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Sample records for nrx-a6 reactor

  1. Summary of loops in the Chalk River NRX and NRU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, D.T.

    1980-12-01

    The design and operating parameters of the high pressure, high temperature light water loops in the NRX and NRU reactors are presented to assist experimenters reviewing these facilities for their experiments. The NRX and NRU reactor design and operating data of interest to the experimenters are also presented. (author)

  2. NRX and NRU reactor research facilities and irradiation and examination charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-08-01

    This report details the irradiation and examination charges on the NRX and NRU reactors at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs. It describes the NRX and NRU research facilities available to external users. It describes the various experimental holes and loops available for research. It also outlines the method used to calculate the facilities charges and the procedure for applying to use the facilities as well as the billing procedures.

  3. The poisoning of NRX pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, W.H.

    1959-09-01

    The experimental methods used to study the poisoning of the NRX reactor are described and the operation of the reactor in relation to these methods is reviewed for the period February to September 1948. (author)

  4. Follow-up of CRNL employees involved in the NRX reactor clean-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.M.; Myers, D.K.; Morrison, D.P.

    1982-07-01

    Data available to date on the mortality of continuing and retired employees of the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories are consistent with the Σhealthy workerΣ effect that has been observed in similar studies at other nuclear facilities. Because of an accident at the NRX research reactor in December 1952, the reactor was largely dismantled and rebuilt in 1953-54. These operations involved appreciable radiation exposures to a number of employees. The follow-up of the 850 on-site AECL staff involved in the clean-up has indicated that there were no unusual patterns in the mortality of this group when compared with those of the general population of Ontario

  5. The genesis of NRX - first stop on the road to CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2015-12-15

    The CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor family is traceable to World War Two and to certain principal players. They gave Canada an early entry into the world of practical nuclear energy with the NRX (National Research Experimental) reactor, developed under the auspices of the ABC (America, Britain, Canada) countries. The principal players on the NRX project were, in alphabetical order: James Chadwick, C.D. Howe, Leslie R. Groves and C-J. Mackenzie. Their careers up to about 1940 are outlined in Section 10. (author)

  6. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vickerd, Meggan

    2013-01-01

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic

  7. Measurement of the stored energy in the NRX reactor reflector graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, H. B.; Larson, E. A.G.

    1959-07-15

    With the co-operation of workers at Windscale and Harwell, whose assistance is hereby gratefully acknowledged, the stored energy content of the inner reflector graphite of NRX has been measured. Measurements made at three different elevations and at different positions through the reflector show that there is, at present, no danger to NRX from an accidental release of the energy. The energy stored in the reflector in 1958 is less by a factor five to ten than the stored energy as measured in 1953. It appears that there has been a continual release of stored energy since 1954 when, after the rehabilitation, the maximum power was raised to 40 MW. Additional thermocouples have been installed in the inner reflector, and future stored energy measurements are being scheduled. (author)

  8. Research reactor put Canada in the nuclear big time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The history of the NRX reactor is briefly recounted. When NRX started up in 1947, it was the most powerful neutron source in the world. It is now the oldest research reactor still operating. NRX had to be rebuilt after an accident in 1952, and its calandria was changed again in 1970. Loops in NRX were used to test fuel for the Nautilus submarine, and the first zircaloy pressure tube in the world. At the present time, NRX is in a 'hot standby' condition as a backup to the NRU reactor, which is used mainly for isotope production. NRX will be decommissioned after completion and startup of the new MAPLE-X reactor

  9. L-Area STS MTR/NRU/NRX Grapple Assembly Closure Mechanics Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    A review of the closure mechanics associated with the Shielded Transfer System (STS) MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly utilized at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was performed. This review was prompted by an operational event which occurred at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories (CNL) utilizing a DTS-XL grapple assembly which is essentially identical to the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly used at the SRS. The CNL operational event occurred when a NRU/NRX fuel basket containing spent nuclear fuel assemblies was inadvertently released by the DTS-XL grapple assembly during a transfer. The SM review of the STS MTR/NRU/NRX grapple assembly will examine the operational aspects of the STS and the engineered features of the STS which prevent such an event at the SRS. The design requirements for the STS NRU/NRX modifications and the overall layout of the STS are provided in other documents.

  10. Performance of the NRX shut-off rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson, R.E.

    1965-08-01

    A new type of shut-off rod of electromechanical design was developed by the American Machine and Foundry Company for use in the NRX reactor following the accident of 1952. The new rods were installed in May, 1956, as part of the control system conversion program which was completed in 1958. Some problems were encountered with limit switch adjustment but minor modifications in design led to much improved operation. he performance of the rods also improved as more experience was gained in the maintenance and adjustment of the various headgear components. Each headgear is now overhauled once a year on a routine basis. The present design of shut-off rod is considered to be very satisfactory. There has only been one occasion when a shut-off rod has failed to come fully down on a trip. Rods have failed to operate correctly on five other occasions but these occurred during shutdown periods or when the reactor was being shutdown manually. (author)

  11. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90oF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, G.M.

    1956-11-01

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95 o F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe 3 O 4 . At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O 2 in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe 3 O 4 and γ-Fe 2 O 3 . At high pH with oxygen present Fe 3 O 4 predominated with some traces of Fe 2 O 3 . The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O 2 in the water 2 present and continual purification 2 present and no purification or pH control 2 present. (author)

  12. Some loop experiments in the NRX reactor to study the corrosion of mild steel by flowing water at 90{sup o}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, G. M.

    1956-11-15

    This work was undertaken to find the water conditions necessary for minimum corrosion in the mild steel thermal shield recirculating systems in NRX and NRU. This report contains the chemical and corrosion results obtained by operating three mild steel loops in which water at 85-95{sup o}F was recirculated through test sections located in J-rod positions in the NRX reactor. Lowest corrosion rates were found when the water was maintained at pH 10.5 with or without oxygen being present. In both cases the corrosion was general in nature and no pitting occurred. At pH 7 with oxygen present in the water severe pitting took place and the corrosion rate was several times higher than similar conditions without oxygen in the water. Under oxygen-free conditions the corrosion product was Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. At pH 7 and with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} in the water the corrosion product was a mixture of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. At high pH with oxygen present Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} predominated with some traces of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The systems tested may he listed in order of increasing corrosiveness: High pH with or without O{sub 2} in the water < water at pH 7 with no O{sub 2} present and continual purification < water with no O{sub 2} present and no purification or pH control < water at pH 7 with 3-5 ppm of O{sub 2} present. (author)

  13. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winfield, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  14. CRNL research reactor retrofit Emergency Filtration System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philippi, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a brief history of NRX and NRU research reactor effluent air treatment systems before describing the selection and design of an appropriate retrofit Emergency Filtration System (EFS) to serve these reactors and the future MX-10 isotope production reactor. The conceptual design of the EFS began in 1984. A standby concrete shielding filter-adsorber system, sized to serve the reactor with the largest exhaust flow, was selected. The standby system, bypassed under normal operating conditions, is equipped with normal exhaust stream shutoff and diversion valves to be activated manually when an emergency is anticipated, or automatically when emergency levels of gamma radiation are detected in the exhaust stream. The first phase of the EFS installation, that is the construction of the EFS and the connection of NRU to the system, was completed in 1987. The second phase of construction, which includes the connection of NRX and provisions for the future connection of MX-10, is to be completed in 1990

  15. Comparison Between Calculated and Measured Cross Section Changes in Natural Uranium Irradiated in NRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstroem, P E

    1961-03-15

    It is desirable to obtain an experimental check of the reliability of the methods currently used to determine reactivity changes in a reactor and, with a view to meeting this requirement to some extent, a preliminary comparison has been made between calculated and measured cross-section changes in rods of natural uranium irradiated in NRX. The measurements were made at Harwell in the GLEEP reactor and a description has been given by, inter alia, Ward and Craig. The theory of the calculations, which is briefly described in this report, has been indicated by Littler. The investigation showed that the methods for calculating burn up used at present provides a good illustration of the long-term variations in isotope contents. A satisfactory agreement is obtained with experimental results when calculating apparent cross-section changes in uranium rods due to irradiation if the fission cross- section for {sup 239}Pu is set to 780 b. This is 34 b higher than the figure quoted in BNL - 325 (1958). However, in order to get a good idea as to whether the calculated long-term variations in reactivity really correspond to reality, it is necessary to make further investigations. For this reason the results quoted in this report should be regarded as preliminary.

  16. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  17. Rationalization and future planning for AECL's research reactor capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    AECL's research reactor capability has played a crucial role in the development of Canada's nuclear program. All essential concepts for the CANDU reactors were developed and tested in the NRX and NRU reactors, and in parallel, important contributions to basic physics were made. The technical feasibility of advanced fuel cycles and of the organic-cooled option for CANDU reactors were also demonstrated in the two reactors and the WR-1 reactor. In addition, an important and growing radio-isotope production industry was established and marketed on a world-wide basis. In 1984, however, it was recognized that a review and rationalization of the research reactor capability was required. The commercial success of the CANDU reactor system had reduced the scope and size of the required development program. Limited research and development funding and competition from other research facilities and programs, required that the scope be reduced to a support basis essential to maintain strategic capability. Currently, AECL, is part-way through this rationalization program and completion should be attained during 1992/93 when the MAPLE reactor is operational and decisions on NRX decommissioning will be made. A companion paper describes some of the unique operational and maintenance problems which have resulted from this program and the solutions which have been developed. Future planning must recognize the age of the NRU reactor (currently 32 years) and the need to plan for eventual replacement. Strategy is being developed and supporting studies include a full technical assessment of the NRU reactor and the required age-related upgrading program, evaluation of the performance characteristics and costs of potential future replacement reactors, particularly the advanced MAPLE concept, and opportunities for international co-operation in developing mutually supportive research programs

  18. Detection of gaseous fission products in water - a method of monitoring fuel sheathing failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunnicliffe, P. R.; Whittier, A. C.

    1959-05-15

    The gaseous activities stripped from samples of effluent coolant from the NRU fuel elements tested in the central thimble of the NRX reactor (NRU loop) and from the NRX main effluent have been investigated. The activities obtained from the NRU loop can be attributed to gaseous fission products only. Design data have been obtained for a 'Gaseous Fission Product Monitor' to be installed for use with the NRU reactor. It is expected that this monitor will have high sensitivity to activity indicative of an incipient fuel element sheath failure. No qualitative determination of the various gaseous activities obtained from the NRX effluent has been made. A strong component of 25 {+-}1 seconds half-life is not consistent with O-19. Limited information concerning sheath failures in NRX was obtained. Of six failures observed in parallel with the installed delayed neutron monitors, three of these gave pre-warnings and in each case the gaseous fission product monitor showed a substantially greater sensitivity. An experiment in which small samples of uranium, inserted into the NRX reactor, could be exposed at will to a stream of water showed the behaviour of the two types of monitors to be similar. However, a number of signals were detected only by the gaseous fission product monitor. These can be attributed to its sensitivity to relatively long lived fission products. (author)

  19. An analysis of water reactor burnup data with the METHUSELAH II code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, M.; Hicks, D.

    1964-10-01

    The METHUSELAH II code has been used to predict long term reactivity and isotopic changes in the YANKEE, Dresden and NRX reactors. In general it is shown that there is a satisfactory measure of agreement and the first core lives of YANKEE and Dresden appear well predicted. However there are discrepancies in the isotopic composition of the plutonium formed which appear to be correlated with the degree of hardness of the reactor spectrum. It is demonstrated that plausible changes in nuclear data could reduce the discrepancies. (author)

  20. Power auxiliaries and research reactors. Section 3 of Symposium on the peaceful uses of atomic energy in Australia, 1958, held in Sydney, in June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1958-10-15

    The problems of disposing of the large amounts of highly-radioactive waste resulting from a large-scale nuclear power program are reviewed. The Canadian research reactor NRX is discussed. The DIDO reactor is briefly described and operating experience for the first year at high flux is summarized. The core of the High Flux Australian Research Reactor (HIFAR) is described, and some reactivity balance data are given (T.R.H.)

  1. The development of lower enrichment fuels for Canadian research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraday, M A; Belanger, L; Grolway, C M [AECL, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Foo, M T [CRNL, Combustion Engineering Superheater Ltd., Moncton, NB (Canada)

    1983-08-01

    As part of the world wide move to proliferation resistant fuels, new fuels which use reduced enrichment uranium are being developed for use in the NRX and NRU reactors. A fuel consisting of particles of a USiAl alloy dispersed in an Al matrix has been selected for development along with Al-37 wt% U alloy and Al-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cermet as backup fuels. This report outlines the progress made in the development of the Al-USiAl and Al-37 wt% U. Results show that good quality extruded rods containing either fuel can be made with techniques similar to those used to fabricate the current NRX and NRU fuels. However, the new fuels will be more expensive to make. Although the oxidation behaviour of the Al-USiAl is not as good as that of the Al-U alloys, its corrosion behaviour in high temperature water does not seem much worse. The oxidation and aqueous corrosion of A-37 wt% U are not much different from those of the Al-U alloys currently used. (author)

  2. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochaski, R.O.

    1962-07-01

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  3. Calculation of fast neutron flux in reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, P. C. [Canadian General Electric (Canada)

    1968-07-15

    The computer program EPITHET was used to calculate the fast neutron flux (>1 MeV) in several reactor pressure tubes and experimental facilities in order to compare the fast neutron flux in the different cases and to provide a self-consistent set of flux values which may be used to relate creep strain to fast neutron flux . The facilities considered are shown below together with the calculated fast neutron flux (>1 MeV). Fast flux 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}s: NPD 1.14, Douglas Point 2.66, Pickering 2.89, Gentilly 2.35, SGHWR 3.65, NRU U-1 and U-2 3.25'' pressure tube - 19 element fuel 3.05, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 28 element fuel 3.18, NRU U-1 and U-2 4.07'' pressure tube - 18 element fuel 2.90, NRX X-5 0.88, PRTR Mk I fuel 2.81, PRTR HPD fuel 3.52, WR-1 2.73, Mk IV creep machine (NRX) 0.85, Mk VI creep machine (NRU) 2.04, Biaxial creep insert (NRU U-49) 2.61.

  4. Burnup calculation of a CANDU6 reactor using the Serpent and MCNP6 codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: mohamed.hussein@rmc.ca, E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lewis, B.J., E-mail: Brent.Lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    A study of fuel burnup for the CANDU6 reactor is carried out to validate the most recent versions of the probabilistic transport code (MCNP6) and the continuous energy burnup calculation code (Serpent). These two codes allow for 3-D geometry calculation accounting for a detailed analysis without unit-cell homogenization. On the other hand, the WIMS-AECL computer program is used to model neutron transport in nuclear-reactor lattices for design, safety analysis, and operation. It works with two-dimensional regions and can perform collision probability calculations for a periodic structure of the lattice cell. In the present work, the multiplication factor, the total flux and fuel burnup could be calculated for a CANDU6 nuclear reactor based on the GENTILLY-2 core design. The MCNP6 and Serpent codes provide a calculation of the track length estimated flux per neutron source. This estimated flux is then scaled with normalization to the reactor power in order to provide a flux in unit of n/cm{sup 2}s. Good agreement is observed between the actual total flux calculated by MCNP6, Serpent and WIMS-AECL. The effective multiplication factors of the whole core CANDU6 reactor are further calculated as a function of burnup and further compared to those calculated by WIMS-AECL where excellent agreement is also obtained. (author)

  5. Burnup calculation of a CANDU6 reactor using the Serpent and MCNP6 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    A study of fuel burnup for the CANDU6 reactor is carried out to validate the most recent versions of the probabilistic transport code (MCNP6) and the continuous energy burnup calculation code (Serpent). These two codes allow for 3-D geometry calculation accounting for a detailed analysis without unit-cell homogenization. On the other hand, the WIMS-AECL computer program is used to model neutron transport in nuclear-reactor lattices for design, safety analysis, and operation. It works with two-dimensional regions and can perform collision probability calculations for a periodic structure of the lattice cell. In the present work, the multiplication factor, the total flux and fuel burnup could be calculated for a CANDU6 nuclear reactor based on the GENTILLY-2 core design. The MCNP6 and Serpent codes provide a calculation of the track length estimated flux per neutron source. This estimated flux is then scaled with normalization to the reactor power in order to provide a flux in unit of n/cm 2 s. Good agreement is observed between the actual total flux calculated by MCNP6, Serpent and WIMS-AECL. The effective multiplication factors of the whole core CANDU6 reactor are further calculated as a function of burnup and further compared to those calculated by WIMS-AECL where excellent agreement is also obtained. (author)

  6. ROP design for Enhanced CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J.; Scherbakova, D; Kastanya, D.; Ovanes, M. [Candu Energy Inc., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6) nuclear power plant is a mid-sized pressurized heavy water reactor design, based on the highly successful CANDU 6 (C6) family of power plants, upgraded to meet today's Canadian and international safety requirements and to satisfy Generation III expectations. The EC6 reactor is equipped with two independent Regional Overpower Protection (ROP) systems to prevent overpowers in the reactor fuel. The ROP system design, retaining the traditional C6 methodology, is determined to cover the End-of-Life (EOL) reactor core condition since the reactor operating/thermal margin gradually decreases as plant equipment ages. Several design changes have been incorporated into the reference C6 plant to mitigate the ageing effect on the ROP trip margin. This paper outlines the basis for the EC6 ROP physics design and presents the ROP related improvements made in the EC6 design to ensure that full power operation is not limited by the ROP throughout the entire life of the reactor. (author)

  7. Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6): a proven mid-sized reactor with fuel cycle capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.; Soulard, M.; Hastings, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is finalizing development of the Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), which incorporates the CANDU 6's well-proven features, and adds enhancements that make the reactor even more safe and easier to operate. The EC6 is the only mid-sized reactor (700 MWe class) with a proven pedigree that meets modern reactor expectations and regulatory standards. It is sized for smaller grids and also has outstanding fuel-cycle capability. Changes are incremental and consistent with the CANDU 6 project approach. The EC6 utilizes modern computers and a distributed control system housed in an advanced control room which, along with automated testing and on-line diagnostics, make the plant easier and safer to operate, with minimal operator intervention. Containment and seismic capability are upgraded to meet modern standards. The first deployment of the EC6 is anticipated in Canada; international markets are also being pursued. AECL is performing a comprehensive review of the EC6 design in the wake of the Fukushima accident, will review lessons learned, and incorporate any necessary improvements into new build design. (author)

  8. Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6): a proven mid-sized reactor with fuel cycle capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.; Soulard, M.; Hastings, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is finalizing development of the Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), which incorporates the CANDU 6's well-proven features, and enhancements that make the reactor even more safe and easier to operate. The EC6 is the only mid-sized reactor (700 MWe class) with a proven pedigree that meets modern reactor expectations and regulatory standards. It is sized for smaller grids and also has outstanding fuel-cycle capability. Changes are incremental and consistent with the CANDU 6 project approach. The EC6 utilizes modern computers and a distributed control system housed in an advanced control room which, along with automated testing and on-line diagnostics, make the plant easier and safer to operate, with minimal operator intervention. Containment and seismic capability are upgraded to meet modern standards. The first deployment of the EC6 is anticipated in Canada; international markets are also being pursued. AECL is performing a comprehensive review of the EC6 design in the wake of the Fukushima accident, will review lessons learned, and incorporate any necessary improvements into new build design. (author)

  9. An estimate of the reactivity of assemblies of NRX fuel elements in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, R.G.

    1960-03-01

    This report contains calculations on the criticality of assemblies of NRX fuel elements in light water. The elements are dealt with in three sections, 'X rods' of natural uranium, enriched elements of U 235 /A1 alloy and enriched elements of Pu/Al alloy. Values of k ∞ and B 2 are provided for two fuel concentrations for each of the two enriched types and for a range of irradiations of the X rods. The calculations for the X rods provide maximum and minimum values of k ∞ . The maximum values for some lattices are a few per cent above unity. Unfortunately, the present experimental evidence does not prove that it is impossible to achieve values of k ∞ greater than unity in lattices of natural uranium in light water. Hence for safety predictions maximum values have been used. The resulting restrictions are not very severe. It is possible to make critical assemblies of the enriched elements, Part (5) contains a set of recommended minimum spacings such that elements of all kinds may safely be mixed in a stack together. There are also predictions of the minimum critical numbers of complete elements or elements cut into slugs. (author)

  10. Effects of heat and pressure on the swelling of irradiated uranium. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churcman, A. T.; Barnes, R. S.; Cottrell, A. H.

    1956-09-15

    Small pieces of a natural uranium fuel bar from the NRX reactor which had been irradiated to 0.3 - 0.4% burn up have been heat treated either in vacuo or at high pressure and changes in their density measured.

  11. Proceedings of the 6. National Meeting of Reactor Physics and Thermohydraulic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The proceedings of the 6. National Meeting of Reactor Physics and Thermohydraulic - 6. ENFIR - allow to evaluate the present status of development in reactor physics and thermohydraulic fields. The mathematical models and methods for calculating neutronic of nuclear reactors, safety reactor analysis, measuring methods of neutronic parameters, computerized simulation of accidents, transients and thermohydraulic analysis are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Characterisation of reactor control rod drives. Specification 1-6. Reaktorstellstabantriebe. Typenblaetter 1-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-03-01

    The committee 'Kernreaktorregelung' of VDI/VDE-Gesellschaft Mess- und Regelungstechnik has developed 6 specifications (Typenblaetter) of reactor control rod drives. The specifications are aimed at giving engineers in reactor control systems an outline concerning the function as well as some construction characteristics. (orig./LN).

  13. The MAPLE-X concept dedicated to the production of radio-isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeds, W.

    1985-06-01

    MAPLE is a versatile new Canadian multi-purpose research reactor concept that meets the nuclear aspirations of developing countries. It is planned to convert the NRX reactor at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories into MAPLE-X as a demonstration prototype of this concept and thereafter to dedicate its operation to the production of radio-isotopes. A description of MAPLE-X and details of molybdenum-99 production are given

  14. 1200 FPD refuelling simulation of RUFIC fuel in a CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soon Young; Jeong, Chang Joon; Min, Byung Joo; Suk, Ho Chun

    2001-07-01

    The refuelling strategy of RUFIC (Recovered Uranium Fuel in CANDU) fuel as a high-burnup fuel for a CANDU 6 reactor is studied to determine the achievable operation characteristics of the fuel and reactor. In this study, three refuelling schemes of 4-, 2-, and 3-bundle shift for 0.92 w/o RUFIC fuel in an CANDU 6 reactor were individually evaluated through 1200 FPD(Full Power Day)refuelling simulaltions where the 0.92 w/o RUFIC is equivalent to CANFLEX 0.9 w/o SEU(Slightly Enriched Uranium) in reactivity and burnup respects. The computer code system used for this study is WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP. The results simulated for the case of 4-bundle shift refueling scheme shows that the peak maximum channel power and peak maximum CPPF(Channel Power Peaking Factor)of 7228 kW and 1.175, respectively, seems too high to maintain the available operating margins, because some data of the maximum channel power exceed the operating limit(7070 kW based on the Technical Specifications of Wolsong 3 and 4 Units). Whereas, the results simulated for the case of 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme shows that sufficient operating margin could be secured where the peak maximum channel power and peak maximum CPPF were 6889 kW and 1.094, respectively. However, the channel refuelling rate (channels/day) of the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme is twice that of the 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme, and hence the 2-bundle shift refuelling would not be an economical refuelling scheme for the RUFIC fuel bundles. Therefore, a 3-bundle shift refuelling scheme for the RUFIC fuel in CANDU 6 reactor was also studied by the 1200 FPD refuelling simulation. As a result, it is found that all the operating parameters in the 3-bundle shift case are achivable for the CANDU 6 reactor operation, and the channel refuelling rate of 2.88 channels/day seems to be attractive compared to the refuelling rate of 4.32 channels/day in the 2-bundle shift case.

  15. Radioactive effluents from CANDU 6 reactors during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boss, C.R.; Allsop, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    During routine operation of a CANDU 6 reactor, various gaseous, liquid, and solid radioactive wastes are generated. The layout of the CANDU 6 reactor and the design of its systems ensure that these are minimized, but small quantities of gaseous and liquid wastes are continually discharged at very low concentrations. This report discusses the make-up of these chronically generated gaseous and liquid effluents. From a safety perspective, the doses to individual members of the public resulting from radioactive wastes chronically discharged from CANDU 6 reactors have been negligible. Similarly, doses to the regional and global populations have been negligible, generally less than 0.001% of background. While far below regulatory limits, releases of tritium, noble gases and gross β - -γ have been the most radiologically significant emissions, while radioiodine and particulates have had the greatest potential to deliver public dose. (author). 8 refs., 16 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Biodegradation of p-nitrophenol using Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in a novel upflow packed bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2011-01-01

    A novel packed bed reactor (PBR) was designed with cross flow aeration at multiple ports along the depth to improve the hydrodynamic conditions of the reactor, and the biodegradation efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 on p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in PBR at different PNP loading rates were evaluated. The novel PBR was designed to improve the hydrodynamic features such as mixing time profile (t m95 ), oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k L a), and overall gas hold up capacity (ε G ) of the reactor. PNP concentration in the influent was varied between 600 and 1400 mg l -1 whereas the hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the reactor was varied between 18 and 7.5 h. Complete removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor up to a PNP loading rate of 2787 mg l -1 d -1 . More than 99.9% removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor for an influent concentration of 1400 mg l -1 and at 18 h HRT. In the present study, PNP was utilized as sole source of carbon and energy by A. chlorophenolicus A6. Furthermore, the bioreactor showed good compatibility in handling shock loading of PNP.

  17. Enhanced CANDU 6 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeez, S.; Alizadeh, A.; Girouard, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The CANDU 6 power reactor is visionary in its approach, remarkable for its on-power refuelling capability and proven over years of safe, economical and reliable power production. Developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, the CANDU 6 design offers excellent performance utilizing state-of-the-art technology. The first CANDU 6 plants went into service in the early 1980's as leading edge technology and the design has been continuously advanced to maintain superior performance with an outstanding safety record. The first CANDU 6 plants- Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau in Canada, Embalse in Argentina and Wolsong- Unit 1 in Korea have been in service for more than 21 years and are still producing electricity at peak performance and to the end of 2004, their average lifetime Capacity Factor was 83.2%. The newer CANDU 6 units in Romania (Cernavoda 1), Korea (Wolsong-Units 2, 3 and 4) and Qinshan (Phase III- Units 1 and 2) have also been performing at outstanding levels. The average lifetime Capacity Factor of the 10 CANDU 6 operating units around the world has been 87% to the end of 2004. Building on these successes, AECL is committed to the further development of this highly successful design, now focussing on meeting customer's needs for reduced costs, further improvements to plant operation and performance, enhanced safety and incorporating up-to-date technology as warranted. This has resulted in AECL embarking on improving the CANDU 6 design through an upgraded product termed as the 'Enhanced CANDU 6' (EC6)- which incorporates several attractive but proven features that will make the CANDU 6 reactor even more economical, safer and easier to operate. Some of the key features that will be incorporated in the EC6 include increasing the plant's power output, shortening the overall project schedule, decreasing the capital cost, dealing with obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the

  18. Thermal and fast reactor benchmark testing of ENDF/B-6.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng

    1999-01-01

    The benchmark testing for B-6.4 was done with the same benchmark experiments and calculating method as for B-6.2. The effective multiplication factors k eff , central reaction rate ratios of fast assemblies and lattice cell reaction rate ratios of thermal lattice cell assemblies were calculated and compared with testing results of B-6.2 and CENDL-2. It is obvious that 238 U data files are most important for the calculations of large fast reactors and lattice thermal reactors. However, 238 U data in the new version of ENDF/B-6 have not been renewed. Only data of 235 U, 27 Al, 14 N and 2 D have been renewed in ENDF/B-6.4. Therefor, it will be shown that the thermal reactor benchmark testing results are remarkably improved and the fast reactor benchmark testing results are not improved

  19. Biodegradation of p-nitrophenol using Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in a novel upflow packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2011-06-15

    A novel packed bed reactor (PBR) was designed with cross flow aeration at multiple ports along the depth to improve the hydrodynamic conditions of the reactor, and the biodegradation efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 on p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal in PBR at different PNP loading rates were evaluated. The novel PBR was designed to improve the hydrodynamic features such as mixing time profile (t(m95)), oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k(L)a), and overall gas hold up capacity (ɛ(G)) of the reactor. PNP concentration in the influent was varied between 600 and 1400 mg l(-1) whereas the hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the reactor was varied between 18 and 7.5h. Complete removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor up to a PNP loading rate of 2787 mg l(-1)d(-1). More than 99.9% removal of PNP was achieved in the reactor for an influent concentration of 1400 mg l(-1) and at 18 h HRT. In the present study, PNP was utilized as sole source of carbon and energy by A. chlorophenolicus A6. Furthermore, the bioreactor showed good compatibility in handling shock loading of PNP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The EC6 - an enhanced mid-sized reactor with fuel cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulard, M.; Yu, S.; Hopwood, J.; Hastings, I.J.

    2011-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has two CANDU reactor products matched to markets: the Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), a modern 700 MWe-class design, and the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR-1000), a 1200 MWe-class Gen III+ design. Both reactor types are designed to meet both market-, and customer-driven needs; the ACR-1000 design is 90% complete and market-ready. The EC6 incorporates the CANDU 6's well-proven features, and adds enhancements that make the reactor even safer and easier to operate. The EC6 is the only mid-sized reactor with a proven pedigree that meets modern reactor expectations and regulatory standards. It is sized for smaller grids and also has outstanding fuel-cycle capability. The EC6 has domestic and offshore market pull and is the current focus of AECL's development program; market interest in the ACR-1000 is anticipated in the longer term. Some of the key features incorporated into the EC6 include upgrading containment and seismic capability to meet modern standards, shortening the overall project schedule, addressing obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the operating plants. The EC6 utilizes modern computers and a distributed control system housed in an advanced control room which, along with automated testing and on-line diagnostics, make the plant easier and safer to operate, with minimal operator intervention. The first deployment of the EC6 is anticipated in Canada; off-shore markets are also being pursued. The EC6 burns natural uranium as standard. But, high neutron economy, on-power refuelling, a simple fuel bundle, and the fundamental CANDU fuel channel design provide the EC6 with the flexibility to accommodate a range of advanced fuels. (author)

  1. Characterisation of reactor control rod drives. Specification 1-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    The committee 'Kernreaktorregelung' of VDI/VDE-Gesellschaft Mess- und Regelungstechnik has developed 6 specifications (Typenblaetter) of reactor control rod drives. The specifications are aimed at giving engineers in reactor control systems an outline concerning the function as well as some construction characteristics. (orig./LN) [de

  2. Implementation of a reactivity meter for the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzovich, P.F.

    1991-06-01

    An 'on line' and 'off line' digital reactivity meter was developed and implemented for the RA-6 research reactor. Safety and control rod calibration will be permitted by means of this system with the same precision and faster than the period method, becoming a helpful tool to the operator in critical approach and in experimental design. (Author) [es

  3. Future development in heavy water reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donnelly, J.; Hart, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    1982 marks the 35th anniversary of the start-up of Canada's first research and test reactor, NRX. Its first power reactor has been operating successfully for the past 20 years. With 5,000 MWe of domestic capacity installed, Canada's major CANDU (Canada Deuterium, Uranium) nuclear program has a further 9,500 MWe under construction in Canada for completion by 1990 as well as committed offshore projects in Argentina, Korea and Romania. The CANDU operating record, by any measure of performance, has been outstanding. This performance is largely due to the discipline imposed on the development, design, construction and operation by two fundamental choices: natural uranium and heavy water. The impact of these two choices on availability, fuel utilization, safety and economics is discussed. Future plans call for building on those characteristics which have made CANDU so successful. When time for change comes, current assessments indicate that it will be possible to convert to more efficient advanced fuel cycles without major changes to the basic CANDU design. Primary attention is being focussed on thorium fuel cycles to ensure an abundant and continuing supply of low cost energy for the long term. The resource savings available from these fuel cycles in expanding systems are reviewed and compared with those available from LWR's and Fast Breeders. The results clearly illustrate the versatility of the CANDU reactor. It can benefit from enrichment plants or get along without them. It can complement LWR's or compete with them. It can complement Fast Breeder Reactors or compete with them as well. In the very long term CANDU's and Fast Breeders combined offer the potential of burning all the world's uranium and all the world's thorium. (author)

  4. A compact, low cost, tritium removal plant for CANDU-6 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, S.K.; Fong, C.; Kalyanam; Woodall, K.B.

    1997-01-01

    Tritium concentrations in CANDU-6 reactors are currently around 40 Ci/kg in moderator systems and around 1.5 Ci/kg in primary heat transport (PHT) systems. It is expected that tritium concentrations in moderator systems will continue to rise and will reach about 80 Ci/kg at maturity. A more detailed description of the increase in tritium concentrations in the moderator and PHT systems of CANDU-6 reactors is given in the next section of this paper. While moderator systems currently contribute more than 50% to tritium emissions, the impact of acute releases of moderator water is more severe at higher tritium concentrations. This impact can be substantially reduced by the addition of an isotope separation system for lowering the tritium level in the moderator system. In addition, lower tritium levels in CANDU systems will inevitably result in reduced occupational exposures, or will provide economic benefits due to ease of maintenance because less protective measures are required and maintenance activities can be more efficient

  5. VVANTAGE 6 - an advanced fuel assembly design for VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshi, P.K.; DeMario, E.E.; Knott, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, Westinghouse fuel assemblies for pressurized water reactors (PWR's) have undergone significant changes to the current VANTAGE 5. VANTAGE 5 PWR fuel includes features such as removable top nozzles, debris filter bottom nozzles, low-pressure-drop zircaloy grids, zircaloy intermediate flow mixing grids, optimized fuel rods, in-fuel burnable absorbers, and increased burnup capability to region average values of 48000 MWD/MTU. These features have now been adopted to the VVER reactors. Westinghouse has completed conceptual designs for an advanced fuel assembly and other core components for VVER-1000 reactors known as VANTAGE 6. This report describes the VVANTAGE 6 fuel assembly design

  6. Enhanced candu 6 reactor: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azeez, S.; Girouard, P.

    2006-01-01

    The CANDU 6 power reactor is visionary in its approach, renowned for its on-power refuelling capability and proven over years of safe, economical and reliable power production. Developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU 6 design offers excellent performance utilizing state-of-the-art technology. The first CANDU 6 plants went into service in the early 1980s as leading edge technology and the design has been continuously advanced to maintain superior performance with an outstanding safety record. The first set of CANDU 6 plants - Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau in Canada, Embalse in Argentina and Wolsong- Unit 1 in Korea - have been in service for more than 22 years and are still producing electricity at peak performance; to the end of 2004, their average Lifetime Capacity Factor was 83.2%. The newer CANDU 6 units in Romania (Cernavoda 1), Korea (Wolsong-Units 2, 3 and 4) and Qinshan (Phase III- Units 1 and 2) have also been performing at outstanding levels. The average lifetime Capacity Factor of the 10 CANDU 6 operating units around the world has been 87% to the end of 2004. Building on these successes, AECL is committed to the further development of this highly successful design, now focussing on meeting customers' needs for reduced costs, further improvements to plant operation and performance, enhanced safety and incorporating up-to-date technology, as warranted. This has resulted in AECL embarking on improving the CANDU 6 design through an upgraded product termed the ''Enhanced CANDU 6'' (EC6), which incorporates several attractive but proven features that make the CANDU 6 reactor even more economical, safer and easier to operate. Some of the key features that are being incorporated into the EC6 include increasing the plant's power output, shortening the overall project schedule, decreasing the capital cost, dealing with obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the

  7. Measurement of fast neutron spectra inside reactors with a Li{sup 6} semiconductor counter spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajdacic, V S; Lalovic, B I; Petrovic, B P [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1963-12-15

    The possibility of using the Li{sup 6} semiconductor counter spectrometer for measuring fast neutron spectra inside reactors has been investigated in details and some solutions of the difficulties associated with the high interference of thermal neutrons in well-moderated reactors are suggested and checked experimentally (author)

  8. Reactor physics verification of the MCNP6 unstructured mesh capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, T. P.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martz, R. L.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 has the ability to transport particles on unstructured meshes generated from the Computed-Aided Engineering software Abaqus. Verification is performed using benchmarks with features relevant to reactor physics - Big Ten and the C5G7 computational benchmark. Various meshing strategies are tested and results are compared to reference solutions. Computational performance results are also given. The conclusions show MCNP6 is capable of producing accurate calculations for reactor physics geometries and the computational requirements for small lattice benchmarks are reasonable on modern computing platforms. (authors)

  9. Reactor physics verification of the MCNP6 unstructured mesh capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, T. P. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martz, R. L. [X-Computational Physics Division, Monte Carlo Codes Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Monte Carlo software package MCNP6 has the ability to transport particles on unstructured meshes generated from the Computed-Aided Engineering software Abaqus. Verification is performed using benchmarks with features relevant to reactor physics - Big Ten and the C5G7 computational benchmark. Various meshing strategies are tested and results are compared to reference solutions. Computational performance results are also given. The conclusions show MCNP6 is capable of producing accurate calculations for reactor physics geometries and the computational requirements for small lattice benchmarks are reasonable on modern computing platforms. (authors)

  10. Research reactor 'A' 6.5/10 MW; Istrazivacki reaktor 'A' 6,5/10 MW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, M [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    This booklet includes a short description of the RA research reactor with basic properties of its components: control and safety system, heavy water system, technical water cooling system, heavy water distillation system, cover gas system, dosimetry control system, power supply system. It is used for fundamental research in reactor and nuclear physics, isotope production, materials testing.

  11. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W.; Lewis, B.J.

    2014-01-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  12. Calculation of the radial and axial flux and power distribution for a CANDU 6 reactor with both the MCNP6 and Serpent codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, M.S.; Bonin, H.W., E-mail: mohamed.hussein@rmc.ca, E-mail: bonin-h@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Lewis, B.J., E-mail: Brent.Lewis@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Tech., Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The most recent versions of the Monte Carlo-based probabilistic transport code MCNP6 and the continuous energy reactor physics burnup calculation code Serpent allow for a 3-D geometry calculation accounting for the detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. These two codes are used to calculate the axial and radial flux and power distributions for a CANDU6 GENTILLY-2 nuclear reactor core with 37-element fuel bundles. The multiplication factor, actual flux distribution and power density distribution were calculated by using a tally combination for MCNP6 and detector analysis for Serpent. Excellent agreement was found in the calculated flux and power distribution. The Serpent code is most efficient in terms of the computational time. (author)

  13. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng

    1995-01-01

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of K eff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testings of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (4 tabs., 2 figs.)

  14. Studies on the liquid fluoride thorium reactor: Comparative neutronics analysis of MCNP6 code with SRAC95 reactor analysis code based on FUJI-U3-(0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaradat, S.Q., E-mail: sqjxv3@mst.edu; Alajo, A.B., E-mail: alajoa@mst.edu

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The verification for FUJI-U3-(0)—a molten salt reactor—was performed. • The MCNP6 was used to study the reactor physics characteristics for FUJI-U3 type. • The results from the MCNP6 were comparable with the ones obtained from literature. - Abstract: The verification for FUJI-U3-(0)—a molten salt reactor—was performed. The reactor used LiF-BeF2-ThF4-UF4 as the mixed liquid fuel salt, and the core was graphite moderated. The MCNP6 code was used to study the reactor physics characteristics for the FUJI-U3-(0) reactor. Results for reactor physics characteristic of the FUJI-U3-(0) exist in literature, which were used as reference. The reference results were obtained using SRAC95 (a reactor analysis code) coupled with ORIGEN2 (a depletion code). Some modifications were made in the reconstruction of the FUJI-U3-(0) reactor in MCNP due to unavailability of more detailed description of the reactor core. The assumptions resulted in two representative models of the reactor. The results from the MCNP6 models were compared with the reference results obtained from literature. The results were comparable with each other, but with some notable differences. The differences are because of the approximations that were done on the SRAC95 model of the FUJI-U3 to simplify the simulation. Based on the results, it is concluded that MCNP6 code predicts well the overall simulation of neutronics analysis to the previous simulation works using SRAC95 code.

  15. Homogeneous fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guisheng

    1995-11-01

    How to choose correct weighting spectrum has been studied to produce multigroup constants for fast reactor benchmark calculations. A correct weighting option makes us obtain satisfying results of K eff and central reaction rate ratios for nine fast reactor benchmark testing of CENDL-2 and ENDF/B-6. (author). 8 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  16. THE IMPACT OF POWER COEFFICIENT OF REACTIVITY ON CANDU 6 REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. KASTANYA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The combined effects of reactivity coefficients, along with other core nuclear characteristics, determine reactor core behavior in normal operation and accident conditions. The Power Coefficient of Reactivity (PCR is an aggregate indicator representing the change in reactor core reactivity per unit change in reactor power. It is an integral quantity which captures the contributions of the fuel temperature, coolant void, and coolant temperature reactivity feedbacks. All nuclear reactor designs provide a balance between their inherent nuclear characteristics and the engineered reactivity control features, to ensure that changes in reactivity under all operating conditions are maintained within a safe range. The CANDU® reactor design takes advantage of its inherent nuclear characteristics, namely a small magnitude of reactivity coefficients, minimal excess reactivity, and very long prompt neutron lifetime, to mitigate the demand on the engineered systems for controlling reactivity and responding to accidents. In particular, CANDU reactors have always taken advantage of the small value of the PCR associated with their design characteristics, such that the overall design and safety characteristics of the reactor are not sensitive to the value of the PCR. For other reactor design concepts a PCR which is both large and negative is an important aspect in the design of their engineered systems for controlling reactivity. It will be demonstrated that during Loss of Regulation Control (LORC and Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA events, the impact of variations in power coefficient, including a hypothesized larger than estimated PCR, has no safety-significance for CANDU reactor design. Since the CANDU 6 PCR is small, variations in the range of values for PCR on the performance or safety of the reactor are not significant.

  17. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus

    2009-01-01

    , phenotypically overlapping with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. With a frequency of at least 1% in our cohort of 179 patients, recessive defects in CNTNAP2 appear to significantly contribute to severe MR. Whereas the established synaptic role of NRXN1 suggests that synaptic defects contribute to the associated...... protein can reorganize synaptic morphology and induce increased density of active zones, the synaptic domains of neurotransmitter release. Moreover, both Nrx-I and Nrx-IV determine the level of the presynaptic active-zone protein bruchpilot, indicating a possible common molecular mechanism in Nrx...

  18. UF6 breeder reactor power plants for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, J.H.; Clement, J.D.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The reactor concept analyzed is a 233 UF 6 core surrounded by a molten salt (Li 7 F, BeF 2 , ThF 4 ) blanket. Nuclear survey calculations were carried out for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. A maximum breeding ratio of 1.22 was found. Thermodynamic cycle calculations were performed for a variety of Rankine cycles. Optimization of a Rankine cycle for a gas core breeder reactor employing an intermediate heat exchanger gave a maximum efficiency of 37 percent. A conceptual design is presented along with a system layout for a 1000 MW stationary power plant. The advantages of the GCBR are as follows: (1) high efficiency, (2) simplified on-line reprocessing, (3) inherent safety considerations, (4) high breeding ratio, (5) possibility of burning all or most of the long-lived nuclear waste actinides, and (6) possibility of extrapolating the technology to higher temperatures and MHD direct conversion

  19. Prediction of hydrogen distribution in the reactor building in CANDU6 plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y.; Song, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The CANDU plants have a lot of zircaloy. The fuel cladding, calandria tubes and pressure tubes are made of zircaloy. The zircaloy can be oxidized and hydrogen is generated during severe accident progression. The detonation or deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) due to hydrogen combustion may occur if the local hydrogen concentration or global hydrogen concentration exceeds certain value. The detonation may result in the rupture of the reactor building. The inside of the reactor building of CANDU plants is complex. So prediction of hydrogen distribution in the reactor building is important. This prediction is made using ISAAC code and GOTHIC code. ISAAC code partitioned the reactor building in to 7 compartments. GOTHIC code modeled the CANDU6 reactor building using 12 nodes. The hydrogen concentrations in the various compartments in the reactor building are compared. GOTHIC code slightly underpredicts hydrogen concentration in the F/M rooms than ISAAC code, but trend is same. The hydrogen concentration in the boiler room and the moderator room shows almost same as for both codes. (author)

  20. Optimization of the neutron calculation model for the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coscia, G.A.

