and H-RA plans were optimized for 24 stage III NSCLC patients. The target prescription dose was 60 Gy. CRT consisted of 5–7 coplanar fields, while RA comprised of two 204 o arcs. H-RA referred to two 204 o arcs plus 2 static fields, which accounted for approximately half of the total dose. The plans were optimized to fulfill the departmental plan acceptance criteria. Results: RA and H-RA yielded a 20% better conformity compared with CRT. Lung volume receiving >20 Gy (V20) and mean lung dose (MLD) were the lowest in H-RA (V20 1.7% and 2.1% lower, MLD 0.59 Gy and 0.41 Gy lower than CRT and RA respectively) without jeopardizing the low-dose lung volume (V5). H-RA plans gave the lowest mean maximum spinal cord dose (34.4 Gy, 3.9 Gy < CRT and 2.2 Gy < RA plans) and NTCP of lung. Higher average MU per fraction (addition 52.4 MU) was observed with a reduced treatment time compared with CRT plans. Conclusion: The H-RA technique was superior in dosimetric outcomes for treating locally-advanced NSCLC compared to CRT and RA.

  20. Virtual medicine: Utilization of the advanced cardiac imaging patient avatar for procedural planning and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbane, Jerold S; Saxon, Leslie A

    Advances in imaging technology have led to a paradigm shift from planning of cardiovascular procedures and surgeries requiring the actual patient in a "brick and mortar" hospital to utilization of the digitalized patient in the virtual hospital. Cardiovascular computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) digitalized 3-D patient representation of individual patient anatomy and physiology serves as an avatar allowing for virtual delineation of the most optimal approaches to cardiovascular procedures and surgeries prior to actual hospitalization. Pre-hospitalization reconstruction and analysis of anatomy and pathophysiology previously only accessible during the actual procedure could potentially limit the intrinsic risks related to time in the operating room, cardiac procedural laboratory and overall hospital environment. Although applications are specific to areas of cardiovascular specialty focus, there are unifying themes related to the utilization of technologies. The virtual patient avatar computer can also be used for procedural planning, computational modeling of anatomy, simulation of predicted therapeutic result, printing of 3-D models, and augmentation of real time procedural performance. Examples of the above techniques are at various stages of development for application to the spectrum of cardiovascular disease processes, including percutaneous, surgical and hybrid minimally invasive interventions. A multidisciplinary approach within medicine and engineering is necessary for creation of robust algorithms for maximal utilization of the virtual patient avatar in the digital medical center. Utilization of the virtual advanced cardiac imaging patient avatar will play an important role in the virtual health care system. Although there has been a rapid proliferation of early data, advanced imaging applications require further assessment and validation of accuracy, reproducibility, standardization, safety, efficacy, quality

  1. Molecular prediction of adjuvant cisplatin efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)—validation in two independent cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Ida Kappel; Santoni Rugiu, Eric; Ravn, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Effective predictive biomarkers for selection of patients benefiting from adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are needed. Based on a previously validated methodology, molecular profiles of predicted sensitivity in two patient cohorts are presented....... Methods The profiles are correlations between in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin and vinorelbine and baseline mRNA expression of the 60 cell lines in the National Cancer Institute panel. An applied clinical samples filter focused the profiles to clinically relevant genes. The profiles were tested on 1......) univariate HR of 0.37 (95% CI:0.12–1.15, p = 0.09) in the ACV cohort and 2) univariate HR of 0.14 (95% CI:0.03–0.59, p = 0.0076) to three years. Functional analysis on the cisplatin profile revealed a group of upregulated genes related to RNA splicing as a part of DNA damage repair and apoptosis. Conclusions...

  2. Epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status and the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A population based quality assurance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Hansen, Karin H.

    2015-01-01

    of adenocarcinoma or NSCLC not otherwise specified - diagnosed from July 2010 to June 2014. Chart review was updated in February 2015. The median age was 68 years (range 31 – 96 years), 6.4% were never-smokers and 37.5% ex-smokers. EGFR-mutation status has been determined for 683 patients (73.6%), but has not been...... possible from the available samples in 89 cases. For 156 patients the analysis has not been requested. The prevalence of EGFR-mutation has been 10.4% in women, 5.4% in men, and 39.2% in never-smokers (no gender difference). The EGFR mutations were proven in cytology samples in 75% of the 56 positive cases...

