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Sample records for nrx-a7 reactor

  1. Summary of loops in the Chalk River NRX and NRU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, D.T.

    1980-12-01

    The design and operating parameters of the high pressure, high temperature light water loops in the NRX and NRU reactors are presented to assist experimenters reviewing these facilities for their experiments. The NRX and NRU reactor design and operating data of interest to the experimenters are also presented. (author)

  2. NRX and NRU reactor research facilities and irradiation and examination charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-08-01

    This report details the irradiation and examination charges on the NRX and NRU reactors at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs. It describes the NRX and NRU research facilities available to external users. It describes the various experimental holes and loops available for research. It also outlines the method used to calculate the facilities charges and the procedure for applying to use the facilities as well as the billing procedures.

  3. The poisoning of NRX pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, W.H.

    1959-09-01

    The experimental methods used to study the poisoning of the NRX reactor are described and the operation of the reactor in relation to these methods is reviewed for the period February to September 1948. (author)

  4. Follow-up of CRNL employees involved in the NRX reactor clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.M.; Myers, D.K.; Morrison, D.P.

    1982-07-01

    Data available to date on the mortality of continuing and retired employees of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories are consistent with the Σhealthy workerΣ effect that has been observed in similar studies at other nuclear facilities. Because of an accident at the NRX research reactor in December 1952, the reactor was largely dismantled and rebuilt in 1953-54. These operations involved appreciable radiation exposures to a number of employees. The follow-up of the 850 on-site AECL staff involved in the clean-up has indicated that there were no unusual patterns in the mortality of this group when compared with those of the general population of Ontario

  5. The genesis of NRX - first stop on the road to CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2015-12-15

    The CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor family is traceable to World War Two and to certain principal players. They gave Canada an early entry into the world of practical nuclear energy with the NRX (National Research Experimental) reactor, developed under the auspices of the ABC (America, Britain, Canada) countries. The principal players on the NRX project were, in alphabetical order: James Chadwick, C.D. Howe, Leslie R. Groves and C-J. Mackenzie. Their careers up to about 1940 are outlined in Section 10. (author)

  6. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickerd, Meggan

    2013-01-01

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic

  7. Measurement of the stored energy in the NRX reactor reflector graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, H. B.; Larson, E. A.G.

    1959-07-15

    With the co-operation of workers at Windscale and Harwell, whose assistance is hereby gratefully acknowledged, the stored energy content of the inner reflector graphite of NRX has been measured. Measurements made at three different elevations and at different positions through the reflector show that there is, at present, no danger to NRX from an accidental release of the energy. The energy stored in the reflector in 1958 is less by a factor five to ten than the stored energy as measured in 1953. It appears that there has been a continual release of stored energy since 1954 when, after the rehabilitation, the maximum power was raised to 40 MW. Additional thermocouples have been installed in the inner reflector, and future stored energy measurements are being scheduled. (author)

  8. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90oF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.M.

    1956-11-01

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95 o F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe 3 O 4 . At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O 2 in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe 3 O 4 and γ-Fe 2 O 3 . At high pH with oxygen present Fe 3 O 4 predominated with some traces of Fe 2 O 3 . The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O 2 in the water 2 present and continual purification 2 present and no purification or pH control 2 present. (author)

  9. Research reactor put Canada in the nuclear big time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the NRX reactor is briefly recounted. When NRX started up in 1947, it was the most powerful neutron source in the world. It is now the oldest research reactor still operating. NRX had to be rebuilt after an accident in 1952, and its calandria was changed again in 1970. Loops in NRX were used to test fuel for the Nautilus submarine, and the first zircaloy pressure tube in the world. At the present time, NRX is in a 'hot standby' condition as a backup to the NRU reactor, which is used mainly for isotope production. NRX will be decommissioned after completion and startup of the new MAPLE-X reactor

  10. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90{sup o}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G. M.

    1956-11-15

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95{sup o}F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At high pH with oxygen present Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predominated with some traces of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O{sub 2} in the water < water at pH 7 with no O{sub 2} present and continual purification < water with no O{sub 2} present and no purification or pH control < water at pH 7 with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} present. (author)

  11. L-Area STS MTR/NRU/NRX Grapple Assembly Closure Mechanics Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    A review of the closure mechanics associated with the Shielded Transfer System (STS) MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly utilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was performed. This review was prompted by an operational event which occurred at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) utilizing a DTS-XL grapple assembly which is essentially identical to the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly used at the SRS. The CNL operational event occurred when a NRU/NRX fuel basket containing spent nuclear fuel assemblies was inadvertently released by the DTS-XL grapple assembly during a transfer. The SM review of the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly will examine the operational aspects of the STS and the engineered features of the STS which prevent such an event at the SRS. The design requirements for the STS NRU/NRX modifications and the overall layout of the STS are provided in other documents.

  12. Performance of the NRX shut-off rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, R.E.

    1965-08-01

    A new type of shut-off rod of electromechanical design was developed by the American Machine and Foundry Company for use in the NRX reactor following the accident of 1952. The new rods were installed in May, 1956, as part of the control system conversion program which was completed in 1958. Some problems were encountered with limit switch adjustment but minor modifications in design led to much improved operation. he performance of the rods also improved as more experience was gained in the maintenance and adjustment of the various headgear components. Each headgear is now overhauled once a year on a routine basis. The present design of shut-off rod is considered to be very satisfactory. There has only been one occasion when a shut-off rod has failed to come fully down on a trip. Rods have failed to operate correctly on five other occasions but these occurred during shutdown periods or when the reactor was being shutdown manually. (author)

  13. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  14. CRNL research reactor retrofit Emergency Filtration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of NRX and NRU research reactor effluent air treatment systems before describing the selection and design of an appropriate retrofit Emergency Filtration System (EFS) to serve these reactors and the future MX-10 isotope production reactor. The conceptual design of the EFS began in 1984. A standby concrete shielding filter-adsorber system, sized to serve the reactor with the largest exhaust flow, was selected. The standby system, bypassed under normal operating conditions, is equipped with normal exhaust stream shutoff and diversion valves to be activated manually when an emergency is anticipated, or automatically when emergency levels of gamma radiation are detected in the exhaust stream. The first phase of the EFS installation, that is the construction of the EFS and the connection of NRU to the system, was completed in 1987. The second phase of construction, which includes the connection of NRX and provisions for the future connection of MX-10, is to be completed in 1990

  15. Comparison Between Calculated and Measured Cross Section Changes in Natural Uranium Irradiated in NRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstroem, P E

    1961-03-15

    It is desirable to obtain an experimental check of the reliability of the methods currently used to determine reactivity changes in a reactor and, with a view to meeting this requirement to some extent, a preliminary comparison has been made between calculated and measured cross-section changes in rods of natural uranium irradiated in NRX. The measurements were made at Harwell in the GLEEP reactor and a description has been given by, inter alia, Ward and Craig. The theory of the calculations, which is briefly described in this report, has been indicated by Littler. The investigation showed that the methods for calculating burn up used at present provides a good illustration of the long-term variations in isotope contents. A satisfactory agreement is obtained with experimental results when calculating apparent cross-section changes in uranium rods due to irradiation if the fission cross- section for {sup 239}Pu is set to 780 b. This is 34 b higher than the figure quoted in BNL - 325 (1958). However, in order to get a good idea as to whether the calculated long-term variations in reactivity really correspond to reality, it is necessary to make further investigations. For this reason the results quoted in this report should be regarded as preliminary.

  16. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  17. Rationalization and future planning for AECL's research reactor capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    AECL's research reactor capability has played a crucial role in the development of Canada's nuclear program. All essential concepts for the CANDU reactors were developed and tested in the NRX and NRU reactors, and in parallel, important contributions to basic physics were made. The technical feasibility of advanced fuel cycles and of the organic-cooled option for CANDU reactors were also demonstrated in the two reactors and the WR-1 reactor. In addition, an important and growing radio-isotope production industry was established and marketed on a world-wide basis. In 1984, however, it was recognized that a review and rationalization of the research reactor capability was required. The commercial success of the CANDU reactor system had reduced the scope and size of the required development program. Limited research and development funding and competition from other research facilities and programs, required that the scope be reduced to a support basis essential to maintain strategic capability. Currently, AECL, is part-way through this rationalization program and completion should be attained during 1992/93 when the MAPLE reactor is operational and decisions on NRX decommissioning will be made. A companion paper describes some of the unique operational and maintenance problems which have resulted from this program and the solutions which have been developed. Future planning must recognize the age of the NRU reactor (currently 32 years) and the need to plan for eventual replacement. Strategy is being developed and supporting studies include a full technical assessment of the NRU reactor and the required age-related upgrading program, evaluation of the performance characteristics and costs of potential future replacement reactors, particularly the advanced MAPLE concept, and opportunities for international co-operation in developing mutually supportive research programs

  18. Detection of gaseous fission products in water - a method of monitoring fuel sheathing failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnicliffe, P. R.; Whittier, A. C.

    1959-05-15

    The gaseous activities stripped from samples of effluent coolant from the NRU fuel elements tested in the central thimble of the NRX reactor (NRU loop) and from the NRX main effluent have been investigated. The activities obtained from the NRU loop can be attributed to gaseous fission products only. Design data have been obtained for a 'Gaseous Fission Product Monitor' to be installed for use with the NRU reactor. It is expected that this monitor will have high sensitivity to activity indicative of an incipient fuel element sheath failure. No qualitative determination of the various gaseous activities obtained from the NRX effluent has been made. A strong component of 25 {+-}1 seconds half-life is not consistent with O-19. Limited information concerning sheath failures in NRX was obtained. Of six failures observed in parallel with the installed delayed neutron monitors, three of these gave pre-warnings and in each case the gaseous fission product monitor showed a substantially greater sensitivity. An experiment in which small samples of uranium, inserted into the NRX reactor, could be exposed at will to a stream of water showed the behaviour of the two types of monitors to be similar. However, a number of signals were detected only by the gaseous fission product monitor. These can be attributed to its sensitivity to relatively long lived fission products. (author)

  19. An analysis of water reactor burnup data with the METHUSELAH II code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, M.; Hicks, D.

    1964-10-01

    The METHUSELAH II code has been used to predict long term reactivity and isotopic changes in the YANKEE, Dresden and NRX reactors. In general it is shown that there is a satisfactory measure of agreement and the first core lives of YANKEE and Dresden appear well predicted. However there are discrepancies in the isotopic composition of the plutonium formed which appear to be correlated with the degree of hardness of the reactor spectrum. It is demonstrated that plausible changes in nuclear data could reduce the discrepancies. (author)

  20. Power auxiliaries and research reactors. Section 3 of Symposium on the peaceful uses of atomic energy in Australia, 1958, held in Sydney, in June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-10-15

    The problems of disposing of the large amounts of highly-radioactive waste resulting from a large-scale nuclear power program are reviewed. The Canadian research reactor NRX is discussed. The DIDO reactor is briefly described and operating experience for the first year at high flux is summarized. The core of the High Flux Australian Research Reactor (HIFAR) is described, and some reactivity balance data are given (T.R.H.)

  1. The development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraday, M A; Belanger, L; Grolway, C M [AECL, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Foo, M T [CRNL, Combustion Engineering Superheater Ltd., Moncton, NB (Canada)

    1983-08-01

    As part of the world wide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt% U alloy and Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt% U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behaviour of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behaviour in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of A-37 wt% U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used. (author)

  2. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochaski, R.O.

    1962-07-01

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  3. Calculation of fast neutron flux in reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, P. C. [Canadian General Electric (Canada)

    1968-07-15

    The computer program EPITHET was used to calculate the fast neutron flux (>1 MeV) in several reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities in order to compare the fast neutron flux in the different cases and to provide a self-consistent set of flux values which may be used to relate creep strain to fast neutron flux . The facilities considered are shown below together with the calculated fast neutron flux (>1 MeV). Fast flux 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}s: NPD 1.14, Douglas Point 2.66, Pickering 2.89, Gentilly 2.35, SGHWR 3.65, NRU U-1 and U-2 3.25'' pressure tube - 19 element fuel 3.05, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 28 element fuel 3.18, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 18 element fuel 2.90, NRX X-5 0.88, PRTR Mk I fuel 2.81, PRTR HPD fuel 3.52, WR-1 2.73, Mk IV creep machine (NRX) 0.85, Mk VI creep machine (NRU) 2.04, Biaxial creep insert (NRU U-49) 2.61.

  4. 9 CFR 78.7 - Brucellosis reactor cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brucellosis reactor cattle. 78.7... Restrictions on Interstate Movement of Cattle Because of Brucellosis § 78.7 Brucellosis reactor cattle. (a) Destination. Brucellosis reactor cattle may be moved interstate only for immediate slaughter as follows: (1...

  5. An estimate of the reactivity of assemblies of NRX fuel elements in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.G.

    1960-03-01

    This report contains calculations on the criticality of assemblies of NRX fuel elements in light water. The elements are dealt with in three sections, 'X rods' of natural uranium, enriched elements of U 235 /A1 alloy and enriched elements of Pu/Al alloy. Values of k ∞ and B 2 are provided for two fuel concentrations for each of the two enriched types and for a range of irradiations of the X rods. The calculations for the X rods provide maximum and minimum values of k ∞ . The maximum values for some lattices are a few per cent above unity. Unfortunately, the present experimental evidence does not prove that it is impossible to achieve values of k ∞ greater than unity in lattices of natural uranium in light water. Hence for safety predictions maximum values have been used. The resulting restrictions are not very severe. It is possible to make critical assemblies of the enriched elements, Part (5) contains a set of recommended minimum spacings such that elements of all kinds may safely be mixed in a stack together. There are also predictions of the minimum critical numbers of complete elements or elements cut into slugs. (author)

  6. Irradiation of defected SAP clad UO2 fuel in the X-7 organic loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.; Cracknell, A.G.; MacDonald, R.D.

    1961-10-01

    This report describes an experiment designed to test the behaviour under irradiation of a UO 2 fuel specimen clad in a defected SAP sheath and cooled by recirculating organic liquid. The specimen containing the defect was irradiated in the X-7 loop in the NRX reactor from the 25th of November until the 13th of December 1960. Up to the 13th of December the behaviour was analogous to that seen with defected UO 2 specimens clad in zircaloy which were irradiated in water loops. Reactor power transients resulted in peaking of gamma ray activities in the loop, but on steady operation these activities tended to fall to a steady state level, Over this period the pressure drop across the fuel increased by a factor of two, the increases occurring after reactor shut downs and start ups. On 13th December the pressure drop increased rapidly, after a reactor shut down and start up, to over five times its original value and the activities in the loop rose to a high level. The specimen was removed and examination showed that the sheath was very badly split and that the volume between the fuel and the sheath was filled with a hard black organic substance. This report gives full details of the irradiation and of the post -irradiation examination. Correlation of the observed phenomenon is attempted and a preliminary assessment of the problems which would be associated with defect fuel in an organic reactor is given. (author)

  7. Effects of heat and pressure on the swelling of irradiated uranium. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churcman, A. T.; Barnes, R. S.; Cottrell, A. H.

    1956-09-15

    Small pieces of a natural uranium fuel bar from the NRX reactor which had been irradiated to 0.3 - 0.4% burn up have been heat treated either in vacuo or at high pressure and changes in their density measured.

  8. Application of MCNPX 2.7.D for reactor core management at the research reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalcheva, Silva; Koonen, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    The paper discusses application of the Monte Carlo burn up code MCNPX 2.7.D for whole core criticality and depletion analysis of the Material Testing Research Reactor BR2 at SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium. Two different approaches in the use of MCNPX 2.7.D are presented. The first methodology couples the evolution of fuel depletion, evaluated by MCNPX 2.7.D in an infinite lattice with a steady-state 3-D power distribution in the full core model. The second method represents fully automatic whole core depletion and criticality calculations in the detailed 3-D heterogeneous geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The accuracy of the method and computational time as function of the number of used unique burn up materials in the model are being studied. The depletion capabilities of MCNPX 2.7.D are compared vs. the developed at the BR2 reactor department MCNPX & ORIGEN-S combined method. Testing of MCNPX 2.7.D on the criticality measurements at the BR2 reactor is presented. (author)

  9. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  10. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yongjun; Ding Jiandong; Lei Lecheng; Zhang Xingwang

    2014-01-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10 −9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10 −9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10 −2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10 −2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation

  11. The MAPLE-X concept dedicated to the production of radio-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeds, W.

    1985-06-01

    MAPLE is a versatile new Canadian multi-purpose research reactor concept that meets the nuclear aspirations of developing countries. It is planned to convert the NRX reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories into MAPLE-X as a demonstration prototype of this concept and thereafter to dedicate its operation to the production of radio-isotopes. A description of MAPLE-X and details of molybdenum-99 production are given

  12. Enhanced decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 in a continuous UASB reactor with quinones as redox mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Zee, van der F.P.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The reductive biotransformation of acid orange 7 (AO7) was explored in a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at low hydraulic residence times (HRT). A colour removal of 85% was achieved when the reactor was operated at a HRT of 6 hours, but decreased up to 70% when the HRT was

  13. Future development in heavy water reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, J.; Hart, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    1982 marks the 35th anniversary of the start-up of Canada's first research and test reactor, NRX. Its first power reactor has been operating successfully for the past 20 years. With 5,000 MWe of domestic capacity installed, Canada's major CANDU (Canada Deuterium, Uranium) nuclear program has a further 9,500 MWe under construction in Canada for completion by 1990 as well as committed offshore projects in Argentina, Korea and Romania. The CANDU operating record, by any measure of performance, has been outstanding. This performance is largely due to the discipline imposed on the development, design, construction and operation by two fundamental choices: natural uranium and heavy water. The impact of these two choices on availability, fuel utilization, safety and economics is discussed. Future plans call for building on those characteristics which have made CANDU so successful. When time for change comes, current assessments indicate that it will be possible to convert to more efficient advanced fuel cycles without major changes to the basic CANDU design. Primary attention is being focussed on thorium fuel cycles to ensure an abundant and continuing supply of low cost energy for the long term. The resource savings available from these fuel cycles in expanding systems are reviewed and compared with those available from LWR's and Fast Breeders. The results clearly illustrate the versatility of the CANDU reactor. It can benefit from enrichment plants or get along without them. It can complement LWR's or compete with them. It can complement Fast Breeder Reactors or compete with them as well. In the very long term CANDU's and Fast Breeders combined offer the potential of burning all the world's uranium and all the world's thorium. (author)

  14. The behaviour of zirconium alloys in Santowax OM organic coolant at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatzky, A.

    1964-10-01

    Zirconium alloys have been exposed to Santowax OM at temperatures of 320 to 400 o C for times as long as 5000 hours. Short-term experiments (less than 2 weeks) were done in stainless-steel bombs and small out-of-pile loops. The X-7 organic loop in the NRX reactor was used to study long-term oxidation and hydriding both in-flux and out-of-flux. The results obtained lead to several tentative conclusions: Aluminum cladding serves as an effective hydrogen barrier; Considerable protection against hydriding is given by zirconium oxide, provided impurities in the organic are carefully controlled; Hydriding is greatly enhanced by the presence of chlorine in the coolant; and, Hydriding is somewhat enhanced by neutron irradiation. Of considerable significance is the fact that a Zircaloy-4 in-reactor test section of the X-7 loop was exposed to Santowax OM at 320 to 400 o C for more than 5000 hours without excessive hydriding. (author)

  15. Syngas fermentation by Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 in a horizontal rotating packed bed biofilm reactor with enhanced ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanwen; Brown, Robert C.; Wen, Zhiyou

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel a horizontal rotating packed bed (h-RPB) reactor for syngas fermentation was reported. • The h-RPB reactor enhanced ethanol productivity by 3.3-folds compared to continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). • The h-RPB reactor has a unique feature of transfer gas from both bulk liquid phase and headspace phase. • The mass transfer in the headspace of h-PRB played an important role for enhanced ethanol production. - Abstract: Gasification of lignocellulosic biomass followed by syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals. Syngas fermentation, however, is commonly limited by low mass transfer rates. In this work, a horizontally oriented rotating packed bed (h-RPB) reactor was developed to improve mass transfer and enhance ethanol production. In the h-RPB reactor, cell attachment materials were packed in the reactor and half submerged in the liquid and half exposed to the headspace. With continuous rotation of the packing materials, the cells in biofilm were alternately in contact with liquid and headspace; thus, transport of syngas to the cells occurred in both the liquid phase and headspace. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k_La) of the h-RPB reactor was lower than that in a traditional continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR), indicating the mass transfer in the liquid phase of h-PRB was lower than CSTR, and the mass transfer in the headspace phase played an important role in syngas fermentation. The syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 in h-RPB resulted in a 7.0 g/L titer and 6.7 g/L/day productivity of ethanol, respectively, 3.3 times higher than those obtained in a CSTR under the same operational conditions. The results demonstrate that the h-RPB reactor is an efficient system for syngas fermentation, making cellulosic ethanol biorefinery one step closer to technical and economic feasibility.

  16. Diagrams about RA reactor operation, Annex 7; Prilog 7 - Rad reaktora RA po godinama - dijagrami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinc, R [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1976-01-15

    This Annex 7 includes diagrams about RA reactor operation (MWh) from 1960-1975; mean values of reactor power per day and month in 1975, and percent of utilisation of experimental space during 1975. [Serbo-Croat] Ovaj prilog sadrzi dijagrame o radu reaktora (MWh) po godinama (1960-1975); srednje vrednosti dnevne snage reaktora u 1975. godini; rad reakrora (MWh) po mesecima u 1975; procenat iskoriscenja eksperimentalnog prostora u 1975. godini.

  17. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 3, Sessions 12-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 3, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, ad the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected abstracts have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  19. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 2, Sessions 6-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 2, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Volume 1, Sessions 1-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [comps.] [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document, Volume 1, includes papers presented at the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics (NURETH-7) September 10--15, 1995 at Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following subjects are discussed: Progress in analytical and experimental work on the fundamentals of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Also combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  1. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus

    2009-01-01

    , phenotypically overlapping with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. With a frequency of at least 1% in our cohort of 179 patients, recessive defects in CNTNAP2 appear to significantly contribute to severe MR. Whereas the established synaptic role of NRXN1 suggests that synaptic defects contribute to the associated...... protein can reorganize synaptic morphology and induce increased density of active zones, the synaptic domains of neurotransmitter release. Moreover, both Nrx-I and Nrx-IV determine the level of the presynaptic active-zone protein bruchpilot, indicating a possible common molecular mechanism in Nrx...

  2. Status of IVO-FR2-Vg7 experiment for irradiation of fast reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elbel, H.; Kummerer, K.; Bojarsky, K.; Lopez Jimenez, J.; Otero de la Gandara, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Report on the Seminar celebrated in Madrid between KfK (Karlsruhe) and JEN (Madrid) concerning a Joint Irradiation Program of Fast Reactor Fuel Rods. The design of fuel rods in general is defined, and, in particular of those with a density 94% DT and diameter 7.6 mm up to a burn-up of 7% FIMA, to be irradiated in the FR2 Reactor (Karlsruhe). Together with the design of NaK and single-wall capsules used in this irradiation, other possibilities of irradiation in the reactor will also be described. (auth.)

  3. Atmospherically dispersed radiocarbon at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, G.M.; Brown, R.M.; Repta, C.J.W.; Selkirk, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    A small percentage of the total radiocarbon produced by the NRX and NRU experimental reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories has been vented from the main reactor stack and atmospherically dispersed across the site. Surveys conducted in 1982-83 and 1993-94 have shown that atmospheric levels more than 50 m from the stack are never greater than 600 Bq.kg -1 carbon above the natural background level, falling to near-global atmospheric levels at the site boundaries roughly 7 km away. A dispersion factor > 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 .s -1 at ∼ 0.75 km distance from the point of emission is calculated on the basis of recent in-stack monitoring. Analysis of growth rings in on-site trees has provided an opportunity to search for correlations of 14 C output summer power production and/or moderator losses. (author). 16 refs., 14 tabs., 11 figs

  4. Design and construction of a 7,500 liter immobilized cell reactor-separator for ethanol production from whey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, M.C.

    1992-12-31

    A 7,500 liter reactor/separator has been constructed for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey permeate. This unit is sited in Hopkinton IA, across the street from a whey generating cheese plant A two phase construction project consisting of (1) building and testing a reactor/separator with a solvent absorber in a single unified housing, and (2) building and testing an extractive distillation/product stripper for the recovery of anhydrous ethanol is under way. The design capacity of this unit is 250,000 gal/yr of anhydrous product. Design and construction details of the reactor/absorber separator are given, and design parameters for the extractive distillation system are described.

  5. Early years of nuclear energy research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    The first experimental attempts in Canada to obtain energy from uranium fission were carried out by the author in the Ottawa laboratories of the National Research Council from 1940 to 42. This program grew into a joint British-Canadian laboratory in Montreal. Work done at this laboratory, which moved to Chalk River in 1946, led to the construction of ZEEP (the first nuclear reactor to operate outside of the United States) NRX, and ultimately to the development of the CANDU power reactors. People involved in the work and events along the way are covered in detail. (LL)

  6. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code

  7. An approach of raising the low power reactor trip block (P-7) in Maanshan Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.C.

    1984-01-01

    The technical specification for the Maanshan Nuclear Power Station (FSAR Table 16.2.2-3) requires that with an increasing reactor power level above the setpoint of low power reactor trip block (P-7), a turbine trip shall initiate a reactor trip. This anticipatory reactor trip on turbine trip prevents the pressurizer PORV from openning during turbine trip event. In order to reduce unnecessary reactor trip due to turbine trip on low reactor power level during Maanshan start-up stage, Taiwan Power Company performed a transient analysis for turbine trip event by using RETRAN code. The highest reactor power level at which a turbine trip will not open the pressurizer PORV is searched. The results demonstrated that this power level can be increased from the original value-10% of the rated thermal power-to about 48% of the rated thermal power

  8. Summary report of the 7th reduced-moderation water reactor workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akie, Hiroshi; Nabeshima, Kunihiko; Uchikawa, Sadao

    2005-08-01

    As a research on the future innovative water reactor, the development of Reduced-Moderation Water Reactors (RMWRs) has been performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The workshop on RMWRs is aiming at information exchange between JAERI and other organizations such as universities, laboratories, utilities and vendors, and has been held every year since 1998. The 7th workshop was held on March 5, 2004 under the joint auspices of JAERI and North Kanto branch of Atomic Energy Society of Japan. The program of the workshop was composed of 5 lectures and an overall discussion time. The workshop started with the lecture by JAERI on the status and future program of PMWR research and development, followed by the two presentations by JAERI and Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, respectively, on the investigation and evaluation of water cooled reactor in Feasibility Study Program on Commercialized Fast Reactor Systems. The lectures were also made on the Japan's nuclear fuel cycle and scenarios for RMWRs deployment by JAERI, and on the next generation reactor development activity by Hitachi, Ltd. The main subjects of the overall discussion time were Na cooled fast reactor, deployment effects of RMWRs and the future plan of the RMWR research and development. This report includes the original papers presented at the workshop and summaries of the questions and answers for each lecture, as well as of the discussion time. In addition in the Appendices, there are included presentation handouts of each lecture, program of the workshop and the participants list. (author)

  9. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Neutronics of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Hansen, G.E.

    1977-11-01

    The study was made to investigate the neutronic feasibility of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor. Three reactor concepts were studied: four- and seven-cell radial reactors and a seven-cell scallop reactor. The reactors were fueled with UF 6 (either U-233 or U-235) and various parameters were varied. A four-cell reactor is not practical nor is the U-235 fueled seven-cell radial reactor; however, the 7-cell U-233 radial and scallop reactors can satisfy all design criteria. The mixed flow gas core reactor is a very attractive reactor concept and warrants further investigation

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW to design new control safety rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoushtari, M.K.; Kakavand, T. [Faculty of Science, University of Zanjan, Zanjan, P.O. Box 451-313 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadat Kiai, S.M., E-mail: sadatkiai@yahoo.co [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTR), Nuclear Science Research, A.E.O.I., P.O. Box 14155-1339, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaforian, H. [Faculty of Science and Technology of Marine, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation has been established for a research reactor with nominal power of 7 MW. A detailed model of the reactor core was employed including standard and control fuel elements, reflectors, irradiation channels, control rods, reactor pool and thermal column. The following physical parameters of reactor core were calculated for the present LEU core: core reactivity (rho), control rod (CR) worth, thermal and epithermal neutron flux distributions, shutdown margin and delayed neutron fraction. Reduction of unfavorable effects of blockage probability of control safety rod (CSR)s in their interiors because of not enough space in their sites, and lack of suitable capabilities to fabricate very thin plates for CSR cladding, is the main aim of the present study. Making the absorber rod thinner and CSR cladding thicker by introducing a better blackness absorbing material and a new stainless steel alloy, respectively, are two studied ways to reduce the effects of mentioned problems.

  12. Testing of a 7-tube palladium membrane reactor for potential use in TEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, Bryan J.; Trujillo, Stephen; Willms, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    A Palladium Membrane Reactor (PMR) consists of a palladium/silver membrane permeator filled with catalyst (catalyst may be inside or outside the membrane tubes). The PMR is designed to recover tritium from the methane, water, and other impurities present in fusion reactor effluent. A key feature of a PMR is that the total hydrogen isotope content of a stream is significantly reduced as (1) methane-steam reforming and/or water-gas shift reactions proceed on the catalyst bed and (2) hydrogen isotopes are removed via permeation through the membrane. With a PMR design matched to processing requirements, nearly complete hydrogen isotope removals can be achieved. A 3-tube PMR study was recently completed. From the results presented in this study, it was possible to conclude that a PMR is appropriate for TEP, perforated metal tube protectors function well, platinum on aluminum (PtA) catalyst performs the best, conditioning with air is probably required to properly condition the Pd/Ag tubes, and that CO/CO 2 ratios maybe an indicator of coking. The 3-tube PMR had a permeator membrane area of 0.0247 m 2 and a catalyst volume to membrane area ratio of 4.63 cc/cm 2 (with the catalyst on the outside of the membrane tubes and the catalyst only covering the membrane tube length). A PMR for TEP will require a larger membrane area (perhaps 0.35 m 2 ). With this in mind, an intermediate sized PMR was constructed. This PMR has 7 permeator tubes and a total membrane area of 0.0851 m 2 . The catalyst volume to membrane area ratio for the 7-tube PMR was 5.18 cc/cm 2 . The total membrane area of the 7-tube PMR (0.0851 m 2 ) is 3.45 times larger than total membrane area of the 3-tube PMR (0.0247 m 2 ). The following objectives were identified for the 7-tube PMR tests: (1) Refine test measurements, especially humidity and flow; (2) Refine maintenance procedures for Pd/Ag tube conditioning; (3) Evaluate baseline PMR operating conditions; (4) Determine PMR scaling method; (5) Evaluate PMR

  13. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Cupac, S.; Stanic, A.

    1990-01-01

    RA reactor was not operated during the past five years due to the renewal and reconstruction of the reactor systems, which in underway. In the period from 1986-1990, reactor was operated only 144 MWh in 1986, for the need of testing the reactor systems and possibility of irradiating 125 I. Reactor will not be operated in 1991 because of the exchange of complete instrumentation which is planned to be finished by the end of 1991. It is expected to start operation in May 1992. That is why this annex includes the plan of reactor operation for period of nine months starting from from the moment of start-up. It is planned to operate the reactor at 0.02 MW power first three months, to increase the power gradually and reach 3.5 MW after 8 months of operation. It is foreseen to operate the reactor at 4.7 MW from the tenth month on [sr

  14. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1995 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loika, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY-1995 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan, DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1995 MYPP. Following direction given by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on December 15, 1993, Advanced Reactors Transition (ART), previously known as Advanced Reactors, will provide the planning and perform the necessary activities for placing the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition. The DOE goal is to accomplish the shutdown in approximately five years. The Advanced Reactors Transition Multi-Year Program Plan, and the supporting documents; i.e., the FFTF Shutdown Program Plan and the FFTF Shutdown Project Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS), are defined for the life of the Program. During the transition period to achieve the Shutdown end-state, the facilities and systems will continue to be maintained in a safe and environmentally sound condition. Additionally, facilities that were associated with the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Programs, and are no longer required to support the Liquid Metal Reactor Program will be deactivated and transferred to an alternate sponsor or the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program for final disposition, as appropriate

  15. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  16. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7. Model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2013-07-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method of FEMAXI-7, and its improvements and extensions. (author)

  17. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7; model and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2011-03-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, and improvements and extensions. (author)

  18. IGORR 7: Proceedings of the 7. meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    According to the subjects covered the papers presented at the meeting were divided into following sessions: New research reactor projects; secondary neutron sources; New research reactor facilities; Improvement of Research Reactors Facilities; Research and Development Needs

  19. Informal presentations by fuel fabricators and others [contributed by W. Ross, U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is representing the the attitude of only one of the major offices of NRC. This is Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations. Under this office regulates all phases, safety and environmental and safeguard aspects, of about 70 power reactors and about 70 non-power reactors. Another portion of NRC is the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. Under this office is regulated the licensing activities of around 600 licensees of all types. Including all licenses of transportation, import-export, and such as this, as well as special nuclear materials not related to the use of reactors. So when we talk about regulating the use and the protection of special nuclear materials, we are talking about all types of special nuclear materials, not just the type that is used in a reactor. Consequently, when a review is being made, such as now being made at the direction of the Commission to see if relaxation of regulations can be given to reduced enrichment, it is not only under the auspices of the Office of nuclear reactor regulations, but also of this other office. Therefore, it has to be more or less a policy statement of the Commission. As far as current regulations are concerned, the NRC has one threshold: it's either above 20% enrichment or it's below 20% enrichment. We are going to look and see if the SNM license in this area as well as the SNM license in that area can be changed so that some intermediate regulations can be applied to the steps in between 90% and 20%. We also regulate on the basis of the kilogram formula quantity. Most of our most stringent regulations are based on te possession of kilograms of highly enriched uranium. If uranium enrichment is dropped to the 45-50% level, then the composition of the alloys would have to increase from 21 wt.% (NRU) or 28 wt.% (NRX) to somewhere in region of 40 to 50%, possibly more. We know that the Al-40 wt.% U alloy can be extruded to the required diameter. We also know that the alloy is more brittle than the

  20. Enhancing mass transfer and ethanol production in syngas fermentation of Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 through a monolithic biofilm reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Yanwen; Brown, Robert; Wen, Zhiyou

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Syngas fermentation process is limited by gas-to-liquid mass transfer. • A novel monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) for efficient mass transfer was developed. • MBR with slug flow resulted in higher k L a than bubble column reactor (BCR). • MBR enhanced ethanol productivity by 53% compared to BCR. • MBR was demonstrated as a promising reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. - Abstract: Syngas fermentation is a promising process for producing fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Currently syngas fermentation faces several engineering challenges, with gas-to-liquid mass transfer limitation representing the major bottleneck. The aim of this work is to evaluate the performance of a monolithic biofilm reactor (MBR) as a novel reactor configuration for syngas fermentation. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient (k L a) of the MBR was evaluated in abiotic conditions within a wide range of gas flow rates (i.e., gas velocity in monolithic channels) and liquid flow rates (i.e., liquid velocity in the channels). The k L a values of the MBR were higher than those of a controlled bubble column reactor (BCR) in certain conditions, due to the slug flow pattern in the monolithic channels. A continuous syngas fermentation using Clostridium carboxidivorans P7 was conducted in the MBR system under varying operational conditions, with the variables including syngas flow rate, liquid recirculation between the monolithic column and reservoir, and dilution rate. It was found that the syngas fermentation performance – measured by such parameters as syngas utilization efficiency, ethanol concentration and productivity, and ratio of ethanol to acetic acid – depended not only on the mass transfer efficiency but also on the biofouling or abrading of the biofilm attached on the monolithic channel wall. At a condition of 300 mL/min of syngas flow rate, 500 mL/min of liquid flow rate, and 0.48 day −1 of dilution rate, the MBR produced much higher

  1. Digital computer control on Canadian nuclear power plants -experience to date and the future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, A.

    1977-10-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the digital computer control system at Pickering through the years 1973 to 1976. This evaluation is based on a study of the Pickering Generating Station operating records. The paper goes on to explore future computer architectures and the advantages that could accrue from a distributed system approach. Also outlined are the steps being taken to develop these ideas further in the context of two Chalk River projects - REDNET, an advanced data acquisition system being installed to process information from engineering experiments in NRX and NRU reactors, and CRIP, a prototype communications network using cable television technology. (author)

  2. Digital reactor period meter type of NSSG-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowacki, S W

    1981-01-01

    The paper presents the idea and electronic circuits of the Digital Reactor Period Meter. The instrument consists of a neutron ionisation chamber, the amplifier logarithming the output chamber current, the circuit taking two samples of the log amplifier output signal and subtracting them, the analog -to -digital dividing circuit and the scaler providing the final information of the reactor period value in seconds and in the digital form. Besides it, the instrument produces the acoustic signal in the case, when the rise-time of neutron flux exceeds the permitted value. The untypical construction of the reactor period meter has been developed to obtain both good measurement accuracy and the resistance against the electromagnetic background pulses interfering with the measuring process. The applied measuring system has been patented.

  3. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management

  4. Mortality among long-term Chalk River employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.M.; Myers, D.K.

    1986-12-01

    Mortality among Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory (CRNL) employees who died during employment or after retirement has been updated to 1985 December 31. Data in tabular form are presented for overall mortality for male and female employees, for the participants in the clean-up for the NRX and NRU reactor accidents and for a group of CRNL staff with lifetime accumulative doses in excess of 0.2 Sv. Data are also presented on the different types of cancer causing death among male employees. No statistically significant increases in cancer deaths were found in any of the groups analyzed. 25 refs

  5. Fast Reactor Physics. Vol. II. Proceedings of a Symposium on Fast Reactor Physics and Related Safety Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Karlsruhe, 30 October - 3 November 1967. The meeting was attended by 183 scientists from 23 countries and three international organizations. Contents: (Vol.1) Review of national programmes (5 papers); Nuclear data for fast reactors (12 papers); Experimental methods (3 papers); Zoned systems (7 papers); Kinetics (7 papers). (Vol.11) Fast critical experiments (8 papers); Heterogeneity in fast critical experiments (5 papers); Fast power reactors (13 papers); Fast pulsed reactors (3 papers); Panel discussion. Each paper is in its original language (50 English, 11 French and 3 Russian) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  6. Project management lessons learned from building the Wendelstein 7-x stellerator fusion research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire-Gormaly, M.; Gittens, A.; Zhang, L., E-mail: m.freire.gormaly@utoronto.ca, E-mail: antonio.gittens@mail.utoronto.ca, E-mail: lavender.zhang@outlook.com [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is the world's largest 'stellerator' nuclear fusion reactor being commissioned in Greifswald, Germany. It will inform the international fusion energy test device (ITER). The complexity of W7- X added challenges since industrial expertise to manufacture components did not exist. The construction was completed eight years behind schedule and almost 100% over budget. Key take-away lessons in project management were revealed from W7-X which can be applied to any nuclear project. These lessons are aligned with the project management knowledge areas of schedule, stakeholder, procurement, scope, schedule, cost, communication, risk, quality, human resources and procurement management. (author)

  7. Project management lessons learned from building the Wendelstein 7-x stellerator fusion research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire-Gormaly, M.; Gittens, A.; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is the world's largest 'stellerator' nuclear fusion reactor being commissioned in Greifswald, Germany. It will inform the international fusion energy test device (ITER). The complexity of W7- X added challenges since industrial expertise to manufacture components did not exist. The construction was completed eight years behind schedule and almost 100% over budget. Key take-away lessons in project management were revealed from W7-X which can be applied to any nuclear project. These lessons are aligned with the project management knowledge areas of schedule, stakeholder, procurement, scope, schedule, cost, communication, risk, quality, human resources and procurement management. (author)

  8. Reactor of the XXI century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhotabaev, Zh.R.; Solov'ev, Yu.A.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of both molten salt reactors (MSR) and homogenous molten salt reactors (HMSR) are illuminated. It is noted that the MSR possess accident probability A=10 -6 1/reactor.years and the HMSR with integral configuration has A=10 -7 1/reactor.years. The methods for these reactors technological problems solution - tritium removal, salt melt circulation and capacity pick up - are discussed

  9. In-pile critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer measurements – A historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, D.C., E-mail: degroeneveld@gmail.com

    2017-06-15

    In the 1960s’ and 1970s’ Canada was a world leader in performing in-reactor heat transfer experiments on fuel bundles instrumented with miniature sheath thermocouples. Several Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and Post-CHF experiments were performed in Chalk River’s NRU and NRX reactors on water-cooled 3-, 18-, 19-, 21-, and 36-element fuel bundles. Most experiments were obtained at steady-state conditions, where the power was raised gradually from single-phase conditions up to the CHF and beyond. Occasionally, post-dryout temperatures up to 600 °C were maintained for several hours. In some tests, the fuel behaviour during loss-of-flow and blowdown transients was investigated – during these transients sheath temperatures could exceed 2000 °C. Because of the increasingly more stringent licensing requirements for in-pile heat transfer tests on instrumented fuel bundles, no in-pile CHF and post-dryout tests on fuel bundles have been performed anywhere in the world for the past 40 years. This paper provides details of these unique in-pile experiments and describes some of their heat transfer results.