    1981-01-01

    A model for the neutronic calculation of the RA-6 reactor which includes the codes ANISN and EQUIPOSE is analyzed. Starting with a brief description of the reactor, the core and its parts, the general scheme of calculation applied is presented. The fuel elements used were those which are utilized in the RA-3 reactor; this is of the MTR type with 90% enriched uranium. With the approximations used, an analysis of such model of calculation was made, trying to optimize it by reducing, if possible, the calculation time without loosing accuracy. In order to improve the calculation model, it is recomended a cross section data library specific for the enrichment of the fuel considered 90% and the incorporation of a more advanced code than EQUIPOISE which would be DIXYBAR. (M.E.L.) [es

  1. Materials considerations for UF6 gas-core reactor. Interim report for preliminary design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1977-04-01

    The limiting materials problem in a high-temperature UF 6 core reactor is the corrosion of the core containment vessel. The UF 6 , the lower fluorides of uranium, and the fluorine that exist at the anticipated reactor operating conditions (1000 K and about one atmosphere UF 6 ) are all corrosive. Because of this, the materials evaluation effort for this reactor design study has concentrated on the identification of a viable system for the containment vessel that meets both the materials and neutronic requirements. A study of the literature has revealed that the most promising corrosion-resistant candidates are Ni or Ni-Al alloys. One of the conclusions of this work is that the containment vessel use a nickel liner or clad since the use of Ni as a structural member is precluded by its relative blackness to thermal neutrons. Estimates of corrosion rates of Ni and Ni-Al alloys, the effects of the pressure and temperature of F 2 on the corrosion rates, calculated equilibrium gas compositions at reactor core operating conditions, suggested methods of fabrication, and recommendations for future research and development are included

  2. Online monitoring and diagnostic system on RA-6 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Peyrano, O. A.; Marticorena, M.; Koch, R. G.; Martinez, J. S; Berruti, G. E.; Nunez, W. M.; Gonzales, L. A.; Tarquini, L. D.; Sotelo, J. P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the Online Automatic Monitoring and Diagnostic System for mechanical components, installed on RA-6 Nuclear Reactor (San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina). This system has been designed, installed and set-up by the Vibrations and Mechatronics Laboratory (Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica) and Sitrack.com Argentina SA. This system provides an online mechanical diagnostic of the main reactor components, allowing incipient failures to be early detected and identified, avoiding unscheduled shut-downs and reducing maintenance times. The diagnostic is accomplished by an online analysis of the vibratory signature of the mechanical components, obtained by vibrations sensors on the main pump and the decay tank. The mechanical diagnostic and the main operational parameters are displayed on the reactor control room and published on the internet. [es

  3. Flux distribution measurements in the Bruce B Unit 6 reactor using a transportable traveling flux detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, T.C.; Drewell, N.H.; Hall, D.S.; Lopez, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    A transportable traveling flux detector (TFD) system for use in power reactors has been developed and tested at Chalk River Nuclear Labs. in Canada. It consists of a miniature fission chamber, a motor drive mechanism, a computerized control unit, and a data acquisition subsystem. The TFD system was initially designed for the in situ calibration of fixed self-powered detectors in operating power reactors and for flux measurements to verify reactor physics calculations. However, this system can also be used as a general diagnostic tool for the investigation of apparent detector failures and flux anomalies and to determine the movement of reactor internal components. This paper describes the first successful use of the computerized TFD system in an operating Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) power reactor and the results obtained from the flux distribution measurements. An attempt is made to correlate minima in the flux profile with the locations of fuel channels so that future measurements can be used to determine the sag of the channels. Twenty-seven in-core flux detector assemblies in the 855-MW (electric) Unit 6 reactor of the Ontario Hydro Bruce B Generating Station were scanned

  4. Atmospherically dispersed radiocarbon at the Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, G.M.; Brown, R.M.; Repta, C.J.W.; Selkirk, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    A small percentage of the total radiocarbon produced by the NRX and NRU experimental reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories has been vented from the main reactor stack and atmospherically dispersed across the site. Surveys conducted in 1982-83 and 1993-94 have shown that atmospheric levels more than 50 m from the stack are never greater than 600 Bq.kg -1 carbon above the natural background level, falling to near-global atmospheric levels at the site boundaries roughly 7 km away. A dispersion factor > 1.2 x 10 6 m 3 .s -1 at ∼ 0.75 km distance from the point of emission is calculated on the basis of recent in-stack monitoring. Analysis of growth rings in on-site trees has provided an opportunity to search for correlations of 14 C output summer power production and/or moderator losses. (author). 16 refs., 14 tabs., 11 figs

  5. NF-6 program complex for BESM-6 computation of the basic neutron-physical characteristics of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zizin, M.N.; Savochkina, O.A.; Chukhlova, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    A structure of standard designations is described and semantics of a number of standard values used in a NF-6 program complex is given. Main source data and results of neutron-physical reactor calculation are standard values, the peculiarities of FORTRAN and ALGOL-GDR algorithm languages in the DUBNA monitoring system were taken account of. As a base of standard values list the FIHAR system list, supplemented with new standard designations for integral reactor characteristics, is used. Developed is also a list of standard values to organize the exchange with external memory in the process of task solution and long-range storage

  6. Early years of nuclear energy research in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurence, G.C.

    1980-01-01

    The first experimental attempts in Canada to obtain energy from uranium fission were carried out by the author in the Ottawa laboratories of the National Research Council from 1940 to 42. This program grew into a joint British-Canadian laboratory in Montreal. Work done at this laboratory, which moved to Chalk River in 1946, led to the construction of ZEEP (the first nuclear reactor to operate outside of the United States) NRX, and ultimately to the development of the CANDU power reactors. People involved in the work and events along the way are covered in detail. (LL)

  7. Enhanced CANDU6: Reactor and fuel cycle options - Natural uranium and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovanes, M.; Chan, P. S. W.; Mao, J.; Alderson, N.; Hopwood, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Enhanced CANDU 6 R (ECo R ) is the updated version of the well established CANDU 6 family of units incorporating improved safety characteristics designed to meet or exceed Generation III nuclear power plant expectations. The EC6 retains the excellent neutron economy and fuel cycle flexibility that are inherent in the CANDU reactor design. The reference design is based on natural uranium fuel, but the EC6 is also able to utilize additional fuel options, including the use of Recovered Uranium (RU) and Thorium based fuels, without requiring major hardware upgrades to the existing control and safety systems. This paper outlines the major changes in the EC6 core design from the existing C6 design that significantly enhance the safety characteristics and operating efficiency of the reactor. The use of RU fuel as a transparent replacement fuel for the standard 37-el NU fuel, and several RU based advanced fuel designs that give significant improvements in fuel burnup and inherent safety characteristics are also discussed in the paper. In addition, the suitability of the EC6 to use MOX and related Pu-based fuels will also be discussed. (authors)

  8. Wireless condition monitoring for the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Peyrano, O.; Calzeta, O.; Rico, N.; Damiani, H.; Coutsiers, E.

    1999-01-01

    The vibration laboratory at C.A.B. has a great experience with the analysis and diagnostic of symptoms of failures in the rotating equipment of the R-6 research reactor and in our longest NPP (CANDU 600 Mw), located in Embalse town, Cordoba City, Argentina. Objective: The standard condition monitoring instrumentation system were designed for large equipment operating under different environmental conditions and sensitivities. The signal processing is not flexible and the diagnostic is an expensive method for the small poll type research reactors. This papers describes the research and development which are related whit the new concept, cheaper and flexible condition monitoring instrumentation system. Implementing a vibration analysis measurements technique with a sensor inside (in the pool) of the nuclear reactor RA-6, and mainly based on fft signal processing, an extensive program for vibration source identification was done. Different nuclear power conditions were monitored as full power and in zero power, also. This zero power shows the best acoustical environmental, because the cooling pumps are stop, and the core is cooling by natural convection. Two sensors were mainly used as the detector's subsystem. One of these detectors was an accelerometer attached to the top of the fine control rod and the other one was a water resistant omnidirectional microphone which was located underwater at different distances from the nuclear core. All the signal measurement by this two sensors were recorded and then was processed. Both signal was acquired at the same time for correlation analysis purposes. The analysis was composed by a 'Spectral Dynamics SD380' connected to a P.C. with dedicated post processing software. On the other hand, some calibration and sensitivity comparison was done using an SKFCM40, dual channel data collector and analyzer. (author)

  9. Fast reactors and problems in their development. Chapter 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, N.

    1980-01-01

    The main differences between fast reactors, in particular the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and thermal reactors are discussed. The view is taken, based on the intrinsic physics of the systems, that fast reactors should be considered as a different genus from thermal reactors. Some conclusions are drawn for fast reactor development generally and for the British programme in particular. Physics, economics and safety aspects are covered. (U.K.)

  10. SoLid: Search for Oscillations with Lithium-6 Detector at the SCK-CEN BR2 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, G.; Beaumont, W.; Buhour, J. M.; Coupé, B.; Cucoanes, A. S.; D'Hondt, J.; Durand, D.; Fallot, M.; Fresneau, S.; Giot, L.; Guillon, B.; Guilloux, G.; Janssen, X.; Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E.; Labare, M.; Moortgat, C.; Pronost, G.; Raes, L.; Ryckbosch, D.; Ryder, N.; Shitov, Y.; Vacheret, A.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Weber, A.; Yermia, F.

    2016-04-01

    Sterile neutrinos have been considered as a possible explanation for the recent reactor and Gallium anomalies arising from reanalysis of reactor flux and calibration data of previous neutrino experiments. A way to test this hypothesis is to look for distortions of the anti-neutrino energy caused by oscillation from active to sterile neutrino at close stand-off (˜ 6- 8m) of a compact reactor core. Due to the low rate of anti-neutrino interactions the main challenge in such measurement is to control the high level of gamma rays and neutron background. The SoLid experiment is a proposal to search for active-to-sterile anti-neutrino oscillation at very short baseline of the SCK•CEN BR2 research reactor. This experiment uses a novel approach to detect anti-neutrino with a highly segmented detector based on Lithium-6. With the combination of high granularity, high neutron-gamma discrimination using 6LiF:ZnS(Ag) and precise localization of the Inverse Beta Decay products, a better experimental sensitivity can be achieved compared to other state-of-the-art technology. This compact system requires minimum passive shielding allowing for very close stand off to the reactor. The experimental set up of the SoLid experiment and the BR2 reactor will be presented. The new principle of neutrino detection and the detector design with expected performance will be described. The expected sensitivity to new oscillations of the SoLid detector as well as the first measurements made with the 8 kg prototype detector deployed at the BR2 reactor in 2013-2014 will be reported.

  11. Comparison of CFD Simulations of Moderator Circulation Phenomena for a CANDU-6 Reactor and MCT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cha, Jae Eun Cha; Seo, Han

    2013-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Moderator Circulation Test (MCT) facility to simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a 1/4 scale-down moderator tank similar to that in a prototype power plant during steady state operation and accident conditions. In the present study, two numerical CFD simulations for the prototype and scaled-down moderator tanks were carried out to check whether the moderator flow and temperature patterns of both the prototype reactor and scaled-down facility are identical. Two different sets of simulations of the moderator circulation phenomena were performed for a CANDU-6 reactor and MCT facility. The results of both simulations were compared to study the effects of scaling on the moderator flow and temperature patterns. There is no significant difference in the results between the prototype and scaled-down model. It was concluded that the present scaling method is properly employed to model the real reactor in the MCT facility

  12. Comparison of CFD Simulations of Moderator Circulation Phenomena for a CANDU-6 Reactor and MCT Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Cha, Jae Eun Cha; Seo, Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is constructing a Moderator Circulation Test (MCT) facility to simulate thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a 1/4 scale-down moderator tank similar to that in a prototype power plant during steady state operation and accident conditions. In the present study, two numerical CFD simulations for the prototype and scaled-down moderator tanks were carried out to check whether the moderator flow and temperature patterns of both the prototype reactor and scaled-down facility are identical. Two different sets of simulations of the moderator circulation phenomena were performed for a CANDU-6 reactor and MCT facility. The results of both simulations were compared to study the effects of scaling on the moderator flow and temperature patterns. There is no significant difference in the results between the prototype and scaled-down model. It was concluded that the present scaling method is properly employed to model the real reactor in the MCT facility.

  13. Program ELM: A tool for rapid thermal-hydraulic analysis of solid-core nuclear rocket fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.T.

    1992-11-01

    This report reviews the state of the art of thermal-hydraulic analysis codes and presents a new code, Program ELM, for analysis of fuel elements. ELM is a concise computational tool for modeling the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of propellant flow through fuel element coolant channels in a nuclear thermal rocket reactor with axial coolant passages. The program was developed as a tool to swiftly evaluate various heat transfer coefficient and friction factor correlations generated for turbulent pipe flow with heat addition which have been used in previous programs. Thus, a consistent comparison of these correlations was performed, as well as a comparison with data from the NRX reactor experiments from the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Applications (NERVA) project. This report describes the ELM Program algorithm, input/output, and validation efforts and provides a listing of the code

  14. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, G.; Jentzsch, K.; Komarek, P.; Maurer, W.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Sanatarius, J.F.; Schawan, M.E.; Scharer, J.E.; Sviatoslavski, I.N.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Walstrom, P.L.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Grieger, G.; Harmeyer, E.; Herrnegger, F.; Kisslinger, J.; Rau, F.; Wobig, H.

    1987-05-01

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellerators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transort behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  15. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, G.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emmert, G.A.; Grieger, G.; Harmeyer, E.; Herrnegger, F.; Huebener, J.; Jentzsch, K.; Kisslinger, J.; Komarek, P.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Larsen, E.M.; Maurer, W.; Rau, F.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Scharer, J.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Vogelsang, W.F.; Walstrom, P.L.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Wobig, H.

    1987-06-01

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellarators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transport behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.) [de

  16. A global model for SF6 plasmas coupling reaction kinetics in the gas phase and on the surface of the reactor walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokkoris, George; Panagiotopoulos, Apostolos; Gogolides, Evangelos; Goodyear, Andy; Cooke, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Gas phase and reactor wall-surface kinetics are coupled in a global model for SF 6 plasmas. A complete set of gas phase and surface reactions is formulated. The rate coefficients of the electron impact reactions are based on pertinent cross section data from the literature, which are integrated over a Druyvesteyn electron energy distribution function. The rate coefficients of the surface reactions are adjustable parameters and are calculated by fitting the model to experimental data from an inductively coupled plasma reactor, i.e. F atom density and pressure change after the ignition of the discharge. The model predicts that SF 6 , F, F 2 and SF 4 are the dominant neutral species while SF 5 + and F - are the dominant ions. The fit sheds light on the interaction between the gas phase and the reactor walls. A loss mechanism for SF x radicals by deposition of a fluoro-sulfur film on the reactor walls is needed to predict the experimental data. It is found that there is a net production of SF 5 , F 2 and SF 6 , and a net consumption of F, SF 3 and SF 4 on the reactor walls. Surface reactions as well as reactions between neutral species in the gas phase are found to be important sources and sinks of the neutral species.

  17. Neutronics investigation of CANDU deuterium uranium 6 reactor fueled (transuranic-TH) O-2 using a computational method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Mirvakili, Seyed Mohammad; Khalafi, Hossein [Reactor Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    241Am, 243Am, and 237Np isotopes are among the most radiotoxic components of spent nuclear fuel. Recently, researchers have planned different incineration scenarios for the highly radiotoxic elements of nuclear waste in critical reactors. Computational methods are widely used to predict burnup rates of such nuclear wastes that are used under fuel matrixes in critical reactors. In this work, the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was used to calculate the neutronic behavior of a transuranic (TRU)-bearing CANada Deuterium Uranium 6 reactor. The computational data showed that the 1.0% TRU-containing thorium-based fuel matrix presents higher proliferation resistance and TRU depletion rate than the other investigated fuel Matrixes. The fuel matrix includes higher negative temperature reactivity coefficients as well. The investigated thorium-based fuel matrix can be successfully used to decrease the production of highly radiotoxic isotopes.

  18. Containment Loads Analysis for CANDU6 Reactor using CONTAIN 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae H.; Yang, Chae Y.

    2013-01-01

    The containment plays an important role to limit the release of radioactive materials to the environment during design basis accidents (DBAs). Therefore, the containment has to maintain its integrity under DBA conditions. Generally, a containment functional DBA evaluation includes calculations of the key containment loads, i. e., pressure and temperature effects associated with a postulated large rupture of the primary or secondary coolant system piping. In this paper, the behavior of containment pressure and temperature was evaluated for loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) of the Wolsong unit 1 in order to assess the applicability of CONTAIN 2.0 code for the containment loads analysis of the CANDU6 reactor. The containment pressure and temperature of the Wolsong unit 1 were evaluated using the CONTAIN 2.0 code and the results were compared with the CONTEMPT4 code. The peak pressure and temperature calculated by CONTAIN 2.0 agreed well with those of CONTEMPT4 calculation. The overall result of this analysis shows that the CONTAIN 2.0 code can apply to the containment loads analysis for the CANDU6 reactor

  19. Magnetite synthesis from ferrous iron solution at pH 6.8 in a continuous stirred tank reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mos, Yvonne M; Zorzano, Karin Bertens; Buisman, Cees J N; Weijma, Jan

    2018-04-01

    Partial oxidation of defined Fe 2+ solutions is a well-known method for magnetite synthesis in batch systems. The partial oxidation method could serve as basis for an iron removal process in drinking water production, yielding magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) as a compact and valuable product. As a first step toward such a process, a series of experiments was carried out, in which magnetite was synthesized from an Fe 2+ solution in a 2 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) at atmospheric pressure and 32 °C. In four experiments, elevating the pH from an initial value of 5.5 or 6.0 to a final value of 6.8, 7.0 or 7.5 caused green rust to form, eventually leading to magnetite. Formation of NH 4 + in the reactor indicated that NO 3 - and subsequently NO 2 - served as the oxidant. However, mass flow analysis revealed an influx of O 2 to the reactor. In a subsequent experiment, magnetite formation was achieved in the absence of added nitrate. In another experiment, seeding with magnetite particles led to additional magnetite precipitation without the need for a pH elevation step. Our results show, for the first time, that continuous magnetite formation from an Fe 2+ solution is possible under mild conditions, without the need for extensive addition of chemicals.

  20. New flux detectors for CANDU 6 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.; Medak, N.

    1992-06-01

    CANDU reactors utilize large numbers of in-core self-powered detectors for control and protection. In the original design, the detectors (coaxial cables) were wound on carrier tubes and immersed in the heavy water moderator. Failures occurred due to corrosion and other factors, and replacement was very costly because the assemblies were not designed with maintenance in mind. A new design was conceived based on straight detectors, of larger diameter, in a sealed package of individual 'well' tubes. This protected the detectors from hostile environments and enabled individual failed sensors to be replaced by inserting spares in vacant neighbouring tubes. The new design was made retrofittable to older CANDU reactors. Provision was made for on-line scanning of the core with a miniature fission chamber. The modified detectors were tested in a lengthy development program and found to exhibit superior performance to that of the original detectors. Most of the CANDU reactors have now adopted the new design. In the case of the Gentilly-2 and Point Lepreau reactors, advantage was taken of the opportunity to redesign the detector layout (using better codes and the increased flexibility in positioning detectors) to achieve better coverage of abnormal events, leading to higher trip setpoints and wider operating margins

  1. CANDU 6 - the highly successful medium sized reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedges, K. R.; Allen, P. J.; Hopwood, J. M.

    2000-01-01

    The CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor system, featuring horizontal fuel channels and heavy water moderator continues to evolve, supported by AECL's strong commitment to comprehensive R and D programs. The initial CANDU 6 design started in the 1970's. The first plants went into service in 1983, and the latest version of the plant is under construction in China. With each plant the technology has evolved giving the dual advantages of proveness and modern technology. CANDU 6 delivers important advantages of the CANDU system with benefit to small and medium-sized grids. This technology has been successfully adopted by, and localized to varying extents in, each of the CANDU 6 markets. For example, all CANDU owners obtain their fuel from domestic suppliers. Progressive CANDU development continues at AECL to enhance this medium size product CANDU 6. There are three key CANDU development strategic thrusts: improved economics, fuel cycle flexibility, and enhanced safety. The CANDU 6 product is also enhanced by incorporating improvements and advanced features that will be arising from our CANDU Technology R and D programs in areas such as heavy water and tritium, control and instrumentation, fuel and fuel cycles, systems and equipment and safety and constructability. (author)

  2. Improvement of top shield analysis technology for CANDU 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyo Yoon; Jin, Young Kwon; Lee, Sung Hee; Moon, Bok Ja; Kim, Yong Il

    1996-07-01

    As for Wolsung NPP unit 1, radiation shielding analysis was performed by using neutron diffusion codes, one-dimensional discrete ordinates code ANISN, and analytical methods. But for Wolsung NPP unit 2, 3, and 4, two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DOT substituted for neutron diffusion codes. In other words, the method of analysis and computer codes used for radiation shielding of CANDU 6 type reactor have been improved. Recently Monte Carlo MCNP code has been widely utilized in the field of radiation physics and other radiation related areas because it can describe an object sophisticately by use of three-dimensional modelling and can adopt continuous energy cross-section library. Nowadays Monte Carlo method has been reported to be competitive to discrete ordinate method in the field of radiation shielding and the former has been known to be superior to the latter for complex geometry problem. However, Monte Carlo method had not been used for radiation streaming calculation in the shielding design of CANDU type reactor. Neutron and gamma radiations are expected to be streamed from calandria through the penetrations to reactivity mechanism deck (R/M deck) because many reactivity control units which are established on R/M deck extend from R/M deck to calandria within penetrations, which are provided by guide tube extensions. More precise estimation of radiation streaming is required because R/M deck is classified as an accessible area where atomic worker can access when necessary. Therefore neutron and gamma dose rates were estimated using MCNP code on the R/M deck in the top shield system of CANDU 6 reactor. 9 tabs., 17 figs., 21 refs. (Author)

  3. Biodegradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in a packed-bed biofilm reactor equipped with an internal net draft tube riser for aeration and liquid circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-De Jesus, A.; Romano-Baez, F.J.; Leyva-Amezcua, L.; Juarez-Ramirez, C.; Ruiz-Ordaz, N. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Galindez-Mayer, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Bioquimica, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biologicas, IPN. Prol. Carpio y Plan de Ayala, Colonia Santo Tomas, s/n. CP 11340, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: cmayer@encb.ipn.mx

    2009-01-30

    For the aerobic biodegradation of the fungicide and defoliant 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a bench-scale packed-bed bioreactor equipped with a net draft tube riser for liquid circulation and oxygenation (PB-ALR) was constructed. To obtain a high packed-bed volume relative to the whole bioreactor volume, a high A{sub D}/A{sub R} ratio was used. Reactor's downcomer was packed with a porous support of volcanic stone fragments. PB-ALR hydrodynamics and oxygen mass transfer behavior was evaluated and compared to the observed behavior of the unpacked reactor operating as an internal airlift reactor (ALR). Overall gas holdup values {epsilon}{sub G}, and zonal oxygen mass transfer coefficients determined at various airflow rates in the PB-ALR, were higher than those obtained with the ALR. When comparing mixing time values obtained in both cases, a slight increment in mixing time was observed when reactor was operated as a PB-ALR. By using a mixed microbial community, the biofilm reactor was used to evaluate the aerobic biodegradation of 2,4,6-TCP. Three bacterial strains identified as Burkholderia sp., Burkholderia kururiensis and Stenotrophomonas sp. constituted the microbial consortium able to cometabolically degrade the 2,4,6-TCP, using phenol as primary substrate. This consortium removed 100% of phenol and near 99% of 2,4,6-TCP. Mineralization and dehalogenation of 2,4,6-TCP was evidenced by high COD removal efficiencies ({approx}95%), and by the stoichiometric release of chloride ions from the halogenated compound ({approx}80%). Finally, it was observed that the microbial consortium was also capable to metabolize 2,4,6-TCP without phenol as primary substrate, with high removal efficiencies (near 100% for 2,4,6-TCP, 92% for COD and 88% for chloride ions)

  4. Neutronics of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soran, P.D.; Hansen, G.E.

    1977-11-01

    The study was made to investigate the neutronic feasibility of a mixed-flow gas-core reactor. Three reactor concepts were studied: four- and seven-cell radial reactors and a seven-cell scallop reactor. The reactors were fueled with UF 6 (either U-233 or U-235) and various parameters were varied. A four-cell reactor is not practical nor is the U-235 fueled seven-cell radial reactor; however, the 7-cell U-233 radial and scallop reactors can satisfy all design criteria. The mixed flow gas core reactor is a very attractive reactor concept and warrants further investigation

  5. RA-6 reactor's probabilistic safety evaluation. Identification and selection of starting events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, J.; Chiossi, C.; Felizia, E.; Vallerga, H.; Kalejman, G.; Navarro, R.; Caruso, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    A summary of the 'Identification and selection of starting events' stage of the previous probabilistic safety evaluation of RA-6 reactor is presented. This evaluation was performed to verify if the safety criteria required for the licensing of RA-6 are met and to promote the diffusion of its meaning and usefulness with educational purposes. At this stage the starting events of RA-6 are determined and the probability that such events occur is calculated. The identification and selection of starting events is performed in two steps: determination of proposed starting events and determination of postulated starting events. The proposed starting events are determined by means of the master logic diagram (MLD) method, while the postulated starting events are obtained by grouping the proposed starting events. The simplifying hypothesis required for the application of MLD to the reactor are also formulated. The probability that the proposed and postulated starting events occur is afterwards calculated, adopting different fault models, in accordance with the nature of events that are considered. Conservative hypothesis on the characteristics of these events and the uncertainty of parameter values of those models are also formulated. The numerical values of the above mentioned probabilities are obtained by giving the parameters suitable values that are extracted from specialized publications. (Author)

  6. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory's Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007). Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is operated under a contract with the University of Chicago. Fundamental and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences are conducted at ANL-E and the laboratory serves as a major center of energy research and development. Building 315, which was completed in 1962, contained two cells, Cells 5 and 4, for holding Zero Power Reactor (ZPR)-6 and ZPR-9, respectively. These reactors were built to increase the knowledge and understanding of fast reactor technology. ZPR-6 was also referred to as the Fast Critical Facility and focused on fast reactor studies for civilian power production. ZPR-9 was used for nuclear rocket and fast reactor studies. In 1967, the reactors were converted for plutonium use. The reactors operated from the mid-1960's until 1982 when they were both shut down. Low levels of radioactivity were expected to be present due to the operating power levels of the ZPR's being restricted to well below 1,000 watts. To evaluate the presence of radiological contamination, DOE characterized the ZPRs in 2001. Currently, the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) and Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) Experiments are being conducted in Cell 4 where the ZPR-9 is located (ANL 2002 and 2006). ANL has performed final

  7. IGORR 6: Proceedings of the 6th meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A total of 39 papers were presented in 4 technical sessions: operating research reactors (operation, upgrades, and refurbishments); operating research reactors (experience from systems for better future design); new research reactors and projects, workshop on cold neutron sources, and workshop on research and development needs. All the papers presented at the meeting are published in this Proceedings

  8. IGORR 6: Proceedings of the 6th meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    A total of 39 papers were presented in 4 technical sessions: operating research reactors (operation, upgrades, and refurbishments); operating research reactors (experience from systems for better future design); new research reactors and projects, workshop on cold neutron sources, and workshop on research and development needs. All the papers presented at the meeting are published in this Proceedings.

  9. Preparation of a criticality benchmark based on experiments performed at the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzana, S.; Blaumann, H; Marquez Damian, J.I

    2009-01-01

    The operation and fuel management of a reactor uses neutronic modeling to predict its behavior in operational and accidental conditions. This modeling uses computational tools and nuclear data that must be contrasted against benchmark experiments to ensure its accuracy. These benchmarks have to be simple enough to be possible to model with the desired computer code and have quantified and bound uncertainties. The start-up of the RA-6 reactor, final stage of the conversion and renewal project, allowed us to obtain experimental results with fresh fuel. In this condition the material composition of the fuel elements is precisely known, which contributes to a more precise modeling of the critical condition. These experimental results are useful to evaluate the precision of the models used to design the core, based on U 3 Si 2 and cadmium wires as burnable poisons, for which no data was previously available. The analysis of this information can be used to validate models for the analysis of similar configurations, which is necessary to follow the operational history of the reactor and perform fuel management. The analysis of the results and the generation of the model were done following the methodology established by International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project, which gathers and analyzes experimental data for critical systems. The results were very satisfactory resulting on a value for the multiplication factor of the model of 1.0000 ± 0.0044, and a calculated value of 0.9980 ± 0.0001 using MCNP 5 and ENDF/B-VI. The utilization of as-built dimensions and compositions, and the sensitivity analysis allowed us to review the design calculations and analyze their precision, accuracy and error compensation. [es

  10. Feasibility analysis of modified AL-6XN steel for structure component application in supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinggang LI; Qingzhi YAN; Rong MA; Haoqiang WANG; Changchun GE

    2009-01-01

    Modified AL-6XN austenite steel was patterned after AL-6XN superaustenitic stainless steel by introducing microalloy elements such as zirconium and titanium in order to adapt to recrystallizing thermo-mechanical treatment and further improve crevice corrosion resistance. Modified AL-6XN exhibited comparable tensile strength, and superior plasticity and impact toughness to commercial AL-6XN steel. The effects of aging behavior on corrosion resistance and impact toughness were measured to evaluate the qualification of modified AL-6XN steel as an in-core component and cladding material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Attention should be paid to degradation in corrosion resistance and impact toughness after aging for 50 hours when modified AL-6XN steel is considered as one of the candidate materials for in-core components and cladding tubes in supercritical water-cooled reactors.

  11. A calculational procedure for neutronic and depletion analysis of Molten-Salt reactors based on SCALE6/TRITON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, R.J.; Chang, J.S.; Liu, Y.-W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Molten-Salt Reactors (MSRs) represent one of the selected categories in the GEN-IV program. This type of reactor is distinguished by the use of liquid fuel circulating in and out of the core, which makes it possible for online refueling and salt processing. However, this operation characteristic also complicates the modeling and simulation of reactor core behaviour using conventional neutronic codes. The TRITON sequence in the SCALE6 code system has been designed to provide the combined capabilities of problem-dependent cross-section processing, rigorous treatment of neutron transport, and coupled with the ORIGEN-S depletion calculations. In order to accommodate the simulation of dynamic refueling and processing scheme, an in-house program REFRESH together with a run script are developed for carrying out a series of stepwise TRITON calculations, that makes the work of analyzing the neutronic properties and performance of a MSR core design easier. As a demonstration and cross check, we have applied this method to reexamine the conceptual design of Molten Salt Actinide Recycler & Transmuter (MOSART). This paper summarizes the development of the method and preliminary results of its application on MOSART. (author)

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  13. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  14. Dose rates modeling of pressurized water reactor primary loop components with SCALE6.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijević, Mario; Pevec, Dubravko; Trontl, Krešimir

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Shielding analysis of the typical PWR primary loop components was performed. • FW-CADIS methodology was thoroughly investigated using SCALE6.0 code package. • Versatile ability of SCALE6.0/FW-CADIS for deep penetration models was proved. • The adjoint source with focus on specific material can improve MC modeling. - Abstract: The SCALE6.0 simulation model of a typical PWR primary loop components for effective dose rates calculation based on hybrid deterministic–stochastic methodology was created. The criticality sequence CSAS6/KENO-VI of the SCALE6.0 code package, which includes KENO-VI Monte Carlo code, was used for criticality calculations, while neutron and gamma dose rates distributions were determined by MAVRIC/Monaco shielding sequence. A detailed model of a combinatorial geometry, materials and characteristics of a generic two loop PWR facility is based on best available input data. The sources of ionizing radiation in PWR primary loop components included neutrons and photons originating from critical core and photons from activated coolant in two primary loops. Detailed calculations of the reactor pressure vessel and the upper reactor head have been performed. The efficiency of particle transport for obtaining global Monte Carlo dose rates was further examined and quantified with a flexible adjoint source positioning in phase-space. It was demonstrated that generation of an accurate importance map (VR parameters) is a paramount step which enabled obtaining Monaco dose rates with fairly uniform uncertainties. Computer memory consumption by the S N part of hybrid methodology represents main obstacle when using meshes with large number of cells together with high S N /P N parameters. Detailed voxelization (homogenization) process in Denovo together with high S N /P N parameters is essential for precise VR parameters generation which will result in optimized MC distributions. Shielding calculations were also performed for the reduced PWR

  15. SAFETY ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR AGED CANDU® 6 NUCLEAR REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WOLFGANG HARTMANN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Safety Analysis for CANDU® 6 nuclear reactors as affected by main Heat Transport System (HTS aging. Operational and aging related changes of the HTS throughout its lifetime may lead to restrictions in certain safety system settings and hence some restriction in performance under certain conditions. A step in confirming safe reactor operation is the tracking of relevant data and their corresponding interpretation by the use of appropriate thermalhydraulic analytic models. Safety analyses ranging from the assessment of safety limits associated with the prevention of intermittent fuel sheath dryout for a slow Loss of Regulation (LOR analysis and fission gas release after a fuel failure are summarized. Specifically for fission gas release, the thermalhydraulic analysis for a fresh core and an 11 Effective Full Power Years (EFPY aged core was summarized, leading to the most severe stagnation break sizes for the inlet feeder break and the channel failure time. Associated coolant conditions provide the input data for fuel analyses. Based on the thermalhydraulic data, the fission product inventory under normal operating conditions may be calculated for both fresh and aged cores, and the fission gas release may be evaluated during the transient. This analysis plays a major role in determining possible radiation doses to the public after postulated accidents have occurred.

  16. Comparison of results for burning with BWR reactors CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON / NEWT); Comparacion de los resultados de quemado para reactores BWR con CASMO y SCALE 6.2 (TRITON/NEWT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we compare the results from two codes burned, CASMO and SCALE 6.2 (TRITON). To do this, is simulated all segments corresponding to a boiling water reactor (BWR) using both codes. In addition, to account for different working points, simulations changing the instantaneous variables, these are repeated: void fractions (6 points), fuel temperature (6 points) and control rods (two points), with a total of 72 possible combinations of different instantaneous variables for each segment. After all simulations are completed for each segment, we can reorder the obtained cross sections, as SCALE CASMO both, to create a library of compositions nemtab format. This format is accepted by the neutronic code of nodal diffusion, PARCS v2.7. Finally compares the results obtained with PARCS and with the SIMULATE3 -SIMTAB methodology to level of full reactor. Also, we have made use of the KENO-VI and MCDANCOFF modules belonging to SCALE. The first is a Monte Carlo transport code with which you can validate the value of the multiplier, the second has been used to obtain values of Dancoff factor and increase the accuracy of model SCALE. (Author)

  17. Severe Accident R and D for Enhanced CANDU-6 Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitheanandan, Thambiayah

    2012-01-01

    CANDU reactors possess a number of inherent of inherent and designed safety features that make them resistant to core damage accidents. The unique feature is the low temperature moderator surrounding the fuel channels, which can serve as an alternate heat sink. The fuel is surrounded by three water systems: heavy water primary coolant, heavy water moderator, and light water calandria vault and shield water. In addition, the liquid inventory in the steam generators is a fourth indirect heat sink, able to cool the primary coolant. The water inventories in the emergency core cooling system and the reserve water tank at the dome of the containment can also provide fuel cooling and water makeup to prevent severe core damage or mitigate the consequences of a severe core damage accident. An assessment of the adequacy of the existing severe accident knowledge base, to confidently perform consequence analyses for the Enhanced CANDU-6 reactor in compliance with regulatory requirements, was recently completed. The assessment relied on systematic Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRT) studies completed domestically and internationally. The assessment recommends cost-effective R and D to mitigate the consequences of severe accidents and associated risk vulnerabilities

  18. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature gas-cooled test reactor HTR-10 using the scale 6.0 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Romulo V.; Fortini, Angela; Pereira, Claubia; Carvalho, Fernando R. de; Oliveira, Arno H.

    2013-01-01

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Test Reactor HTR-10 is a 10 MW modular pebble bed type reactor, which core is filled with 27,000 spherical fuel elements, e.g. TRISO coated particles. This reactor was built by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET), Tsinghua University, China, and its first criticality was attained on December 1, 2000. The main objectives of the HTR-10 are to verify and demonstrate the technical and safety features of the modular HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) and to establish an experimental base for developing nuclear process heat applications. In this work, using the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 6.0, a nuclear code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the HTR-10 first critical core is modeled by the DEN/UFMG. The K eff was obtained and compared with the reference value obtained by the Idaho National Laboratory. The result presents good agreement with experimental value. The goal is to validate the DEN/UFMG model to be applied in transmutation studies changing the fuel. (author)

  19. Fusion reactors as a future energy source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifritz, W.

    A detailed update of fusion research concepts is given. Discussions are given for the following areas: (1) the magnetic confinement principle, (2) UWMAK I: conceptual design for a fusion reactor, (3) the inertial confinement principle, (4) the laser fusion power plant, (5) electron-induced fusion, (6) the long-term development potential of fusion reactors, (7) the symbiosis between fusion and fission reactors, (8) fuel supply for fusion reactors, (9) safety and environmental impact, and (10) accidents, and (11) waste removal and storage

  20. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  1. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  2. Research reactor utilization. Summary reports of three study group meetings: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, held in Istanbul 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, held in Caracas 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, held in Lucas Heights 28 February - 4 March 1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The three sections of this book, which are summary reports of three Study Group meetings of the IAEA: Irradiation techniques at research reactors, Istanbul, 15-19 November 1965; Research reactor operation and maintenance problems, Caracas, 6-10 December 1965; and Research reactor utilization in the Far East, Lucas Heights, Australia, 28 February - 4 March 1966. These meetings were the latest in a series designed to promote efficient utilization of research reactors, to disseminate information on advances in techniques, to discuss common problems in reactor operations, and to outline some advanced areas of reactor-based research. (author)

  3. Informal presentations by fuel fabricators and others [contributed by W. Ross, U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is representing the the attitude of only one of the major offices of NRC. This is Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations. Under this office regulates all phases, safety and environmental and safeguard aspects, of about 70 power reactors and about 70 non-power reactors. Another portion of NRC is the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. Under this office is regulated the licensing activities of around 600 licensees of all types. Including all licenses of transportation, import-export, and such as this, as well as special nuclear materials not related to the use of reactors. So when we talk about regulating the use and the protection of special nuclear materials, we are talking about all types of special nuclear materials, not just the type that is used in a reactor. Consequently, when a review is being made, such as now being made at the direction of the Commission to see if relaxation of regulations can be given to reduced enrichment, it is not only under the auspices of the Office of nuclear reactor regulations, but also of this other office. Therefore, it has to be more or less a policy statement of the Commission. As far as current regulations are concerned, the NRC has one threshold: it's either above 20% enrichment or it's below 20% enrichment. We are going to look and see if the SNM license in this area as well as the SNM license in that area can be changed so that some intermediate regulations can be applied to the steps in between 90% and 20%. We also regulate on the basis of the kilogram formula quantity. Most of our most stringent regulations are based on te possession of kilograms of highly enriched uranium. If uranium enrichment is dropped to the 45-50% level, then the composition of the alloys would have to increase from 21 wt.% (NRU) or 28 wt.% (NRX) to somewhere in region of 40 to 50%, possibly more. We know that the Al-40 wt.% U alloy can be extruded to the required diameter. We also know that the alloy is more brittle than the

  4. Study on the use of slightly enriched uranium fuel cycle in an existing CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Choong Sub; Kim, Hyun Dae [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    To test the viability of CANFLEX-SEU bundles in an existing CANDU 6 reactor, core follow-up simulation has been carried out using the reactor fueling simulation program of the CANDU 6, RFSP computer code, and a lattice physics code, WIMS-AECL. During the core follow-up, bundle and channel powers and zone levels have been checked against their operating limits at each simulation. It is observed from the simulation results that an equilibrium core loaded with 0.9 w/o CANFLEX-SEU bundles could be refueled and maintained for 550 FPD without any significant violations in the channel and bundle power limits and the permissible operating range of the liquid zone controllers. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  5. Study on the use of slightly enriched uranium fuel cycle in an existing CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Choong Sub; Kim, Hyun Dae [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To test the viability of CANFLEX-SEU bundles in an existing CANDU 6 reactor, core follow-up simulation has been carried out using the reactor fueling simulation program of the CANDU 6, RFSP computer code, and a lattice physics code, WIMS-AECL. During the core follow-up, bundle and channel powers and zone levels have been checked against their operating limits at each simulation. It is observed from the simulation results that an equilibrium core loaded with 0.9 w/o CANFLEX-SEU bundles could be refueled and maintained for 550 FPD without any significant violations in the channel and bundle power limits and the permissible operating range of the liquid zone controllers. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  6. Plutonium and minor actinides management in thermal high - temperature reactors - the EU FP6 project puma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J. C.

    2007-01-01

    The High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (HTR) can fulfil a very useful niche for the purposes of Pu and Minor Actinide (MA) incineration due to its unique and unsurpassed safety features, as well as to the attractive incentives offered by the nature of the coated particle (CP) fuel. No European reactor of this type is currently available, but there has been, and still is, considerable interest internationally. Decisions to construct such a reactor in China and in South Africa have already been made or are about to be made. Apart from the unique and unsurpassed safety features offered by this reactor type, the nature of the CP fuel offers a number of attractive characteristics. In particular, it can withstand burn-ups far beyond that in either LWR or FR systems. Demonstrations as high as 75% FIMA have been achieved. The coated particle itself offers significantly improved proliferation resistance, and finally with a correct choice of the kernel composition, it can be a very effective support for direct geological disposal of the fuel. The overall objective of the PUMA project, a Specific Targeted Research Project (STREP) within the European Union 6th Framework (EU FP6), is to investigate the possibilities for the utilisation and transmutation of plutonium and especially minor actinides in contemporary and future (high temperature) gas-cooled reactor designs, which are promising tools for improving the sustainability of the nuclear fuel cycle. This contributes to the reduction of Pu and MA stockpiles, and also to the development of safe and sustainable reactors for CO 2 -free energy generation. A number of important issues concerning the use of Pu and MA in gas-cooled reactors have already been dealt with in other projects, or are being treated in ongoing projects, e.g. as part of EU FP6. However, further steps are required to demonstrate the potential of HTRs as Pu/MA transmuters based on realistic/feasible designs of CP Pu/MA fuel and the PUMA focuses on necessary

  7. Development of safety analysis methodology for moderator system failure of CANDU-6 reactor by thermal-hydraulics/physics coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Jin, Dong Sik; Chang, Soon Heung

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed new safety analysis methodology of moderator system failures for CANDU-6. • The new methodology used the TH-physics coupling concept. • Thermalhydraulic code is CATHENA, physics code is RFSP-IST. • Moderator system failure ends to the subcriticality through self-shutdown. -- Abstract: The new safety analysis methodology for the CANDU-6 nuclear power plant (NPP) moderator system failure has been developed by using the coupling technology with the thermalhydraulic code, CATHENA and reactor core physics code, RFSP-IST. This sophisticated methodology can replace the legacy methodology using the MODSTBOIL and SMOKIN-G2 in the field of the thermalhydraulics and reactor physics, respectively. The CATHENA thermalhydraulic model of the moderator system can simulate the thermalhydraulic behaviors of all the moderator systems such as the calandria tank, head tank, moderator circulating circuit and cover gas circulating circuit and can also predict the thermalhydraulic property of the moderator such as moderator density, temperature and water level in the calandria tank as the moderator system failures go on. And these calculated moderator thermalhydraulic properties are provided to the 3-dimensional neutron kinetics solution module – CERBRRS of RFSP-IST as inputs, which can predict the change of the reactor power and provide the calculated reactor power to the CATHENA. These coupling calculations are performed at every 2 s time steps, which are equivalent to the slow control of CANDU-6 reactor regulating systems (RRS). The safety analysis results using this coupling methodology reveal that the reactor operation enters into the self-shutdown mode without any engineering safety system and/or human interventions for the postulated moderator system failures of the loss of heat sink and moderator inventory, respectively

  8. Digital computer control on Canadian nuclear power plants -experience to date and the future outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, A.

    1977-10-01

    This paper discusses the performance of the digital computer control system at Pickering through the years 1973 to 1976. This evaluation is based on a study of the Pickering Generating Station operating records. The paper goes on to explore future computer architectures and the advantages that could accrue from a distributed system approach. Also outlined are the steps being taken to develop these ideas further in the context of two Chalk River projects - REDNET, an advanced data acquisition system being installed to process information from engineering experiments in NRX and NRU reactors, and CRIP, a prototype communications network using cable television technology. (author)

  9. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. Analyses of fluid flow and heat transfer inside calandria vessel of CANDU-6 reactor using CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seon Oh; Kim, Man Woong; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-01-01

    In a CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor, fuel channel integrity depends on the coolability of the moderator as an ultimate heat sink under transient conditions such as a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with coincident Loss Of Emergency Core Cooling (LOECC). as well as normal operating conditions. This study presents assessments of moderator thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the normal operating conditions and one transient condition for CANDU-6 reactors, using a general purpose three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code. First, an optimized calculation scheme is obtained by many-sided comparisons of the predicted results with the related experimental data, and by evaluating the fluid flow and temperature distributions. Then, using the optimized scheme, analyses of real CANDU-6 in normal operating conditions and the transition condition have been performed. The present model successfully predicted the experimental results and also reasonably assessed the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of a real CANDU-6 with 380 fuel channels. A flow regime map with major parameters representing the flow pattern inside a calandria vessel has also proposed to be used as operational and/or regulatory guidelines

  11. Mortality among long-term Chalk River employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, M.M.; Myers, D.K.

    1986-12-01

    Mortality among Chalk River Nuclear Laboratory (CRNL) employees who died during employment or after retirement has been updated to 1985 December 31. Data in tabular form are presented for overall mortality for male and female employees, for the participants in the clean-up for the NRX and NRU reactor accidents and for a group of CRNL staff with lifetime accumulative doses in excess of 0.2 Sv. Data are also presented on the different types of cancer causing death among male employees. No statistically significant increases in cancer deaths were found in any of the groups analyzed. 25 refs

  12. Neutronics modeling of TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah using agent, KENO6 and MCNP5 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X.; Xiao, S.; Choe, D.; Jevremovic, T.