  3. A study to assess the effectiveness of planned exercise programme in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineeta Nath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychotic disorders are some of the most severe, chronic, and intractable psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is a common and unsolved mental health problem in the world today. Negative symptoms are those symptoms that tend to reflect diminution or loss of normal functions like apathy, anhedonia, alogia, avolition, affective flattening, or social isolation. Exercise is useful for the reduction of some of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, depression, and anxiety, and also to reduce auditory hallucinations and improve sleep patterns, self-esteem, and general behaviour in people living with schizophrenia. Aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of planned exercise programme in negative symptoms among patients with schizophrenia. Methodology: A quasi experimental research design was used for this study. Total 60 samples were assigned into two groups with 30 in control group and 30 in experimental group. The data was collected by using structured socio-demographic proforma, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and Scale for Assessment of Negative symptoms. Result: There was a statistically significant difference in pre and post test scores in both control and experimental groups. But statistically significant difference in post test mean scores on negative symptoms between control and experimental groups indicated effectiveness of planned exercise programme along with medical and nursing care. Conclusion: The findings concluded that planned exercise programme with routine medical and nursing care was effective in reduction of negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

  4. Overexpression of the duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) by NSCLC tumor cells results in increased tumor necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, Christina L; Belperio, John A; Burdick, Marie D; Strieter, Robert M

    2004-01-01

    The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) is known to be a promiscuous chemokine receptor that binds a variety of CXC and CC chemokines in the absence of any detectable signal transduction events. Within the CXC group of chemokines, DARC binds the angiogenic CXC chemokines including IL-8 (CXCL8), GROα (CXCL1) and ENA-78 (CXCL5), all of which have previously been shown to be important in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumor growth. We hypothesized that overexpression of DARC by a NSCLC tumor cell line would result in the binding of the angiogenic ELR+ CXC chemokines by the tumor cells themselves, and thus interfere with the stimulation of endothelial cells and induction of angiogenesis by the tumor cell-derived angiogenic chemokines. NSCLC tumor cells that constitutively expressed DARC were generated and their growth characteristics were compared to control transfected cells in vitro and in vivo in SCID animals. We found that tumors derived from DARC-expressing cells were significantly larger in size than tumors derived from control-transfected cells. However, upon histological examination we found that DARC-expressing tumors had significantly more necrosis and decreased tumor cellularity, as compared to control tumors. Expression of DARC by NSCLC cells was also associated with a decrease in tumor-associated vasculature and a reduction in metastatic potential. The expression of DARC in the context of NSCLC tumors may act as a chemokine decoy receptor and interferes with normal tumor growth and chemokine-induced tumor neovascularization

  5. New customized patient repositioning system for use in three dimensional (3D) treatment planning and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Toshihiro; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishioka, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Noriaki; Yamaguchi, Megumi; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Takekawa, Naomitu; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To develop a safe and easy method for customized patient repositioning and immobilization prior to 3-D treatment planning and during precise radiotherapy. Materials and methods: The new material consists of impression material, and covering material to fix and hold the impression. The impression material is composed of numerous effervescent polystyrene beads (3.1 mm in diameter) coated by polymerizing substance, urethane prepolymer. When being wet, the material beads adhere to each other due to polymelization, and it is hardened in 5 to 10 minutes. Within one hour the mold is sufficiently dry to be used for treatment planning utilizing computed tomography(CT). The physical characteristics of the material, the subjective comfort of the patient, the reduction in time required for repositioning in the treatment of the head and neck tumors, and the reduction in patient movement in the treatment of the breast cancers were investigated. Results: During the hardening stage, the maximum temperature of the material was 33 deg. C. Non-toxic CO 2 gas was produced and evaporated from the covering fabric. The mold, with a density of 0.095, was strong enough to endure compression, flexure, and scratching. In the healthy volunteers, no sensitivity to the skin was observed after 12 hours' attachment to the skin. The CT number of the material was less than minus 800, and no build-up effect was demonstrated in megavoltage photon therapy. Various molds were made and used as neck rest adjunctive to thermoplastic face mask, whole body cast, and arm rest (Figure). A questionnaire survey administered to 59 patients with brain, head and neck tumors, and to 18 patients with breast cancers, revealed that subjective comfort was markedly improved (90.9%) of improved (9.1%) by virtue of the new material. In the treatment of head and neck tumors, the mean time and SD for repositioning were 61.1 ± 13.6 seconds with the ready-made neck-rest and 49.4 ± 8.4 seconds with the