  10. PLUS7TM In-Reactor Operating Performance and Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyutae; Jang, Youngki; Choi, Joonhyung; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Yoonho; Suh, Jungmin

    2006-01-01

    KNFC has developed an advanced fuel, PLUS7 TM , for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants(KSNPs) through the joint development program with Westinghouse. With the help of various out-of-pile tests, it is found that the PLUS7 TM shows much better performance than the current fuel, GUARDIAN TM from the safety and economy points of view. Now four Lead Test Assembles(LTAs) of the PLUS7 TM are being irradiated for the 3 rd cycle after the successful completion of the 1 st and 2 nd irradiation cycles. During the 1 st and 2 nd irradiation cycles, no fuel failure was observed at LTAs and their nuclear-related parameters matched their design values well. During the overhaul period, on the other hand, pool side examinations were performed for four LTAs to generate key in-reactor fuel performance data such as fuel rod and assembly growths, fuel rod-to-top nozzle gap, fuel assembly bow and twist, fuel rod bow, spacer grid width, fuel rod diameter and fuel rod oxide layer thickness. It is found that all measured values are bounded by upper and lower predicted ones. The detailed economic analyses have shown that significant fuel cycle cost can be reduced by more than one million dollars per cycle of one KSNP with the introduction of the PLUS7 TM assembly. Furthermore, more than one hundred million dollars with power up-rating of 5% can be saved annually for currently operating eight KSNPs, which is easily and safety achievable with the PLUS7 TM assembly

  11. Calculation of the transmutation rates of Tc-99, I-129 and Cs-135 in the High Flux Reactor, in the Phenix Reactor and in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bultman, J.

    1992-04-01

    Transmutation of long-lived fission products is of interest for the reduction of the possible dose to the population resulting from long-term leakage of nuclear waste from waste disposals. Three isotopes are of special interest: Tc-99, I-129 and Cs-135. Therefore, experiments on transmutation of these isotopes in nuclear reactors are planned. In the present study, the possible transmutation rates and mass reductions are determined for experiments in High Flux Reactor (HFR) located in Petten (Netherlands) and in Phenix (France). Also, rates were determined for a standard Light Water Reactor (LWR). The transmutation rates of the 3 fission products will be much higher in HFR than in Phenix reactor, as both total flux and effective cross sections are higher. For thick targets the effective half lives are approximately 3, 2 and 7 years for Tc-99, I-129 and Cs-135 irradiation respectively in HFR and 22, 16 and 40 years for Tc-99, I-129 and Cs-135 irradiation in Phenix reactor. The transmutation rates in LWR are low. Only the relatively large power of LWR guarantees a large total mass reduction. Especially transmutation of Cs-135 will be very difficult in Phenix and LWR, clearly shown by the very long effective half lives of 40 and 100 years, respectively. (author). 7 refs.; 5 figs.; 7 tabs

  12. Distributed control and instrumentation systems for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1976-01-01

    The centralized dual computer system philosophy has evolved as the key concept underlying the highly successful application of direct digital control in CANDU power reactors. After more than a decade, this basis philosophy bears re-examination in the light of advances in system concepts--notably distributed architectures. A number of related experimental programs, all aimed at exploring the prospects of applying distributed systems in Canadian nuclear power plants are discussed. It was realized from the outset that the successful application of distributed systems depends on the availability of a highly reliable, high capacity, low cost communications medium. Accordingly, an experimental facility has been established and experiments have been defined to address such problem areas as interprocess communications, distributed data base design and man/machine interfaces. The design of a first application to be installed at the NRU/NRX research reactors is progressing well

  13. Muon trackers for imaging a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, N.; Miyadera, H.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Borozdin, K. N.; Durham, J. M.; Fuzita, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Izumi, M.; Nakayama, K.; Saltus, M.; Sugita, T.; Takakura, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    2016-09-01

    A detector system for assessing damage to the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors by using cosmic-ray muon tomography was developed. The system consists of a pair of drift-tube tracking detectors of 7.2× 7.2-m2 area. Each muon tracker consists of 6 x-layer and 6 y-layer drift-tube detectors. Each tracker is capable of measuring muon tracks with 12 mrad angular resolutions, and is capable of operating under 50-μ Sv/h radiation environment by removing gamma induced background with a novel time-coincidence logic. An estimated resolution to observe nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi is 0.3 m when the core is imaged from outside the reactor building.

  14. 7. European conference of TRIGA reactor users. Conference papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1982-07-01

    At the Seventh European Conference of TRIGA Users, held in September 1982, in Istanbul, Turkey, the following aspects are discussed: safety aspects of TRIGA reactors; developments and improvements; operating and maintenance experiences; applications; reactor calculations; fuel cycle aspects and research programs.

  15. 7. European conference of TRIGA reactor users. Conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    At the Seventh European Conference of TRIGA Users, held in September 1982, in Istanbul, Turkey, the following aspects are discussed: safety aspects of TRIGA reactors; developments and improvements; operating and maintenance experiences; applications; reactor calculations; fuel cycle aspects and research programs

  16. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  17. A history of ZED-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ZED-2 Reactor at Chalk River Laboratories was 50 years old this fall. First criticality occurred in September 1960. ZED-2 is perhaps not very well known in the Canadian Nuclear Industry, certainly not as well known as the various CANDU power reactors or the research reactors NRU and NRX. Part of the reason for this I suspect is that when casually judging the importance of reactors the first parameters that spring to mind are power generated (for power reactors) or neutron flux (for research reactors), bigger being 'better in both cases. By these standards ZED-2 does indeed appear puny: the maximum allowed power is 200W and the corresponding flux about 10 8 to 10 9 neutrons cm -2 s -1 , both numbers being about a factor of 500,000 smaller than the corresponding values for NRU. So, what is it all about? How is it that such an apparently insignificant reactor has operated for 50 years?, longer than any other Canadian reactor except NRU and the McMaster Reactor. What is it used for? What contributions has it made to the Canadian industry? Maybe one might also ask for how long is it going to continue? Well, that's what this talk is about, although I think I will leave the final question to wiser heads than mine. ZED-2 is a descendant of famous progenitors: starting with Enrico Farm's first critical pile of graphite and uranium (created at the University of Chicago in 1942) through Canada's ZEEP (first reactor to go critical outside the USA) that went critical in 1945. These early critical facilities were first about proof of principle that a self sustaining nuclear chain reaction could be established and controlled in a reasonable sized facility and second, in the longer term, developing understanding of the underlying reactor physics and the development of theories and methods to accurately predict the important properties of critical assemblies generally. (author)

  18. YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films deposited by MOCVD vertical reactor with a flow guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujiono, E.H.; Negeri Makassar; Sani, R.A.; Saragi, T.; Arifin, P.; Barmawi, M.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of a flow guide in a vertical MOCVD reactor on the deposition uniformity and growth rate of thin YBCO films has been studied. Without the flow guide the growth rates are low, have a poor uniformity and the film composition is not stoichiometric. The growth rate of the films grown using a reactor with the flow guide was approximately twice that without the flow guide. Using this flow guide the growth rates were 0.4-0.7 μm/h for growth temperatures varying between 600 and 750 C, and the crystalline quality as well as the surface morphology of YBCO films on MgO substrates is improved. For films grown at temperatures above 650 C the composition of Y:Ba:Cu is 1:2:3, as confirmed by EDAX spectra. Films deposited without and with the flow guide at 700 C have critical temperatures around 85 and 88 K, respectively. The reduction in ΔT c (T c,zero -T c,onset ) also shows an improvement of the superconducting properties of YBCO thin films deposited with a flow guide. (orig.)

  19. A two dimensional code (R,Z) for nuclear reactor analysis and its application to the UAR-RI reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishay, S.T.; Mikhail, I.F.I.; Gaafar, M.A.; Michaiel, M.L.; Nassar, S.F.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study is given of fuel consumption in completely reflected cylindrical reactors. A two group, two dimensional (r,z) code is developed to carry out the required procedure. The code is applied to the UAR-RI reactor and the results are found to be in complete agreement with the experimental observations and with the theoretical interpretations. 7 fig., 12 tab

  20. Corrosion and hydriding behaviour of some Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloys in water, steam and various gases at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgaard, S. B.

    1962-05-15

    Fuel sheaths and pressure tubes in Canadian power reactors are at present made from Zircaloy-2. Mechanical properties of a suitably heat treated Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy are superior to those of Zircaloy-2, but any new alloy must have resistance to corrosion and hydriding by the coolant and by the gas that insulates the pressure tube from the cold moderator. Exposed to water at temperatures up to 325{sup o}C, the Zr 2.5 wt% Nb alloy has corrosion resistance acceptable for power reactors. Resistance to air and carbon dioxide is less favourable. Addition of tin, or iron and chromium, to the base alloy have little effect on the corrosion resistance, but the addition of copper reduces corrosion in water and steam to some extent and in air and carbon dioxide to a greater extent. Studies of the effect of heat treatment suggest that the amount of niobium in a solid-solution controls the rate of oxidation and hydriding and that concentration, size and distribution of second phase is of little importance. Initial results obtained in NRX indicate that a thermal flux of 3-7 x 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/sec has little or no effect on oxidation and hydriding in high temperature water. (author)

  1. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  2. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, Volume 2, are divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 7: Deterministic transport methods 1 (7 conferences), - session 8: Interpretation and analysis of reactor instrumentation (6 conferences), - session 9: High speed computing applied to reactor operations (5 conferences), - session 10: Diffusion theory and kinetics (7 conferences), - session 11: Fast reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences), - session 12: Deterministic transport methods 2 (7 conferences), - session 13: Application of expert systems to physical aspects of reactor design and operation.

  3. A stability identification system for boiling water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belblidia, L.A.; Chevrier, A.

    1994-01-01

    Boiling water reactors are subject to instabilities under low-flow, high-power operating conditions. These instabilities are a safety concern and it is therefore important to determine stability margins. This paper describes a method to estimate a measure of stability margin, called the decay ratio, from autoregressive modelling of time series data. A phenomenological model of a boiling water reactor with known stability characteristics is used to generate time series to validate the program. The program is then applied to signals from local power range monitors from the cycle 7 stability tests at the Leibstadt plant. (author) 7 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  4. International topical meeting. Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM) and meeting of the International Group on Reactor Research (IGORR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear research and test reactors have been in operation for over 60 years, over 270 research reactors are currently operating in more than 50 countries. This meeting is dedicated to different aspects of research reactor fuels: new fuels for new reactors, the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels, spent fuel management and computational tools for core simulation. About 80 contributions are reported in this document, they are organized into 7 sessions: 1) international topics and overview on new projects and fuel, 2) new projects and upgrades, 3) fuel development, 4) optimisation and research reactor utilisation, 5) innovative methods in research reactors physics, 6) safety, operation and research reactor conversion, 7) fuel back-end management, and a poster session. Experience from Australian, Romanian, Libyan, Syrian, Vietnamese, South-African and Ghana research reactors are reported among other things. The Russian program for research reactor spent fuel management is described and the status of the American-driven program for the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels is presented. (A.C.)

  5. Coil winding pack FE-analysis for a HELIAS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schauer, F.; Egorov, K.; Bykov, V.

    2011-01-01

    At the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP) a reference design is being created of an upgraded five-periodic HELIAS type stellarator reactor which evolves from Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) by scaling of the coil centre line geometries by a factor of four. This reactor type was extensively investigated at IPP with regard to physical characteristics and to some extent also to engineering issues. The upgrade concerns an increase of the induction at the plasma axis and correspondingly at the superconductor. The aim is to develop the reactor concept to a stage and such detail that major engineering problems are unveiled, and relevant comparisons with other concepts, including tokamaks, can be drawn in view of upcoming decisions concerning a DEMO reactor. Even though progress in plasma physics, and in particular future results of W7-X and other machines - particularly of ITER - will probably lead to somewhat different coil shapes, no principal changes of the reference design are expected. In this paper the option of a roll-formed square coil cable jacket is investigated. Detailed structural FE analysis of the coil winding pack demonstrates the feasibility of such a conductor which appears to be the most economical option. It also allows sufficient space for a cable current density very similar to that of the ITER TF coil with a similar overall winding pack cross section of ∼0.5 m 2 . Already existing Nb 3 Sn conductors could thus be safely applied in such a HELIAS reactor. Obvious progress of superconductor technology, particularly concerning Nb 3 Al, will be beneficial concerning savings of conductor material, ease of manufacture, higher operation temperature, etc.

  6. Impact of proposed research reactor standards on reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringle, J C; Johnson, A G; Anderson, T V [Oregon State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    A Standards Committee on Operation of Research Reactors, (ANS-15), sponsored by the American Nuclear Society, was organized in June 1971. Its purpose is to develop, prepare, and maintain standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training. Of the 15 original members, six were directly associated with operating TRIGA facilities. This committee developed a standard for the Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors (ANS-15.1), the revised draft of which was submitted to ANSI for review in May of 1973. The Committee then identified 10 other critical areas for standards development. Nine of these, along with ANS-15.1, are of direct interest to TRIGA owners and operators. The Committee was divided into subcommittees to work on these areas. These nine areas involve proposed standards for research reactors concerning: 1. Records and Reports (ANS-15.3) 2. Selection and Training of Personnel (ANS-15.4) 3. Effluent Monitoring (ANS-15.5) 4. Review of Experiments (ANS-15.6) 5. Siting (ANS-15.7) 6. Quality Assurance Program Guidance and Requirements (ANS-15.8) 7. Restrictions on Radioactive Effluents (ANS-15.9) 8. Decommissioning (ANS-15.10) 9. Radiological Control and Safety (ANS-15.11). The present status of each of these standards will be presented, along with their potential impact on TRIGA reactor operation. (author)

  7. Impact of proposed research reactor standards on reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, J.C.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1974-01-01

    A Standards Committee on Operation of Research Reactors, (ANS-15), sponsored by the American Nuclear Society, was organized in June 1971. Its purpose is to develop, prepare, and maintain standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training. Of the 15 original members, six were directly associated with operating TRIGA facilities. This committee developed a standard for the Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors (ANS-15.1), the revised draft of which was submitted to ANSI for review in May of 1973. The Committee then identified 10 other critical areas for standards development. Nine of these, along with ANS-15.1, are of direct interest to TRIGA owners and operators. The Committee was divided into subcommittees to work on these areas. These nine areas involve proposed standards for research reactors concerning: 1. Records and Reports (ANS-15.3) 2. Selection and Training of Personnel (ANS-15.4) 3. Effluent Monitoring (ANS-15.5) 4. Review of Experiments (ANS-15.6) 5. Siting (ANS-15.7) 6. Quality Assurance Program Guidance and Requirements (ANS-15.8) 7. Restrictions on Radioactive Effluents (ANS-15.9) 8. Decommissioning (ANS-15.10) 9. Radiological Control and Safety (ANS-15.11). The present status of each of these standards will be presented, along with their potential impact on TRIGA reactor operation. (author)

  8. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Sessions 17-24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F. [American Nuclear Society, La Grange Park, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Technical papers accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics are included in the present Proceedings. Except for the invited papers in the plenary session, all other papers are contributed papers. The topics of the meeting encompass all major areas of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, including analytical and experimental works on the fundamental mechanisms of fluid flow and heat transfer, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Because of the complex nature of nuclear reactors and power plants, several papers deal with the combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. The participation in the conference by the authors from several countries and four continents makes the Proceedings a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the field of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics worldwide. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  9. Proceedings of the 7th International Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics NURETH-7. Sessions 17-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, R.C.; Feiner, F.

    1995-09-01

    Technical papers accepted for presentation at the Seventh International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics are included in the present Proceedings. Except for the invited papers in the plenary session, all other papers are contributed papers. The topics of the meeting encompass all major areas of nuclear thermal-hydraulics, including analytical and experimental works on the fundamental mechanisms of fluid flow and heat transfer, the development of advanced mathematical and numerical methods, and the application of advancements in the field in the development of novel reactor concepts. Because of the complex nature of nuclear reactors and power plants, several papers deal with the combined issues of thermal-hydraulics and reactor/power-plant safety, core neutronics and/or radiation. The participation in the conference by the authors from several countries and four continents makes the Proceedings a comprehensive review of the recent progress in the field of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics worldwide. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  10. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R 0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R 0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  11. MDS Nordion - a Canadian success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, F.

    1998-01-01

    MDS Nordion,the world leading supplier of radioisotopes, had its beginnings as a small division of the crown company Eldorado Mining and Refining Ltd. in the late 1940's. With the end of World War II, Eldorado found itself with a supply of radium left over from the production of uranium during the war and set up a small group in Ottawa to sell it. Most of the stock of radium was disposed of when the development of the NRX reactor made reactor produced radioisotopes possible. The company turned to selling these radioisotopes and soon focused on Cobalt 60 for its use in cancer therapy. In 1952, the group transferred to AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.), as part of the Commercial Products Division. In 1988, as part of the federal government's move to privatization, the organization was split into two companies, Theratronics, which manufactures the cancer therapy machines and other equipment for the use of radioisotopes, and Nordion International, which continued the primary business of processing, packaging, selling radioisotopes. In 1991 Nordion International was sold to MDS Inc., a large international group of companies in the life and sciences fields with headquarters in Toronto. The name was changed to MDS Nordion in December 1996

  12. Study of reactor parameters of on critical systems, Phase I: Safety report for RB zero power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisic, N.

    1962-09-01

    In addition to the safety analysis for the zero power RB reactor, this report contains a general description of the reactor, reactor components, auxiliary equipment and the reactor building. Reactor Rb has been reconstructed during 1961-1962 and supplied with new safety-control system as well as with a complete dosimetry instrumentation. Since RB reactor was constructed without shielding special attention is devoted to safety and protection of the staff performing experiments. Due to changed circumstances in the Institute ( start-up of the RA 7 MW power reactor) the role of the RB reactor was redefined

  13. Compact stellarators as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Valanju, P.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Hirshman, S.; Spong, D.A.; Strickler, D.; Williamson, D.E.; Ware, A.

    2001-01-01

    Two types of compact stellarators are examined as reactors: two- and three-field-period (M=2 and 3) quasi-axisymmetric devices with volume-average =4-5% and M=2 and 3 quasi-poloidal devices with =10-15%. These low-aspect-ratio stellarator-tokamak hybrids differ from conventional stellarators in their use of the plasma-generated bootstrap current to supplement the poloidal field from external coils. Using the ARIES-AT model with B max =12T on the coils gives Compact Stellarator reactors with R=7.3-8.2m, a factor of 2-3 smaller R than other stellarator reactors for the same assumptions, and neutron wall loadings up to 3.7MWm -2 . (author)

  14. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Saitou, Hiroaki [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed, as an extended version from the former version FEMAXI-6, for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which are fully disclosed in the code model description published in the form of another JAEA-Data/Code report. The present manual, which is the very counterpart of this description document, gives detailed explanations of files and operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of input/output, sample Input/Output, methods of source code modification, subroutine structure, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform fuel analysis by FEMAXI-7. (author)

  15. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2013-10-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed, as an extended version from the former version FEMAXI-6, for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which are fully disclosed in the code model description published in the form of another JAEA-Data/Code report. The present manual, which is the very counterpart of this description document, gives detailed explanations of files and operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of input/output, sample Input/Output, methods of source code modification, subroutine structure, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform fuel analysis by FEMAXI-7. (author)

  16. A multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changwen Ma

    2000-01-01

    An integrated natural circulation self pressurized reactor can be used for sea water desalination, electrogeneration, ship propulsion and district or process heating. The reactor can be used for ship propulsion because it has following advantages: it is a integrated reactor. Whole primary loop is included in a size limited pressure vessel. For a 200 MW reactor the diameter of the pressure vessel is about 5 m. It is convenient to arranged on a ship. Hydraulic driving facility of control rods is used on the reactor. It notably decreases the height of the reactor. For ship propulsion, smaller diameter and smaller height are important. Besides these, the operation reliability of the reactor is high enough, because there is no rotational machine (for example, circulating pump) in safety systems. Reactor systems are simple. There are no emergency water injection system and boron concentration regulating system. These features for ship propulsion reactor are valuable. Design of the reactor is based on existing demonstration district heating reactor design. The mechanic design principles are the same. But boiling is introduced in the reactor core. Several variants to use the reactor as a movable seawater desalination plant are presented in the paper. When the sea water desalination plant is working to produce fresh water, the reactor can supply electricity at the same time to the local electricity network. Some analyses for comprehensive application of the reactor have been done. Main features and parameters of the small (Thermopower 200 MW) reactor are given in the paper. (author)

  17. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel performance code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Saitou, Hiroaki [ITOCHU Techno-Solutions Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-15

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which has been fully disclosed in the code model description published recently as JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. The present manual, which is the counterpart of this description, gives detailed explanations of operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of Input/Output, methods of source code modification, features of subroutine modules, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform a fuel analysis with FEMAXI-7. This report includes some descriptions which are modified from the original contents of JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  18. Input/output manual of light water reactor fuel performance code FEMAXI-7 and its related codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Nagase, Fumihisa; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2012-07-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in normal conditions and in anticipated transient conditions. Numerous functional improvements and extensions have been incorporated in FEMAXI-7, which has been fully disclosed in the code model description published recently as JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. The present manual, which is the counterpart of this description, gives detailed explanations of operation method of FEMAXI-7 code and its related codes, methods of Input/Output, methods of source code modification, features of subroutine modules, and internal variables in a specific manner in order to facilitate users to perform a fuel analysis with FEMAXI-7. This report includes some descriptions which are modified from the original contents of JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (author)

  19. A two-stage ethanol-based biodiesel production in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2012-01-01

    were conducted in a simulated series of reactors by repeatedly passing the reaction mixture through a single reactor, with separation of the by-product glycerol and water between passes in the first and second stages, respectively. The second stage brought the major components of biodiesel to ‘in......-spec’ levels according to the European biodiesel specifications for methanol-based biodiesel. The highest overall productivity achieved in the first stage was 2.52 kg FAEE(kg catalyst)−1 h−1 at a superficial velocity of 7.6 cm min−1, close to the efficiency of a stirred tank reactor under similar conditions...

  20. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Managing severe reactor accidents. A review and evaluation of our knowledge on reactor accidents and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Veine

    2002-11-01

    The report gives a review of the results from the last years research on severe reactor accidents, and an opinion on the possibilities to refine the present strategies for accident management in Swedish and Finnish BWRs. The following aspect of reactor accidents are the major themes of the study: 1. Early pressure relief from hydrogen production; 2. Recriticality in re-flooded, degraded core; 3. Melt-through; 4. Steam explosion after melt-through; 5. Coolability of the melt after after melt-through; 6. Hydrogen fire in the reactor containment; 7. Leaking containment; 8. Hydrogen fire in the reactor building; 9. Long-time developments after a severe accident; 10. Accidents during shutdown for overhaul; 11. Information need for remedial actions. Possibilities for improving the strategies in each of these areas are discussed. The review shows that our knowledge is sufficient in the areas 1, 2, 4, 6, 8. For the other areas, more research is needed

  2. Evaluation of the passage of Lactobacillus gasseri K7 and bifidobacteria from the stomach to intestines using a single reactor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Ah Ueli

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Probiotic bacteria are thought to play an important role in the digestive system and therefore have to survive the passage from stomach to intestines. Recently, a novel approach to simulate the passage from stomach to intestines in a single bioreactor was developed. The advantage of this automated one reactor system was the ability to test the influence of acid, bile salts and pancreatin. Lactobacillus gasseri K7 is a strain isolated from infant faeces with properties making the strain interesting for cheese production. In this study, a single reactor system was used to evaluate the survival of L. gasseri K7 and selected bifidobacteria from our collection through the stomach-intestine passage. Results Initial screening for acid resistance in acidified culture media showed a low tolerance of Bifidobacterium dentium for this condition indicating low survival in the passage. Similar results were achieved with B. longum subsp. infantis whereas B. animalis subsp. lactis had a high survival. These initial results were confirmed in the bioreactor model of the stomach-intestine passage. B. animalis subsp. lactis had the highest survival rate (10% attaining approximately 5 × 106 cfu ml-1 compared to the other tested bifidobacteria strains which were reduced by a factor of up to 106. Lactobacillus gasseri K7 was less resistant than B. animalis subsp. lactis but survived at cell concentrations approximately 1000 times higher than other bifidobacteria. Conclusion In this study, we were able to show that L. gasseri K7 had a high survival rate in the stomach-intestine passage. By comparing the results with a previous study in piglets we could confirm the reliability of our simulation. Of the tested bifidobacteria strains, only B. animalis subsp. lactis showed acceptable survival for a successful passage in the simulation system.

  3. European commission - 7th framework programme. The collaborative project on European sodium fast reactor (CP ESFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.

    2009-01-01

    The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 european partners; it will be realized under the aegis of the 7th FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission of 5.8 M euro (11.55 M euro total budget). It will be a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follow: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture vis a vis of abnormal situations and the robustness of the safety demonstrations; the guarantee of a financial risk comparable to that of the other means of energy production; a flexible and robust management of the nuclear materials and especially the waste reduction through the Minor Actinides burning. (author)

  4. Irradiation experiment on fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides up to 7 at.% burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, H.; Yokoo, T.; Ogata, T.; Inoue, T.; Ougier, M.; Glatz, J.P.; Fontaine, B.; Breton, L.

    2007-01-01

    Fast reactor metal fuels containing minor actinides (MAs: Np, Am, Cm) and rare earths (REs) have been irradiated in the fast reactor PHENIX. In this experiment, four types of fuel alloys, U-19Pu-10Zr, U-19Pu-10Zr-2MA-2RE, U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA-5RE and U-19Pu-10Zr-5MA (wt.%), are loaded into part of standard metal fuel stacks. The postirradiation examinations will be conducted at ∼2.4, ∼7 and ∼11 at.% burnup. As for the low-burnup fuel pins, nondestructive postirradiation tests have already been performed and the fuel integrity was confirmed. Furthermore, the irradiation experiment for the intermediate burnup goal of ∼7 at.% was completed in July 2006. For the irradiation period of 356.63 equivalent full-power days, the neutron flux level remained in the range of 3.5-3.6 x 10 15 n/cm 2 /s at the axial peak position. On the other hand, the maximum linear power of fuel alloys decreased gradually from 305-315 W/cm (beginning of irradiation) to 250-260 W/cm (end of irradiation). The discharged peak burnup was estimated to be 6.59-7.23 at.%. The irradiation behavior of MA-containing metal fuels up to 7 at.% burnup was predicted using the ALFUS code, which was developed for U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel performance analysis. As a result, it was evaluated that the fuel temperature is distributed between ∼410 deg. C and ∼645 deg. C at the end of the irradiation experiment. From the stress-strain analysis based on the preliminarily employed cladding irradiation properties and the FCMI stress distribution history, it was predicted that a cladding strain of not more than 0.9% would appear. (authors)

  5. Commissioning of research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on meeting the requirements for the commissioning of research reactors on the basis of international best practices. Specifically, it provides recommendations on fulfilling the requirements established in paras 6.44 and 7.42-7.50 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety of Research Reactors, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4, IAEA, Vienna (2005) and guidance and specific and consequential recommendations relating to the recommendations presented in paras 615-621 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors, Safety Series No. 35-G2, IAEA, Vienna (1994) and paras 228-229 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, Safety Series No. 35-G1, IAEA, Vienna (1994). This Safety Guide is intended for use by all organizations involved in commissioning for a research reactor, including the operating organization, the regulatory body and other organizations involved in the research reactor project

  6. Cavity temperature and flow characteristics in a gas-core test reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putre, H. A.

    1973-01-01

    A test reactor concept for conducting basic studies on a fissioning uranium plasma and for testing various gas-core reactor concepts is analyzed. The test reactor consists of a conventional fuel-element region surrounding a 61-cm-(2-ft-) diameter cavity region which contains the plasma experiment. The fuel elements provide the neutron flux for the cavity region. The design operating conditions include 60-MW reactor power, 2.7-MW cavity power, 200-atm cavity pressure, and an average uranium plasma temperature of 15,000 K. The analytical results are given for cavity radiant heat transfer, hydrogen transpiration cooling, and uranium wire or powder injection.

  7. A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% 235 U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm 3 and 3.8 gU/cm 3 are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively

  8. A Review of the UK Fast Reactor Programme: March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Towards the end of 1979 the Government announced a new programme of thermal reactor stations to be built over ten years (totalling 15GW), in addition to the two AGR stations at Torness and Heysham 'B' which had been approved by the previous Government. The first station of the new programme will be based on a Westinghouse PWR, subject to safety clearance and the outcome of a public inquiry, and it is envisaged that the remaining stations of the programme would be split between PWRs and AGRs. The AEA Chairman wrote formally to the Secretary of State for Energy in December 1979, putting forward on behalf of the Electricity Supply Authorities, NNC, BNFL and the AEA a recommended strategy for building the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), subject to normal licensing procedure and to public inquiry, so as to ensure that the key options for introducing commercial fast reactors, when required, should remain open. A Government statement is expected during the next few months. Meanwhile the level of effort on fast reactor research and development in the UK has been maintained, the fast reactor remaining the largest of the UKAEA's reactor development projects with expenditure totalling somewhat over £80M per annum. The main feature of the UK fast reactor programme has continued to be the operation of PFR (Sections 2 and 7) which is yielding a wealth of experience and of information relevant to the design of commercial fast reactors. Bum-up of standard driver fuel has reached 6-7% by heavy atoms, while specially enriched lead fuel pins have reached 11 % without failure. An extensive programme of work in the reactor and its associated steam plant was completed in March 1980 and the reactor then started its fifth power run. The fuel reprocessing plant at DNE is being commissioned and has reprocessed some of the spent fuel remaining from the DFR. It will start soon on reprocessing fuel discharged from the PFR. During the year improvements to the design of the future

  9. Anaerobic Digestion of Sugarcane Vinasse Through a Methanogenic UASB Reactor Followed by a Packed Bed Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Díaz, A; Pereda-Reyes, I; Oliva-Merencio, D; Lebrero, R; Zaiat, M

    2017-12-01

    The anaerobic treatment of raw vinasse in a combined system consisting in two methanogenic reactors, up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) + anaerobic packed bed reactors (APBR), was evaluated. The organic loading rate (OLR) was varied, and the best condition for the combined system was 12.5 kg COD m -3 day -1 with averages of 0.289 m 3 CH 4  kg COD r -1 for the UASB reactor and 4.4 kg COD m -3 day -1 with 0.207 m 3 CH 4  kg COD r -1 for APBR. The OLR played a major role in the emission of H 2 S conducting to relatively stable quality of biogas emitted from the APBR, with H 2 S concentrations <10 mg L -1 . The importance of the sulphate to COD ratio was demonstrated as a result of the low biogas quality recorded at the lowest ratio. It was possible to develop a proper anaerobic digestion of raw vinasse through the combined system with COD removal efficiency of 86.7% and higher CH 4 and a lower H 2 S content in biogas.

  10. Compact power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetch, J.R.; Dieckamp, H.M.; Wilson, L.A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector

  11. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  12. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7. Model and structure [Revised edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Udagawa, Yutaka; Amaya, Masaki; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-7 has been developed for the purpose of analyzing the fuel behavior in both normal conditions and anticipated transient conditions. This code is an advanced version which has been produced by incorporating the former version FEMAXI-6 with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In FEMAXI-7, many new models have been added and parameters have been clearly arranged. Also, to facilitate effective maintenance and accessibility of the code, modularization of subroutines and functions have been attained, and quality comment descriptions of variables or physical quantities have been incorporated in the source code. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-7 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior analyses. This report is the revised edition of the first one which describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, and improvements and extensions. The first edition, JAEA-Data/Code 2010-035, was published in 2010. The first edition was extended by orderly addition and disposition of explanations of models and organized as the revised edition after three years interval. (author)

  13. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, volume one, are divided into 6 sessions bearing on: - session 1: Advances in computational methods including utilization of parallel processing and vectorization (7 conferences) - session 2: Fast, epithermal, reactor physics, calculation, versus measurements (9 conferences) - session 3: New fast and thermal reactor designs (9 conferences) - session 4: Thermal radiation and charged particles transport (7 conferences) - session 5: Super computers (7 conferences) - session 6: Thermal reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences).

  14. Method of operating a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosumi, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent stress corrosion cracking in the structural material of a reactor pressure vessel. Method: Prior to the starting of a reactor, the reactor pressure vessel is evacuated to carry out degassing of reactor water, and, at the same time, reactor water is heated. After reactor water is heated to a predetermined temperature, control rods are extracted to start nuclear heating. While the temperature of the reactor water is in a temperature range where elution of a metal which is a structural material of the reactor pressure vessel becomes vigorous and the sensitivity to the stress corrosion cracks increases, the reactor is operated at the maximum permissible temperature raising speed or maximum permissible cooling speed. (Aizawa, K.)

  15. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  16. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  17. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faghihi, F.; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile 239 Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m 2 ) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate 239 Pu production rate. Produced 239 Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, 239 Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type

  18. Oklo natural reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Isao

    1985-01-01

    In 1954, Professor Kazuo, Kuroda of Arkansas University in USA published the possibility that spontaneously generated natural nuclear reactors existed in prehistoric age. In 1972, 18 years after that, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique published that in the Oklo uranium deposit in Gabon, Africa, a natural nuclear reactor was found. This fact was immediately informed to the whole world, but in Japan, its details have not necessarily been well known. The chance of investigating into this fact and visiting the Oklo deposit by the favor of COMUF, the owner of the Oklo deposit, was given, therefore, the state of the natural reactors, which has been known so far, is reported. At present, 12 natural reactors have been found in the vicinity of the Oklo deposit. The natural reactors were generated spontaneously in uranium deposits about 1.7 billion years ago when the isotopic abundance of U-235 was 3 %, and the chain reaction started naturally. When the concentration of U-235 lowered, the reaction stopped naturally. The abnormality in the U-235 abundance in natural uranium was found, and the cause was pursued. The evidence of the existence of natural reactors was shown. (Kako, I.)

  19. Sensory regulation of neuroligins and neurexin I in the honeybee brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Biswas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurexins and neuroligins, which have recently been associated with neurological disorders such as autism in humans, are highly conserved adhesive proteins found on synaptic membranes of neurons. These binding partners produce a trans-synaptic bridge that facilitates maturation and specification of synapses. It is believed that there exists an optimal spatio-temporal code of neurexin and neuroligin interactions that guide synapse formation in the postnatal developing brain. Therefore, we investigated whether neuroligins and neurexin are differentially regulated by sensory input using a behavioural model system with an advanced capacity for sensory processing, learning and memory, the honeybee.Whole brain expression levels of neuroligin 1-5 (NLG1-5 and neurexin I (NrxI were estimated by qRT-PCR analysis in three different behavioural paradigms: sensory deprivation, associative scent learning, and lateralised sensory input. Sensory deprived bees had a lower level of NLG1 expression, but a generally increased level of NLG2-5 and NrxI expression compared to hive bees. Bees that had undergone associative scent training had significantly increased levels of NrxI, NLG1 and NLG3 expression compared to untrained control bees. Bees that had lateralised sensory input after antennal amputation showed a specific increase in NLG1 expression compared to control bees, which only happened over time.Our results suggest that (1 there is a lack of synaptic pruning during sensory deprivation; (2 NLG1 expression increases with sensory stimulation; (3 concomitant changes in gene expression suggests NrxI interacts with all neuroligins; (4 there is evidence for synaptic compensation after lateralised injury.

  20. Probabilistic safety criteria on high burnup HWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    BACO is a code for the simulation of the thermo-mechanical and fission gas behaviour of a cylindrical fuel rod under operation conditions. Their input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. In this paper, experimental CANDU fuel rods irradiated at the NRX reactor together with experimental MOX fuel rods and the IAEA-CRP FUMEX cases are used in order to determine the sensitivity of BACO code predictions. The techniques for sensitivity analysis defined in BACO are: the 'extreme case analysis', the 'parametric analysis' and the 'probabilistic (or statistics) analysis'. We analyse the CARA and CAREM fuel rods relation between predicted performance and statistical dispersion in order of enhanced their original designs taking account probabilistic safety criteria and using the BACO's sensitivity analysis. (author)

  1. Neurexin Dysfunction in Adult Neurons Results in Autistic-like Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Rabaneda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs comprise a group of clinical phenotypes characterized by repetitive behavior and social and communication deficits. Autism is generally viewed as a neurodevelopmental disorder where insults during embryonic or early postnatal periods result in aberrant wiring and function of neuronal circuits. Neurexins are synaptic proteins associated with autism. Here, we generated transgenic βNrx1ΔC mice in which neurexin function is selectively impaired during late postnatal stages. Whole-cell recordings in cortical neurons show an impairment of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the βNrx1ΔC mice. Importantly, mutant mice exhibit autism-related symptoms, such as increased self-grooming, deficits in social interactions, and altered interaction for nonsocial olfactory cues. The autistic-like phenotype of βNrx1ΔC mice can be reversed after removing the mutant protein in aged animals. The defects resulting from disruption of neurexin function after the completion of embryonic and early postnatal development suggest that functional impairment of mature circuits can trigger autism-related phenotypes.

  2. A Preliminary Analysis of Reactor Performance Test (LOEP) for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeonil; Park, Su-Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The final phase of commissioning is reactor performance test, which is to prove the integrated performance and safety of the research reactor at full power with fuel loaded such as neutron power calibration, Control Absorber Rod/Second Shutdown Rod drop time, InC function test, Criticality, Rod worth, Core heat removal with natural mechanism, and so forth. The last test will be safety-related one to assure the result of the safety analysis of the research reactor is marginal enough to be sure about the nuclear safety by showing the reactor satisfies the acceptance criteria of the safety functions such as for reactivity control, maintenance of auxiliaries, reactor pool water inventory control, core heat removal, and confinement isolation. After all, the fuel integrity will be ensured by verifying there is no meaningful change in the radiation levels. To confirm the performance of safety equipment, loss of normal electric power (LOEP), possibly categorized as Anticipated Operational Occurrence (AOO), is selected as a key experiment to figure out how safe the research reactor is before turning over the research reactor to the owner. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the reactor performance test (LOEP) for a research reactor. The results showed how different the transient between conservative estimate and best estimate will look. Preliminary analyses have shown all probable thermal-hydraulic transient behavior of importance as to opening of flap valve, minimum critical heat flux ratio, the change of flow direction, and important values of thermal-hydraulic parameters.

  3. ABWR1. A Generation III.7 reactor after the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Kurosaki, Toshikazu; Taguchi, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    iB1350 stands for an innovative, intelligent and inexpensive BWR 1350. It is the first Generation III.7 reactor after the Fukushima Daiichi accident. It has incorporated lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident and WENRA safety objectives. It has innovative safety to cope with devastating natural disasters including a giant earthquake, a large tsunami and a monster hurricane. The iB1350 can survive passively such devastation and a very prolonged SBO without any support from the outside of a site up to 7 days even preventing core melt. It, however, is based on the well-established proven ABWR design. The NSSS is exactly the same as that of the current ABWR. As for safety design it has a double cylinder RCCV (Mark W containment) and an in-depth hybrid safety system (IDHS). The Mark W containment has double FP confinement barriers and the in-containment filtered venting system (IFVS) that enable passively no emergency evacuation outside the immediate vicinity of the plant for a SA. It has a large volume to hold hydrogen, a core catcher, a passive flooding system and an innovative passive containment cooling system (iPCCS) establishing passively practical elimination of containment failure even in a long term. The IDHS consists of 4 division active safety systems for a DBA, 2 division active safety systems for a SA and built-in passive safety systems (BiPSS) consisting of an isolation condenser (IC) and the iPCCS for a SA. The IC/PCCS pools have enough capacity for 7 day grace period. The IC/PCCS heat exchangers, core and spent fuel pool are enclosed inside the CV building and protected against a large airplane crash. The iB1350 can survive a large airplane crash only by the CV building and the built-in passive safety systems therein. The dome of the CV building consists of a single wall made of steel and concrete composite. This single dome structure facilitates a short-term construction period and cost saving. The CV diameter is smaller than that of most

  4. Nuclear reactors situation in Japan after the major earthquake of March 11, 2011. March 16, 2011, 7:00 PM status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This situation note is established according to the information gained on March 16, 2011, at 7:00 PM, by the crisis centre of the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN). The situation of all 6 reactors of the Fukushima I site (Dai-ichi) and of their spent fuel pools, as well as the situation of the reactors No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the Fukushima II site (Daini), and of the Onagawa and Tokai power plants is briefly presented with the progress of the accident management actions. (J.S.)

  5. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  6. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  7. The conversion of NRU from HEU to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Atfield, M.D.; Kennedy, I.C.