    2010-01-01

    The TRIGA reactor at the University of Utah is modelled in 2D using the AGENT state-of-the-art methodology based on the Method of Characteristics (MOC) and R-function theory supporting detailed reactor analysis of reactor geometries of any type. The TRIGA reactor is also modelled using KENO6 and MCNP5 for comparison. The spatial flux and reaction rates distribution are visualized by AGENT graphics support. All methodologies are in use in to study the effect of different fuel configurations in developing practical educational exercises for students studying reactor physics. At the University of Utah we train graduate and undergraduate students in obtaining the Nuclear Regulatory Commission license in operating the TRIGA reactor. The computational models as developed are in support of these extensive training classes and in helping students visualize the reactor core characteristics in regard to neutron transport under various operational conditions. Additionally, the TRIGA reactor is under the consideration for power uprate; this fleet of computational tools once benchmarked against real measurements will provide us with validated 3D simulation models for simulating operating conditions of TRIGA. (author)

  13. After Action Report: Advanced Test Reactor Complex 2015 Evaluated Drill October 6, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Forest Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted an evaluated drill on October 6, 2015, to allow the ATR Complex emergency response organization (ERO) to demonstrate the ability to respond to and mitigate an emergency by implementing the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.”

  14. Evaluation of tritium production rate in a gas-cooled reactor with continuous tritium recovery system for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Hideaki, E-mail: mat@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Nakaya, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Yasuyuki [Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Shimakawa, Satoshi; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Nishikawa, Masabumi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The performance of a gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production system was studied. • A continuous tritium recovery using helium gas was considered. • Gas-cooled reactors with 3 GW output in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium in a year • Performance of the system was examined for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and LiAlO{sub 2} compounds. -- Abstract: The performance of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor as a tritium production with continuous tritium recovery system is examined. A gas turbine high-temperature reactor of 300-MWe (600 MW) nominal capacity (GTHTR300) is assumed as the calculation target, and using the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code MVP-BURN, burn-up simulations for the three-dimensional entire-core region of the GTHTR300 were performed. A Li loading pattern for the continuous tritium recovery system in the gas-cooled reactor is presented. It is shown that module gas-cooled reactors with a total thermal output power of 3 GW in all can produce ∼6 kg of tritium maximum in a year.

  15. Criticality analysis of IPEN/MB-01 reactor using scale 6.0 and ENDF/B VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Fabiano S.; Salome, Jean; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Since 1988, the IPEN/MB-01 reactor has been utilized for basic reactor physics research and as an instructional laboratory system. A series of experiments was conducted, and many of the components were evaluated in LEU-COMP-THERM-077 and LEU-COMP-THERM-089 benchmarks. In this work, we will compare the benchmark value references, with the newest ENDF/BVII libraries for neutron transport calculations through KENO-VI of the SCALE 6.0 codes. The 3D reactor model was simulated using 238 groups of energy and continuous energy libraries. The idea was to obtain, on this work, preliminary values of effective neutron multiplication factor to guide future work to get nuclear data as neutron flux, depleted fuel isotopic composition and generate homogenized and collapsed cross-sections libraries by few neutron energy groups to be used by other neutronic codes. It is expected that this study will produce a research source to be used as a support for future works employing such codes for nuclear safety criticality analysis and to verify compliance with the requirements of safety standards for nuclear fuel materials. (author)

  16. IFPE/MT4-MT6A-LOCA, Large-break LOCA in-reactor fuel bundle materials tests at NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Turnbull, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Description - Objectives - Results: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted a series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding mechanical deformation tests in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River National Laboratory in Canada. The objective of these tests was to perform simulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) experiments using full-length light-water reactor fuel rods to study mechanical deformation, flow blockage, and coolability. Three phases of a LOCA (i.e., heat-up, reflood, and quench) were performed in situ using nuclear fissioning to simulate the low-level decay power during a LOCA after shutdown. All tests used PWR-type, non-irradiated fuel rods. Provided here is information on two materials tests, MT-6A and MT-4, which PNNL considers the better characterized for the purposes of setting up computer cases. The NRU reactor is a heterogeneous, thermal, tank-type research reactor. It has a power level of 135 MWth and is heavy-water moderated and cooled. The coolant has an inlet temperature of 310 K at a pressure of 0.65 MPa. The MT tests were conducted in a specially designed test train to supply the specified coolant conditions of flowing steam, stagnant steam, and then reflood. Typical instrumentation for the MT tests included fuel centerline thermocouples, cladding inner surface thermocouples, cladding outer surface thermocouples, rod internal gas pressure transducers or pressure switches, coolant channel steam probes, and self-powered neutron detectors. This instrumentation allowed for determining rupture times and cladding temperature. The test rods for the LOCA cases in the NRU reactor were irradiated in flowing steam prior to the transient, stagnant steam during the transient and prior to reflood, and then reflood conditions to complete the transient. Both cladding inner surface and outer surface temperatures were measured, in addition to coolant temperatures. However, only cladding inner surface temperatures were

  17. Cascade: a high-efficiency ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade attains a net power-plant efficiency of 49% and its cost is competitive with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, pressurized-water reactor, and coal-fired power plants. The Cascade reactor and blanket are made of ceramic materials and activation is 6 times less than that of the MARS Tandem Mirror Reactor operating at comparable power. Hands-on maintenance of the heat exchangers is possible one day after shutdown. Essentially all tritium is recovered in the vacuum system, with the remainder recovered from the helium power conversion loop. Tritium leakage external to the vacuum system and power conversion loop is only 0.03 Ci/d

  18. In-pile critical heat flux and post-dryout heat transfer measurements – A historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, D.C., E-mail: degroeneveld@gmail.com

    2017-06-15

    In the 1960s’ and 1970s’ Canada was a world leader in performing in-reactor heat transfer experiments on fuel bundles instrumented with miniature sheath thermocouples. Several Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and Post-CHF experiments were performed in Chalk River’s NRU and NRX reactors on water-cooled 3-, 18-, 19-, 21-, and 36-element fuel bundles. Most experiments were obtained at steady-state conditions, where the power was raised gradually from single-phase conditions up to the CHF and beyond. Occasionally, post-dryout temperatures up to 600 °C were maintained for several hours. In some tests, the fuel behaviour during loss-of-flow and blowdown transients was investigated – during these transients sheath temperatures could exceed 2000 °C. Because of the increasingly more stringent licensing requirements for in-pile heat transfer tests on instrumented fuel bundles, no in-pile CHF and post-dryout tests on fuel bundles have been performed anywhere in the world for the past 40 years. This paper provides details of these unique in-pile experiments and describes some of their heat transfer results.

  19. Sulfide toxicity kinetics of a uasb reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Paula Jr.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sulfide toxicity on kinetic parameters of anaerobic organic matter removal in a UASB (up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor is presented. Two lab-scale UASB reactors (10.5 L were operated continuously during 12 months. The reactors were fed with synthetic wastes prepared daily using glucose, ammonium acetate, methanol and nutrient solution. One of the reactors also received increasing concentrations of sodium sulfide. For both reactors, the flow rate of 16 L.d-1 was held constant throughout the experiment, corresponding to a hydraulic retention time of 15.6 hours. The classic model for non-competitive sulfide inhibition was applied to the experimental data for determining the overall kinetic parameter of specific substrate utilization (q and the sulfide inhibition coefficient (Ki. The application of the kinetic parameters determined allows prediction of methanogenesis inhibition and thus the adoption of operating parameters to minimize sulfide toxicity in UASB reactors.

  20. Status of advanced technologies for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The future development of the CANDU reactor is a continuation of a successful series of reactors, the most recent of which are nine CANDU 6 Mk 1* units and four Darlington units. There are three projects underway that continue the development of the CANDU reactor. These new design projects flow from the original reactor designs and are a natural progression of the CANDU 6 Mk 1, two units of which are operating successfully in Canada, one each in Argentina and Korea, with five more being built in Rumania. These new design projects are known as: CANDU 6 Mk 2, an improved version of CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 3, a small, advanced version of the CANDU 6 Mk 1; CANDU 6 Mk 3, a series of advanced CANDU reactors. A short description of modified versions of CANDU reactors is given in this paper. 5 figs

  1. Distributed control and instrumentation systems for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, G.; L'Archeveque, J.V.R.

    1976-01-01

    The centralized dual computer system philosophy has evolved as the key concept underlying the highly successful application of direct digital control in CANDU power reactors. After more than a decade, this basis philosophy bears re-examination in the light of advances in system concepts--notably distributed architectures. A number of related experimental programs, all aimed at exploring the prospects of applying distributed systems in Canadian nuclear power plants are discussed. It was realized from the outset that the successful application of distributed systems depends on the availability of a highly reliable, high capacity, low cost communications medium. Accordingly, an experimental facility has been established and experiments have been defined to address such problem areas as interprocess communications, distributed data base design and man/machine interfaces. The design of a first application to be installed at the NRU/NRX research reactors is progressing well

  2. Consolidation of the neutron spectrum in the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzana, S.; Chiaraviglio, N.

    2013-01-01

    Unfolding procedures can be used to determine the neutron or gamma spectrum in a multigroup structure from experimental and calculation results. In this way, it is possible to adjust with high reliability magnitudes that cannot be directly measured. For neutron unfolding it is necessary the use of a set of detectors with different energetic response. In this work we describe two unfolding experiences in different positions of the RA-6 reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Centre. One of them consisted in the unfolding in an incore position and the other one in the BNCT facility beam.Experimental techniques and neutron detectors for each experience are described along with the correction factors that must be taken into account for each experience. In both cases there is good agreement between measured and adjusted quantities. (author) [es

  3. Generation IV reactors: international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Hittner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Generation IV international forum (GIF) was initiated in 2000 by DOE (American department of energy) in order to promote nuclear energy in a long term view (2030). GIF has selected 6 concepts of reactors: 1) VHTR (very high temperature reactor system, 2) GHR (gas-cooled fast reactor system), 3) SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor system, 4) SCWR (super-critical water-cooled reactor system), 5) LFR (lead-cooled fast reactor system), and 6) MFR (molten-salt reactor system). All these 6 reactor systems have been selected on criteria based on: - a better contribution to sustainable development (through their aptitude to produce hydrogen or other clean fuels, or to have a high energy conversion ratio...) - economic profitability, - safety and reliability, and - proliferation resistance. The 6 concepts of reactors are examined in the first article, the second article presents an overview of the results of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) within IAEA. The project finished its first phase, called phase-IA. It has produced an outlook into the future role of nuclear energy and defined the need for innovation. The third article is dedicated to 2 international cooperations: MICANET and HTR-TN. The purpose of MICANET is to propose to the European Commission a research and development strategy in order to develop the assets of nuclear energy for the future. Future reactors are expected to be more multiple-purposes, more adaptable, safer than today, all these developments require funded and coordinated research programs. The aim of HTR-TN cooperation is to promote high temperature reactor systems, to develop them in a long term perspective and to define their limits in terms of burn-up and operating temperature. (A.C.)

  4. Managing severe reactor accidents. A review and evaluation of our knowledge on reactor accidents and accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Veine

    2002-11-01

    The report gives a review of the results from the last years research on severe reactor accidents, and an opinion on the possibilities to refine the present strategies for accident management in Swedish and Finnish BWRs. The following aspect of reactor accidents are the major themes of the study: 1. Early pressure relief from hydrogen production; 2. Recriticality in re-flooded, degraded core; 3. Melt-through; 4. Steam explosion after melt-through; 5. Coolability of the melt after after melt-through; 6. Hydrogen fire in the reactor containment; 7. Leaking containment; 8. Hydrogen fire in the reactor building; 9. Long-time developments after a severe accident; 10. Accidents during shutdown for overhaul; 11. Information need for remedial actions. Possibilities for improving the strategies in each of these areas are discussed. The review shows that our knowledge is sufficient in the areas 1, 2, 4, 6, 8. For the other areas, more research is needed

  5. Electrodeless, multi-megawatt reactor for room-temperature, lithium-6/deuterium nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a reactor design to facilitate a room-temperature nuclear fusion/fission reaction to generate heat without generating unwanted neutrons, gamma rays, tritium, or other radioactive products. The room-temperature fusion/fission reaction involves the sequential triggering of billions of single-molecule, 6 LiD 'fusion energy pellets' distributed in lattices of a palladium ion accumulator that also acts as a catalyst to produce the molecules of 6 LiD from a solution comprising D 2 O, 6 LiOD with D 2 gas bubbling through it. The D 2 gas is the source of the negative deuterium ions in the 6 LiD molecules. The next step is to trigger a first nuclear fusion/fission reaction of some of the 6 LiD molecules, according to the well-known nuclear reaction: 6 Li + D → 2 4 He + 22.4 MeV. The highly energetic alpha particles ( 4 He nuclei) generated by this nuclear reaction within the palladium will cause shock and vibrations in the palladium lattices, leading to compression of other 6 LiD molecules and thereby triggering a second series of similar fusion/fission reactions, leading to a third series, and so on. The absorption of the kinetic energy in the palladium will, in turn, generate a continuous flow of heat into the heavy water carrier, which would be removed with a heat exchanger. (author)

  6. Enhancement of safety analysis reliability for a CANDU-6 reactor using RELAP-CANDU/SCAN coupled code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Woong; Choi, Yong Seog; Sin, Chul; Kim, Hyun Koon; Kim, Hho Jung; Hwang, Su Hyun; Hong, In Seob; Kim, Chang Hyo

    2005-01-01

    In LOCA analysis of the CANDU reactor, the system thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP-CANDU, alone cannot predict the transient behavior accurately. Therefore, the best estimate neutronics and system thermal-hydraulic coupled code system is necessary to describe the transient behavior with higher accuracy and reliability. To perform on-line calculation of safety analysis for CANDU reactor, a coupled thermal hydraulics-neutronics code system was developed in such a way that the best-estimate thermal-hydraulic system code for CANDU reactor, RELAP-CANDU, is coupled with the full three-dimensional reactor core kinetic code

  7. Parametric study of moderator heat exchanger for Candu 6 advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Efrizon; Vecchiarelli, Jack

    2000-01-01

    The passive moderator system for Candu 6 advanced reactor require moderator heat exchanger with the small size and the low resistance coefficient of the shell-side. The study is to determine the required size of moderator heat exchanger, and to calculate the shell side of resistance coefficient have been done. Using computer code CATHENA, it is concluded that the moderator heat exchanger can be used at full power-normal operation condition, especially for the cases with 3600 to 8100 number of tube and 15.90 mm tube diameter. This study show that the proposed moderator heat exchanger have given satisfactory results

  8. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  9. Calibration method of liquid zone controller using the ex-core detector signal of CANDU 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, D.H.; Lee, E.K.; Shin, H.C.; Bae, S.M.; Hong, S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We developed a new LZC calibration method and measurement system. ► Photo-neutron effect, reactor core size, and detector position were evaluated and tested. ► We applied the new method and system to Wolsong NPP Unit 1. ► The LZC calibration test was well completed, and the requirement of the test was satisfied. - Abstract: The Phase-B test (low-power reactor physics test) is one of the commissioning tests for Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors that ensures the safe and reliable operation of the core during the design lifetime. The Phase-B test, which includes the approach to the first criticality at low reactor powers, is performed to verify the feasibility of the reactor’s physics design and to ensure the integrity of the control and protection facilities. The commissioning testing of pressurized heavy water moderated reactors (PHWRs) is usually performed only once (at the initial commissioning after construction). The large-scale facilities of the Wolsong nuclear power plant (NPP) Unit 1 have been gradually improved since May 2009 to extend its lifetime. The refurbishment was completed in April 2011 – then this NPP has been in operation again. We discusses the new methodology and measurement system that uses an ex-core detector signal for liquid zone controller (LZC) calibration of the Phase-B test instead of conventional methods. The inverse kinetic equation in the reactivity calculator is modified to treat the 17 delayed neutron groups including 11 photo-neutron fractions. The signal acquisition resolution of the reactivity calculator was enhanced and installed reactivity calculating module by each channel. The ex-core detector was confirmed to be applicable to a large reactor core, such as the CANDU 6 by comparison with the in-core flux detector signal. A preliminary test was performed in Wolsong NPP Unit 2 to verify the robustness of the reactivity calculator. This test convincingly demonstrated that the reactivity calculator

  10. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility at the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F. A.; Calzetta, O

    2004-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation activation analysis facility was developed at the 500 kw thermal power RA-6 research reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Center, Argentina.This facility consist of a radial beam port with external positioning of the sample.The gamma radiation is reduced by a bismuth filter placed inside the extraction tube and the beam diameter is limited by a set of two collimators up to 5 cm.The neutron flux at the sample position is 7 10 6 n/cm 2 s with a Cadmium ratio of 20/1.The gamma detector is a 50 % efficiency type p HPGe rounded by a NaI(Tl) for Compton suppressioning.The gamma spectra is measured through 0 to 8.5 MeV.The background have counting rate of 350 cps without sample. In this work is shown the efficiency curve, the calculed sensibilities and the lower detection limits for B, Cd, Sm, Gd, H, Cl, Hg, Eu, Ti, Ag, Au, Mo. The RA-6's PGNAA facility is fully working, although the analytic capacity is under improvement [es

  11. Detection of gaseous heavy water leakage points in CANDU 6 pressurized heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, T-K.; Jung, S-H.

    1996-01-01

    During reactor operation, the heavy water filled primary coolant system in a CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water (PHWR) may leak through routine operations of the plant via components, mechanical joints, and during inadvertent operations etc. Early detection of leak points is therefore important to maintain plant safety and economy. There are many independent systems to monitor and recover heavy water leakage in a CANDU 6 PHWR. Methodology for early detection based on operating experience from these systems, is investigated in this paper. In addition, the four symptoms of D 2 O leakage, the associated process for clarifying and verifying the leakage, and the probable points of leakage are discussed. (author)

  12. A history of ZED-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ZED-2 Reactor at Chalk River Laboratories was 50 years old this fall. First criticality occurred in September 1960. ZED-2 is perhaps not very well known in the Canadian Nuclear Industry, certainly not as well known as the various CANDU power reactors or the research reactors NRU and NRX. Part of the reason for this I suspect is that when casually judging the importance of reactors the first parameters that spring to mind are power generated (for power reactors) or neutron flux (for research reactors), bigger being 'better in both cases. By these standards ZED-2 does indeed appear puny: the maximum allowed power is 200W and the corresponding flux about 10 8 to 10 9 neutrons cm -2 s -1 , both numbers being about a factor of 500,000 smaller than the corresponding values for NRU. So, what is it all about? How is it that such an apparently insignificant reactor has operated for 50 years?, longer than any other Canadian reactor except NRU and the McMaster Reactor. What is it used for? What contributions has it made to the Canadian industry? Maybe one might also ask for how long is it going to continue? Well, that's what this talk is about, although I think I will leave the final question to wiser heads than mine. ZED-2 is a descendant of famous progenitors: starting with Enrico Farm's first critical pile of graphite and uranium (created at the University of Chicago in 1942) through Canada's ZEEP (first reactor to go critical outside the USA) that went critical in 1945. These early critical facilities were first about proof of principle that a self sustaining nuclear chain reaction could be established and controlled in a reasonable sized facility and second, in the longer term, developing understanding of the underlying reactor physics and the development of theories and methods to accurately predict the important properties of critical assemblies generally. (author)

  13. Nuclear reactors situation in Japan after the major earthquake of March 11, 2011. March 17, 2011, 6:00 AM status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This situation note is established according to the information gained on March 17, 2011, at 6:00 AM, by the crisis centre of the French institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IRSN). The situation of all 6 reactors of the Fukushima I site (Dai-ichi) and of their spent fuel pools, as well as the situation of the reactors No. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the Fukushima II site (Daini), and of the Onagawa and Tokai power plants is briefly presented with the progress of the accident management actions. (J.S.)

  14. Optimal operating parameters of the reactor oscillator in the channel of 6.5/10 MW reactor; Odredjivanje optimalnih radnih tacaka za reaktorski oscilator u kanalu na reaktoru 6,5/10 MW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lolic, B; Zecevic, V [The Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1961-07-01

    Operating conditions for the reactor oscillator in the central vertical experimental channel (VK5) in the RA reactor were studied during 1960. Channel VK5 was chosen because the sensitivity of the reactor is highest in this case. The central vertical experimental channel is placed in the center of the core and its bottom is placed 200 mm from the bottom of the reactor core. Diameter of the channel is is 110 mm and its length 5706 mm. During operation of the reactor oscillator with total modulation of the reactor power, it is very important to determine the oscillator operating point and the oscillation amplitude in such a way to avoid any change in reactor power level. Positive reactivity changes originating from oscillations of the samples should be compensated by the negative reactivity changes so that the effect should be nil. Operating points of the reactor oscillator are in the middle of the straight part of the figure showing the reactivity change dependent on the position of the absorber.

  15. Facility with a nuclear district heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The district heating reactor has a pressure vessel which contains the reactor core and at least one coolant conducting primary heat carrier surrounded by a heat sink. The pressure vessel has two walls with a space between them. This space is connected with a container which contains air as heat isolating medium and water as heat conducting medium. During the normal reactor operation the space is filled by air from the container with the aid of a blower, whereas in the case of a break-down of the cooling system it is filled by water which flows out of the container by gravity after the blower has been switched off. The after-heat, generated in the reactor core during cooling break-down, is removed into the heat sink surrounding the pressure vessel in a safe and simple way. 6 figs

  16. Criticality calculations of the HTR-10 pebble-bed reactor with SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Meng-Jen; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Peir, Jinn-Jer; Liang, Jenq-Horng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparisons of the HTR-10 criticality calculations with SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5 were performed. • The DOUBLEHET unit-cell treatment provides the best k eff estimation among PBR criticality calculations using SCALE6. • The continuous-energy SCALE6 calculations present a non-negligible discrepancy with MCNP5 in three PBR cases. - Abstract: HTR-10 is a 10 MWt prototype pebble-bed reactor (PBR) that presents a doubly heterogeneous geometry for neutronics calculations. An appropriate unit-cell treatment for the associated fuel elements is vital for creating problem-dependent multigroup cross sections. Considering four unit-cell options for resonance self-shielding correction in SCALE6, a series of HTR-10 core models were established using the CSAS6 sequence to systematically investigate how they affected the computational accuracy and efficiency of PBR criticality calculations. Three core configurations, which ranged from simplified infinite lattices to a detailed geometry, were examined. Based on the same ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section library, multigroup results were evaluated by comparing with continuous-energy SCALE6/CSAS6 and MCNP5 calculations. The comparison indicated that the INFHOMMEDIUM results overestimated the effective multiplication factor (k eff ) by about 2800 pcm, whereas the LATTICECELL and MULTIREGION treatments overestimated k eff values with similar biases at approximately 470–680 pcm. The DOUBLEHET results attained further improvement, reducing the k eff overestimation to approximately 280 pcm. The comparison yielded two unexpected problems from using SCALE6/CSAS6 in HTR-10 criticality calculations. In particular, the continuous-energy CSAS6 calculations in this study present a non-negligible discrepancy with MCNP5, potentially causing a k eff value overestimate of approximately 680 pcm. Notably, using a cell-weighted mixture instead of an explicit model of individual TRISO particles in the pebble fuel zone does not shorten the

  17. Reactor of the XXI century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhotabaev, Zh.R.; Solov'ev, Yu.A.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of both molten salt reactors (MSR) and homogenous molten salt reactors (HMSR) are illuminated. It is noted that the MSR possess accident probability A=10 -6 1/reactor.years and the HMSR with integral configuration has A=10 -7 1/reactor.years. The methods for these reactors technological problems solution - tritium removal, salt melt circulation and capacity pick up - are discussed

  18. Analysis of Moderator System Failure Accidents by Using New Method for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Dongsik; Kim, Jonghyun; Cho, Cheonhwey [Atomic Creative Technology Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungmin [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    To reconfirm the safety of moderator system failure accidents, the safety analysis by using the reactor physics code, RFSP-IST, coupled with the thermal hydraulics code, CATHENA is performed additionally. In the present paper, the newly developed analysis method is briefly described and the results obtained from the moderator system failure accident simulations for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 reactor by using the new method are summarized. The safety analysis of the moderator system failure accidents for Wolsong-1 CANDU 6 reactor was carried out by using the new code system, i. e., CATHENA and RFSP-IST, instead of the non-IST old codes, namely, SMOKIN G-2 and MODSTBOIL. The analysis results by using the new method revealed as same with the results by using the old method that the fuel integrity is warranted because the localized power peak remained well below the limits and, most importantly, the reactor operation enters into the self-shutdown mode due to the substantial loss of moderator D{sub 2}O inventory from the moderator system. In the analysis results obtained by using the old method, it was predicted that the ROP trip conditions occurred for the transient cases which are also studied in the present paper. But, in the new method, it was found that the ROP trip conditions did not occur. Consequently, in the safety analysis performed additionally by using the new method, the safety of moderator system failure accidents was reassured. In the future, the new analysis method by using the IST codes instead of the non-IST old codes for the moderator system failure accidents is strongly recommended.

  19. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  20. Roles of plasma neutron source reactor in development of fusion reactor engineering: Comparison with fission reactor engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Shoichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1995-01-01

    The history of development of fusion power reactor has come to a turning point, where the main research target is now shifting from the plasma heating and confinement physics toward the burning plasma physics and reactor engineering. Although the development of fusion reactor system is the first time for human beings, engineers have experience of development of fission power reactor. The common feature between them is that both are plants used for the generation of nuclear reactions for the production of energy, nucleon, and radiation on an industrial scale. By studying the history of the development of the fission reactor, one can find the existence of experimental neutron reactors including irradiation facilities for fission reactor materials. These research neutron reactors played very important roles in the development of fission power reactors. When one considers the strategy of development of fusion power reactors from the points of fusion reactor engineering, one finds that the fusion neutron source corresponds to the neutron reactor in fission reactor development. In this paper, the authors discuss the roles of the plasma-based neutron source reactors in the development of fusion reactor engineering, by comparing it with the neutron reactors in the history of fission power development, and make proposals for the strategy of the fusion reactor development. 21 refs., 6 figs

  1. Behavior of the future LHC magnet protection diodes irradiated in a nuclear reactor at 4.6 K with intermediate annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berland, V.; Hagedorn, D.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the LHC project at CERN, the effects of radiation on the electrical characteristics of epitaxial diodes for superconducting magnet protection were studied. The diodes were exposed to an irradiation dose up to 50 kGy and a neutron fluence of 10 15 n/cm 2 with intermediate thermal annealing each 10 kGy dose steps in the Technical University of Munich reactor at 4.6 K

  2. Uncertainty analysis of the 35% reactor inlet header break in a CANDU 6 reactor using RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 with integrated uncertainty analysis option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupleac, D.; Perez, M.; Reventos, F.; Allison, C.

    2011-01-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 code, designed to predict the behavior of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology Software Development and Training Program (SDTP). RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0, which is the first version of RELAP5 completely rewritten to FORTRAN 90/95/2000 standards, uses the publicly available RELAP5 and SCDAP models in combination with (a) advanced programming and numerical techniques, (b) advanced SDTP-member-developed models for LWR, HWR, and research reactor analysis, and (c) a variety of other member-developed computational packages. One such computational package is an integrated uncertainty analysis (IUA) package being developed jointly by the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) and Innovative Systems Software (ISS). RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0(IUA) follows the input-propagation approach using probability distribution functions to define the uncertainty of the input parameters. The main steps for this type of methodologies, often referred as to statistical approaches or Wilks’ methods, are the ones that follow: 1. Selection of the plant; 2. Selection of the scenario; 3. Selection of the safety criteria; 4. Identification and ranking of the relevant phenomena based on the safety criteria; 5. Selection of the appropriate code parameters to represent those phenomena; 6. Association of uncertainty by means of Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) for each selected parameter; 7. Random sampling of the selected parameters according to its PDF and performing multiple computer runs to obtain uncertainty bands with a certain percentile and confidence level; 8. Processing the results of the multiple computer runs to estimate the uncertainty bands for the computed quantities associated with the selected safety criteria. RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0(IUA) calculates the number of required code runs given the desired percentile and confidence level, performs the sampling process for the

  3. Uncertainty analysis of the 35% reactor inlet header break in a CANDU 6 reactor using RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 with integrated uncertainty analysis option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupleac, D., E-mail: danieldu@cne.pub.ro [Politehnica Univ. of Bucharest (Romania); Perez, M.; Reventos, F., E-mail: marina.perez@upc.edu, E-mail: francesc.reventos@upc.edu [Technical Univ. of Catalonia (Spain); Allison, C., E-mail: iss@cableone.net [Innovative Systems Software (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0 code, designed to predict the behavior of reactor systems during normal and accident conditions, is being developed as part of an international nuclear technology Software Development and Training Program (SDTP). RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0, which is the first version of RELAP5 completely rewritten to FORTRAN 90/95/2000 standards, uses the publicly available RELAP5 and SCDAP models in combination with (a) advanced programming and numerical techniques, (b) advanced SDTP-member-developed models for LWR, HWR, and research reactor analysis, and (c) a variety of other member-developed computational packages. One such computational package is an integrated uncertainty analysis (IUA) package being developed jointly by the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) and Innovative Systems Software (ISS). RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0(IUA) follows the input-propagation approach using probability distribution functions to define the uncertainty of the input parameters. The main steps for this type of methodologies, often referred as to statistical approaches or Wilks’ methods, are the ones that follow: 1. Selection of the plant; 2. Selection of the scenario; 3. Selection of the safety criteria; 4. Identification and ranking of the relevant phenomena based on the safety criteria; 5. Selection of the appropriate code parameters to represent those phenomena; 6. Association of uncertainty by means of Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) for each selected parameter; 7. Random sampling of the selected parameters according to its PDF and performing multiple computer runs to obtain uncertainty bands with a certain percentile and confidence level; 8. Processing the results of the multiple computer runs to estimate the uncertainty bands for the computed quantities associated with the selected safety criteria. RELAP/SCDAPSIM/MOD4.0(IUA) calculates the number of required code runs given the desired percentile and confidence level, performs the sampling process for the

  4. A New In-core Production Method of Co-60 in CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Jinqi; Kim, Woosong; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Younwon [BEES Inc, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study introduces an innovative method for Co-60 production in the CANDU6 core. In this new scheme, the central fuel element is replaced by a Co-59 target and Co-60 is obtained after the fuel bundle is discharged. It has been shown that the new method can produce significantly higher amount of Co-60 than the conventional Co production method in CANDU6 reactors without compromising the fuel burnup by removing some (<50%) of the adjuster rods in the whole core. The coolant void reactivity is noticeably reduced when a Co-59 target is loaded into the central pin of the fuel bundle. Meanwhile, the peak power in a fuel bundle is just a little higher due to the central Co-59 target than in conventional CANDU6 fuel design. The basic technology for Co-60 producing was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in 1946 and the same technology was adapted and applied in CANDU6 power reactors. The standard CANDU6 reactor has 21 adjuster rods which are fully inserted into the core during normal operation. The stainless steel adjuster rods are replaced with neutronically-equivalent Co-59 adjusters to produce Co-60. Nowadays, the roles of the adjuster rods are rather vague since nuclear reactors cannot be quickly restarted after a sudden reactor trip due to more stringent regulations. In some Canadian CANDU6 reactors, some or all the adjuster rods are removed from the core to maximize the uranium utilization.

  5. Muon trackers for imaging a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, N.; Miyadera, H.; Morris, C. L.; Bacon, J.; Borozdin, K. N.; Durham, J. M.; Fuzita, K.; Guardincerri, E.; Izumi, M.; Nakayama, K.; Saltus, M.; Sugita, T.; Takakura, K.; Yoshioka, K.

    2016-09-01

    A detector system for assessing damage to the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors by using cosmic-ray muon tomography was developed. The system consists of a pair of drift-tube tracking detectors of 7.2× 7.2-m2 area. Each muon tracker consists of 6 x-layer and 6 y-layer drift-tube detectors. Each tracker is capable of measuring muon tracks with 12 mrad angular resolutions, and is capable of operating under 50-μ Sv/h radiation environment by removing gamma induced background with a novel time-coincidence logic. An estimated resolution to observe nuclear fuel debris at Fukushima Daiichi is 0.3 m when the core is imaged from outside the reactor building.

  6. Development of the electron beam welding of the aluminium alloy 6061-T6 for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leblanc, Y.

    2013-01-01

    The aluminium alloy 6061-T6 has been selected for the construction of the Jules Horowitz's reactor vessel. This reactor vessel is pressurized and will be made through butt welding of ∼ 2 cm thick aluminium slabs. The electron beam welding process has been tested and qualified. It appears that this welding process allows: -) welding without pre-heating, -) vacuum welding, -) welding of 100% of the thickness in one passage, -) very low deforming welding process, -) very low density and very low volume of blow holes, -) weak ZAT (Thermal Affected Zones), and -) high reproducibility that permits automation. (A.C.)

  7. Licensed reactor nuclear safety criteria applicable to DOE reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors, establishes reactor safety requirements to assure that reactors are sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that adequately protects health and safety and is in accordance with uniform standards, guides, and codes which are consistent with those applied to comparable licensed reactors. This document identifies nuclear safety criteria applied to NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] licensed reactors. The titles of the chapters and sections of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.70, Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants, Rev. 3, are used as the format for compiling the NRC criteria applied to the various areas of nuclear safety addressed in a safety analysis report for a nuclear reactor. In each section the criteria are compiled in four groups: (1) Code of Federal Regulations, (2) US NRC Regulatory Guides, SRP Branch Technical Positions and Appendices, (3) Codes and Standards, and (4) Supplemental Information. The degree of application of these criteria to a DOE-owned reactor, consistent with their application to comparable licensed reactors, must be determined by the DOE and DOE contractor

  8. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  9. Small propulsion reactor design based on particle bed reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewig, H.; Lazareth, O.; Mughabghab, S.; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) designs are discussed which use 233 U and /sup 242m/Am as fissile materials. A constant total power of 100MW is assumed for all reactors in this study. Three broad aspects of these reactors is discussed. First, possible reactor designs are developed, second physics calculations are outlined and discussed and third mass estimates of the various candidates reactors are made. It is concluded that reactors with a specific mass of 1 kg/MW can be envisioned of 233 U is used and approximately a quarter of this value can be achieved if /sup 242m/Am is used. If this power level is increased by increasing the power density lower specific mass values are achievable. The limit will be determined by uncertainties in the thermal-hydraulic analysis. 5 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232Th, 235U)O2 fuel using MCNPX2.6 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feghhi, Seyed Amir Hossein; Rezazadeh, Marzieh; Kadi, Yacine; ); Tenreiro, Claudio; Aref, Morteza; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    The small reactor design for the remote and less developed areas of the user countries should have simple features in view of the lack of infra-structure and resources. Many researchers consider long core life with no on-site refuelling activity as a primary feature for the small reactor design. Long core life can be achieved by enhancing internal conversion rate of fertile to fissile materials. For that purpose, thorium cycle can he adopted because a high fissile production rate of 233 U converted from 232 Th can be expected in the thermal energy region. A simple nuclear reactor core arranged 19 assemblies in hexagonal structure, using thorium-based fuel and heavy water as coolant and moderator was simulated using MCNPX2.6 code, aiming an optimized critical assembly. Optimized reflector thickness and gap between assemblies were determined to achieve minimum neutron leakage and void reactivity. The result was a more compact core, where assemblies were designed having 19-fuel pins in 1.25 pitch-to-diameter ratio. Optimum reflector thickness of 15 cm resulted in minimal neutron leakage in view of economic limitations. A 0.5 cm gap between assembles achieved more safety and 2.2 % enrichment requirements. The present feasibility study suggests a thermal core of acceptable neutronic parameters to achieve a simple and safe core. (author)

  11. Probability safety assessment of the Kozloduy-5 and Kozloduy-6 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyadzhiev, A; Manchev, B [Risk Engineering Ltd., Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1996-12-31

    A probability safety assessment (PSA) of Level 1 (assessment of plant failures leading to the determination of core damage frequency) has been carried out for the NPP Kozloduy Units 5 and 6 (reactors WWER-1000). The scope of the study includes all significant accident initiators including seismic (earthquake) and fire initiators. Event trees for all initiators and fault trees for front line systems, support systems and major safety systems have been built. A distribution of the different initiators has been established as follows: internal initiators - 85%, seismic initiators - 5%, fire initiators- 10%. The loss of offsite power was identified as main contributor from the internal initiators with frequency 1,1.10{sup -4}/y. It is concluded that the safety functions of WWER-1000 are adequately covered by the safety systems. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Numerical modeling of a nuclear production reactor cooling lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.; Pepper, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A finite element model has been developed which predicts flow and temperature distributions within a nuclear reactor cooling lake at the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Numerical results agree with values obtained from a 3-D EPA numerical lake model and actual measurements obtained from the lake. Because the effluent water from the reactor heat exchangers discharges directly into the lake, downstream temperatures at mid-lake could exceed the South Carolina DHEC guidelines for thermal exchanges during the summer months. Therefore, reactor power was reduced to maintain temperature compliance at mid-lake. Thermal mitigation measures were studied that included placing a 6.1 m deep fabric curtain across mid-lake and moving the reactor outfall upstream. These measurements were calculated to permit about an 8% improvement in reactor power during summer operation

  13. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables.

  14. Protective actions as a factor in power reactor siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gant, K.S.; Schweitzer, M.

    1984-06-01

    This report examines the relationship between a power reactor site and the ease of implementing protective actions (emergency measures a serious accident). Limiting populating density around a reactor lowers the number of people at risk but cannot assure that all protective actions are possible for those who reside near the reactor. While some protective measures can always be taken (i.e., expedient respiratory protection, sheltering) the ability to evacuate the area or find adequate shelter may depend on the characteristics of the area near the reactor site. Generic siting restrictions designed to identify and eliminate these site-specific constraints would be difficult to formulate. The authors suggest identifying possible impediments to protective actions at a proposed reactor site and addressing these problems in the emergency plans. 66 references, 6 figures, 8 tables

  15. MDS Nordion - a Canadian success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, F.

    1998-01-01

    MDS Nordion,the world leading supplier of radioisotopes, had its beginnings as a small division of the crown company Eldorado Mining and Refining Ltd. in the late 1940's. With the end of World War II, Eldorado found itself with a supply of radium left over from the production of uranium during the war and set up a small group in Ottawa to sell it. Most of the stock of radium was disposed of when the development of the NRX reactor made reactor produced radioisotopes possible. The company turned to selling these radioisotopes and soon focused on Cobalt 60 for its use in cancer therapy. In 1952, the group transferred to AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.), as part of the Commercial Products Division. In 1988, as part of the federal government's move to privatization, the organization was split into two companies, Theratronics, which manufactures the cancer therapy machines and other equipment for the use of radioisotopes, and Nordion International, which continued the primary business of processing, packaging, selling radioisotopes. In 1991 Nordion International was sold to MDS Inc., a large international group of companies in the life and sciences fields with headquarters in Toronto. The name was changed to MDS Nordion in December 1996

  16. PLM and the single reactor utility - or how a single reactor utility can face the PLM issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.H.

    1994-01-01

    Although Gentilly-2 reactor was planned to last for 30 years, its life could be significantly shorter if nothing were done, whereas retubing and refurbishment after, say, 25 years should result in an extension of service life to 45-50 years. In the long run, dimensional changes rather than hydriding may prove to be the pressure tubes' life limiting factor. Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Power and AECL have an agreement to cooperate in developing a life management program for CANDU-6 reactors. The author expresses the opinion that cost-benefit criteria should be introduced in regulatory decision making. 6 refs., 9 figs

  17. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  18. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Ruben Calabrese

    1999-01-01

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  19. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George E. Skodras; Sotiris Kaldis; Savas G. Topis; Dimitris Koutsonikolas; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the intergrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with a simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and permselectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Gas pollutant cleaning by a membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topis, S.; Koutsonikolas, D.; Kaldis, S. (and others) [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    An alternative technology for the removal of gas pollutants at the integrated gasification combined cycle process for power generation is the use of a catalytic membrane reactor. In the present study, ammonia decomposition in a catalytic reactor, with simultaneous removal of hydrogen through a ceramic membrane, was investigated. A Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was prepared by the dry and wet impregnation method and characterized by ICP, SEM, XRD and N{sub 2} adsorption before and after activation. Commercially available {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membranes were also characterized and the permeabilities and selectivities of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} were measured by the variable volume method. In parallel with the experimental analysis, the necessary mathematical models were developed to describe the operation of the catalytic membrane reactor and to compare its performance with the conventional reactor. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fuel Fabrication and Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    The uranium from the enrichment plant is still in the form of UF6. UF6 is not suitable for use in a reactor due to its highly corrosive chemistry as well as its phase diagram. UF6 is converted into UO2 fuel pellets, which are in turn placed in fuel rods and assemblies. Reactor designs are variable in moderators, coolants, fuel, performance etc.The dream of energy ‘too-cheap to meter’ is no more, and now the nuclear power industry is pushing ahead with advanced reactor designs.

  2. Calculation of the flow distribution for the new core of the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.C.; Delmastro, Dario F.

    2007-01-01

    In this work the pressure drop, the flow distribution, effective cooling flow rate and the velocity in the subchannels that cool fuel plates for the new core of RA-6 research reactor were calculated. These calculations were performed for a flow of 340 m 3 /hr and water temperatures of 12 C degrees, of 35 C degrees and 42 C degrees. The flow distribution was calculated without considering either safety factors or geometric changes. All the calculations were performed considering the flow as isothermal. (author) [es

  3. Adjusting to new realities. IAEO meeting on fuel cycle and reactor strategies, June 3-6, 1997 in Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek-Fink, P.

    1997-01-01

    The IAEA, in co-operation with the European Commission, the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD and the Uranium Institute, organized an international symposium to discuss the 'new realities' in the nuclear fuel cycle with special emphasis on plutonium management. The symposium covered all aspects of the fuel cycle in six sessions: Global Energy Outlook; Present Status and Immediate Prospects of Plutonium Management; Future Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies; Safety, Health and Environmental Implications of the Different Fuel Cycles; Non-Proliferation and Safeguards Aspects; and International Co-operation. The Symposium took place in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. About 300 participants from 41 countries and 4 international organizations attended. The Symposium gave a comprehensive overview on the present situation of the fuel cycle and the expected developments up to 2050. During this period nuclear energy will continue to be dominated by Thermal Reactors; Fast Reactors will be introduced slowly after 2030. In general, an evolutionary and not a revolutionary process is expected. (orig.) [de

  4. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor - a new production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nulton, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    One of the reactor concepts being considered for application as a new production reactor (NPR) is a 350-MW(thermal) modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The proposed MHTGR-NPR is based on the design of the commercial MHTGR and is being developed by a team that includes General Atomics and Combustion Engineering. The proposed design includes four modules combined into a production block that includes a shared containment, a spent-fuel storage facility, and other support facilities. The MHTGR has a helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, graphite-reflected annular core formed from prismatic graphite fuel blocks. The MHTGR fuel consists of highly enriched uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microsphere fuel particles that are coated with successive layers of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC). Tritium-producing targets consist of enriched 6 Li aluminate microsphere target particles that are coated with successive layers of PyC and SiC similar to the fuel microspheres. Normal reactivity control is implemented by articulated control rods that can be inserted into channels in the inner and outer reflector blocks. Shutdown heat removal is accomplished by a single shutdown heat exchanger and electric motor-driven circulator located in the bottom of the reactor vessel. Current plans are to stack spent fuel elements in dry, helium-filled, water-cooled wells and store them for ∼1 yr before reprocessing. All phases of MHTGR fuel reprocessing have been demonstrated

  5. Supercritical Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the 6 concepts selected for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. SCWR is a new concept, it is an attempt to optimize boiling water reactors by using the main advantages of supercritical water: only liquid phase and a high calorific capacity. The SCWR requires very high temperatures (over 375 C degrees) and very high pressures (over 22.1 MPa) to operate which allows a high conversion yield (44% instead of 33% for a PWR). Low volumes of coolant are necessary which makes the neutron spectrum shift towards higher energies and it is then possible to consider fast reactors operating with supercritical water. The main drawbacks of supercritical water is the necessity to use very high pressures which has important constraints on the reactor design, its physical properties (density, calorific capacity) that vary strongly with temperatures and pressures and its very high corrosiveness. The feasibility of the concept is not yet assured in terms of adequate materials that resist to corrosion, reactor stability, reactor safety, and reactor behaviour in accidental situations. (A.C.)