  6. Advance Care Planning Does Not Adversely Affect Hope or Anxiety Among Patients With Advanced Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J; Schubart, Jane R; Whitehead, Megan M; Farace, Elana; Lehman, Erik; Levi, Benjamin H

    2015-06-01

    Many physicians avoid advance care planning (ACP) discussions because they worry such conversations will lead to psychological distress. To investigate whether engaging in ACP using online planning tools adversely affects hope, hopelessness, or anxiety among patients with advanced cancer. Patients with advanced cancer and an estimated survival of two years or less (Intervention group) and a Control group were recruited at a tertiary care academic medical center (2007-2012) to engage in ACP using an online decision aid ("Making Your Wishes Known"). Pre/post and between-group comparisons were made, including hope (Herth Hope Index), hopelessness (Beck Hopelessness Scale), and anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory). Secondary outcomes included ACP knowledge, self-determination, and satisfaction. A total of 200 individuals completed the study. After engaging in ACP, there was no decline in hope or increase in hopelessness in either the Control or Intervention group. Anxiety was likewise unchanged in the Control group but decreased slightly in the Intervention group. Knowledge of ACP (% correct answers) increased in both the groups, but more so in the Intervention group (13% increase vs. 4%; P<0.01). Self-determination increased slightly in both groups, and satisfaction with the ACP process was greater (P<0.01) in the Intervention than Control group. Engaging in ACP with online planning tools increases knowledge without diminishing hope, increasing hopelessness, or inducing anxiety in patients with advanced cancer. Physicians need not avoid ACP out of concern for adversely affecting patients' psychological well-being. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiation therapy planning of patients with breast cancer with the aid of parasternal lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Eiji

    1982-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to establish the basis of the precise radiotherapy planning of the parasternal lymph nodes for patients with breast cancer. Twenty-four female patients with breast cancer were examined by parasternal lymphoscintigraphy. Their ages ranged from 26 to 76 years (average: 51.8 yrs). The parasternal lymphoscintigram was obtained 4 hours after bilateral subcostal injection of sup(99m)Tc-sulfur colloid or sup(99m)Tc-antimony sulfide colloid. The three-dimensional location of the lymph nodes was observed using both a conventional parallel hole collimator and a bilateral collimator. The following results were obtained. 1) The widest distance between the right and left chains of the parasternal lymph nodes was 5.6 +- 1.0 cm (n = 17, range: 4.1 - 7.7 cm). 2) The average lateral distance of the lymph nodes from the midsternal line was 2.3 +- 0.8 cm (n = 88, range: 0.7 - 5.2 cm). The lateral distance tended to be longer on the right side than on the left side. 3) The average depth of the lymph nodes from the surface of the skin was 2.3 +- 0.7 cm (n = 116, range: 0.9 - 4.3 cm). 4) The more the patients were obese, the more deeply seated the parasternal lymph nodes tended to be. 5) In the retrospective analysis of the conventional radiotherapy planning at the Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, it was found that about 59% of the parasternal lymph nodes were located in the radiation field and about 19% of the lymph nodes were seated within +-1 cm of the objective depth. In this paper, the author tries to emphasize that it might be important to examine the exact location and depth of the parasternal lymph nodes in each patient for the radiation therapy planning. (author)

  8. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging for surgical planning in pediatric patients: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Jarod L; Griffin, Natalie; Hacker, Carl D; Vellimana, Ananth K; Akbari, S Hassan; Shimony, Joshua S; Smyth, Matthew D; Leuthardt, Eric C; Limbrick, David D