    1990-01-01

    The program at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) to develop and test low-enriched uranium fuel (LEU, 3 Si, USiAl, USi Al and U 3 Si 2 (U-3.96 wt% Si; U-3.5 wt% Si-1.5 wt% AL; U-3.2 wt%; Si-3 wt% Al; U-7.3 wt% Si, respectively). Fuel elements were fabricated with uranium loadings suitable for NRU, 3.15 gU/cm 3 , and for NRX, 4.5 gU/cm 3 , and were irradiated under normal fuel-operating conditions. Eight experimental irradiations involving 100 mini-elements and 84 full-length elements (7X12-element rods) were completed to qualify the LEU fuel and the fabrication technology. Post irradiation examinations confirmed that the performance of the LEU fuel, and that of a medium enrichment uranium (MEU, 45% U-235) alloy fuel tested as a back-up, was comparable to the HEU fuel. The uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling was approximately linear up to burnups exceeding NRU's design terminal burnup (80 at%). NRU was partially converted to LEU fuel when the first 31 prototype fuel rods manufactured with industrial scale production equipment were installed in the reactor. The rods were loaded in NRU at a fuelling rate of about two rods per week over the period 1988 September to December. This partial LEU core (one third of a full NRU core) has allowed the reactor engineers and physicists to evaluate the bulk effects of the LEU conversion on NRU operations. As expected, the irradiation is proceeding without incident

  8. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  9. Simulation of hydrogen deflagration and detonation in a BWR reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manninen, M.; Silde, A.; Lindholm, I.; Huhtanen, R.; Sjoevall, H.

    2002-01-01

    A systematic study was carried out to investigate the hydrogen behaviour in a BWR reactor building during a severe accident. BWR core contains a large amount of Zircaloy and the containment is relatively small. Because containment leakage cannot be totally excluded, hydrogen can build up in the reactor building, where the atmosphere is normal air. The objective of the work was to investigate, whether hydrogen can form flammable and detonable mixtures in the reactor building, evaluate the possibility of onset of detonation and assess the pressure loads under detonation conditions. The safety concern is, whether the hydrogen in the reactor building can detonate and whether the external detonation can jeopardize the containment integrity. The analysis indicated that the possibility of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in the reactor building could not be ruled out in case of a 20 mm 2 leakage from the containment. The detonation analyses indicated that maximum pressure spike of about 7 MPa was observed in the reactor building room selected for the analysis

  10. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  11. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  12. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing

  13. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  14. Plutonium-239 production rate study using a typical fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Havasi, H.; Amin-Mozafari, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to compute fissile {sup 239}Pu material by supposed typical fusion reactor operation to make the fuel requirement for other purposes (e.g. MOX fissile fuel, etc.). It is assumed that there is a fusion reactor has a cylindrical geometry and uses uniformly distributed deuterium-tritium as fuel so that neutron wall load is taken at 10(MW)/(m{sup 2}) . Moreover, the reactor core is surrounded by six suggested blankets to make best performance of the physical conditions described herein. We determined neutron flux in each considered blanket as well as tritium self-sufficiency using two groups neutron energy and then computation is followed by the MCNP-4C code. Finally, material depletion according to a set of dynamical coupled differential equations is solved to estimate {sup 239}Pu production rate. Produced {sup 239}Pu is compared with two typical fission reactors to find performance of plutonium breeding ratio in the case of the fusion reactor. We found that 0.92% of initial U is converted into fissile Pu by our suggested fusion reactor with thermal power of 3000 MW. For comparison, {sup 239}Pu yield of suggested large scale PWR is about 0.65% and for LMFBR is close to 1.7%. The results show that the fusion reactor has an acceptable efficiency for Pu production compared with a large scale PWR fission reactor type.

  15. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  16. Steam reforming of heptane in a fluidized bed membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakib, Mohammad A.; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim; Elnashaie, Said S. E. H.

    n-Heptane served as a model compound to study steam reforming of naphtha as an alternative feedstock to natural gas for production of pure hydrogen in a fluidized bed membrane reactor. Selective removal of hydrogen using Pd 77Ag 23 membrane panels shifted the equilibrium-limited reactions to greater conversion of the hydrocarbons and lower yields of methane, an intermediate product. Experiments were conducted with no membranes, with one membrane panel, and with six panels along the height of the reactor to understand the performance improvement due to hydrogen removal in a reactor where catalyst particles were fluidized. Results indicate that a fluidized bed membrane reactor (FBMR) can provide a compact reformer for pure hydrogen production from a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock at moderate temperatures (475-550 °C). Under the experimental conditions investigated, the maximum achieved yield of pure hydrogen was 14.7 moles of pure hydrogen per mole of heptane fed.

  17. Space nuclear reactor concepts for avoidance of a single point failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents three space nuclear reactor concepts for future exploration missions requiring electrical power of 10's to 100's kW, for 7-10 years. These concepts avoid a single point failure in reactor cooling; and they could be used with a host of energy conversion technologies. The first is lithium or sodium heat pipes cooled reactor. The heat pipes operate at a fraction of their prevailing capillary or sonic limit. Thus, when a number of heat pipes fail, those in the adjacent modules remove their heat load, maintaining reactor core adequately cooled. The second is a reactor with a circulating liquid metal coolant. The reactor core is divided into six identical sectors, each with a separate energy conversion loop. The sectors in the reactor core are neurotically coupled, but hydraulically decoupled. Thus, when a sector experiences a loss of coolant, the fission power generated in it will be removed by the circulating coolant in the adjacent sectors. In this case, however, the reactor fission power would have to decrease to avoid exceeding the design temperature limits in the sector with a failed loop. These two reactor concepts are used with energy conversion technologies, such as advanced Thermoelectric (TE), Free Piston Stirling Engines (FPSE), and Alkali Metal Thermal-to- Electric Conversion (AMTEC). Gas cooled reactors are a better choice to use with Closed Brayton Cycle engines, such as the third reactor concept to be presented in the paper. It has a sectored core that is cooled with a binary mixture of He-Xe (40 gm/mole). Each of the three sectors in the reactor has its own CBC and neutronically, but not hydraulically, coupled to the other sectors

  18. Expected characteristics of future reactors for human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taketani, Kiyoaki

    1992-01-01

    Based on four reactor safety components (namely: a) God-given safety, b) Equipment safety, c) Quick-response safety, d) Containing safety), categorical assessment is made of various nuclear reactor concepts ranging from present existing reactors to future reactors based on innovative reactor design. In pursuit of nuclear reactor safety, ultimate characteristics of the ideal nuclear reactor are expected to coincide with those of an inherently safe reactor. A definition of 'inherently safe' has already been proposed by a committee in Japan. As a realistic and existable reactor, which is as close to the ideal reactor, a future reactor which is almost the same as a global reactor, is proposed. This global reactor must be constructable anywhere on earth and must permit easy operation and maintenance by anyone. It is also discussed to identify what behavior is expected of the global reactor under various conditions. At the same time, this future reactor which includes the global reactor, should solve a) the nuclear fuel resource issue, b) efficient utilization of fission energy and c) environmental issues as the greenhouse effect. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs

  19. Structure and thermal properties of as-fabricated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg low-enriched uranium research reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulakov, Mykola, E-mail: mykola.kulakov@cnl.ca [Fuel Development Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Saoudi, Mouna [Fuel Development Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Piro, Markus H.A. [Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Donaberger, Ronald L. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Aluminum-clad U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg pin-type mini-elements (with a core uranium loading of 4.5 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been fabricated at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories for experimental tests and ultimately for use in research and test reactors. In this study, the microstructure and phase composition of unirradiated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg fuel cores were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and neutron powder diffraction. Thermal properties were characterized using a combination of experimental measurements and thermodynamic calculations. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method. The temperature-dependent specific heat capacities were calculated based on the linear rule of mixture using the weight fraction of different crystalline phases and their specific heat capacity values taken from the literature. The thermal conductivity was then calculated using the measured thermal diffusivity, the measured density and the calculated specific heat capacity. The resulting thermal conductivity is practically identical for both types of fuel. The in-reactor temperatures were predicted using conjugate heat transfer simulations. - Highlights: • Neutron diffraction analysis shows that most of the γ-U(Mo) phase was retained in as-fabricated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg fuel cores. • The experimental thermal conductivity of both types of fuel is practically identical. • Based on conjugate heat transfer simulations, under normal operating conditions, the in-reactor fuel centreline temperature is about 510 K.

  20. Evaluation of Pressure Changes in HANARO Reactor Hall after a Reactor Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Geeyang; Han, Jaesam; Ahn, Gukhoon; Jung, Hoansung

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of this work is intended to evaluate the characteristics of the thermal behavior regarding how the decay heat will be affected by the reactor hall pressure change and the increase of pool water temperature induced in the primary coolant after a reactor shutdown. The particular reactor pool water temperature at the surface where it is evaporated owing to the decay heat resulting in the local heat transfer rate is related to the pressure change response in the reactor hall associated with the primary cooling system because of the reduction of the heat exchanger to remove the heat. The increase in the pool water temperature is proportional to the heat transfer rate in the reactor pool. Consequently, any limit on the reactor pool water temperature imposes a corresponding limit on the reactor hall pressure. At HANARO, the decay heat after a reactor shutdown is mainly removed by the natural circulation cooling in the reactor pool. This paper is written for the safety feature of the pressure change related leakage rate from the reactor hall. The calculation results show that the increase of pressure in the reactor hall will not cause any serious problems to the safety limits although the reactor hall pressure is slightly increased. Therefore, it was concluded that the pool water temperature increase is not so rapid as to cause the pressure to vary significantly in the reactor hall. Furthermore, the mathematical model developed in this work can be a useful analytical tool for scoping and parametric studies in the area of thermal transient analysis, with its proper representation of the interaction between the temperature and pressure in the reactor hall

  1. iB1350 no.1. A generation III.7 reactor after the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hosomi, Kenji; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Taguchi, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    iB1350 stands for an innovative, intelligent and inexpensive BWR 1350. It is the first generation III.7 reactor after the Fukushima Daiichi accident. It has incorporated lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident and WENRA safety objectives. It has innovative safety to cope with devastating natural disasters including a giant earthquake, a large tsunami and a monster hurricane. The iB1350 can survive passively such devastation and a very prolonged SBO without any support from the outside of a site up to 7 days even preventing core melt. It, however, is based on the well-established proven ABWR design. The NSSS is exactly the same as that of the current ABWR. As for safety design, it has a double cylinder RCCV (Mark W containment) and in-depth hybrid safety systems (IDHS). The Mark W containment has double FP confinement barriers and the in-containment filtered venting system (IFVS) that enable passively no emergency evacuation outside the immediate vicinity of the plant for a SA. It has a large volume to hold hydrogen, an innovative core catcher (iCC), a passive flooding system and an innovative passive containment cooling system (iPCCS) establishing passively practical elimination of containment failure even in a long term. The IDHS consists of 4 division active safety systems for a DBA, 2 division active safety systems for a SA and built-in passive safety systems (BiPSS) consisting of an isolation condenser (IC) and the iPCCS for a SA. While the conventional PCCS can never cool the S/P, the iPCCS can automatically cool the S/P directly even in a DBA LOCA. That makes it possible for the iB1350 to optimize the active safety systems for a DBA. Sato came up with several optimized configurations of the IDHS that are expected to achieve further cost reduction and enhance its reliability resulting from passive feature of the iPCCS. The IC/iPCCS pool has enough capacity for 7 day grace period. The IC/iPCCS heat exchangers, the core and the spent fuel pool are

  2. Dose rate in the reactor room and environment during maintenance in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Satoh, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Seki, Yasushi

    1995-01-01

    According to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) conceptual design activity, after reactor shutdown, damaged segments are pulled up from the reactor and hung from the reactor room ceiling by a remote handling device. The dose rate in the reactor room and the environment is estimated for this situation, and the following results are obtained. First, the dose rate in the room is > 10 8 μSv/h. Since this dose rate is 10 7 times greater than the biological radiation shielding design limit of 25 μSv/h, workers cannot enter the room. Second, lenses and optical fiber composed of glass that is radiation resistant up to 10 6 Gy would be damaged after <100 h near the segment, and devices using semiconductors could not work after several hours or so in the aforementioned dose-rate conditions. Third, during suspension of one blanket segment from the ceiling, the dose rate in the site boundary can be reduced by one order by a 23-cm-thicker reactor building roof. To reduce dose rate in public exposure to a value that is less than one-tenth of the public exposure radiation shielding design limit of 100 μSv/yr, the distance of the site boundary from the reactor must be greater than 200 m for a reactor building with a 160-cm-thick concrete roof. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Upgrading of the Munich reactor with a compact core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Glaeser, W.; Meier, J.; Rau, G.; Roehrmoser, A.; Zhang, L.

    1985-01-01

    An extremely small reactor core has been proposed for the project of substantial modernization of the FRM research reactor at Munich. According to the present status this 'compact core' will be a cylinder with a diameter of about 20 cm and 70 cm high. The new high-density U 3 Si/Al dispersion fuel of about 45% enrichment is contained in 20 concentric fuel plate rings. The compact core is surrounded by a large heavy-water tank which will incorporate the user installations (beam tubes and irradiation channels). However, the primary cooling circuit will contain light water which is not only more economic but also essential for the performance of the small core. An important optimization potential to decrease easily the power density peaks in the core is to reduce further the enrichment in those fuel plate rings where the neutron flux is particularly high. Two-dimensional neutron transport calculations show that such a core, containing about 7.5 kg 235 U, should have an effective multiplication factor of about 1.22 and an unperturbed but realistic maximum thermal neutron flux in the heavy water tank of 7 to 8x10 14 cm -2 .s -1 at 20 MW reactor power. (author)

  4. Wastewater treatment in a hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tizghadam, Mostafa [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Dagot, Christophe [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France)], E-mail: dagot@ensil.unilim.fr; Baudu, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2008-06-15

    A novel hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor (HASBR), which contained both suspended and attached-growth biomass perfect mixing cells in series, was developed by installing standing and hanging baffles and introducing plastic brushes into a conventional activated sludge (CAS) reactor. It was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The effects on the operational performance of developing the suspended and attached-growth biomass and reactor configuration were investigated. The change of the flow regime from complete-mix to plug-flow, and the addition of plastic brushes as a support for biofilm, resulted in considerable improvements in the COD, nitrogen removal efficiency of domestic wastewater and sludge settling properties. In steady state, approximately 98 {+-} 2% of the total COD and 98 {+-} 2% of the ammonia of the influent were removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 593 {+-} 11 mg COD/L and 43 {+-} 5 mg N/L, respectively, at a HRT of 10 h. These results were 93 {+-} 3 and 6 {+-} 3% for the CAS reactor, respectively. Approximately 90 {+-} 7% of the total COD was removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 654 {+-} 16 mg COD/L at a 3 h HRT, and in the organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.36 kg COD m{sup -3} day{sup -1}. The result for the CAS reactor was 60 {+-} 3%. Existing CAS plants can be upgraded by changing the reactor configuration and introducing biofilm support media into the aeration tank.

  5. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipaun, Susan, E-mail: susan@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Industrial Technology Division, Blok 29T, Bangi 43200, Selangor (Malaysia); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering, 222 Fulton Hall 301 W.14th St., Rolla 64509 MO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  6. Graphite-water steam-generating reactor in the USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dollezhal, N A [AN SSSR, Moscow

    1981-10-01

    One of the types of power reactor used in the USSR is the graphite-water steam-generating reactor RBMK. This produces saturated steam at a pressure of 7MPa. Reactors giving 1GWe each have been installed at the Leningrad, Kursk, Chernobyl and other power stations. Further stations using reactors of this type are being built. A description is given of the fuel element design, and of the layout of the plant. The main characteristics of RBMK reactors using fuel of rated and higher enrichment are listed.

  7. CANDU reactors with reactor grade plutonium/thorium carbide fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahin, Suemer [Atilim Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering; Khan, Mohammed Javed; Ahmed, Rizwan [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan); Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Faculty of Technology

    2011-08-15

    Reactor grade (RG) plutonium, accumulated as nuclear waste of commercial reactors can be re-utilized in CANDU reactors. TRISO type fuel can withstand very high fuel burn ups. On the other hand, carbide fuel would have higher neutronic and thermal performance than oxide fuel. In the present work, RG-PuC/ThC TRISO fuels particles are imbedded body-centered cubic (BCC) in a graphite matrix with a volume fraction of 60%. The fuel compacts conform to the dimensions of sintered CANDU fuel compacts are inserted in 37 zircolay rods to build the fuel zone of a bundle. Investigations have been conducted on a conventional CANDU reactor based on GENTILLYII design with 380 fuel bundles in the core. Three mixed fuel composition have been selected for numerical calculation; (1) 10% RG-PuC + 90% ThC; (2) 30% RG-PuC + 70% ThC; (3) 50% RG-PuC + 50% ThC. Initial reactor criticality values for the modes (1), (2) and (3) are calculated as k{sub {infinity}}{sub ,0} = 1.4848, 1.5756 and 1.627, respectively. Corresponding operation lifetimes are {proportional_to} 2.7, 8.4, and 15 years and with burn ups of {proportional_to} 72 000, 222 000 and 366 000 MW.d/tonne, respectively. Higher initial plutonium charge leads to higher burn ups and longer operation periods. In the course of reactor operation, most of the plutonium will be incinerated. At the end of life, remnants of plutonium isotopes would survive; and few amounts of uranium, americium and curium isotopes would be produced. (orig.)

  8. Rotating reactors : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, F.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    This review-perspective paper describes the current state-of-the-art in the field of rotating reactors. The paper has a focus on rotating reactor technology with applications at lab scale, pilot scale and industrial scale. Rotating reactors are classified and discussed according to their geometry:

  9. Progress report concerning safety research for nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    Examination and evaluation of safety research results for nuclear reactor facilities have been performed, as more than a year has elapsed since the plan had been initiated in April, 1976, by the special sub-committee for the safety of nuclear reactor facilities. The research is carried out by being divided roughly into 7 items, and seems to be steadily proceeding, though it does not yet reach the target. The above 7 items include researches for (1) criticality accident, (2) loss of coolant accident, (3) safety for light water reactor fuel, (4) construction safety for reactor facilities, (5) reduction of release of radioactive material, (6) safety evaluation based on the probability theory for reactor facilities, and (7) aseismatic measures for reactor facilities. With discussions on the progress and the results of the research this time, research on the behaviour on fuel in abnormal transients including in-core and out-core experiments has been added to the third item, deleting the power-cooling mismatch experiment in Nuclear Safety Research Reactor of JAERI. Also it has been decided to add two research to the seventh item, namely measured data collection, classification and analysis, and probability assessment of failures due to an earthquake. For these 7 items, the report describes the concrete contents of research to be performed in fiscal years of 1977 and 1978, by discussing on most rational and suitable contents conceivable at present. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Simulation development for TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handoyo, D.

    1997-01-01

    A simulator of the dynamic of TRIGA reactor has been made. this simulator is meant to study the reactor kinetic behavior and for operator training to more assure the safety and the reliability of the real operation of TRIGA reactor. the simulator consists of PC (Personal Computer) for processing the calculation of reactivity, neutron flux, period, ect and control panel for regulating the input data such as the change of power range, control rod position as well as cooling flow rate. the result will be displayed on screen monitor of personal computer as given in the real control room of TRIGA reactor. the output of simulator will be verified by comparing with measurement result in the real TRIGA MARK II reactor of Musashi institute of technology. for the change of reactivity of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 the reactor power and fuel temperature between the simulator and measurements are comparable

  11. Farewell to a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Denmark's second reactor, DR 2, whose first criticality took place the night of 18/19 December 1958 was shut down for the last time on 31 October 1975. It was a light-water moderrated and cooled reactor of swimming-pool type with a thermal power of 5 MW, using 90% enriched uranium. The operation is described. The reactor and auxiliary equipment are now being put 'in store' - all fuel elements sent for reprocessing, the reactor tank and cooling circuits emptied, and a lead shielding placed over the tank opening. The rest of the equipment will remain in place. (B.P.)

  12. Production of 48V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, S.; Cohen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The production of 48 V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the 6 Li(n, t) 4 He reaction, and eventually 7 Li(n, n't) 4 He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from 48 V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  13. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  14. Neutron source for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromasa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily increase a start-up power of a reactor without irradiation in other reactors. Structure: A neutron source comprises Cf 252 , a natural antimony rod, a layer of beryllium, and a vessel of neutron source. On upper and lower portion of Cf 252 are arranged natural antimony rods, which are surrounded by the Be layer, the entirety being charged into the vessel. The Cf 252 may emit neutron, has a half life more than a period of operating cycle of the reactor and is less deteriorated even irradiated by radioactive rays while being left within the reactor. The natural antimony rod is radioactivated by neutron from Cf 252 and neutron as reactor power increases to emit γ rays. The Be absorbs γ rays to emit the neutron. The antimony rod is irradiated within the reactor. Further, since the Cf 252 is small in neutron absorption cross section, it is hard to be deteriorated even while being inserted within the reactor. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Moderator heat recovery of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath, H.E.S.; Ahmed, S.T.

    1986-01-01

    A moderator heat recovery scheme is proposed for CANDU reactors. The proposed circuit utilizes all the moderator heat to the first stages of the plant feedwater heating system. CANDU-600 reactors are considered with moderator heat load varying from 120 to 160 MWsub(th), and moderator outlet temperature (from calandria) varying from 80 to 100 0 C. The steam saved from the turbine extraction system was found to produce an additional electric power ranging from 5 to 11 MW. This additional power represents a 0.7-1.7% increase in the plant electric output power and a 0.2-0.7% increase in the plant thermal efficiency. The outstanding features and advantages of the proposed scheme are presented. (author)

  16. Considerations in the design of a high power medical isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Nordyke, William H.; Brown, Roy

    2002-01-01

    For the low enriched aqueous homogeneous reactor to be economic in the production of medical isotopes, such as Mo-99 and Sr-89, the power level should be of the order of 100 kWth. This is double the earlier designs and this paper discusses the design changes which must be considered to meet this goal. The topics considered are: 1. Heat removal from the reactor solution; 2. Recombination of radiolytic gases; 3. Adequate radiation shielding; 4. Stability of reactor power with fluctuating reactivity; 5. Adequate cooling of the reflector; 6. Independent shutdown mechanisms; 7. Required volume of the reactor; 8. Economic implementation. (author)

  17. Characteristics and uses of a 250 kW TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimic, V.

    1985-01-01

    The 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor is a light water reactor with solid fuel elements in which the zirconium hydride moderator is homogeneously distributed between enriched uranium. Therefore the reactor has the large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, the fuel also has very high retention of radioactive fission products. The reactor core is a cylindrical configuration with an annular graphite reflector. The experimental facilities include a rotary specimen rack, a central incore radiation thimble, a pneumatic transfer system, and pulsing capability. Other experimental facilities include two radial and two tangential beam tubes, a graphite thermal column, and a graphite thermalizing column. At the steady state power of 250 kW the peak flux is 1x10 13 n/cm 2 s in the central test position. In addition, pulsing to about 2000 MW is usually provided giving peak fluxes of about 2x10 16 n/cm 2 sec. All TRIGA reactors produce a core-average thermal neutron flux of about 10 7 n.v per watt. Only with very large accelerators could such a high neutron flux be achieved. In order to give an appreciation for the research conducted at research reactors, the types of research could be summarized as follows: thermal neutron scattering, neutron radiography, neutron and nuclear physics, activation analysis, radiochemistry, biology and medicine, and teaching and training. Typical applied research with a 250 kW reactor has been conducted in medicine in biology, archeology, metallurgy and materials science, engineering and criminology. It is well known that research reactors have been used routinely to produce isotopes for industry and medicine. In some instances, reactors are the preferred method of isotope production. We can conclude that the 250 kW TRIGA research reactor is a useful and wide ranging source of radiation for basic and applied research. The operation cost for this instrument is relatively low. (author)

  18. Wastewater treatment in a hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizghadam, Mostafa; Dagot, Christophe; Baudu, Michel

    2008-01-01

    A novel hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor (HASBR), which contained both suspended and attached-growth biomass perfect mixing cells in series, was developed by installing standing and hanging baffles and introducing plastic brushes into a conventional activated sludge (CAS) reactor. It was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The effects on the operational performance of developing the suspended and attached-growth biomass and reactor configuration were investigated. The change of the flow regime from complete-mix to plug-flow, and the addition of plastic brushes as a support for biofilm, resulted in considerable improvements in the COD, nitrogen removal efficiency of domestic wastewater and sludge settling properties. In steady state, approximately 98 ± 2% of the total COD and 98 ± 2% of the ammonia of the influent were removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 593 ± 11 mg COD/L and 43 ± 5 mg N/L, respectively, at a HRT of 10 h. These results were 93 ± 3 and 6 ± 3% for the CAS reactor, respectively. Approximately 90 ± 7% of the total COD was removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 654 ± 16 mg COD/L at a 3 h HRT, and in the organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.36 kg COD m -3 day -1 . The result for the CAS reactor was 60 ± 3%. Existing CAS plants can be upgraded by changing the reactor configuration and introducing biofilm support media into the aeration tank

  19. Aerobic biodegradation of a sulfonated phenylazonaphthol dye by a bacterial community immobilized in a multistage packed-bed BAC reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Arias, Alfredo; Juárez-Ramírez, Cleotilde; de los Cobos-Vasconcelos, Daniel; Ruiz-Ordaz, Nora; Salmerón-Alcocer, Angélica; Ahuatzi-Chacón, Deifilia; Galíndez-Mayer, Juvencio

    2010-11-01

    A microbial community able to aerobically degrade the azo dye Acid Orange 7 was selected from riparian or lacustrine sediments collected at sites receiving textile wastewaters. Three bacterial strains, pertaining to the genera Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, and Rhizobium, constitute the selected community. The biodegradation of AO7 was carried out in batch-suspended cell culture and in a continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor. The rapid decolorization observed in batch culture, joined to a delay of about 24 h in COD removal and cell growth, suggests that enzymes involved in biodegradation of the aromatic amines generated after AO7 azo-bond cleavage (1-amino-2-naphthol [1-A2N] and 4-aminobenzenesulfonic acid [4-ABS]), are inducible in this microbial consortium. After this presumptive induction period, the accumulated byproducts, measured through COD, were partially metabolized and transformed in cell mass. At all azo dye loading rates used, complete removal of AO7 and 1-A2N was obtained in the multistage packed-bed BAC reactor (PBR).; however, the overall COD (eta ( COD )) and 4-ABS (eta ( ABS )) removal efficiencies obtained in steady state continuous culture were about 90%. Considering the toxicity of 1-A2N, its complete removal has particular relevance. In the first stages of the packed-bed BAC reactor (Fig. 4a-c), major removal was observed. In the last stage, only a slight removal of COD and 4-ABS was obtained. Comparing to several reported studies, the continuously operated multistage packed-bed BAC reactor showed similar or superior results. In addition, the operation of large-packed-bed BAC reactors could be improved by using several shallow BAC bed stages, because the pressure drop caused by bed compaction of a support material constituted by small and fragile particles can be reduced.

  20. Modeling and performance of the MHTGR [Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor] reactor cavity cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    1990-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) of the Modular High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy is designed to remove the nuclear afterheat passively in the event that neither the heat transport system nor the shutdown cooling circulator subsystem is available. A computer dynamic simulation for the physical and mathematical modeling of and RCCS is described here. Two conclusions can be made form computations performed under the assumption of a uniform reactor vessel temperature. First, the heat transferred across the annulus from the reactor vessel and then to ambient conditions is very dependent on the surface emissivities of the reactor vessel and RCCS panels. These emissivities should be periodically checked to ensure the safety function of the RCCS. Second, the heat transfer from the reactor vessel is reduced by a maximum of 10% by the presence of steam at 1 atm in the reactor cavity annulus for an assumed constant in the transmission of radiant energy across the annulus can be expected to result in an increase in the reactor vessel temperature for the MHTGR. Further investigation of participating radiation media, including small particles, in the reactor cavity annulus is warranted. 26 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  1. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  2. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In 1998 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  3. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  4. An internally illuminated monolith reactor: Pros and cons relative to a slurry reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, Joana T.; Carneiro, J.T.; Berger, Rob; Moulijn, Jacob A.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, kinetic models for the photo-oxidation of cyclohexane in two different photoreactor systems are discussed: a top illumination reactor (TIR) representative of a slurry reactor, and the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR) representing a reactor containing

  5. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigon, B.; Vacelet, H.; Dornbusch, D.

    2000-01-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor are presented. Safety criteria are explained. Finally, merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U 3 Si 2 fuel are discussed. (author)

  6. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  7. Neurexin-1β Binding to Neuroligin-1 Triggers the Preferential Recruitment of PSD-95 versus Gephyrin through Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Neuroligin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Giannone

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between neurexin-1β (Nrx1β and neuroligin-1 (Nlg1 induces early recruitment of the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95 scaffold; however, the associated signaling mechanisms are unknown. To dissociate the effects of ligand binding and receptor multimerization, we compared conditions in which Nlg1 in neurons was bound to Nrx1β or nonactivating HA antibodies. Time-lapse imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and single-particle tracking demonstrated that in addition to aggregating Nlg1, Nrx1β binding stimulates the interaction between Nlg1 and PSD-95. Phosphotyrosine immunoblots and pull-down of gephyrin by Nlg1 peptides in vitro showed that Nlg1 can be phosphorylated at a unique tyrosine (Y782, preventing gephyrin binding. Expression of Nlg1 point mutants in neurons indicated that Y782 phosphorylation controls the preferential binding of Nlg1 to PSD-95 versus gephyrin, and accordingly the formation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses. We propose that ligand-induced changes in the Nlg1 phosphotyrosine level control the balance between excitatory and inhibitory scaffold assembly during synapse formation and stabilization.

  8. Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S4) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The Submersion-Subcritical Safe Space (S 4 ) reactor, developed for future space power applications and avoidance of single point failures, is presented. The S 4 reactor has a Mo-14% Re solid core, loaded with uranium nitride fuel, cooled by He-30% Xe and sized to provide 550 kWth for 7 years of equivalent full power operation. The beryllium oxide reflector of the S 4 reactor is designed to completely disassemble upon impact on water or soil. The potential of using Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) materials in different forms to ensure that the reactor remains subcritical in the worst-case submersion accident is investigated. Nine potential SSAs are considered in terms of their effect on the thickness of the radial reflector and on the combined mass of the reactor and the radiation shadow shield. The SSA materials are incorporated as a thin (0.1 mm) coating on the outside surface of the reactor core and as core additions in three possible forms: 2.0 mm diameter pins in the interstices of the core block, 0.25 mm thick sleeves around the fuel stacks and/or additions to the uranium nitride fuel. Results show that with a boron carbide coating and 0.25 mm iridium sleeves around the fuel stacks the S 4 reactor has a reflector outer diameter of 43.5 cm with a combined reactor and shadow shield mass of 935.1 kg. The S 4 reactor with 12.5 at.% gadolinium-155 added to the fuel, 2.0 mm diameter gadolinium-155 sesquioxide interstitial pins, and a 0.1 mm thick gadolinium-155 sesquioxide coating has a slightly smaller reflector outer diameter of 43.0 cm, resulting in a smaller total reactor and shield mass of 901.7 kg. With 8.0 at.% europium-151 added to the fuel, along with europium-151 sesquioxide for the pins and coating, the reflector's outer diameter and the total reactor and shield mass are further reduced to 41.5 cm and 869.2 kg, respectively

  9. The SPHINX reactor for engineering tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Artamkin, K.N.; Bovin, A.P.; Bulkin, Y.M.; Kartashev, E.F.; Korneev, A.A.; Stenbok, I.A.; Terekhov, A.S.; Khmel'Shehikov, V.V.; Cherkashov, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    A research reactor known as SPHINX is under development in the USSR. The reactor will be used mainly to carry out tests on mock-up power reactor fuel assemblies under close-to-normal parameters in experimental loop channels installed in the core and reflector of the reactor, as well as to test samples of structural materials in ampoule and loop channels. The SPHINX reactor is a channel-type reactor with light-water coolant and moderator. Maximum achievable neutron flux density in the experimental channels (cell composition 50% Fe, 50% H 2 O) is 1.1 X 10 15 neutrons/cm 2 · s for fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) and 1.7 X 10 15 for thermal neutrons at a reactor power of 200 MW. The design concepts used represent a further development of the technical features which have met with approval in the MR and MIR channel-type engineering test reactors currently in use in the USSR. The 'in-pond channel' construction makes the facility flexible and eases the carrying out of experimental work while keeping discharges of radioactivity into the environment to a low level. The reactor and all associated buildings and constructions conform to modern radiation safety and environmental protection requirements

  10. Results of a comparison study of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno de Mesquita, K.G.; Gout, W.; Heil, J.A.; Tanke, R.H.J.; Geevers, F.

    1991-06-01

    The PINK programme is a 4-year programme of five parties involved in nuclear energy in the Netherlands: GKN (operator of the Dodewaard plant), KEMA (Research institute of the Netherlands Utilities), ECN (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation), NUCON (Engineering and Contracting Company) and IRI Interfaculty Reactor Institute of the Delft University of Technology), to coordinate their efforts to intensify the nuclear competence of the industry, the utilities and the research and engineering companies. This programme is sponsored by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The PINK programme consists of five parts. This report pertains to part 1 of the programme: comparison study of advanced reactors concerning the four so-called second-stage designs SBWR, AP600, SIR and CANDU, which, compared to the first-stage reactor designs, features increased use of passive safety systems and simplification. The objective of the current study is to compare these advanced reactor designs in order to provide comprehensive information for the PINK steering committee that is useful in the selection process of a design for further study and development work. In ch. 2 the main features of the four reactors are highlighted. In ch. 3 the most important safety features and the behaviour of the four reactors under accident situations are compared. Passive safety systems are identified and forgivingness is described and compared. Results of the preliminary probabilistic safety analysis are presented. Ch. 4 deals with the proven technology of the four concepts, ch. 5 with the Netherlands requirements, ch. 6 with commercial aspects, and ch. 7 with the fuel cycle and radioactive waste produced. In ch. 8 the costs are compared and finally in ch. 9 conclusions are drawn and recommendations are made. (author). 13 figs

  11. Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Guen Hong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A configuration of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor with a low aspect ratio tokamak-type neutron source was determined in a self-consistent manner by using coupled analysis of tokamak systems and neutron transport. We investigated the impact of blanket configuration on the characteristics of a fusion-driven transmutation reactor. It was shown that by merging the TRU burning blanket and tritium breeding blanket, which uses PbLi as the tritium breeding material and as coolant, effective transmutation is possible. The TRU transmutation capability can be improved with a reduced blanket thickness, and fast fluence at the first wall can be reduced.  Article History: Received: July 10th 2017; Received: Dec 17th 2017; Accepted: February 2nd 2018; Available online How to Cite This Article: Hong, B.G. (2018 Impact of Blanket Configuration on the Design of a Fusion-Driven Transmutation Reactor. International Journal of Renewable Energy Development, 7(1, 65-70. https://doi.org/10.14710/ijred.7.1.65-70

  12. Reactor utilization, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Stanic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor was operated until August 1984 due to prohibition issued by the Ministry since the reactor does not have the emergency cooling system nor special filters in the ventilation system yet. This means that the operation plan was fulfilled by 69%. This annex includes detailed tables containing data about utilization of reactor experimental channels, irradiated samples, as well as interruptions of operation. Detailed data about reactor power during this period are shown as well

  13. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  14. Monitoring the Thermal Power of Nuclear Reactors with a Prototype Cubic Meter Antineutrino Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, A; Bowden, N; Misner, A; Palmer, T

    2007-06-27

    In this paper, we estimate how quickly and how precisely a reactor's operational status and thermal power can be monitored over hour to month time scales, using the antineutrino rate as measured by a cubic meter scale detector. Our results are obtained from a detector we have deployed and operated at 25 meter standoff from a reactor core. This prototype can detect a prompt reactor shutdown within five hours, and monitor relative thermal power to 3.5% within 7 days. Monitoring of short-term power changes in this way may be useful in the context of International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Reactor Safeguards Regime, or other cooperative monitoring regimes.

  15. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  16. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,

  17. Investigations related to a one-piece removal of the reactor block in the frame of the JRR-3 reconstruction program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, N.; Kanenari, A.; Futamura, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Suzuki, S.; Nagase, T.; Iwatani, A.; Otsubo, F.

    1987-01-01

    In the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), an outdated research reactor (Japan Research Reactor No.3; JRR-3) was removed to a storage facility between October 14th and November 7th, 1986. The removal of the 2250-ton reactor block (10 x 10 x 10 m) was performed as a part of a program to replace the JRR-3's core (10-MW thermal) with an upgraded research reactor core. The heavy water and fuel elements were taken out from the JRR-3 before removal work began. The reactor block was raised about 3.7 meters, using a 12-cubic meter steel frame and a center-hole jack system. The reactor block was then transported horizontally about 34 meters on steel rails, using four 100-ton jacks, to a storage facility. Finally, the reactor block was lowered 14 meters into the storage facility. After the reactor block was stored, a new 20-MW thermal, light-water moderated and cooled JRR-3 core will be built, with criticality targeted for 1989

  18. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  19. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guigon, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Reacteur Jules Horowitz, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vacelet, H. [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques, CERCA, Etablissement de Romans, 26 (France); Dornbusch, D. [Technicatome, Service d' Architecture Generale, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2003-07-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs: from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper will be presented the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor: its total power, neutron flux, fuel element... Safety criteria will be explained. Finally merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-M major radius commercial tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and MHD calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using an MGF set and solid-state rectifier/inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (approx. > 8 s) seems to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  1. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  2. Hanford B Reactor Building Hazard Assessment Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P. W.

    1999-01-01

    The 105-B Reactor (hereinafter referred to as B Reactor) is located in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The B Reactor is one of nine plutonium production reactors that were constructed in the 1940s during the Cold War Era. Construction of the B Reactor began June 7, 1943, and operation began on September 26, 1944. The Environmental Restoration Contractor was requested by RL to provide an assessment/characterization of the B Reactor building to determine and document the hazards that are present and could pose a threat to the environment and/or to individuals touring the building. This report documents the potential hazards, determines the feasibility of mitigating the hazards, and makes recommendations regarding areas where public tour access should not be permitted

  3. RA reactor exploitation, task 3.08/01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecevic, V.

    1963-01-01

    During 1963 the RA reactor was operated for 1852 hours at mean power of 5.7 MW (total power production was 10716 MWh). Reactor was used for irradiation according to the demand of 356 users, and 15 experiments. The reason for decreased operation in comparison with the previous year was repair of all the reactor equipment and decontamination of the heavy water system. This report contains detailed data about reactor power, reactivity changes and fuel burnup. Mean monthly usage of the reactor experimental channels as well as samples which were irradiated are part of this report

  4. The STAT7 Code for Statistical Propagation of Uncertainties In Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of Plate-Fueled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Wilson, Erik [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The STAT code was written to automate many of the steady-state thermal hydraulic safety calculations for the MIT research reactor, both for conversion of the reactor from high enrichment uranium fuel to low enrichment uranium fuel and for future fuel re-loads after the conversion. A Monte-Carlo statistical propagation approach is used to treat uncertainties in important parameters in the analysis. These safety calculations are ultimately intended to protect against high fuel plate temperatures due to critical heat flux or departure from nucleate boiling or onset of flow instability; but additional margin is obtained by basing the limiting safety settings on avoiding onset of nucleate boiling. STAT7 can simultaneously analyze all of the axial nodes of all of the fuel plates and all of the coolant channels for one stripe of a fuel element. The stripes run the length of the fuel, from the bottom to the top. Power splits are calculated for each axial node of each plate to determine how much of the power goes out each face of the plate. By running STAT7 multiple times, full core analysis has been performed by analyzing the margin to ONB for each axial node of each stripe of each plate of each element in the core.

  5. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking

  6. University Reactor Instrumentation grant program. Final report, September 7, 1990--August 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (OSU NRL) participated in the Department of Energy (DOE) grant program commonly denoted as the University Reactor Instrumentation (URI) program from the period September 1990 through August 1995, after which funding was terminated on a programmatic basis by DOE. This program provided funding support for acquisition of capital equipment targeted for facility upgrades and improvements, including modernizing reactor systems and instrumentation, improvements in research and instructional capabilities, and infrastructure enhancements. The staff of the OSU NRL submitted five grant applications during this period, all of which were funded either partially or in their entirety. This report will provide an overview of the activities carried out under these grants and assess their impact on the OSU NRL facilities

  7. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  8. Roles of individual radicals generated by a submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor during Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Saiful Islam [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Ji, E-mail: yunji@kfri.re.kr [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD) has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150). Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml). E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES) shows that OH and NO (α, β) radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA) OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml) than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β) radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.