  6. Dose rate in the reactor room and environment during maintenance in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Koichi; Satoh, Satoshi; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Seki, Yasushi

    1995-01-01

    According to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) conceptual design activity, after reactor shutdown, damaged segments are pulled up from the reactor and hung from the reactor room ceiling by a remote handling device. The dose rate in the reactor room and the environment is estimated for this situation, and the following results are obtained. First, the dose rate in the room is > 10 8 μSv/h. Since this dose rate is 10 7 times greater than the biological radiation shielding design limit of 25 μSv/h, workers cannot enter the room. Second, lenses and optical fiber composed of glass that is radiation resistant up to 10 6 Gy would be damaged after <100 h near the segment, and devices using semiconductors could not work after several hours or so in the aforementioned dose-rate conditions. Third, during suspension of one blanket segment from the ceiling, the dose rate in the site boundary can be reduced by one order by a 23-cm-thicker reactor building roof. To reduce dose rate in public exposure to a value that is less than one-tenth of the public exposure radiation shielding design limit of 100 μSv/yr, the distance of the site boundary from the reactor must be greater than 200 m for a reactor building with a 160-cm-thick concrete roof. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Anaerobic biogranulation in a hybrid reactor treating phenolic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishnan, Anushyaa; Gupta, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    Granulation was examined in four similar anaerobic hybrid reactors 15.5 L volume (with an effective volume of 13.5 L) during the treatment of synthetic coal wastewater at the mesophilic temperature of 27 ± 5 deg. C. The hybrid reactors are a combination of UASB unit at the lower part and an anaerobic filter at the upper end. Synthetic wastewater with an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2240 mg/L, phenolics concentration of 752 mg/L and a mixture of volatile fatty acids was fed to three hybrid reactors. The fourth reactor, control system, was fed with a wastewater containing sodium acetate and mineral nutrients. Coal waste water contained phenol (490 mg/L); m-, o-, p-cresols (123.0, 58.6, 42 mg/L); 2,4-, 2,5-, 3,4- and 3,5-dimethyl phenols (6.3, 6.3, 4.4 and 21.3 mg/L) as major phenolic compounds. A mixture of anaerobic digester sludge and partially granulated sludge (3:1) were used as seed materials for the start up of the reactors. Granules were observed after 45 days of operation of the systems. The granules ranged from 0.4 to 1.2 mm in diameter with good settling characteristics with an SVI of 12 mL/g SS. After granulation, the hybrid reactor performed steadily with phenolics and COD removal efficiencies of 93% and 88%, respectively at volumetric loading rate of 2.24 g COD/L d and hydraulic retention time of 24 h. The removal efficiencies for phenol and m/p-cresols reached 92% and 93% (corresponding to 450.8 and 153 mg/L), while o-cresol was degraded to 88% (corresponding to 51.04 mg/L). Dimethyl phenols could be removed completely at all the organic loadings and did not contribute much to the residual organics. Biodegradation of o-cresol was obtained in the hybrid-UASB reactors

  8. A multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changwen Ma

    2000-01-01

    An integrated natural circulation self pressurized reactor can be used for sea water desalination, electrogeneration, ship propulsion and district or process heating. The reactor can be used for ship propulsion because it has following advantages: it is a integrated reactor. Whole primary loop is included in a size limited pressure vessel. For a 200 MW reactor the diameter of the pressure vessel is about 5 m. It is convenient to arranged on a ship. Hydraulic driving facility of control rods is used on the reactor. It notably decreases the height of the reactor. For ship propulsion, smaller diameter and smaller height are important. Besides these, the operation reliability of the reactor is high enough, because there is no rotational machine (for example, circulating pump) in safety systems. Reactor systems are simple. There are no emergency water injection system and boron concentration regulating system. These features for ship propulsion reactor are valuable. Design of the reactor is based on existing demonstration district heating reactor design. The mechanic design principles are the same. But boiling is introduced in the reactor core. Several variants to use the reactor as a movable seawater desalination plant are presented in the paper. When the sea water desalination plant is working to produce fresh water, the reactor can supply electricity at the same time to the local electricity network. Some analyses for comprehensive application of the reactor have been done. Main features and parameters of the small (Thermopower 200 MW) reactor are given in the paper. (author)

  9. Neutron transport. Physics and calculation of nuclear reactors with applications to pressurized water reactors and fast neutron reactors. 2 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussac, J.; Reuss, P.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the main physical bases of neutron theory and nuclear reactor calculation. 1) Interactions of neutrons with matter and basic principles of neutron transport; 2) Neutron transport in homogeneous medium and the neutron field: kinetic behaviour, slowing-down, resonance absorption, diffusion equation, processing methods; 3) Theory of a reactor constituted with homogeneous zones: critical condition, kinetics, separation of variables, calculation and neutron balance of the fundamental mode, one-group and multigroup theories; 4) Study of heterogeneous cell lattices: fast fission factor, resonance absorption, thermal output factor, diffusion coefficient, computer codes; 5) Operation and control of reactors: perturbation theory, reactivity, fuel properties evolution, poisoning by fission products, calculation of a reactor and fuel management; 6) Study of some types of reactors: PWR and fast breeder reactors, the main reactor types of the present French program [fr

  10. 75 FR 36126 - Office of New Reactors; Proposed Revision to Standard Review Plan Section 13.6.1, Revision 1 on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... Standard Review Plan Section 13.6.1, Revision 1 on Physical Security--Combined License and Operating...), Section 13.6.1 on ``Physical Security--Combined License and Operating Reactors,'' (Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS) Accession No. ML100350158). The Office of Nuclear Security and...

  11. Research of heat releasing element of an active zone of gaseous nuclear reactor with pumped through nuclear fuel - uranium hexafluoride (UF6)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.; Batyrbekov, E.; Belyakova, E.; Kunakov, S.; Koltyshev, S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the offered project is learning physics and substantiation of possibility of creation gaseous nuclear reactor with pumped through nuclear fuel-hexafluoride of uranium (Uf6).Main problems of this work are'. Determination of physic-chemical, spectral and optical properties of non-equilibrium nuclear - excited plasma of hexafluoride of uranium and its mixtures with other gases. Research of gas dynamics of laminar, non-mixing two-layer current of gases of hexafluoride of uranium and helium at availability and absence of internal energy release in hexafluoride of uranium with the purpose to determinate a possibility of isolation of hexafluoride of uranium from walls by inert helium. Creation and research of gaseous heat releasing element with pumped through fuel Uf6 in an active zone of research nuclear WWR-K reactor. Objects of a research: Non-equilibrium nuclear - excited plasma of hexafluoride of uranium and its mixtures with other gases. With use of specially created ampoules will come true in-reactor probe and spectral diagnostics of plasma. Calculations of kinetics with the account of main elementary processes proceeding in it, will be carried out. Two-layer non-mixed streams of hexafluoride of uranium and helium at availability and absence of internal energy release. Conditions of obtaining and characteristics of such streams will be investigated. Gaseous heat releasing element with pumped through fuel - Uf6 in an active zone of nuclear WWR-K reactor

  12. Impact of proposed research reactor standards on reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ringle, J C; Johnson, A G; Anderson, T V [Oregon State University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    A Standards Committee on Operation of Research Reactors, (ANS-15), sponsored by the American Nuclear Society, was organized in June 1971. Its purpose is to develop, prepare, and maintain standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training. Of the 15 original members, six were directly associated with operating TRIGA facilities. This committee developed a standard for the Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors (ANS-15.1), the revised draft of which was submitted to ANSI for review in May of 1973. The Committee then identified 10 other critical areas for standards development. Nine of these, along with ANS-15.1, are of direct interest to TRIGA owners and operators. The Committee was divided into subcommittees to work on these areas. These nine areas involve proposed standards for research reactors concerning: 1. Records and Reports (ANS-15.3) 2. Selection and Training of Personnel (ANS-15.4) 3. Effluent Monitoring (ANS-15.5) 4. Review of Experiments (ANS-15.6) 5. Siting (ANS-15.7) 6. Quality Assurance Program Guidance and Requirements (ANS-15.8) 7. Restrictions on Radioactive Effluents (ANS-15.9) 8. Decommissioning (ANS-15.10) 9. Radiological Control and Safety (ANS-15.11). The present status of each of these standards will be presented, along with their potential impact on TRIGA reactor operation. (author)

  13. Impact of proposed research reactor standards on reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringle, J.C.; Johnson, A.G.; Anderson, T.V.

    1974-01-01

    A Standards Committee on Operation of Research Reactors, (ANS-15), sponsored by the American Nuclear Society, was organized in June 1971. Its purpose is to develop, prepare, and maintain standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training. Of the 15 original members, six were directly associated with operating TRIGA facilities. This committee developed a standard for the Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors (ANS-15.1), the revised draft of which was submitted to ANSI for review in May of 1973. The Committee then identified 10 other critical areas for standards development. Nine of these, along with ANS-15.1, are of direct interest to TRIGA owners and operators. The Committee was divided into subcommittees to work on these areas. These nine areas involve proposed standards for research reactors concerning: 1. Records and Reports (ANS-15.3) 2. Selection and Training of Personnel (ANS-15.4) 3. Effluent Monitoring (ANS-15.5) 4. Review of Experiments (ANS-15.6) 5. Siting (ANS-15.7) 6. Quality Assurance Program Guidance and Requirements (ANS-15.8) 7. Restrictions on Radioactive Effluents (ANS-15.9) 8. Decommissioning (ANS-15.10) 9. Radiological Control and Safety (ANS-15.11). The present status of each of these standards will be presented, along with their potential impact on TRIGA reactor operation. (author)

  14. Reactor physics data for safety analysis of CANFLEX-NU CANDU-6 core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun

    2001-08-01

    This report contains the reactor physics data for safety analysis of CANFLEX-NU fuel CANDU-6 core. First, the physics parameters for time-average core have been described, which include the channel power and maximum bundle power map, channel axial power shape and bundle burnup. And, next the data for fuel performance such as relative ring power distribution and bundle burnup conversion ratio are represented. The transition core data from 0 to 900 full power day are represented by 100 full power day interval. Also, the data for reactivity devices of time-average core and 300 full power day of transition core are given.

  15. Physics design of advanced steady-state tokamak reactor A-SSTR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Satoshi; Ushigusa, Kenkichi

    2000-10-01

    Based on design studies on the fusion power reactor such as the DEMO reactor SSTR, the compact power reactor A-SSTR and the DREAM reactor with a high environmental safety and high availability, a new concept of compact and economic fusion power reactor (A-SSTR2) with high safety and high availability is proposed. Employing high temperature superconductor, the toroidal filed coils supplies the maximum field of 23T on conductor which corresponds to 11T at the magnetic axis. A-SSTR2 (R p =6.2m, a p =1.5m, I p =12MA) has a fusion power of 4GW with β N =4. For an easy maintenance and for an enough support against a strong electromagnetic force on coils, a poloidal coils system has no center solenoid coils and consists of 6 coils located on top and bottom of the machine. Physics studies on the plasma equilibrium, controllability of the configuration, the plasma initiation and non-inductive current ramp-up, fusion power controllability and the diverter have shown the validity of the A-SSTR2 concept. (author)

  16. Actualización del sistema SCADA y de control para los reactores MQ5 y MQ6 de la planta de Pinturas Condor, Sherwin Williams Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Reinoso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente documento describe la actualización del sistema SCADA para los reactores MQ5 y MQ6 de la planta de Pinturas Condor mediante el software Intouch y la actualización del sistema de control del reactor MQ5 implementado en un controlador lógico programable (PLC de marca SCHNEIDER, además de la arquitectura de control realizada en el proyecto. El sistema SCADA y de control de los reactores permiten la visualización y control de los datos y variables más relevantes durante las diferentes fases de producción de resinas en los reactores MQ5 y MQ6.

  17. Application of SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC Sequence for Activation Calculation in Reactor Primary Shield Concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong IL

    2014-01-01

    Activation calculation requires flux information at desired location and reaction cross sections for the constituent elements to obtain production rate of activation products. Generally it is not an easy task to obtain fluxes or reaction rates with low uncertainties in a reasonable time for deep penetration problems by using standard Monte Carlo methods. The MAVRIC (Monaco with Automated Variance Reduction using Importance Calculations) sequence in SCALE 6.1 code package is intended to perform radiation transport on problems that are too challenging for standard, unbiased Monte Carlo methods. And the SCALE code system provides plenty of ENDF reaction types enough to consider almost all activation reactions in the nuclear reactor materials. To evaluate the activation of the important isotopes in primary shield, SCALE 6.1 MAVRIC sequence has been utilized for the KSNP reactor model and the calculated results are compared to the isotopic activity concentration of related standard. Related to the planning for decommission, the activation products in concrete primary shield such as Fe-55, Co-60, Ba-133, Eu-152, and Eu-154 are identified as important elements according to the comparisons with related standard for exemption. In this study, reference data are used for the concrete compositions in the activation calculation to see the applicability of MAVRIC code to the evaluation of activation inventory in the concrete primary shield. The composition data of trace elements as shown in Table 1 are obtained from various US power plant sites and accordingly they have large variations in quantity due to the characteristics of concrete composition. In practical estimation of activation radioactivity for a specific plant related to decommissioning, rigorous chemical analysis of concrete samples of the plant would first have to be performed to get exact information for compositions of concrete. Considering the capability of solving deep penetration transport problems and richness

  18. Development of U6Fe-Al dispersions for the use of LEU in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1983-01-01

    For some time now, efforts are being made to develop fuel dispersions that would permit the use of low (approx. 20% 235-U) enriched uranium (LEU) instead of the currently used highly (approx. 93% 235-U) enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. Since penalties in the performance of the reactor have to be avoided, the 235-U content in the dispersion has at least to be retained at current levels. On account of their high U-densities, the major development effort has been focussed on the uranium silicides (U 3 Si, U 3 Si(Al), and U 3 Si 2 -based dispersions). With silicides as dispersants, it is possible to fabricate fuel element plates with U-densities in the dispersion of about 6.0 gU/cm 3 . In comparison to the silicides, the U 6 Fe-phase offers several advantages namely: higher U-density (approx. 17.0 gU/cm 3 ); relative ease of formation compared to U 3 Si; possible advantages with regard to reprocessing of the spent fuel due to the absence of silicon. The studies outlined here were performed with a view to investigating the preparation, reaction behavior and dimensional stability after heat treatment of U 6 Fe-Al dispersions

  19. Development of U6Fe-Al dispersions for the use of LEU in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1983-01-01

    For some time now, efforts are being made to develop fuel dispersions that would permit the use of low (∼ 20% 235-U) enriched uranium (LEU) instead of the currently used highly (∼ 93% 235-U) enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. Since penalties in the performance of the reactor have to be avoided, the 235-U content in the dispersion has at least to be retained at current levels. On account of their high U-densities, the major development effort has been focussed on the uranium silicides [U 3 Si, U 3 Si(Al), and U 3 Si 2 - based dispersions. With silicides as dispersants, it is possible to fabricate fuel element plates with U-densities in the dispersion of about 6.0 g U/cm 3 . In comparison to the silicides, the U 6 Fe-phase offers several advantages namely: - higher U-density (∼ 17.0 g U/cm 3 ); - relative ease of formation compared to U 3 Si; - possible advantages with regard to reprocessing of the spent fuel due to the absence of silicon. The studies outlined here were therefore performed with a view to investigating the preparation, reaction behaviour and dimensional stability after heat treatment of U 6 Fe-Al dispersions

  20. First TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] transient overpower tests on U-Pu-Zr fuel: M5 and M6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, W.R.; Bauer, T.H.; Wright, A.E.; Rhodes, E.A.; Stanford, G.S.; Klickman, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) tests M5 and M6 were the first transient overpower (TOP) tests of the margin to cladding breach and prefailure elongation of metallic U-Pu-Zr ternary fuel, the reference fuel of the Integral Fast Reactor concept. Similar tests on U-Fs fueled EBR-II driver pins were previously performed and reported [1,2]. Results from these earlier tests indicated a margin to failure of about 4 times nominal power and significant axial elongation prior to failure, a feature that was very pronounced at low burnups. While these two fuel types are similar in many respects, the ternary alloy exhibits a much more complex physical structure and is typically irradiated at much higher temperatures. Thus, a prime motivation for performing M5 and M6 was to compare the safety related fuel performance characteristics of U-Fs and U-Pu-Zr. This report described conditions, results, and conclusions of testing of these fuel types

  1. Measurements of low reactivities using a reactor oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obradovic, D.; Petrovic, M.

    1965-12-01

    Most of the methods of measuring reactivity are limited to the region from several hundreds to several thousands of pcm. The present work develops a method of measuring low reactivities from several pcm to about 600 pcm using the ROB-1 reactor oscillator on the RB reactor of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences at Vinca. The accuracy of measurement is better than 1%. Several methods are used to measure low reactivities. The most often used is the method based on measuring the stable reactor period. The bottom limit of this method is about 30 porn /1,2/. For control rod calibration the method of rod oscillation is used /3,4/. This method is confronted with considerable influence of space effects /5/. Reference /6/ reports on a method for measuring the reactivity coefficient at a critical level in liquid-moderated reactors. The method is based on measuring reactor response to the oscillation of the moderator about the critical level. The present work reports on a method of determining the reactivity by measuring the phase shift between the perturbation of the effective multiplication factor and reactor response. With the use of the ROB-1 reactor oscillator, the method allows measurement of the reactivity from several pcm to about 600 pcm with an accuracy of 1% (author)

  2. Measurements of low reactivities using a reactor oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obradovic, D; Petrovic, M [Institute of nuclear sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1965-12-15

    Most of the methods of measuring reactivity are limited to the region from several hundreds to several thousands of pcm. The present work develops a method of measuring low reactivities from several pcm to about 600 pcm using the ROB-1 reactor oscillator on the RB reactor of the Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences at Vinca. The accuracy of measurement is better than 1%. Several methods are used to measure low reactivities. The most often used is the method based on measuring the stable reactor period. The bottom limit of this method is about 30 porn /1,2/. For control rod calibration the method of rod oscillation is used /3,4/. This method is confronted with considerable influence of space effects /5/. Reference /6/ reports on a method for measuring the reactivity coefficient at a critical level in liquid-moderated reactors. The method is based on measuring reactor response to the oscillation of the moderator about the critical level. The present work reports on a method of determining the reactivity by measuring the phase shift between the perturbation of the effective multiplication factor and reactor response. With the use of the ROB-1 reactor oscillator, the method allows measurement of the reactivity from several pcm to about 600 pcm with an accuracy of 1% (author)

  3. Peak power factor determination of the RA-6 Argentinean Research Reactor using measurement-calculations correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F. A.; Blaumann, H.; Lopasso, E.; Longhino, J

    2009-01-01

    The maximum power of a reactor is limited by the power peaking factor. During the design stage it is calculated with neutronic calculation codes. This is not enough for ensuring its value due to modelling approximations. For the RA-6s low enrichment new core a calculus-measurement correlation method have been applied. Position and magnitude of the maximum power density estimated by calculus are used by this method. For this work 249 cooper-gold alloy (1.55% Au) wires have been distributed along the core using 19 aluminium blades. Their positions have been selected using information given by a 5 groups PUMA reactor model. Wire s activity have been measured with a HPGe detector. Gold activity have been used only for verifying the calculated core spectrum. The measured power peaking factor was 2.48±0.3 (3σ), 15% above the calculated value. About 97% of measured points had less than 20% calculation-measurement difference and about 80% had less than 10%. The power peaking factor determined by this method consolidates also the calculations models. [es

  4. Thermohydraulic calculations in rectangular channels for RA-6 type reactors with transition regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillin, N; Vertullo, A.; Masson, V.; Hilal, R

    2009-01-01

    In August 2000 and within the framework of the RA-6 core conversion from high to low enrichment (20%), a preliminary analysis was performed to evaluate the maximum power that the reactor could operate with the new kernel without makeing substantial changes. This meant keeping intact, for example, the concrete shield of the pool and the nucleus inlet and outlet pipes embedded in the walls. Preliminary results indicated that for these boundary conditions a maximum power of about 3 MWt could be achieved. In August 2005 the project was resumed and new calculations performed taking as a starting point the ECBE plate fuel element(U3O8-Al). A core was developed with cooling channle widths of 2.6 mm for the control fuel elements and 2.7 mm for standard fuel elements. The thermo-hydraulic calculation puts in evidence that coolant flow into the core was in the transitional regime for the vast majority of configurations. While TERMIC code, used for thermo-hydraulic design, has been extensively tested and validated for use in research reactors under turbulent and laminar flows, this is not so for transition conditions. The transition regime is strongly dependent on conditions such as flow inlet characteristics, channel geometry, etc.. and therefore there are no reliable correlations for general use. For this reason we found it convenient to carry out experiments simulating the working conditions in order to adjust the code results with experimental data. In the present work we show the experimental results, the simulation of the experiences using the TERMIC code, and the adjustments made to the correlations used by the code so that it can be applied to the thermo-hydraulic design of the new core. [es

  5. Study on the technical feasibility of Fission-Track dating at two irradiation positions of the RA-6 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorval, Eric

    2005-01-01

    The method of Fission-Track dating is based upon the detection of the damage caused by fission fragments from the Uranium contained in geological samples.In order to determine the age of a sample, both the amount of spontaneous fissions occurred and the Uranium concentration must be known.The latter requires the irradiation of the samples inside a reactor with a well-thermalized flux, so that fissions are induced over 235 U targets only. Therefore, the Uranium concentration may be determined.The main inconvenient presented by the irradiation sites at the RA-6 MTR-type reactor is that neutron flux is not completely thermal there, which means that fissions due to epithermal and fast neutrons will not be negligible.In the same way, tracks due to fissions of 238 U and 232 Th will be detected. In order to know the corrections that must be applied to those measurements performed in this reactor, it is necessary to characterize fast flux.Because of it, this laboratory's gamma spectrometry equipment had to be calibrated. After that, several activation detectors were irradiated and results were analyzed. Finally, it was determined that it is feasible to Fission-Track date at the I6 position. However, limitations associated to this method were analyzed for the values of flux measured in the different sites

  6. Pyrolysis of Rubber in a Screw Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnik, A. V.; Savchin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of an analysis of thermal methods described in the literature and from the results of experimental investigations of steam conversion, the authors have developed and created a facility for thermal processing of rubber waste. Rubber crumb was used as the raw material; the temperature in the reactor was 500°C; nitrogen, steam, and a mixture of light hydrocarbons (noncondensable part of pyrolysis products) represented the working medium. The pyrolysis yielded 36-38% of a solid fraction, 54-56% of a liquid hydrocarbon fraction, and 6-9% of noncondensable gases. Changes in the composition of the gas mixture have been determined at different stages of processing. Gas chromatography of pyrolysis gases has shown that the basic gases produced by pyrolysis are H2 and hydrocarbons C2H4, C3H6, C3H8, C4H8, C2H6, C3H6O2, and C4H10, and a small amount of H2S, CO, and CO2. Noncondensable gases will be used as a fuel to heat the reactor and to implement the process.

  7. Abatement of fluorinated compounds using a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with a reverse vortex plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.H.; Cho, C.H.; Shin, D.H. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Y.C., E-mail: ychong@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Y.W. [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2 Oxikdo-dong, Gunsan-city, Jeollabuk-do (Korea, Republic of); School of Advanced Green Energy and Environments, Handong Global University, Heunghae-eup, Buk-gu, Pohang-city, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • We developed a microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). • We calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste. • The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased from 29% to 43% than conventional vortex reactor. - Abstract: Abatement of fluorinated compounds (FCs) used in semiconductor and display industries has received an attention due to the increasingly stricter regulation on their emission. We have developed a 2.45 GHz microwave plasma torch with reverse vortex reactor (RVR). In order to design a reverse vortex plasma reactor, we calculated a volume fraction and temperature distribution of discharge gas and waste gas in RVR by ANSYS CFX of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation code. Abatement experiments have been performed with respect to SF{sub 6}, NF{sub 3} by varying plasma power and N{sub 2} flow rates, and FCs concentration. Detailed experiments were conducted on the abatement of NF{sub 3} and SF{sub 6} in terms of destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The DRE of 99.9% for NF{sub 3} was achieved without an additive gas at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 150 liter per minute (L/min) by applying a microwave power of 6 kW with RVR. Also, a DRE of SF{sub 6} was 99.99% at the N{sub 2} flow rate of 60 L/min using an applied microwave power of 6 kW. The performance of reverse vortex reactor increased about 43% of NF{sub 3} and 29% of SF{sub 6} abatements results definition by decomposition energy per liter more than conventional vortex reactor.

  8. Possibility of implementation of 6-year fuel cycle at NPP with VVER-440 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heraltova, L., E-mail: lenka.heraltova@fjfi.cvut.cz [UJV Rez a.s., Hlavni 130, 250 68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Brehova 7, 115 19 Praha 1 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Possibility of extension of fuel cycle. • Increase of enrichment above 5% {sup 235}U. • Core properties calculated by diffusion code ANDREA. • Back end fuel cycle characteristic. - Abstract: This paper discusses possibility of an extension of a fuel cycle at a VVER-440 reactor for up to 6 years. The prolongation of a fuel cycle was realized by optimization of a fuel design and increasing of a fuel enrichment. The modified design of the fuel assembly covers change of pellet geometry, decreasing of parasitic absorption in construction materials, improved moderation of fuel pins and also increase of enrichment. Fuel assemblies with enrichment up to 7% {sup 235}U are considered for prolonged fuel batches. Three different batch lengths were considered for evaluation of core properties – 12, 18 and 24 months, and two types of burnable absorbers were included – Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Comparison of proposed fuel assemblies was realized by length of a batch, average burnup, maximal power of fuel assembly or fuel pin, control fuel assembly worth, reactivity coefficients, and effective delayed neutrons fraction. Comparison of characteristics of a burned fuel discharged from a reactor core is discussed in the last part of the paper.

  9. The Application of Best Estimate and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology to Large LOCA Power Pulse in a CANDU 6 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Razzak, A.; Zhang, J.; Sills, H.E.; Flatt, L.; Jenkins, D.; Wallace, D.J.; Popov, N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes briefly a best estimate plus uncertainty analysis (BE+UA) methodology and presents its proto-typing application to the power pulse phase of a limiting large Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) for a CANDU 6 reactor fuelled with CANFLEX R fuel. The methodology is consistent with and builds on world practice. The analysis is divided into two phases to focus on the dominant parameters for each phase and to allow for the consideration of all identified highly ranked parameters in the statistical analysis and response surface fits for margin parameters. The objective of this analysis is to quantify improvements in predicted safety margins under best estimate conditions. (authors)

  10. The behaviour of zirconium alloys in Santowax OM organic coolant at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawatzky, A.

    1964-10-01

    Zirconium alloys have been exposed to Santowax OM at temperatures of 320 to 400 o C for times as long as 5000 hours. Short-term experiments (less than 2 weeks) were done in stainless-steel bombs and small out-of-pile loops. The X-7 organic loop in the NRX reactor was used to study long-term oxidation and hydriding both in-flux and out-of-flux. The results obtained lead to several tentative conclusions: Aluminum cladding serves as an effective hydrogen barrier; Considerable protection against hydriding is given by zirconium oxide, provided impurities in the organic are carefully controlled; Hydriding is greatly enhanced by the presence of chlorine in the coolant; and, Hydriding is somewhat enhanced by neutron irradiation. Of considerable significance is the fact that a Zircaloy-4 in-reactor test section of the X-7 loop was exposed to Santowax OM at 320 to 400 o C for more than 5000 hours without excessive hydriding. (author)

  11. Performance of a UASB reactor treating coffee wet wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardia Puebla, Yans; Rodríguez Pérez, Suyén; Janet Jiménez Hernández; Sánchez Girón, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    The present work shows the results obtained in the anaerobic digestion process of coffee wet wastewater processing. An UASB anaerobic reactor was operated in single-stage in mesophilic temperature controlled conditions (37±1ºC). The effect of both organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) in the anaerobic digestion of coffee wet wastewater was investigated. The OLR values considered in the single-stage UASB reactor varied in a range of 3,6-4,1 kgCOD m-3 d-1 and the HRT stayed in a range of 21,5-15,5 hours. The evaluation results show that the best performance of UASB reactor in single-stage was obtained at OLR of 3,6 kg COD m-3 d-1 with an average value of total and soluble COD removal of 77,2% and 83,4%, respectively, and average methane concentration in biogas of 61%. The present study suggests that the anaerobic digestion is suitable to treating coffee wet wastewater. (author)

  12. Preliminary design of a tandem mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, J.N.

    1984-04-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to examine the TARA mirror experiment as a possible tandem mirror reactor configuration. This is a preliminary study to size the coil structure based on using the smallest end cell axial length that physics and engineering allow, zeroing the central cell parallel currents and having interchange stability. The input powers are estimated for the final reactor design so a Q value may be estimated. The Q value is defined as the fusion power divided by the total injected power absorbed by the plasma. A computer study was performed on the effect of the transition size, the transition vertical spacing and transition current. These parameters affect the central cell parallel currents, the recircularization of the flux tube and the ratio of central cell beta to anchor beta needed for marginal stability. Two designs were identified. The first uses 100 keV and 13 keV neutral beams to pump the ions that trap in the thermal barrier. The Q value of this reactor is 11.3. The second reactor uses a pump beam at 40 keV. This energy is chosen because there is a resonance for the charge exchange cross section between D 0 and He 2+ at this energy, thus the alpha ash will be pumped along with the deuterium and tritium. The Q value of this reactor is 11.6

  13. A two-stage ethanol-based biodiesel production in a packed bed reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yuan; Nordblad, Mathias; Woodley, John

    2012-01-01

    were conducted in a simulated series of reactors by repeatedly passing the reaction mixture through a single reactor, with separation of the by-product glycerol and water between passes in the first and second stages, respectively. The second stage brought the major components of biodiesel to ‘in......-spec’ levels according to the European biodiesel specifications for methanol-based biodiesel. The highest overall productivity achieved in the first stage was 2.52 kg FAEE(kg catalyst)−1 h−1 at a superficial velocity of 7.6 cm min−1, close to the efficiency of a stirred tank reactor under similar conditions...

  14. The Thermal-hydraulic Analysis for the Aging Effect of the Component in CANDU-6 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Jung, Jong Yeob

    2014-01-01

    CANDU reactor consists of a lot of components, including pressure tube, reactor pump, steam generator, feeder pipe, and so on. These components become to have the aging characteristics as the reactor operates for a long time. The aging phenomena of these components lead to the change of operating parameters, and it finally results to the decrease of the operating safety margin. Actually, due to the aging characteristics of components, CANDU reactor power plant has the operating license for the duration of 30 years and the plant regularly check the plant operating state in the overhaul period. As the reactor experiences the aging, the reactor operators should reduce the reactor power level in order to keep the minimum safety margin, and it results to the deficit of economical profit. Therefore, in order to establish the safety margin for the aged reactor, the aging characteristics for components should be analyzed and the effect of aging of components on the operating parameter should be studied. In this study, the aging characteristics of components are analyzed and revealed how the aging of components affects to the operating parameter by using NUCIRC code. Finally, by scrutinizing the effect of operating parameter on the operating safety margin, the effect of aging of components on the safety margin has been revealed

  15. Flow inversion and natural convection in a MTR (Materials Testing Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimenez, M.O.; Clausse, A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermohydraulic evolution of a refrigerating channel of the MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) RA-6 reactor's core, at the Bariloche Atomic Center, has been studied during the transient caused by the primary system's pump decommissioning. This transient constitutes one of the reactor's operating power boundaries due to the maximum temperature permissible in fuel plates. The problem regarding the thermohydraulic code altered for the rectangular geometry calculation characteristic of the MTR design is analyzed. (Author) [es

  16. Method of operating a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosumi, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Michiyoshi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent stress corrosion cracking in the structural material of a reactor pressure vessel. Method: Prior to the starting of a reactor, the reactor pressure vessel is evacuated to carry out degassing of reactor water, and, at the same time, reactor water is heated. After reactor water is heated to a predetermined temperature, control rods are extracted to start nuclear heating. While the temperature of the reactor water is in a temperature range where elution of a metal which is a structural material of the reactor pressure vessel becomes vigorous and the sensitivity to the stress corrosion cracks increases, the reactor is operated at the maximum permissible temperature raising speed or maximum permissible cooling speed. (Aizawa, K.)

  17. The contract of design of an atomic reactor system in Yonggwang - 5, 6 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This is a contract of design of an atomic reactor system in Yonggwang 5, 6 nuclear power plant. It has the general contract condition. In the appendix, it indicates the detail regulations between two parties which are the coverage of division on the responsibility, schedule of the delivery, standard of the technology, guarantee, drawing and paper support of the Korea Electric Power Corporation, support of technology drill, test, regulations of code and standard and list of items and prices.

  18. Assessment of torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Painter, S.L.

    1992-12-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors because stellarators have no dangerous disruptions and no need for continuous current drive or power recirculated to the plasma, both easing the first wall, blanket, and shield design; less severe constraints on the plasma parameters and profiles; and better access for maintenance. This study shows that a reactor based on the torsatron configuration (a stellarator variant) could also have up to double the mass utilization efficiency (MUE) and a significantly lower cost of electricity (COE) than a conventional tokamak reactor (ARIES-I) for a range of assumptions. Torsatron reactors can have much smaller coil systems than tokamak reactors because the coils are closer to the plasma and they have a smaller cross section (higher average current density because of the lower magnetic field). The reactor optimization approach and the costing and component models are those used in the current stage of the ARIES-I tokamak reactor study. Typical reactor parameters for a 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor example are major radius R 0 = 6.6-8.8 m, on-axis magnetic field B 0 = 4.8-7.5 T, B max (on coils) = 16 T, MUE 140-210 kW(e)/tonne, and COE (in constant 1990 dollars) = 67-79 mill/kW(e)h. The results are relatively sensitive to assumptions on the level of confinement improvement and the blanket thickness under the inboard half of the helical windings but relatively insensitive to other assumptions

  19. Nuclear reactors to come

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2002-01-01

    The demand for nuclear energy will continue to grow at least till 2050 because of mainly 6 reasons: 1) the steady increase of the world population, 2) China, India and Indonesia will reach higher social standard and their energy consumption will consequently grow, 3) fossil energy resources are dwindling, 4) coal will be little by little banned because of its major contribution to the emission of green house effect gas, 5) renewable energies need important technological jumps to be really efficient and to take the lead, and 6) fusion energy is not yet ready to take over. All these reasons draw a promising future for nuclear energy. Today 450 nuclear reactors are operating throughout the world producing 17% of the total electrical power demand. In order to benefit fully of this future, nuclear industry has to improve some characteristics of reactors: 1) a more efficient use of uranium (it means higher burnups), 2) a simplification and automation of reprocessing-recycling chain of processes, 3) efficient measures against proliferation and against any misuse for terrorist purposes, and 4) an enhancement of safety for the next generation of reactors. The characteristics of fast reactors and of high-temperature reactors will likely make these kinds of reactors the best tools for energy production in the second half of this century. (A.C.)

  20. Optimization of the power distribution in a large power reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel'yanov, I.Ya.; Nazaryan, V.G.; Postnikov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor power distribution optimization problem is solved for the case of the RBMK-1000 reactor. The algorithm is written in terms of the linear programming method. The algorithm rests on two assumptions: 1) the relative power change of each fuel assembly is a linear function of reactivity increment caused by displacement of a regulating rod; 2) the change is an additive value. The algorithm is written in ALGOL for the BESM-6 computer. The optimum reactivity gain for the RBMK reactor has proved to equal the reactivity of 35-40 control rods. The results obtained confirm the validity of the assumptions. It is noted that the total computation time on the BESM-6 can be reduced to 20 min

  1. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of 6-30-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The Operating Units Status Report - Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Management and Program Analysis from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the U.S. It is hoped the report is helpful to all agencies and individuals interested in maintaining an awareness of the U.S. energy situation as a whole

  2. The Jules Horowitz Reactor project, a driver for revival of the research reactor community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pere, P.; Cavailler, C.; Pascal, C.

    2010-01-01

    The first concrete of the nuclear island for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) was poured at the end of July 2009 and construction is ongoing. The JHR is the largest new platform for irradiation experiments supporting Generation II and III reactors, Generation IV technologies, and radioisotope production. This facility, composed of a unique grouping of workshops, hot cells and hot laboratories together with a first-rate MTR research reactor, will ensure that the process, from preparations for irradiation experiments through post-irradiation non-destructive examination, is completed expediently, efficiently and, of course, safely. In addition to the performance requirements to be met in terms of neutron fluxes on the samples (5x10 14 n.cm -2 /sec -1 E>1 MeV in core and 3,6x10 14 n.cm -2 /sec -1 E<0.625 eV in the reflector) and the JHR's considerable irradiation capabilities (more than 20 experiments and one-tenth of irradiation area for simultaneous radioisotope production), the JHR is the first MTR to be built since the end of the 1960s, making this an especially challenging project. The presentation will provide an overview of the reactor, hot cells and laboratories and an outline of the key milestones in the project schedule, including initial criticality in early 2014 and radioisotope production in 2015. This will be followed by a description of the project organization set up by the CEA as owner and future operator and AREVA TA as prime contractor and supplier of critical systems, and a discussion of project challenges, especially those dealing with the following items:accommodation of a broad experimental domain; involvement by international partners making in-kind contributions to the project; ? development of components critical to safety and performance; the revival of engineering of research reactors and experimental devices involving France's historical players in the field of research reactors, and; tools to carry out the project, including computer codes

  3. First preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    A preliminary design of a tokamak experimental fusion reactor to be built in the near future is under way. The goals of the reactor are to achieve reactor-level plasma conditions for a sufficiently long operation period and to obtain design, construction and operational experience for the main components of full-scale power reactors. This design covers overall reactor system including plasma characteristics, reactor structure, blanket neutronics, shielding, superconducting magnets, neutral beam injector, electric power supply system, fuel circulating system, reactor cooling system, tritium recovery system and maintenance scheme. The main design parameters are as follows: the reactor fusion power 100 MW, torus radius 6.75 m, plasma radius 1.5 m, first wall radius 1.75 m, toroidal magnet field on axis 6 T, blanket fertile material Li 2 O, coolant He, structural material 316SS and tritium breeding ratio 0.9. (auth.)

  4. Sensory regulation of neuroligins and neurexin I in the honeybee brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Biswas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurexins and neuroligins, which have recently been associated with neurological disorders such as autism in humans, are highly conserved adhesive proteins found on synaptic membranes of neurons. These binding partners produce a trans-synaptic bridge that facilitates maturation and specification of synapses. It is believed that there exists an optimal spatio-temporal code of neurexin and neuroligin interactions that guide synapse formation in the postnatal developing brain. Therefore, we investigated whether neuroligins and neurexin are differentially regulated by sensory input using a behavioural model system with an advanced capacity for sensory processing, learning and memory, the honeybee.Whole brain expression levels of neuroligin 1-5 (NLG1-5 and neurexin I (NrxI were estimated by qRT-PCR analysis in three different behavioural paradigms: sensory deprivation, associative scent learning, and lateralised sensory input. Sensory deprived bees had a lower level of NLG1 expression, but a generally increased level of NLG2-5 and NrxI expression compared to hive bees. Bees that had undergone associative scent training had significantly increased levels of NrxI, NLG1 and NLG3 expression compared to untrained control bees. Bees that had lateralised sensory input after antennal amputation showed a specific increase in NLG1 expression compared to control bees, which only happened over time.Our results suggest that (1 there is a lack of synaptic pruning during sensory deprivation; (2 NLG1 expression increases with sensory stimulation; (3 concomitant changes in gene expression suggests NrxI interacts with all neuroligins; (4 there is evidence for synaptic compensation after lateralised injury.

  5. Effect of increasing nitrobenzene loading rates on the performance of anaerobic migrating blanket reactor and sequential anaerobic migrating blanket reactor/completely stirred tank reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuscu, Ozlem Selcuk; Sponza, Delia Teresa

    2009-01-01

    A laboratory scale anaerobic migrating blanket reactor (AMBR) reactor was operated at nitrobenzene (NB) loading rates increasing from 3.33 to 66.67 g NB/m 3 day and at a constant hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6 days to observe the effects of increasing NB concentrations on chemical oxygen demand (COD), NB removal efficiencies, bicarbonate alkalinity, volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation and methane gas percentage. Moreover, the effect of an aerobic completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) reactor, following the anaerobic reactor, on treatment efficiencies was also investigated. Approximately 91-94% COD removal efficiencies were observed up to a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day in the AMBR reactor. The COD removal efficiencies decreased from 91% to 85% at a NB loading rate of 66.67 g/m 3 day. NB removal efficiencies were approximately 100% at all NB loading rates. The maximum total gas, methane gas productions and methane percentage were found to be 4.1, 2.6 l/day and 59%, respectively, at a NB loading rate of 30.00 g/m 3 day. The optimum pH values were found to be between 7.2 and 8.4 for maximum methanogenesis. The total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentrations in the effluent were 110 and 70 mg/l in the first and second compartments at NB loading rates as high as 66.67 and 6.67 g/m 3 day, respectively, while they were measured as zero in the effluent of the AMBR reactor. In this study, from 180 mg/l NB 66 mg/l aniline was produced in the anaerobic reactor while aniline was completely removed and transformed to 2 mg/l of cathechol in the aerobic CSTR reactor. Overall COD removal efficiencies were found to be 95% and 99% for NB loading rates of 3.33 and 66.67 g/m 3 day in the sequential anaerobic AMBR/aerobic CSTR reactor system, respectively. The toxicity tests performed with Photobacterium phosphoreum (LCK 480, LUMIStox) and Daphnia magna showed that the toxicity decreased with anaerobic/aerobic sequential reactor system from the influent, anaerobic and to

  6. Probabilistic safety criteria on high burnup HWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    BACO is a code for the simulation of the thermo-mechanical and fission gas behaviour of a cylindrical fuel rod under operation conditions. Their input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. In this paper, experimental CANDU fuel rods irradiated at the NRX reactor together with experimental MOX fuel rods and the IAEA-CRP FUMEX cases are used in order to determine the sensitivity of BACO code predictions. The techniques for sensitivity analysis defined in BACO are: the 'extreme case analysis', the 'parametric analysis' and the 'probabilistic (or statistics) analysis'. We analyse the CARA and CAREM fuel rods relation between predicted performance and statistical dispersion in order of enhanced their original designs taking account probabilistic safety criteria and using the BACO's sensitivity analysis. (author)

  7. Neurexin Dysfunction in Adult Neurons Results in Autistic-like Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Rabaneda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs comprise a group of clinical phenotypes characterized by repetitive behavior and social and communication deficits. Autism is generally viewed as a neurodevelopmental disorder where insults during embryonic or early postnatal periods result in aberrant wiring and function of neuronal circuits. Neurexins are synaptic proteins associated with autism. Here, we generated transgenic βNrx1ΔC mice in which neurexin function is selectively impaired during late postnatal stages. Whole-cell recordings in cortical neurons show an impairment of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the βNrx1ΔC mice. Importantly, mutant mice exhibit autism-related symptoms, such as increased self-grooming, deficits in social interactions, and altered interaction for nonsocial olfactory cues. The autistic-like phenotype of βNrx1ΔC mice can be reversed after removing the mutant protein in aged animals. The defects resulting from disruption of neurexin function after the completion of embryonic and early postnatal development suggest that functional impairment of mature circuits can trigger autism-related phenotypes.

  8. A Preliminary Analysis of Reactor Performance Test (LOEP) for a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeonil; Park, Su-Ki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The final phase of commissioning is reactor performance test, which is to prove the integrated performance and safety of the research reactor at full power with fuel loaded such as neutron power calibration, Control Absorber Rod/Second Shutdown Rod drop time, InC function test, Criticality, Rod worth, Core heat removal with natural mechanism, and so forth. The last test will be safety-related one to assure the result of the safety analysis of the research reactor is marginal enough to be sure about the nuclear safety by showing the reactor satisfies the acceptance criteria of the safety functions such as for reactivity control, maintenance of auxiliaries, reactor pool water inventory control, core heat removal, and confinement isolation. After all, the fuel integrity will be ensured by verifying there is no meaningful change in the radiation levels. To confirm the performance of safety equipment, loss of normal electric power (LOEP), possibly categorized as Anticipated Operational Occurrence (AOO), is selected as a key experiment to figure out how safe the research reactor is before turning over the research reactor to the owner. This paper presents a preliminary analysis of the reactor performance test (LOEP) for a research reactor. The results showed how different the transient between conservative estimate and best estimate will look. Preliminary analyses have shown all probable thermal-hydraulic transient behavior of importance as to opening of flap valve, minimum critical heat flux ratio, the change of flow direction, and important values of thermal-hydraulic parameters.