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Cerebral mapping for surgical planning and operative guidance is a challenging task in neurosurgery. Pediatric patients are often poor candidates for many modern mapping techniques because of inability to cooperate due to their immature age, cognitive deficits, or other factors. Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is uniquely suited to benefit pediatric patients because it is inherently noninvasive and does not require task performance or significant cooperation. Recent advances in the field have made mapping cerebral networks possible on an individual basis for use in clinical decision making. The authors present their initial experience translating rs-fMRI into clinical practice for surgical planning in pediatric patients. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed cases in which the rs-fMRI analysis technique was used prior to craniotomy in pediatric patients undergoing surgery in their institution. Resting-state analysis was performed using a previously trained machine-learning algorithm for identification of resting-state networks on an individual basis. Network maps were uploaded to the clinical imaging and surgical navigation systems. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics, including need for sedation during imaging and use of task-based fMRI, were also recorded. RESULTS Twenty patients underwent rs-fMRI prior to craniotomy between December 2013 and June 2016. Their ages ranged from 1.9 to 18.4 years, and 12 were male. Five of the 20 patients also underwent task-based fMRI and one underwent awake craniotomy. Six patients required sedation to tolerate MRI acquisition, including resting-state sequences. Exemplar cases are presented including anatomical and resting-state functional imaging. CONCLUSIONS Resting-state fMRI is a rapidly advancing field of study allowing for whole brain analysis by a noninvasive modality. It is applicable to a wide range of patients and effective even under general anesthesia. The nature of resting

  9. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  10. Aptamer-miRNA-212 Conjugate Sensitizes NSCLC Cells to TRAIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Iaboni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a promising antitumor agent for its remarkable ability to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells, without affecting the viability of healthy bystander cells. The TRAIL tumor suppressor pathway is deregulated in many human malignancies including lung cancer. In human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells, sensitization to TRAIL therapy can be restored by increasing the expression levels of the tumor suppressor microRNA-212 (miR-212 leading to inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein PED/PEA-15 implicated in treatment resistance. In this study, we exploited a previously described RNA aptamer inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase receptor Axl (GL21.T expressed on lung cancer cells, as a means to deliver miR-212 into human NSCLC cells expressing Axl. We demonstrate efficient delivery of miR-212 following conjugation of the miR to GL21.T (GL21.T-miR212 chimera. We show that the chimera downregulates PED and restores TRAIL-mediate cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Importantly, treatment of Axl+ lung cancer cells with the chimera resulted in (i an increase in caspase activation and (ii a reduction of cell viability in combination with TRAIL therapy. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the GL21.T-miR212 chimera can be employed as an adjuvant to TRAIL therapy for the treatment of lung cancer.

  11. Role of image-guided patient repositioning and online planning in localized prostate cancer IMRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerma, Fritz A.; Liu, Bei; Wang, Zhendong; Yi, Byongyong; Amin, Pradip; Liu, Sandy; Feng Yuanming; Yu, Cedric X.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the expected benefit of image-guided online replanning over image-guided repositioning of localized prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Materials and methods: On 10 to 11 CT scans of each of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients, the prostate, bladder and rectum are manually segmented. Using a 3-mm PTV margin expansion from the CTV, an IMRT plan is made on the first CT scan of each patient. Online repositioning is simulated by recalculating the IMRT plan from the initial CT scan on the subsequent CT scans of each patient. For online replanning, IMRT is replanned twice on all CT scans, using 0-mm and 3-mm margins. The doses from subsequent CT images of each patient are then deformed to the initial CT anatomy using a mesh-based thin-plate B-spline deformation method and are accumulated for DVH and isodose review. Results: Paired t-tests show that online replanning with 3-mm margins significantly increases the prostate volume receiving the prescribed dose over replanning with 0-mm margins (p-value 0.004); gives marginally better target coverage than repositioning with 3-mm margins(p-value 0.06-0.343), and reduces variations in target coverage over repositioning. Fractional volumes of rectum and bladder receiving 75%, 80%, 85%, 90%, and 95% (V75, V80, V85, V90, and V95) of the prescription dose are evaluated. V90 and V95 values for the rectum are 1.6% and 0.7 % for 3-mm margin replanning and 1% and 0.4 % for 0-mm margin replanning, with p-values of 0.010-0.011. No significant differences between repositioning and replanning with 3-mm margins are found for both the rectum and the bladder. Conclusions: Image-guided replanning using 3-mm margins reduces target coverage variations, and maintains comparable rectum and bladder sparing to patient repositioning in localized prostate cancer IMRT. Marginal reductions in doses to rectum and bladder are possible when planning margins are eliminated in the online replanning scenario