  9. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Painter, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R 0 = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B 0 = 4.8-7.5 T, B max (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions

  10. Safety equipment in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiratori, Hirozo; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Ugawa, Yukio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To safely retain, even if fuel should be molten and flown through the bottom of a container in a reactor, the molten fuel to remove heat generation of the fuel to prevent occurrence of a critical trouble. Structure: A reactor container housing a core and coolant has thereunder a separation dome in a central portion thereof and a partitioning plate coaxially and circularly disposed in the periphery of the separation dome, with a tray formed of magnesium oxide being disposed. Further, a cooling path system is provided so as to surround the tray. The cooling path system and the reactor container are surrounded and protected by a reactor wall provided with heat insulating refractory bricks, a coolant pouring system extends through the reactor wall, and the coolant is supplied to the tray. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  12. FISA 2009 - 7th European Commission conference on EURATOM research and training in reactor systems. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, G. van; Manolatos, P.; Hugon, M.; Bhatnagar, V.; Deffrennes, M.; Webster, S.

    2010-01-01

    The main achievements of the first series of projects under EURATOM FP-7 for nuclear research and training activities (2007 to 2011) were discussed. Approximately 500 participants were registered at FISA 2009 and at the 7 post-conference workshops, representing a wide audience of nuclear scientists and decision makers coming from 32 countries worldwide. The focus of the conference was on scientific and technological research in the following areas: nuclear plant life management for existing reactors (Generation II), severe accident management (Generation III), assessment of future nuclear fission systems (Generation IV), partitioning and transmutation systems (innovative fuels), access to large research infrastructures, and nuclear education and training. Special attention was devoted to the societal and industrial goals of GIF: sustainability, industrial competitiveness, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance. (orig.)

  13. Reactor FaceMap Tool: A modern graphics tool for displaying reactor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A prominent graphical user interface in reactor physics applications at the Savannah River Site is the reactor facemap display. This is a two dimensional view of a cross section of a reactor. In the past each application which needed a facemap implemented its own version. Thus, none of the code was reused, the facemap implementation was hardware dependent and the user interface was different for each facemap. The Reactor FaceMap Tool was built to solve these problems. Through the use of modern computing technologies such as X Windows, object-oriented programming and client/server technology the Reactor FaceMap Tool has the flexibility to work in many diverse applications and the portability to run on numerous types of hardware

  14. MYRRHA – A multi-purpose fast spectrum research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aït Abderrahim, Hamid; Baeten, Peter; De Bruyn, Didier; Fernandez, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Historical evolution of the MYRRHA project. ► Detail design of the MYRRHA Accelerator Driven System. ► Irradiation performance simulation of the MYRRHA ADS. - Abstract: MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) currently under development at SCK⋅CEN and will replace the Material Testing Reactor (MTR) BR2. The MYRRHA facility is currently being developed with the aid of the FP7-project “Central Design Team” and will be as a flexible irradiation facility, able to work in both subcritical and critical modes. In this way, MYRRHA will allow fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for GEN IV systems, material developments for fusion reactors, radioisotope production for medical and industrial applications, and Si-doping. MYRRHA will also demonstrate the full concept of Accelerator Driven Systems by coupling the requisite three components (accelerator, spallation target and subcritical reactor) at reasonable power level to allow operation feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow for the study of efficient transmutation of high-level nuclear waste. Since MYRRHA is based on the heavy liquid metal technology, Lead–Bismuth Eutectic, it will be able to significantly contribute to the development of Lead Fast Reactor (LFR) technology. Further, in critical mode, MYRRHA will play the role of European Technology Pilot Plant in the path forward for LFR. In this paper we present the historical perspectives, international and high profile membership within the consortium of the MYRRHA project and the rationale for the design choices are presented. Also, the latest configuration of the reactor system is described together with the different irradiation capabilities. More specifically, the possibilities and performances for fuel irradiations are presented in detail.

  15. Effluent releases at the TRIGA reactor facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittemore, W L [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1974-07-01

    The principal effluent from the operating TRIGA reactors in our facility is argon-41. As monitored by a recording gas and particulate stack monitor, the values shown in the table, the Mark III operating 24 hours per day for very long periods produced the largest amount of radioactive argon. The quantity of 23.7 Ci A-41 when diluted by the normal reactor room ventilation system corresponded to 1.45 x 10{sup -6} {mu}Ci/cc. As diluted in the roof stack stream and the reactor building wake, the concentration immediately outside the reactor building was 25% MPC for an unrestricted area. The continued dilution of this effluent resulted in a concentration of a few percent MPC at the site boundary (unrestricted area) 350 meters from the reactor. (author)

  16. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given

  17. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given. (author)

  18. A flooding induced station blackout analysis for a pressurized water reactor using the RISMC toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandelli, Diego; Prescott, Steven; Smith, Curtis; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate the impact of a power uprate on a pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a tsunami-induced flooding test case. This analysis is performed using the RISMC toolkit: the RELAP-7 and RAVEN codes. RELAP-7 is the new generation of system analysis codes that is responsible for simulating the thermal-hydraulic dynamics of PWR and boiling water reactor systems. RAVEN has two capabilities: to act as a controller of the RELAP-7 simulation (e.g., component/system activation) and to perform statistical analyses. In our case, the simulation of the flooding is performed by using an advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics code called NEUTRINO. The obtained results allow the user to investigate and quantify the impact of timing and sequencing of events on system safety. The impact of power uprate is determined in terms of both core damage probability and safety margins

  19. Global risk of radioactive fallout after major nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Kunkel, D.; Lawrence, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Major reactor accidents of nuclear power plants are rare, yet the consequences are catastrophic. But what is meant by ''rare''? And what can be learned from the Chernobyl and Fukushima incidents? Here we assess the cumulative, global risk of exposure to radioactivity due to atmospheric dispersion of gases and particles following severe nuclear accidents (the most severe ones on the International Nuclear Event Scale, INES 7), using particulate "1"3"7Cs and gaseous "1"3"1I as proxies for the fallout. Our results indicate that previously the occurrence of INES 7 major accidents and the risks of radioactive contamination have been underestimated. Using a global model of the atmosphere we compute that on average, in the event of a major reactor accident of any nuclear power plant worldwide, more than 90% of emitted "1"3"7Cs would be transported beyond 50 km and about 50% beyond 1000 km distance before being deposited. This corroborates that such accidents have large-scale and trans-boundary impacts. Although the emission strengths and atmospheric removal processes of "1"3"7Cs and "1"3"1I are quite different, the radioactive contamination patterns over land and the human exposure due to deposition are computed to be similar. High human exposure risks occur around reactors in densely populated regions, notably in West Europe and South Asia, where a major reactor accident can subject around 30 million people to radioactive contamination. The recent decision by Germany to phase out its nuclear reactors will reduce the national risk, though a large risk will still remain from the reactors in neighbouring countries.

  20. Nuclear reactor refueling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a nuclear reactor core and a fuel storage area while the fuel assembies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. The system comprises an in-vessel fuel transfer machine located inside the reactor vessel and an ex-vessel fuel transfer machine located in a fuel storage tank. The in-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises two independently rotatable frames with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed on the lower rotatable frame. The ex-vessel fuel transfer machine comprises one frame with a pivotable fuel transfer apparatus disposed thereon. The pivotable apparatuses are capable of being aligned with each other to transfer a fuel assembly between the reactor vessel and fuel storage tank while the fuel assembly remains completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant. 9 claims, 7 figures

  1. A conceptual design of neutron tumor therapy reactor facility with a YAYOI based fast neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; An, Shigehiro.

    1983-01-01

    Fast neutron is known as one of useful radiations for radiation therapy of tumors. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of tumors which makes use of 10 B(n, α) 7 Li reaction of 10 B compounds selectively attached to tumor cells with thermal and intermediate neutrons is another way of neutron based radiation therapy which is, above all, attractive enough to kill tumor cells selectively sparing normal tissue. In Japan, BNCT has already been applied and leaned to be effective. After more than a decade operational experiences and the specific experiments designed for therapeutical purposes, in this paper, a conceptual design of a special neutron therapy reactor facility based on YAYOI - fast neutron source reactor of Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo - modified to provide an upward beam of fast and intermediate neutrons is presented. Emphasis is placed on the in-house nature of facility and on the coordinating capability of biological and physical researches as well as maintenances of the facility. (author)

  2. RA Research reactor Annual report 1982 - Part 1, Operation, maintenance and utilization of the RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Martinc, R.; Kozomara-Maic, S.; Cupac, S.; Radivojevic, J.; Stamenkovic, D.; Skoric, M.; Miokovic, J.

    1982-12-01

    Reactor test operation started in September 1981 at 2 MW power with 80% enriched fuel continued during 1982 according to the previous plan. The initial reactor core was made of 44 fuel channel each containing 10 fuel slugs. The first half of 1982 was used for the needed measurements and analysis of operating parameters and functioning of reactor systems and equipment under operating conditions. Program concerned with the testing operation at higher power levels was started in the second half of this year. It was found that the inherent excess reactivity and control rod worths ensure safe operation according to the IAEA safety standards. Excess reactivity is high enough to enable higher power level of 4.7 MW during 4 monthly cycles each lasting 15-20 days. Favourable conditions for cooling exist for the initial core configuration. Effects of poisoning at startup on the reactivity and power density distribution were measured as well as initial spatial distribution of the neutron flux which was 3,9 10 13 cm -2 s -1 at 2 MW power. Modification of the calibration coefficient in the system for automated power level control was determined. All the results show that all the safety criteria and limitations concerned with fuel utilization are fulfilled if reactor power would be 4.7 MW. Additional testing operation at 3, 4, and 4.7 MW power levels will be needed after obtaining the licence for operating at nominal power. Transition from the initial core with 44 fuel channels to the equilibrium lattice configuration with 72 fuel channels each containing 10 fuel slugs, would be done gradually. Reactor was not operated in September because of the secondary coolant pipes were exchanged between Danube and the horizontal sedimentary. Control and maintenance of the reactor equipment was done regularly and efficiently dependent on the availability of the spare parts. Difficulties in maintenance of the reactor instrumentation were caused by unavailability of the outdated spare parts

  3. Coolant cleanup system for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Atsushi; Usui, Naoshi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi; Osumi, Katsumi.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the electric conductivity of reactor water lower and to minimize the heat loss in the cleanup system by providing a low temperature cleanup system and a high temperature cleanup system together. Constitution: A low temperature cleanup system using ion exchange resins as filter aids and a high temperature cleanup system using inorganic ion exchange materials as filter aids are provided in combination. A part of the reactor water in a reactor pressure vessel is passed through a conductivity meter, one portion of which flows into the high temperature cleanup system having no heat exchanger and filled with inorganic ion exchange materials by way of a first flow rate control valve and the other portion of which flows into the low temperature cleanup system having heat exchangers and filled with the ion exchange materials by way of a second control valve. The first control valve is adjusted so as to flow, for example, about more than 15% of the feedwater flow rate to the high temperature cleanup system and the second control valve is adjusted with its valve opening degree depending on the indication of the conductivity meter so as to flow about 2 - 7 % of the feedwater flow rate into the low temperature cleanup system, to thereby control the electric conductivity to between 0.055 - 0.3 μS/cm. (Moriyama, K.)

  4. Culture-independent detection of 'TM7' bacteria in a streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurogi, T.; Linh, N. T. T.; Kuroki, T.; Yamada, T. [Department of Environmental and Life Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Hiraishi, A. [Department of Environmental and Life Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580, Japan and Electronics-inspired Interdisciplinary Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    Nitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes has been believed for long time to take place under neutral conditions and is inhibited under acidic conditions. However, we previously constructed acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) being capable of nitrification at < pH 4 and harboring bacteria of the candidate phylum 'TM7' as the major constituents of the microbial community. In light of the fact that the 16S rRNA of TM7 bacteria has a highly atypical base substitution possibly responsible for resistance to streptomycin at the ribosome level, this study was undertaken to construct streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying (SRAN) reactors and to demonstrate whether TM7 bacteria are abundant in these reactors. The SRAN reactors were constructed by seeding with nitrifying sludge from an ANSBR and cultivating with ammonium-containing mineral medium (pH 4.0), to which streptomycin at a concentration of 10, 30 and 50 mg L{sup −1} was added. In all reactors, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate in every batch cycle. PCR-aided denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that some major clones assigned to TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were constantly present during the overall period of operation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes also showed that TM7 bacteria predominated in all SRAN reactors, accounting for 58% of the total bacterial population on average. Although the biological significance of the TM7 bacteria in the SRAN reactors are unknown, our results suggest that these bacteria are possibly streptomycin-resistant and play some important roles in the acidophilic nitrifying process.

  5. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-m major radius commerical tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using a motor-generator flywheel set and solid-state rectifier-inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (greater than or equal to 8 s) seem to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  6. Reinforced confinement in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor containing a reactor core, a swimming pool space that is filled and pressurized with a neutron-absorbing solution, a reactor tank, at least one heat exchanger, at least one inlet line, at least one return line and at least one circulation pump, where the said reactor tank is confined in the said swimming pool space and designed to be cooled with the aid of relatively pure water, which is fed by means of the said at least one circulating pump to the said reactor tank from the said heat exchanger via the said at least one inlet line and is returned to the heat exchanger via the said at least one return line. The problem that is to be solved by the invention is to design a reactor of the above type in such a way that a complete confinement of the primary circuit of the reactor is achieved at relatively low extra cost. This problem is solved by providing the reactor with a special confinement space that confines the heat exchanger, but not the reactor tank, with the confinement space and the swimming pool space being fashioned in the same concrete body

  7. Probabilistic analysis of some safety aspects of a swimming pool reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieber, K.; Nicolescu, T.

    1984-01-01

    A probabilistic risk analysis of some safety aspects without the investigation of radioactivity release has been performed for the 10 MW (thermal) swimming-pool research reactor SAPHIR. Our presentation is focused on the 7 internal initiating events found to be relevant with respect to accident sequences that could result with core melt due to loss of coolant or overcriticality. The results are given by the core melt frequencies for the investigated accident sequences. It could be demonstrated by our investigation that the core melt hazard of the reactor is extremely low. (author)

  8. RAPK-7. code for calculating mass transfer and corrosion products activation in the circulation loops of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaylov, A.V.; Moryakov, A.V.; Nikitin, A.V.

    2012-09-01

    The RAPK-7 code was developed to simulate formation of non-irradiated and activated corrosion products, their transport and deposition on inner surfaces of primary components and in primary coolant of water-cooled reactors during their operation on power and after shutdown. The key feature of this code is its particular emphasis on the contamination of circulation loops by radioactive corrosion products of reactor which operates on variable modes. Such reactors typically are: research reactors and their experimental loops, naval nuclear power systems, etc. It's typical for such reactors to have repeated (over the campaign) and frequent variations in power (activating neutron fluxes), thermal-physical, hydrodynamic and other parameters of coolant, intensive water mass exchange between the circulation loop and the pressuriser, etc. The processes of mass-transfer are described by the RAPK-7 code with the use of models similar to those employed by the COTRAN and PACTOLE codes. The circulation circuit is broken down into computation areas. The user will then set the concentrations of water chemistry adjusting additives (alkali, boric acid, ammonia, hydrogen), as well as parameters in each area, such as wall temperature, coolant flow core temperature, pressure, flow rate, velocity, the radial component of coolant flowrate and activating neutron flux density. All the above parameters can be set as time-dependent step functions (bar charts), with independent time steps for each of them. The number of computation areas, the number of time dependencies and the level of detail in their description are limited by computer capabilities only. A 'brake' mode with a single-step change of the required set of parameters is provided to allow for jump-type events, such as replacement of contaminated components with clean ones during core refueling or repairs, emergency injection of boric acid, water mass exchange between the circulation circuit and the pressuriser, etc

  9. Target-fueled nuclear reactor for medical isotope production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Richard L.; Parma, Edward J.

    2017-06-27

    A small, low-enriched, passively safe, low-power nuclear reactor comprises a core of target and fuel pins that can be processed to produce the medical isotope .sup.99Mo and other fission product isotopes. The fuel for the reactor and the targets for the .sup.99Mo production are the same. The fuel can be low enriched uranium oxide, enriched to less than 20% .sup.235U. The reactor power level can be 1 to 2 MW. The reactor is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days.

  10. Transmutation of actinide 237Np with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.M.; Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of fusion reactors to transmute fission reactor wastes to stable species is an attractive concept. In this paper, the feasibility of transmutation of the long-lived actinide radioactive waste Np-237 with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor has been investigated. A new waste management concept of burning HLW (High Level Waste), utilizing released energy and converting Np-237 into fissile fuel Pu-239 through transmutation has been adopted. The detailed neutronics and depletion calculation of waste inventories was carried out with a modified version of one-dimensional neutron transport and burnup calculation code system BISON1.5 in this study. The transmutation rate of Np with relationship to neutron wall loading, Pu and Np with relationship to neutron wall load, Pu and Np concentration in the transmutation zone have been explored as well as relevant results are also given

  11. Practical course on reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2004-06-01

    This course is based on the description of the instrumentation of the TRIGA-reactor Vienna, which is used for training research and isotope production. It comprises the following chapters: 1. instrumentation, 2. calibration of the nuclear channels, 3. rod drop time of the control rods, 4. neutron flux density measurements using compensated ionization, 5. neutron flux density measurement with fission chambers (FC), 6. neutron flux density measurement with self-powered neutron detectors (SPND), 7. pressurized water reactor simulator, 8. verification of the radiation level during reactor operation. There is one appendix about neutron-sensitive thermocouples. (nevyjel)

  12. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), a European Material Testing Reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation. To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10 14 ncm -2 s -1 and a fast flux of 6,4.10 14 ncm -2 s -1 , it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = deplacement per atom). The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (author)

  13. Reactor physics aspects of burning actinides in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of the different recycling strategies of actinides other than fuel treated in the literature, is given along with nuclear data requirements for actinide build-up and transmutation studies. The effects of recycling actinides in a nuclear reactor on the flux distribution, the infinite neutron multiplication factor, the reactivity control system, the reactivity coefficients and the delayed neutron fraction are discussed considering a notional LWR or LMFBR as an Actinide Trasmutaton Reactor. Some operational problems of Actinide Transmutation reactors are mentioned, which are caused by the α-decay heat and the neutron sources of Actinide Target Elements

  14. A nuclear reactor for district heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, A.R.; Fenton, N.

    1989-07-01

    Global energy requirements are expected to double over the next 40 years. In the northern hemisphere, many countries consume in excess of 25 percent of their primary energy supply for building heating. Satisfying this need, within the constraints now being acknowledged for sustainable global development, provides an important opportunity for district heating. Fuel-use flexibility, energy and resource conservation, and reduced atmospheric pollution from acid gases and greenhouse gases, are important features offered by district heating systems. Among the major fuel options, only hydro-electricity and nuclear heat completely avoid emissions of combustion gases. To fill the need for an economical nuclear heat source, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited has designed a 10 MW plant that is suitable as a heat source within a network or as the main supply to large individual users. Producing hot water at temperatures below 100 degrees C, it incorporates a small pool-type reactor based on AECL's successful SLOWPOKE Research Reactor. A 2 MW prototype for the commercial unit is now being tested at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba. With capital costs of $7 million (Canadian), unit energy costs are projected to be $0.02/kWh for a 10 MW unit operating in a heating grid over a 30-year period. By keeping the reactor power low and the water temperature below 100 degrees C, much of the complexity of the large nuclear power plants can be avoided, thus allowing these small, safe nuclear heating systems to be economically viable

  15. Biodegradation of p-nitrophenol using Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in a novel upflow packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2011-01-01

    A novel packed bed reactor (PBR) was designed with cross flow aeration at multiple ports along the depth to improve the hydrodynamic conditions of the reactor, and the biodegradation efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 on p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in PBR at different PNP loading rates were evaluated. The novel PBR was designed to improve the hydrodynamic features such as mixing time profile (t m95 ), oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k L a), and overall gas hold up capacity (ε G ) of the reactor. PNP concentration in the influent was varied between 600 and 1400 mg l -1 whereas the hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the reactor was varied between 18 and 7.5 h. Complete removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor up to a PNP loading rate of 2787 mg l -1 d -1 . More than 99.9% removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor for an influent concentration of 1400 mg l -1 and at 18 h HRT. In the present study, PNP was utilized as sole source of carbon and energy by A. chlorophenolicus A6. Furthermore, the bioreactor showed good compatibility in handling shock loading of PNP.

  16. Micropollutant removal from black water and grey water sludge in a UASB-GAC reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkovskyi, A; Sevenou, L; Meulepas, R J W; Hernandez Leal, L; Zeeman, G; Rijnaarts, H H M

    2018-02-01

    The effect of granular activated carbon (GAC) addition on the removal of diclofenac, ibuprofen, metoprolol, galaxolide and triclosan in a up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor was studied. Prior to the reactor studies, batch experiments indicated that addition of activated carbon to UASB sludge can decrease micropollutant concentrations in both liquid phase and sludge. In continuous experiments, two UASB reactors were operated for 260 days at an HRT of 20 days, using a mixture of source separated black water and sludge from aerobic grey water treatment as influent. GAC (5.7 g per liter of reactor volume) was added to one of the reactors on day 138. No significant difference in COD removal and biogas production between reactors with and without GAC addition was observed. In the presence of GAC, fewer micropollutants were washed out with the effluent and a lower accumulation of micropollutants in sludge and particulate organic matter occurred, which is an advantage in micropollutant emission reduction from wastewater. However, the removal of micropollutants by adding GAC to a UASB reactor would require more activated carbon compared to effluent post-treatment. Additional research is needed to estimate the effect of bioregeneration on the lifetime of activated carbon in a UASB-GAC reactor.

  17. Status Report on Scoping Reactor Physics and Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Molten Salt Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Mueller, Donald E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-08-31

    Experiments are being planned at Research Centre Rež (RC Rež) to use the FLiBe (2 7LiF-BeF2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) to perform reactor physics measurements in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments are intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems utilizing FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis of these planned experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objective of these analyses is to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a status update on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. The S/U analyses will be used to inform design of FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE.

  18. Status Report on Scoping Reactor Physics and Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Molten Salt Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Mueller, Donald E.; Patton, Bruce W.; Powers, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments are being planned at Research Centre Rež (RC Rež) to use the FLiBe (2 "7LiF-BeF_2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) to perform reactor physics measurements in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments are intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems utilizing FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analysis of these planned experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objective of these analyses is to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a status update on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. The S/U analyses will be used to inform design of FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE.

  19. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration; Turbina de gas reactor modular con helio en cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de los Santos, G. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: tesgleon@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  20. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashanii, Ahmed Ali

    2010-01-01

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  1. Production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Gerencia de Capacitacion, Quimica Nuclear y Ciencias de la Salud, Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Univ. Tecnologica Nacional, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4} He reaction, and eventually {sup 7}Li(n, n't){sup 4}He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from {sup 48}V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  2. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  3. Digital control system of advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Huaqing; Zhang Rui; Liu Lixin

    2001-01-01

    This article produced the Digital Control System For Advanced Reactor made by NPIC. This system uses Siemens SIMATIC PCS 7 process control system and includes five control system: reactor power control system, pressurizer level control system, pressurizer pressure control system, steam generator water level control system and dump control system. This system uses three automatic station to realize the function of five control system. Because the safety requisition of reactor is very strict, the system is redundant. The system configuration uses CFC and SCL. the human-machine interface is configured by Wincc. Finally the system passed the test of simulation by using RETRAN 02 to simulate the control object. The research solved the key technology of digital control system of reactor and will be very helpful for the nationalization of digital reactor control system

  4. Development of a methodology of analysis of instabilities in BWR reactors; Desarrollo de una metodologia de analisis de inestabilidades en reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Abarca, A.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu, G.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology of analysis of the reactors instabilities of BWR type. This methodology covers of modal analysis of the point operation techniques of signal analysis and simulation of transients, through 3D Coupled RELAP5/PARCSv2.7 code.

  5. Collective control of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognin, L

    1995-06-01

    Nowadays, mainly related to the increasing complexity of working environments, working activities become more and collective. The present research on the paradoxical nature of working teams, considered from a reliability point of view. This document is composed of four Sections. The first Section introduces the context of the research, its objectives and the underlying assumptions. In the second Section, we describe a working situation, which is the control of a nuclear reactor. Relations between cooperative work and reliability are discussed in the third Section. Finally, in the fourth Section, a synthesis of the research and some perspectives are proposed. (authors). 7 refs.

  6. Collective control of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognin, L.

    1995-06-01

    Nowadays, mainly related to the increasing complexity of working environments, working activities become more and collective. The present research on the paradoxical nature of working teams, considered from a reliability point of view. This document is composed of four Sections. The first Section introduces the context of the research, its objectives and the underlying assumptions. In the second Section, we describe a working situation, which is the control of a nuclear reactor. Relations between cooperative work and reliability are discussed in the third Section. Finally, in the fourth Section, a synthesis of the research and some perspectives are proposed. (authors). 7 refs

  7. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  8. Chemical reactor for a PUREX reprocessing plant of 200Kg U/day capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveria Lopes, M.J. de.

    1974-03-01

    Dissolution of spent reactor fuels in Purex process is studied. Design of a chemical reactor for PWR elements, 3% enriched uranium dioxide with zircaloy cladding, for a 200Kg/day uranium plant is the main objective. Chop-leach process is employed and 7.5M nitric acid is used. Non-criticality was obtained by safe geometry and checked by spectrum homogeneous calculus and diffusion codes. Fuel cycle is considered and decladding and dissolution are treated more accurately

  9. A neural network to predict reactor core behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Jose Ortiz-Servin; Jose Alejandro Castillo; Pelta, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The global fuel management problem in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors) can be understood as a very complex optimization problem, where the variables represent design decisions and the quality assessment of each solution is done through a complex and computational expensive simulation. This last aspect is the major impediment to perform an extensive exploration of the design space, mainly due to the time lost evaluating non promising solutions. In this work, we show how we can train a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) to predict the reactor behavior for a given configuration. The trained MLP is able to evaluate the configurations immediately, thus allowing performing an exhaustive evaluation of the possible configurations derived from a stock of fuel lattices, fuel reload patterns and control rods patterns. For our particular problem, the number of configurations is approximately 7.7 x 10 10 ; the evaluation with the core simulator would need above 200 years, while only 100 hours were required with our approach to discern between bad and good configurations. The later were then evaluated by the simulator and we confirm the MLP usefulness. The good core configurations reached the energy requirements, satisfied the safety parameter constrains and they could reduce uranium enrichment costs. (authors)

  10. RELAP-7 Software Verification and Validation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk, Reliability, and Regulatory Support; Choi, Yong-Joon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk, Reliability, and Regulatory Support; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk, Reliability, and Regulatory Support

    2014-09-25

    This INL plan comprehensively describes the software for RELAP-7 and documents the software, interface, and software design requirements for the application. The plan also describes the testing-based software verification and validation (SV&V) process—a set of specially designed software models used to test RELAP-7. The RELAP-7 (Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program) code is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework – MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s capability and extends the analysis capability for all reactor system simulation scenarios.

  11. Culture-independent detection of 'TM7' bacteria in a streptomycin-resistant acidophilic nitrifying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurogi, T.; Linh, N. T. T.; Kuroki, T.; Yamada, T.; Hiraishi, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification in biological wastewater treatment processes has been believed for long time to take place under neutral conditions and is inhibited under acidic conditions. However, we previously constructed acidophilic nitrifying sequencing-batch reactors (ANSBRs) being capable of nitrification at −1 was added. In all reactors, the pH varied between 2.7 and 4.0, and ammonium was completely converted to nitrate in every batch cycle. PCR-aided denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) targeting 16S rRNA genes revealed that some major clones assigned to TM7 bacteria and Gammaproteobacteria were constantly present during the overall period of operation. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with specific oligonucleotide probes also showed that TM7 bacteria predominated in all SRAN reactors, accounting for 58% of the total bacterial population on average. Although the biological significance of the TM7 bacteria in the SRAN reactors are unknown, our results suggest that these bacteria are possibly streptomycin-resistant and play some important roles in the acidophilic nitrifying process

  12. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  13. ENHANCEMENT OF EQUILIBRIUMSHIFT IN DEHYDROGENATION REACTIONS USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuddin Ilias, Ph.d., P.E.; Franklin G. King, D.Sc.

    2001-01-01

    With the advances in new inorganic materials and processing techniques, there has been renewed interest in exploiting the benefits of membranes in many industrial applications. Inorganic and composite membranes are being considered as potential candidates for use in membrane-reactor configuration for effectively increasing reaction rate, selectivity and yield of equilibrium limited reactions. To investigate the usefulness of a palladium-ceramic composite membrane in a membrane reactor-separator configuration, we investigated the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift. A two-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous reactor model was developed to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane by equilibrium shift in a tubular membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was considered to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to permeation through the membrane. For a dehydrogenation reaction, the feed stream to the reaction side contained cyclohexane and argon, while the separation side used argon as the sweep gas. Equilibrium conversion for dehydrogenation of cyclohexane is 18.7%. The present study showed that 100% conversion could be achieved by equilibrium shift using Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. For a feed containing cyclohexane and argon of 1.64 x 10(sup -6) and 1.0 x 10(sup -3) mol/s, over 98% conversion could be readily achieved. The dehydrogenation of cyclohexane was also experimentally investigated in a palladium-ceramic membrane reactor. The Pd-ceramic membrane was fabricated by electroless deposition of palladium on ceramic substrate. The performance of Pd-ceramic membrane was compared with a commercially available hydrogen-selective ceramic membrane. From limited experimental data it was observed that by appropriate choice of feed flow rate and sweep gas rate, the conversion of cyclohexane to benzene and hydrogen can increased to 56% at atmospheric pressure and 200 C in a Pd-ceramic membrane reactor. In the commercial ceramic membrane

  14. A new fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new nuclear reactor design based on the fluidized bed concept is proposed. A current design utilizes spherical fuel of slightly enriched Zircaloy-clad uranium dioxide fluidized by light water under pressure. The reactor is modular in system; therefore, any size reactor can be constructed from the basic standard modul. The reactor physics calculations show that reactivity increases with porosity to a maximum value and thereafter decreases. This produces inherent safety and eliminates the need for control rods and burnable poisons. The heat transfer calculations show that the maximum power extracted from the reactor core is not limited to the material temperature limits but to the maximum mass flow of coolant, which corresponds to the desired operating porosity. Design simplicity and inherent safety make it an attractive small reactor design. (Author) [pt

  15. Preliminary design of a borax internal core-catcher for a gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1976-09-01

    Preliminary thermal calculations show that a core-catcher appears to be feasible, which is able to cope with the complete meltdown of the core and blankets of a 1,000 MWe GCFR. This core-catcher is based on borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ) as dissolving material of the oxide fuel and of the fission products occuring in oxide form. The borax is contained in steel boxes forming a 2.1 meter thick slab on the base of the reactor cavity inside the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, just underneath the reactor core. The fission products are dispersed in the pool formed by the liquid borax. The heat power density in the pool is conveniently reduced and the resulting heat fluxes at the borders of the pool can be safely carried away through the PCRV liner and its water cooling system. (orig.) [de

  16. RELAP-7 Closure Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berry, R. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hansel, J. E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, J. P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johns, Russell C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical integration methods, and physical models. The end result will be a reactor systems analysis capability that retains and improves upon RELAP5’s and TRACE’s capabilities and extends their analysis capabilities for all reactor system simulation scenarios. The RELAP-7 code utilizes the well-posed 7-equation two-phase flow model for compressible two-phase flow. Closure models used in the TRACE code has been reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past decades and provide a basis for the colure correlations implemented in the RELAP-7 code. This document provides a summary on the closure correlations that are currently implemented in the RELAP-7 code. The closure correlations include sub-grid models that describe interactions between the fluids and the flow channel, and interactions between the two phases.

  17. Investigation of flow stabilization in a compact reactor vessel of a FBR. Flow visualization in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    In the feasibility studies of Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System, a compact reactor vessel is considered from economical improvement point of a sodium cooled loop type fast reactor. The flow field was visualized by water experiment for a reactor vessel with 'a column type UIS (Upper Internal Structure)', which has a slit for fuel handling mechanism and is useful for a compact fast reactor. In this research, the 1/20 scale test equipment using water was made to understand coolant flow through a slit of a column type UIS' and fundamental behavior of reactor upper plenum flow. In the flow visualization tests, tracer particles were added in the water, and illuminated by the slit-shaped pulse laser. The flow visualization image was taken with a CCD camera. We obtained fluid velocity vectors from the visualization image using the Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results are as follows. 1. Most of coolant flow through a slit of 'column type UIS' arrived the dip plate directly. In the opposite side of a slit, most of coolant flowed toward reactor vessel wall before it arrived the dip plate. 2. The PIV was useful to measure the flow field in the reactor vessel. The obtained velocity field was consistent with the flow visualization result. 3. The jet through the UIS slit was dependent on the UIS geometry. There is a possibility to control the jet by the UIS geometry. (author)

  18. Reactor physics calculations in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeglund, R.

    1995-01-01

    The seventh biennial meeting on reactor physics calculations in the Nordic countries was arranged by VTT Energy on May 8-9, 1995. 26 papers on different subjects in the field of reactor physics were presented by 45 participants representing research establishments, technical universities, utilities, consultants and suppliers. Resent development and verification of the program systems of ABB Atom, Risoe, Scandpower, Studsvik and VTT Energy were the main topic of the meeting. Benchmarking of the two assembly codes CASMO-4 and HELIOS is proceeding. Cross section data calculated with CASMO-HEX have been validated for the Loviisa reactors. On core analysis ABB atom gives a description on its latest core simulator version POLCA7 with the calculation Core Master 2 and the BWR core supervision system Core Watch. Transient calculations with HEXTRAN, HEXTRAN- PLIM, TRAB, RAMONA, SIMULATE-3K and a code based on PRESTO II/POLCA7 were also presented

  19. Effective utilization and management of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muranaka, R [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Research and Isotopes

    1984-06-01

    The problem of utilizing a research reactor effectively is closely related to its management and therefore should not be considered separately. Too often, attention has been focused on specific techniques and methods rather than on the overall programme of utilization, with the result that skills and equipment have been acquired without any active continuing programme of applications and services. The seminar reported here provided a forum for reactor managers, users, and operators to discuss their experience. At the invitation of the Government of Malaysia, it was held at the Asia Pacific Development Centre, Kuala Lumpur, from 7 to 11 November 1983. It was attended by about 50 participants from 19 Member States; it is hoped that a report on the seminar, including papers presented, can be published and thus reach a wider audience. Thirty-one lectures and contributions were presented at a total of seven sessions: Research reactor management; Radiation exposure and safety; Research reactor utilization (two sessions); PUSPATI Research Reactor Project Development; Core conversion to low-enriched uranium, and safeguards; Research reactor technology. In addition, a panel discussed the causes and resolutions of the under-utilization of research reactors.

  20. Effective utilization and management of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of utilizing a research reactor effectively is closely related to its management and therefore should not be considered separately. Too often, attention has been focused on specific techniques and methods rather than on the overall programme of utilization, with the result that skills and equipment have been acquired without any active continuing programme of applications and services. The seminar reported here provided a forum for reactor managers, users, and operators to discuss their experience. At the invitation of the Government of Malaysia, it was held at the Asia Pacific Development Centre, Kuala Lumpur, from 7 to 11 November 1983. It was attended by about 50 participants from 19 Member States; it is hoped that a report on the seminar, including papers presented, can be published and thus reach a wider audience. Thirty-one lectures and contributions were presented at a total of seven sessions: Research reactor management; Radiation exposure and safety; Research reactor utilization (two sessions); PUSPATI Research Reactor Project Development; Core conversion to low-enriched uranium, and safeguards; Research reactor technology. In addition, a panel discussed the causes and resolutions of the under-utilization of research reactors

  1. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.

    1994-01-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  2. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author)

  3. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are (a) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons, (b) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles, (c) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas, and (d) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising. (author).

  4. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  5. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  6. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  7. MLR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryazantsev, E.P.; Egorenkov, P.M.; Nasonov, V.A.; Smimov, A.M.; Taliev, A.V.; Gromov, B.F.; Kousin, V.V.; Lantsov, M.N.; Radchenko, V.P.; Sharapov, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    The Material Testing Loop Reactor (MLR) development was commenced in 1991 with the aim of updating and widening Russia's experimental base to validate the selected directions of further progress of the nuclear power industry in Russia and to enhance its reliability and safety. The MLR reactor is the pool-type one. As coolant it applies light water and as side reflector beryllium. The direction of water circulation in the core is upward. The core comprises 30 FA arranged as hexagonal lattice with the 90-95 mm pitch. The central materials channel and six loop channels are sited in the core. The reflector includes up to 11 loop channels. The reactor power is 100 MW. The average power density of the core is 0.4 MW/I (maximal value 1.0 MW/l). The maximum neutron flux density is 7.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the core (E>0.1 MeV), and 5.10 14 n/cm 2 s in the reflector (E<0.625 eV). In 1995 due to the lack of funding the MLR designing was suspended. (author)

  8. Inherent safety characteristics of innovative reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heil, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The added safety value of innovative or third generation reactor designs has been evaluated in order to determine the most suitable candidate for Dutch government funded research and development support. To this end, four innovative reactor concepts, viz. PIUS (Process Inherent Ultimate Safety), PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small), HTR-M (High Temperature Reactor Module) and MHTGR (Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor), have been studied and their passive and inherent safety characteristics have been outlined. Also the outlook for further technological and industrial development has been considered. The results of the study confirm the perspective of the innovative reactors for reduced dependence on active safety provisions and for a further reduced vulnerability to technical failures and human errors. The accident responses to generic accident initiators, viz. reactivity and cooling accidents, and also to reactor specific accidents show that neither active safety systems nor short term operator actions are required for maintaining the reactor core in a controlled and coolable condition. Whether this gives rise to a higher total safety of the innovative reactor designs, compared to evolutionary or advanced reactors, cannot be concluded. Supplementary experimental and analytical analyses of reactor specific accidents are required to be able to assess the safety of these innovative designs in a more quantitative manner. It is believed that the safety case of innovative reactors, which are less dependent on active safety systems, can be communicated with the general public in a more transparent way. Considering the perspective for further technological and industrial development it is not expected that any of the considered innovative reactor concepts will become commercially available within the next one to two decades. However, they could be made available earlier if they would receive sufficient financial backing. Considering the added safety perspectives

  9. Innovative energy production in fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyoshi, A.; Momota, H.; Motojima, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sudo, S.; Tomita, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Ohnishi, M.; Onozuka, M.; Uenosono, C.

    1993-10-01

    Concepts of innovative energy production in neutron-lean fusion reactors without having the conventional turbine-type generator are proposed for improving the plant efficiency. These concepts are: (1) traveling wave direct energy conversion of 14.7 MeV protons; (2) cusp type direct energy conversion of charged particles; (3) efficient use of radiation with semiconductor and supplying clean fuel in a form of hydrogen gas; and (4) direct energy conversion from deposited heat to electric power with semiconductor utilizing Nernst effect. The candidates of reactors such as a toroidal system and an open system are also studied for application of the new concepts. The study shows the above concepts for a commercial reactor are promising.

  10. A study on ex-vessel steam explosion for a flooded reactor cavity of reactor scale - 15216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.; Yoon, E.; Kim, Y.; Cho, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A steam explosion can occur when a molten corium is mixed with a coolant, more volatile liquid. In severe accidents, corium can come into contact with coolant either when it flows to the bottom of the reactor vessel and encounters the reactor coolant, or when it breaches the reactor vessel and flows into the reactor containment. A steam explosion could then threaten the containment structures, such as the reactor vessel or the concrete walls/penetrations of the containment building. This study is to understand the shortcomings of the existing analysis code (TEXAS-V) and to estimate the steam explosion loads on reactor scale and assess the effect of variables, then we compared results and physical phenomena. Sensitivity study of major parameters for initial condition is performed. Variables related to melt corium such as corium temperature, falling velocity and diameter of melt are more important to the ex-vessel steam explosion load and the steam explosion loads are proportional to these variables related to melt corium. Coolant temperature on reactor cavity has a specific area to increase the steam explosion loads. These results will be used to evaluate the steam explosion loads using ROAAM (Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology) and to develop the evaluation methodology of ex-vessel steam explosion. (authors)

  11. Auxiliary reactor for a hydrocarbon reforming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Dorson, Matthew H.; Mitchell, William L.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Davis, Robert; Rumsey, Jennifer W.

    2006-01-17

    An auxiliary reactor for use with a reformer reactor having at least one reaction zone, and including a burner for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, and heat exchanger for transferring heat from auxiliary reactor gas stream and heat transfer medium, preferably two-phase water, to reformer reaction zone. Auxiliary reactor may include first cylindrical wall defining a chamber for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, the chamber having an inlet end, an outlet end, a second cylindrical wall surrounding first wall and a second annular chamber there between. The reactor being configured so heated auxiliary reactor gas flows out the outlet end and into and through second annular chamber and conduit which is disposed in second annular chamber, the conduit adapted to carry heat transfer medium and being connectable to reformer reaction zone for additional heat exchange.