  9. Three-phase packed bed reactor with an evaporating solvent—I. Experimental: the hydrogenation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in methanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, K.B.; Damhof, J.K.; Kroijenga, P.J.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present experimental data on the three-phase hydrogenation of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) to triaminotoluene. The experiments are performed in a cocurrent upflow packed bed reactor. Methanol is used as an evaporating solvent. The influence of the main operating parameters, the

  10. 1: the atom. 2: radioactivity. 3: man and radiations. 4: the energy. 5: nuclear energy: fusion and fission. 6: the operation of a nuclear reactor. 7: the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This series of 7 digest booklets present the bases of the nuclear physics and of the nuclear energy: 1 - the atom (structure of matter, chemical elements and isotopes, the four fundamental interactions, nuclear physics); 2 - radioactivity (definition, origins of radioelements, applications of radioactivity); 3 - man and radiations (radiations diversity, biological effects, radioprotection, examples of radiation applications); 4 - energy (energy states, different forms of energy, characteristics); 5 - nuclear energy: fusion and fission (nuclear energy release, thermonuclear fusion, nuclear fission and chain reaction); 6 - operation of a nuclear reactor (nuclear fission, reactor components, reactor types); 7 - nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel preparation, fuel consumption, reprocessing, wastes management). (J.S.)

  11. Irradiation of fuels and materials in the Jules Horowitz reactor: The 6th European Union JHR co-ordination action (JHR-CA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iracane, Daniel; Parrat, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The Fermine thematic network in the 5th FP pointed out the need for a new MTR facility in Europe to answer the continuous need of irradiation capabilities for fission power reactors and fusion facilities and to face the ageing of present MTRs. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) Project in Cadarache copes with this context, as an international service-oriented user-facility. In the field of nuclear fuels and materials irradiation experiments, a 6th FP co-ordination action, called JHR-CA, has started at the beginning of 2004 for 2 years. The main objective is to network existing expertise on development of a new generation of experimental devices, through definition of conceptual designs, instrumentation and related in-reactor services. This paper presents the outline of the JHR project, the organization of the JHR-CA programme, and a choice of irradiation device conceptual design results. (author)

  12. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  13. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-07-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing.

  14. A next-generation reactor concept: The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1992-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an advanced liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory as reactor technology for the 21st century. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system, in particular passive safety and waste management. The IFR concept consists of four technical features: (1) liquid sodium cooling, (2) pool-type reactor configuration, (3) metallic fuel, and (4) fuel cycle closure based on pyroprocessing

  15. Simulation of LOFT anticipated-transient experiments L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3 using TRAC-PF1/MOD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahota, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Anticipated-transient experiments L6-1, L6-2, and L6-3, performed at the Loss-of-fluid Test (LOFT) facility, are analyzed using the latest released version of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-PF1/MOD1). The results are used to assess TRAC-PF1/MOD1 trip and control capabilities, and predictions of thermal-hydraulic phenomena during slow transients. Test L6-1 simulated a loss-of-stream load in a large pressurized-water reactor (PWR), and was initiated by closing the main steam-flow control valve (MSFCV) at its maximum rate, which reduced the heat removal from the secondary-coolant system and increased the primary-coolant system pressure that initiated a reactor scram. Test L6-2 simulated a loss-of-primary coolant flow in a large PWR, and was initiated by tripping the power to the primary-coolant pumps (PCPs) allowing the pumps to coast down. The reduced primary-coolant flow caused a reactor scram. Test L6-3 simulated an excessive-load increase incident in a large PWR, and was initiated by opening the MSFCV at its maximum rate, which increased the heat removal from the secondary-coolant system and decreased the primary-coolant system pressure that initiated a reactor scram. The TRAC calculations accurately predict most test events. The test data and the calculated results for most parameters of interest also agree well

  16. Molten salt reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Simon, N.; Renault, C.

    2014-01-01

    Molten salt reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. The principle of this reactor is very innovative: the nuclear fuel is dissolved in the coolant which allows the online reprocessing of the fuel and the online recovery of the fission products. A small prototype: the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE - 8 MWt) was operating a few years in the sixties in the USA. The passage towards a fast reactor by the suppression of the graphite moderator leads to the concept of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) which is presently studied through different European projects such as MOST, ALISIA and EVOL. Worldwide the main topics of research are: the adequate materials resisting to the high level of corrosiveness of the molten salts, fuel salt reprocessing, the 3-side coupling between neutron transport, thermohydraulics and thermo-chemistry, the management of the changing chemical composition of the salt, the enrichment of lithium with Li 7 in the case of the use of lithium fluoride salt and the use of MSFR using U 233 fuel (thorium cycle). The last part of the article presents a preliminary safety analysis of the MSFR. (A.C.)

  17. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Sixth Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: 1. Review of IWGFR Activities - 1a. Approval of the minutes of the Fifth IWGFR Meeting. 1b. Report by Scientific Secretary regarding the activities of the Group. 2. Comments on National Programmes on Fast Breeder Reactors. 3. International Coordination of the Schedule for Major Fast Reactor Meetings and other major international meetings having a predominant fast reactor interest. 4. Consideration of Conferences on Fast Reactors. 4a. IAEA Symposium on Fuel and Fuel Elements for Fast Reactors, Brussels, Belgium 2-6 July 1973. 4b. International Symposium on Physics of Fast Reactors, Tokyo, Japan, 16 to 23 October 1973. 4c. International Conference on Fast Reactor Power Stations, London, UK, 11 to 14 March 1974 . 4d. Suggestions of the IWGFR members on other conferences. 5. Consideration of a Schedule for Specialists' Meetings in 1973-74. 6. Other Business - 6a. First-aid in Sodium Burns. 6b. Principles of Good Practice for Safe Operation of Sodium Circuits. 6c. Bibliography on Fast Reactors. 7. The Date and Place of the Seventh Annual Meeting of the IWGFR

  18. Reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashinakagawa, Emiko; Sato, Kanemitsu.

    1992-01-01

    Taking notice on the fact that Fe based alloys and Ni based alloys are corrosion resistant in a special atmosphere of a nuclear reactor, Fe or Ni based alloys are applied to reactor core structural components such as fuel cladding tubes, fuel channels, spacers, etc. On the other hand, the neutron absorption cross section of zirconium is 0.18 barn while that of iron is 2.52 barn and that of nickel is 4.6 barn, which amounts to 14 to 25 times compared with that of zirconium. Accordingly, if the reactor core structural components are constituted by the Fe or Ni based alloys, neutron economy is lowered. Since it is desirable that neutrons contribute to uranium fission with least absorption to the reactor core structural components, the reactor core structural components are constituted with the Fe or Ni based alloys of good corrosion resistance only at a portion in contact with reactor water, that is, at a surface portion, while the main body is constituted with zircalloy in the present invention. Accordingly, corrosion resistnace can be kept while keeping small neutron absorption cross section. (T.M.)

  19. EC6 for Darlington - a managed-enhancements replication project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulard, M.R.

    2011-01-01

    CANDU 6 design has a well-deserved reputation for lifetime performance and on-time, on-schedule construction. Candu Energy is finalizing development of an upgraded reactor product, the Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), which incorporates the CANDU 6's well-proven features, and adds enhancements that make the reactor even more safe and easier to operate. The EC6 is the only mid-sized reactor (700 MWe class) with a proven pedigree that meets modern reactor expectations and regulatory standards. It is sized for smaller grids and also has outstanding fuel-cycle capability. Some of the key features incorporated into the EC6 include increasing the plant's power output, shortening the overall project schedule, addressing obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the operating plants. The EC6 utilizes modern computers and a distributed control system housed in an advanced control room which, along with automated testing and on-line diagnostics, make the plant easier and safer to operate, with minimal operator intervention. An array of health monitoring equipment are also installed to foretell impending equipment problems, which can be acted upon, avoiding complications that could result in forced shutdowns. Improvements to the fire protection system and enhanced security features will further protect the assets. Containment and seismic capability are upgraded to meet modern standards. The first deployment of the EC6 is anticipated in Canada; other markets are also being pursued. The EC6 reactor is designed for a target lifetime capacity factor of 92% including 94% year-to-year and a 1% Forced Loss Rate. Since the number and duration of maintenance outages impact plant capacity factors, periodic short duration maintenance outages of less than a month once every 36 months is a key target of the EC6 reactor. This objective is achieved by automating a number of tasks such as shutdown systems testing. The majority

  20. Design analysis and microprocessor based control of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbakh, N.J.

    1988-01-01

    The object of this thesis is to design and test a microprocessor based controller, to a simulated nuclear reactor system. The mathematical model that describes the dynamics of a typical nuclear reactor of one group of delayed neutrons approximations with temperature feedback was chosen. A digital computer program has been developed for the design and analysis of a simulated model based on the concept of state-variable feedback in order to meet a desired system response with maximum overshoot of 3.4% and setting time of 4 sec. The state variable feedback coefficients are designed for the continuous system, then an approximation is used to obtain in the state variable feedback vector for the discrete system. System control was implemented utilizing Direct Digital Control (DDC) of a nuclear reactor simulated model through a control algorithm that was performed by means of a microprocessor based system. The controller performance was satisfactorily tested by exciting the reactor system with a transient reactivity disturbance and by a step change in power demand. Direct digital control, when implemented on a microprocessor adds versatility, flexibility in system design with the added advantage of possible use of optimal control algorithms. 6 tabs.; 30 figs.; 46 refs.; 6 apps

  1. The JASON reactor at the Royal Naval College: Silver Jubilee 6th November 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.; Roust, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    The 10 kW Research and Training Reactor Jason has been used at the Royal Naval College for 25 years in support of the Naval Nuclear Submarine Propulsion Programme. The principal features of Jason, relevant to its training role are given, along with the specifications of Jason, instrumentation, maintenance and operational experience. The educational role of the reactor is described with respect to the Nuclear Reactor Course, Nuclear Advanced Course, and the Nuclear Radiation Protection Course. Future developments in operator training, advantages of the low power reactor, quality control of education and training, and research and development, are also discussed. (U.K.)

  2. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  3. 6. European conference of TRIGA reactor users. Conference papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Sixth European Conference of TRIGA Users was held in September 1980, in Mainz, Germany under the joint sponsorship of INTERATOM and the Institut fur Kernchemie. The main areas of discussions were: Fuel cycle aspects; New reactor developments and improvements; TRIGA applications; Operating and maintenance experiences and Instrumentation

  4. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  5. Heavy-Water Power Reactors. Proceedings Of A Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    Proceedings of a Symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Vienna, 11-15 September 1967. The timeliness of the meeting was underlined by the large gathering of over 225 participants from 28 countries and three international organizations. Contents: Experience with heavy-water power and experimental reactors and projects (14 papers); New and advanced power reactor designs and concepts (8 papers); Development programmes and thorium cycle (9 papers); Economics and prospects of heavy-water power reactors (7 papers); Physics and fuel management (8 papers); Fuels (5 papers); Safety, control and engineering (6 papers); Panel discussion. Except for one Russian paper, which is published in English, each paper is in its original language (49 English and 8 French) and is preceded by an abstract in English with a second one in the original language if this is not English. Discussions are in English. (author)

  6. TIBER (Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor) II as a precursor to an international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Gilleland, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor (TIBER) was pursued in the US as one option for an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This concept evolved from earlier work on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) to develop a small, ignited tokamak. While the copper-coil versions of TFCX became the short-pulsed, 1.23-m radius, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), the superconducting TIBER with long pulse or steady state and a 2.6-m radius was considered for international collaboration. Recently the design was updated to TIBER II, to accommodate more conservative confinement scaling, double-poloidal divertors for impurity control, steady-state current drive, and nuclear testing. 18 refs., 1 fig

  7. Biological biogas upgrading capacity of a hydrogenotrophic community in a trickle-bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachbauer, Lydia; Voitl, Gregor; Bochmann, Günther; Fuchs, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Data on long term operation of a system supplied with real biogas are presented. • Ex-situ biological methanation is feasible for biogas upgrading. • Gas quality obtained complies with strictest direct grid injection criteria. • Biomethane can act as flexible storage for renewable surplus electricity. - Abstract: The current study reports on biological biogas upgrading by means of hydrogen addition to obtain biomethane. A mesophilic (37 °C) 0.058 m"3 trickle-bed reactor with an immobilized hydrogenotrophic enrichment culture was operated for a period of 8 months using a substrate mix of molecular hydrogen (H_2) and biogas (36–42% CO_2). Complete CO_2 conversion (> 96%) was achieved up to a H_2 loading rate of 6.5 m_n"3 H_2/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d, corresponding to 2.3 h gas retention time. The optimum H_2/CO_2 ratio was determined to be between 3.67 and 4.15. CH_4 concentrations above 96% were achieved with less than 0.1% residual H_2. This gas quality complies even with tightest standards for grid injection without the need for additional CO_2 removal. If less rigid standards must be fulfilled H_2 loading rates can be almost doubled (10.95 versus 6.5 m_n"3 H_2/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d) making the process even more attractive. At this H_2 loading the achieved methane productivity was 2.52 m_n"3 CH_4/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d. In terms of biogas this corresponds to an upgrading capacity of 6.9 m_n"3 biogas/m"3_r_e_a_c_t_o_r _v_o_l_. × d. The conducted experiments demonstrate that biological methanation in an external reactor is well feasible for biogas upgrading under the prerequisite that an adequate H_2 source is available.

  8. A review of fast reactor activities in Switzerland - April 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydler, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the nuclear fission field, there are activities related to many different reactor concepts, including the Light Water Reactor, the Light Water High Converter Reactor, the High Temperature Reactor, the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor and the recently proposed new concept of a small heating reactor. In 1984 the total expenditure for fast reactor activities remained the same as that in the previous year, but the budget for 1985 has declined. The 6.0 million Swiss Francs expended in 1984 have been allocated to an LMFBR safety progamme (46%) and a fuel development programme (54%). All activities reported below are carried out at the Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR). In the natural convection studies described in Section 5, the Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (LKT) of the Federal Institute of Technology at Zuerich is actively participating. In the past twelve months collaboration with foreign research organizations in the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Italy (JRC Ispra) and the U.K. for the LMFBR safety programme, and the Federal Republic of Germany and the U.S.A. for the fuel development programme has proved to be very fruitful. In this context an attachment agreement with CEA-DERS at Cadarache is worth mentioning, since it enabled an EIR staff member to participate in the prediction and analysis of the SCARABEE-APL in-pile tests

  9. Neutrino-4 experiment on the search for a sterile neutrino at the SM-3 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A. P., E-mail: serebrov@pnpi.spb.ru; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Chernyi, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Martemyanov, V. P.; Tsinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute,” (Russian Federation); Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K. [State Scientific Centre Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (Russian Federation); and others

    2015-10-15

    In view of the possibility of the existence of a sterile neutrino, test measurements of the dependence of the reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from the reactor core has been performed on SM-2 reactor with the Neutrino-2 detector model in the range of 6–11 m. Prospects of the search for reactor antineutrinos at short distances have been discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Pressure Changes in HANARO Reactor Hall after a Reactor Shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Geeyang; Han, Jaesam; Ahn, Gukhoon; Jung, Hoansung

    2013-01-01

    The major objective of this work is intended to evaluate the characteristics of the thermal behavior regarding how the decay heat will be affected by the reactor hall pressure change and the increase of pool water temperature induced in the primary coolant after a reactor shutdown. The particular reactor pool water temperature at the surface where it is evaporated owing to the decay heat resulting in the local heat transfer rate is related to the pressure change response in the reactor hall associated with the primary cooling system because of the reduction of the heat exchanger to remove the heat. The increase in the pool water temperature is proportional to the heat transfer rate in the reactor pool. Consequently, any limit on the reactor pool water temperature imposes a corresponding limit on the reactor hall pressure. At HANARO, the decay heat after a reactor shutdown is mainly removed by the natural circulation cooling in the reactor pool. This paper is written for the safety feature of the pressure change related leakage rate from the reactor hall. The calculation results show that the increase of pressure in the reactor hall will not cause any serious problems to the safety limits although the reactor hall pressure is slightly increased. Therefore, it was concluded that the pool water temperature increase is not so rapid as to cause the pressure to vary significantly in the reactor hall. Furthermore, the mathematical model developed in this work can be a useful analytical tool for scoping and parametric studies in the area of thermal transient analysis, with its proper representation of the interaction between the temperature and pressure in the reactor hall

  11. Experimental study of the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A 6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, V. P; Garcia, J. C; Delmastro, D. F

    2006-01-01

    In this work the core grid by-pass orifices inlet pressure drop of the new core of the R A6 reactor are experimentally studied.The experiments are performed using a 1:1 scale mock-up of an external fuel element cell.Different gaps between fuel elements are considered in order to take into account the design allowances. Different flows are considered to take into account the normal operation flow range.Measurement uncertainties are included.The results will be used to calculate the core flow distribution [es

  12. The Jules Horowitz reactor project, a driver for revival of the research reactor community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pere, P.; Cavailler, C.; Pascal, C. [AREVA TA, CEA Cadarache - Etablissement d' AREVA TA - Chantier RJH - MOE - BV2 - BP no. 9 - 13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); CS 50497 - 1100, rue JR Gauthier de la Lauziere, 13593 Aix en Provence cedex 3 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The first concrete of the nuclear island for the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) was poured at the end of July 2009 and construction is ongoing. The JHR is the largest new platform for irradiation experiments supporting Generation II and III reactors, Generation IV technologies, and radioisotope production. This facility, composed of a unique grouping of workshops, hot cells and hot laboratories together with a first -rate MTR research reactor, will ensure that the process, from preparations for irradiation experiments through post-irradiation non-destructive examination, is completed expediently, efficiently and, of course, safely. In addition to the performance requirements to be met in terms of neutron fluxes on the samples (5x10{sup 14} n.cm{sup -2}/sec{sup -1} E> 1 MeV in core and 3,6x10{sup 14} n.cm{sup -2}/sec{sup -1} E<0.625 eV in the reflector) and the JHR's considerable irradiation capabilities (more than 20 experiments and one-tenth of irradiation area for simultaneous radioisotope production), the JHR is the first MTR to be built since the end of the 1960's, making this an especially challenging project. The presentation will provide an overview of the reactor, hot cells and laboratories and an outline of the key milestones in the project schedule, including initial criticality in early 2014 and radioisotope production in 2015. This will be followed by a description of the project organization set up by the CEA as owner and future operator and AREVA TA as prime contractor and supplier of critical systems, and a discussion of project challenges, especially those dealing with the following items: - accommodation of a broad experimental domain, - involvement by international partners making in-kind contributions to the project, - development of components critical to safety and performance, - the revival of engineering of research reactors and experimental devices involving France's historical players in the field of research reactors, and

  13. VERONA V6.22 – An enhanced reactor analysis tool applied for continuous core parameter monitoring at Paks NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Végh, J., E-mail: janos.vegh@ec.europa.eu [Institute for Energy and Transport of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Postbus 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Pós, I., E-mail: pos@npp.hu [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd., H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Horváth, Cs., E-mail: csaba.horvath@energia.mta.hu [Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Kálya, Z., E-mail: kalyaz@npp.hu [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd., H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Parkó, T., E-mail: parkot@npp.hu [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd., H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Ignits, M., E-mail: ignits@npp.hu [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd., H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary)

    2015-10-15

    Between 2003 and 2007 the Hungarian Paks NPP performed a large modernization project to upgrade its VERONA core monitoring system. The modernization work resulted in a state-of-the-art system that was able to support the reactor thermal power increase to 108% by more accurate and more frequent core analysis. Details of the new system are given in Végh et al. (2008), the most important improvements were as follows: complete replacement of the hardware and the local area network; application of a new operating system and porting a large fraction of the original application software to the new environment; implementation of a new human-system interface; and last but not least, introduction of new reactor physics calculations. Basic novelty of the modernized core analysis was the introduction of an on-line core-follow module based on the standard Paks NPP core design code HELIOS/C-PORCA. New calculations also provided much finer spatial resolution, both in terms of axial node numbers and within the fuel assemblies. The new system was able to calculate the fuel applied during the first phase of power increase accurately, but it was not tailored to determine the effects of burnable absorbers as gadolinium. However, in the second phase of the power increase process the application of fuel assemblies containing three fuel rods with gadolinium content was intended (in order to optimize fuel economy), therefore off-line and on-line VERONA reactor physics models had to be further modified, to be able to handle the new fuel according to the accuracy requirements. In the present paper first a brief overview of the system version (V6.0) commissioned after the first modernization step is outlined; then details of the modified off-line and on-line reactor physics calculations are described. Validation results for new modules are treated extensively, in order to illustrate the extent and complexity of the V&V procedure associated with the development and licensing of the new

  14. A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1997-01-01

    Previous models for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys have assumed that the mechanism is a completely solid-state diffusion process, determined by the growth and breakdown of the protective oxide film. In-reactor kinetics have been related to out-reactor kinetics with the oxide-metal interface temperature calculated from effects of heat flux. Recent experimental results have suggested that oxide dissolution and reprecipitation may be a major process leading to the formation of thick porous oxide films in-reactor. The model described here is based on the dissolution of primary recoil tracks in the oxide as the primary process distinguishing in-reactor from out-reactor corrosion. The consequences of such a model would be a very different microscopic morphology of in-reactor and out-reactor thick films, a significant irradiation effect on non-heat transfer surfaces, and a change in the kinetics of the overall process. This model should be equally applicable to PWR and BWR water chemistries because of the amphoteric nature of ZrO 2 , and the effects of LiOH should operate by an essentially identical mechanism. A reciprocal rate equation should fit these processes and with additive terms seems capable of accommodating all water chemistry effects, except for discontinuous processes such as nodular corrosion. (author). 60 refs, 6 figs

  15. Mathematical modeling of a three-phase trickle bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The transient behavior in a three-phase trickle bed reactor system (N2/H2O-KCl/activated carbon, 298 K, 1.01 bar was evaluated using a dynamic tracer method. The system operated with liquid and gas phases flowing downward with constant gas flow Q G = 2.50 x 10-6 m³ s-1 and the liquid phase flow (Q L varying in the range from 4.25x10-6 m³ s-1 to 0.50x10-6 m³ s-1. The evolution of the KCl concentration in the aqueous liquid phase was measured at the outlet of the reactor in response to the concentration increase at reactor inlet. A mathematical model was formulated and the solutions of the equations fitted to the measured tracer concentrations. The order of magnitude of the axial dispersion, liquid-solid mass transfer and partial wetting efficiency coefficients were estimated based on a numerical optimization procedure where the initial values of these coefficients, obtained by empirical correlations, were modified by comparing experimental and calculated tracer concentrations. The final optimized values of the coefficients were calculated by the minimization of a quadratic objective function. Three correlations were proposed to estimate the parameters values under the conditions employed. By comparing experimental and predicted tracer concentration step evolutions under different operating conditions the model was validated.

  16. Comparison of nuclear irradiation parameters of fusion breeder materials in high flux fission test reactors and a fusion power demonstration reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, U.; Herring, S.; Hogenbirk, A.; Leichtle, D.; Nagao, Y.; Pijlgroms, B.J.; Ying, A.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear irradiation parameters relevant to displacement damage and burn-up of the breeder materials Li 2 O, Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 2 TiO 3 have been evaluated and compared for a fusion power demonstration reactor and the high flux fission test reactor (HFR), Petten, the advanced test reactor (ATR, INEL) and the Japanese material test reactor (JMTR, JAERI). Based on detailed nuclear reactor calculations with the MCNP Monte Carlo code and binary collision approximation (BCA) computer simulations of the displacement damage in the polyatomic lattices with MARLOWE, it has been investigated how well the considered HFRs can meet the requirements for a fusion power reactor relevant irradiation. It is shown that a breeder material irradiation in these fission test reactors is well suited in this regard when the neutron spectrum is well tailored and the 6 Li-enrichment is properly chosen. Requirements for the relevant nuclear irradiation parameters such as the displacement damage accumulation, the lithium burn-up and the damage production function W(T) can be met when taking into account these prerequisites. Irradiation times in the order of 2-3 full power years are necessary for the HFR to achieve the peak values of the considered fusion power Demo reactor blanket with regard to the burn-up and, at the same time, the dpa accumulation

  17. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized; Desarrollo de Tecnologias para Reactores Nucleares de pequeno y medio tamano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-08-15

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  18. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Michiko.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain an optimum structural arrangement of IRM having a satisfactory responsibility to the inoperable state of a nuclear reactor and capable of detecting the reactor power in an averaged manner. Constitution: As the structural arrangement of IRM, from 6 to 16 even number of IRM are bisected into equial number so as to belong two trip systems respectively, in which all of the detectors are arranged at an equal pitch along a circumference of a circle with a radius rl having the center at the position of the central control rod in one trip system, while one detector is disposed near the central control rod and other detectors are arranged substantially at an equal pitch along the circumference of a circle with a radius r2 having the center at the position for the central control rod in another trip system. Furthermore, the radius r1 and r2 are set such that r1 = 0.3 R, r2 = 0.5 R in the case where there are 6 IRM and r1 = 0.4 R and R2 = 0.8 R where there are eight IRM where R represents the radius of the reactor core. (Kawakami, Y.)

  19. Rotating reactors : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, F.; Schaaf, van der J.; Nijhuis, T.A.; Schouten, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    This review-perspective paper describes the current state-of-the-art in the field of rotating reactors. The paper has a focus on rotating reactor technology with applications at lab scale, pilot scale and industrial scale. Rotating reactors are classified and discussed according to their geometry:

  20. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... components and molecular mass distribution of the lignin oils. The obtained lignin oil has a very different components composition when compared to a beech wood oil....

  1. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  2. Neutronic design of a traveling wave reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L.

    2010-10-01

    The traveling wave reactor is an innovative kind of fast breeder reactor, capable of operate for decades without refueling and whose operation requires only a small amount of enriched fuel for the ignition. Also, one of its advantages is its versatility; it can be designed as small modules of about 100 M We or large scale units of 1000 M We. In this paper the behaviour of the traveling wave reactor core is studied in order to determine whether the traveling breeding/burning wave moves (as theoretically predicted) or not. To achieve this, we consider a two pieces cylinder, the first one, the ignition zone, containing highly enriched fuel and the second, the breeding zone, which is the larger, containing natural or depleted uranium or thorium. We consider that both zones are homogeneous mixtures of fuel, sodium as coolant and iron as structural material. We also include a reflector material outside the cylinder to reduce the neutron leakages. Simulations were run with MCNPX version 2.6 code. We observed that the wave does move as time passes as predicted by theory, and reactor remains supercritical in the time we have simulated (3000 days). Also, we found that thorium does not perform as well as uranium for breeding in this type of reactor. Further test with different reflectors are planned for both U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycles. (Author)

  3. Reactor technology progress report on Joyo, vol. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The works of the Technology Section, Fast Experimental Reactor Division, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., are roughly divided into core technology, anomaly monitoring techniques, plant technology, purity control techniques and operation planning and management. In this book, the state of activities in the Technology Section, the result of operation of Joyo and the foreign information related to FBRs in the quarter from July to September, 1981, are reported. The operation of Joyo of 75 MW rating No. 5 cycle was finished on August 9, and after fuel handling and FFDL test, the operation of special test cycle was carried out in September. In this quarter, main report papers were one N-report and 108 memos. The examination of the preliminary analysis and the plan for shifting to the MK-2 core and the performance test, and the planning of the core construction for the operation from No. 1 to No. 3 cycle with the MK-2 core and the analysis of its characteristics were carried out. The revision of the long term plan of the Technology Section was started in July, and the first draft was completed in September. The compilation of the general report on the MK-1 core was started in July. Three meetings for technical discussion within the Division were held. (Kako, I.)

  4. Farewell to a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanborg, P.

    1976-01-01

    Denmark's second reactor, DR 2, whose first criticality took place the night of 18/19 December 1958 was shut down for the last time on 31 October 1975. It was a light-water moderrated and cooled reactor of swimming-pool type with a thermal power of 5 MW, using 90% enriched uranium. The operation is described. The reactor and auxiliary equipment are now being put 'in store' - all fuel elements sent for reprocessing, the reactor tank and cooling circuits emptied, and a lead shielding placed over the tank opening. The rest of the equipment will remain in place. (B.P.)

  5. Pattern recognition application for surveillance of abnormal conditions in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Dzwinel, W.

    1990-01-01

    The system to monitor abnormal conditions in a nuclear reactor, based on the noise analysis of the reactor basic parameters such as power, temperature and coolant flow rate, has been developed. The pattern recognition techniques such as clustering, cluster analysis, feature selection and clusters visualization methods form the basis of the software. Apart from non-hierarchical clustering procedures applied earlier, the hierarchical one is recommended. The system application for IBR-2 Dubna reactor diagnostics is shown. 10 refs.; 6 figs

  6. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) surface blistering studies on fusion reactor materials, (2) TFTR design support activities, (3) analysis of samples bombarded in-situ in PLT, (4) chemical sputtering effects, (5) modeling of surface behavior, (6) ion migration in glow discharge tube cathodes, (7) alloy development for irradiation performance, (8) dosimetry and damage analysis, and (9) development of tritium migration in fusion devices and reactors

  7. Feasibility of ISO 14000 certification for the RA-6 reactor of the Bariloche Atomic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gho, Carlos J.

    2003-01-01

    The strengths and weaknesses of a proposal to set up a System for the Environmental Management of RA-6 reactor are reviewed. With this aim: The facility, its surroundings, its institutional frame, and the links of both the National Atomic Energy Commission and the Bariloche Atomic Center with the environmental issues are described. The RA-6 past and present regarding the environment is analyzed. The existence of an abundant documentation on procedures and manuals for administrative and technical management, as well as records of environmental behavior is determined. A summary is made of the work done with the staff in order to assess their motivation to develop this type of initiative, and their degree of knowledge and awareness of environmental issues. It is worthy to point out the high professional training of the RA-6 staff. This information is analyzed under the point of view of ISO 14001 both text and philosophy. It is shown that there exist important strengths that enable to face a concrete project, and that the weaknesses are few, most of them can be overcome somehow easily. The opportunity is remarkable. Conclusion is made that RA-6 is not only in optimal conditions to face successfully the implementation of an Environmental Management System, but it has already a rudimentary one

  8. Experience in using a research reactor for the training of power reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blotcky, A.J.; Arsenaut, L.J.

    1972-01-01

    A research reactor facility such as the one at the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital would have much to offer in the way of training reactor operators. Although most of the candidates for the course had either received previous training in the Westinghouse Reactor Operator Training Program, had operated nuclear submarine reactors or had operated power reactors, they were not offered the opportunity to perform the extensive manipulations of a reactor that a small research facility will allow. In addition the AEC recommends 10 research reactor startups per student as a prerequisite for a cold operator?s license and these can easily be obtained during the training period

  9. Prospect of realizing nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This Report describes the results of the research work on nuclear fusion, which CRIEPI has carried out for about ten years from the standpoint of electric power utilities, potential user of its energy. The principal points are; (a) economic analysis (calculation of costs) based on Japanese analysis procedures and database of commercial fusion reactors, including fusion-fission hybrid reactors, and (b) conceptual design of two types of hybrid reactors, that is, fission-fuel producing DMHR (Demonstration Molten-Salt Hybrid Reactor) and electric-power producing THPR (Tokamak Hybrid Power Reactor). The Report consists of the following chapters: 1. Introduction. 2. Conceptual Design of Hybrid Reactors. 3. Economic Analysis of Commercial Fusion Reactors. 4. Basic Studies Applicable Also to Nuclear Fusion Technology. 5. List of Published Reports and Papers; 6. Conclusion. Appendices. (author)

  10. Evaluation of Torsatrons as reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, J.F.; Gulec, K.; Miller, R.L.; El-Guebaly, L.

    1994-03-01

    Stellarators have significant operational advantages over tokamaks as ignited steady-state reactors. This scoping study, which uses an integrated cost-minimization code that incorporates costing and reactor component models self-consistently with a 1-D energy transport calculation, shows that a torsatron reactor could also be economically competitive with a tokamak reactor. The projected cost of electricity (COE) estimated using the Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Studies (ARIES) costing algorithms is 65.6 mill/kW(e)h in constant 1992 dollars for a reference 1-GW(e) Compact Torsatron reactor case. The COE is relatively insensitive (<10% variation) over a wide range of assumptions, including variations in the maximum field allowed on the coils, the coil elongation, the shape of the density profile, the beta limit, the confinement multiplier, and the presence of a large loss region for alpha particles. The largest variations in the COE occur for variations in the electrical power output demanded and the plasma-coil separation ratio

  11. Neutron source for a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Hiromasa.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To easily increase a start-up power of a reactor without irradiation in other reactors. Structure: A neutron source comprises Cf 252 , a natural antimony rod, a layer of beryllium, and a vessel of neutron source. On upper and lower portion of Cf 252 are arranged natural antimony rods, which are surrounded by the Be layer, the entirety being charged into the vessel. The Cf 252 may emit neutron, has a half life more than a period of operating cycle of the reactor and is less deteriorated even irradiated by radioactive rays while being left within the reactor. The natural antimony rod is radioactivated by neutron from Cf 252 and neutron as reactor power increases to emit γ rays. The Be absorbs γ rays to emit the neutron. The antimony rod is irradiated within the reactor. Further, since the Cf 252 is small in neutron absorption cross section, it is hard to be deteriorated even while being inserted within the reactor. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Monte Carlo estimation of the dose and heating of cobalt adjuster rods irradiated in the CANDU 6 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, D.; Dumitrache, I.

    2005-01-01

    The present work is a part of a more complex project related to the replacement of the original stainless steel adjuster rods with cobalt assemblies in the CANDU 6 reactor core. The 60 Co produced by 59 Co irradiation could be used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper will mainly describe some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronic equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and heating of the irradiated cobalt rods, are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS 2.1. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. (authors)

  13. A new model for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B [University of Toronto, ON (Canada). Centre for Nuclear Engineering

    1997-02-01

    Previous models for the in-reactor corrosion of zirconium alloys have assumed that the mechanism is a completely solid-state diffusion process, determined by the growth and breakdown of the protective oxide film. In-reactor kinetics have been related to out-reactor kinetics with the oxide-metal interface temperature calculated from effects of heat flux. Recent experimental results have suggested that oxide dissolution and reprecipitation may be a major process leading to the formation of thick porous oxide films in-reactor. The model described here is based on the dissolution of primary recoil tracks in the oxide as the primary process distinguishing in-reactor from out-reactor corrosion. The consequences of such a model would be a very different microscopic morphology of in-reactor and out-reactor thick films, a significant irradiation effect on non-heat transfer surfaces, and a change in the kinetics of the overall process. This model should be equally applicable to PWR and BWR water chemistries because of the amphoteric nature of ZrO{sub 2}, and the effects of LiOH should operate by an essentially identical mechanism. A reciprocal rate equation should fit these processes and with additive terms seems capable of accommodating all water chemistry effects, except for discontinuous processes such as nodular corrosion. (author). 60 refs, 6 figs.

  14. Material options for a commercial fusion reactor first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabiri, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    A study has been conducted to evaluate the potential of various materials for use as first walls in high-power-density commercial fusion reactors. Operating limits for each material were obtained based on a number of criteria, including maximum allowable structural temperatures, critical heat flux, ultimate tensile strength, and design-allowable stress. The results with water as a coolant indicate that a modified alloy similar to HT-9 may be a suitable candidate for low- and medium-power-density reactor first walls with neutron loads of up to 6 MW/m 2 . A vanadium or copper alloy must be used for high-power-density reactors. The neutron wall load limit for vanadium alloys is about 14 MW 2 , provided a suitable coating material is chosen. The extremely limited data base for radiation effects hinders any quantitative assessment of the limits for copper alloys

  15. Seismic analysis of fuel and target assemblies at a production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braverman, J.I.; Wang, Y.K.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the unique modeling and analysis considerations used to assess the seismic adequacy of the fuel and target assemblies in a production reactor at Savannah River Site. This confirmatory analysis was necessary to provide assurance that the reactor can operate safely during a seismic event and be brought to a safe shutdown condition. The plant which was originally designed in the 1950's required to be assessed to more current seismic criteria. The design of the reactor internals and the magnitude of the structural responses enabled the use of a linear elastic dynamic analysis. A seismic analysis was performed using a finite element model consisting of the fuel and target assemblies, reactor tank, and a portion of the concrete structure supporting the reactor tank. The effects of submergence of the fuel and target assemblies in the water contained within the reactor tank can have a significant effect on their seismic response. Thus, the model included hydrodynamic fluid coupling effects between the assemblies and the reactor tank. Fluid coupling mass terms were based on formulations for solid bodies immersed in incompressible and frictionless fluids. The potential effects of gap conditions were also assessed in this evaluation. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  16. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Biodegradation of 4-bromophenol by Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in batch shake flasks and in a continuously operated packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigated growth and biodegradation of 4-bromophenol (4-BP) by Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6 in batch shake flasks as well as in a continuously operated packed bed reactor (PBR). Batch growth kinetics of A. chlorophenolicus A6 in presence of 4-BP followed substrate inhibition kinetics with the estimated biokinetic parameters value of μ max = 0.246 h(-1), K i = 111 mg L(-1), K s  = 30.77 mg L(-1) and K = 100 mg L(-1). In addition, variations in the observed and theoretical biomass yield coefficient and maintenance energy of the culture were investigated at different initial 4-BP concentration. Results indicates that the toxicity tolerance and the biomass yield of A. chlorophenolicus A6 towards 4-BP was found to be poor as the organism utilized the substrate mainly for its metabolic maintenance energy. Further, 4-BP biodegradation performance by the microorganism was evaluated in a continuously operated PBR by varying the influent concentration and hydraulic retention time in the ranges 400-1,200 mg L(-1) and 24-7.5 h, respectively. Complete removal of 4-BP was achieved in the PBR up to a loading rate of 2,276 mg L(-1) day(-1).

  18. Light water reactor fuel analysis code. FEMAXI-6 (Ver.1). Detailed structure and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Saitou, Hiroaki

    2006-02-01

    A light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-6 is an advanced version which has been produced by integrating the former version FEMAXI-V with numerous functional improvements and extensions. In particular, the FEMAXI-6 code has attained a complete coupled solution of thermal analysis and mechanical analysis, enabling an accurate prediction of pellet-clad gap size and PCMI in high burnup fuel rods. Also, such new models have been implemented as pellet-clad bonding and fission gas bubble swelling, and linkage function with detailed burning analysis code has been enhanced. Furthermore, a number of new materials properties and parameters have been introduced. With these advancements, the FEMAXI-6 code has been upgraded to a versatile analytical tool for high burnup fuel behavior not only in the normal operation but also in anticipated transient conditions. This report describes in detail the design, basic theory and structure, models and numerical method, improvements and extensions, and method of model modification. In order to facilitate effective and wide-ranging application of the code, formats and methods of input/output of the code are also described, and a sample output in an actual form is included. (author)

  19. Wastewater treatment in a hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tizghadam, Mostafa [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France); Dagot, Christophe [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France)], E-mail: dagot@ensil.unilim.fr; Baudu, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Eau et de l' Environnement, Universite de Limoges, ENSIL, Parc ESTER, 16 Rue Atlantis, F-87068 Limoges Cedex (France)

    2008-06-15

    A novel hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor (HASBR), which contained both suspended and attached-growth biomass perfect mixing cells in series, was developed by installing standing and hanging baffles and introducing plastic brushes into a conventional activated sludge (CAS) reactor. It was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The effects on the operational performance of developing the suspended and attached-growth biomass and reactor configuration were investigated. The change of the flow regime from complete-mix to plug-flow, and the addition of plastic brushes as a support for biofilm, resulted in considerable improvements in the COD, nitrogen removal efficiency of domestic wastewater and sludge settling properties. In steady state, approximately 98 {+-} 2% of the total COD and 98 {+-} 2% of the ammonia of the influent were removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 593 {+-} 11 mg COD/L and 43 {+-} 5 mg N/L, respectively, at a HRT of 10 h. These results were 93 {+-} 3 and 6 {+-} 3% for the CAS reactor, respectively. Approximately 90 {+-} 7% of the total COD was removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 654 {+-} 16 mg COD/L at a 3 h HRT, and in the organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.36 kg COD m{sup -3} day{sup -1}. The result for the CAS reactor was 60 {+-} 3%. Existing CAS plants can be upgraded by changing the reactor configuration and introducing biofilm support media into the aeration tank.

  20. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. Neutronic parameters for three different thorium fuel matrices loaded separately in the modelled thermal core have been investigated. 233U, 235U and 239Pu isotopes have been used as fissile element in the thorium oxide fuel, separately. Burn-up of three different fuels has been calculated at 1 MW constant power. 135X and 149Sm concentration variations have been studied in the modelled core during 165 days burn-up. Burn-up of thorium oxide enriched with 233U resulted in the least 149Sm and 135Xe productions and net fissile production of 233U after 165 days. The negative fuel, coolant and void reactivity of the used fuel assures safe operation of the modelled thermal core containing (233U-Th O2 matrix. Furthermore, utilisation of thorium breeder fuel demonstrates several advantages, such as good neutronic economy, 233U production and less production of long-lived α emitter high radiotoxic wastes in biological internal exposure point of view

  1. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  2. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In 1998 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  3. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  4. An internally illuminated monolith reactor: Pros and cons relative to a slurry reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, Joana T.; Carneiro, J.T.; Berger, Rob; Moulijn, Jacob A.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, kinetic models for the photo-oxidation of cyclohexane in two different photoreactor systems are discussed: a top illumination reactor (TIR) representative of a slurry reactor, and the so-called internally illuminated monolith reactor (IIMR) representing a reactor containing

  5. Analysis of a main steam isolation value closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main steam isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4. Without boron injection and makeup coolant, the reactor loses its coolant inventory very quickly and the reactor power drops rapidly to ∼ 16% of rated power due to negative void reactivity. With coolant makeup from the high-pressure core spray and the reactor core isolation cooling systems, the rector reaches a quasi-steady-state condition after an initially rapidly changing transient. The dome pressure, downcomer water level, and core power oscillate around a mean value; the average core power is ∼ 15%, which is approximately equal to the power needed to heat and evaporate the subcooled makeup coolant. Lower boron concentrations in the core tend to complicate reactor behavior due to the combination of two competing phenomena: the negative boron reactivity and the positive reactivity caused by a void collapse

  6. The analysis for inventory of experimental reactor high temperature gas reactor type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Kuntjoro; Pande Made Udiyani

    2016-01-01

    Relating to the plan of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) to operate an experimental reactor of High Temperature Gas Reactors type (RGTT), it is necessary to reactor safety analysis, especially with regard to environmental issues. Analysis of the distribution of radionuclides from the reactor into the environment in normal or abnormal operating conditions starting with the estimated reactor inventory based on the type, power, and operation of the reactor. The purpose of research is to analyze inventory terrace for Experimental Power Reactor design (RDE) high temperature gas reactor type power 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt. Analyses were performed using ORIGEN2 computer code with high temperatures cross-section library. Calculation begins with making modifications to some parameter of cross-section library based on the core average temperature of 570 °C and continued with calculations of reactor inventory due to RDE 10 MWt reactor power. The main parameters of the reactor 10 MWt RDE used in the calculation of the main parameters of the reactor similar to the HTR-10 reactor. After the reactor inventory 10 MWt RDE obtained, a comparison with the results of previous researchers. Based upon the suitability of the results, it make the design for the reactor RDE 20MWEt and 30 MWt to obtain the main parameters of the reactor in the form of the amount of fuel in the pebble bed reactor core, height and diameter of the terrace. Based on the main parameter or reactor obtained perform of calculation to get reactor inventory for RDE 20 MWT and 30 MWT with the same methods as the method of the RDE 10 MWt calculation. The results obtained are the largest inventory of reactor RDE 10 MWt, 20 MWt and 30 MWt sequentially are to Kr group are about 1,00E+15 Bq, 1,20E+16 Bq, 1,70E+16 Bq, for group I are 6,50E+16 Bq, 1,20E+17 Bq, 1,60E+17 Bq and for groups Cs are 2,20E+16 Bq, 2,40E+16 Bq, 2,60E+16 Bq. Reactor inventory will then be used to calculate the reactor source term and it

  7. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigon, B.; Vacelet, H.; Dornbusch, D.

    2000-01-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor are presented. Safety criteria are explained. Finally, merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U 3 Si 2 fuel are discussed. (author)

  8. Comparison between TRU burning reactors and commercial fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Sanda, Toshio; Ogawa, Takashi

    2001-03-01

    Research and development for stabilizing or shortening the radioactive wastes including in spent nuclear fuel are widely conducted in view point of reducing the environmental impact. Especially it is effective way to irradiate and transmute long-lived TRU by fast reactors. Two types of loading way were previously proposed. The former is loading relatively small amount of TRU in all commercial fast reactors and the latter is loading large amount of TRU in a few TRU burning reactors. This study has been intended to contribute to the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactor cycle system. The transmutation and nuclear characteristics of TRU burning reactors were evaluated and compared with those of conventional transmutation system using commercial type fast reactor based upon the investigation of technical information about TRU burning reactors. Major results are summarized as follows. (1) Investigation of technical information about TRU burning reactors. Based on published reports and papers, technical information about TRU burning reactor concepts transmutation system using convectional commercial type fast reactors were investigated. Transmutation and nuclear characteristics or R and D issue were investigated based on these results. Homogeneously loading of about 5 wt% MAs on core fuels in the conventional commercial type fast reactor may not cause significant impact on the nuclear core characteristics. Transmutation of MAs being produced in about five fast reactors generating the same output is feasible. The helium cooled MA burning fast reactor core concept propose by JAERI attains criticality using particle type nitride fuels which contain more than 60 wt% MA. This reactor could transmute MAs being produced in more than ten 1000 MWe-LWRs. Ultra-long life core concepts attaining more than 30 years operation without refueling by utilizing MA's nuclear characteristics as burnable absorber and fertile nuclides were proposed. Those were pointed out that

  9. Incineration of actinide targets in a pressurized water reactor spin project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puill, A.; Bergeron, J.