  12. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  13. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  14. A prospective randomized study of postoperative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CT+RT) vs. radiotherapy(RT) alone in resected stage II and IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Geol Lee; Joo, Hang Kim; Kyung, Young Chung; Doo, Yun Lee; Kil, Dong Kim; Won, Young Lee; Sung, Kyu Kim; Sei, Kyu Kim; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Objective: A prospective randomized study has been conducted to compare the results of treatment between CT+RT and RT alone as an adjuvant setting in completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC. Materials and Methods: Patients who had completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC were randomized into a CT+RT arm(arm A) and a RT alone arm(arm B) as an adjuvant setting after stratification according to cell type(squamous vs. non-squamous) and stage(II vs. IIIA). CT(Etoposide 100mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-3, Cisplatin 20mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-5, total 6cycles) was started in postop. 3 weeks with a 4 weeks interval. RT(5040cGy/5-6wks, 180cGy/fr) was started in postoperative 5 weeks after the first cycle of CT for group A and in postoperative 4 weeks for group B. A total of 69 patients were registered from Sep. 1990 to Jun. 1993. Sixty five of these patients were evaluable because 4 patients were ineligible due to distant metastasis before adjuvant treatment. Two patients who refused adjuvant treatment were included in this study to avoid selection bias. Results: Sixteen patients (48%) have received CT of more than 3 cycles and 51 patients(78%) have received RT of more than 50Gy. Four patients died due to treatment-related complications [broncho-pleural fistula 3(arm A:B=2:1), pneumonia 1(arm A)]. Survival and the patterns of failure are as follows: Conclusion: There is no statistical significance in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure between the CT+RT arm and RT alone arm as an adjuvant setting in resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC

  15. Influence of the number and interval of treatment cycles on cytokine-induced killer cells and their adjuvant therapeutic effects in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanlong; Lv, Huimin; Zhao, Juan; Li, Qi; Mu, Guannan; Li, Jiade; Wuyang, Jiazi; Lou, Ge; Wang, Ruitao; Zhang, Yanqiao; Huang, Xiaoyi

    2017-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have important therapeutic effects in adoptive cell transfer (ACT) for the treatment of various malignancies. In this study, we focused on in vitro expansion of CIK cells and their clinical efficacy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 64 patients with NSCLC (enrolled from 2011 to 2012), including 32 patients who received chemotherapy alone or with sequential radiotherapy (conventional treatment, control group) and 32 patients who received conventional treatment and sequential CIK infusion (study group), were retrospectively analyzed. The time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS) and adverse effects were analyzed and the phenotype of lymphocytes in CIK population was also determined by flow cytometry. After in vitro expansion, the average percentage of CIK cells was 26.35%. During the 54-month follow up, the median OS and TTP were significantly longer in the study group than in the control group (P=0.0189 and P=0.0129, respectively). The median OS of the ACT≥4cycles subgroup was significantly longer than that of the ACTcells in patients who received ≥4cycles of ACT was higher than that in patients treated with cells were difficult to expand in vitro in some patients after the first ACT cycle but became much easier as the treatment cycles increased monthly. Longer treatment interval negatively impacted the expansion of CIK cells. Systematic immune levels can be increasingly boosted by reinfusion of ACT. Conventional treatment plus CIK cells is an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent progression and prolong survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Hippocampal sparing radiotherapy for glioblastoma patients: a planning study using volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmaier, Jan; Kantz, Steffi; Söhn, Matthias; Dohm, Oliver S.; Bächle, Stefan; Alber, Markus; Parodi, Katia; Belka, Claus; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential to reduce exposure of the contralateral hippocampus in radiotherapy for glioblastoma using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Datasets of 27 patients who had received 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for glioblastoma with a prescribed dose of 60Gy in fractions of 2Gy were included in this planning study. VMAT plans were optimized with the aim to reduce the dose to the contralateral hippocampus as much as possible without compromising other parameters. Hippocampal dose and treatment parameters were compared to the 3D-CRT plans using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The influence of tumour location and PTV size on the hippocampal dose was investigated with the Mann–Whitney-U-test and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. The median reduction of the contralateral hippocampus generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) with VMAT was 36 % compared to the original 3D-CRT plans (p < 0.05). Other dose parameters were maintained or improved. The median V30Gy brain could be reduced by 17.9 % (p < 0.05). For VMAT, a parietal and a non-temporal tumour localisation as well as a larger PTV size were predictors for a higher hippocampal dose (p < 0.05). Using VMAT, a substantial reduction of the radiotherapy dose to the contralateral hippocampus for patients with glioblastoma is feasible without compromising other treatment parameters. For larger PTV sizes, less sparing can be achieved. Whether this approach is able to preserve the neurocognitive status without compromising the oncological outcome needs to be investigated in the setting of prospective clinical trials