  12. Enhanced degradation of p-chlorophenol in a novel pulsed high voltage discharge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Wenjuan; Ying, Xiangli; Shi, Junwen

    2009-03-15

    The yields of active specie such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical were all enhanced in a novel discharge reactor. In the reactor, the original formation rate of hydroxyl radical was 2.27 x 10(-7) mol L(-1)s(-1), which was about three times than that in the contrast reactor. Ozone was formed in gas-phase and was transferred into the liquid. The characteristic of mass transfer was better in the novel reactor than that in the contrast reactor, which caused much higher ozone concentration in liquid. The dissociation of hydrogen peroxide was more evident in the former, which promoted the formations of hydroxyl radical. The p-chlorophenol (4-CP) degradation was also enhanced. Most of the ozone transferred into the liquid and hydrogen peroxide generated by discharge could be utilized by the degradation process of 4-CP. About 97% 4-CP was removed in 36 min discharge in the novel reactor. Organic acids such as formic, acetic, oxalic, propanoic and maleic acid were generated and free chloride ions were released in the degradation process. With the formation of organic acid, the pH was decreased and the conductivity was increased.

  13. Enhanced degradation of p-chlorophenol in a novel pulsed high voltage discharge reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian Wenjuan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)], E-mail: bwenjuan@suda.edu.cn; Ying Xiangli; Shi Junwen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2009-03-15

    The yields of active specie such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical were all enhanced in a novel discharge reactor. In the reactor, the original formation rate of hydroxyl radical was 2.27 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} s{sup -1}, which was about three times than that in the contrast reactor. Ozone was formed in gas-phase and was transferred into the liquid. The characteristic of mass transfer was better in the novel reactor than that in the contrast reactor, which caused much higher ozone concentration in liquid. The dissociation of hydrogen peroxide was more evident in the former, which promoted the formations of hydroxyl radical. The p-chlorophenol (4-CP) degradation was also enhanced. Most of the ozone transferred into the liquid and hydrogen peroxide generated by discharge could be utilized by the degradation process of 4-CP. About 97% 4-CP was removed in 36 min discharge in the novel reactor. Organic acids such as formic, acetic, oxalic, propanoic and maleic acid were generated and free chloride ions were released in the degradation process. With the formation of organic acid, the pH was decreased and the conductivity was increased.

  14. Enhanced degradation of p-chlorophenol in a novel pulsed high voltage discharge reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bian Wenjuan; Ying Xiangli; Shi Junwen

    2009-01-01

    The yields of active specie such as ozone, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical were all enhanced in a novel discharge reactor. In the reactor, the original formation rate of hydroxyl radical was 2.27 x 10 -7 mol L -1 s -1 , which was about three times than that in the contrast reactor. Ozone was formed in gas-phase and was transferred into the liquid. The characteristic of mass transfer was better in the novel reactor than that in the contrast reactor, which caused much higher ozone concentration in liquid. The dissociation of hydrogen peroxide was more evident in the former, which promoted the formations of hydroxyl radical. The p-chlorophenol (4-CP) degradation was also enhanced. Most of the ozone transferred into the liquid and hydrogen peroxide generated by discharge could be utilized by the degradation process of 4-CP. About 97% 4-CP was removed in 36 min discharge in the novel reactor. Organic acids such as formic, acetic, oxalic, propanoic and maleic acid were generated and free chloride ions were released in the degradation process. With the formation of organic acid, the pH was decreased and the conductivity was increased

  15. Biodegradation of p-nitrophenol using Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in a novel upflow packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2011-06-15

    A novel packed bed reactor (PBR) was designed with cross flow aeration at multiple ports along the depth to improve the hydrodynamic conditions of the reactor, and the biodegradation efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 on p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in PBR at different PNP loading rates were evaluated. The novel PBR was designed to improve the hydrodynamic features such as mixing time profile (t(m95)), oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a), and overall gas hold up capacity (ɛ(G)) of the reactor. PNP concentration in the influent was varied between 600 and 1400 mg l(-1) whereas the hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the reactor was varied between 18 and 7.5h. Complete removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor up to a PNP loading rate of 2787 mg l(-1)d(-1). More than 99.9% removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor for an influent concentration of 1400 mg l(-1) and at 18 h HRT. In the present study, PNP was utilized as sole source of carbon and energy by A. chlorophenolicus A6. Furthermore, the bioreactor showed good compatibility in handling shock loading of PNP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  17. Carbon dioxide hydrate formation in a fixed-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, S.; Lang, X. [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation; Wang, Y.; Liang, D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Inst. of Energy Conversion and Guangzhou Center of Natural Gas Hydrate; Sun, X.; Jurcik, B. [Air Liquide Laboratories, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates are thermodynamically stable at high pressures and near the freezing temperature of pure water. Methane hydrates occur naturally in sediments in the deep oceans and permafrost regions and constitute an extensive hydrocarbon reservoir. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) hydrates are of interest as a medium for marine sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Sequestering CO{sub 2} as hydrate has potential advantages over most methods proposed for marine CO{sub 2} sequestration. Because this technique requires a shallower depth of injection when compared with other ocean sequestration methods, the costs of CO{sub 2} hydrate sequestration may be lower. Many studies have successfully used different continuous reactor designs to produce CO{sub 2} hydrates in both laboratory and field settings. This paper discussed a study that involved the design and construction of a fixed-bed reactor for simulation of hydrate formation system. Water, river sands and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the seep kind of hydrate formation. Carbon dioxide gas was distributed as small bubbles to enter from the bottom of the fixed-bed reactor. The paper discussed the experimental data and presented a diagram of the gas hydrate reactor system. The morphology as well as the reaction characters of CO{sub 2} hydrate was presented in detail. The results were discussed in terms of experimental phenomena and hydrate formation rate. A mathematical model was proposed for describing the process. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Preparing the construction of a school reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities are discussed of teaching and training nuclear reactor operation and control, teaching experimental reactor physics and investigating reactor lattice parameters using a training reactor to be installed at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering in Prague. Requirements are indicated for the reactor's technical design and the Faculty's possibilities to contribute to its construction. (J.B.)

  19. Who needs a small reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Janet.

    1991-01-01

    The opportunities and problems facing small reactors were debated at the Delhi seminar. It was established that these were markets where small reactors, producing heat as well as electricity, might be of use. Small combined heat and power reactors would be more useful in district heating than would large reactors, as their optimum heat production is in line with current district heating schemes. Most process heat requirements are below 900 o C and so may be provided by small nuclear plants. Several areas in electricity supply where small and medium sized reactors could find a market were also identified. Despite good reasons for favouring nuclear plants in these markets, such as no production of carbon dioxide, no need to use expensive oil or other scarce fossil fuels and flexibility, these are, however, disincentives to potential buyers. While serial production would decrease plant costs, the lead plants would bear heavy financial risks. Currently too many options in plant design make it difficult to present the advantages of small reactor technology. Siting reactors near centres of population would be problematical. The disposal of spent fuel and radioactive wastes would create problems in developing or non-nuclear countries. Over and above all these problems, however, was that of public acceptance. Some ways of overcoming these disincentives were discussed. (author)

  20. Very-high-temperature reactors for future use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1988-08-01

    Very-high-temperature reactors (VHTRs) show promise for economic generation of electricity and of high-temperature process heat. The key is the development of high-temperature materials which permit gas turbine VHTRs to generate electricity economically, at reactor coolant temperatures which can be used for fossil fuel conversion processes. 7 refs., 5 figs

  1. Maintenance and material aspects of DREAM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, S.; Nishio, S.; Yamada, R.; Seki, Y.; Kurihara, R.; Adachi, J.; Yamazaki, S.

    2000-01-01

    A concept of a commercial fusion power reactors (Fusion Power: 5.5 GW, electric output: 2.7 GW) having high environmental safety, high thermal efficiency and high availability has been studied in JAERI. The gross reactor configuration was designed to achieve good maintainability, high performance breeding blanket, high efficient power generation system and little radwastes. Design was based on the use of low activation structural material (SiC/SiC composites) and helium as a coolant. In this paper, maintenance and material aspects of DREAM reactor design is discussed. The concluding remarks are as follows. (1) The difficulty of development of maintenance tool is alleviated by sector replacement and the radiation dose environment less than 10 Gy/h in a reactor chamber. (2) Design requirement and present status of SiC/SiC composites was investigated. (3) The SiC/SiC composite development program is planned to satisfy the requirements of DREAM reactor

  2. Conceptual design of fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-03-01

    A conceptual design study (option C) has been carried out for the fusion experimental reactor (FER). In addition to design of the tokamak reactor and associated systems based on the reference design specifications, feasibility of a water-shield reactor concept was examined as a topical study. The design study for the reference tokamak reactor has produced a reactor concept for the FER, along with major R D items for the concept, based on close examinations on thermal design, electromagnetics, neutronics and remote maintenance. Particular efforts have been directed to the area of electromagnetics. Detailed analyses with close simulation models have been performed on PF coil arrangements and configurations, shell effects of the blanket for plasma position unstability, feedback control, and eddy currents during disruptions. The major design specifications are as follows; Peak fusion power 437 MW Major radius 5.5 m Minor radius 1.1 m Plasma elongation 1.5 Plasma current 5.3 MA Toroidal beta 4 % Field on axis 5.7 T (author)

  3. A computer control system for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, K.C.; Sandquist, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Most reactor applications until now, have not required computer control of core output. Commercial reactors are generally operated at a constant power output to provide baseline power. However, if commercial reactor cores are to become load following over a wide range, then centralized digital computer control is required to make the entire facility respond as a single unit to continual changes in power demand. Navy and research reactors are much smaller and simpler and are operated at constant power levels as required, without concern for the number of operators required to operate the facility. For navy reactors, centralized digital computer control may provide space savings and reduced personnel requirements. Computer control offers research reactors versatility to efficiently change a system to develop new ideas. The operation of any reactor facility would be enhanced by a controller that does not panic and is continually monitoring all facility parameters. Eventually very sophisticated computer control systems may be developed which will sense operational problems, diagnose the problem, and depending on the severity of the problem, immediately activate safety systems or consult with operators before taking action

  4. A new advanced safe nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    1999-01-01

    The reactor design is based on fluidized bed concept and utilizes pressurized water reactor technology. The fuel is automatically removed from the reactor by gravity under any accident condition. The reactor demonstrates the characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. Here two options for modification to the original design are proposed in order to increase the stability and thermal efficiency of the reactor. A modified version of the reactor involves the choice of supercritical steam as the coolant to produce a plant thermal efficiency of about 40%. Another is to modify the shape of the reactor core to produce a non-fluctuating bed and consequently guarantee the dynamic stability of the reactor. The mixing of Tantalum in the fuel is also proposed as an additional inhibition to power excursion. The spent fuel pellets may not be considered nuclear waste since they are in the shape and size that can easily be used as a a radioactive source for food irradiation and industrial applications. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum by varying the porosity in order to be a plutonium burner or utilize a thorium fuel cycle. (author)

  5. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  6. Search for eV sterile neutrinos at a nuclear reactor — the Stereo project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haser, J.; Stereo Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The re-analyses of the reference spectra of reactor antineutrinos together with a revised neutrino interaction cross section enlarged the absolute normalization of the predicted neutrino flux. The tension between previous reactor measurements and the new prediction is significant at 2.7 σ and is known as “reactor antineutrino anomaly”. In combination with other anomalies encountered in neutrino oscillation measurements, this observation revived speculations about the existence of a sterile neutrino in the eV mass range. Mixing of this light sterile neutrino with the active flavours would lead to a modification of the detected antineutrino flux. An oscillation pattern in energy and space could be resolved by a detector at a distance of few meters from a reactor core: the neutrino detector of the Stereo project will be located at about 10 m distance from the ILL research reactor in Grenoble, France. Lengthwise separated in six target cells filled with 2 m3 Gd-loaded liquid scintillator in total, the experiment will search for a position-dependent distortion in the energy spectrum.

  7. Partial gasification of coal in a fluidized bed reactor: Comparison of a laboratory and pilot scale reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, R.; Shen, L.H.; Zhang, M.Y.; Jin, B.S.; Xiong, Y.Q.; Duan, Y.F.; Zhong, Z.P.; Zhou, H.C.; Chen, X.P.; Huang, Y.J. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2007-01-15

    A 0.1 MWth lab-scale and 2 MWth pilot-scale experimental rigs were constructed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a new process. The aim of the lab-scale study is to optimize coal partial gasification reactions operating conditions, which were applied in the pilot-scale tests. A comparison between the laboratory and pilot scale experimental results is presented in this paper in order to provide valuable information for scaling-up of the PFB coal partial reactor to industrial applications. The results show that trends and phenomena obtained in the laboratory reactor are confirmed in a pilot plant operating at similar conditions. However, many differences are observed in the two reactors. The higher heat loss in the lab-scale reactor is responsible for higher equivalence ratio (ER) and lower gas heating value at the similar reactor temperature. With respect to the pilot-scale reactor, mass transfer limitation between bubbles and emulsion phase may become important. Hence, longer contact time is required to achieve the same conversions as in the lab-scale reactor. This difference is explained by a significant change of the hydrodynamic conditions due to the formation of larger bubbles.

  8. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  9. Design of the core of a breed/burn fast reactor with the deterministic code KANEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L.

    2014-10-01

    The breeding fast reactors are interesting because they generate more plutonium than they consume, however, the fuel has to be reprocessed for the generated plutonium is used in another reactor. In a breed/burn reactor (BBR) the plutonium is generated and used -in situ- inside the same reactor, reducing this way costs and the proliferation possibility. In this work, the core of a BBR was designed; cooled by sodium that consists of 210 active assemblies and 7 spaces for control rods, each assembly consists of 169 pines. The design differs from other BBR it includes a blanket in the reactor center. The above-mentioned was to take advantage of the fact by geometry that the population of fast and epithermal neutrons will be high in the area, due to the fissions in adjacent fissile areas. Favorable results were obtained, although not definitive with exchange scheme of spent fuel. Efforts should be made in the future to homogenize the power generation within the reactor and replace the spent assemblies more efficiently. (Author)

  10. Boron concentration evolution in the temporary curtains of a BWR reactor. Burcur code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano Aguado, M.; Perlado Martin, J.M.; Minguez Torres, E.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical model and the user's guide of the code Burcur is included. This code analyzes the burnable poison concentration of the temporary curtains as a function of time, for BWR reactors of the 7 x 7 design. The computing time being reasonably short, the number of burnup steps is as high as necessary.(author) [es

  11. Production and release of {sup 14}C from a swimming pool reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamoorthy, T M [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Environmental Assessment Div.; Sadarangani, S H [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiation Safety Systems Div.; Doshi, G R [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Health Physics Div.

    1994-04-01

    The annual production rate of {sup 14}C in the Apsara swimming pool reactor works out to be about 2.94 mCi. The concentration distribution of {sup 14}C in different compartments viz. pool water, reactor hall air and ion-exchange resin ranged from 200 to 440 pCi/l, 0.09 to 0.38 pCi/l, an average concentration of 8.16 pCi/g respectively. The mean residence time of {sup 14}C in pool water is evaluated to be about 7 days taking into account various sinks. The study revealed atmospheric exchange at the air-water interface as the dominant process responsible for the loss of {sup 14}C from the pool water. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Research reactor job analysis - A project description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, John; Bessler, Nancy J.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing the need of the improved training in nuclear industry, nuclear utilities established training program guidelines based on Performance-Based Training (PBT) concepts. The comparison of commercial nuclear power facilities with research and test reactors owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), made in an independent review of personnel selection, training, and qualification requirements for DOE-owned reactors pointed out that the complexity of the most critical tasks in research reactors is less than that in power reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started a project by commissioning Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to conduct a job analysis survey of representative research reactor facilities. The output of the project consists of two publications: Volume 1 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Overview, which contains an Introduction, Project Description, Project Methodology,, and. An Overview of Performance-Based Training (PBT); and Volume 2 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Implementation, which contains Guidelines for Application of Preliminary Task Lists and Preliminary Task Lists for Reactor Operators and Supervisory Reactor Operators

  13. RSAS: a Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Dixon, B.W.; Bray, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). RSAS is being developed for use at the NRC's Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. The system generates situation assessments for the NRC Reactor Safety Team based on a limited number of plant parameters, known operator actions, and plant status data. The RSAS rule base currently covers one reactor type. The extension of the rule base to other reactor types is also discussed

  14. MIT research reactor. Power uprate and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Lin-Wen [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a university research reactor located on MIT campus. and has a long history in supporting research and education. Recent accomplishments include a 20% power rate to 6 MW and expanding advanced materials fuel testing program. Another important ongoing initiative is the conversion to high density low enrichment uranium (LEU) monolithic U-Mo fuel, which will consist of a new fuel element design and power increase to 7 MW. (author)

  15. Utilization of research reactors - A global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents 1) a worldwide picture of research reactors, operable, shutdown, under construction and planned, 2) statistics on utilization of research reactors including TRIGA reactors, and 3) some results of a survey conducted during 1988 on the utilization of research reactors in developing Member States in the Asia-Pacific Region

  16. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  17. Establishing a Radiation Protection Programme for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, M. M.

    2014-04-01

    The nature and intensity of radiation from the operation of a research reactor depend on the type of reactor, its design features and its operational history. The protection of workers from the harmful effect of radiation must therefore be of paramount importance to any operating organization of a research reactor. This project report attempts to establish an operational radiation protection programme for a research reactor using the Ghana Research Reactor-1 as a case study. (au)

  18. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance

  19. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance in the

  20. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  1. Annual report on the state of RB reactor components and equipment, december 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    1998-12-01

    According to the performed analysis, it is considered that the RB reactor can be operated safely until the existing control and safety systems could be maintained in satisfactory operable state. Failures of heavy water circulation system valves which may cause decreased availability but no accident. During 1998 the reactor lattice was changed 7 times, meaning that experiments were done with 7 configurations of the reactor core. Total reactor operation amounted to 177.5 Wh with 40 start-ups (attained criticality levels). This report contains 4 Annexes, detailed description of the state of reactor equipment in 1998, reactor operation nd utilization data, plan for regular annual maintenance and refurbishment of reactor equipment and plan for minimum needed resources for regular maintenance of the components and equipment in the forthcoming year

  2. RELAP-7 Level 2 Milestone Report: Demonstration of a Steady State Single Phase PWR Simulation with RELAP-7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrs, David; Berry, Ray; Gaston, Derek; Martineau, Richard; Peterson, John; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Zou, Ling

    2012-01-01

    The document contains the simulation results of a steady state model PWR problem with the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on INL's modern scientific software development framework - MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). This report summarizes the initial results of simulating a model steady-state single phase PWR problem using the current version of the RELAP-7 code. The major purpose of this demonstration simulation is to show that RELAP-7 code can be rapidly developed to simulate single-phase reactor problems. RELAP-7 is a new project started on October 1st, 2011. It will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series (the replacement for RELAP5). The key to the success of RELAP-7 is the simultaneous advancement of physical models, numerical methods, and software design while maintaining a solid user perspective. Physical models include both PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations) and experimental based closure models. RELAP-7 will eventually utilize well posed governing equations for multiphase flow, which can be strictly verified. Closure models used in RELAP5 and newly developed models will be reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past three decades. RELAP-7 uses modern numerical methods, which allow implicit time integration, higher order schemes in both time and space, and strongly coupled multi-physics simulations. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. Its development follows modern software design paradigms. The code is easy to read, develop, maintain, and couple with other codes. Most importantly, the modern software design allows the RELAP-7 code to

  3. Towards a reduced activation structural materials database for fusion DEMO reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Diegele, E.; Laesser, R.; Klimiankou, M.; Lindau, R.; Materna-Morris, E.; Rieth, M.; Lucon, E.; Petersen, C.; Schneider, H.-C.; Pippan, R.; Rensman, J.W.; Schaaf, B. van der; Tavassoli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The development of First Wall, Blanket and Divertor materials which are capable of withstanding many years the high neutron and heat fluxes, is a critical path to fusion power. Therefore, the timely availability of a sound materials database has become an indispensable element in international fusion road maps. In order to provide materials design data for short term needs of ITER Test Blanket Modules and for a DEMOnstration fusion reactor, a wealth of R and D results on the European reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steel EUROFER, and on oxide dispersion strengthened variants are being characterized, mainly in the temperature window 250-650 deg. C. The characterisation includes irradiations up to 15 dpa in the mixed spectrum reactor HFR and up to 75 dpa in the fast breeder reactor BOR60. Industrial EUROFER-batches of 3.5 and 7.5 tons have been produced with a variety of semi-finished, quality-assured product forms. To increase thermal efficiency of blankets, high temperature resistant SiC f /SiC channel inserts for liquid metal coolant tubes are also developed. Regarding radiation damage resistance, a broad based reactor irradiation programs counts several steps from ≤5dpa (ITER TBMs) up to 75 dpa (DEMO). For the European divertor designers, a materials data base is presently being set up for pure W and W alloys, and related reactor irradiations are foreseen with temperatures from 650-1000 deg. C. (author)

  4. Method of operating a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgin, A.J.; Schaefer, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    A method of controlling a nuclear power generting station in the event of a malfunction of particular operating components is described. Upon identification of a malfunction, preselected groups of control rods are fully inserted sequentially until a predetermined power level is approached. Additional control rods are then selectively inserted to quickly bring the reactor to a second given power level to be compatible with safe operation of the system with the malfunctioning component. At the time the thermal power output of the reactor is being reduced, the turbine is operated at a rate consistent with the output of the reactor. In the event of a malfunction, the power generating system is operated in a turbine following reactor mode, with the reactor power rapidly reduced, in a controlled manner, to a safe level compatible with the type of malfunction experienced

  5. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on organic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Teruo

    1995-01-01

    Insulators for the superconducting magnets of fusion reactor are classified as electrical and thermal insulators for which tough organic materials will be used. When the magnet is exposed by fast neutrons and gamma-rays from plasma in a fusion reactor, the fusion reactor systems will cause fatal damage by the degradation of insulators. Therefore, it is necessary to select materials resistant irradiation damage for use as insulators. Electrical and mechanical tests were carried out at 4.2 K without warmup after the reactor irradiation at 5 K. The effects of reactor irradiation at the dose of 10 7 Gy on epoxy resins (bisphenol-A), G-10 CR, VL-E 200 and G-11 CR caused large decreases in mechanical strength. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), polyimide and phenol novolac resins, which were used to laminate reinforced plastics with glass-cloth against irradiation, showed good resistance. Effects of cryogenic reactor irradiation on several organic materials and epoxy laminate-reinforced plastics with glass-cloth and Kevlar-cloth were also discussed. (author)

  6. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance

  7. Design options for a bunsen reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles

    2013-10-01

    This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  9. Medium temperature carbon dioxide gas turbine reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nitawaki, Takeshi; Muto, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas turbine reactor with a partial pre-cooling cycle attains comparable cycle efficiencies of 45.8% at medium temperature of 650 deg. C and pressure of 7 MPa with a typical helium (He) gas turbine reactor of GT-MHR (47.7%) at high temperature of 850 deg. C. This higher efficiency is ascribed to: reduced compression work around the critical point of CO 2 ; and consideration of variation in CO 2 specific heat at constant pressure, C p , with pressure and temperature into cycle configuration. Lowering temperature to 650 deg. C provides flexibility in choosing materials and eases maintenance through the lower diffusion leak rate of fission products from coated particle fuel by about two orders of magnitude. At medium temperature of 650 deg. C, less expensive corrosion resistant materials such as type 316 stainless steel are applicable and their performance in CO 2 have been proven during extensive operation in AGRs. In the previous study, the CO 2 cycle gas turbomachinery weight was estimated to be about one-fifth compared with He cycles. The proposed medium temperature CO 2 gas turbine reactor is expected to be an alternative solution to current high-temperature He gas turbine reactors

  10. Design of the core of a breed/burn fast reactor with the deterministic code KANEXT; Diseno del nucleo de un reactor rapido de cria/quemado con el codigo deterministico KANEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L., E-mail: rcarlos.lope@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The breeding fast reactors are interesting because they generate more plutonium than they consume, however, the fuel has to be reprocessed for the generated plutonium is used in another reactor. In a breed/burn reactor (BBR) the plutonium is generated and used -in situ- inside the same reactor, reducing this way costs and the proliferation possibility. In this work, the core of a BBR was designed; cooled by sodium that consists of 210 active assemblies and 7 spaces for control rods, each assembly consists of 169 pines. The design differs from other BBR it includes a blanket in the reactor center. The above-mentioned was to take advantage of the fact by geometry that the population of fast and epithermal neutrons will be high in the area, due to the fissions in adjacent fissile areas. Favorable results were obtained, although not definitive with exchange scheme of spent fuel. Efforts should be made in the future to homogenize the power generation within the reactor and replace the spent assemblies more efficiently. (Author)

  11. Processes influencing cooling of reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magoulas, V.E.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge of heated reactor cooling water from SRP reactors to the Savannah River is through sections of stream channels into the Savannah River Swamp and from the swamp into the river. Significant cooling of the reactor effluents takes place in both the streams and swamp. The majority of the cooling is through processes taking place at the surface of the water. The major means of heat dissipation are convective transfer of heat to the air, latent heat transfer through evaporation and radiative transfer of infrared radiation. A model was developed which incorporates the effects of these processes on stream and swamp cooling of reactor effluents. The model was used to simulate the effect of modifications in the stream environment on the temperature of water flowing into the river. Environmental effects simulated were the effect of changing radiant heat load, the effect of changes in tree canopy density in the swamp, the effect of total removal of trees from the swamp, and the effect of diverting the heated water from L reactor from Steel Creek to Pen Branch. 6 references, 7 figures

  12. Degradation of Procion Red H-E7B reactive dye by coupling a photo-Fenton system with a sequencing batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Montano, Julia; Torrades, Francesc; Garcia-Hortal, Jose A.; Domenech, Xavier; Peral, Jose

    2006-01-01

    A bench-scale study combining photo-Fenton reaction with an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to degrade a commercial homo-bireactive dye (Procion Red H-E7B, 250 mg l -1 ) was investigated. The photo-Fenton process was applied as a pre-treatment, avoiding complete mineralisation, just to obtain a bio-compatible water able to be treated by means of the SBR in a second step. In this sense, different Fenton reagent concentrations were assessed by following dye solution biodegradability enhancement (BOD 5 /COD), as well as the toxicity (EC 50 ), DOC, colour (Abs 543.5 ) and H 2 O 2 evolution with photo-Fenton irradiation time. Obtained pre-treated solutions were biologically oxidized in a SBR containing non-acclimated activated sludge. Different hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the bioreactor were tested to attain the maximum organic load removal efficiency. Best results were obtained with 60 min of 10 mg l -1 Fe(II) and 125 mg l -1 H 2 O 2 photo-Fenton pre-treatment and 1 day HRT in SBR

  13. Luncheon address: Development of the CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bain, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The paper is a highlight of the some of the achievements in the development of the CANDU Reactor, taken from the book C anada Enters the Nuclear Age . The CANDU reactor is one of Canada's greatest scientific/engineering achievements, that started in the 1940's and bore fruit with the reactors of the 60's, 70's, and 80's. The Government decided in the 1950's to proceed with a demonstration nuclear power reactor (NPD), AECL invited 7 Canadian corporations to bid on a contract to design and construct the NPD plant. General Electric was selected. A utility was also essential for participation and Ontario Hydro was chosen. In May 1957 it was concluded that the minimum commercial size would be about 200MWe and it should use horizontal pressure tubes to contain the fuel and pressurized heavy water coolant. The book also talks of standard out-reactor components such as pumps, valves, steam generators and piping. A major in-reactor component of interest was the fuel, fuel channels and pressure tubes. A very high level of cooperation was required for the success of the CANDU program

  14. Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

  15. High strength sewage treatment in a UASB reactor and an integrated UASB-digester system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Nidal

    2008-11-01

    The treatment of high strength sewage was investigated in a one-stage upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a UASB-digester system. The one-stage UASB reactor was operated in Palestine at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10h and at ambient air temperature for a period of more than a year in order to asses the system response to the Mediterranean climatic seasonal temperature fluctuation. Afterwards, the one-stage UASB reactor was modified to a UASB-digester system by incorporating a digester operated at 35 degrees C. The achieved removal efficiencies in the one-stage UASB reactor for total, suspended, colloidal, dissolved and VFA COD were 54, 71, 34, 23%, and -7%, respectively during the first warm six months of the year, and achieved only 32% removal efficiency for COD total over the following cold six months of the year. The modification of the one-stage UASB reactor to a UASB-digester system had remarkably improved the UASB reactor performance as the UASB-digester achieved removal efficiencies for total, suspended, colloidal, dissolved and VFA COD of 72, 74, 74, 62 and 70%. Therefore, the anaerobic treatment of high strength sewage during the hot period in Palestine in a UASB-digester system is very promising.

  16. Cold trap dismantling and sodium removal at a fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Stutz, Uwe [WAK GmbH, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Hauptabt. Dekontaminationsbetriebe Rueckbau Kompakte Natriumgekuehlte Kernreaktoranlage (KNK); Hosking, Paul [Nuclear Decommissioning Services Limited (NDSL), Sutherland, Dornoch (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15

    The first German prototype Fast Breeder Nuclear Reactor (KNK) is currently being dismantled after being the only operating Fast Breeder-type reactor in Germany. As this reactor type used sodium as a coolant in its primary and secondary circuit, 7 cold traps containing various amounts of partially activated sodium needed to be disposed of as part of the dismantling. The resulting combined difficulties of radioactive contamination and high chemical reactivity were handled by treating the cold traps differently depending on their size and the amount of sodium contained inside. Six small cold traps were processed on-site by cutting them up into small parts using a band saw under a protective atmosphere. The sodium was then converted to sodium hydroxide by using water. The remaining large cold trap could not be handled in the same way due to its dimensions (2.9 m x 1.1 m) and the declared amount of sodium inside (1,700 kg). It was therefore manually dismantled inside a large box filled with a protective atmosphere, while the resulting pieces were packaged for later burning in a special facility. The experiences gained by KNK during this process may be advantageous for future dismantling projects in similar sodium-cooled reactors worldwide. (orig.)

  17. A study on the fault diagnostic techniques for reactor internal structures using neutron noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Ryong; Jeong, Seong Ho; Park, Jin Ho; Park, Jin Suk

    1994-08-01

    The unfavorable phenomena, such as flow induced vibration and aging process in reactor internals, cause degradation of structural integrity and may result in loosing some mechanical binding components which might impact other equipments and components or cause flow blockage. Since these malfunctions and potential failures change reactor noise signal, it is necessary to analyze reactor noise signal for early fault diagnosis in the point of few of safety and plant economics. The objectives of this study are to establish fault diagnostic and TS(thermal shield), and to develop a data acquisition and signal processing software system. In the first year of this study, an analysis technique for the reactor internal vibration using the reactor noise was proposed. With the technique proposed and the reactor noise signals (ex-core neutron and acceleration), the dynamic characteristics of Ulchin-1 reactor internals were obtained, and compared with those of Tricastin-1 which is the prototype of Ulchin-1. In the second year, a PC-based expert system for reactor internals fault diagnosis is developed, which included data acquisition, signal processing, feature extraction function, and represented diagnostic knowledge by the IF-THEN rule. To know the effect of the faults, the reactor internals of Ulchin-1 is modeled using FEM and simulated with an artificial defect given in the hold-down spring. Trend in the dynamic characteristics of reactor internals is also observed during one fuel cycle to know the effect of boron concentration. 100 figs, 7 tabs, 18 refs. (Author)

  18. A Shielding Analysis of Hot Cell for a 10 MW Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alnajjar, Alaaddin; Park, Chang Je; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byunchul

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a shielding analysis has been performed for the hot cell in a 10 MW research reactor. Two kinds of shielding analysis code systems are used such as MCNPX2.7 and M-Shield7. The first one is Monte Carlo stochastic code and the second one is a deterministic point kernel code. The results are compared in this study. In order to obtain source term, the ORIGEN-S code is used for different kinds of source. Four kinds of sources are taken into consideration. From the simulation, it is also proposed that the proper thickness of shielding material and the maximum source capacity in the hot cell. This study shows preliminary analysis results of hot cell shielding for 10MW research reactor. Total four different source terms are considered such as spent fuel assembly, Ir-192, Mo-99, and I-131. For shielding material, general concrete, heavy concrete, and lead are used. MCNPX code is mainly used for a simplified hot cell model and the result are nearly consistent when compared with M-Shield code. Required shielding thickness and the hot cell capacity are also obtained for various criterion of surface dose rates

  19. Nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel and applies in particular when this is a fast reactor, the core or active part of the reactor being inside the vessel and immersed under a suitable volume of flowing liquid metal to cool it by extracting the calories released by the nuclear fission in the fuel assemblies forming this core [fr

  20. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant)

  1. A Novel Dual-Stage Hydrothermal Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellstern, Henrik Christian; Becker, Jacob; Hald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The dual-stage reactor is a novel continuous flow reactor with two reactors connected in series. It is designed for hydrothermal flow synthesis of nanocomposites, in which a single particle consists of multiple materials. The secondary material may protect the core nanoparticle from oxidation....... The dual-stage reactor combines the ability to produce advanced materials with an upscaled capacity in excess of 10 g/hour (dry mass). TiO2 was synthesized in the primary reactor and reproduced previous results. The dual-stage capability was succesfully demonstrated with a series of nanocomposites incl. Ti...

  2. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND THE DENITRIFICATION IN UASB REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Tavares de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental conditions in Brazil have been contributing to the development of anaerobic systems in the treatment of wastewaters, especially UASB - Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactors. The classic biological process for removal of nutrients uses three reactors - Bardenpho System, therefore, this work intends an alternative system, where the anaerobic digestion and the denitrification happen in the same reactor reducing the number of reactors for two. The experimental system was constituted by two units: first one was a nitrification reactor with 35 L volume and 15 d of sludge age. This system was fed with raw sanitary waste. Second unit was an UASB, with 7.8 L and 6 h of hydraulic detention time, fed with ¾ of effluent nitrification reactor and ¼ of raw sanitary waste. This work had as objective to evaluate the performance of the UASB reactor. In terms of removal efficiency, of bath COD and nitrogen, it was verified that the anaerobic digestion process was not affected. The removal efficiency of organic material expressed in COD was 71%, performance already expected for a reactor of this type. It was also observed that the denitrification process happened; the removal nitrate efficiency was 90%. Therefore, the denitrification process in reactor UASB is viable.

  4. Analysis of an accelerator-driven subcritical light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Wakker, P.H.; Wetering, T.F.H. van de; Verkooijen, A.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the basic characteristics of an accelerator-driven light water reactor has been made. The waste in the nuclear fuel cycle is considerably less than in the light water reactor open fuel cycle. This is mainly caused by the use of equilibrium nuclear fuel in the reactor. The accelerator enables the use of a fuel composition with infinite multiplication factor k ∞ < 1. The main problem of the use of this type of fuel is the strongly peaked flux distribution in the reactor core. A simple analytical model shows that a large core is needed with a high peak power factor in order to generate net electric energy. The fuel in the outer regions of the reactor core is used very poorly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Study of reactor parameters of on critical systems, Phase I: Safety report for RB zero power reactor; Ispitivanje reaktorskih parametara na kriticnim sistemima, I faza: Izvestaj o sigurnosti reaktora nulte snage RB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences Vinca, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1962-09-15

    In addition to the safety analysis for the zero power RB reactor, this report contains a general description of the reactor, reactor components, auxiliary equipment and the reactor building. Reactor Rb has been reconstructed during 1961-1962 and supplied with new safety-control system as well as with a complete dosimetry instrumentation. Since RB reactor was constructed without shielding special attention is devoted to safety and protection of the staff performing experiments. Due to changed circumstances in the Institute ( start-up of the RA 7 MW power reactor) the role of the RB reactor was redefined.

  6. Phosphorus removal from UASB reactor effluent by reactive media filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Gómez, Raúl; Renman, Gunno

    2017-08-01

    The phosphorus (P) and BOD7 removal performance of an upflow packed bed reactor (PBR) filled with two reactive filter media was studied over 50 weeks. The lower one-fifth of the reactor was filled with calcium-silicate-hydrate (Sorbulite®) and the upper four-fifth with calcium-silicate (Polonite®). A laboratory-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor (UASB) delivered wastewater to the PBR. A model was developed to describe the gradient in P concentration change in the reactor, based on reaction kinetics. The reaction terms were assumed to follow the Langmuir isotherm, based on the results obtained in a batch test. First, a comparison was made between experimental and simulated results. The capability of the model to forecast P removal capacity was then tested for three hypothetical cases: (i) reactor filled with Sorbulite and Polonite, (ii) reactor filled with only Sorbulite, and (iii) reactor filled with only Polonite. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was performed for the main parameters in the model. The average removal of P and BOD7 from the UASB effluent was 98% and 90%, respectively. The starting pH of the dual-medium effluent was 12.2 and decreased gradually over time to 11.1. The simulation both overestimated and underestimated mean measured P removal but was within the range of maximum and minimum measured values. The hypothetical cases revealed that most P was removed by Polonite due to calcium phosphate precipitation. The removal capacity of the two filter materials and their layer height in the reactor were the most sensitive parameters in the simulation.