    1993-01-01

    The ability of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) with uranium fuel to limit the inventory growth of minor actinides (237 neptunium, and americium) produced by the French nuclear powerplants is studied. Targets containing an actinide oxide mixed to an inert matrix are loaded in some reactors. After being irradiated along with the fuel, the target is specially reprocessed. The remaining actinide and the plutonium which is produced, added to fresh actinide, are recycled in new targets. The radiotoxicity balance, with and without incineration, is examined considering that only the losses coming from the target reprocessing treated as waste. A scenario arbitrarily based on 18 years of operation results in a reduction of the radiotoxicity of the waste by a factor between 10 and 20, depending on the actinide considered. 6 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission fifteenth water reactor safety information meeting: Volume 6, Decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, TMI-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.J.

    1988-02-01

    This six-volume report contains 140 papers out of the 164 that were presented at the Fifteenth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the National Bureau of Standards, Gaithersburg, Maryland, during the week of October 26-29, 1987. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. This report, Volume 6, discusses decontamination and decommissioning, accident management, and the Three Mile Island-2 reactor accident. Thirteen reports have been cataloged separately

  11. Tritium resources available for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovari, M.; Coleman, M.; Cristescu, I.; Smith, R.

    2018-02-01

    The tritium required for ITER will be supplied from the CANDU production in Ontario, but while Ontario may be able to supply 8 kg for a DEMO fusion reactor in the mid-2050s, it will not be able to provide 10 kg at any realistic starting time. The tritium required to start DEMO will depend on advances in plasma fuelling efficiency, burnup fraction, and tritium processing technology. It is in theory possible to start up a fusion reactor with little or no tritium, but at an estimated cost of 2 billion per kilogram of tritium saved, it is not economically sensible. Some heavy water reactor tritium production scenarios with varying degrees of optimism are presented, with the assumption that only Canada, the Republic of Korea, and Romania make tritium available to the fusion community. Results for the tritium available for DEMO in 2055 range from zero to 30 kg. CANDU and similar heavy water reactors could in theory generate additional tritium in a number of ways: (a) adjuster rods containing lithium could be used, giving 0.13 kg per year per reactor; (b) a fuel bundle with a burnable absorber has been designed for CANDU reactors, which might be adapted for tritium production; (c) tritium production could be increased by 0.05 kg per year per reactor by doping the moderator with lithium-6. If a fusion reactor is started up around 2055, governments in Canada, Argentina, China, India, South Korea and Romania will have the opportunity in the years leading up to that to take appropriate steps: (a) build, refurbish or upgrade tritium extraction facilities; (b) extend the lives of heavy water reactors, or build new ones; (c) reduce tritium sales; (d) boost tritium production in the remaining heavy water reactors. All of the alternative production methods considered have serious economic and regulatory drawbacks, and the risk of diversion of tritium or lithium-6 would also be a major concern. There are likely to be serious problems with supplying tritium for future

  12. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  13. Neurexin-1β Binding to Neuroligin-1 Triggers the Preferential Recruitment of PSD-95 versus Gephyrin through Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Neuroligin-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Giannone

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion between neurexin-1β (Nrx1β and neuroligin-1 (Nlg1 induces early recruitment of the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95 scaffold; however, the associated signaling mechanisms are unknown. To dissociate the effects of ligand binding and receptor multimerization, we compared conditions in which Nlg1 in neurons was bound to Nrx1β or nonactivating HA antibodies. Time-lapse imaging, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and single-particle tracking demonstrated that in addition to aggregating Nlg1, Nrx1β binding stimulates the interaction between Nlg1 and PSD-95. Phosphotyrosine immunoblots and pull-down of gephyrin by Nlg1 peptides in vitro showed that Nlg1 can be phosphorylated at a unique tyrosine (Y782, preventing gephyrin binding. Expression of Nlg1 point mutants in neurons indicated that Y782 phosphorylation controls the preferential binding of Nlg1 to PSD-95 versus gephyrin, and accordingly the formation of inhibitory and excitatory synapses. We propose that ligand-induced changes in the Nlg1 phosphotyrosine level control the balance between excitatory and inhibitory scaffold assembly during synapse formation and stabilization.

  14. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2001-01-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  15. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  16. Material and geometry options and performance characteristics for a test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahshan, S.N.; Fletcher, C.D.; Terry, W.K.

    1993-01-01

    For the past 3 yr, an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) design team has studied design options for a new test reactor to provide continued testing services after several aging test reactors in the United States are decommissioned. This new reactor, the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR), would also fill other currently unmet needs, such as medical isotope production and space reactor component testing. Consideration of user needs, safety requirements, developmental uncertainties, and other factors led to the selection of an evolutionary design with plate fuel and several independently cooled test loops. The fuel would be cooled by light water, but most neutron moderation would come from heavy water or beryllium. The BATR design was tentatively scaled to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), an existing reactor at INEL: The power output of BATR is 250 MW(thermal), and the active core heights is 1 m. For safety in loss-of-flow events, the coolant flows upward through the core. The BATR design has one large test loop (with a test space diameter of 15.0 cm) along the central axis of the core and six smaller test loops (with test space diameters of 8.0 cm) centered at 6-deg azimuthal intervals on a 24.71-cm-diam circle around the central core axis

  17. International topical meeting. Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM) and meeting of the International Group on Reactor Research (IGORR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear research and test reactors have been in operation for over 60 years, over 270 research reactors are currently operating in more than 50 countries. This meeting is dedicated to different aspects of research reactor fuels: new fuels for new reactors, the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels, spent fuel management and computational tools for core simulation. About 80 contributions are reported in this document, they are organized into 7 sessions: 1) international topics and overview on new projects and fuel, 2) new projects and upgrades, 3) fuel development, 4) optimisation and research reactor utilisation, 5) innovative methods in research reactors physics, 6) safety, operation and research reactor conversion, 7) fuel back-end management, and a poster session. Experience from Australian, Romanian, Libyan, Syrian, Vietnamese, South-African and Ghana research reactors are reported among other things. The Russian program for research reactor spent fuel management is described and the status of the American-driven program for the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels is presented. (A.C.)

  18. Feasibility study to restart the research reactor RA with a converted core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Plecas, I.; Marinkovic, N.

    1999-01-01

    Main options are specified for the future status of the 6.5 MW heavy water research reactor RA. Arguments pro and contra restarting the reactor are presented. When considering the option to restart the RA reactor, possibilities to improve its neutronic parameters, such as neutron flux values and irradiation capabilities, are discussed, as well as the compliance with the worldwide activities of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. Possibility of core conversion is examined. Detailed reactor physics design calculations are performed for different fuel types and uranium loading. For different fuel management schemes results are presented for the effective multiplication factor, power distribution, fuel burnup and consumption. It is shown that, as far as reactor core parameters are considered, conversion to lower enrichment fuel could be easily accomplished. However, conversion to the lower enrichment could only be justified if combined with improvement of some other reactor attributes. (author)

  19. Development of a safeguards system for the THTR pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelhardt, H.

    1978-08-01

    This report provides a survey of the technical possibilities of safeguarding the THTR-300 pebble bed reactor in accordance with the NPT. Description of the reactor system, the operational mode, and the operator's material control system are presented in Sections 2, 3 and 4. A suggested safeguards approach which is based on an item counting of pebble elements with containment and surveillance as a supplementary measure is described in the Sections 5 and 6

  20. Sterilization of swine wastewater treated by anaerobic reactors using UV photo-reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlon Lopes Pereira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of ultraviolet radiation is an established procedure with growing application forthe disinfection of contaminated wastewater. This study aimed to evaluate the efficiency of artificial UV radiation, as a post treatment of liquid from anaerobic reactors treating swine effluent. The UV reactors were employed to sterilize pathogenic microorganisms. To this end, two photo-reactors were constructed using PVC pipe with100 mm diameter and 1060 mmlength, whose ends were sealed with PVC caps. The photo-reactors were designed to act on the liquid surface, as the lamp does not get into contact with the liquid. To increase the efficiency of UV radiation, photo-reactors were coated with aluminum foil. The lamp used in the reactors was germicidal fluorescent, with band wavelength of 230 nm, power of 30 Watts and manufactured by Techlux. In this research, the HRT with the highest removal efficiency was 0.063 days (90.6 minutes, even treating an effluent with veryhigh turbidity due to dissolved solids. It was concluded that the sterilization method using UV has proved to be an effective and appropriate process, among many other procedures.

  1. Analysis of a main steam isolation valve closure anticipated transient without scram in a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, T.J.; Pan, C.; Chen, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) could be a major accident sequence with possible core melt and containment damage in a boiling water reactor (BWR). The behavior of a BWR/6 during a main stream isolation valve closure ATWS is investigated using the best-estimate computer program, RETRAN-02. The effects of both makeup coolant and boron injection on the reactor behavior are studied. It is found that the BWR/6 behaves similarly to the BWR/2 and BWR/4

  2. ''Sleeping reactor'' irradiations: Shutdown reactor determination of short-lived activation products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerde, E.A.; Glasgow, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    At the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the principal irradiation system has a thermal neutron flux (φ) of ∼ 4 x 10 14 n/cm 2 · s, permitting the detection of elements via irradiation of 60 s or less. Irradiations of 6 or 7 s are acceptable for detection of elements with half-lives of as little as 30 min. However, important elements such as Al, Mg, Ti, and V have half-lives of only a few minutes. At HFIR, these can be determined with irradiation times of ∼ 6 s, but the requirement of immediate counting leads to increased exposure to the high activity produced by irradiation in the high flux. In addition, pneumatic system timing uncertainties (about ± 0.5 s) make irradiations of 9 Be(γ,n) 8 Be, the gamma rays principally originating in the spent fuel. Upon reactor SCRAM, the flux drops to ∼ 1 x 10 10 n/cm 2 · s within 1 h. By the time the fuel elements are removed, the flux has dropped to ∼ 6 x 10 8 . Such fluxes are ideal for the determination of short-lived elements such as Al, Ti, Mg, and V. An important feature of the sleeping reactor is a flux that is not constant

  3. Studies of conceptual spheromak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsurai, M.; Yamada, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary design studies are carried out for a spheromak fusion reactor. Simplified circuit theory is applied to obtain the characteristic relations among various parameters of the spheromak configuration for an aspect ratio of A >or approx. 1.6. These relations are used to calculate the parameters for the conceptual designs of three types of fusion reactor: (1) the DT reactor with two-component-type operation, (2) the ignited DT reactor, and (3) the ignited catalysed-type DD reactor. With a total wall loading of approx. 4 MW.m -2 , it is found that edge magnetic fields of only approx. 4 T (DT) and approx. 9 T (Cat. DD) are required for ignited reactors of 1 m plasma (minor) radius with output powers in the gigawatt range. An assessment of various schemes of generation, compression and translation of spheromak plasmas is presented. (author)

  4. Reactor utilization, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Stanic, A.

    1984-01-01

    Reactor was operated until August 1984 due to prohibition issued by the Ministry since the reactor does not have the emergency cooling system nor special filters in the ventilation system yet. This means that the operation plan was fulfilled by 69%. This annex includes detailed tables containing data about utilization of reactor experimental channels, irradiated samples, as well as interruptions of operation. Detailed data about reactor power during this period are shown as well

  5. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  6. Permeated defect detecting test method and device in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Yoshishige.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device capable of performing a test for entire inner surfaces of the reactor upon periodical inspection of a BWR type reactor while sufficiently taking countermeasures for radiation rays into consideration. Namely, the present invention comprises following steps. (1) A provisional step for taking a shroud head of a reactor core shroud and incore structural components above and below the shroud out of the reactor, discharging reactor water and water tightly closing openings such as reactor wall perforation holes, (2) a pretreatment step for washing exposed inner surfaces of the reactor and peeling deteriorated materials, (3) a first drying step for drying portions washed and peeled in the step (2), (4) a permeation step for applying a permeation liquid of a defect detecting medium on the exposed inner surfaces of the reactor, (5) a permeation liquid removing step for removing the an excess permeation liquid in the step (4), (6) a second drying step for drying corresponding portions after performing the step (5), and (7) a flaw detecting step for optically observing the corresponding portions after performing the step (6) and detecting flaws. (I.S.)

  7. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Bernot

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M and O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235 U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited to

  8. EQ6 Calculations for Chemical Degradation Of N Reactor (U-Metal) Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Bernot

    2001-02-27

    The Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Waste Package Department of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management & Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) performed calculations to provide input for disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the N Reactor, a graphite moderated reactor at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site (ref. 1). The N Reactor core was fueled with slightly enriched (0.947 wt% and 0.947 to 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in Mark IV and Mark IA fuels, respectively) U-metal clad in Zircaloy-2 (Ref. 1, Sec. 3). Both types of N Reactor SNF have been considered for disposal at the proposed Yucca Mountain site. For some WPs, the outer shell and inner shell may breach (Ref. 3) allowing the influx of water. Water in the WP will moderate neutrons, increasing the likelihood of a criticality event within the WP; and the water may, in time, gradually leach the fissile components from the WP, further affecting the neutronics of the system. This study presents calculations of the long-term geochemical behavior of WPs containing two multi-canister overpacks (MCO) with either six baskets of Mark IA or five baskets of Mark IV intact N Reactor SNF rods (Ref. 1, Sec. 4) and two high-level waste (HLW) glass pour canisters (GPCs) arranged according to the codisposal concept (Ref. 4). The specific study objectives were to determine: (1) The extent to which fissile uranium will remain in the WP after corrosion/dissolution of the initial WP configuration (2) The extent to which fissile uranium will be carried out of the degraded WP by infiltrating water (such that internal criticality is no longer possible, but the possibility of external criticality may be enhanced); and (3) The nominal chemical composition for the criticality evaluations of the WP design, and to suggest the range of parametric variations for additional evaluations. The scope of this calculation, the chemical compositions (and subsequent criticality evaluations) of the simulations, is limited

  9. Conceptual design of a Tokamak hybrid power reactor (THPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, F.; Imamura, Y.; Inoue, M.; Asami, N.; Kasai, M.; Yanagisawa, I.; Ida, T.; Takuma, T.; Yamaji, K.; Akita, S.

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design of a fusion-fission hybrid tokamak reactor has been carried out to investigate the engineering feasibility and promising scale of a commercial hybrid reactor power plant. A tokamak fusion driver based on the recent plasma scaling law is introduced in this design study. The major parameters and features of the reactor are R=6.06 m, a=1.66 m, Ip=11.8 MA, Pf=668 MW, double null divertor plasma and steady state burning with RF current drive. The fusion power has been determined with medium energy multiplication in the blanket so as to relieve thermal design problems and produce electric power around 1000 MW. Uranium silicide is used for the fast fission blanket material to promise good nuclear performance. The coolant of the blanket is FLIBE and the tritium breeding blanket material is Li 2 O ceramics providing breeding ratio above unity

  10. A new MTR fuel for a new MTR reactor: UMo for the Jules Horowitz reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guigon, B. [CEA Cadarache, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire DEN, Reacteur Jules Horowitz, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Vacelet, H. [Compagnie pour l' Etude et la Realisation de Combustibles Atomiques, CERCA, Etablissement de Romans, 26 (France); Dornbusch, D. [Technicatome, Service d' Architecture Generale, 13 - Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2003-07-01

    Within some years, the Jules Horowitz Reactor will be the only working experimental reactor (material and fuel testing reactor) in France. It will have to provide facilities for a wide range of needs: from activation analysis to power reactor fuel qualification. In this paper will be presented the main characteristics of the Jules Horowitz Reactor: its total power, neutron flux, fuel element... Safety criteria will be explained. Finally merits and disadvantages of UMo compared to the standard U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel will be discussed. (authors)

  11. Proposal of a fast gas-cooled reactor using transuranics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Anderson Altair Pinheiro de

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, nations that have invested in research and energy generation through nuclear source have devoted part of their efforts in developing new technologies for nuclear reactors. Part of this investment focuses on new material testing, particularly regarding new fuels. In a world view that breaths sustainability, the reprocess and reuse of spent fuel from conventional reactors comes alive in nuclear technology, presenting itself as a real alternative of energy source for the latest generation of reactors. Different concepts of fourth generation reactors have been proposed and must meet some basic requirements, such as: extended burnup, improvement of passive safety, better radioactive waste management, possibility to use reprocessed fuel and proliferation resistance. In this context, the GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) is one of the future promises, presenting satisfactory neutronic results on the use of type of fuel (U, Pu) C. In the present work, the fuel of a traditional GFR reactor that uses (U, Pu)C was sub was replaced by a transuranic reprocessed fuel (TRU), obtained by non-proliferation reprocessing technology. The UO 2 fuel initially enriched by 3.1% was burned in a standard PWR, with full burn of 33,000 MWd/T. Afterward it was left in a pool for 5 years and finally reprocessed by UREX + method. Two fuels were studied and evaluated, one diluted with depleted uranium (U, TRU)C, and the other diluted in thorium (Th, TRU)C. Assessments were done in steady state and as well as during burning and were compared with results obtained using the standard fuel, (U, Pu) C. The outcome shows that the use of TRU as a fuel, in GFR type reactors, is a real possibility. The research was done using the SCALE 6.0 code modules. (author)

  12. PC-version of RAM6-code for calculation of parameters of the effective logarithmic boundary condition at the absorbent rod surface in reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Van Ngoc; Ngo Dang Nhan

    1990-01-01

    The RAM-6 code for calculation of parameters of the effective logarithmic boundary condition at the absorbent rod surface in reactor is suitably modofied to work on IBM PC, the instructions for its usage are presented and capabilities of the personal cpmputer oriented RAM-6 code are demonstrated. (author). 4 refs, 5 tabs, 2 figs

  13. Main results of the analysis of internal flooding in the reactor building of Kozloduy NPP Unit 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demireva, E.; Goranov, S.; Horstmann, R.

    2004-01-01

    For modernization of Units 5 and 6 of Kozloduy NPP, a comprehensive analysis of internal flooding scenarios has been carried out for the reactor building outside the containment and for the turbine hall by FRAMATOME ANP and ENPRO Consult. The objective of the presentation is to provide information on the main results obtained in the flooding analysis of the reactor building (outside containment). The flooding analysis is being performed under application of the 'Methodology and boundary conditions'. Flooding calculations are provided for all of the rooms in the reactor building outside the containment in which the fluid systems, having the capacity for flooding, are mounted. The performed functional analysis shows whether the consequences of a postulated initial event are within the NPP design or could lead to situations which are not taken into account in the design. The proposals for overcoming of identified unacceptable situations and the possible strategy of room draining are also given. Several cases of leaks inside the sealed rooms in the restricted area lead to the situation that the rooms will get totally flooded. Even if this should be acceptable from the point of view of loss of system function, the water pressure effect on the structural elements, as walls and doors, does not allow such complete filling-up. The second relevant identified effect was spreading of humidity and high temperatures to adjacent rooms. Long-lasting effects of this type have to be avoided, in order to prevent potential common cause effects on safety system equipment (authors)

  14. Wastewater treatment in a hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizghadam, Mostafa; Dagot, Christophe; Baudu, Michel

    2008-01-01

    A novel hybrid activated sludge baffled reactor (HASBR), which contained both suspended and attached-growth biomass perfect mixing cells in series, was developed by installing standing and hanging baffles and introducing plastic brushes into a conventional activated sludge (CAS) reactor. It was used for the treatment of domestic wastewater. The effects on the operational performance of developing the suspended and attached-growth biomass and reactor configuration were investigated. The change of the flow regime from complete-mix to plug-flow, and the addition of plastic brushes as a support for biofilm, resulted in considerable improvements in the COD, nitrogen removal efficiency of domestic wastewater and sludge settling properties. In steady state, approximately 98 ± 2% of the total COD and 98 ± 2% of the ammonia of the influent were removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 593 ± 11 mg COD/L and 43 ± 5 mg N/L, respectively, at a HRT of 10 h. These results were 93 ± 3 and 6 ± 3% for the CAS reactor, respectively. Approximately 90 ± 7% of the total COD was removed in the HASBR, when the influent wastewater concentration was 654 ± 16 mg COD/L at a 3 h HRT, and in the organic loading rate (OLR) of 5.36 kg COD m -3 day -1 . The result for the CAS reactor was 60 ± 3%. Existing CAS plants can be upgraded by changing the reactor configuration and introducing biofilm support media into the aeration tank

  15. Isothermal calorimeter for reactor radiation dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radak, B; Markovic, V [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Odeljenje za radijacionu hemiju, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    An isothermal calorimeter with thermistors for measuring absorbed dose rates from 10{sup 4}-5-6.10{sup 5} rad/h in reactor experimental holes has been designed. A kinetics method for determining the equilibrium temperature difference has been developed, and its application in isothermal calorimetry proved. The expected accuracy in measurements within {+-} 2-5% has been proved by measurements carried out in the reactor. Some data obtained by measurements in the reactor RA are presented (author)

  16. Reactor core in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1989-01-01

    In a reactor core in FBR type reactors, a portion of homogenous fuels constituting the homogenous reactor core is replaced with multi-region fuels in which the enrichment degree of fissile materials is lower nearer to the axial center. This enables to condition the composition such that a reactor core having neutron flux distribution either of a homogenous reactor core or a heterogenous reactor core has substantially identical reactivity. Accordingly, in the transfer from the homogenous reactor core to the axially heterogenous reactor core, the average reactivity in the reactor core is substantially equal in each of the cycles. Further, by replacing a portion of the homogenous fuels with a multi-region fuels, thereby increasing the heat generation near the axial center, it is possiable to reduce the linear power output in the regions above and below thereof and, in addition, to improve the thermal margin in the reactor core. (T.M.)

  17. Full Core Criticality Modeling of Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Using the SCALE6.0 and MCNP5 Code Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matijevic, M.; Jecmenica, R.; Pevec, D.; Trontl, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is one of the reactor concepts selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation of innovative nuclear energy systems. It was selected among a group of more than 100 prototypes and his commercial availability is expected by 2030. GFR has common goals of the rest GIF advanced reactor types: economy, safety, proliferation resistance, availability and sustainability. Several GFR fuel design concepts such as plates, rod pins and pebbles are currently being investigated in order to meet the high temperature constraints characteristic for a GFR working enviroment. In the previous study we have compared the fuel depletion results for heterogeneous GFR fuel assembly (FA), obtained with TRITON6 sequence of SCALE6.0 code system, with the MCNPX-CINDER90 and TRIPOLI-4-D codes. Present work is a continuation of neutronic criticality analysis of heterogeneous FA and full core configurations of a GFR concept using 3-D Monte Carlo codes KENO-VI/SCALE6.0 and MCNP5. The FA is based on a hexagonal mesh of fuel rods (uranium and plutonium carbide fuel, silicon carbide clad, helium gas coolant) with axial reflector thickness being varied for the purpose of optimization. Three reflector materials were analysed: zirconium carbide (ZrC), silicon carbide (SiC) and natural uranium. ZrC has been selected as a reflector material, having the best contribution to the neutron economy and to the reactivity of the core. The core safety parameters were also analysed: a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity was verified for the heavy metal fuel and coolant density loss. Criticality calculations of different FA active heights were performed and the reflector thickness was also adjusted. Finally, GFR full core criticality calculations using different active fuel rod heights and fixed ZrC reflector height were done to find the optimal height of the core. The Shannon entropy of the GFR core fission distribution was proved to be

  18. Safety equipment in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiratori, Hirozo; Ishiyama, Satoshi; Ugawa, Yukio.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To safely retain, even if fuel should be molten and flown through the bottom of a container in a reactor, the molten fuel to remove heat generation of the fuel to prevent occurrence of a critical trouble. Structure: A reactor container housing a core and coolant has thereunder a separation dome in a central portion thereof and a partitioning plate coaxially and circularly disposed in the periphery of the separation dome, with a tray formed of magnesium oxide being disposed. Further, a cooling path system is provided so as to surround the tray. The cooling path system and the reactor container are surrounded and protected by a reactor wall provided with heat insulating refractory bricks, a coolant pouring system extends through the reactor wall, and the coolant is supplied to the tray. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. Fusion reactor development: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This paper is a review of the current prospects for fusion reactor development based upon the present status in plasma physics research, fusion technology development and reactor conceptual design for the tokamak magnetic confinement concept. Recent advances in tokamak plasma research and fusion technology development are summarized. The direction and conclusions of tokamak reactor conceptual design are discussed. The status of alternate magnetic confinement concept research is reviewed briefly. A feasible timetable for the development of fusion reactors is presented

  20. Production of 48V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siri, S.; Cohen, I.M.

    2009-01-01

    The production of 48 V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the 6 Li(n, t) 4 He reaction, and eventually 7 Li(n, n't) 4 He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from 48 V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  1. Reactor FaceMap Tool: A modern graphics tool for displaying reactor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    A prominent graphical user interface in reactor physics applications at the Savannah River Site is the reactor facemap display. This is a two dimensional view of a cross section of a reactor. In the past each application which needed a facemap implemented its own version. Thus, none of the code was reused, the facemap implementation was hardware dependent and the user interface was different for each facemap. The Reactor FaceMap Tool was built to solve these problems. Through the use of modern computing technologies such as X Windows, object-oriented programming and client/server technology the Reactor FaceMap Tool has the flexibility to work in many diverse applications and the portability to run on numerous types of hardware

  2. Heat transfer study of a submerged reactor channel under boil-off condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Deb [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.; Sahoo, P.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Ghosh, A.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Health, Safety and Environment Group

    2012-12-15

    Experiments have been carried out to study the heatup behavior of a single segmented reactor channel for Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor under submerged, partially submerged and exposed conditions. This situation may arise from a severe accident scenario of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors where full or segmented reactor channels are likely to be disassembled and form a submerged debris bed. An assembly of electrical heater rod, simulating fuel bundle and channel components like Pressure Tube and Calandria Tube constitutes the segmented reactor channel. Heatup of this assembly is observed with respect to different water levels ranging from full submergence to totally exposed and power levels of 6-8 kW, typical to decay power level. It has been observed from the set of experiment that fuel bundle local dry out followed by heatup does not happen till the bundle is partially submerged. Temperature excursion of the bundle is evident when the bundle is exposed to steam-air environment. (orig.)

  3. A comparison of mass transfer coefficients between trickle-bed, hollow fiber membrane and stirred tank reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, James J; Atiyeh, Hasan K; Devarapalli, Mamatha; Phillips, John R; Lewis, Randy S; Huhnke, Raymond L

    2013-04-01

    Trickle-bed reactor (TBR), hollow fiber membrane reactor (HFR) and stirred tank reactor (STR) can be used in fermentation of sparingly soluble gasses such as CO and H2 to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals. Gas fermenting reactors must provide high mass transfer capabilities that match the kinetic requirements of the microorganisms used. The present study compared the volumetric mass transfer coefficient (K(tot)A/V(L)) of three reactor types; the TBR with 3 mm and 6 mm beads, five different modules of HFRs, and the STR. The analysis was performed using O2 as the gaseous mass transfer agent. The non-porous polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) HFR provided the highest K(tot)A/V(L) (1062 h(-1)), followed by the TBR with 6mm beads (421 h(-1)), and then the STR (114 h(-1)). The mass transfer characteristics in each reactor were affected by agitation speed, and gas and liquid flow rates. Furthermore, issues regarding the comparison of mass transfer coefficients are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given

  5. A WIMS-NESTLE reactor physics model for an RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, R.T.; Meriwether, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    This work describes the static neutronic calculations made for a three-dimensional model of an RBMK (Russian) reactor. Future work will involve the use of this neutronic model and a thermal-hydraulic model in coupled calculations. The lattice code, WIMS-D, was used to obtain the cross sections for the static neutronic calculations. The static reactor neutronic calculations were made with NESTLE, a three-dimensional nodal diffusion code. The methods used to establish an RBMK reactor model for use in these codes are discussed, and the cross sections calculated are given. (author)

  6. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, volume one, are divided into 6 sessions bearing on: - session 1: Advances in computational methods including utilization of parallel processing and vectorization (7 conferences) - session 2: Fast, epithermal, reactor physics, calculation, versus measurements (9 conferences) - session 3: New fast and thermal reactor designs (9 conferences) - session 4: Thermal radiation and charged particles transport (7 conferences) - session 5: Super computers (7 conferences) - session 6: Thermal reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences).

  7. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  8. Considerations in the design of a high power medical isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Nordyke, William H.; Brown, Roy

    2002-01-01

    For the low enriched aqueous homogeneous reactor to be economic in the production of medical isotopes, such as Mo-99 and Sr-89, the power level should be of the order of 100 kWth. This is double the earlier designs and this paper discusses the design changes which must be considered to meet this goal. The topics considered are: 1. Heat removal from the reactor solution; 2. Recombination of radiolytic gases; 3. Adequate radiation shielding; 4. Stability of reactor power with fluctuating reactivity; 5. Adequate cooling of the reflector; 6. Independent shutdown mechanisms; 7. Required volume of the reactor; 8. Economic implementation. (author)

  9. Fuel Management Study for a CANDU reactor Using New Physics Codes Suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Bong Ghi; Park, Joo Hwan

    2008-01-01

    A CANDU reactor is a heavy-water-moderated, natural uranium fuelled reactor with a pressure tube. The reactor contains a horizontal cylindrical vessel (calandria) and each pressure tube is isolated from the heavy-water moderator in a calandria. This allows the moderator system to be operated of a high-pressure and of a high-temperature coolant in pressure tube. The primary reactivity control in a CANDU reactor is the on-power refueling on a daily basis and an additional reactivity control is provided through an individual reactivity device movement, which includes 21 adjusters, 6 liquid zone controllers, 4 mechanical control absorbers and 2 shutdown systems. The refueling in CANDU is carried out on power and this makes the in-core fuel management different from that in a reactor refueled during shutdowns. The objective of a fuel management is to determine a fuel loading and fuel replacement procedure which will result in a minimum total unit energy cost in a safe and reliable operation. In this article, the in-core fuel management for the CANDU reactor was studied by using the new physics code suite of WIMS-IST/DRAGON-IST/RFSP-IST with the model of Wolsong-1 NPP

  10. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  11. Okulo natural reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Minoru

    1993-01-01

    French CEA has reported in 1972 that natural nuclear reactors existed in Okulo uranium deposit in Gabon in Africa, that caused nuclear fission chain reaction (Okulo phenomena) spontaneously two billion years ago. The fission products and transuranic elements produced by the natural reactors have been preserved in strata without movement while subjected to geological phenomena for such very long years. 16 zones of the natural reactors have been discovered so far. The geological features of the Okulo uranium deposit are explained. The total amount of 235 U lost by the chain reaction was estimated to be about 6t, and the fission products were about 6t. The Okulo phenomena offered the valuable results of the synthetic formation disposal test that the nature has carried out for such long years. The significance of the study on natural analog is discussed. Organic substances and the mechanism of holding and movement of uranium and fission nuclides, the stability of uraninite and the age measurement of the deposit by Nd-Sm process are reported as the main results. (K.I.)

  12. Commercial tokamak reactors with resistive toroidal field magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bombery, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Jassby, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Scaling relations and design concepts are developed for commercial tokamak reactors that use watercooled copper toroidal field (TF) magnets. Illustrative parameters are developed for reactors that are scaled up in size from LITE test reactor designs, which use quasi-continuous copper plate magnets. Acceptably low magnet power requirements may be attainable in a moderate beta (β = 0.065) commercial reactor with a major radius of 6.2 m. The shielding thickness and magnet size are substantially reduced relative to values in commercial reactors with superconducting magnets. Operation at high beta (β = 0.14) leads to a reduction in reactor size, magnet-stored energy, and recirculating power. Reactors using resistive TF magnets could provide advantages of physically smaller devices, improved maintenance features, and increased ruggedness and reliability

  13. The fuel of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This booklet is a presentation of the different steps of the preparation of nuclear fuels performed by Cogema. The documents starts with a presentation of the different French reactor types: graphite moderated reactors, PWRs using MOX fuel, fast breeder reactors and research reactors. The second part describes the fuel manufacturing process: conditioning of nuclear materials and fabrication of fuel assemblies. The third part lists the different companies involved in the French nuclear fuel industry while part 4 gives a short presentation of the two Cogema's fuel fabrication plants at Cadarache and Marcoule. Part 5 and 6 concern the quality assurance, the safety and reliability aspects of fuel elements and the R and D programs. The last part presents some aspects of the environmental and personnel protection performed by Cogema. (J.S.)

  14. Utilization of thorium and U-ZrH1.6 fuels in various heterogeneous cores for TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damahuri, Abdul Hannan Bin; Mohamed, Hassan; Aziz Mohamed, Abdul; Idris, Faridah

    2018-01-01

    The use of thorium as nuclear fuel has been an appealing prospect for many years and will be great significance to nuclear power generation. There is an increasing need for more research on thorium as Malaysian government is currently active in the national Thorium Flagship Project, which was launched in 2014. The thorium project, which is still in phase 1, focuses on the research and development of the thorium extraction from mineral processing ore. Thus, the aim of the study is to investigate other alternative TRIGA PUSPATI Reactor (RTP) core designs that can fully utilize thorium. Currently, the RTP reactor has an average neutron flux of 2.797 x 1012 cm-2/s-1 and an effective multiplication factor, k eff, of 1.001. The RTP core has a circular array core configuration with six circular rings. Each ring consists of 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 or 36 U-ZrH1.6 fuel rods. There are three main type of uranium weight, namely 8.5, 12 and 20 wt.%. For this research, uranium zirconium hydride (U-ZrH1.6) fuel rods in the RTP core were replaced by thorium (ThO2) fuel rods. Seven core configurations with different thorium fuel rods placements were modelled in a 2D structure and simulated using Monte Carlo n-particle (MCNPX) code. Results show that the highest initial criticality obtained is around 1.35101. Additionally there is a significant discrepancy between results from previous study and the work because of the large estimated leakage probability of approximately 21.7% and 2D model simplification.

  15. Results of a comparison study of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno de Mesquita, K.G.; Gout, W.; Heil, J.A.; Tanke, R.H.J.; Geevers, F.

    1991-06-01

    The PINK programme is a 4-year programme of five parties involved in nuclear energy in the Netherlands: GKN (operator of the Dodewaard plant), KEMA (Research institute of the Netherlands Utilities), ECN (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation), NUCON (Engineering and Contracting Company) and IRI Interfaculty Reactor Institute of the Delft University of Technology), to coordinate their efforts to intensify the nuclear competence of the industry, the utilities and the research and engineering companies. This programme is sponsored by the Ministry of Economic Affairs. The PINK programme consists of five parts. This report pertains to part 1 of the programme: comparison study of advanced reactors concerning the four so-called second-stage designs SBWR, AP600, SIR and CANDU, which, compared to the first-stage reactor designs, features increased use of passive safety systems and simplification. The objective of the current study is to compare these advanced reactor designs in order to provide comprehensive information for the PINK steering committee that is useful in the selection process of a design for further study and development work. In ch. 2 the main features of the four reactors are highlighted. In ch. 3 the most important safety features and the behaviour of the four reactors under accident situations are compared. Passive safety systems are identified and forgivingness is described and compared. Results of the preliminary probabilistic safety analysis are presented. Ch. 4 deals with the proven technology of the four concepts, ch. 5 with the Netherlands requirements, ch. 6 with commercial aspects, and ch. 7 with the fuel cycle and radioactive waste produced. In ch. 8 the costs are compared and finally in ch. 9 conclusions are drawn and recommendations are made. (author). 13 figs

  16. Neutronic performance of a 14 MW TRIGA reactor: LEU vs HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Cornella, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    A primary objective of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is to develop means for replacing, wherever possible, currently used highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel ( 235 U enrichment > 90%) with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel ( 235 U enrichment < 20%) without significantly degrading the performance of research and test reactors. The General Atomic Company has developed a low-enriched but high uranium content Er-U-ZrH/sub 1.6/ fuel to enable the conversion of TRIGA reactors (and others) from HEU to LEU. One possible application is to the water-moderated 14 MW TRIGA Steady State Reactor (SSR) at the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors. The work reported here was undertaken for the purpose of comparing the neutronic performance of the SSR for HEU fuel with that for LEU fuel. In order to make these relative comparisons as valid as possible, identical methods and models were used for the neutronic calculations

  17. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinc, R.; Cupac, S.; Stanic, A.

    1990-01-01

    RA reactor was not operated during the past five years due to the renewal and reconstruction of the reactor systems, which in underway. In the period from 1986-1990, reactor was operated only 144 MWh in 1986, for the need of testing the reactor systems and possibility of irradiating 125 I. Reactor will not be operated in 1991 because of the exchange of complete instrumentation which is planned to be finished by the end of 1991. It is expected to start operation in May 1992. That is why this annex includes the plan of reactor operation for period of nine months starting from from the moment of start-up. It is planned to operate the reactor at 0.02 MW power first three months, to increase the power gradually and reach 3.5 MW after 8 months of operation. It is foreseen to operate the reactor at 4.7 MW from the tenth month on [sr

  18. Rapid restoration of methanogenesis in an acidified UASB reactor treating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Báez, María Consuelo; Valderrama-Rincon, Juan Daniel

    2017-02-15

    Anaerobic bioreactors are often used for removal of xenobiotic and highly toxic pollutants from wastewater. Most of the time, the pollutant is so toxic that the stability of the reactor becomes compromised. It is well known that methanogens are one of the most sensitive organisms in the anaerobic consortia and hence the stability of the reactors is highly dependant on methanogenesis. Unfortunately few studies have focused on recovering the methanogenic activity once it has been inhibited by highly toxic pollutants. Here we establish a quick recovery strategy for neutralization of an acidified UASB reactor after failure by intoxication with an excess of TCP in the influent. Once the reactor returned to pH values compatible with methanogenesis, biogas production was re-started after one day and the system was re-acclimated to TCP. Successful removal of TCP from synthetic wastewater was shown for concentrations up to 70mg/L after restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reinforced confinement in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention concerns a nuclear reactor containing a reactor core, a swimming pool space that is filled and pressurized with a neutron-absorbing solution, a reactor tank, at least one heat exchanger, at least one inlet line, at least one return line and at least one circulation pump, where the said reactor tank is confined in the said swimming pool space and designed to be cooled with the aid of relatively pure water, which is fed by means of the said at least one circulating pump to the said reactor tank from the said heat exchanger via the said at least one inlet line and is returned to the heat exchanger via the said at least one return line. The problem that is to be solved by the invention is to design a reactor of the above type in such a way that a complete confinement of the primary circuit of the reactor is achieved at relatively low extra cost. This problem is solved by providing the reactor with a special confinement space that confines the heat exchanger, but not the reactor tank, with the confinement space and the swimming pool space being fashioned in the same concrete body

  20. Systems analysis of a 100-MWe modular liquid metal cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, E.E.; Rhow, S.K.; Switick, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The response of a 100-MWe modular liquid metal cooled reactor to unprotected loss of flow and/or loss of primary heat removal accidents is analyzed using the systems analysis code SASSYS. The reactor response is tracked for the first 1000 s following a postulated upset in the primary heat removal system. The calculations do not take credit for the functioning of any decay heat removal other than through the secondary system. In addition to the power rating, other features of the reactor are an average sodium temperature rise of 148 K, a sodium void worth (counting the core and upper axial blanket) of 1.89 $, and 3.6 $ of Doppler feedback due to a uniform e-fold fuel temperature increase

  1. Transmutation of actinide 237Np with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, K.M.; Huang, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    The use of fusion reactors to transmute fission reactor wastes to stable species is an attractive concept. In this paper, the feasibility of transmutation of the long-lived actinide radioactive waste Np-237 with a fusion reactor and a hybrid reactor has been investigated. A new waste management concept of burning HLW (High Level Waste), utilizing released energy and converting Np-237 into fissile fuel Pu-239 through transmutation has been adopted. The detailed neutronics and depletion calculation of waste inventories was carried out with a modified version of one-dimensional neutron transport and burnup calculation code system BISON1.5 in this study. The transmutation rate of Np with relationship to neutron wall loading, Pu and Np with relationship to neutron wall load, Pu and Np concentration in the transmutation zone have been explored as well as relevant results are also given

  2. TREAT Reactor Control and Protection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipinski, W.C.; Brookshier, W.K.; Burrows, D.R.; Lenkszus, F.R.; McDowell, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    The main control algorithm of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) Automatic Reactor Control System (ARCS) resides in Read Only Memory (ROM) and only experiment specific parameters are input via keyboard entry. Prior to executing an experiment, the software and hardware of the control computer is tested by a closed loop real-time simulation. Two computers with parallel processing are used for the reactor simulation and another computer is used for simulation of the control rod system. A monitor computer, used as a redundant diverse reactor protection channel, uses more conservative setpoints and reduces challenges to the Reactor Trip System (RTS). The RTS consists of triplicated hardwired channels with one out of three logic. The RTS is automatically tested by a digital Dedicated Microprocessor Tester (DMT) prior to the execution of an experiment. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. Reactor physics aspects of burning actinides in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hage, W.; Schmidt, E.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of the different recycling strategies of actinides other than fuel treated in the literature, is given along with nuclear data requirements for actinide build-up and transmutation studies. The effects of recycling actinides in a nuclear reactor on the flux distribution, the infinite neutron multiplication factor, the reactivity control system, the reactivity coefficients and the delayed neutron fraction are discussed considering a notional LWR or LMFBR as an Actinide Trasmutaton Reactor. Some operational problems of Actinide Transmutation reactors are mentioned, which are caused by the α-decay heat and the neutron sources of Actinide Target Elements

  4. Candu reactors with thorium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Fehrenbach, P.; Duffey, R.; Kuran, S.; Ivanco, M.; Dyck, G.R.; Chan, P.S.W.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mancuso, C.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade and a half AECL has established a strong record of delivering CANDU 6 nuclear power plants on time and at budget. Inherently flexible features of the CANDU type reactors, such as on-power fuelling, high neutron economy, fuel channel based heat transport system, simple fuel bundle configuration, two independent shut down systems, a cool moderator and a defence-in-depth based safety philosophy provides an evolutionary path to further improvements in design. The immediate milestone on this path is the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM** (ACRTM**), in the form of the ACR-1000TM**. This effort is being followed by the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) design that will allow water-cooled reactors to attain high efficiencies by increasing the coolant temperature above 550 0 C. Adaptability of the CANDU design to different fuel cycles is another technology advantage that offers an additional avenue for design evolution. Thorium is one of the potential fuels for future reactors due to relative abundance, neutronics advantage as a fertile material in thermal reactors and proliferation resistance. The Thorium fuel cycle is also of interest to China, India, and Turkey due to local abundance that can ensure sustainable energy independence over the long term. AECL has performed an assessment of both CANDU 6 and ACR-1000 designs to identify systems, components, safety features and operational processes that may need to be modified to replace the NU or SEU fuel cycles with one based on Thorium. The paper reviews some of these requirements and the associated practical design solutions. These modifications can either be incorporated into the design prior to construction or, for currently operational reactors, during a refurbishment outage. In parallel with reactor modifications, various Thorium fuel cycles, either based on mixed bundles (homogeneous) or mixed channels (heterogeneous) have been assessed for technical and economic viability. Potential applications of a

  5. UWMAK-II: a conceptual tokamak reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of a Tokamak fusion power reactor, UWMAK-II. The aim of this study is to perform a self consistent and thorough analysis of a probable future fusion power reactor in order to assess the technological problems posed by such a system and to examine feasible solutions. UWMAK-II is a conceptual Tokamak fusion reactor designed to deliver 1716 MWe continuously and to generate 5000 MW(th) during the plasma burn. The structural material is 316 stainless steel and the primary coolant is helium. UWMAK-II is a low aspect ratio, low field design and includes a double null, axisymmetric poloidal field divertor for impurity control. In addition, a carbon curtain, made of two dimensional woven carbon fiber, is mounted on the first vacuum chamber wall to protect the plasma from high Z impurities and to protect the first wall from erosion by charged particle bombardment. The blanket is designed to minimize the inventory of both tritium and lithium while achieving a breeding ratio greater than one. This has led to a blanket design based on the use of a solid breeding material (LiAlO 2 ) with beryllium as a neutron multiplier. The lithium is enriched to 90 percent 6 Li and the blanket coolant is helium at a maximum pressure of 750 psia (5.2 x 10 6 N/m 2 ). A cell of the UWMAK-II blanket design is shown. The breeding ratio is between 1.11 and 1.19 based on one-dimensional discrete ordinates transport calculations, depending on the method of homogenization. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations, which take into account the more complicated geometry, give a breeding ratio of 1.06. The total energy per fusion is 21.56 MeV, which is fairly high

  6. The influence of the reactor pressure on the hydrodynamics in a cocurrent gas-liquid trickle-bed reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, W.J.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of the reactor pressure on the liquid hold-up in the trickle-flow regime and on the transition between trickle-flow and pulse-flow has been investigated in a trickle-flow column operating up to 6.0 MPa with water, and nitrogen or helium as the gas phase. The effect of the gas velocity

  7. Neutronics investigation of CANada Deuterium Uranium 6 reactor fueled (transuranic–Th) O2 using a computational method

    OpenAIRE

    Zohreh Gholamzadeh; Seyed Mohammad Mirvakili; Hossein Khalafi

    2015-01-01

    Background: 241Am, 243Am, and 237Np isotopes are among the most radiotoxic components of spent nuclear fuel. Recently, researchers have planned different incineration scenarios for the highly radiotoxic elements of nuclear waste in critical reactors. Computational methods are widely used to predict burnup rates of such nuclear wastes that are used under fuel matrixes in critical reactors. Methods: In this work, the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code was used to calculate the neutronic b...