  17. An automatic virtual patient reconstruction from CT-scans for hepatic surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, L; Delingette, H; Malandain, G; Ayache, N; Koehl, C; Clément, J M; Dourthe, O; Marescaux, J

    2000-01-01

    PROBLEM/BACKGROUND: In order to help hepatic surgical planning we perfected automatic 3D reconstruction of patients from conventional CT-scan, and interactive visualization and virtual resection tools. From a conventional abdominal CT-scan, we have developed several methods allowing the automatic 3D reconstruction of skin, bones, kidneys, lung, liver, hepatic lesions, and vessels. These methods are based on deformable modeling or thresholding algorithms followed by the application of mathematical morphological operators. From these anatomical and pathological models, we have developed a new framework for translating anatomical knowledge into geometrical and topological constraints. More precisely, our approach allows to automatically delineate the hepatic and portal veins but also to label the portal vein and finally to build an anatomical segmentation of the liver based on Couinaud definition which is currently used by surgeons all over the world. Finally, we have developed a user friendly interface for the 3D visualization of anatomical and pathological structures, the accurate evaluation of volumes and distances and for the virtual hepatic resection along a user-defined cutting plane. A validation study on a 30 patients database gives 2 mm of precision for liver delineation and less than 1 mm for all other anatomical and pathological structures delineation. An in vivo validation performed during surgery also showed that anatomical segmentation is more precise than the delineation performed by a surgeon based on external landmarks. This surgery planning system has been routinely used by our medical partner, and this has resulted in an improvement of the planning and performance of hepatic surgery procedures. We have developed new tools for hepatic surgical planning allowing a better surgery through an automatic delineation and visualization of anatomical and pathological structures. These tools represent a first step towards the development of an augmented

  18. The role of patient-based treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardiansyah, Deni; Attarwala, Ali Asgar [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Maass, Christian; Glatting, Gerhard [Heidelberg University, Medical Radiation Physics/Radiation Protection, Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Mueller, Berthold [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Kletting, Peter [Universitaet Ulm, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    Accurate treatment planning is recommended in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) to minimize the toxicity to organs at risk while maximizing tumor cell sterilization. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of different degrees of individualization on the prediction accuracy of individual therapeutic biodistributions in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). A recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was fitted to the biokinetic data of 15 patients with NETs after pre-therapeutic injection of {sup 111}In-DTPAOC. Mathematical phantom patients (MPP) were defined using the assumed true (true MPP), mean (MPP 1A) and median (MPP 1B) parameter values of the patient group. Alterations of the degree of individualization were introduced to both mean and median patients by including patient-specific information as a priori knowledge: physical parameters and hematocrit (MPP 2A/2B). Successively, measurable individual biokinetic parameters were added: tumor volume V{sub tu} (MPP 3A/3B), glomerular filtration rate GFR (MPP 4A/4B), and tumor perfusion f{sub tu} (MPP 5A/5B). Furthermore, parameters of MPP 5A/5B and a simulated {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET measurement 60 min p.i. were used together with the population values used as Bayesian parameters (MPP 6A/6B). Therapeutic biodistributions were simulated assuming an infusion of {sup 90}Y-DOTATATE (3.3 GBq) over 30 min to all MPPs. Time-integrated activity coefficients were predicted for all MPPs and compared to the true MPPs for each patient in tumor, kidneys, spleen, liver, remainder, and whole body to obtain the relative differences RD. The large RD values of MPP 1A [RD{sub tumor} = (625 ± 1266)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 38)% ], and MPP 1B [RD{sub tumor} = (197 ± 505)%, RD{sub kidneys} = (11 ± 39)% ] demonstrate that individual treatment planning is needed due to large physiological differences between patients. Although addition of individual patient parameters reduced the