  7. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon de los Santos, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  8. Effect of increasing nitrobenzene loading rates on the performance of anaerobic migrating blanket reactor and sequential anaerobic migrating blanket reactor/completely stirred tank reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) reactor was operated at nitrobenzene (NB) loading rates increasing from 3.33 to 66.67 g NB/m 3 day and at a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 days to observe the effects of increasing NB concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD), NB removal efficiencies, bicarbonate alkalinity, volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation and methane gas percentage. Moreover, the effect of an aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) reactor, following the anaerobic reactor, on treatment efficiencies was also investigated. Approximately 91-94% COD removal efficiencies were observed up to a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day in the AMBR reactor. The COD removal efficiencies decreased from 91% to 85% at a NB loading rate of 66.67 g/m 3 day. NB removal efficiencies were approximately 100% at all NB loading rates. The maximum total gas, methane gas productions and methane percentage were found to be 4.1, 2.6 l/day and 59%, respectively, at a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day. The optimum pH values were found to be between 7.2 and 8.4 for maximum methanogenesis. The total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentrations in the effluent were 110 and 70 mg/l in the first and second compartments at NB loading rates as high as 66.67 and 6.67 g/m 3 day, respectively, while they were measured as zero in the effluent of the AMBR reactor. In this study, from 180 mg/l NB 66 mg/l aniline was produced in the anaerobic reactor while aniline was completely removed and transformed to 2 mg/l of cathechol in the aerobic CSTR reactor. Overall COD removal efficiencies were found to be 95% and 99% for NB loading rates of 3.33 and 66.67 g/m 3 day in the sequential anaerobic AMBR/aerobic CSTR reactor system, respectively. The toxicity tests performed with Photobacterium phosphoreum (LCK 480, LUMIStox) and Daphnia magna showed that the toxicity decreased with anaerobic/aerobic sequential reactor system from the influent, anaerobic and to

  9. A fission-fusion hybrid reactor in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with natural uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Mark; Parker, Ronald R.; Forget, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    This work develops a conceptual design for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor operating in steady-state L-mode tokamak configuration with a subcritical natural or depleted uranium pebble bed blanket. A liquid lithium-lead alloy breeds enough tritium to replenish that consumed by the D-T fusion reaction. The fission blanket augments the fusion power such that the fusion core itself need not have a high power gain, thus allowing for fully non-inductive (steady-state) low confinement mode (L-mode) operation at relatively small physical dimensions. A neutron transport Monte Carlo code models the natural uranium fission blanket. Maximizing the fission power gain while breeding sufficient tritium allows for the selection of an optimal set of blanket parameters, which yields a maximum prudent fission power gain of approximately 7. A 0-D tokamak model suffices to analyze approximate tokamak operating conditions. This fission blanket would allow the fusion component of a hybrid reactor with the same dimensions as ITER to operate in steady-state L-mode very comfortably with a fusion power gain of 6.7 and a thermal fusion power of 2.1 GW. Taking this further can determine the approximate minimum scale for a steady-state L-mode tokamak hybrid reactor, which is a major radius of 5.2 m and an aspect ratio of 2.8. This minimum scale device operates barely within the steady-state L-mode realm with a thermal fusion power of 1.7 GW. Basic thermal hydraulic analysis demonstrates that pressurized helium could cool the pebble bed fission blanket with a flow rate below 10 m/s. The Brayton cycle thermal efficiency is 41%. This reactor, dubbed the Steady-state L-mode non-Enriched Uranium Tokamak Hybrid (SLEUTH), with its very fast neutron spectrum, could be superior to pure fission reactors in terms of breeding fissile fuel and transmuting deleterious fission products. It would likely function best as a prolific plutonium breeder, and the plutonium it produces could actually be more

  10. Fast reactors - Dounreay and the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.

    1988-01-01

    In 1960 at Dounreay, the Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) supplied the world's first fast reactor grid electricity, and went on to a highly successful career as a test facility, as fuel designs advanced. In the 1960s, the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) was designed and built, beginning operation in 1974. The PFR was built to provide a sound technical and experienced base to support the UK's future Fast Reactor development and design. The in-vessel fuel handling facilities have demonstrated the flexibility of the pool design and a considerable body of in-core fuel handling experience is available. A key issue for further Fast Reactor application is the performance of fuel and, because PFR was designed to take full-scale fuel assemblies, the fuel performance experience is directly relevant to commercial designs. The original PFR design irradiation target of 60000 MWd/t U (equivalent to 7.5 % burn-up) has already been exceeded by a factor of more than two and a 15.9 % burn-up sub-assembly has been discharged and reprocessed without difficulty. Soon a 20 % sub-assembly will follow. Also the PFR reprocessing plant has demonstrated the safety and efficiency of this essential adjunct to Fast Reactor operation. The safety and the environmental protection features of both the PFR and its fuel reprocessing plant have been demonstrated over the last 14 years. 2 refs., 3 figs

  11. Tritium monitoring within the reactor hall of a DT fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Monitoring the reactor hall atmosphere of DT-fueled fusion reactors will probably be performed with conventional ion chamber and proportional counter instruments modified as necessry to deal with the background radiation. Background includes external neutron and gamma radiation and internal beta-gamma radiation from the activated atmosphere. Although locating instruments in remote areas of the reactor hall and adding local shielding and electronic compensation may be feasible, placing the instruments in accessible low-background areas outside of the reactor hall and doing remote sampling is preferable and solves most of the radiation problems. The remaining problem of the activated atmosphere may be solved by recently developed instruments in conjunction with the use of semi-permeable membranes currently under development and evaluation

  12. Reactor science and technology: operation and control of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Junlong

    1994-01-01

    This article is a collection of short reports on reactor operation and research in China in 1991. The operation of and research activities linked with the Heavy Water Research Reactor, Swimming Pool Reactor and Miniature Neutron Source Reactor are briefly surveyed. A number of papers then follow on the developing strategies in Chinese fast breeder reactor technology including the conceptual design of an experimental fast reactor (FFR), theoretical studies of FFR thermo-hydraulics and a design for an immersed sodium flowmeter. Reactor physics studies cover a range of topics including several related to work on zero power reactors. The section on reactor safety analysis is concerned largely with the assessment of established, and the presentation of new, computer codes for use in PWR safety calculations. Experimental and theoretical studies of fuels and reactor materials for FBRs, PWRs, BWRs and fusion reactors are described. A final miscellaneous section covers Mo-Tc isotope production in the swimming pool reactor, convective heat transfer in tubes and diffusion of tritium through plastic/aluminium composite films and Li 2 SiO 3 . (UK)

  13. Actinides burnup in a sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Pineda A, R.; Martinez C, E.; Alonso, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The burnup of actinides in a nuclear reactor is been proposed as part of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, this process would close the fuel cycle recycling some of the radioactive material produced in the open nuclear fuel cycle. These actinides are found in the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power reactors at the end of their burnup in the reactor. Previous studies of actinides recycling in thermal reactors show that would be possible reduce the amounts of actinides at least in 50% of the recycled amounts. in this work, the amounts of actinides that can be burned in a fast reactor is calculated, very interesting results surge from the calculations, first, the amounts of actinides generated by the fuel is higher than for thermal fuel and the composition of the actinides vector is different as in fuel for thermal reactor the main isotope is the {sup 237}Np in the fuel for fast reactor the main isotope is the {sup 241}Am, finally it is concluded that the fast reactor, also generates important amounts of waste. (Author)

  14. Permeated defect detecting test method and device in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshishige.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device capable of performing a test for entire inner surfaces of the reactor upon periodical inspection of a BWR type reactor while sufficiently taking countermeasures for radiation rays into consideration. Namely, the present invention comprises following steps. (1) A provisional step for taking a shroud head of a reactor core shroud and incore structural components above and below the shroud out of the reactor, discharging reactor water and water tightly closing openings such as reactor wall perforation holes, (2) a pretreatment step for washing exposed inner surfaces of the reactor and peeling deteriorated materials, (3) a first drying step for drying portions washed and peeled in the step (2), (4) a permeation step for applying a permeation liquid of a defect detecting medium on the exposed inner surfaces of the reactor, (5) a permeation liquid removing step for removing the an excess permeation liquid in the step (4), (6) a second drying step for drying corresponding portions after performing the step (5), and (7) a flaw detecting step for optically observing the corresponding portions after performing the step (6) and detecting flaws. (I.S.)

  15. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  16. Design of a multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Rios, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of a research reactor is essential in any endeavor to improve the execution of a nuclear programme, since it is a very versatile tool which can make a decisive contribution to a country's scientific and technological development. Because of their design, however, many existing research reactors are poorly adapted to certain uses. In some nuclear research centres, especially in the advanced countries, changes have been made in the original designs or new research prototypes have been designed for specific purposes. These modifications have proven very costly and therefore beyond the reach of developing countries. For this reason, what the research institutes in such countries need is a single sufficiently versatile nuclear plant capable of meeting the requirements of a nuclear research programme at a reasonable cost. This is precisely what a multipurpose reactor does. The Mexican National Nuclear Research Institute (ININ) plans to design and build a multipurpose research reactor capable at the same time of being used for the development of reactor design skills and for testing nuclear materials and fuels, for radioisotopes production, for nuclear power studies and basic scientific research, for specialized training, and so on. For this design work on the ININ Multipurpose Research Reactor, collaborative relations have been established with various international organizations possessing experience in nuclear reactor design: Atomehnergoeksport of the USSR: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL); General Atomics (GA) of the USA; and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  17. Quality assurance in the manufacture of metallic uranium fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, B.K.; Kumar, Arbind; Nanekar, P.P.; Vaidya, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    Two Research Reactors viz. CIRUS and DHRUVA are operating at Trombay since 1960 and 1985 respectively. Cirus is a 40 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and light water as coolant. Dhruva is a 100 MWth reactor using heavy water as moderator and coolant. The maximum neutron flux of these reactors are 6.7 x 10 13 n/cm 2 /s (Cirus) and 1.8 x 10 14 n/cm 2 /s (Dhruva). Both these reactors are used for basic research, R and D in reactor technology, isotope production and operator training. Fuel material for these reactors is natural uranium metallic rods claded in finned aluminium (99.5%) tubes. This presentation will discuss various issues related to fabrication quality assurance and reactor behavior of metallic uranium fuel used in research reactors

  18. New training reactor at Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, W.; Knorr, J.; Wolf, T.

    2006-01-01

    A total of 14 low-power (up to 10 W) training reactors have been operated at German universities, 9 of them officially classified as being operational in 2004, though for very different uses. This number is expected to drop sharply. The only comprehensive upgrading of a training reactor took place at Dresden Technical University: AKR-2, the most modern facility in Germany, started routine operation in April 2005, under a newly granted license pursuant to Sec. 7, Subsec. 1 of the German Atomic Energy Act, for training students in nuclear technology, for suitable research projects, and a a center of information about reactor technology and nuclear technology for the interested public. One special aspect of this refurbishment was the installation of digital safety I and C systems of the TELEPERM XS line, which are used also in other modern plants. This fact, plus the easy possibility to use the plant for many basic experiments in reactor physics and radiation protection, make the AKR-2 attractive also to other users (e.g. for training reactor personnel or other persons working in nuclear technology). (orig.)

  19. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  20. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author) [es

  1. Neutron field control cybernetics model of RBMK reactor operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyakov, V.V.; Postnikov, V.V.; Sviridenkov, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Results on parameter optimization for cybernetics model of RBMK reactor operator by power release control function are presented. Convolutions of various criteria applied previously in algorithms of the program 'Adviser to reactor operator' formed the basis of the model. 7 refs.; 4 figs

  2. Economic incentives of short out-of-reactor time for fast breeder reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, B.W.; Haffner, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    Economic benefits (primarily reduced uranium ore and enrichment expenditures) can be realized by reducing the LMFBR out-of-reactor fuel cycle time only if process cost penalties and R and D costs can be minimized. The results of the evaluation presented show the potential gross benefits of reducing the out-of-reactor time and the effects of various associated cost penalties on these benefits. The gross benefit results estimate the potential savings in electrical power generation in the next 50 years using constant 1975 dollars and discounting the costs at 7 1 / 2 percent per year

  3. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  4. The safety basis of the integral fast reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, D.R.; Seidel, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) and metallic fuel have emerged as the US Department of Energy reference reactor concept and fuel system for the development of an advanced liquid-metal reactor. This article addresses the basic elements of the IFR reactor concept and focuses on the safety advances achieved by the IFR Program in the areas of (1) fuel performance, (2) superior local faults tolerance, (3) transient fuel performance, (4) fuel-failure mechanisms, (5) performance in anticipated transients without scram, (6) core-melt mitigation, and (7) actinide recycle

  5. Hybrid simulation of reactor kinetics in CANDU reactors using a modal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, B.M.; McDonnell, F.N.; Hinds, H.W.T.; m.

    1980-01-01

    A hybrid computer model for simulating the behaviour of large CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor cores is presented. The main dynamic variables are expressed in terms of weighted sums of a base set of spatial natural-mode functions with time-varying co-efficients. This technique, known as the modal or synthesis approach, permits good three-dimensional representation of reactor dynamics and is well suited to hybrid simulation. The hybrid model provides improved man-machine interaction and real-time capability. The model was used in two applications. The first studies the transient that follows a loss of primary coolant and reactor shutdown; the second is a simulation of the dynamics of xenon, a fission product which has a high absorption cross-section for neutrons and thus has an important effect on reactor behaviour. Comparison of the results of the hybrid computer simulation with those of an all-digital one is good, within 1% to 2%

  6. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state

  7. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  8. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  9. REDNET: a distributed data acquisition system for a nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, R.R.; Pensom, C.F.

    1984-05-01

    Experimental facilities such as those in the NRU nuclear research reactor at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL) need a data acquisition system that combines high performance with flexibility. The REactor Data NETwork (REDNET) is a system being developed at CRNL that used distributed computer technology to meet demanding requirements. This paper describes the distributed architecture of REDNET, comprising 7 minicomputers, and presents an overview of the software configuration and data structures which have been designed to produce a versatile and interactive system that must gather and store data at rates ranging from 20 times a second to once every 30 minutes. Each experimenter is provided with a unique set of points that are referred to collectively, and manipulated together as a group. Facilities are provided to modify operating parameters for and view data values in a group without affecting other groups. Facilities incorporated for graceful degradation of REDNET and automatic recovery from failures are also described

  10. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.) [pt

  11. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  12. Licensed operating reactors status summary report data as of April 30, 1983. Vol. 7, No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  13. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1983. Volume 7, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  14. Neutronic design analyses for a dual-coolant blanket concept: Optimization for a fusion reactor DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, I.; Gómez-Ros, J.M.; Veredas, G.; Sanz, J.; Sedano, L.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket for a DEMO fusion reactor is studied. ► An iterative process optimizes neutronic responses minimizing reactor dimension. ► A 3D toroidally symmetric geometry has been generated from the CAD model. ► Overall TBR values support the feasibility of the conceptual model considered. ► Power density in TF coils is below load limit for quenching. - Abstract: The generation of design specifications for a DEMO reactor, including breeding blanket (BB), vacuum vessel (VV) and magnetic field coils (MFC), requires a consistent neutronic optimization of structures between plasma and MFC. This work targets iteratively to generate these neutronic specifications for a Dual-Coolant He/Pb15.7Li breeding blanket design. The iteration process focuses on the optimization of allowable space between plasma scrapped-off-layer and VV in order to generate a MFC/VV/BB/plasma sustainable configuration with minimum global system volumes. Two VV designs have been considered: (1) a double-walled option with light-weight stiffeners and (2) a thick massive one. The optimization process also involves VV materials, looking to warrant radiation impact operational limits on the MFC. The resulting nuclear responses: peak nuclear heating in toroidal field (TF) coil, tritium breeding ratio (TBR), power amplification factor and helium production in the structural material are provided.

  15. SiC epitaxial layer growth in a novel multi-wafer VPE reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burk, A.A. Jr.; O`Loughlin, M.J. [Northrop Grumman Advanced Technology Lab., Baltimore, MD (United States); Mani, S.S. [Northrop Grumman Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Preliminary results are presented for SiC epitaxial layer growth employing a unique planetary SiC-VPE reactor. The high-throughput, multi-wafer (7 x 2-inch) reactor, was designed for atmospheric and reduced pressure operation at temperatures up to and exceeding 1600 C. Specular epitaxial layers have been grown in the reactor at growth rates from 3-5 {mu}m/hr. The thickest layer grown to data was 42 {mu}m. The layers exhibit minimum unintentional n-type doping of {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}, room temperature mobilities of {proportional_to}1000 cm{sup 2}/Vs, and intentional n-type doping from {proportional_to}5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} to >1 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Intrawafer thickness and doping uniformities of 4% and 7% (standard deviation/mean) have been obtained, respectively, on 35 mm diameter substrates. Recently, 3% thickness uniformity has been demonstrated on a 50 mm substrate. Within a run, wafer-to-wafer thickness deviation is {proportional_to}4-14%. Doping variation is currently larger, ranging as much as a factor of two from the highest to the lowest doped wafer. Continuing efforts to improve the susceptor temperature uniformity and reduce unintentional hydrocarbon generation to improve layer uniformity and reproducibility, are presented. (orig.) 18 refs.

  16. Fabrication of ORNL Fuel Irradiated in the Peach Bottom Reactor and Postirradiation Examination of Recycle Test Elements 7 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Jr. E.L.

    2001-01-01

    Seven full-sized Peach Bottom Reactor fuel elements were fabricated in a cooperative effort by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Gulf General Atomic (GGA) as part of the National HTGR Fuel Recycle Development Program. These elements contain bonded fuel rods and loose beds of particles made from several combinations of fertile and fissile particles of interest for present and future use in the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). The portion of the fuel prepared for these elements by ORNL is described in detail in this report, and it is in conjunction with the GGA report (GA-10109) a complete fabrication description of the test. In addition, this report describes the results obtained to date from postirradiation examination of the first two elements removed from the Peach Bottom Reactor, RTE-7 and -4. The fuel examined had relatively low exposure, up to about 1.5 x 10 21 neutrons/cm* fast (>0.18 MeV) fluence, compared with the peak anticipated HTGR fluence of 8.0 x 10 21 , but it has performed well at this exposure. Dimensional data indicate greater irradiation shrinkage than expected from accelerated test data to higher exposures. This suggests that either the method of extrapolation of the higher exposure data back to low exposure is faulty, or the behavior of the coated particles in the neutron spectrum characteristic of the accelerated tests does not adequately represent the behavior in an HTGR spectrum

  17. Kinetic parameters of hydroprocessing reactions in a flow reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raychaudhuri, U.; Banerjee, T.S.; Ghar, R.N. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India))

    1994-01-01

    The change in distillation properties of a blend of light and heavy distillates over a commercial hydrotreating catalyst was studied using a small packed bed reactor. The results were interpreted assuming a pseudo-component model that took into account the physical and chemical complexity of the system. A first order series-parallel reaction mechanism was found to be valid for the operating conditions involved. Pore diffusion effects were also taken into consideration. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Minor Actinide Burning in Thermal Reactors. A Report by the Working Party on Scientific Issues of Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, K.; Porsch, D.; Rimpault, G.; Taiwo, T.; Worrall, A.

    2013-01-01

    The actinides (or actinoids) are those elements in the periodic table from actinium upwards. Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) are two of the principal elements in nuclear fuel that could be classed as major actinides. The minor actinides are normally taken to be the triad of neptunium (Np), americium (Am) and curium (Cm). The combined masses of the remaining actinides (i.e. actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium, californium, einsteinium and fermium) are small enough to be regarded as very minor trace contaminants in nuclear fuel. Those elements above uranium in the periodic table are known collectively as the transuranics (TRUs). The operation of a nuclear reactor produces large quantities of irradiated fuel (sometimes referred to as spent fuel), which is either stored prior to eventual deep geological disposal or reprocessed to enable actinide recycling. A modern light water reactor (LWR) of 1 GWe capacity will typically discharge about 20-25 tonnes of irradiated fuel per year of operation. About 93-94% of the mass of uranium oxide irradiated fuel is comprised of uranium (mostly 238 U), with about 4-5% fission products and ∼1% plutonium. About 0.1-0.2% of the mass is comprised of neptunium, americium and curium. These latter elements accumulate in nuclear fuel because of neutron captures, and they contribute significantly to decay heat loading and neutron output, as well as to the overall radio-toxic hazard of spent fuel. Although the total minor actinide mass is relatively small - approximately 20-25 kg per year from a 1 GWe LWR - it has a disproportionate impact on spent fuel disposal, and thus the longstanding interest in transmuting these actinides either by fission (to fission products) or neutron capture in order to reduce their impact on the back end of the fuel cycle. The combined masses of the trace actinides actinium, thorium, protactinium, berkelium and californium in irradiated LWR fuel are only about 2 parts per billion, which is far too low for

  19. Fast reactor development programme in France during 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Rigoleur, C.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, the total amount of electricity produced in France was 471 TWh, out of which 358.2 TWh (76 %) were produced by nuclear power plants, 36.9 TWh (7.8 %) by conventional thermal plants, and 75.5 TWh (16 %) by hydraulic plants. The net electrical power consumption was 368.7 TWh. At the end of 1995, 'Electricite de France' had 54 PWR units in operation. The availability factor for these units was maintained at 81%. 1995 was marked by a decrease of unexpected shutdowns (1.8% in 1995 instead of 2.2% in 1994), a new reduction in programmed shutdown periods, and a good safety level was maintained. In the field of Fast Reactors, the main events of 1995 were the following. At the end of December 1994, the PHENIX reactor was authorized to perform its 49th cycle at 350 MW th (143 MWe). This 49th cycle was completed without any significant problems on April 7, 1995. During the remainder of the year, the reactor had been shut down in order to carry out several tasks within the scope of the ten-year extension of the PHENIX reactor's lifetime. Concerning the CREYS-MALVILLE plant (SUPER-PHENIX) the first part of the year was devoted to repairing argon leak of one of the IHX. Authorization to restart the reactor was given on August 22. The end of the year was beset by a number of minor incidents. The reactor was restarted at the end of 1995 and reactor power was increased by successive steps (30% Pn (Nominal Power) up to February 6 1996; followed by 50 %...). The 'Decret d'Autorisation de Creation' stipulates that because of its prototype character, SUPER PHENIX will have to be operated under conditions explicitly giving priority to safety and knowledge acquisition, with an objective of research and demonstration. In this context, the so-called 'knowledge acquisition' programme designed to prove the capacity of a large FBR to produce electricity on an industrial scale, to test the consumption of plutonium and minor actinides in a large fast reactor, as well as to provide

  20. U.S. Status of Fast Reactor Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Summary: • Fast reactor R&D is focused on key technologies innovations for performance improvement (cost reduction) and safety: 1. System Integration and Concept Development; 2. Safety Technology; 3. Advanced Materials; 4. Ultrasonic Viewing; 5. Advanced Energy Conversion (Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle); 6. Reactor Simulation; 7. Nuclear Data; 8. Advanced Fuels. • Fast reactors have flexible capability for actinide management: – A wide variety of fuel cycle options are being considered; • International R&D collaboration pursued in Generation-IV and multilateral arrangements

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  2. Lateral restraint assembly in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.; Gorholt, W.

    1977-01-01

    A lateral restraint assembly is described for a reactor of, for example, the high temperature gas-cooled type which commonly includes a reactor core of relatively complex construction supported within a shell or vessel providing a shielded cavity for containing the reactor core. (U.K.)

  3. Method for filling a reactor with a catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for filling a reactor with a catalyst for the carbonylation of carbonylated compounds in the gas phase. According to said method, a SILP catalyst is covered with a filling agent which is liquid under normal conditions and is volatile under carbonylation reaction...... conditions, and a thus-treated catalyst is introduced into the reactor and the reactor is sealed....

  4. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of each reactor in each one of the

  6. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  7. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  8. Japan: The institute for the economy of energy recommends a quick re-start of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2014-01-01

    The Japanese Institute for the Economy of the Energy (IEEJ) considers that the sooner the nuclear reactors will re-start, the better the Japanese economy and environment will be. The 48 Japanese reactors were stopped after the Fukushima accident and their restart is linked to the implementation of new measures for reinforcing safety. Until now only 2 reactors Sendai 1 and Sendai 2 have been allowed to re-start. The procedure for the safety assessment of the reactors is slower than expected. A study shows that only 7 reactors may be allowed to re-start before march 2015 and a total of 19 units may be operating in march 2016. In this scenario 2% of the electricity will come from nuclear energy in 2014 and 15% in 2015, natural gas imports will still be necessary for the production of electricity and their global cost is estimated to reach 56 billions euros while Japan's rate of energy independence will drop by 4.6%. (A.C.)

  9. ISIS Training Reactor: A Reactor Dedicated to Education and Training for Students and Professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulon, F.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • INSTN strategy: complete theoretical courses by practical courses on the ISIS research reactor. • Training courses integrated both in Academic degree programs and continuing education. • 27 hours of training courses have been developed focusing on the practical and safety aspects of reactor operation. • The Education and Training activity became the main activity of ISIS reactor: 400 trainees/year; 360 hours/year; 40% in English. • Remote access to the Training courses: Internet Reactor Laboratory under development to be started from 2014 to broadcast training courses from ISIS reactor to guest institutions

  10. Zircaloy behaviour in high temperature irradiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanic, V.F.

    1982-04-01

    The corrosion and hydriding of Zircaloy during irradiation in high temperature water is strongly dependent on the oxygen concentration of the water. Corrosion tests in the NRX and NRU research reactors using small samples have demonstrated the importance of water chemistry in maintaining Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding within acceptable limits. Zircaloy fuel cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides during irradiation in hich temperature water containing dissolved oxygen. Results from examinations of prototype fuel cladding irradiated in the research reactors are presented to show how local variations in coolant flow, fast neutron flux, metallurgical structure and surface condition can influence the onset of non-uniform corrosion under these conditions. Destructive examinations of CANDU-PHW reactor fuel cladding have emphasized the importance of good chemistry control, especially the dissolved oxygen concentration of the water. When reactor coolants are maintained under normal reducing conditions at high pH (5 to 10 cm 3 D 2 /kg D 2 O; 2 /kg D 2 O; pH > 10 with LiOD), Zircaloy cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides. These patch-type oxides tend to coalesce with time to form a thick, uniform oxide layer after extended exposure. Under reducing coolant conditions, Zircaloy cladding absorbs less than 200 mg D/kg Zr (approximately 2.5 mg/dm 2 equivalent hydrogen) in about 500 days. With oxygen in the coolant, deuterium absorption is considerably less despite the significant increase in corrosion under such conditions

  11. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  12. Improved nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. A generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounds the reactor vessel and a central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and supports the bottom wall of the reactor vessel and the reactor core. The periphery of the reactor vessel bore is supported by an annular structure which allows thermal expansion but not seismic motion of the vessel, and a bed of thermally insulating material uniformly supports the vessel base whilst allowing expansion thereof. A guard ring prevents lateral seismic motion of the upper end of the reactor vessel. The periphery of the core is supported by an annular structure supported by the vessel base and keyed to the vessel wall so as to be able to expand but not undergo seismic motion. A deck is supported on the containment structure above the reactor vessel open top by annular bellows, the deck carrying the reactor control rods such that heating of the reactor vessel results in upward expansion against the control rods. (author)

  13. Caramel fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.

    1979-11-01

    This fuel for research reactors is made of UO 2 pellets in a zircaloy cladding to replace 93% enriched uranium. It is a cold fuel, non contaminating and non proliferating, enrichment is only 7 to 8%. Irradiation tests were performed until burn-up of 50000 MWD/t [fr

  14. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a sodium cooled reactor of the type having a reactor hot pool, a slightly lower pressure reactor cold pool and a reactor vessel liner defining a reactor vessel liner flow gap separating the hot pool and the cold pool along the reactor vessel sidewalls and wherein the normal sodium circuit in the reactor includes main sodium reactor coolant pumps having a suction on the lower pressure sodium cold pool and an outlet to a reactor core; the reactor core for heating the sodium and discharging the sodium to the reactor hot pool; a heat exchanger for receiving sodium from the hot pool, and removing heat from the sodium and discharging the sodium to the lower pressure cold pool; the improvement across the reactor vessel liner comprising: a jet pump having a venturi installed across the reactor vessel liner, the jet pump having a lower inlet from the reactor vessel cold pool across the reactor vessel liner and an upper outlet to the reactor vessel hot pool

  15. Irradiation of a CANDU UOsub(2) fuel element with twenty-three machined slits cut through the zircaloy sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaSilva, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    A CANDU fuel element was purposely defected, exposing a minimum UOsub(2) fuel stack area of 272 mmsup(2), by machining 23 longitudinal slits through the Zircaloy-4 sheathing. The element was then irradiated in the X-2 loop of the NRX reactor for a period of 14.64 effective full power days at a linear heat rating of 48 kW/m to investigate the relationship between fission product release and UOsub(2) oxidation behaviour in an element with minimal fuel-to-gap fission gas trapping. The fission product releases, as measured by on-line gamma-ray spectroscopy, revealed that the noble gases and radioiodines are both released from the UOsub(2) fuel matrix directly to the coolant via simple diffusion kinetics, and that their diffusivities in hyperstoichiometric UOsub(2) are approximately equal. The oxidation of UOsub(2) to the higher states UOsub(2+x), Usub(4)Osub(9) and Usub(3)Osub(8), was accompanied by substantial fuel swelling and sheath deformation preferentially located in the lower powered end of the element. The spalling and erosion behaviour of the fuel pellets was correlated to the rate of fuel oxidation

  16. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Performance of a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henquin, E.R.; Bisang, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → For this reactor configuration the current distribution is uniform. → For this reactor configuration with bipolar connection the leakage current is small. → The mass-transfer conditions are closely uniform along the electrode. → The fluidodynamic behaviour can be represented by the dispersion model. → This reactor represents a suitable device for laboratory trials. - Abstract: This paper reports on a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor with an innovative design feature, which is based on a filter press arrangement with inclined segmented electrodes and under a modular assembly. Under bipolar connection, the fraction of leakage current is lower than 4%, depending on the bipolar Wagner number, and the current distribution is closely uniform. When a turbulence promoter is used, the local mass-transfer coefficient shows a variation of ±10% with respect to its mean value. The fluidodynamics of the reactor responds to the dispersion model with a Peclet number higher than 10. It is concluded that this reactor is convenient for laboratory research.

  18. A comparative study on recycling spent fuels in gas-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hangbok; Baxter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates advanced Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel cycle scenarios which are based on recycling spent nuclear fuel for the sustainability of nuclear energy. A 600 MWth GFR was used for the fuel cycle analysis, and the equilibrium core was searched with different fuel-to-matrix volume ratios such as 70/30 and 60/40. Two fuel cycle scenarios, i.e., a one-tier case combining a Light Water Reactor (LWR) and a GFR, and a two-tier case using an LWR, a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and a GFR, were evaluated for mass flow and fuel cycle cost, and the results were compared to those of LWR once-through fuel cycle. The mass flow calculations showed that the natural uranium consumption can be reduced by more than 57% and 27% for the one-tier and two-tier cycles, respectively, when compared to the once-through fuel cycle. The transuranics (TRU) which pose a long-term problem in a high-level waste repository, can be significantly reduced in the multiple recycle operation of these options, resulting in more than 110 and 220 times reduction of TRU inventory to be geologically disposed for the one-tier and two-tier fuel cycles, respectively. The fuel cycle costs were estimated to be 9.4 and 8.6 USD/MWh for the one-tier fuel cycle when the GFR fuel-to-matrix volume ratio was 70/30 and 60/40, respectively. However the fuel cycle cost is reduced to 7.3 and 7.1 USD/MWh for the two-tier fuel cycle, which is even smaller than that of the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion the GFR can provide alternative fuel cycle options to the once-through and other fast reactor fuel cycle options, by increasing the natural uranium utilization and reducing the fuel cycle cost.

  19. Research and development of a super fast reactor (12). Considerations for the reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    A research program aimed at developing the Super Fast Reactor (Super FR) has been entrusted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan since December 2005. It includes the following three projects. (A) Development of the Super Fast Reactor concept. (B)Thermal-hydraulic experiments. (C) Materials development. Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) has joined this program and works on part (A) together with the University of Tokyo. From the utility's viewpoint, it is important to consider the most desirable characteristics for Super FR to have. Four issues were identified in project (A), (1) Fuel design, (2) Reactor core design, (3) Safety, and (4) Plant characteristics of Super FR. This report describes the desired characteristics of Super FR with respect to item (1) fuel design and item (2) Reactor core design, as compared with a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. The other two issues will be discussed in this project, and will also be considered in the design process of Super FR. (author)

  20. Plant with nuclear reactor, in particular a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reactor core of the plant has tubular and vertically movable control rods moved by a flow of coolant under pressure. Each control rod surrounds a similarly tubular guide rod, stationary relative to the reactor core, leaving an annular slot-like space therebetween. The inside of each guide rod forms a first pressure chamber supplied with the coolant under pressure. The upper end of each control rod is closed and has a vertical shaft that extends into the inside of the guide rod and forms therewith a second annular slot-like space. At least one first restriction is provided in the first annular slot-like space and at least one second restriction is provided in the second annular slot-like space. A second pressure chamber is formed between both restrictions. The coolant supplied to the guide rod thus returns to the pressure vessel surrounding the reactor core through the second annular slot-like space, the second pressure chamber and the first annular slot-like space. Controlling means are provided, with which pressure thrusts can be generated if necessary in the coolant within the first pressure chamber. (author) 5 refs., 10 figs

  1. Decommissioning of a small reactor (BR3 reactor, Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoumont, J.; Massaut, V.; Klein, M.; Demeulemeester, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1989, SCK-CEN has been dismantling its PWR reactor BR3 (Belgian Reactor No. 3). After gaining a great deal of experience in remote dismantling of highly radioactive components during the actual dismantling of the two sets of internals, the BR3 team completed the cutting of its reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During the feasibility phase of the RPV dismantling, a decision was made to cut it under water in the refuelling pool of the plant, after having removed it from its cavity. The RPV was cut into segments using a milling cutter and a bandsaw machine. These mechanical techniques have shown their ability for this kind of operations. Prior to the segmentation, the thermal insulation situated around the RPV was remotely removed and disposed of. The paper will describe all these operations. The BR3 decommissioning activities also include the dismantling of contaminated loops and equipment. After a careful sorting of the pieces, optimized management routes are selected in order to minimize the final amount of radioactive waste to be disposed of. Some development of different methods of decontamination were carried out: abrasive blasting (or sand blasting), chemical decontamination (Oxidizing-Reducing process using Cerium). The main goal of the decontamination program is to recycle most of the metallic materials either in the nuclear world or in the industrial world by reaching the respective recycling or clearance level. Overall the decommissioning of the BR3 reactor has shown the feasibility of performing such a project in a safe and economical way. Moreover, BR3 has developed methodologies and decontamination processes to economically reduce the amount of radwaste produced. (author)

  2. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  3. Complete Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Experiments with MSRE FLiBe Salt and Perform Comparison with Molten Salt Cooled and Molten Salt Fueled Reactor Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mueller, Don [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In September 2016, reactor physics measurements were conducted at Research Centre Rez (RC Rez) using the FLiBe (2 7LiF + BeF2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments were intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems using FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in collaboration with RC Rez, performed sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses of these experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objectives of these analyses were (1) to identify potential sources of bias in fluoride salt-cooled and salt-fueled reactor simulations resulting from cross section uncertainties, and (2) to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a final report on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. In the future, these S/U analyses could be used to inform the design of additional FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE. The key finding of this work is that, for both solid and liquid fueled fluoride salt reactors, radiative capture in 7Li is the most significant contributor to potential bias in neutronics calculations within the FLiBe salt.

  4. A novel approach to the production of medical radioisotopes: the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonin, H.W.; Hilborn, J.W.; Carlin, G.E.; Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2009, the unexpected 15-month outage of the Canadian NRU nuclear reactor resulted in a sudden 30% world shortage, with higher shortages experienced in North America than in Europe. Commercial radioisotope production is from just eight nuclear reactors, most being aging systems near the end of their service life. This paper proposes a more efficient production and distribution model. Tc-99m unit doses would be distributed to regional hospitals from ten integrated 'industrial radiopharmacies', located at existing licensed nuclear reactor sites in North America. At each site, one or more 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE nuclear reactors would deliver 15 litres of irradiated aqueous uranyl sulfate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells, for extraction of Mo-99; and the low-enriched uranium would be recycled. Purified Mo-99 would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily for road delivery to all of the nuclear medicine hospitals within a 3-hour range. At the current price of $20 per unit dose, the annual gross income from 10 sites would be approximately $360 million. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor evolved from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors at the end-of-core life, enabling them to continue their primary missions of research and education, together with full time commercial radioisotope production. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both deterministic and probabilistic reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture is a dilute aqueous solution of low-enriched uranyl sulfate containing approximately 1 kg of U-235. The reactor is controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector. Safety analysis was carried out for both normal operation and transient conditions. The most severe

  5. A novel approach to the production of medical radioisotopes: the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonin, H.W., E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Hilborn, J.W. [retired, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Carlin, G.E. [Ontario Power Generation, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gagnon, R.; Busatta, P. [Royal Canadian Navy, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    In 2009, the unexpected 15-month outage of the Canadian NRU nuclear reactor resulted in a sudden 30% world shortage, with higher shortages experienced in North America than in Europe. Commercial radioisotope production is from just eight nuclear reactors, most being aging systems near the end of their service life. This paper proposes a more efficient production and distribution model. Tc-99m unit doses would be distributed to regional hospitals from ten integrated 'industrial radiopharmacies', located at existing licensed nuclear reactor sites in North America. At each site, one or more 20 kW Homogeneous SLOWPOKE nuclear reactors would deliver 15 litres of irradiated aqueous uranyl sulfate fuel solution daily to industrial-scale hot cells, for extraction of Mo-99; and the low-enriched uranium would be recycled. Purified Mo-99 would be incorporated in large Mo-99/Tc-99m generators for extraction of Tc-99m five days a week; and each automated hot-cell facility would be designed to load up to 7,000 Tc-99m syringes daily for road delivery to all of the nuclear medicine hospitals within a 3-hour range. At the current price of $20 per unit dose, the annual gross income from 10 sites would be approximately $360 million. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor evolved from the inherently safe SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor, with a double goal: replacing the heterogeneous SLOWPOKE-2 reactors at the end-of-core life, enabling them to continue their primary missions of research and education, together with full time commercial radioisotope production. The Homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor was modelled using both deterministic and probabilistic reactor simulation codes. The homogeneous fuel mixture is a dilute aqueous solution of low-enriched uranyl sulfate containing approximately 1 kg of U-235. The reactor is controlled by mechanical absorber rods in the beryllium reflector. Safety analysis was carried out for both normal operation and transient conditions. The most severe

  6. Organic loading rate effect on the acidogenesis of cheese whey: a comparison between UASB and SBR reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, R; Iglesias-Iglesias, R; Kennes, C; Veiga, M C

    2017-09-16

    Volatile fatty acids (VFA) production and degree of acidification (DA) were investigated in the anaerobic treatment of cheese whey by comparison of two processes: a continuous process using a laboratory upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor and a discontinuous process using a sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The main purpose of this work was to study the organic loading rate (OLR) effect on the yield of VFA in two kinds of reactors. The predominant products in the acidogenic process in both reactors were: acetate, propionate, butyrate and valerate. The maximum DA obtained was 98% in an SBR at OLR of 2.7 g COD L -1 d -1 , and 97% in the UASB at OLR at 15.1 g COD L -1 d -1 . The results revealed that the UASB reactor was more efficient at a medium OLR with a higher VFA yield, while with the SBR reactor, the maximum acidification was obtained at a lower OLR with changes in the VFA profile at different OLRs applied.

  7. Fluidized bed nuclear reactor as a IV generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    2002-01-01

    The object of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of the Fluidized Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) concept under the light of the requirements set for the IV generation nuclear reactors. It is seen that FBNR generally meets the goals of providing sustainable energy generation that meets clean air objectives and promotes long-term availability of systems and effective fuel utilization for worldwide energy production; minimize and manage their nuclear waste and notably reduce the long term stewardship burden in the future, thereby improving protection for the public health and the environment; increase the assurance that it is a very unattractive and least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials; excel in safety and reliability; have a very low likelihood and degree of reactor core damage; eliminate the need for offsite emergency response; have a clear life-cycle cost advantage over other energy sources; have a level of financial risk comparable to other energy projects. The other advantages of the proposed design are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (author)

  8. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. Reactor physics aspects of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Critoph, E.

    1980-01-01

    These four lectures are being given at the Winter Course on Nuclear Physics at Trieste during 1978 February. They constitute part of the third week's lectures in Part II: Reactor Theory and Power Reactors. A physical description of CANDU reactors is given, followed by an overview of CANDU characteristics and some of the design options. Basic lattice physics is discussed in terms of zero energy lattice experiments, irradiation effects and analytical methods. Start-up and commissioning experiments in CANDU reactors are reviewed, and some of the more interesting aspects of operation discussed - fuel management, flux mapping and control of the power distribution. Finally, some of the characteristics of advanced fuel cycles that have been proposed for CANDU reactors are summarized. (author)

  10. A study of reactor neutrino monitoring at the experimental fast reactor JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Hara, T.; Haruna, T.; Ishihara, N.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ito, C.; Katsumata, M.; Kawasaki, T.; Konno, T.; Kuze, M.; Maeda, J.; Matsubara, T.; Miyata, H.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nitta, K.; Sakamoto, Y.; Suekane, F.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, H.

    2012-01-01

    We carried out a study of neutrino detection at the experimental fast reactor JOYO using a 0.76 tons gadolinium loaded liquid scintillator detector. The detector was set up on the ground level at 24.3 m from the JOYO reactor core of 140 MW thermal power. The measured neutrino event rate from reactor on-off comparison was 1.11±1.24(stat.)±0.46(syst.) events/day. Although the statistical significance of the measurement was not enough, backgrounds in such a compact detector at the ground level were studied in detail and MC simulations were found to describe the data well. A study for improvement of the detector for future such experiments is also shown.

  11. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  12. Degradation of Procion Red H-E7B reactive dye by coupling a photo-Fenton system with a sequencing batch reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Montano, Julia [Departament de Quimica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Torrades, Francesc [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, ETSEI de Terrassa (UPC), C/Colom, 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Garcia-Hortal, Jose A. [Departament d' Enginyeria Textil i Paperera, ETSEI de Terrassa (UPC), C/Colom, 11, E-08222 Terrassa, Barcelona (Spain); Domenech, Xavier [Departament de Quimica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Peral, Jose [Departament de Quimica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.peral@uab.es

    2006-06-30

    A bench-scale study combining photo-Fenton reaction with an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to degrade a commercial homo-bireactive dye (Procion Red H-E7B, 250 mg l{sup -1}) was investigated. The photo-Fenton process was applied as a pre-treatment, avoiding complete mineralisation, just to obtain a bio-compatible water able to be treated by means of the SBR in a second step. In this sense, different Fenton reagent concentrations were assessed by following dye solution biodegradability enhancement (BOD{sub 5}/COD), as well as the toxicity (EC{sub 50}), DOC, colour (Abs{sub 543.5}) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} evolution with photo-Fenton irradiation time. Obtained pre-treated solutions were biologically oxidized in a SBR containing non-acclimated activated sludge. Different hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the bioreactor were tested to attain the maximum organic load removal efficiency. Best results were obtained with 60 min of 10 mg l{sup -1} Fe(II) and 125 mg l{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} photo-Fenton pre-treatment and 1 day HRT in SBR.

  13. Mitigate Strategy of Very High Temperature Reactor Air-ingress Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Tae Kyu [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Arcilesi, David J.; Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard N. [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Oh, Chang H.; Kim, Eung S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2016-10-15

    A critical safety event of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Since a VHTR uses graphite as a core structure, if there is a break on the pressure vessel, the air in the reactor cavity could ingress into the reactor core. The worst case scenario of the accident is initiated by a double-ended guillotine break of the cross vessel that connects the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. The operating pressures in the vessel and containment are about 7 and 0.1 MPa, respectively. In the VHTR, the reactor pressure vessel is located within a reactor cavity which is filled with air during normal operation. Therefore, the air-helium mixture in the cavity may ingress into the reactor pressure vessel after the depressurization process. In this paper, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool, FLUENT, was used to figure out air-ingress mitigation strategies in the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) designed by General Atomics, Inc. After depressurization, there is almost no air in the reactor cavity; however, the air could flow back to the reactor cavity since the reactor cavity is placed in the lowest place in the reactor building. The heavier air could flow to the reactor cavity through free surface areas in the reactor building. Therefore, Argon gas injection in the reactor cavity is introduced. The injected argon would prevent the flow by pressurizing the reactor cavity initially, and eventually it prevents the flow by making the gas a heavier density than air in the reactor cavity. The gate opens when the reactor cavity is pressurized during the depressurization and it closes by gravity when the depressurization is terminated so that it can slow down the air flow to the reactor cavity.