  8. Thermohydraulics in a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor prestressed-concrete reactor vessel during unrestricted core-heatup accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Colman, J.; Araj, K.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothetical accident considered for siting considerations in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGR) is the so called Unrestricted Core Heatup Accident (UCHA), in which all forced circulation is lost at initiation, and none of the auxillary cooling loops can be started. The result is a gradual slow core heatup, extending over days. Whether the liner cooling system (LCS) operates during this time is of crucial importance. If it does not, the resulting concrete decomposition of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) will ultimately cause containment building (CB) failure after about 6 to 10 days. The primary objective of the work described here was to establish for such accident conditions the core temperatures and approximate fuel failure rates, to check for potential thermal barrier failures, and to follow the PCRV concrete temperatures, as well as PCRV gas releases from concrete decomposition. The work was done for the General Atomic Corporation Base Line Zero reactor of 2240 MW(t). Most results apply at least qualitatively also to other large HTGR steam cycle designs

  9. A Review of the UK Fast Reactor Programme: March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Towards the end of 1979 the Government announced a new programme of thermal reactor stations to be built over ten years (totalling 15GW), in addition to the two AGR stations at Torness and Heysham 'B' which had been approved by the previous Government. The first station of the new programme will be based on a Westinghouse PWR, subject to safety clearance and the outcome of a public inquiry, and it is envisaged that the remaining stations of the programme would be split between PWRs and AGRs. The AEA Chairman wrote formally to the Secretary of State for Energy in December 1979, putting forward on behalf of the Electricity Supply Authorities, NNC, BNFL and the AEA a recommended strategy for building the Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR), subject to normal licensing procedure and to public inquiry, so as to ensure that the key options for introducing commercial fast reactors, when required, should remain open. A Government statement is expected during the next few months. Meanwhile the level of effort on fast reactor research and development in the UK has been maintained, the fast reactor remaining the largest of the UKAEA's reactor development projects with expenditure totalling somewhat over £80M per annum. The main feature of the UK fast reactor programme has continued to be the operation of PFR (Sections 2 and 7) which is yielding a wealth of experience and of information relevant to the design of commercial fast reactors. Bum-up of standard driver fuel has reached 6-7% by heavy atoms, while specially enriched lead fuel pins have reached 11 % without failure. An extensive programme of work in the reactor and its associated steam plant was completed in March 1980 and the reactor then started its fifth power run. The fuel reprocessing plant at DNE is being commissioned and has reprocessed some of the spent fuel remaining from the DFR. It will start soon on reprocessing fuel discharged from the PFR. During the year improvements to the design of the future

  10. Kinetic analysis of sub-prompt-critical reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1992-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of safety-related kinetics problems in experimental neutron multiplying assemblies has been carried out using a sub-prompt-critical reactor model. The model is based on the concept of a sub-prompt-critical nuclear reactor and the concept of instantaneous neutron multiplication in a reactor system. Computations of reactor power, period and reactivity using the model show excellent agreement with results obtained from exact kinetics method. Analytic expressions for the energy released in a controlled nuclear power excursion are derived. Application of the model to a Pulsed Fast Reactor gives its sensitivity between 4 and 5. (author). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  11. Calculation models for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashanii, Ahmed Ali

    2010-01-01

    Determination of different parameters of nuclear reactors requires neutron transport calculations. Due to complicity of geometry and material composition of the reactor core, neutron calculations were performed for simplified models of the real arrangement. In frame of the present work two models were used for calculations. First, an elementary cell model was used to prepare cross section data set for a homogenized-core reactor model. The homogenized-core reactor model was then used to perform neutron transport calculation. The nuclear reactor is a tank-shaped thermal reactor. The semi-cylindrical core arrangement consists of aluminum made fuel bundles immersed in water which acts as a moderator as well as a coolant. Each fuel bundle consists of aluminum cladded fuel rods arranged in square lattices. (author)

  12. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  13. The feasibility of using a Fourier RTOF spectrometer at a low-power research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayouf, R.M.A.; Priesmeyer, H.G.; Kudryashev, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    The present situation of Fourier time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometry is discussed using the FSS spectrometer as example. The use of the Fourier reverse TOF spectrometry, as an efficient tool for studying condensed matter, at a 2 MW (WWR-S type) reactor is also assessed. The arrangement of the RTOF spectrometer, which could be successfully used at such type of reactor, is introduced. The suggested arrangement applies a neutron guide tube of 24 m length and allows for effective luminosity 2.4.10 6 at a flight path distance of 3.6 m. The number of neutrons scattered from a sample (5 cm 3 in volume) and incident on the detector system, as estimated for the suggested arrangement, is ∝1.6.10 3 n/sec. Such high counting rate allows to measure a diffraction spectrum within less than an hour. (orig.) With 12 figs [de

  14. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hideyuki; Ichimiya, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor core is a homogeneous reactor core divided into two regions of an inner reactor core region at the center and an outer reactor core region surrounding the outside of the inner reactor core region. In this case, the inner reactor core region has a lower plutonium enrichment degree and less amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction, and the outer reactor core region has higher plutonium enrichment degree and greater amount of neutron leakage in the radial direction. Moderator materials containing hydrogen are added only to the inner reactor core fuels in the inner reactor core region. Pins loaded with the fuels with addition of the moderator materials are inserted at a ratio of from 3 to 10% of the total number of the fuel pins. The moderator materials containing hydrogen comprise zirconium hydride, titanium hydride, or calcium hydride. With such a constitution, fluctuation of the power distribution in the radial direction along with burning is suppressed. In addition, an absolute value of the Doppler coefficient can be increased, and a temperature coefficient of coolants can be reduced. (I.N.)

  15. TRAC calculations of a loss-of-coolant accident in a reactor scale model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyun, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The TRAC (Transient Reactor Analysis Code) is being developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as an advanced best-estimate computer program for analysis of postulated hypothetical accidents in pressurized water reactors. As a part of the TRAC developmental verification efforts, a TRAC posttest analysis of Semiscale Mod-3 Test S-07-6 was conducted. The results of this analysis show that the agreement between TRAC calculations and experimental data is not very good. In particular, TRAC does not predict the long term doncomer and core liquid level oscillations during the reflood phase

  16. Safety features in small integral PWR ABV-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranaev, Youry D. [State Scientific Centre of Russian Federation - Institure for Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-04-15

    Long term operation experience of Bilibin Nuclear Power Plant with four EGP-6 reactors of 48MWth each at Chukotka peninsula, as well as results of manifold feasibility studies showed that Small Reactors (SR) have and will have promising market potential in outlying isolated regions of Russia as viable alternative of fossil fuel energy sources. Detailed design and licensing of the Small Floating Nuclear Power Plant Valamin/1/ with two integral pressurized water reactors ABV-6/2, 3/ is under way in Russia. The basic ABV-6 reactor design performance are presented in Table 1.

  17. Evaluation of VVER-1200/V-491 reactor pressure vessel integrity during large break LOCA along with SBO using MELCOR 1.8.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui Thi Hoa; Tran Chi Thanh

    2015-01-01

    After Fukushima accident and stress test recommended by IAEA for existing reactors, higher safety requirements are enforced upon nuclear power plants during design extension and severe accident conditions. Based on those arguments, Vietnam Government requests a lot of effective safety solutions, in designs proposed for the nuclear power plants in Ninh Thuan province of Vietnam, which can prevent the accident progression toward severe accidents and mitigate severe accident consequences. One of safety requirements is related to delay time of core melt during design extension condition. Especially, if the worst case of accidents occurs, the reactor vessel integrity must be maintained at least 24 hours from the beginning of the accident. With the aim at investigation of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) integrity, in this study, MELCOR 1.8.6 code is used to evaluate the integrity of RPV lower head for VVER-1200/V-491 reactor during a Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) in combination with Station Blackout (SBO) event. The study figures out several parameters related to melt down progress such as: rupture position and rupture timing, the amount of hydrogen generated. Availability of the second stage hydro-accumulators (HA2) in the VVER-1200/V-491 is assumed as an additional improvement to delay the timing of core melt as well as to maintain the vessel integrity for long-term. (author)

  18. Reactor noise diagnostics based on multivariate autoregressive modeling: Application to LOFT [Loss-of-Fluid-Test] reactor process noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    Multivariate noise analysis of power reactor operating signals is useful for plant diagnostics, for isolating process and sensor anomalies, and for automated plant monitoring. In order to develop a reliable procedure, the previously established techniques for empirical modeling of fluctuation signals in power reactors have been improved. Application of the complete algorithm to operational data from the Loss-of-Fluid-Test (LOFT) Reactor showed that earlier conjectures (based on physical modeling) regarding the perturbation sources in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) affecting coolant temperature and neutron power fluctuations can be systematically explained. This advanced methodology has important implication regarding plant diagnostics, and system or sensor anomaly isolation. 6 refs., 24 figs

  19. Mechanical behaviour of the reactor vessel support of a pressurized water reactor: tests and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvin, M.; L'huby, Y.; Quillico, J.J.; Humbert, J.M.; Thomas, J.P.; Hugenschmitt, R.

    1985-08-01

    The PWR reactor vessel is supported by a steel ring laying on the reactor pit. This support has to ensure a good behaviour of the vessel in the event of accidental conditions (earthquake and pipe rupture). A new evolution of the evaluation methods of the applied forces has shown a significant increase in the design loads used until now. In order to take into account these new forces, we carried out a test on a representative mock-up of the vessel support (scale 1/6). This test was performed by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. Several static equivalent forces were applied on the experimental mock-up. Displacements and strains were simultaneously recorded. The results of the test have enabled to justify the design of the pit and the ring, to show up a wide safety margin until the collapse of the structures and to check our hypothesis about the transmission of the forces between the ring and the pit

  20. Calculation of photon dose for Dalat research reactor in case of loss of reactor tank water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Vinh Vinh; Huynh Ton Nghiem; Nguyen Kien Cuong

    2007-01-01

    Photon sources of actinides and fission products were estimated by ORIGEN2 code with the modified cross-section library for Dalat research reactor (DRR) using new cross-section generated by WIMS-ANL code. Photon sources of reactor tank water calculated from the experimental data. MCNP4C2 with available non-analog Monte Carlo model and ANSI/ANL-6.1.1-1977 flux-to-dose factors were used for dose estimation. The agreement between calculation results and those of measurements showed that the methods and models used to get photon sources and dose were acceptable. In case the reactor water totally leaks out from the reactor tank, the calculated dose is very high at the top of reactor tank while still low in control room. In the reactor hall, the operation staffs can access for emergency works but with time limits. (author)

  1. Effect of DUPIC cycle on CANDU reactor safety parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M. A. [Atomic Energy Authority, ETRR-2, Cairo (Egypt); Badawi, Alya [Dept. of Nuclear and Radiation Engineering, Alexandria University, Alexandria (Egypt)

    2016-10-15

    Although, the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in CANda Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) cycle is still under investigation, DUPIC cycle is a promising method for uranium utilization improvement, for reduction of high level nuclear waste, and for high degree of proliferation resistance. This paper focuses on the effect of DUPIC cycle on CANDU reactor safety parameters. MCNP6 was used for lattice cell simulation of a typical 3,411 MWth PWR fueled by UO{sub 2} enriched to 4.5w/o U-235 to calculate the spent fuel inventories after a burnup of 51.7 MWd/kgU. The code was also used to simulate the lattice cell of CANDU-6 reactor fueled with spent fuel after its fabrication into the standard 37-element fuel bundle. It is assumed a 5-year cooling time between the spent fuel discharges from the PWR to the loading into the CANDU-6. The simulation was carried out to calculate the burnup and the effect of DUPIC fuel on: (1) the power distribution amongst the fuel elements of the bundle; (2) the coolant void reactivity; and (3) the reactor point-kinetics parameters.

  2. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  3. Some considerations on a plasma in the JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Yamato, H.; Maki, K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of the plasma characteristics for the JAERI tokamak experimental fusion reactor is reported. In order to make the reactor compact, the self-sustaining condition has been removed. Stationary heating by 200 keV neutral deuteron beam to maintain the power balance is applied expecting the power amplification by the TCT effect. The main parameters determined are power output of 100 MW, toroidal field on axis of 6 T, aspect ratio of 4.5 and major radius of 6.75 m. The results of the plasma power balance, fueling by means of the gas blanket scheme, power stabilization with feedback and the start-up are presented

  4. Operation and maintenance of the RA reactor, Report on operation in 1966, task 6.08

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, D. and others

    1966-12-01

    During 1966, RA reactor was operated at nominal power for 196 days and 28 days at lower power levels. The total production was 31015 MWh which is 3% higher than planned. Practically there were no discrepancies from the plan. The reactor was used for irradiation and experiments according to the demand of 644 users, of which 516 were from the Institute. This report contains detailed data about reactor power and experiments performed in 1966, and a chart showing discrepancies from the plan. data concerned about the utilization of reactor experimental channels are included as well. Total number of safety shutdowns was 37, of which 20 were caused by power cuts, 10 due to voltage instabilities, 4 due to human error and 3 due to failures of instrumentation. These data are compared to safety shutdown data of previous few years. There have been no accidents which could cause any significant effects. The incidents occurred during this year are described in detail. Detailed data concerning exposure of the personnel are part of this report

  5. Gaseous fuel reactors for power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. S.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors have significant advantages as energy sources for closed-cycle power systems. The advantages arise from the removal of temperature limits associated with conventional reactor fuel elements, the wide variety of methods of extracting energy from fissioning gases, and inherent low fissile and fission product in-core inventory due to continuous fuel reprocessing. Example power cycles and their general performance characteristics are discussed. Efficiencies of gaseous fuel reactor systems are shown to be high with resulting minimal environmental effects. A technical overview of the NASA-funded research program in gaseous fuel reactors is described and results of recent tests of uranium hexafluoride (UF6)-fueled critical assemblies are presented.

  6. Results and recommendations from the reactor chemistry and corrosion tasks of the reactor materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, E.W.; Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1990-11-01

    Within the general context of extended service life, the Reactor Materials Program was initiated in 1984. This comprehensive program addressed material performance in SRS reactor tanks and the primary coolant or Process Water System (PWS) piping. Three of the eleven tasks concerned moderator quality and corrosion mitigation. Definition and control of the stainless steel aqueous environment is a key factor in corrosion mitigation. The Reactor Materials Program systematically investigated the SRS environment and its effect on crack initiation and propagation in stainless steel, with the objective of improving this environment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the contributions of Tasks 6, 7 and 10 of the Reactor Materials Program to the understanding and control of moderator quality and its relationship to mitigation of stress corrosion cracking

  7. Reactor core and initially loaded reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo.

    1989-01-01

    In BWR type reactors, improvement for the reactor shutdown margin is an important characteristic condition togehter with power distribution flattening . However, in the reactor core at high burnup degree, the reactor shutdown margin is different depending on the radial position of the reactor core. That is , the reactor shutdown margin is smaller in the outer peripheral region than in the central region of the reactor core. In view of the above, the reactor core is divided radially into a central region and as outer region. The amount of fissionable material of first fuel assemblies newly loaded in the outer region is made less than the amount of the fissionable material of second fuel assemblies newly loaded in the central region, to thereby improve the reactor shutdown margin in the outer region. Further, the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower portion of the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than the ratio between the amount of the fissionable material in the upper region and that of the fissionable material in the lower region of the second fuel assemblies, to thereby obtain a sufficient thermal margin in the central region. (K.M.)

  8. Biodegradation of 4-bromophenol by Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6T in a newly designed packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Naresh Kumar; Ghosh, Pranab Kumar; Pakshirajan, Kannan

    2013-02-01

    Bromophenol is listed as a priority pollutant by the U.S. EPA. However, there has been no report on the removal of bromophenol in any biological system that is operated in a continuous mode. The efficiency of Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6(T) on the biodegradation of 4-bromophenol (4-BP) in a newly designed packed bed reactor (PBR) was evaluated with different influent 4-BP concentrations between 400 mg l(-1) and 1200 mg l(-1) and hydraulic retention times (HRTs) between 24 h and 7.5 h. The response of the PBR to 4-BP shock loadings was also tested, and the bioreactor was found to adequately handle these shock loadings. The percentage of effluent toxicity in the PBR was tested using mixed microbial consortia as the test species; this experiment was performed using a 4-BP influent concentration of 1200 mg l(-1) and HRTs between 24 h and 7.5 h. A maximal 98% effluent toxicity removal was achieved when the PBR was operated at an HRT of 24 h. In the present study, 4-BP was used as the sole source of carbon and energy, and the complete removal of 4-BP was achieved with 4-BP loading rates of up to 2277 mg l(-1) day(-1). Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A new fluidized bed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new nuclear reactor design based on the fluidized bed concept is proposed. A current design utilizes spherical fuel of slightly enriched Zircaloy-clad uranium dioxide fluidized by light water under pressure. The reactor is modular in system; therefore, any size reactor can be constructed from the basic standard modul. The reactor physics calculations show that reactivity increases with porosity to a maximum value and thereafter decreases. This produces inherent safety and eliminates the need for control rods and burnable poisons. The heat transfer calculations show that the maximum power extracted from the reactor core is not limited to the material temperature limits but to the maximum mass flow of coolant, which corresponds to the desired operating porosity. Design simplicity and inherent safety make it an attractive small reactor design. (Author) [pt

  10. Commissioning of research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on meeting the requirements for the commissioning of research reactors on the basis of international best practices. Specifically, it provides recommendations on fulfilling the requirements established in paras 6.44 and 7.42-7.50 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety of Research Reactors, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4, IAEA, Vienna (2005) and guidance and specific and consequential recommendations relating to the recommendations presented in paras 615-621 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors, Safety Series No. 35-G2, IAEA, Vienna (1994) and paras 228-229 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, Safety Series No. 35-G1, IAEA, Vienna (1994). This Safety Guide is intended for use by all organizations involved in commissioning for a research reactor, including the operating organization, the regulatory body and other organizations involved in the research reactor project

  11. Anti-neutrino flux in a research reactor for non-proliferation application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khakshournia, Samad; Foroughi, Shokoufeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI)

    2017-11-15

    Owing to growing interest in the study of emitted antineutrinos from nuclear reactors to test the Atomic Energy Agency safeguards, antineutrino flux was studied in the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) using ORIGEN code. According to our prediction, antineutrino rate was obtained 2.6 x 10{sup 17} (v{sub e}/sec) in the core No. 57F of the TRR. Calculations indicated that evolution of antineutrino flux was very slow with time and the performed refueling had not an observable effect on antineutrino flux curve for a 5 MW reactor with the conventional refueling program. It is seen that for non-proliferation applications the measurement of the contribution of {sup 239}Pu to the fission using an antineutrino detector is not viable in the TRR.

  12. Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials: News for the Reactor Materials Crosscut, May 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    2016-09-26

    In this newsletter for Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) Reactor Materials, pages 1-3 cover highlights from the DOE-NE (Nuclear Energy) programs, pages 4-6 cover determining the stress-strain response of ion-irradiated metallic materials via spherical nanoindentation, and pages 7-8 cover theoretical approaches to understanding long-term materials behavior in light water reactors.

  13. Non-electric applications of pool-type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, E.O.; Cherkashov, Yu.M.; Romenkov, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper recommends the use of pool-type light water reactors for thermal energy production. Safety and reliability of these reactors were already demonstrated to the public by the long-term operation of swimming pool research reactors. The paper presents the design experience of two projects: Apatity Underground Nuclear Heating Plant and Nuclear Sea-Water Desalination Plant. The simplicity of pool-type reactors, the ease of their manufacturing and maintenance make this type of a heat source attractive to the countries without a developed nuclear industry. (author). 6 figs, 1 tab

  14. GRIMH3: A new reactor calculation code at Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, T.T.; Pevey, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    The GRIMHX reactor code currently in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was written at a time when computer processing speed and memory storage were very limited. Recently, a new reactor code (GRIMH3) was written to take advantage of the hardware improvements (vectorization and higher memory capacities) as well as the range of available computers at SRS (workstations and supercomputers). The GRIMH3 code computes the solution of the static multigroup neutron diffusion equation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional hexagonal geometry. Either direct or adjoint solutions can be computed for k eff searches, buckling searches, external neutron sources, power flattening searches, or power normalization factor calculations with 1, 6, 24, 54, or 96 points per hex. The GRIMHX reactor code currently in use at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was written at a time when computer processing speed and memory storage were very limited. Recently, a new reactor code (GRIMH3) was written to take advantage of the hardware improvements (vectorization and higher memory capacities) as well as the range of available computers at SRS (workstations and supercomputers). The GRIMH3 code computes the solution of the static multigroup neutron diffusion equation in one-, two-, and three-dimensional hexagonal geometry. Either direct or adjoint solutions can be computed for k eff searches, buckling searches, external neutron sources, power flattening searches, or power normalization factor calculations with 1, 6, 24, 54, or 96 points per hex

  15. Investigation of flow stabilization in a compact reactor vessel of a FBR. Flow visualization in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    In the feasibility studies of Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System, a compact reactor vessel is considered from economical improvement point of a sodium cooled loop type fast reactor. The flow field was visualized by water experiment for a reactor vessel with 'a column type UIS (Upper Internal Structure)', which has a slit for fuel handling mechanism and is useful for a compact fast reactor. In this research, the 1/20 scale test equipment using water was made to understand coolant flow through a slit of a column type UIS' and fundamental behavior of reactor upper plenum flow. In the flow visualization tests, tracer particles were added in the water, and illuminated by the slit-shaped pulse laser. The flow visualization image was taken with a CCD camera. We obtained fluid velocity vectors from the visualization image using the Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results are as follows. 1. Most of coolant flow through a slit of 'column type UIS' arrived the dip plate directly. In the opposite side of a slit, most of coolant flowed toward reactor vessel wall before it arrived the dip plate. 2. The PIV was useful to measure the flow field in the reactor vessel. The obtained velocity field was consistent with the flow visualization result. 3. The jet through the UIS slit was dependent on the UIS geometry. There is a possibility to control the jet by the UIS geometry. (author)

  16. TRIGASIM: A computer program to simulate a TRIGA Mark I Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruby, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    A Fortran-77 computer program has been written which simulates the operation of a TRIGA Mark I Reactor. The 'operator' has options at 1-second intervals, of raising rods, lowering rods, maintaining rods steady, dropping a rod, or scramming the reactor. Results are printed to the screen, and to 2 output files - a tabular record and a logarithmic plot of the power. The Point Kinetic Equations are programmed with 6 delayed groups, quasi-static power feedback, and forward differencing. A pulsing option is available, with simulation which employs the Fuchs Model. A pulse-tail model has been devised to simulate behavior for a few minutes following a pulse. Both graphic and tabular output are also available for the pulses. (author)

  17. WITAMIR-I: A tandem mirror power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Beyer, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual design of a near term commercial tandem mirror power reactor will be presented. The basic configuration utilizes Yin-yang minimum B end plugs with inboard thermal barriers, which are pumped by neutral beam injection. The maximum magnetic fields are 6.1 T, 8.1 T and 15 T in the central cell, Yin-yang, and thermal barrier magnets, respectively. The blanket utilizes Pb 83 Li 17 as the coolant and breeder, and HT-9 as the structural material. This configuration yields a high energy multiplication (1.37), a sufficient tritium breeding ratio (1.07) and has a major advantage with respect to maintenance. A single stage direct convertor is used at one end and an electron thermal dump at the other end. The plasma Q is 28 at a fusion power level of 3000 MWsub(th); the net electrical output is 1530 MWe and the overall efficiency is 39%. Cost estimates indicate that WITAMIR-I is competitive with recent tokamak power reactor designs. (author)

  18. Plasma core reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, T.S.; Rodgers, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations are being conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of fissioning uranium plasma core reactors and to characterize space and terrestrial applications for such reactors. Uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) fuel is injected into core cavities and confined away from the surface by argon buffer gas injected tangentially from the peripheral walls. Power, in the form of thermal radiation emitted from the high-temperature nuclear fuel, is transmitted through fused-silica transparent walls to working fluids which flow in axial channels embedded in segments of the cavity walls. Radiant heat transfer calculations were performed for a six-cavity reactor configuration; each cavity is approximately 1 m in diameter by 4.35 m in length. Axial working fluid channels are located along a fraction of each cavity peripheral wall

  19. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  20. Effluent releases at the TRIGA reactor facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittemore, W L [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1974-07-01

    The principal effluent from the operating TRIGA reactors in our facility is argon-41. As monitored by a recording gas and particulate stack monitor, the values shown in the table, the Mark III operating 24 hours per day for very long periods produced the largest amount of radioactive argon. The quantity of 23.7 Ci A-41 when diluted by the normal reactor room ventilation system corresponded to 1.45 x 10{sup -6} {mu}Ci/cc. As diluted in the roof stack stream and the reactor building wake, the concentration immediately outside the reactor building was 25% MPC for an unrestricted area. The continued dilution of this effluent resulted in a concentration of a few percent MPC at the site boundary (unrestricted area) 350 meters from the reactor. (author)

  1. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed

  2. A comparison of radioactive waste from first generation fusion reactors and fast fission reactors with actinide recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, M.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1991-04-01

    Limitations of the fission fuel resources will presumably mandate the replacement of thermal fission reactors by fast fission reactors that operate on a self-sufficient closed fuel cycle. This replacement might take place within the next one hundred years, so the direct competitors of fusion reactors will be fission reactors of the latter rather than the former type. Also, fast fission reactors, in contrast to thermal fission reactors, have the potential for transmuting long-lived actinides into short-lived fission products. The associated reduction of the long-term activation of radioactive waste due to actinides makes the comparison of radioactive waste from fast fission reactors to that from fusion reactors more rewarding than the comparison of radioactive waste from thermal fission reactors to that from fusion reactors. Radioactive waste from an experimental and a commercial fast fission reactor and an experimental and a commercial fusion reactor has been characterized. The fast fission reactors chosen for this study were the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2 and the Integral Fast Reactor. The fusion reactors chosen for this study were the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and a Reduced Activation Ferrite Helium Tokamak. The comparison of radioactive waste parameters shows that radioactive waste from the experimental fast fission reactor may be less hazardous than that from the experimental fusion reactor. Inclusion of the actinides would reverse this conclusion only in the long-term. Radioactive waste from the commercial fusion reactor may always be less hazardous than that from the commercial fast fission reactor, irrespective of the inclusion or exclusion of the actinides. The fusion waste would even be far less hazardous, if advanced structural materials, like silicon carbide or vanadium alloy, were employed.

  3. NCSU PULSTAR reactor instrumentation upgrade. Final technical report, September 6, 1990--March 19, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyj, S.J.; Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Reactor Program at North Carolina State University initiated an upgrade program at the NCSU PULSTAR Reactor in 1990. Twenty-year-old instrumentation is currently undergoing replacement with solid-state and current technology equipment. The financial assistance from the United States Department of Energy has been the primary source of support. This report provides the status of the first two phases of the upgrade program

  4. RAPID-L Highly Automated Fast Reactor Concept Without Any Control Rods (1) Reactor concept and plant dynamics analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Tsunoda, Hirokazu; Mishima, Kaichiro; Iwamura, Takamichi

    2002-01-01

    The 200 kWe uranium-nitride fueled lithium cooled fast reactor concept 'RAPID-L' to achieve highly automated reactor operation has been demonstrated. RAPID-L is designed for Lunar base power system. It is one of the variants of RAPID (Refueling by All Pins Integrated Design), fast reactor concept, which enable quick and simplified refueling. The essential feature of RAPID concept is that the reactor core consists of an integrated fuel assembly instead of conventional fuel subassemblies. In this small size reactor core, 2700 fuel pins are integrated altogether and encased in a fuel cartridge. Refueling is conducted by replacing a fuel cartridge. The reactor can be operated without refueling for up to 10 years. Unique challenges in reactivity control systems design have been attempted in RAPID-L concept. The reactor has no control rod, but involves the following innovative reactivity control systems: Lithium Expansion Modules (LEM) for inherent reactivity feedback, Lithium Injection Modules (LIM) for inherent ultimate shutdown, and Lithium Release Modules (LRM) for automated reactor startup. All these systems adopt lithium-6 as a liquid poison instead of B 4 C rods. In combination with LEMs, LIMs and LRMs, RAPID-L can be operated without operator. This is the first reactor concept ever established in the world. This reactor concept is also applicable to the terrestrial fast reactors. In this paper, RAPID-L reactor concept and its transient characteristics are presented. (authors)

  5. Effect of elevated temperatures on heavy concrete structural strength in Qinshan phase 3 CANDU 6 reactor buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikhan, S.; Khan, A.F.; Chen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Heavy concrete is commonly used inside the Qinshan Phase 3 CANDU 6 reactor buildings for radiation shielding functions in order to provide access to key areas during reactor operation. In some cases, the heavy concrete elements are also structural elements. Concerns have been raised about the functional performance of the heavy concrete structural elements, specifically the primary heat transport pump (PHTS) supporting slabs, surrounding the feeder cabinets when subjected to elevated temperatures between 42 degree C and 121 degree C and their corresponding temperature gradients on a long-term basis during the normal operation of the plant. This paper presents the results of a test investigation on the strength of heavy concrete under elevated temperature conditions being experienced by the heavy concrete structural elements around the feeder cabinet to confirm that these structural elements meet their functional requirements. The loading conditions consist subjecting the specimens to the elevated temperatures and temperature gradient noted during commissioning, including the effect of epoxy coating. The heavy concrete mix proportion and materials of the test samples (ilmenite aggregate and Portland cement) are identical to those used for heavy concrete structural elements surrounding the feeder cabinet. Subsequent to the confirmation of the functional requirements of the heavy concrete structural elements, alarm limits are recommended for these structural elements. (authors)

  6. An evaluation of a mesophilic reactor for treating wastewater from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An evaluation of anaerobic treatment of potato-processing wastewater using an up flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) reactor at 37°C was conducted. Wastewater from a potato-processing plant in Harare, with an average of 6.8 g COD/l, (COD = chemical oxygen demand) a high concentration of total solids (up to 6725 ...

  7. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR), a European Material Testing Reactor (MTR), with extended experimental capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Bergamaschi, Y.; Bouilloux, Y.; Bravo, X.; Guigon, B.; Rommens, M.; Tremodeux, P.

    2003-01-01

    The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) is the European MTR (Material Testing Reactor) designed to provide, after 2010, the necessary knowledge for keeping the existing power plants in operation and to design innovative reactors types with new objectives such as: minimizing the radioactive waste production, taking into account additional safety requirements, preventing risks of nuclear proliferation. To achieve such an ambitious objective. The JHR is designed with a high flexibility in order to satisfy the current demand from European industry, research and to be able to accommodate future requirements. The JHR will offer a wide range of performances and services in gathering, in a single site at Cadarache, all the necessary functionalities and facilities for an effective production of results: e.g. fuel fabrication laboratories, preparation of the instrumented devices, interpretation of the experiments, modelling. The JHR must rely on a top level scientific environment based on experts teams from CEA and EC and local universities. With a thermal flux of 7,4.10 14 ncm -2 s -1 and a fast flux of 6,4.10 14 ncm -2 s -1 , it is possible to carry out irradiation experiments on materials and fuels whatever the reactor type considered. It will also be possible to carry out locally, fast neutron irradiation to achieve damage effect up to 25 dpa/year. (dpa = deplacement per atom). The study of the fuels behavior under accidental conditions, from analytical experiments, on a limited amount of irradiated fuel, is a major objective of the project. These oriented safety tests are possible by taking into account specific requirements in the design of the facility such as the tightness level of the containment building, the addition of an alpha hot cell and a laboratory for on line fission products measurement. (author)

  8. Licensed operating reactors: status summary report, data as of May 31, 1983. Volume 7, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  9. A study on ex-vessel steam explosion for a flooded reactor cavity of reactor scale - 15216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.; Yoon, E.; Kim, Y.; Cho, Y.

    2015-01-01

    A steam explosion can occur when a molten corium is mixed with a coolant, more volatile liquid. In severe accidents, corium can come into contact with coolant either when it flows to the bottom of the reactor vessel and encounters the reactor coolant, or when it breaches the reactor vessel and flows into the reactor containment. A steam explosion could then threaten the containment structures, such as the reactor vessel or the concrete walls/penetrations of the containment building. This study is to understand the shortcomings of the existing analysis code (TEXAS-V) and to estimate the steam explosion loads on reactor scale and assess the effect of variables, then we compared results and physical phenomena. Sensitivity study of major parameters for initial condition is performed. Variables related to melt corium such as corium temperature, falling velocity and diameter of melt are more important to the ex-vessel steam explosion load and the steam explosion loads are proportional to these variables related to melt corium. Coolant temperature on reactor cavity has a specific area to increase the steam explosion loads. These results will be used to evaluate the steam explosion loads using ROAAM (Risk Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology) and to develop the evaluation methodology of ex-vessel steam explosion. (authors)

  10. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  11. Auxiliary reactor for a hydrocarbon reforming system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clawson, Lawrence G.; Dorson, Matthew H.; Mitchell, William L.; Nowicki, Brian J.; Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Davis, Robert; Rumsey, Jennifer W.

    2006-01-17

    An auxiliary reactor for use with a reformer reactor having at least one reaction zone, and including a burner for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, and heat exchanger for transferring heat from auxiliary reactor gas stream and heat transfer medium, preferably two-phase water, to reformer reaction zone. Auxiliary reactor may include first cylindrical wall defining a chamber for burning fuel and creating a heated auxiliary reactor gas stream, the chamber having an inlet end, an outlet end, a second cylindrical wall surrounding first wall and a second annular chamber there between. The reactor being configured so heated auxiliary reactor gas flows out the outlet end and into and through second annular chamber and conduit which is disposed in second annular chamber, the conduit adapted to carry heat transfer medium and being connectable to reformer reaction zone for additional heat exchange.

  12. Effect of temperature on selenium removal from wastewater by UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessì, Paolo; Jain, Rohan; Singh, Satyendra; Seder-Colomina, Marina; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Rene, Eldon R; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin; Carucci, Alessandra; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-05-01

    The effect of temperature on selenium (Se) removal by upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors treating selenate and nitrate containing wastewater was investigated by comparing the performance of a thermophilic (55 °C) versus a mesophilic (30 °C) UASB reactor. When only selenate (50 μM) was fed to the UASB reactors (pH 7.3; hydraulic retention time 8 h) with excess electron donor (lactate at 1.38 mM corresponding to an organic loading rate of 0.5 g COD L(-1) d(-1)), the thermophilic UASB reactor achieved a higher total Se removal efficiency (94.4 ± 2.4%) than the mesophilic UASB reactor (82.0 ± 3.8%). When 5000 μM nitrate was further added to the influent, total Se removal was again better under thermophilic (70.1 ± 6.6%) when compared to mesophilic (43.6 ± 8.8%) conditions. The higher total effluent Se concentration in the mesophilic UASB reactor was due to the higher concentrations of biogenic elemental Se nanoparticles (BioSeNPs). The shape of the BioSeNPs observed in both UASB reactors was different: nanospheres and nanorods, respectively, in the mesophilic and thermophilic UASB reactors. Microbial community analysis showed the presence of selenate respirers as well as denitrifying microorganisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  14. Preparing the construction of a school reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matejka, K.

    1977-01-01

    The possibilities are discussed of teaching and training nuclear reactor operation and control, teaching experimental reactor physics and investigating reactor lattice parameters using a training reactor to be installed at the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering in Prague. Requirements are indicated for the reactor's technical design and the Faculty's possibilities to contribute to its construction. (J.B.)

  15. Who needs a small reactor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, Janet.

    1991-01-01

    The opportunities and problems facing small reactors were debated at the Delhi seminar. It was established that these were markets where small reactors, producing heat as well as electricity, might be of use. Small combined heat and power reactors would be more useful in district heating than would large reactors, as their optimum heat production is in line with current district heating schemes. Most process heat requirements are below 900 o C and so may be provided by small nuclear plants. Several areas in electricity supply where small and medium sized reactors could find a market were also identified. Despite good reasons for favouring nuclear plants in these markets, such as no production of carbon dioxide, no need to use expensive oil or other scarce fossil fuels and flexibility, these are, however, disincentives to potential buyers. While serial production would decrease plant costs, the lead plants would bear heavy financial risks. Currently too many options in plant design make it difficult to present the advantages of small reactor technology. Siting reactors near centres of population would be problematical. The disposal of spent fuel and radioactive wastes would create problems in developing or non-nuclear countries. Over and above all these problems, however, was that of public acceptance. Some ways of overcoming these disincentives were discussed. (author)

  16. A computer control system for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, K.C.; Sandquist, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    Most reactor applications until now, have not required computer control of core output. Commercial reactors are generally operated at a constant power output to provide baseline power. However, if commercial reactor cores are to become load following over a wide range, then centralized digital computer control is required to make the entire facility respond as a single unit to continual changes in power demand. Navy and research reactors are much smaller and simpler and are operated at constant power levels as required, without concern for the number of operators required to operate the facility. For navy reactors, centralized digital computer control may provide space savings and reduced personnel requirements. Computer control offers research reactors versatility to efficiently change a system to develop new ideas. The operation of any reactor facility would be enhanced by a controller that does not panic and is continually monitoring all facility parameters. Eventually very sophisticated computer control systems may be developed which will sense operational problems, diagnose the problem, and depending on the severity of the problem, immediately activate safety systems or consult with operators before taking action

  17. Application of fuel management calculation codes for CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju Haitao; Wu Hongchun

    2003-01-01

    Qinshan Phase III Nuclear Power Plant adopts CANDU-6 reactors. It is the first time for China to introduce this heavy water pressure tube reactor. In order to meet the demands of the fuel management calculation, DRAGON/DONJON code is developed in this paper. Some initial fuel management calculations about CANDU-6 reactor of Qinshan Phase III are carried out using DRAGON/DONJON code. The results indicate that DRAGON/DONJON can be used for the fuel management calculation for Qinshan Phase III

  18. Field-reversed mirror reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor design is a multicell arrangement wherein a series of field-reversed plasma layers are arranged along the axis of a long superconducting solenoid which provides the background magnetic field. Normal copper mirror coils and Ioffe bars placed at the first wall radius provide shallow axial and radial magnetic wells for each plasma layer. Each of 11 plasma layers requires the injection of 3.6 MW of 200 keV deuterium and tritium and produces 20 MW of fusion power. The reactor has a net electric output of 74 MWe and an estimated direct capital cost of $1200/kWe

  19. A new advanced safe nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefidvash, Farhang

    1999-01-01

    The reactor design is based on fluidized bed concept and utilizes pressurized water reactor technology. The fuel is automatically removed from the reactor by gravity under any accident condition. The reactor demonstrates the characteristics of inherent safety and passive cooling. Here two options for modification to the original design are proposed in order to increase the stability and thermal efficiency of the reactor. A modified version of the reactor involves the choice of supercritical steam as the coolant to produce a plant thermal efficiency of about 40%. Another is to modify the shape of the reactor core to produce a non-fluctuating bed and consequently guarantee the dynamic stability of the reactor. The mixing of Tantalum in the fuel is also proposed as an additional inhibition to power excursion. The spent fuel pellets may not be considered nuclear waste since they are in the shape and size that can easily be used as a a radioactive source for food irradiation and industrial applications. The reactor can easily operate with any desired spectrum by varying the porosity in order to be a plutonium burner or utilize a thorium fuel cycle. (author)

  20. Practical course on reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2004-06-01

    This course is based on the description of the instrumentation of the TRIGA-reactor Vienna, which is used for training research and isotope production. It comprises the following chapters: 1. instrumentation, 2. calibration of the nuclear channels, 3. rod drop time of the control rods, 4. neutron flux density measurements using compensated ionization, 5. neutron flux density measurement with fission chambers (FC), 6. neutron flux density measurement with self-powered neutron detectors (SPND), 7. pressurized water reactor simulator, 8. verification of the radiation level during reactor operation. There is one appendix about neutron-sensitive thermocouples. (nevyjel)

  1. Compact toroid refueling of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Hogan, J.T.; Milora, S.L.; Thomas, C.E.

    1988-04-01

    The feasibility of refueling fusion reactors and devices such as the International Thermonuclear Engineering Reactor (ITER) with high-velocity compact toroids is investigated. For reactors with reasonable limits on recirculating power, it is concluded that the concept is not economically feasible. For typical ITER designs, the compact toroid fueling requires about 15 MW of electrical power, with about 5 MW of thermal power deposited in the plasma. At these power levels, ideal ignition (Q = ∞) is not possible, even for short-pulse burns. The pulsed power requirements for this technology are substantial. 6 ref., 1 figs

  2. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  3. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonboel, E. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-11-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: `Reactors in Nordic Surroundings`, which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs.

  4. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonboel, E.

    1996-11-01

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  5. RA Research nuclear reactor, Part I - RA nuclear reactor operation, maintenance and utilization in 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.; Martinc, R.; Cupac, S.; Sulem, B.; Badrljica, R.; Majstorovic, D.; Sanovic, V.

    1984-12-01

    During the 1984 the reactor operation was limited by the temporary operating license issued by the Committee of Serbian ministry for health and social care. The reason was the non existing emergency cooling system and lack of appropriate filters in the special ventilation system. This temporary license has limited the reactor power to 2 MW from 1981. Operation of the primary cooling system was changed in order to avoid appearance of the previously noticed aluminium oxyhydrate on the surface of the fuel element claddings. The new cooling regime enabled more efficient heavy water purification. Control and maintenance of the reactor instrumentation and tools was done regularly but dependent on the availability of the spare parts. In order to enable future reliable operation of the RA reactor, according to new licensing regulations, during 1984, three major tasks are planned: building of the new emergency system, reconstruction of the existing ventilation system, and renewal of the reactor instrumentation. Financing of the planned activities will be partly covered by the IAEA. this Part I of the report includes 8 Annexes describing in detail the reactor operation, and 6 special papers dealing with the problems of reactor operation and utilization

  6. Partial gasification of coal in a fluidized bed reactor: Comparison of a laboratory and pilot scale reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, R.; Shen, L.H.; Zhang, M.Y.; Jin, B.S.; Xiong, Y.Q.; Duan, Y.F.; Zhong, Z.P.; Zhou, H.C.; Chen, X.P.; Huang, Y.J. [Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2007-01-15

    A 0.1 MWth lab-scale and 2 MWth pilot-scale experimental rigs were constructed to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a new process. The aim of the lab-scale study is to optimize coal partial gasification reactions operating conditions, which were applied in the pilot-scale tests. A comparison between the laboratory and pilot scale experimental results is presented in this paper in order to provide valuable information for scaling-up of the PFB coal partial reactor to industrial applications. The results show that trends and phenomena obtained in the laboratory reactor are confirmed in a pilot plant operating at similar conditions. However, many differences are observed in the two reactors. The higher heat loss in the lab-scale reactor is responsible for higher equivalence ratio (ER) and lower gas heating value at the similar reactor temperature. With respect to the pilot-scale reactor, mass transfer limitation between bubbles and emulsion phase may become important. Hence, longer contact time is required to achieve the same conversions as in the lab-scale reactor. This difference is explained by a significant change of the hydrodynamic conditions due to the formation of larger bubbles.