  19. Planning performance in schizophrenia patients: a meta-analysis of the influence of task difficulty and clinical and sociodemographic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, F; Viechtbauer, W; Leonhart, R; Nitschke, K; Kaller, C P

    2017-08-01

    Despite a large body of research on planning performance in adult schizophrenia patients, results of individual studies are equivocal, suggesting either no, moderate or severe planning deficits. This meta-analysis therefore aimed to quantify planning deficits in schizophrenia and to examine potential sources of the heterogeneity seen in the literature. The meta-analysis comprised outcomes of planning accuracy of 1377 schizophrenia patients and 1477 healthy controls from 31 different studies which assessed planning performance using tower tasks such as the Tower of London, the Tower of Hanoi and the Stockings of Cambridge. A meta-regression analysis was applied to assess the influence of potential moderator variables (i.e. sociodemographic and clinical variables as well as task difficulty). The findings indeed demonstrated a planning deficit in schizophrenia patients (mean effect size: ; 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.78) that was moderated by task difficulty in terms of the minimum number of moves required for a solution. The results did not reveal any significant relationship between the extent of planning deficits and sociodemographic or clinical variables. The current results provide first meta-analytic evidence for the commonly assumed impairments of planning performance in schizophrenia. Deficits are more likely to become manifest in problem items with higher demands on planning ahead, which may at least partly explain the heterogeneity of previous findings. As only a small fraction of studies reported coherent information on sample characteristics, future meta-analyses would benefit from more systematic reports on those variables.

  20. SU-F-T-336: A Quick Auto-Planning (QAP) Method for Patient Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, J; Zhang, Z; Wang, J; Xie, J; Lu, S; Zhao, J; Hu, W

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop a quick auto-planning system that permits fast patient IMRT planning with conformal dose to the target without manual field alignment and time-consuming dose distribution optimization. Methods: The planning target volume (PTV) of the source and the target patient were projected to the iso-center plane in certain beameye- view directions to derive the 2D projected shapes. Assuming the target interior was isotropic for each beam direction boundary analysis under polar coordinate was performed to map the source shape boundary to the target shape boundary to derive the source-to-target shape mapping function. The derived shape mapping function was used to morph the source beam aperture to the target beam aperture over all segments in each beam direction. The target beam weights were re-calculated to deliver the same dose to the reference point (iso-center) as the source beam did in the source plan. The approach was tested on two rectum patients (one source patient and one target patient). Results: The IMRT planning time by QAP was 5 seconds on a laptop computer. The dose volume histograms and the dose distribution showed the target patient had the similar PTV dose coverage and OAR dose sparing with the source patient. Conclusion: The QAP system can instantly and automatically finish the IMRT planning without dose optimization.

  1. Improving operational effectiveness of tactical master plans for emergency and elective patients under stochastic demand and capacitated resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Bekkers, J.A.; Dellaert, N.P.; Jeunet, J.; Vissers, J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a two-stage planning procedure for master planning of elective and emergency patients while allocating at best the available hospital resources. Four types of resources are considered: operating theatre, beds in the medium and in the intensive care units, and nursing hours in the

  2. Improving operational effectiveness of tactical master plans for emergency and elective patients under stochastic demand and capacitated resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Bekkers, J.A.; Dellaert, N.P.; Jeunet, J.; Vissers, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a two-stage planning procedure for master planning of elective and emergency patients while allocating at best the available hospital resources. Four types of resources are considered: operating theatre, beds in the medium and in the intensive care units, and nursing hours in the

  3. 75 FR 37242 - Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Under the Patient Protection and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... Requirements for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Under the Patient Protection and Affordable... Labor and the Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight of the U.S. Department of Health... guidance to employers, group health plans, and health insurance issuers providing group health insurance...

  4. 77 FR 47573 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 46 [REG-136008-11] RIN 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes... on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of certain self-insured health...