  14. Simulation of a Hydrometallurgical Leaching Reactor modeled as a DAE system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Duenas Diez

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available An existing dynamic model of the main reactor in the Silgrain process for the production of Si from FeSi has been extended here in order to resemble more closely the behavior of the real reactor. The previous model was based on the application of macroscopic mass conservation law, the population balance equation and the assumptions of complete mixing and isothermic conditions. The major modifications are the inclusion of the condition governing the entrainment of particles in the outflow, and the formulation of the energy balance. The extended model consists of 1 integrodifferential equation, 4 implicit ordinary differential equations, 7 algebraic equations and 3 integral equations. After discretization in the particle size space, a system of differential and algebraic equations (DAE is obtained. DAEs are not ODEs and they require analysis and characterization and may require reformulation. After such analysis, it was concluded that the system is implicit index-one for the usual range of operation and that a method based on the Backward Differentiation formulas (BDF can be used for its solution. The model was implemented in Matlab and the ode15s code was used for solving the system of equations. The simulation results are satisfactory and seem to match qualitatively with the known operation of the reactor. The model is suitable for further use in designing a model-based control scheme.

  15. Permanent seal ring for a nuclear reactor cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Marshall, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear reactor containment arrangement is described including: a. a reactor vessel which thermally expands and contracts during cyclic operation of the reactor and which has a peripheral wall; b. a containment wall spaced apart from and surrounding the peripheral wall of the reactor vessel and defining an annular thermal expansion gap therebetween for accommodating thermal expansion; and c. an annular ring seal which sealingly engages and is affixed to and extends between the peripheral wall of the reactor vessel and the containment wall

  16. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Zaetta, A.; Johner, J.; Mathoniere, G.

    2000-01-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  17. Reactor noise analysis of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtani, Hideji; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    1980-01-01

    As a part of dynamics tests in experimental fast reactor ''JOYO'', reactor noise tests were carried out. The reactor noise analysis techniques are effective for study of plant characteristics by determining fluctuations of process signals (neutron signal, reactor inlet temperature signals, etc.), which are able to be measured without disturbances for reactor operations. The aims of reactor noise tests were to confirm that no unstable phenomenon exists in ''JOYO'' and to gain initial data of the plant for reference of the future data. Data for the reactor noise tests treated in this paper were obtained at 50 MW power level. Fluctuations of process signals were amplified and recorded on analogue tapes. The analysis was performed using noise code (NOISA) of digital computer, with which statistical values of ASPD (auto power spectral density), CPSD (cross power spectral density), and CF (coherence function) were calculated. The primary points of the results are as follows. 1. RMS value of neutron signal at 50 MW power level is about 0.03 MW. This neutron fluctuation is not disturbing reactor operations. 2. The fluctuations of A loop reactor inlet temperatures (T sub(AI)) are larger than the fluctuations of B loop reactor inlet temperature (T sub(BI)). For this reason, the major driving force of neutron fluctuations seems to be the fluctuations of T sub(AI). 3. Core and blanket subassemblies can be divided into two halves (A and B region), with respect to the spacial motion of temperature in the reactor core. A or B region means the region in which sodium temperature fluctuations in subassembly are significantly affected by T sub(AI) or T sub(BI), respectively. This phenomenon seems to be due to the lack of mixing of A and B loop sodium in lower plenum of reactor vessel. (author)

  18. The heavy water accountancy for research reactors in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshijima, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Sumitoshi; Nemoto, Denjirou

    1998-11-01

    The three research reactors have been operated by the Department of Research Reactor and used about 41 tons heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector of research reactors. The JRR-2 is a tank type research reactor of 10MW in thermal power and its is used as moderator, coolant and reflector about 16 tons heavy water. The JRR-3M is a light water cooled and moderated pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 20MW and its is used as reflector about 7.3 tons heavy water. In the JRR-4, which is a light water cooled swimming pool type research reactor with the maximum thermal power of 3.5MW, about 1 ton heavy water is used to supply fully thermalized neutrons with a neutron beam experiment of facility. The heavy water was imported from U.S.A., CANADA and Norway. Parts of heavy water is internationally controlled materials, therefore management of heavy water is necessary for materials accountancy. This report described the change of heavy water inventories in each research reactors, law and regulations for accounting of heavy water in JAERI. (author)

  19. Preliminary Design Concept for a Reactor-internal CRDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Suhn; Kim, Keung Koo

    2013-01-01

    A rod ejection accident may cause severer result in SMRs because SMRs have relatively high control rod reactivity worth compared with commercial nuclear reactors. Because this accident would be perfectly excluded by adopting a reactor-internal CRDM (Control Rod Drive Mechanism), many SMRs accept this concept. The first concept was provided by JAERI with the MRX reactor which uses an electric motor with a ball screw driveline. Babcock and Wilcox introduced the concept in an mPower reactor that adopts an electric motor with a roller screw driveline and hydraulic system, and Westinghouse Electric Co. proposes an internal Control Rod Drive in its SMR with an electric motor with a latch mechanism. In addition, several other applications have been reported thus far. The reactor-internal CRDM concept is now widely adopted in many SMR designs, and this concept may also be applied in an evolutionary reactor development. So the preliminary study is conducted based on the SMART CRDM design. A preliminary design concept for a reactor-internal CRDM was proposed and evaluated through an electromagnetic analysis. It was found that there is an optimum design for the motor housing, and the results may contribute to the realization a reactor-internal CRDM for an evolutionary reactor development. More detailed analysis results will be reported later

  20. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  1. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  2. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  3. Nuclear reactors for space electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buden, D.

    1978-06-01

    The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is studying reactor power plants for space applications in the late 1980s and 1990s. The study is concentrating on high-temperature, compact, fast reactors that can be coupled with various radiation shielding systems and thermoelectric, dynamic, or thermionic electric power conversion systems, depending on the mission. Lifetimes of 7 to 10 yr at full power, at converter operating temperatures of 1275 to 1675 0 K, are being studied. The systems are being designed such that no single-failure modes exist that will cause a complete loss of power. In fact, to meet the long lifetimes, highly redundant design features are being emphasized. Questions have been raised about safety since the COSMOS 954 incident. ''Fail-safe'' means to prevent exposure of the population to radioactive material, meeting the environmental guidelines established by the U.S. Government have been and continue to be a necessary requirement for any space reactor program. The major safety feature to prevent prelaunch and launch radioactive material hazards is not operating the reactor before achieving the prescribed orbit. Design features in the reactor ensure that accidental criticality cannot occur. High orbits (above 400 to 500 nautical miles) have sufficient lifetimes to allow radioactive elements to decay to safe levels. The major proposed applications for satellites with reactors in Earth orbit are in geosynchronous orbit (19,400 nautical miles). In missions at geosynchronous orbit, where orbital lifetimes are practically indefinite, the safety considerations are negligible. Orbits below 400 to 500 nautical miles are the ones where a safety issue is involved in case of satellite malfunction. The potential missions, the question of why reactors are being considered as a prime power candidate, reactor features, and safety considerations will be discussed

  4. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  5. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kimitaka; Fukuie, Ken; Iijima, Tooru; Shimpo, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor for exchanging fuels by pulling up reactor core upper mechanisms, a connection mechanism is disposed for connecting the top of the reactor core and the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms. In addition, a cylindrical body is disposed surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, and a support member is disposed to the cylindrical body for supporting an intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is connected to the top of the reactor core. Same displacements are caused to both of them upon occurrence of earthquakes and, as a result, it is possible to eliminate mutual horizontal displacement between a control rod guide hole of the reactor core upper mechanisms and a control rod insertion hole of the reactor core. In addition, since the intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms is supported by the support member disposed to the cylindrical body surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, deformation caused to the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is reduced, so that the mutual horizontal displacement with respect to the control rod insertion hole of the reactor core can be reduced. As a result, performance of control rod insertion upon occurrence of the earthquakes is improved, so that reactor shutdown is conducted more reliably to improve reactor safety. (N.H.)

  6. FEM analysis of mechanical behaviour of coil support connections in Wendelstein 7-X fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krzesinski, G.; Zagrajek, T.; Marek, P.; Dobosz, R.; Czarkowski, P.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of Wendelstein 7-X project is the stellarator-type fusion reactor. In this device plasma channel is under control of magnetic field coming from magnet system of very complicated shape, made of 70 superconducting coils symmetrically arranged in 5 identical sections. Every coil is connected to central ring with two extensions which transfer loads resulting from electromagnetic field and gravity. The aim of this work was to analyse mechanical behaviour of the bolted connections using detailed 3D finite element models. All simulations were performed assuming elasto-plastic behaviour of the materials, assembly stresses and friction contacts between different parts of the connections. Stress distributions, displacements, forces acting on the bolts and welds were studied using standard and submodeling routines. The results were subsequently used to optimize the design of critical central support elements. (author)

  7. History of fast reactor development in U.S.A.-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Sasao, Nobuyki

    2007-01-01

    History and present state of fast reactor was reviewed in series. As a history of fast reactor development in U.S.A. - I, this third lecture presented the dawn of the fast reactor development in the USA. The first fast reactor was the Clementine reactor with plutonium fuels and mercury coolant. The LAMPRE-1 reactor was the first sodium cooled and molten plutonium reactor. Experimental breeder reactor (EBR-1) was the first reactor to produce electricity and four kinds of fuels were loaded. Zero-power reactors were constructed to conduct reactor physics experiments on fast reactors. Today there are renewed interests in fast reactors due to their ability to fission actinides and reduce radioactive wastes. (T. Tanaka)

  8. Reactor building integrity testing: A novel approach at Gentilly 2 - principles and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, N.; Lafreniere, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, Hydro-Quebec embarked on an ambitious development program to provide the Gentilly 2 nuclear power station with an effective, yet practical reactor building Integrity Test. The Gentilly 2 Integrity Test employs an innovative approach based on the reference volume concept. It is identified as the Temperature Compensation Method (TCM) System. This configuration has been demonstrated at both high and low test pressure and has achieved extraordinary precision in the leak rate measurement. The Gentilly 2 design allows the Integrity Test to be performed at a nominal 3 kPa(g) test pressure during an (11) hour period with the reactor at full power. The reactor building Pressure Test by comparison, is typically performed at high pressure 124 kPa(g)) in a 7 day window during an annual outage. The Integrity Test was developed with the goal of demonstrating containment availability. Specifically it was purported to detect a leak or hole in the 'bottled-up' reactor building greater in magnitude than an equivalent pipe of 25 mm diameter. However it is considered feasible that the high precision of the Gentilly 2 TCM System Integrity Test and a stable reactor building leak characteristic will constitute sufficient grounds for the reduction of the Pressure Test frequency. It is noted that only the TCM System has, to this date, allowed a relevant determination of the reactor building leak rate at a nominal test pressure of 3 kPa(g). Classical method tests at low pressure have lead to inconclusive results due to the high lack of precision

  9. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  10. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masami; Nishio, Masahide.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the rupture of the dry well even when the melted reactor core drops into a reactor pedestal cavity. Constitution: In a reactor container in which a dry well disposed above the reactor pedestal cavity for containing the reactor pressure vessel and a torus type suppression chamber for containing pressure suppression water are connected with each other, the pedestal cavity and the suppression chamber are disposed such that the flow level of the pedestal cavity is lower than the level of the pressure suppression water. Further, a pressure suppression water introduction pipeway for introducing the pressure suppression water into the reactor pedestal cavity is disposed by way of an ON-OFF valve. In case if the melted reactor core should fall into the pedestal cavity, the ON-OFF valve for the pressure suppression water introduction pipeway is opened to introduce the pressure suppression water in the suppression chamber into the pedestal cavity to cool the melted reactor core. (Ikeda, J.)

  11. A small modular fast reactor as starting point for industrial deployment of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.; Lo Pinto, Pierre; Konomura, Mamoru

    2006-01-01

    The current commercial reactors based on light water technology provide 17% of the electricity worldwide owing to their reliability, safety and competitive economics. In the near term, next generation reactors are expected to be evolutionary type, taking benefits of extensive LWR experience feedbacks and further improved economics and safety provisions. For the long term, however, sustainable energy production will be required due to continuous increase of the human activities, environmental concerns such as greenhouse effect and the need of alternatives to fossil fuels as long term energy resources. Therefore, future generation commercial reactors should meet some criteria of sustainability that the current generation cannot fully satisfy. In addition to the current objectives of economics and safety, waste management, resource extension and public acceptance become other major objectives among the sustainability criteria. From this perspective, two questions can be raised: what reactor type can meet the sustainability criteria, and how to proceed to an effective deployment in harmony with the high reliability and availability of the current nuclear reactor fleet. There seems to be an international consensus that the fast spectrum reactor, notably the sodium-cooled system is most promising to meet all of the long term sustainability criteria. As for the latter, we propose a small modular fast reactor project could become a base to prepare the industrial infrastructure. The paper has the following contents: - Introduction; - SMFR project; - Core design; - Supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle; - Near-term reference plant; - Advanced designs; - Conclusions. To summarize, the sodium-cooled fast reactor is currently recognized as the technology of choice for the long term nuclear energy expansion, but some research and development are required to optimize and validate advanced design solutions. A small modular fast reactor can satisfy some existing near-term market niche

  12. Denitrification performance of Pseudomonas denitrificans in a fluidized-bed biofilm reactor and in a stirred tank reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattaneo, C.; Nicolella, C.; Rovatti, M. [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Genoa, Via Opera Pia 15, 16145 Genoa (Italy)

    2003-04-09

    Denitrification of a synthetic wastewater containing nitrates and methanol as carbon source was carried out in two systems - a fluidized-bed biofilm reactor (FBBR) and a stirred tank reactor (STR) - using Pseudomonas denitrificans over a period of five months. Nitrogen loading was varied during operation of both reactors to assess differences in the response to transient conditions. Experimental data were analyzed to obtain a comparison of denitrification kinetics in biofilm and suspended growth reactors. The comparison showed that the volumetric degradation capacity in the FBBR (5.36 kg {sub N} . m{sup -3} . d{sup -1}) was higher than in the STR, due to higher biomass concentration (10 kg {sub BM} . m{sup -3} vs 1.2 kg {sub BM} m{sup -3}). (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle; 1: l'atome. 2: la radioactivite. 3: l'homme et les rayonnements. 4: l'energie. 5: l'energie nucleaire: fusion et fission. 6: le fonctionnement d'un reacteur nucleaire. 7: le cycle du combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  14. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected. (author)

  15. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spelt, P.F.; Crane, C.; Feng, L.; Abidi, M.; Tosunoglu, S.

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected

  16. Statement to International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles: Challenges and Opportunities, 7 December 2009, Kyoto, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Distinguished Guests, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is my honour to address participants at this opening session of the International Conference on Fast Reactors and Related Fuel Cycles: Challenges and Opportunities, organized by the IAEA and hosted by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Fast reactor technology has the potential to ensure that energy resources which would last hundreds of years with the technology we are using today will actually last several thousand years. In other words it can withstand enormous increases in demand. This innovative technology also reduces the risk to the environment and helps to limit the burden that will be placed on future generations in the form of waste products. The coming year will be an exciting one for the development of fast-spectrum nuclear reactors. We expect to reach many important milestones: - the first criticality of the China Experimental Fast Reactor; - the restart of the Monju prototype fast reactor in Japan; and - the new insights we will gain through the end-of-life studies at the Phenix reactor in France. In the near future, new fast reactors will be commissioned: the 500MW(e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor in India, the first in a series of five of the same type, and the BN-800 reactor in the Russian Federation. Moreover, France, Japan, India, China and the Republic of Korea are preparing advanced prototypes, demonstration or commercial reactors for the 2020-2030 period. Nuclear power is set to be an increasingly important part of the global energy mix in the coming decades as demand for energy grows. Scores of countries in both the developed and developing world have told the IAEA that they are interested in introducing nuclear power. The 30 countries which already have nuclear power reactors are set to build more. This trend is likely to be accompanied by accelerated deployment of fast reactors. Continued advances in research and technology development are necessary to ensure improved economics and

  17. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico; Metodologia para la comparacion integral de reactores nucleares: seleccion de un reactor para Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Laboratorio de Analisis de Ingenieria de Reactores Nucleares, Paseo Cuauhnahuac 8532, 62550 Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)]. e-mail: ricarera@yahoo.com.mx

    2006-07-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of

  18. Assessment of the Capability of Molten Salt Reactors as a Next Generation High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsheikh, B.M.

    2017-01-01

    Molten Salt Reactor according to Aircraft Reactor Experiment (ARE) and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) programs, was designed to be the first full-scale, commercial nuclear power plant utilizing molten salt liquid fuels that can be used for producing electricity, and producing fissile fuels (breeding)burning actinides. The high temperature in the primary cycle enables the realization of efficient thermal conversion cycles with net thermal efficiencies reach in some of the designs of nuclear reactors greater than 45%. Molten salts and liquid salt because of their low vapor pressure are excellent candidates for meeting most of the requirements of these high temperature reactors. There is renewed interest in MSRs because of changing goals and new technologies in the use of high-temperature reactors. Molten Salt Reactors for high temperature create substantial technical challenges to have high effectiveness intermediate heat transfer loop components. This paper will discuss and investigate the capability and compatibility of molten salt reactors, toward next generation high temperature energy system and its technical challenges

  19. Tritium release during inspection of reactor 'RA' at 'Vinca' institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipka, V.; Miljevic, N.; Grsic, Z.; Todorovic, D.; Radenkovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    Tritium content in daily precipitation, atmospheric water vapor inside of the reactor hall and around 'Vinca' Institute as well as in soil up to 800 m distance was monitoring during the regular inspection of the fuel channels. Tritium activity in the reactor hall air moisture was in the range from 0.022 to 6.7 MBq/m 3 . Tritium content in soil moisture between 12.7 and 530.9 Bq/l indicate a certain contamination due to tritium release in the environment, depending on the depth and distance from the place of release (author) [sr

  20. Simulation of a pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Andre Felipe da Silva de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic is used to simulate natural circulation condition after a research reactor shutdown. A benchmark problem was used to test the viability of usage such code to simulate the reactor model. A model which contains the core, the pool, the reflector tank, the circulation pipes and chimney was simulated. The reactor core contained in the full scale model was represented by a porous media. The parameters of porous media were obtained from a separate CFD analysis of the full core model. Results demonstrate that such studies can be carried out for research and test of reactors design. (author)

  1. Hydrogen sulfide removal from air by Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans in a trickle bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M; Gómez, J M; Cantero, D; Páca, J; Halecký, M; Kozliak, E I; Sobotka, M

    2009-09-01

    A strain of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans immobilized in polyurethane foam was utilized for H(2)S removal in a bench-scale trickle-bed reactor, testing the limits of acidity and SO(4) (2-) accumulation. The use of this acidophilic strain resulted in remarkable stability in the performance of the system. The reactor maintained a >98-99 % H(2)S removal efficiency for c of up to 66 ppmv and empty bed residence time 98 % H(2)S was achieved under steady-state conditions, over the pH range of 0.44-7.30. Despite the accumulation of acidity and SO(4) (2-) (up to 97 g/L), the system operated without inhibition.

  2. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  3. Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity in a packed bed reactor of a chemical heat pump for high-temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yukitaka; Yamada, Mitsuteru; Kanie, Toshihiro; Yoshizawa, Yoshio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal performance of a chemical heat pump that uses a calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reaction system was discussed as a heat storage system for utilizing heat output from high temperature gas reactors (HTGR). Calcium oxide/carbon dioxide reactivity for the heat pump was measured using a packed bed reactor containing 1.0 kg of reactant. The reactor was capable of storing heat at 900 deg. C by decarbonation of calcium carbonate and generating up to 997 deg. C by carbonation of calcium oxide. The amount of stored heat in the reactor was 800-900 kJ kg -1 . The output temperature of the reactor could be controlled by regulating the carbonation pressure. The thermal storage performance of the reactor was superior to that of conventional sensible heat storage systems. A heat pump using this CaO/CO 2 reactor is expected to contribute to thermal load leveling and to realize highly efficient utilization of HTGR output due to the high heat storage density and high-quality temperature output of the heat pump

  4. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  5. Reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned reactor safety research sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    The reactor safety research program, sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Division of Reactor Safety Research, is described in terms of its program objectives, current status, and future plans. Elements of safety research work applicable to water reactors, fast reactors, and gas cooled reactors are presented together with brief descriptions of current and planned test facilities. (U.S.)

  6. Nuclear reactor, reactor core thereof, and device for constituting the reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiyama, Masashi.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is constituted by charging coolants (light water) in a reactor pressure vessel and distributing fuel assemblies, reflecting material sealing pipes, moderator (heavy water and helium gas) sealing pipes, and gas sealing pipes therein. A fuel guide tube is surrounded by a cap and the gap therebetween is made hollow and filled with coolant steams. The cap is supported by a baffle plate. The moderator sealing pipe is disposed in a flow channel of coolants in adjacent with the cap. The position of the moderator sealing tube in the reactor core is controlled by water stream from a hydraulic pump with a guide tube extending below the baffle plate being as a guide. Then, the position of the moderator sealing tube is varied to conduct power control, burnup degree compensation, and reactor shut down. With such procedures, moderator cooling facility is no more necessary to simplify the structure. Further, heat generated from the moderator is transferred to the coolants thereby improving heat efficiency of the reactor. (I.N.)

  7. Core configuration of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device for fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaya, H., E-mail: nakaya@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Matsuura, H.; Nakao, Y. [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 8190395 (Japan); Shimakawa, S.; Goto, M.; Nakagawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nishikawa, M. [Malaysia-Japan International Institute of Technology, UTM, Kuala Lumpur 54100 (Malaysia)

    2014-05-01

    The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production device is examined, assuming the compound LiAlO{sub 2} as the tritium-producing material. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300 MWe nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations are carried out. To load sufficient Li into the core, LiAlO{sub 2} is loaded into the removable reflectors that surround the ring-shaped fuel blocks in addition to the burnable poison insertion holes. It is shown that module high-temperature gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW can produce almost 8 kg of tritium in a year.

  8. Experience in operation of heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, Ion; Bilegan, Iosif; Ghitescu, Petre

    1999-01-01

    The paper presents the main topics of the CANDU owners group (COG) meeting held in Mangalia, Romania on 7-10 September 1998. These meetings are part of the IAEA program for exchange of information related mainly to CANDU reactor operation safety. The first meeting for PHWR reactors took place in Vienna in 1989, followed by those in Argentina (1991), India (1994) and Korea (1996). The topics discussed at the meeting in Romania were: operation experience and recent major events, performances of CANDU reactors and safe operation, nuclear safety and operation procedures of PHWR, programs and strategies of lifetime management of installations and components of NPPs, developments and updates

  9. Socioeconomic consequences of nuclear reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawil, J.J.; Callaway, J.W.; Coles, B.L.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Imhoff, K.L.; Lewis, P.M.; Nesse, R.J.; Strenge, D.L.

    1984-06-01

    This report identifies and characterizes the off-site socioeconomic consequences that would likely result from a severe radiological accident at a nuclear power plant. The types of impacts that are addressed include economic impacts, health impacts, social/psychological impacts and institutional impacts. These impacts are identified for each of several phases of a reactor accident - from the warning phase through the post-resettlement phase. The relative importance of the impact during each accident phase and the degree to which the impact can be predicted are indicated. The report also examines the methods that are currently used for assessing nuclear reactor accidents, including development of accident scenarios and the estimating of socioeconomic accident consequences with various models. Finally, a critical evaluation is made regarding the use of impact analyses in estimating the contribution of socioeconomic consequences to nuclear accident reactor accident risk. 116 references, 7 figures, 15 tables

  10. Low power reactor for remote applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Palmer, R.G.; Kirchner, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    A compact, low power reactor is being designed to provide electric power for remote, unattended applications. Because of the high fuel and maintenance costs for conventional power sources such as diesel generators, a reactor power supply appears especially attractive for remote and inaccessible locations. Operating at a thermal power level of 135 kWt, the power supply achieves a gross electrical output of 25 kWe from an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine. By intentional selection of design features stressing inherent safety, operation in an unattended mode is possible with minimal risk to the environment. Reliability is achieved through the use of components representing existing, proven technology. Low enrichment uranium particle fuel, in graphite core blocks, cooled by heat pipes coupled to an ORC converter insures long-term, virtually maintenance free, operation of this reactor for remote applications. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  11. The Integration Of Process Heat Applications To High Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKellar, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

  12. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the SAFARI-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    A neutronic feasibility study to convert the SAFARI-1 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with NECSA. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current 90% enriched HEU fuel type (UAl) and two 19.75% enriched LEU fuel types (U 3 Si 2 and U7Mo). The thermal fluxes with the LEU fuels were 3 - 9% lower than with the current HEU fuel. For the same fuel assembly design, a uranium density of approximately 4.5 g/cm 3 was required with U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel and a uranium density of about 4.6 g/cm 3 was required with U7Mo-Al fuel to match the 24.6-day cycle of the UAl-alloy fuel with 0.92 gU/cm 3 . The selection of a suitable LEU fuel and the decision to convert SAFARI-1 will be an economic matter that depends upon the fuel type, fuel assembly design, experiment performance and fuel cycle costs. (author)

  13. Method of fueling for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the monitoring of reactor power with sufficient accuracy, upon starting even without existence of neutron source in case of a low average burnup degree in the reactor core. Constitution: Each of fuel assemblies is charged such that neutron source region monitors for the start-up system in a reactor core neutron instrumentation system having nuclear fuel assemblies and a neutron instrumentation system are surrounded with 4 or 16 fuel assemblies of a low burnup degree. Then, the average burnup degree of the fuel assemblies surrounding the neutron source region monitors are increased than the reactor core burnup degree, whereby neutrons released from the peripheral fuels are increased, sufficient number of neutron counts can be obtained even with no neutron sources upon start-up and the reactor power can be monitored at a sufficient accuracy. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Application of gamma spectrometry technique in combination with weighing for material balance taking in the production of highly enriched U-A1 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serin, P.A.

    1975-07-01

    The purpose of this project is to obtain the data on material balance for a batch of highly enriched U-Al alloys (used in the NRX and NRU reactors) during production of fuel, using gamma spectrometry (mainly the 186 KeV photopeak) and weighing, and to determine operational data of the Agency's single channel stabilized spectrometer (SAM-1) for measurement of the product typical for the production of highly enriched U-Al fuel (U-Al billets, fuel elements, scrap). The data collected indicates that gamma spectrometry using the single channel stabilized spectrometer is a valid non-destructive method of determining quantitatively U-235 content of U-Al alloy in the form of cast billets or extruded fuel elements providing that adequate standards are available. An accuracy of better than + 1% relative can be obtained using a simple jig to provide reproducible counting geometry. Count rates should be kept well below the saturation level of the detector and counter, preferably by a lead collimator in front of the detector. This non-destructive method is not easily applicable to scrap because of the inability to maintain constant geometry and to prepare standards closely similar in size and shape to the samples

  15. Kinetic study on the effect of temperature on biogas production using a lab scale batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepanraj, B; Sivasubramanian, V; Jayaraj, S

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, biogas production from food waste through anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 2l laboratory-scale batch reactor operating at different temperatures with a hydraulic retention time of 30 days. The reactors were operated with a solid concentration of 7.5% of total solids and pH 7. The food wastes used in this experiment were subjected to characterization studies before and after digestion. Modified Gompertz model and Logistic model were used for kinetic study of biogas production. The kinetic parameters, biogas yield potential of the substrate (B), the maximum biogas production rate (Rb) and the duration of lag phase (λ), coefficient of determination (R(2)) and root mean square error (RMSE) were estimated in each case. The effect of temperature on biogas production was evaluated experimentally and compared with the results of kinetic study. The results demonstrated that the reactor with operating temperature of 50°C achieved maximum cumulative biogas production of 7556ml with better biodegradation efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic simulation platform to verify the performance of the reactor regulating system for a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    Digital instrumentation and controls system technique is being introduced in new constructed research reactor or life extension of older research reactor. Digital systems are easy to change and optimize but the validated process for them is required. Also, to reduce project risk or cost, we have to make it sure that configuration and control functions is right before the commissioning phase on research reactor. For this purpose, simulators have been widely used in developing control systems in automotive and aerospace industries. In these literatures, however, very few of these can be found regarding test on the control system of research reactor with simulator. Therefore, this paper proposes a simulation platform to verify the performance of RRS (Reactor Regulating System) for research reactor. This simulation platform consists of the reactor simulation model and the interface module. This simulation platform is applied to I and C upgrade project of TRIGA reactor, and many problems of RRS configuration were found and solved. And it proved that the dynamic performance testing based on simulator enables significant time saving and improves economics and quality for RRS in the system test phase. (authors)

  17. ADVANCED CONTROL FOR A ETHYLENE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitru POPESCU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is the design and implementation of control solutions for petrochemical processes, namely the control and optimization of a pyrolysis reactor, the key-installation in the petrochemical industry. We present the technological characteristics of this petrochemical process and some aspects about the proposed control system solution for the ethylene plant. Finally, an optimal operating point for the reactor is found, considering that the process has a nonlinear multi-variable structure. The results have been implemented on an assembly of pyrolysis reactors on a petrochemical platform from Romania.

  18. The rehabilitation/upgrading of Philippine Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renato, T Banaga [Philippines Nuclear Research Inst., Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    The Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) is the only research reactor in the Philippines. It was acquired through the Bilateral Agreement with the United States of America. The General Electric (G.E.) supplied PRR-1 first become operational in 1963 and used MTR plate type fuel. The original one-megawatt G.E. reactor was shutdown and converted into a 3 MW TRIGA PULSING REACTOR in 1984. The conversion includes the upgrading of the cooling system, replacement of new reactor coolant pumps, heat exchanger, cooling tower, replacement of new nuclear instrumentation and standard TRIGA console, TRIGA fuel supplied by General Atomic (G.A.). Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) provided the old reactor, did the detailed design of the new cooling system, provided the new non-nuclear instrumentation and electrical power supply system and performed all construction, installation and modification work on site. The TRIGA conversion fuel is contained in a shrouded 4-rod cluster which fit into the original grid plate. The new fuel is a E{sub 1}-U-Z{sub 1}-H{sub 1.6} TRIGA fuel, has a 20% wt Uranium loading with 19.7% U-235 enrichment and about 0.5 wt % Erbium. The Start-up, calibration and Demonstration of Pulsing and Full Power Operation were completed during a three week start-up phase which were performed last March 1968. A few days after, a leak in the pool liner was discovered. The reactor was shutdown again for repair and up to present the reactor is still in the process of rehabilitation. This paper will describe the rehabilitation/upgrading done on the PRR-1 since 1988 up to present. (author)

  19. The rehabilitation/upgrading of Philippine Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renato T, Banaga

    1998-01-01

    The Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) is the only research reactor in the Philippines. It was acquired through the Bilateral Agreement with the United States of America. The General Electric (G.E.) supplied PRR-1 first become operational in 1963 and used MTR plate type fuel. The original one-megawatt G.E. reactor was shutdown and converted into a 3 MW TRIGA PULSING REACTOR in 1984. The conversion includes the upgrading of the cooling system, replacement of new reactor coolant pumps, heat exchanger, cooling tower, replacement of new nuclear instrumentation and standard TRIGA console, TRIGA fuel supplied by General Atomic (G.A.). Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) provided the old reactor, did the detailed design of the new cooling system, provided the new non-nuclear instrumentation and electrical power supply system and performed all construction, installation and modification work on site. The TRIGA conversion fuel is contained in a shrouded 4-rod cluster which fit into the original grid plate. The new fuel is a E 1 -U-Z 1 -H 1.6 TRIGA fuel, has a 20% wt Uranium loading with 19.7% U-235 enrichment and about 0.5 wt % Erbium. The Start-up, calibration and Demonstration of Pulsing and Full Power Operation were completed during a three week start-up phase which were performed last March 1968. A few days after, a leak in the pool liner was discovered. The reactor was shutdown again for repair and up to present the reactor is still in the process of rehabilitation. This paper will describe the rehabilitation/upgrading done on the PRR-1 since 1988 up to present. (author)

  20. RB Research nuclear reactor RB reactor, Annual report for 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    2000-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 2000 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a comprehensive list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor. It contains data about reactor operation during previous 14 years, i.e. from 1986 - 2000

  1. Production of energy in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The cooling gas having left the reactor core is fed to a generator for direct production of current from the kinetic energy. Afterwards the gas is fed to a heat exchanger for cooling, then compressed and refed to the reactor core. The method further comprises that one part of the energy of the fission material is directly converted to electric energy in the reactor core, whereas the other part of the energy of the fission material is impressed upon the cooling gas. According to the invention the cooling gas when entering the reactor is first fed to that part of the reactor core which serves as a thermoionic or thermoelectric transducer. Afterwards the cooling gas is fed to the remaining part of the reactor gas. (P.K.)

  2. Liner of a thermonuclear pulse THETA-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, G.A.; Izotov, E.N.; Karasev, B.G.; Komin, A.V.; Krivosheev, M.V.; Levashov, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Some possible constructive solutions to the problem of fabrication of the theta-pinch reactor liner by the method of centrifugal casting in a casting mould are considered. A scheme for liner manufacturing is presented, which includes the following elements: 1) a casting mould of dielectric material presenting a hollow cylinder of 4 m in diam., 3 m in length and 12 t in weight, which rotates at 8 rps in the reactor chamber; 2) a system for heat protection of the casting mould; the volume heat of the mould is suggested to remove by gaseous helium flowing under pressure along axial cooling channels of 5 mm in diam.; the channels are evenly distributed throughout the thickness of the mould shell; 3) a system for preparation and supply of a liquid metal to the casting mould, the metal is being supplied into the casting mould from its both ends at a rate of 1.7 t of the melt per second; 4) a system for rotation of the mould, which comprises two gas turbines mounted on both ends of the mould and two main stop-radial slip supports with gas lubrication

  3. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  4. Results of the Nucifer reactor neutrino experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Christian; Lindner, Manfred [MPIK Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear reactors are a strong and pure source of electron antineutrinos. With neutrino experiments close to compact reactor cores new insights into neutrino properties and reactor physics can be obtained. The Nucifer experiment is one of the pioneers in this class of very short baseline projects. Its detector to reactor distance is only about 7 m. The data obtained in the last years allowed to estimate the plutonium concentration in the reactor core by the neutrino flux measurement. This is of interest for safeguard applications and non proliferation efforts. The antineutrinos in Nucifer are detected via the inverse beta decay on free protons. Those Hydrogen nuclei are provided by 850 liters of organic liquid scintillator. For higher detection efficiency and background reduction the liquid is loaded with Gadolinium. Despite all shielding efforts and veto systems the background induced by the reactor activity and cosmogenic particles is still the main challenge in the experiment. The principle of the Nucifer detector is similar to the needs of upcoming experiments searching for sterile neutrinos. Therefore, the Nucifer results are also valuable input for the understanding and optimization of those next generation projects. The observation of sterile neutrinos would imply new physics beyond the standard model.

  5. Reactor physics tests of TRIGA Mark-II Reactor in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Trkov, A.; Rant, J.; Glumac, B.; Dimic, V.

    2008-01-01

    TRIGA Mark-II Reactor in Ljubljana was recently reconstructed. The reconstruction consisted mainly of replacing the grid plates, the control rod mechanisms and the control unit. The standard type control rods were replaced by the fuelled follower type, the central grid location (A ring) was adapted for fuel element insertion, the triangular cutouts were introduced in the upper plate design. However, the main novelty in reactor physics and operational features of the reactor was the installation of a pulse rod. Having no previous operational experience in pulsing, a detailed and systematic sequence of tests was defined in order to check the predicted design parameters of the reactor with measurements. The following experiments are treated in this paper: initial criticality, excess reactivity measurements, control rod worth measurement, fuel temperature distribution, fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, pulse parameters measurement (peak power, prompt energy, peak temperature). Flux distributions in steady state and pulse mode were measured as well, however, they are treated only briefly due to the volume of the results. The experiments were performed with completely fresh fuel of 12 w% enriched Standard Stainless Steel type. The core configuration was uniform (one fuel element type, including fuelled followers) and compact (no irradiation channels or gaps), as such being particularly convenient for testing the computer codes for TRIGA reactor calculations. Comparison of analytical predictions, obtained with WIMS, SLXTUS, TRIGAP and PULSTRI codes to measured values showed agreement within the error of the measurement and calculation. The paper has the following contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Steady State Experiments; 2.1. Core loading and critical experiment; 2.2. Flux range determination for tests at zero power; 2.3. Digital reactivity meter checkout; 2.4. Control rod worth measurements; 2.5. Excess reactivity measurement; 2.6. Thermal power calibration; 2.7

  6. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure - TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrell, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program is to provide fresh nuclear reactor fuel to United States universities at no, or low, cost to the university. The title of the fuel remains with the United States government and when universities are finished with the fuel, the fuel is returned to the United States government. The program is funded by the United States Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy division, managed by Department of Energy - Idaho Field Office, and contracted to the Idaho National Laboratory's Management and Operations Contractor - Battelle Energy Alliance. Program has been at Idaho since 1977 and INL subcontracts with 26 United States domestic reactor facilities (13 TRIGA facilities, 9 plate fuel facilities, 2 AGN facilities, 1 Pulstar fuel facility, 1 Critical facility). University has not shipped fuel since 1968 and as such, we have no present procedures for shipping spent fuel. In addition: floor loading rate is unknown, many interferences must be removed to allow direct access to the reactor tank, floor space in the reactor cell is very limited, pavement ends inside our fence; some of the surface is not finished. The whole approach is narrow, curving and downhill. A truck large enough to transport the cask cannot pull into the lot and then back out (nearly impossible / refused by drivers); a large capacity (100 ton), long boom crane would have to be used due to loading dock obstructions. Access to the entrance door is on a sidewalk. The campus uses it as a road for construction equipment, deliveries and security response. Large trees are on both sides of sidewalk. Spent fuel shipments have never been done, no procedures approved or in place, no approved casks, no accident or safety analysis for spent fuel loading. Any cask assembly used in this facility will have to be removed from one crane, moved on the floor and then attached to another crane to get from the staging area to the reactor room. Reactor

  7. Material and component progress within ARCHER for advanced high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckthorpe, D.E.; Davies, M.; Pra, F.; Bonnamy, P.; Fokkens, J.; Heijna, M.; Bout, N. de; Vreeling, A.; Bourlier, F.; Lhachemi, D.; Woayehune, A.; Dubiez-le-Goff, S.; Hahner, P.; Futterer, M.; Berka, J.; Kalivodora, J.; Pouchon, M.A.; Schmitt, R.; Homerin, P.; Marsden, B.; Mummery, P.; Mutch, G.; Ponca, D.; Buhl, P.; Hoffmann, M.; Rondet, F.; Pecherty, A.; Baurand, F.; Alenda, F.; Esch, M.; Kohlz, N.; Reed, J.; Fachinger, J.; Klower, Dr.

    2014-01-01

    The ARCHER (Advanced High-Temperature Reactors for Cogeneration of Heat and Electricity R and D) integrated project started in 2011 as part of the European Commission 7. Framework Programme (FP7) for a period of four years to perform High Temperature Reactor technology R and D in support of reactor demonstration. The project consortium encompasses conventional and Nuclear Industry, Utilities, Technical Support Organizations, Research and Development Organizations and Academia. The activities involved contribute to the Generation IV (GIF) International Forum and collaborate with related projects in the US, China, Japan, and the Republic of Korea in cooperation with IAEA and ISTC. This paper addresses the progress of the work on materials and component technologies within ARCHER over the first two years of the project. (authors)

  8. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: (1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, (2) operating experiences, (3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, (4) irradiation studies, (5) irradiation facilities, (6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and (7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. Proceedings of the sixth Asian symposium on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    The symposium consisted of 16 sessions with 58 submitted papers. Major fields were: 1) status and future plan of research and testing reactors, 2) operating experiences, 3) design and modification of the facility, and reactor fuels, 4) irradiation studies, 5) irradiation facilities, 6) reactor characteristics and instrumentation, and 7) neutron beam utilization. Panel discussion on the 'New Trends on Application of Research and Test Reactors' was also held at the last of the symposium. About 180 people participated from China, Korea, Indonesia, Thailand, Bangladesh, Vietnam, Chinese Taipei, Belgium, France, USA, Japan and IAEA. The 58 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Research reactor standards and their impact on the TRIGA reactor community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, W.J.