  5. Functional image guided radiation therapy planning in volumetric modulated arc therapy for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiko Doi, MD

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Significant reductions in fV5, fV10, fMLD, V5, and MLD were achieved with the functional image guided VMAT plan without negative effects on other factors. LAA-based functional image guided radiation therapy planning in VMAT is a feasible method to spare the functional lung in patients with MPM.

  6. Validation of intensity modulated radiation therapy patient plans with portal images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpon, G.; Warren, S.; Mahe, D.; Gaudaire, S.; Lisbona, A.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to show the feasibility of step and shoot intensity-modulated radiation therapy pre-treatment quality control for patients using the electronic portal imaging device (iViewGT) fitted on a Sli+ linac (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) instead of radiographic films. Since the beginning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatments, the dosimetric quality control necessary before treating each new patient has been a time-consuming and therefore costly obligation. In order to fully develop this technique, it seems absolutely essential to reduce the cost of these controls, especially the linac time. Up to now, verification of the relative dosimetry field by field has been achieved by acquiring radiographic films in the isocenter plane and comparing them to the results of the XiO planning system (Computerized Medical Systems, Missouri, USA) using RIT113 v4.1 software (Radiological Imaging Technology, Colorado, USA). A qualitative and quantitative evaluation was realised for every field of every patient. A quick and simple procedure was put into place to be able to make the same verifications using portal images. This new technique is not a modification of the overall methodology of analysis. The results achieved by comparing the measurement with the electronic portal imaging device and the calculation with the treatment planning system were in line with those achieved with the films for all indicators we studied (isodoses, horizontal and vertical dose profiles and gamma index). (authors)

  7. Patient autonomy and advance care planning: a qualitative study of oncologist and palliative care physicians' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephanie B; Butow, Phyllis N; Kerridge, Ian; Tattersall, Martin H N

    2018-02-01

    Patients' are encouraged to participate in advance care planning (ACP) in order to enhance their autonomy. However, controversy exists as to what it means to be autonomous and there is limited understanding of how social and structural factors may influence cancer patients' ability to exercise their autonomy. The objective of this study is to explore oncologists' and palliative care physicians' understanding of patient autonomy, how this influences reported enactment of decision-making at the end of life (EOL), and the role of ACP in EOL care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with consultant oncologists (n = 11) and palliative medicine doctors (n = 7) working in oncology centres and palliative care units across Australia. We found that doctors generally conceptualized autonomy in terms of freedom from interference but that there was a profound disconnect between this understanding of autonomy and clinical practice in EOL decision-making. The clinicians in our study privileged care, relationships and a 'good death' above patient autonomy, and in practice were reluctant to 'abandon' their patients to total non-interference in decision-making. Patient autonomy in healthcare is bounded, as while patients were generally encouraged to express their preferences for care, medical norms about the quality and 'reasonableness' of care, the availability of services and the patients' family relationships act to enhance or limit patients' capacity to realize their preferences. While for many, this disconnect between theory and practice did not diminish the rhetorical appeal of ACP; for others, this undermined the integrity of ACP, as well as its relevance to care. For some, ACP had little to do with patient autonomy and served numerous other ethical, practical and political functions. The ethical assumptions regarding patient autonomy embedded in academic literature and policy documents relating to ACP are disconnected from the realities of clinical care

  8. SU-E-T-622: Identification and Improvement of Patients Eligible for Dose Escalation with Matched Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, K; Holcombe, C; Kapp, D; Buyyounouski, M; Hancock, S; Xing, L; Atwood, T; King, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-therapy dose-escalation beyond 80Gy may improve tumor control rates for patients with localized prostate cancer. Since toxicity remains a concern, treatment planners must achieve dose-escalation while still adhering to dose-constraints for surrounding structures. Patientmatching is a machine-learning technique that identifies prior patients that dosimetrically match DVH parameters of target volumes and critical structures prior to actual treatment planning. We evaluated the feasibility of patient-matching in (1)identifying candidates for safe dose-escalation; and (2)improving DVH parameters for critical structures in actual dose-escalated plans. Methods: We analyzed DVH parameters from 319 historical treatment plans to determine which plans could achieve dose