    1980-01-01

    The American Nuclear Society has established a standards committee devoted to writing standards for research reactors. This committee was formed in 1971 and has since that time written over 15 standards that cover all aspects of research reactor operation. The committee has representation from virtually every group concerned with research reactors and their operation. This organization includes University reactors, National laboratory reactors, Nuclear Regulatory commission, Department of Energy and private nuclear companies and insurers. Since its beginning the committee has developed standards in the following areas: Standard for the development of technical specifications for research reactors; Quality control for plate-type uranium-aluminium fuel elements; Records and reports for research reactors; Selection and training of personnel for research reactors; Review of experiments for research reactors; Research reactor site evaluation; Quality assurance program requirements for research reactors; Decommissioning of research reactors; Radiological control at research reactor facilities; Design objectives for and monitoring of systems controlling research reactor effluents; Physical security for research reactor facilities; Criteria for the reactor safety systems of research reactors; Emergency planning for research reactors; Fire protection program requirements for research reactors; Standard for administrative controls for research reactors. Besides writing the above standards, the committee is very active in using communications with the nuclear regulatory commission on proposed rules or positions which will affect the research reactor community

  11. Discussion of the use of the Dragon reactor as a facility for integral reactor physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutmann, H

    1972-06-05

    The purpose and use of the Dragon Reactor Experiment (DRE) has changed considerably during the years of its operation. The original purpose was to show that the principle of a High Temperature Reactor is sound and demonstrate its operation. After this achievement, the purpose of the Dragon reactor changed to the use as a fuel testing facility. During recent years, a new use of the DRE has been added to its use as a fuel testing facility, namely Fuel Element Design Testing. The current report covers reactor physics experiments aspects.

  12. Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data 1992 annual report: Power reactors. Volume 7, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1993-07-01

    The annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) is devoted to the activities performed during 1992. The report is published in two separate parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance, measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year, and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event report% diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. The reports contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports for that group of licensees. NUREG-1272, Vol. 7, No. 2, covers nonreactors and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1992 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued for 1984--1992.

  13. Nuclear reactors situation in Japan after the major earthquake of March 11, 2011. March 13, 2011, 7:00 AM status; Situation des reacteurs nucleaires au Japon suite au seisme majeur survenu le 11 mars 2011 (13 mars 2011 - Point a 7h)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    This situation note is established according to the information gained on March 13, 2011, at 7:00 AM, by the crisis centre of the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN). The situation of the reactors No. 1, 2 and 3 of the Fukushima I site is briefly presented with the progress of the accident management actions. (J.S.)

  14. Requirements for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedin, F.

    2009-01-01

    The EUR (European Utilities Requirements) is an organization founded in 1991 whose aim was to write down the European specifications and requirements for the future reactors of third generation. EUR gathers most of the nuclear power producers of Europe. The EUR document has been built on the large and varied experience of EUR members and can be used to elaborate invitations to tender for nuclear projects. 4000 requirements only for the nuclear part of the plant are listed, among which we have: -) the probability of core meltdown for a reactor must be less than 10 -6 per year, -) the service life of every component that is not replaceable must be 60 years, -) the capacity of the spent fuel pool must be sufficient to store 10-15 years of production without clearing out. The EUR document is both open and complete: every topic has been considered, it does not favor any type of reactor but can ban any technology that is too risky or has an unfavourable feedback experience. The assessment of the conformity with the EUR document of 7 reactor projects (BWR 90/, EPR, EP1000, SWR1000, ABWR, AP1000 and VVER-AES-92) has already be made. (A.C.)

  15. Risk contribution from low power and shutdown of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Pratt, W.T.

    1997-01-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (a pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (a boiling water reactor), were selected for study by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, respectively. The program objectives included assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences, and other qualitative and quantitative results with full power accidents as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope included a Level 3 PRA for traditional internal events and a Level 1 PRA on fire, flooding, and seismically induced core damage sequences. 12 refs., 7 tabs

  16. A review of the UK fast reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the United Kingdom Fast Reactor Programme is introduced. Operational experience with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) is briefly summarized. The design concept of the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) is given in some detail. The emphasis is on materials development, chemical engineering/sodium technology, fuel reprocessing and fuel cycle, engineering component development and reactor safety

  17. SOLASE: a conceptual laser fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Moses, G.A.

    1977-12-01

    The SOLASE conceptual laser fusion reactor has been designed to elucidate the technological problems posed by inertial confinement fusion reactors. This report contains a detailed description of all aspects of the study including the physics of pellet implosion and burn, optics and target illumination, last mirror design, laser system analysis, cavity design, pellet fabrication and delivery, vacuum system requirements, blanket design, thermal hydraulics, tritium analysis, neutronics calculations, radiation effects, stress analysis, shield design, reactor and plant building layout, maintenance procedures, and power cycle design. The reactor is designed as a 1000 MW/sub e/ unit for central station electric power generation

  18. Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R.

    1979-12-01

    The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O 2 fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required

  19. The Design of a Nuclear Reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this largely pedagogical article is toemploy pre-college physics to arrive at an understanding of a system as complex as a nuclear reactor. We focus on three key issues: the fuelpin, the moderator, and lastly the dimensions ofthe nuclear reactor.

  20. Reactor core for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hisao; Kasai, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Tsugio; Matsumoto, Hiroshi.

    1996-01-01

    In a gas-sealed assembly for a FBR type reactor, two or more kinds of assemblies having different eigen frequency and a structure for suppressing oscillation of liquid surface are disposed in a reactor core. Coolant introduction channels for introducing coolants from inside and outside are disposed in the inside of structural members of an upper shielding member to form a shielding member-cooling structure in the reactor core. A structure for promoting heat conduction between a sealed gas in the assembly and coolants at the inner side or the outside of the assembly is disposed in the reactor core. A material which generates heat by neutron irradiation is disposed in the assembly to heat the sealed gases positively by radiation heat from the heat generation member also upon occurrence of power elevation-type event to cause temperature expansion. Namely, the coolants flown out from or into the gas sealed-assemblies cause differential fluctuation on the liquid surface, and the change of the capacity of a gas region is also different on every gas-sealed assemblies thereby enabling to suppress fluctuation of the reactor power. Pressure loss is increased by a baffle plate or the like to lower the liquid surface of the sodium coolants or decrease the elevating speed thereof thereby suppressing fluctuation of the reactor power. (N.H.)

  1. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsbedt, Anstein N.

    1988-01-01

    An improved reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system for a sodium cooled nuclear reactor is disclosed. The sodium cooled nuclear reactor is of the type having a reactor vessel liner separating the reactor hot pool on the upstream side of an intermediate heat exchanger and the reactor cold pool on the downstream side of the intermediate heat exchanger. The improvement includes a flow path across the reactor vessel liner flow gap which dissipates core heat across the reactor vessel and containment vessel responsive to a casualty including the loss of normal heat removal paths and associated shutdown of the main coolant liquid sodium pumps. In normal operation, the reactor vessel cold pool is inlet to the suction side of coolant liquid sodium pumps, these pumps being of the electromagnetic variety. The pumps discharge through the core into the reactor hot pool and then through an intermediate heat exchanger where the heat generated in the reactor core is discharged. Upon outlet from the heat exchanger, the sodium is returned to the reactor cold pool. The improvement includes placing a jet pump across the reactor vessel liner flow gap, pumping a small flow of liquid sodium from the lower pressure cold pool into the hot pool. The jet pump has a small high pressure driving stream diverted from the high pressure side of the reactor pumps. During normal operation, the jet pumps supplement the normal reactor pressure differential from the lower pressure cold pool to the hot pool. Upon the occurrence of a casualty involving loss of coolant pump pressure, and immediate cooling circuit is established by the back flow of sodium through the jet pumps from the reactor vessel hot pool to the reactor vessel cold pool. The cooling circuit includes flow into the reactor vessel liner flow gap immediate the reactor vessel wall and containment vessel where optimum and immediate discharge of residual reactor heat occurs.

  2. A Review of the United Kingdom Fast Reactor Programme, March 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramman, J.I.; Wheeler, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power produced about 20% of the electricity supply in the United Kingdom in 1986, mostly from gas-cooled reactors, i.e. the 10 AGRs currently in operation and the 26 older MAGNOX reactors. Plans to increase the nuclear component of generating capacity by building the first PWR in the UK, Sizewell 'B', were strongly endorsed in the report by Sir Frank Layfield published on 26 January 1987. This resulted from the Public Inquiry into building Sizewell 'B', which was held between 11 January 1983 and 7 March 1985, the longest Public Inquiry ever held in the UK. The government gave the go-ahead for the building of Sizewell 'B' on 12 March 1987

  3. Handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.

    1997-01-01

    In Japan eleven research reactors are in operation. After the 19th International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research Reactors and Test Reactors (RERTR) on October 6-10, 1996, Seoul, Korea, the Five Agency Committee on Highly Enriched Uranium, which consists of Science and Technology Agency, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) met on November 7,1996, to discuss the handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan. Advantages and disadvantages to return spent fuel to the USA in comparison to Europe were discussed. So far, a number of spent fuel elements in JAERI and KURRI are to be returned to the US. The first shipment to the US is planned for 60 HEU elements from JMTR in 1997. The shipment from KURRI is planned to start in 1999. (author)

  4. Preliminary design of a Binary Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, E. Y.; Francois, J. L.; Lopez S, R. C.

    2014-10-01

    A binary breeder reactor (BBR) is a reactor that by means of the transmutation and fission process can operates through the depleted uranium burning with a small quantity of fissile material. The advantages of a BBR with relation to other nuclear reactor types are numerous, taking into account their capacity to operate for a long time without requiring fuel reload or re-arrangement. In this work four different simulations are shown carried out with the MCNPX code with libraries Jeff-3.1 to 1200 K. The objective of this study is to compare two different models of BBR: a spherical reactor and a cylindrical one, using two fuel cycles for each one of them (U-Pu and Th-U) and different reflectors for the two different geometries. For all the models a super-criticality state was obtained at least 10.9 years without carrying out some fuel re-arrangement or reload. The plutonium-239 production was achieved in the models where natural uranium was used in the breeding area, while the production of uranium-233 was observed in the cases where thorium was used in the fertile area. Finally, a behavior of stationary wave reactor was observed inside the models of spherical reactor when contemplating the power uniform increment in the breeding area, while inside the cylindrical models was observed the behavior of a traveling wave reactor when registering the displacement of the burnt wave along the cylindrical model. (Author)

  5. Comparison between TRU burning reactors and commercial fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Sanda, Toshio; Ogawa, Takashi

    2001-03-01

    Research and development for stabilizing or shortening the radioactive wastes including in spent nuclear fuel are widely conducted in view point of reducing the environmental impact. Especially it is effective way to irradiate and transmute long-lived TRU by fast reactors. Two types of loading way were previously proposed. The former is loading relatively small amount of TRU in all commercial fast reactors and the latter is loading large amount of TRU in a few TRU burning reactors. This study has been intended to contribute to the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactor cycle system. The transmutation and nuclear characteristics of TRU burning reactors were evaluated and compared with those of conventional transmutation system using commercial type fast reactor based upon the investigation of technical information about TRU burning reactors. Major results are summarized as follows. (1) Investigation of technical information about TRU burning reactors. Based on published reports and papers, technical information about TRU burning reactor concepts transmutation system using convectional commercial type fast reactors were investigated. Transmutation and nuclear characteristics or R and D issue were investigated based on these results. Homogeneously loading of about 5 wt% MAs on core fuels in the conventional commercial type fast reactor may not cause significant impact on the nuclear core characteristics. Transmutation of MAs being produced in about five fast reactors generating the same output is feasible. The helium cooled MA burning fast reactor core concept propose by JAERI attains criticality using particle type nitride fuels which contain more than 60 wt% MA. This reactor could transmute MAs being produced in more than ten 1000 MWe-LWRs. Ultra-long life core concepts attaining more than 30 years operation without refueling by utilizing MA's nuclear characteristics as burnable absorber and fertile nuclides were proposed. Those were pointed out that

  6. Computerized reactor monitor and control for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, L.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of a computerized process control system developed by Transelektro-KFKI-Videoton (Hangary) for a twenty-year-old research reactor in Budapest and or a new one in Tajura (Libya) is given. The paper describes the computer hardware (R-10) and the implemented software (PROCESS-24K) as well as their applications at nuclear reactors. The computer program provides for man-machine communication, data acquisition and processing, trend and alarm analysis, the control of the reactor power, reactor physical calculations and additional operational functions. The reliability and the possible further development of the computerized systems which are suitable for application at reactors of different design are also discussed. (Sz.J.)

  7. Cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Tokamak Engineering Reactor (ITER) is a program presently underway to design a next-generation tokamak reactor. The cryogenic system for this reactor must meet unusual and new requirements. Unusually high heat loads (100 kW at 4.5 K) must be handled because neutron shielding has been limited to save space in the reactor core. Also, large variations in the cryogenics loads occur over short periods of time because of the pulsed nature of some of the operating scenarios. This paper describes a workable cryogenic system design for a compact tokamak reactor such as ITER. A design analysis is presented dealing with a system that handles transient loads, coil quenches, reactor cool-down and the effect of variations in helium-supply temperatures on the cryogenic stability of the coils. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  8. The influence of Triga 2000 reactor operation on the surface contamination at reactor room using smear test method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bintu Khoiriyyah; Budi Purnama; Tri Cahyo Laksono

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of surface contamination should be conducted to determine the safety of work areas. Surface contamination at the TRIGA 2000 reactor room which is on PSTNT-BATAN Bandung remain to be implemented although reactor not operating. In this research monitoring of surface contamination when TRIGA 2000 in operation of the first time after several years not operating aims to determine the influence on the results of monitoring. The monitoring of surface contamination has been done using smear test method at some predetermined in TRIGA 2000 reactor room. The highest surface contamination activities is obtained 0.32 Bq/cm 2 and there are some points that are not detected. Based on keputusan kepala BAPETEN No.1/Ka BAPETEN/ V/99 the work showed that the TRIGA 2000 reactor in the category of low area contamination, that is <3.7 Bq/cm 2 to gross beta. (author)

  9. Choice of thermal reactor systems: a report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    This is a report by the UK National Nuclear Corporation published by the UK Secretary of State for Energy (Mr. Benn) on 29th July 1977. It is concerned with the advantages and disadvantages of three thermal reactor systems -the AGR (advanced gas cooled reactor), the PWR (pressurised water reactor), and the SGHWR (steam generating heavy water reactor). The object was to help in the future choice of a thermal system for the UK to cover the next 25 years. The matter of export potential is also considered. A programme of four stations of 1100 to 1300 MW each over six years starting from 1979 was assumed. It is emphasised that a decision must be taken now both about reactor systems and actual orders. Headings are as follows: Extract from conclusions reached; Summary of main features of assessment; General conclusions regarding the following - safety, security of the investment, operational characteristics, development and launching requirements, effect on industry, and capital and generation costs. It is stated that in order to make an overall judgement on reactor choice the technical, commercial and social issues involved must be weighed in conjunction with cost differentials.

  10. Synfuels from fusion: using the tandem mirror reactor and a thermochemical cycle to produce hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    This study is concerned with the following area: (1) the tandem mirror reactor and its physics; (2) energy balance; (3) the lithium oxide canister blanket system; (4) high-temperature blanket; (5) energy transport system-reactor to process; (6) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (7) interfacing the GA cycle; (8) matching power and temperature demands; (9) preliminary cost estimates; (10) synfuels beyond hydrogen; and (11) thermodynamics of the H 2 SO 4 -H 2 O system

  11. A fast spectrum dual path flow cermet reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghaie, S.; Feller, G.J.; Peery, S.D.; Parsley, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    A cermet fueled, dual path fast reactor for space nuclear propulsion applications is conceptually designed. The reactor utilizes an outer annulus core and an inner cylindrical core with radial and axial reflector. The dual path flow minimizes the impact of power peaking near the radial reflector. Basic neutronics and core design aspects of the reactor are discussed. The dual path reactor is integrated into a 25000 lbf thrust nuclear rocket

  12. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes the EG ampersand G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options

  13. A worldwide survey of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    While the completion of the SNR 300 was accompanied by manifold discussions on questions relevant to safety and energy policies in the Federal Republic of Germany and as a result considerable scheduling delays and exceeding of budgets were recorded, breeder reactor technology has been progressing worldwide. The transition from the development phase with small trial reactors to the construction and operation of large performance reactors was completed systematically, in particular in France and the Soviet Union. Even though the uranium supply situation does not make a short-term and comprehensive employment of fast breeder reactors essential, technology has meanwhile been advanced to such a level and extensive operating experience is on hand to enable the construction and safe operation of fast breeder reactors. A positive answer has long been found to the question of the realization of a breeding rate to guarantee the breeding effect. There remain now the endeavors to achieve a reduction in investment and fuel cycle costs. (orig.) [de

  14. Integral Fast Reactor: A future source of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southon, R.

    1993-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a reactor concept that would be an important part of the worlds energy future. This report discusses the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept which provides significant improvements over current generation reactors in reactor safety, plant complexity, nuclear proliferation, and waste generation. Two major facilities, a reactor and a fuel cycle facility, make up the IFR concept. The reactor uses fast neutrons and metal fuel in a sodium coolant at atmospheric pressure that relies on laws of physics to keep it safe. The fuel cycle facility is a hot cell using remote handling techniques for fabricating reactor fuel. The fuel feed stock includes spent fuel from the reactor, and potentially, spent light water reactor fuel and plutonium from weapons. This paper discusses the unique features of the IFR concept and the differences the quality assurance program has from current commercial practices. The IFR concept provides an opportunity to design a quality assurance program that makes use of the best contemporary ideas on management and quality

  15. Optimal reactor strategy for commercializing fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, Kenji; Nagano, Koji

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, a fuel cycle optimization model developed for analyzing the condition of selecting fast breeder reactors in the optimal reactor strategy is described. By dividing the period of planning, 1966-2055, into nine ten-year periods, the model was formulated as a compact linear programming model. With the model, the best mix of reactor types as well as the optimal timing of reprocessing spent fuel from LWRs to minimize the total cost were found. The results of the analysis are summarized as follows. Fast breeder reactors could be introduced in the optimal strategy when they can economically compete with LWRs with 30 year storage of spent fuel. In order that fast breeder reactors monopolize the new reactor market after the achievement of their technical availability, their capital cost should be less than 0.9 times as much as that of LWRs. When a certain amount of reprocessing commitment is assumed, the condition of employing fast breeder reactors in the optimal strategy is mitigated. In the optimal strategy, reprocessing is done just to meet plutonium demand, and the storage of spent fuel is selected to adjust the mismatch of plutonium production and utilization. The price hike of uranium ore facilitates the commercial adoption of fast breeder reactors. (Kako, I.)

  16. On blanket concepts of the Helias reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobig, H.; Harmeyer, E.; Herrnegger, F.; Kisslinger, J.

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses various options for a blanket of the Helias reactor HSR22. The Helias reactor is an upgrade version of the Wendelstein 7-X device. The dimensions of the Helias reactor are: major radius 22 m, average plasma radius 1.8 m, magnetic field on axis 4.75 T, maximum field 10 T, number of field periods 5, fusion power 3000 MW. The minimum distance between plasma and coils is 1.5 m, leaving sufficient space for a blanket and shield. Three options of a breeding blanket are discussed taking into account the specific properties of the Helias configuration. Due to the large area of the first wall (2600 m 2 ) the average neutron power load on the first wall is below 1 MWm .2 , which has a strong impact on the blanket performance with respect to lifetime and cooling requirements. A comparison with a tokamak reactor shows that the lifetime of first wall components and blanket components in the Helias reactor is expected to be at least two times longer. The blanket concepts being discussed in the following are: the solid breeder concept (HCPB), the dual-coolant Pb-17Li blanket concept and the water-cooled Pb-17Li concept (WCLL). (orig.)

  17. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - a new production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulton, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    One of the reactor concepts being considered for application as a new production reactor (NPR) is a 350-MW(thermal) modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The proposed MHTGR-NPR is based on the design of the commercial MHTGR and is being developed by a team that includes General Atomics and Combustion Engineering. The proposed design includes four modules combined into a production block that includes a shared containment, a spent-fuel storage facility, and other support facilities. The MHTGR has a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, graphite-reflected annular core formed from prismatic graphite fuel blocks. The MHTGR fuel consists of highly enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microsphere fuel particles that are coated with successive layers of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Tritium-producing targets consist of enriched 6 Li aluminate microsphere target particles that are coated with successive layers of PyC and SiC similar to the fuel microspheres. Normal reactivity control is implemented by articulated control rods that can be inserted into channels in the inner and outer reflector blocks. Shutdown heat removal is accomplished by a single shutdown heat exchanger and electric motor-driven circulator located in the bottom of the reactor vessel. Current plans are to stack spent fuel elements in dry, helium-filled, water-cooled wells and store them for ∼1 yr before reprocessing. All phases of MHTGR fuel reprocessing have been demonstrated

  18. Comparison of a fission-gas effects in a transient overpower test (HUT 5-7A) to FRAS3 code predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, E.E.; Randklev, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    Fission gas has an important bearing on fuel dynamics during reactor transients. Fission-gas bubble sizes and densities, both within grains and on grain boundaries, are characterized as functions of radial location at the axial midplane in studies of PNL-9 fuel microstructures before and after the HUT 5-7A (PNL 9-25) TREAT test. The FRAS3 code, being developed to model fission-gas effects in reactor transients, is applied to analyze the results of the HUT 5-7A test are presented to illustrate the observed phenomena and the validity of the modeling approach

  19. Strategic planning for research reactors. Guidance for reactor managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide guidance on how to develop a strategic plan for a research reactor. The IAEA is convinced of the need for research reactors to have strategic plans and is issuing a series of publications to help owners and operators in this regard. One of these covers the applications of research reactors. That report brings together all of the current uses of research reactors and enables a reactor owner or operator to evaluate which applications might be possible with a particular facility. An analysis of research reactor capabilities is an early phase in the strategic planning process. The current document provides the rationale for a strategic plan, outlines the methodology of developing such a plan and then gives a model that may be followed. While there are many purposes for research reactor strategic plans, this report emphasizes the use of strategic planning in order to increase utilization. A number of examples are given in order to clearly illustrate this function

  20. A compact reactor/ORC power source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, K.L.; Kirchner, W.L.; Willcutt, G.J.

    1986-01-01

    A compact power source that combines an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) electric generator with a nuclear reactor heat source is being designed and fabricated. Incorporating existing ORC technology with proven reactor technology, the compact reactor/ORC power source offers high reliability while minimizing the need for componenet development. Thermal power at 125 kWt is removed from the coated particle fueled, graphite moderated reactor by heat pipes operating at 500 0 C. Outside the reactor vessel and connected to the heat pipes are vaporizers in which the toluene ORC working fluid is heated to 370 0 C. In the turbine-alternator-pump (TAP) combined-rotating unit, the thermal energy of the toluene is converted to 25 kWe of electric power. Lumped parameter systems analyses combined with a finite element thermal analyses combined with a finite element thermal analysis have aided in the power source design. The analysis have provided assurance of reliable multiyear normal operation as well as full power operation with upset conditions, such as failed heat pipes and inoperative ORC vaporizers. Because of inherent high reliability, long life, and insensitivity to upset conditions, this power source is especially suited for use in remote, inaccessible locations where fuel delivery and maintenance costs are high

  1. Defining microbial community composition and seasonal variation in a sewage treatment plant in India using a down-flow hanging sponge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Naoki; Hatamoto, Masashi; Hirakata, Yuga; Ali, Muntjeer; Jayaswal, Komal; Iguchi, Akinori; Okubo, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Masanobu; Kubota, Kengo; Tagawa, Tadashi; Uemura, Shigeki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki

    2018-05-01

    The characteristics of the microbial community in a practical-scale down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor, high in organic matter and sulfate ion concentration, and the seasonal variation of the microbial community composition were investigated. Microorganisms related to sulfur oxidation and reduction (2-27%), as well as Leucobacter (7.50%), were abundant in the reactor. Anaerobic bacteria (27-38% in the first layer) were also in abundance and were found to contribute to the removal of organic matter from the sewage in the reactor. By comparing the Simpson index, the abundance-based coverage estimator (ACE) index, and the species composition of the microbial community across seasons (summer/dry, summer/rainy, autumn/dry, and winter/dry), the microbial community was found to change in composition only during the winter season. In addition to the estimation of seasonal variation, the difference in the microbial community composition along the axes of the DHS reactor was investigated for the first time. Although the abundance of each bacterial species differed along both axes of the reactor, the change of the community composition in the reactor was found to be greater along the vertical axis than the horizontal axis of the DHS reactor.

  2. Microbiologically influenced corrosion in the service water system of a test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subba Rao, T.; Venugopalan, V.P.; Nair, K.V.K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the biofouling and corrosion problems in the service water system of a test reactor. Results of microbiological, electron microscopic and chemical analyses of water and deposit samples indicate the role of bacteria in the corrosion process. The primary role played by iron oxidising bacteria is emphasised. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. The Design of a Nuclear Reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... The aim of this largely pedagogical article is toemploy pre-college physics to arrive at an understanding of a system as complex as a nuclear reactor. We focus on three key issues: the fuelpin, the moderator, and lastly the dimensions ofthe nuclear reactor.

  4. The ICRH tokamak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, F.W.

    1976-01-01

    A Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor where the ion are maintained at Tsub(i) approximately 20keV>Tsub(e) approximately 7keV by ion-cyclotron resonance heating is shown to produce an energy amplification of Q>2 provided the principal ion energy loss channel is via collisional transfer to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power to the electrons. Such a reactor produces 19MW of fusion power and requires a 50MHz radio-frequency generator capable of 50MW peak power; it is otherwise compatible with the conceptual design for the Princeton TFTR. The required n tausub(E) values for electrons and ions are respectively ntausub(Ee)>1.5.10 13 cm -3 -sec and ntausub(Ei)>4.10 13 cm -3 -sec. The principal areas where research is needed to establish this concept are: tokamak transport calculations, ICRH physics, trapped-particle instability energy losses, tokamak equilibria with high values of βsub(theta), and, of course, impurities

  5. A parameter set for a double-null DEMO reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooke, P.I.H.

    1987-01-01

    The present study is aimed at commenting on the reactor-relevance of the design principles and technology being proposed for NET. The authors propose that a double-null device serve as a basis for a NET-based demonstration reactor. Calculations are carried out to determine the parameter set for reactors based on the double-null NET design, and the results are presented in tabular form. (U.K.)

  6. How power is generated in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaminathan, V.

    1978-01-01

    Power generation by nuclear fission as a result of chain reaction caused by neutrons interacting with fissile material such as 235 U, 233 U and 239 Pu is explained. Electric power production by reactor is schematically illustrated. Materials used in thermal reactor and breeder reactor are compared. Fuel reprocessing and disposal of radioactive waste coming from reprocessing plant is briefly described. Nuclear activities in India are reviewed. Four heavy water plants and two power reactors are under construction and will be operative in the near future. Two power reactors are already in operation. Nuclear Fuel Complex at Hyderabad supplies fuel element to the reactors. Fuel reprocessing and waste management facility has been set up at Tarapur. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay and Reactor Research Centre at Kalpakkam near Madras are engaged in applied and basic research in nuclear science and engineering. (B.G.W.)

  7. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  8. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  9. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  10. Slurry reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuerten, H; Zehner, P [BASF A.G., Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-08-01

    Slurry reactors are designed on the basis of empirical data and model investigations. It is as yet not possible to calculate the flow behavior of such reactors. The swarm of gas bubbles and cluster formations of solid particles and their interaction in industrial reactors are not known. These effects control to a large extent the gas hold-up, the gas-liquid interface and, similarly as in bubble columns, the back-mixing of liquids and solids. These hydrodynamic problems are illustrated in slurry reactors which constructionally may be bubble columns, stirred tanks or jet loop reactors. The expected effects are predicted by means of tests with model systems modified to represent the conditions in industrial hydrogenation reactors. In his book 'Mass Transfer in Heterogeneous Catalysis' (1970) Satterfield complained of the lack of knowledge about the design of slurry reactors and hence of the impossible task of the engineer who has to design a plant according to accepted rules. There have been no fundamental changes since then. This paper presents the problems facing the engineer in designing slurry reactors, and shows new development trends.

  11. Antibiotic Fermentation Broth Treatment by a pilot upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactor and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, T; Kabuk, H A; Varinca, K B; Debik, E; Durak, I; Kavurt, C

    2012-10-01

    In this study, an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) mesophilic reactor was used to remove antibiotic fermentation broth wastewater. The hydraulic retention time was held constant at 13.3 days. The volumetric organic loading value increased from 0.33 to 7.43 kg(COD)m(-3)d(-1) using antibiotic fermentation broth wastewater gradually diluted with various ratios of domestic wastewater. A COD removal efficiency of 95.7% was obtained with a maximum yield of 3,700 L d(-1) methane gas production. The results of the study were interpreted using the modified Stover-Kincannon, first-order, substrate mass balance and Van der Meer and Heertjes kinetic models. The obtained kinetic coefficients showed that antibiotic fermentation broth wastewater can be successfully treated using a UASB reactor while taking COD removal and methane production into account. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  13. Feasibility study of a fission supressed blanket for a tandem-mirror hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Lee, J.D.; Barr, W.L.

    1981-01-01

    A study of fission suppressed blankets for the tandem mirror not only showed such blankets to be feasible but also to be safer than fissioning blankets. Such hybrids could produce enough fissile material to support up to 17 light water reactors of the same nuclear power rating. Beryllium was compared to 7 Li for neutron multiplication; both were considered feasible but the blanket with Li produced 20% less fissile fuel per unit of nuclear power in the reactor. The beryllium resource, while possibly being too small for extensive pure fusion application, would be adequate (with carefully planned industrial expansion) for the hybrid because of the large support ratio, and hence few hybrids required. Radiation damage and coatings for beryllium remain issues to be resolved by further study and experimentation. Molten salt reprocessing was compared to aqueous solution reprocessing

  14. A model for nuclear research reactor dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ramin, E-mail: Barati.ramin@aut.ac.ir; Setayeshi, Saeed, E-mail: setayesh@aut.ac.ir

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A thirty-fourth order model is used to simulate the dynamics of a research reactor. • We consider delayed neutrons fraction as a function of time. • Variable fuel and temperature reactivity coefficients are used. • WIMS, BORGES and CITVAP codes are used for initial condition calculations. • Results are in agreement with experimental data rather than common codes. -- Abstract: In this paper, a useful thirty-fourth order model is presented to simulate the kinetics and dynamics of a research reactor core. The model considers relevant physical phenomena that govern the core such as reactor kinetics, reactivity feedbacks due to coolant and fuel temperatures (Doppler effects) with variable reactivity coefficients, xenon, samarium, boron concentration, fuel burn up and thermal hydraulics. WIMS and CITVAP codes are used to extract neutron cross sections and calculate the initial neuron flux respectively. The purpose is to present a model with results similar to reality as much as possible with reducing common simplifications in reactor modeling to be used in different analyses such as reactor control, functional reliability and safety. The model predictions are qualified by comparing with experimental data, detailed simulations of reactivity insertion transients, and steady state for Tehran research reactor reported in the literature and satisfactory results have been obtained.

  15. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  16. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  17. A glossary of terms for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, R.C.

    1979-04-01

    The glossary aims to provide definitions of technical terms likely to be used in a fast reactor enquiry and to encourage the use of the same set of consistent terms in any documents intended for such an inquiry. In some cases definitions are formulated in the limited context of LMFBRS rather than applying to all types of reactors. A brief guide is presented to the different reactor types. (author)

  18. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Toru; Murata, Ritsuko.

    1996-01-01

    In the present invention, a spent fuel storage pool of a BWR type reactor is formed at an upper portion and enlarged in the size to effectively utilize the space of the building. Namely, a reactor chamber enhouses reactor facilities including a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor container, and further, a spent fuel storage pool is formed thereabove. A second spent fuel storage pool is formed above the auxiliary reactor chamber at the periphery of the reactor chamber. The spent fuel storage pool and the second spent fuel storage pool are disposed in adjacent with each other. A wall between both of them is formed vertically movable. With such a constitution, the storage amount for spent fuels is increased thereby enabling to store the entire spent fuels generated during operation period of the plant. Further, since requirement of the storage for the spent fuels is increased stepwisely during periodical exchange operation, it can be used for other usage during the period when the enlarged portion is not used. (I.S.)

  19. A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, O.

    1976-01-01

    A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel comprising a pump mounted in the reactor vessel and driven by a water-cooled electric motor mounted in a housing outside the reactor vessel, the shaft of the pump passing through the reactor-vessel bottom and being coupled to the motor shaft in a member mechanically connected to the bottom of the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the motor housing, the pump shaft being surrounded by a resilient sealing ring, the reactor vessel communicating with the cooling channels of the pump, when the latter is operating, via a slot surrounding the pump hollow cylindrical shaft, characterized in that the slot inner end is used for/forming a circular space surrounding the pump shaft and surrounded by the motorhousing, in which is coaxially mounted a separating cylindral wall, the upper edge of which is tightly applied against the inner wall of the motor-housing to which it is fastened vertically, the inner surface of said wall being turned towards the outer surface of a circular packing-box, the outer surface of said separating wall constituting a separating radical inner surface for a circular chamber through which flow the motor cooling water. (author)

  20. Fission rate measurements in fuel plate type assembly reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The methods, materials and equipment have been developed to allow extensive and precise measurement of fission rate distributions in water moderated, U-Al fuel plate assembly type reactor cores. Fission rate monitors are accurately positioned in the reactor core, the reactor is operated at a low power for a short time, the fission rate monitors are counted with detectors incorporating automated sample changers and the measurements are converted to fission rate distributions. These measured fission rate distributions have been successfully used as baseline information related to the operation of test and experimental reactors with respect to fission power and distribution, fuel loading and fission experiments for approximately twenty years at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). 7 refs., 8 figs

  1. Burnout experiments with 6 x 6, 8 x 8 and 7 x 7 rod bundle test sections using freon as model fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulfs, H.; Katsaounis, A.; Minden, C.v.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports on burnout experiments at staedy state condition using Freon12 as model fluid. The experiments were carried out with three test sections with 6 x 6, 8 x 8 and 7 x 7 rod bundles. The axial flux distribution of the rods is either constant or reactor like. The transformed measured points using STEVENS and BOURE scaling factors to equivalent water conditions respectively, were compared to the burnout correlation W3 using the reactor layout program DYNAMIT. The DYNAMIT code is a thermohydraulic lay-out reactor program without consideration of mixing flow between the subchannels. (orig.) [de

  2. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the 13 N content in the containment atmosphere. 13 N is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/ 13 N+ 4 He. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium 13 N concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  3. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This study deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process Hl+016/yields/Nl3+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m/sup -3/ and 7 kBq m/sup -3/ for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge(Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. 8 refs

  4. Reactor coolant pressure boundary leakage detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dissing, E.; Svansson, L.

    1979-08-01

    The present paper deals with a system for monitoring the leakage of reactor coolant. This system is based primarily on the detection of the N13 content in the containment atmosphere. N13 is produced from the oxygen of the reactor water via the recoil proton nuclear process H1+016 → N13+He4. The generation is therefore independent of fuel element leakage and of the corrosion product content in the water. It is solely related to the neutron flux level in the reactor core. Typical figures for the equilibrium N13 concentration in the containment atmosphere following a 4 kg/minute coolant leakage are 5 kBq m -3 and 7 kBq m -3 for BWR and PWR respectively. These levels are readily measured with a 10 liter Ge (Li) flow detector assembly operated at elevated pressure. (Auth.)

  5. Oscillation characteristics of the reactor 'A'; Oscilatorne karakteristike reaktora 'A'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecevic, V; Lolic, B [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    In addition to good knowledge of reactor physical properties, design of the reactor oscillator demands determining of the oscillator operating points as well as oscillation reactor properties. This paper contains study of the RA reactor power changes due to oscillations in in one of the vertical experimental channels. It has been concluded that the reactor optimum operating conditions are attained when the oscillator operates at optimum points, and other parameters are determined dependent on the sensitivity of the method and reactor stability.

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions

  7. Three-dimensional calculations of neutron streaming in the beam tubes of the ORNL HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, R.L.; Rhoades, W.A.; Williams, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    The streaming of neutrons through the beam tubes in High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has resulted in a reduction of the fracture toughness of the reactor vessel. As a result, an evaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken in order to determine if the reactor can be operated again. As a part of this evaluation, three-dimensional neutron transport calculations were performed to obtain fluxes at points of interest in the wall of the vessel. By comparing the calculated and measured activation of dosimetry specimens from the vessel surveillance program, it was determined that the calculated flux shape was satisfactory to transpose the surveillance data to the locations in the vessel. A bias factor was applied to correct for the average C/E ratio of 0.69. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Thermionic nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, E.B.

    1986-01-01

    Thermionic nuclear reactors can be expected to be candidate space power supplies for power demands ranging from about ten kilowatts to several megawatts. The conventional ''ignited mode'' thermionic fuel element (TFE) is the basis for most reactor designs to date. Laboratory converters have been built and tested with efficiencies in the range of 7-12% for over 10,000 hours. Even longer lifetimes are projected. More advanced capabilities are potentially achievable in other modes of operation, such as the self-pulsed or unignited diode. Coupled with modest improvements in fuel and emitter material performance, the efficiency of an advanced thermionic conversion system can be extended to the 15-20% range. Advanced thermionic power systems are expected to be compatible with other advanced features such as: (1) Intrinsic subcritically under accident conditions, ensuring 100% safety upon launch abort; (2) Intrinsic low radiation levels during reactor shutdown, allowing manned servicing and/or rendezvous; (3) DC to DC power conditioning using lightweight power MOSFETS; and (4) AC output using pulsed converters

  9. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Format and Contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This is a new complete version of the safety report of nuclear reactor RA is made according to the recommendations of the IAEA. Report includes all the relevant data needed for evaluation of safe operation of this nuclear facility. Each of seven volumes of this report cover separate topics as follows: (1) introduction; (2) Site characteristics; (3) description of the reactor building and installations; (4) description of the reactor; (5) description of the coolant system; (6) description of the regulation and safety instrumentation; (7) description of the power supply system; (8) description of the auxiliary systems; (9) radiation protection issues; (10) radioactive waste management (11) reactor operation; (12) accident analysis during previous operation; (13) analysis of possible accident causes; (14) safety analysis and preventive actions: (15) analysis of significant accidents; (16) analysis of maximum possible accident; (17) environmental impact analysis in case of accident [sr

  10. Low-level radioactive river sediment particles originating from the Chalk river nuclear site carry a mixture of radionuclides and metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Ole Christian; Cagno, Simone; Salbu, Brit [Norwegian University of Life Sciences - NMBU, Center of Excellence in Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Aas (Norway); Falkenberg, Gerald [Photon science, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Janssens, Koen; Nuyts, Gert; Vanmeert, Frederik [AXIL, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerpen (Belgium); Jaroszewicz, Jakub [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland); Priest, Nicholas D.; Audet, Marc [Nuclear Science Division, AECL Chalk River Laboratories (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The Chalk River Laboratory of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., site is located on the Ottawa River approximately 200 km northwest of Ottawa, Canada. The site has two large research reactors: NRX, which operated from 1947 to 1991 and NRU, which continues to operate and is used to produce a significant fraction of the world's supply of medical isotopes. During the course of the operation of the NRX reactor small quantities of radioactive particles were discharged to the Ottawa River through a process sewer discharge pipe. These are now located in river bed sediments within a 0.08 km² area close to the discharge pipe. In the present study, selected particles were isolated from riverbed sediments. These were then characterized by environmental scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive micro X-ray analysis (ESEM-EDX). This was undertaken to obtain information on particle size, structure and the distribution of elements across particle surfaces. Based on the results of ESEM-EDX, particles were selected for X-ray absorption nano-tomography analysis, which provides videos showing the 3D density distribution of the particles. Furthermore, 2D and 3D Synchrotron Radiation based X-ray techniques (micro-X-ray fluorescence; micro-XRF, micro-X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy; micro-XANES and micro-X-ray diffraction; micro-XRD) with submicron resolution (beam size 0.5 μm) were employed to investigate the elemental and phase composition (micro-XRF/XRD) and oxidation states (micro-XANES) of matrix elements with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Results show that the particles investigated so far varied according to: 1) <~40 μm diameter sized U fuel particles similar in structure to particles observed from Chernobyl and Krasnoyarsk-26 and 2) larger particles with diameters up to several hundred μm. The larger particles comprised a matrix of low density, sediment material with high density inclusions that contained a range of metals including Cu, Cr, As

  11. ''Sleeping reactor'' irradiations: Shutdown reactor determination of short-lived activation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerde, E.A.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    At the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the principal irradiation system has a thermal neutron flux (φ) of ∼ 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 · s, permitting the detection of elements via irradiation of 60 s or less. Irradiations of 6 or 7 s are acceptable for detection of elements with half-lives of as little as 30 min. However, important elements such as Al, Mg, Ti, and V have half-lives of only a few minutes. At HFIR, these can be determined with irradiation times of ∼ 6 s, but the requirement of immediate counting leads to increased exposure to the high activity produced by irradiation in the high flux. In