  7. Reactor theory and power reactors. 1. Calculational methods for reactors. 2. Reactor kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Various methods for calculation of neutron flux in power reactors are discussed. Some mathematical models used to describe transients in nuclear reactors and techniques for the reactor kinetics' relevant equations solution are also presented

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-H-6:2, 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:3, 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils; the 118-H-6:6 Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils; the 100-H-9, 100-H-10, and 100-H-13 French Drains; the 100-H-11 and 100-H-12 Expansion Box French Drains; and the 100-H-14 and 100-H-31 Surface Contamination Zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of removal actions for the 105-H Reactor Ancillary Support Areas, Below-Grade Structures, and Underlying Soils (subsite 118-H-6:2); 105-H Reactor Fuel Storage Basin and Underlying Soils (118-H-6:3); and Fuel Storage Basin Deep Zone Side Slope Soils. This CVP also documents remedial actions for the following seven additional waste sties: French Drain C (100-H-9), French Drain D (100-H-10), Expansion Box French Drain E (100-H-11), Expansion Box French Drain F (100-H-12), French Drain G (100-H-13), Surface Contamination Zone H (100-H-14), and the Polychlorinated Biphenyl Surface Contamination Zone (100-H-31)

  9. Gamma Radiation Assessment In Kartini Reactor And Its Vicinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazid, M.; Supriyatni, E.; Maryono; Bastianudin, Aris

    2000-01-01

    Measurement to calculate dose assesment for gamma radiation in Kartini Reactor and its vicinity has been done whether on operated or un operated condition. Measurement was performed using height pressured ionization chamber, Reuther Stokes RS-112 production. Measurement location was determined based on distance variation inwardly and outwardly of reactor building and its vicinity. The result showed that the average dose rate in the reactor building when un operated is in the range of 11.4-38.6 mu rad/hour and when the reactor operated is 166.4-1910.9 mu rad/hour. While the vicinity of the reactor on operated condition the average dose rate is 34.4-38.6 mu rad/hour in un operated condition is 6.9-7.0 mu rad/hour. This result showed that the reactor operated did not rise the radiation exposure level in its vicinity. From the personnel assesment dose rate of gamma radiation is 28.54 mrem/week on operated condition, 0.90 mrem.week on un operated condition. While dose rate outside the reactor is 0.44 and 0.27 mrem/week for operated and un operated condition consecutively. This dose rate is still below maximum permissible dose than recommended by the national regulation of radiation protection from BAPETEN No. 01/Ka.BAPETEN/V-99

  10. Experiment for search for sterile neutrino at SM-3 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Ivochkin, V. G.; Samoylov, R. M.; Fomin, A. K.; Zinoviev, V. G.; Neustroev, P. V.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gruzinsky, N. V.; Solovey, V. A.; Cherniy, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Martemyanov, V. P.; Zinoev, V. G.; Tarasenkov, V. G.; Aleshin, V. I.; Petelin, A. L.; Pavlov, S. V.; Izhutov, A. L.; Sazontov, S. A.; Ryazanov, D. K.; Gromov, M. O.; Afanasiev, V. V.; Matrosov, L. N.; Matrosova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    In connection with the question of possible existence of sterile neutrino the laboratory on the basis of SM-3 reactor was created to search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino. A prototype of a neutrino detector with scintillator volume of 400 l can be moved at the distance of 6-11 m from the reactor core. The measurements of background conditions have been made. It is shown that the main experimental problem is associated with cosmic radiation background. Test measurements of dependence of a reactor antineutrino flux on the distance from a reactor core have been made. The prospects of search for oscillations of reactor antineutrino at short distances are discussed.

  11. Research reactor job analysis - A project description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, John; Bessler, Nancy J.

    1988-01-01

    Addressing the need of the improved training in nuclear industry, nuclear utilities established training program guidelines based on Performance-Based Training (PBT) concepts. The comparison of commercial nuclear power facilities with research and test reactors owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), made in an independent review of personnel selection, training, and qualification requirements for DOE-owned reactors pointed out that the complexity of the most critical tasks in research reactors is less than that in power reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started a project by commissioning Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to conduct a job analysis survey of representative research reactor facilities. The output of the project consists of two publications: Volume 1 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Overview, which contains an Introduction, Project Description, Project Methodology,, and. An Overview of Performance-Based Training (PBT); and Volume 2 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Implementation, which contains Guidelines for Application of Preliminary Task Lists and Preliminary Task Lists for Reactor Operators and Supervisory Reactor Operators

  12. RSAS: a Reactor Safety Assessment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Dixon, B.W.; Bray, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). RSAS is being developed for use at the NRC's Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. The system generates situation assessments for the NRC Reactor Safety Team based on a limited number of plant parameters, known operator actions, and plant status data. The RSAS rule base currently covers one reactor type. The extension of the rule base to other reactor types is also discussed

  13. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 6 - PRESENTATION OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a possible solution for the designing of a device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The decommissioning activities are dismantling, demolition, controlled removal of equipment, components, conventional or hazardous waste (radioactive, toxic in compliance with the international basic safety standards on radiation protection. One as the most important operation in the final phase of the nuclear reactor dismantling is the decommissioning of fuel channels. For the fuel channels decommissioning should be taken into account the detailed description of the fuel channel and its components, the installation documents history, adequate radiological criteria for decommissioning guidance, safety and environmental impact assessment, including radiological and non-radiological analysis of the risks that can occur for workers, public and environment, the description of the proposed program for decommissioning the fuel channel and its components, the description of the quality assurance program and of the monitoring program, the equipments and methods used to verify the compliance with the decommissioning criteria, the planning of performing the final radiological assessment at the end of the fuel channel decommissioning. These will include also, a description of the proposed radiation protection procedures to be used during decommissioning. The dismantling of the fuel channel is performed by one device which shall provide radiation protection during the stages of decommissioning, ensuring radiation protection of the workers. The device shall be designed according to the radiation protection procedures. The decommissioning device assembly of the fuel channel components is composed of the device itself and moving platform support for coupling of the selected channel to be dismantled. The fuel channel decommissioning device is an autonomous device designed for

  14. Utilization of research reactors - A global perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents 1) a worldwide picture of research reactors, operable, shutdown, under construction and planned, 2) statistics on utilization of research reactors including TRIGA reactors, and 3) some results of a survey conducted during 1988 on the utilization of research reactors in developing Member States in the Asia-Pacific Region

  15. Preliminary shielding design evaluation for reactor assembly of SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyo Youn; Kang, Chang M.; Kim, Ha Yong; Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, Moon Hee

    1999-03-01

    This report describes a preliminary evaluations of SMART shielding design near the reactor core by using the DORT two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport code. The results indicate that maximum neutron fluence at the bottom of reactor vessel is 1.64x10 17 n/cm 2 and that on the radial surface of reactor vessel is 6.71x10 16 n/cm 2 . These results meet the requirement, 1.0x10 20 n/cm 2 , in 10 CFR 50.61 and the integrity of SMART reactor vessel is confirmed during the lifetime of reactor. (Author). 20 refs., 11 tabs., 8 figs

  16. Generation IV reactors: reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardonnier, J.L.; Dumaz, P.; Antoni, O.; Arnoux, P.; Bergeron, A.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Delpech, M.; Garnier, J.C.; Anzieu, P.; Francois, G.; Lecomte, M.

    2003-01-01

    Liquid metal reactor concept looks promising because of its hard neutron spectrum. Sodium reactors benefit a large feedback experience in Japan and in France. Lead reactors have serious assets concerning safety but they require a great effort in technological research to overcome the corrosion issue and they lack a leader country to develop this innovative technology. In molten salt reactor concept, salt is both the nuclear fuel and the coolant fluid. The high exit temperature of the primary salt (700 Celsius degrees) allows a high energy efficiency (44%). Furthermore molten salts have interesting specificities concerning the transmutation of actinides: they are almost insensitive to irradiation damage, some salts can dissolve large quantities of actinides and they are compatible with most reprocessing processes based on pyro-chemistry. Supercritical water reactor concept is based on operating temperature and pressure conditions that infers water to be beyond its critical point. In this range water gets some useful characteristics: - boiling crisis is no more possible because liquid and vapour phase can not coexist, - a high heat transfer coefficient due to the low thermal conductivity of supercritical water, and - a high global energy efficiency due to the high temperature of water. Gas-cooled fast reactors combining hard neutron spectrum and closed fuel cycle open the way to a high valorization of natural uranium while minimizing ultimate radioactive wastes and proliferation risks. Very high temperature gas-cooled reactor concept is developed in the prospect of producing hydrogen from no-fossil fuels in large scale. This use implies a reactor producing helium over 1000 Celsius degrees. (A.C.)

  17. Establishing a Radiation Protection Programme for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, M. M.

    2014-04-01

    The nature and intensity of radiation from the operation of a research reactor depend on the type of reactor, its design features and its operational history. The protection of workers from the harmful effect of radiation must therefore be of paramount importance to any operating organization of a research reactor. This project report attempts to establish an operational radiation protection programme for a research reactor using the Ghana Research Reactor-1 as a case study. (au)

  18. Programmed elimination of neutronic poisons in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perriere, G. de la

    1967-11-01

    This work deals with the use of salts of elements having a large neutron capture cross-section, so-called 'soluble poisons' which are dissolved in the moderating water to control the reactivity of heavy-water reactors, and more particularly to compensate the xenon effect in the reactor EL 4. The report describes the controlled elimination of these poisons by fixation on ion-exchange resins. The poisons considered are lithium-6, cadmium and gadolinium in the sulphate form, and boron as boric acid. The thermodynamic and kinetic constants of the ion-exchange reactions were first determined and a study was then made of the fixation of these compounds in beds of small-calibre resins placed in columns. Lithium-6 is the poison which is most easily applicable to compensate the xenon effect in the reactor EL 4. It can be eliminated rapidly and completely from heavy water, and its use does not lead to supplementary problems of protection against the gamma radiation of the reactor circuits. (author) [fr

  19. Irradiation of defected SAP clad UO2 fuel in the X-7 organic loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.F.S.; Cracknell, A.G.; MacDonald, R.D.

    1961-10-01

    This report describes an experiment designed to test the behaviour under irradiation of a UO 2 fuel specimen clad in a defected SAP sheath and cooled by recirculating organic liquid. The specimen containing the defect was irradiated in the X-7 loop in the NRX reactor from the 25th of November until the 13th of December 1960. Up to the 13th of December the behaviour was analogous to that seen with defected UO 2 specimens clad in zircaloy which were irradiated in water loops. Reactor power transients resulted in peaking of gamma ray activities in the loop, but on steady operation these activities tended to fall to a steady state level, Over this period the pressure drop across the fuel increased by a factor of two, the increases occurring after reactor shut downs and start ups. On 13th December the pressure drop increased rapidly, after a reactor shut down and start up, to over five times its original value and the activities in the loop rose to a high level. The specimen was removed and examination showed that the sheath was very badly split and that the volume between the fuel and the sheath was filled with a hard black organic substance. This report gives full details of the irradiation and of the post -irradiation examination. Correlation of the observed phenomenon is attempted and a preliminary assessment of the problems which would be associated with defect fuel in an organic reactor is given. (author)

  20. Method of operating a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurgin, A.J.; Schaefer, W.F.

    1978-01-01

    A method of controlling a nuclear power generting station in the event of a malfunction of particular operating components is described. Upon identification of a malfunction, preselected groups of control rods are fully inserted sequentially until a predetermined power level is approached. Additional control rods are then selectively inserted to quickly bring the reactor to a second given power level to be compatible with safe operation of the system with the malfunctioning component. At the time the thermal power output of the reactor is being reduced, the turbine is operated at a rate consistent with the output of the reactor. In the event of a malfunction, the power generating system is operated in a turbine following reactor mode, with the reactor power rapidly reduced, in a controlled manner, to a safe level compatible with the type of malfunction experienced

  1. Production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Gerencia de Capacitacion, Quimica Nuclear y Ciencias de la Salud, Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Univ. Tecnologica Nacional, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4} He reaction, and eventually {sup 7}Li(n, n't){sup 4}He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from {sup 48}V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  2. Characterization of a fast to thermal neutron spectrum converter on PROSPERO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, X.; Authier, N.; Casoli, P.; Combacon, S. [CEA, Valduc Center, 21120 Is sur Tille (France); Calzavarra, Y. [ILL, Institut Laue Langevin, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2009-07-01

    The PROSPERO reactor is located at CEA Valduc Center in France. The reactor is composed of an internal core made of High Enriched Uranium metal alloy surrounded by a reflector of depleted uranium. The reactor is used as a fast neutron spectrum source and is operated in delayed critical state with a continuous and steady power for several hours, which can vary from 3 mW to 3 kW, which is the nominal power. The flux at nominal power varies from 5.10{sup +10} n.cm{sup -2}/s at the reflector surface to 10{sup +7} n.cm{sup -2}/s at 5 meters from reactor axis. It has been decided to build a neutron energy converter allowing the production of a neutron thermal spectrum. As the core produces fast neutrons spectrum, we built a hollow cubic box of 50 cm x 50 cm x 50 cm with 10-cm-thick polyethylene bricks and placed one meter away from central reactor axis to moderate as much as possible neutrons to lower energies (E<0.6 eV). Analysis of the moderated flux inside the converter was performed using different activation foils such as indium or gold. We have developed a model of the experiment in the Monte Carlo neutron transport code TRIPOLI-4. A non-analogous transport calculation scheme was necessary to reproduce properly the experimental activities. The results of the calculated activations are within 4% of the experimental measurements given with 10% uncertainty (2 sigma). We show that the converter realizes thermalization of 80 % of the PROSPERO reactor fast neutrons below the cadmium threshold of 0.6 eV. Epithermal neutrons represent 15% of the spectrum and only 5% are in the fast neutron range above 1 MeV. The total flux at the center of the converter is 1.4 10{sup +9} n.cm{sup -2}/s at 3000 W

  3. Progress of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis (I) - reactor physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Jeong, Chang Joon; Roh, Gyu Hong; Rhee, Bo Wook; Park, Jee Won

    2003-12-01

    Since 1992, the direct use of spent pressurized water reactor fuel in CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) has been studied as an alternative to the once-through fuel cycle. The DUPIC fuel cycle study is focused on the technical feasibility analysis, the fabrication of DUPIC fuels for irradiation tests and the demonstration of the DUPIC fuel performance. The feasibility analysis was conducted for the compatibility of the DUPIC fuel with existing CANDU-6 reactors from the viewpoints of reactor physics, reactor safety, fuel cycle economics, etc. This study has summarized the intermediate results of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis, which includes the CANDU reactor physics design requirements, DUPIC fuel core physics design method, performance of the DUPIC fuel core, regional overpower trip setpoint, and the CANDU primary shielding. The physics analysis showed that the CANDU-6 reactor can accommodate the DUPIC fuel without deteriorating the physics design requirements by adjusting the fuel management scheme if the fissile content of the DUPIC fuel is tightly controlled.

  4. Programming for a nuclear reactor instrument simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new computerized control system for a transient test reactor incorporates a simulator for pre-operational testing of control programs. The part of the simulator pertinent to the discussion here consists of two microprocessors. An 8086/8087 reactor simulator calculates simulated reactor power by solving the reactor kinetics equations. An 8086 instrument simulator takes the most recent power value developed by the reactor simulator and simulates the appropriate reading on each of the eleven reactor instruments. Since the system is required to run on a one millisecond cycle, careful programming was required to take care of all eleven instruments in that short time. This note describes the special programming techniques used to attain the needed performance

  5. Design options for a bunsen reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles

    2013-10-01

    This work is being performed for Matt Channon Consulting as part of the Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA). Matt Channon Consulting has requested Sandia's assistance in the design of a chemical Bunsen reactor for the reaction of SO2, I2 and H2O to produce H2SO4 and HI with a SO2 feed rate to the reactor of 50 kg/hour. Based on this value, an assumed reactor efficiency of 33%, and kinetic data from the literature, a plug flow reactor approximately 1%E2%80%9D diameter and and 12 inches long would be needed to meet the specification of the project. Because the Bunsen reaction is exothermic, heat in the amount of approximately 128,000 kJ/hr would need to be removed using a cooling jacket placed around the tubular reactor. The available literature information on Bunsen reactor design and operation, certain support equipment needed for process operation and a design that meet the specification of Matt Channon Consulting are presented.

  6. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  7. Primary circuit and reactor core T-H characteristics determination of WWER 440 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky, J.; Petenyi, V.; Zavodsky, M.

    2010-01-01

    The WWER-440 nuclear fuel vendor permanently improves the assortment of produced nuclear fuel assemblies for achieving better fuel cycle economy and reactor operation safety. During unit refuelling there also could be made some other changes in hydraulic parameters of primary circuit (change of impeller wheels, hydraulic resistance coefficient changes of internal parts of primary circuit, etc.). Therefore it is necessary to determine real coolant flow rate through the reactor during units start-up after their refuelling, and also to have the skilled methodology and computing code for analyzing factors, which affecting the inaccuracy of coolant flow redistribution determination through reactor on flows through separate parts of reactor core in any case of parallel operation of different assembly types. Computing code TH-VCR and CORFLO are used for reactor core characteristics determination for one type of fuel and control assemblies and also in case of parallel operation of different assembly types. The code TH-VCR is able to calculate coolant flow rate for different combinations of three different fuel assembly channel types and three different control assembly channel types. The CORFLO code deals the area of the reactor core which consists of 312 fuel assemblies and 37 control assemblies. Regarding the rotational 60 deg symmetry of reactor core only 1/6 of reactor core with 59 fuel assemblies is taken into account. Computing code CORFLO is verified and validated at this time. Paper presents some results from measurements of coolant flow rate through reactors during start-up after unit refuelling and short description of computing code TH-VCR and CORFLO with some calculated results. (Authors)

  8. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW e and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k eff = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  9. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  10. Development of a methodology for simulation of gas cooled reactors with purpose of transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clarysson Alberto da

    2009-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology of MHR (Modular Helium Reactor) simulation using the WIMSD-5B (Winfrith Improved Multi/group Scheme) nuclear code which is validated by MCNPX 2.6.0 (Monte Carlo N-Particle transport eXtend) nuclear code. The goal is verify the capability of WIMSD-5B to simulate a reactor type GT-MHR (Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor), considering all the fuel recharges possibilities. Also is evaluated the possibility of WIMSD-5B to represent adequately the fuel evolution during the fuel recharge. Initially was verified the WIMSD-5B capability to simulate the recharge specificities of this model by analysis of neutronic parameters and isotopic composition during the burnup. After the model was simulated using both WIMSD-5B and MCNPX 2.6.0 codes and the results of k eff , neutronic flux and isotopic composition were compared. The results show that the deterministic WIMSD-5B code can be applied to a qualitative evaluation, representing adequately the core behavior during the fuel recharges being possible in a short period of time to inquire about the burned core that, once optimized, can be quantitatively evaluated by a code type MCNPX 2.6.0. (author)

  11. RA Research reactor, Part I: Technical and operational properties of the RA reactor; Analiza sigurnosti rada Reaktora RA I-III, Deo I: Tehnicke i pogonske karakteristike reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raisic, N; Zecevic, V; Nikolic, M; Popovic, B; Milosevic, M; Milic, M; Strugar, P; Pesic, M; Nikolic, V; Rajic, M; Radivojevic, J; Jankovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1963-02-15

    RA reactor is a research reactor with rather high power density. Apart from research it is used for isotope production and industrial applications due to high reactivity excess (about 11%). It is a thermal reactor, heavy water moderated, cooled by D{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O, with a graphite reflector. Nominal power is 6.5 MW. Fuel is 2% enriched metal uranium, reactor core height is 1220 mm, and diameter is 1405 mm. Reactor lattice is square with lattice pitch 130 mm. There is 6 horizontal experimental channels and a graphite column. There is a total of 84 fuel channels and 45 experimental channels in the core. Maximum thermal neutron flux is 5.5 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2} s at nominal power level.

  12. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  13. Hall effect measurements of Frenkel defect clustering in aluminium during high-dose reactor irradiation at 4.6 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Mauer, W.; Pfaendner, K.; Rosner, P.

    1976-01-01

    The low-field Hall coefficient R 0 of irradiated aluminium at 4.6 K is independent of the Frenkel defect (FD) concentration, however sensitively dependent of their configuration. Since measurement of R 0 is not too difficult, rather extensive investigations of FD clustering during irradiation can be performed, but only qualitative interpretations are possible. Several pure Al samples have been irradiated with reactor neutrons at 4.6 K up to very high doses phit resp. resistivity increments Δrho 0 (maximum 91% of extrapolated saturation value Δrho 0 sup(sat) approximately 980 nΩcm). The main results are 1.FD clustering within a single displacement cascade is not a very strong effect in Al, since the R 0 values are essentially the same after reactor and after electron irradiation. Rough cascade averages are: volume Vsub(c) approximately 2.1 x 10 5 at.vol. and FD concentration csub(c) approximately 1100 ppm. 2. There is practically no dose-dependent FD clustering up to Δrho 0 approximately 350 nΩcm, since R 0 remains essentially constant there. It follows that dose-dependent FD clustering can only occur for high-order overlap of cascade volumes. The differential dose curve dΔrho 0 /dphit is perfectly linear in Δrho 0 as long as R 0 = const. 3. For Δrho 0 > 350 nΩcm FD clustering becomes increasingly important and R 0 changes strongly. Surprisingly dR 0 /dphit approximately const whence there is a constant rate of cluster size increase in spite of the vanishing rate of FD production, evidence of the continuous regrouping of the lattice and its defects. (author)

  14. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, C.W.; Stevens, W.W.

    1990-01-01

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  15. Nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel and applies in particular when this is a fast reactor, the core or active part of the reactor being inside the vessel and immersed under a suitable volume of flowing liquid metal to cool it by extracting the calories released by the nuclear fission in the fuel assemblies forming this core [fr

  16. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sotic, O.

    1992-12-01

    Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1992 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection. First part includes 8 annexes describing reactor operation, activities of services for maintenance of reactor components and instrumentation, financial report and staffing. Second annex B is a paper by Z. Vukadin 'Recurrence formulas for evaluating expansion series of depletion functions' published in 'Kerntechnik' 56, (1991) No.6 (INIS record no. 23024136. Second part of the report is devoted to radiation protection issues and contains 4 annexes with data about radiation control of the working environment and reactor environment, description of decontamination activities, collection of radioactive wastes, and meteorology data [sr

  17. International tokamak reactor conceptual design overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) Workshop is an unique collaborative effort among Euratom, Japan, the USA and the USSR, under the auspices of the IAEA, to assess, define, design, construct and operate the next major experiment in the World Tokamak Program beyond the TFTR, JET, JT-60, T-15 generation. During the Zero-Phase (1979), a technical data base assessment was performed, leading to a positive assessment of feasibility. During Phase-I (1/80-6/81), a conceptual design was developed to define the concept. The programmatic objectives are that INTOR should: (1) be the maximum reasonable step beyond the TFTR, JET, JT-60, T-15 generation of tokamaks, (2) demonstrate the plasma performance required for tokamak DEMOs, (3) test the development and integration into a reactor system of those technologies required for a DEMO, (4) serve as a test facility for blanket, tritium production, materials, and plasma engineering technology, (5) test fusion reactor component reliability, (6) test the maintainability of a fusion reactor, and (7) test the factors affecting the reliability, safety and environmental acceptability of a fusion reactor. A conceptual design has been developed to define a device which is consistent with these objectives. The design concept could, with a reasonable degree of confidence, be developed into a workable engineering design of a tokamak that met the performance objectives of INTOR. There is some margin in the design to allow for uncertainty. While design solutions have been found for all of the critical issues, the overall design may not yet be optimal. (author)

  18. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant)

  19. The international thermonuclear reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Project is a 6-year collaborative effort involving the U.S., Europe, Japan, and the Russian Federation to produce a detailed engineering design for the next-step fusion device

  20. A Novel Dual-Stage Hydrothermal Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellstern, Henrik Christian; Becker, Jacob; Hald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The dual-stage reactor is a novel continuous flow reactor with two reactors connected in series. It is designed for hydrothermal flow synthesis of nanocomposites, in which a single particle consists of multiple materials. The secondary material may protect the core nanoparticle from oxidation....... The dual-stage reactor combines the ability to produce advanced materials with an upscaled capacity in excess of 10 g/hour (dry mass). TiO2 was synthesized in the primary reactor and reproduced previous results. The dual-stage capability was succesfully demonstrated with a series of nanocomposites incl. Ti...

  1. Feed water control device in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okutani, Tetsuro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent substantial fluctuations of the water level in a nuclear reactor and always keep a constant standard level under any operation condition. Constitution: When the causes for fluctuating the reactor water level is resulted, a certain amount of correction signal is added to a level deviation signal for the difference between the reactor standard level and the actual reactor water level to control the flow rate of the feed water pump depending on the addition signal. If reactor scram should occur, for instance, a level correction signal changing stepwise depending on a scram signal is outputted and added to the level deviation signal. As the result, the flow rate of feed water sent into the reactor just after the scram is increased, whereby the lowering in the reactor water level upon scram can be decreased as compared with the case where no such level compensation signal is inputted. (Kamimura, M.)

  2. Fusion reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    Nuclear fusion could soon become a viable energy source. Work in plasma physics, fusion technology and fusion safety is progressing rapidly in a number of Member States and international collaboration continues on work aiming at the demonstration of fusion power generation. Safety of fusion reactors and technological and radiological aspects of waste management are important aspects in the development and design of fusion machines. In order to provide an international forum to review and discuss the status and the progress made since 1983 in programmes related to operational safety aspects of fusion reactors, their waste management and decommissioning concepts, the IAEA had organized the Technical Committee on ''Fusion Reactor Safety'' in Culham, 3-7 November 1986. All presentations of this meeting were divided into four sessions: 1. Statements on National-International Fusion Safety Programmes (5 papers); 2. Operation and System Safety (15 papers); 3. Waste Management and Decommissioning (5 papers); 4. Environmental Impacts (6 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 31 papers. Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Conceptual design study of small lead-bismuth cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikazawa, Yoshitaka; Hori, Toru; Kida, Masanori; Konomura, Mamoru

    2004-11-01

    In phase 2 of the feasibility study of commercialized fast reactor cycle systems of JNC, we make a concept of a small sodium cooled reactor for a power source of a city with various requirements, such as, safety and economical competitiveness. various reactor concepts are surveyed and a tank type reactor whose intermediate heat exchanger and primary main pumps are arranged in series is selected. In this study, a compact long life core and a simple reactor structure designs are pursued. The core type is three regional Zr concentration with one Pu enrichment core, the reactor outlet temperature achieves 550degC and the reactor electric output increases from 150 MWe to 165 MWe. The construction cost is much higher than the economical goal in the case of FOAK. But the construction cost in the case of NOAK is estimated to be 85.6% achieving the economical goal. (author)

  4. Study of the neutronic behavior of a fuel assembly with gadolinium of a reactor HPLWR; Estudio del comportamiento neutronico de un ensamble combustible con gadolinia de un reactor HPLWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    This work presents a neutronic study of a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to center of the arrangement, for the nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water, High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). For the fuel analyses of the reactor HPLWR the neutronic code Helios-2 was used, settling down as the first study on fuel under conditions of supercritical water that has been simulated with this code. The analyzed variables, essentials in the neutronic design of any reactor, were the infinite neutrons multiplication factor (k{infinity}) and the maximum power peaking factor (PPF{sub max}), as well as the reactivity coefficients by the fuel temperature. The k{infinity} and PPF{sub max} values were obtained under conditions in cold (293.6 K) and in hot (to 880.8 K). The tests were realized for a reference fuel assembly design, with 40 fuel rods with enrichments of 4 and 5% of U-235, and considering different concentrations of consumable poison (gadolinium - Gd{sub 2O3}) in some rods of the same assembly. The obtained results show values k{infinity} and PPF{sub max} minors to the present in the conventional light water reactors. Moreover, the reactivity coefficients by fuel temperature were verified with the purpose of satisfying the safety conditions required in the nuclear reactors. (Author)

  5. Enhanced decolourisation of Acid Orange 7 in a continuous UASB reactor with quinones as redox mediators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Zee, van der F.P.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The reductive biotransformation of acid orange 7 (AO7) was explored in a lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor at low hydraulic residence times (HRT). A colour removal of 85% was achieved when the reactor was operated at a HRT of 6 hours, but decreased up to 70% when the HRT was

  6. Tritium monitoring within the reactor hall of a DT fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Monitoring the reactor hall atmosphere of DT-fueled fusion reactors will probably be performed with conventional ion chamber and proportional counter instruments modified as necessry to deal with the background radiation. Background includes external neutron and gamma radiation and internal beta-gamma radiation from the activated atmosphere. Although locating instruments in remote areas of the reactor hall and adding local shielding and electronic compensation may be feasible, placing the instruments in accessible low-background areas outside of the reactor hall and doing remote sampling is preferable and solves most of the radiation problems. The remaining problem of the activated atmosphere may be solved by recently developed instruments in conjunction with the use of semi-permeable membranes currently under development and evaluation

  7. Reactor science and technology: operation and control of reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Junlong

    1994-01-01

    This article is a collection of short reports on reactor operation and research in China in 1991. The operation of and research activities linked with the Heavy Water Research Reactor, Swimming Pool Reactor and Miniature Neutron Source Reactor are briefly surveyed. A number of papers then follow on the developing strategies in Chinese fast breeder reactor technology including the conceptual design of an experimental fast reactor (FFR), theoretical studies of FFR thermo-hydraulics and a design for an immersed sodium flowmeter. Reactor physics studies cover a range of topics including several related to work on zero power reactors. The section on reactor safety analysis is concerned largely with the assessment of established, and the presentation of new, computer codes for use in PWR safety calculations. Experimental and theoretical studies of fuels and reactor materials for FBRs, PWRs, BWRs and fusion reactors are described. A final miscellaneous section covers Mo-Tc isotope production in the swimming pool reactor, convective heat transfer in tubes and diffusion of tritium through plastic/aluminium composite films and Li 2 SiO 3 . (UK)

  8. Actinides burnup in a sodium fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez S, J. R.; Pineda A, R.; Martinez C, E.; Alonso, G., E-mail: ramon.ramirez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The burnup of actinides in a nuclear reactor is been proposed as part of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle, this process would close the fuel cycle recycling some of the radioactive material produced in the open nuclear fuel cycle. These actinides are found in the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power reactors at the end of their burnup in the reactor. Previous studies of actinides recycling in thermal reactors show that would be possible reduce the amounts of actinides at least in 50% of the recycled amounts. in this work, the amounts of actinides that can be burned in a fast reactor is calculated, very interesting results surge from the calculations, first, the amounts of actinides generated by the fuel is higher than for thermal fuel and the composition of the actinides vector is different as in fuel for thermal reactor the main isotope is the {sup 237}Np in the fuel for fast reactor the main isotope is the {sup 241}Am, finally it is concluded that the fast reactor, also generates important amounts of waste. (Author)

  9. Analysis of power variation in a CANDU-6 with a loss of moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.

    2008-01-01

    A loss of heavy water in a postulated small failure in the horizontal unpressurized calandria vessel of a CANDU-6 reactor will lead to a drop in the moderator level in the reactor core. The STEPBACK and SETBACK functions at the initial moment of the drop in moderator level ensure a reactor shutdown and a reduction in total reactor power during this 900 seconds postulated transient. If the STEPBACK and SETBACK functions are unavailable, the reactor's regulating system will try to compensate for the negative reactivity resulting from the loss of the moderator. This kind of compensation will lead to power distortions from top to bottom in the reactor core. .Comparisons of different moderator leakage rates were used in the analysis to determine the relationships between the power and the moderator leakage rates. Maximum bundle and channel powers obtained were insensitive to the moderator leakage rate. .In a complete analysis for a moderator leakage rate of 40 1/s, it was found that, without the STEPBACK and SETBACK functions, serious power distortions would occur during the 900 seconds transient. The maximization of bundle and channel power during this transient happened in the bottom part of the reactor , and the regulating system worsened this power distortion. .From the above analysis, it was concluded that the maximum bundle power attained during the loss of the moderator was 1.18% of its initial value. The risk of bundle dryout was, therefore, quite small. (author)

  10. Study of the neutronic behavior of a fuel assembly with gadolinium of a reactor HPLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L.; Espinosa P, G.

    2012-10-01

    This work presents a neutronic study of a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to center of the arrangement, for the nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water, High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). For the fuel analyses of the reactor HPLWR the neutronic code Helios-2 was used, settling down as the first study on fuel under conditions of supercritical water that has been simulated with this code. The analyzed variables, essentials in the neutronic design of any reactor, were the infinite neutrons multiplication factor (k∞) and the maximum power peaking factor (PPF max ), as well as the reactivity coefficients by the fuel temperature. The k∞ and PPF max values were obtained under conditions in cold (293.6 K) and in hot (to 880.8 K). The tests were realized for a reference fuel assembly design, with 40 fuel rods with enrichments of 4 and 5% of U-235, and considering different concentrations of consumable poison (gadolinium - Gd 2O3 ) in some rods of the same assembly. The obtained results show values k∞ and PPF max minors to the present in the conventional light water reactors. Moreover, the reactivity coefficients by fuel temperature were verified with the purpose of satisfying the safety conditions required in the nuclear reactors. (Author)

  11. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  12. Design of a multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Rios, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of a research reactor is essential in any endeavor to improve the execution of a nuclear programme, since it is a very versatile tool which can make a decisive contribution to a country's scientific and technological development. Because of their design, however, many existing research reactors are poorly adapted to certain uses. In some nuclear research centres, especially in the advanced countries, changes have been made in the original designs or new research prototypes have been designed for specific purposes. These modifications have proven very costly and therefore beyond the reach of developing countries. For this reason, what the research institutes in such countries need is a single sufficiently versatile nuclear plant capable of meeting the requirements of a nuclear research programme at a reasonable cost. This is precisely what a multipurpose reactor does. The Mexican National Nuclear Research Institute (ININ) plans to design and build a multipurpose research reactor capable at the same time of being used for the development of reactor design skills and for testing nuclear materials and fuels, for radioisotopes production, for nuclear power studies and basic scientific research, for specialized training, and so on. For this design work on the ININ Multipurpose Research Reactor, collaborative relations have been established with various international organizations possessing experience in nuclear reactor design: Atomehnergoeksport of the USSR: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL); General Atomics (GA) of the USA; and Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

  13. Production of sealed sup 6 sup 0 Co and sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir sources of high specific activity in the nuclear reactor RA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrijevic, R.; Vucina, J.

    1998-01-01

    Given is a review on the development of the production of 60 Co and 192 Ir performed in the Vinca Institute in the nuclear reactor RA. The experience gained showed that this reactor was suitable for obtaining of these and some other radionuclides. One possibility of its re-start is that the performances of the reactor remain the same (power 6.5 MW, max.neutron flux up to 6x10 13 n.cm -2 s -1 ). By applying new techniques of target preparation, 60 Co for sterilization units of specific activity 1.11 TBq/g could be produced. Maximal activity of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir would be about 1.48 TBq what is satisfactory for the sources for gamma radiography. The increase of the flux to 10 14 n.cm -2 s -1 would enable the production of 60 Co of specific activities about 3.335 TBq/g. This is satisfactory for the sources for the radiation therapy of activities up to 111 TBq and for gamma radiography of activities about 0.37 TBq. In the case of 192 Ir the sources for the radiation therapy of activities about 0.37 TBq could be obtained. Maximal achievable activities of 192 Ir would be about 3.7 TBq. (author)

  14. The water desalination complex based on ABV-type reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, Yu.K.; Fadeev, Yu.P.; Vorobiev, V.M.; Baranaev, Yu.D.

    1997-01-01

    A floating nuclear desalination complex with two barges, one for ABV type reactor plant, with twin reactor 2 x 6 MW(e), and one for reverse osmosis desalination plant, was described. The principal specifications of the ABV type reactor plant and desalination barge were given. The ABV type reactor has a traditional two-circuit layout using an integral type reactor vessel with all mode natural convection of primary coolant. The desalted water cost was estimated to be around US $0.86 per cubic meter. R and D work has been performed and preparations for commercial production are under way. (author)

  15. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  16. Core monitoring at the WNP-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeen, D.R.; Torres, R.H.; Burke, W.J.; Jenkins, I.; Jones, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The WNP-2 reactor is a 3,323-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR) that is operated by the Washington Public Power Supply System. The WNP-2 reactor began commercial operation in 1984 and is currently in its eighth cycle. The core monitoring system used for the first cycle of operation was supplied by the reactor vendor. Cycles 2 through 6 were monitored with the POWERPLEX Core Monitoring Software System (CMSS) using the XTGBWR simulation code. In 1991, the supply system upgraded the core monitoring system by installing the POWERPLEX 2 CMSS prior to the seventh cycle of operation for WNP-2. The POWERPLEX 2 CMSS was developed by Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) and is based on SPC's advanced state-of-the-art reactor simulator code MICROBURN-B. The improvements in the POWERPLEX 2 system are possible as a result of advances in minicomputer hardware

  17. The CAREM reactor and present currents in reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    INVAP has been working on the CAREM project since 1983. It concerns a very low power reactor for electrical energy generation. The design of the reactor and the basic criteria used were described in 1984. Since then, a series of designs have been presented for reactors which are similar to CAREM regarding the solutions presented to reduce the chance of major nuclear accidents. These designs have been grouped under different names: Advanced Reactors, Second Generation Reactors, Inherently Safe Reactors, or even, Revolutionary Reactors. Every reactor fabrication firm has, at least, one project which can be placed in this category. Presently, there are two main currents of Reactor Design; Evolutionary and Revolutionary. The present work discusses characteristics of these two types of reactors, some revolutionary designs and common criteria to both types. After, these criteria are compared with CAREM reactor design. (Author) [es

  18. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N. [Boris Kidric Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z. [Jozef Stefan Institute Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1972-07-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  19. Experience in utilizing research reactors in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.; Raisic, N.; Copic, M.; Gabrovsek, Z.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear institutes in Yugoslavia possess three research reactors. Since 1958, two heavy-water reactors have been in operation at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute, a zero-power reactor RB and a 6. 5-MW reactor RA. At the Jozef Stefan Institute, a 250-kW TRIGA Mark II reactor has been operating since 1966. All reactors are equipped with the necessary experimental facilities. The main activities based on these reactors are: (1) fundamental research in solid-state and nuclear physics; (2) R and D activities related to nuclear power program; and (3) radioisotope production. In fundamental physics, inelastic neutron scattering and diffraction phenomena are studied by means of the neutron beam tubes and applied to investigations of the structures of solids and liquids. Valuable results are also obtained in n - γ reaction studies. Experiments connected with the fuel -element development program, owing to the characteristics of the existing reactors, are limited to determination of the fuel element parameters, to studies on the purity of uranium, and to a small number of capsule irradiations. All three reactors are also used for the verification of different methods applied in the analysis of power reactors, particularly concerning neutron flux distributions, the optimization of reactor core configurations and the shielding effects. An appreciable irradiation space in the reactors is reserved for isotope production. Fruitful international co-operation has been established in all these activities, on the basis of either bilateral or multilateral arrangements. The paper gives a critical analysis of the utilization of research reactors in a developing country such as Yugoslavia. The investments in and the operational costs of research reactors are compared with the benefits obtained in different areas of reactor application. The impact on the general scientific, technological and educational level in the country is also considered. In particular, an attempt is made ro

  20. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  1. Obtaining 64Cu in a nuclear reactor from a Zn matrix: Preliminary tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, Andrea; Bedregal, Patricia; Montoya, Eduardo; Cohen, Marcos Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The design and feasibility of a method for obtaining 6C u in a nuclear reactor, from the 64 Zn(n,p) 64 Cu threshold reaction of zinc, induced by the fast component of the neutron spectrum, is presented. The product obtained will be used in positron emission tomography (PET). The preliminary experiments were performed using the RP-10 research reactor at a power of 3.5 MW, followed by a radiochemical separation by solvent extraction using a chloroform solution of dithizone. The radioisotope has been identified and quantified through the full energy peak of 1345.77 keV, using a high resolution gamma spectrometry system. The preliminary yield achieved demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method. (authors).

  2. Hybrid simulation of reactor kinetics in CANDU reactors using a modal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, B.M.; McDonnell, F.N.; Hinds, H.W.T.; m.

    1980-01-01

    A hybrid computer model for simulating the behaviour of large CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor cores is presented. The main dynamic variables are expressed in terms of weighted sums of a base set of spatial natural-mode functions with time-varying co-efficients. This technique, known as the modal or synthesis approach, permits good three-dimensional representation of reactor dynamics and is well suited to hybrid simulation. The hybrid model provides improved man-machine interaction and real-time capability. The model was used in two applications. The first studies the transient that follows a loss of primary coolant and reactor shutdown; the second is a simulation of the dynamics of xenon, a fission product which has a high absorption cross-section for neutrons and thus has an important effect on reactor behaviour. Comparison of the results of the hybrid computer simulation with those of an all-digital one is good, within 1% to 2%

  3. Advances in Reactor Physics, Mathematics and Computation. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings of the international topical meeting on advances in reactor physics, mathematics and computation, Volume 2, are divided into 7 sessions bearing on: - session 7: Deterministic transport methods 1 (7 conferences), - session 8: Interpretation and analysis of reactor instrumentation (6 conferences), - session 9: High speed computing applied to reactor operations (5 conferences), - session 10: Diffusion theory and kinetics (7 conferences), - session 11: Fast reactor design, validation and operating experience (8 conferences), - session 12: Deterministic transport methods 2 (7 conferences), - session 13: Application of expert systems to physical aspects of reactor design and operation.

  4. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovchenko, Mariya; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Burn, Kenneth W.; Console Camprini, Patrizio; Duhamel, Isabelle; Peron, Arthur

    2017-09-01

    The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  5. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  6. Digital computer operation of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colley, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for the safe operation of a complex system such as a nuclear reactor using a digital computer. The computer is supplied with a data base containing a list of the safe state of the reactor and a list of operating instructions for achieving a safe state when the actual state of the reactor does not correspond to a listed safe state, the computer selects operating instructions to return the reactor to a safe state

  7. Simulation of the flow obstruction of a jet pump in a BWR reactor with the code RELAP/SCDAPSIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas V, J.; Filio L, C.

    2016-09-01

    This work simulates the flow obstruction of a jet pump in one of the recirculation loops of a nuclear power plant with a reactor of type BWR at 100% of operating power, in order to analyze the behavior of the total flow of the refrigerant passing through the reactor core, the total flow in each recirculation loop of the reactor, together with the 10 jet pumps of each loop. The behavior of the power and the reactivity insertion due to the change of the refrigerant flow pattern is also analyzed. The simulation was carried out using the RELAP/SCDAPSIM version 3.5 code, using a reactor model with 10 jet pumps in each recirculation loop and a core consisting of 6 radial zones and 25 axial zones. The scenario postulates the flow obstruction in a jet pump in a recirculation loop A when the reactor operates at 100% rated power, causing a change in the total flow of refrigerant in the reactor core, leading to a decrease in power. Once the reactor conditions are established to its new power, the operator tries to recover the nominal power using the flow control valve of the recirculation loop A, opening stepwise as a strategy to safely recover the reactor power. In this analysis is assumed that the intention of the nuclear plant operator is to maintain the operation of the reactor during the established cycle. (Author)

  8. Advanced fuels for nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNally, J.R. Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Should magnetic confinement of hot plasma prove satisfactory at high β (16 πnkT//sub B 2 / greater than 0.1), thermonuclear fusion fuels other than D.T may be contemplated for future fusion reactors. The prospect of the advanced fusion fuels D.D and 6 Li.D for fusion reactors is quite promising provided the system is large, well reflected and possesses a high β. The first generation reactions produce the very active, energy-rich fuels t and 3 He which exhibit a high burnup probability in very hot plasmas. Steady state burning of D.D can ensue in a 60 kG field, 5 m reactor for β approximately 0.2 and reflectivity R/sub mu/ = 0.9 provided the confinement time is about 38 sec. The feasibility of steady state burning of 6 Li.D has not yet been demonstrated but many important features of such systems still need to be incorporated in the reactivity code. In particular, there is a need for new and improved nuclear cross section data for over 80 reaction possibilities

  9. The stand prototype of minimum power NRE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belogurov, A.I.; Grigorenko, L.N.; Mamontov, Yu.I.; Rachuk, V.S.; Stukalov, A.I.; Konyukhov, G.V.

    1995-01-01

    For ensuring of full-scale development of nuclear rocket engine (NRE) reactor was created stand prototype (reactor IRGIT?) The main differences of its are as follows: 1) Fasteners of technologies channels contents fuel assemblies in bottom are worked out the split. It is provides possibility a distance channels change without disassembly of reactor stand prototype from stand; 2) Cooling of the vessels, the moderator, the reflector and the barrel actuate is carried out by hydrogen; 3) The lower bottom modified for organization the hydrogen efflux in the form a reactor jet; 4) Radiation defence is introduced as part of stand prototype for ensuring of serviceability of stand accessories and tests routine service; 5) Each technology channels is provided of critical nozzle; 6) Control, regulation and defence of reactor has being carried out on stand system

  10. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  11. Linear regression and sensitivity analysis in nuclear reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Akansha; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Presented a benchmark for the applicability of linear regression to complex systems. • Applied linear regression to a nuclear reactor power system. • Performed neutronics, thermal–hydraulics, and energy conversion using Brayton’s cycle for the design of a GCFBR. • Performed detailed sensitivity analysis to a set of parameters in a nuclear reactor power system. • Modeled and developed reactor design using MCNP, regression using R, and thermal–hydraulics in Java. - Abstract: The paper presents a general strategy applicable for sensitivity analysis (SA), and uncertainity quantification analysis (UA) of parameters related to a nuclear reactor design. This work also validates the use of linear regression (LR) for predictive analysis in a nuclear reactor design. The analysis helps to determine the parameters on which a LR model can be fit for predictive analysis. For those parameters, a regression surface is created based on trial data and predictions are made using this surface. A general strategy of SA to determine and identify the influential parameters those affect the operation of the reactor is mentioned. Identification of design parameters and validation of linearity assumption for the application of LR of reactor design based on a set of tests is performed. The testing methods used to determine the behavior of the parameters can be used as a general strategy for UA, and SA of nuclear reactor models, and thermal hydraulics calculations. A design of a gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFBR), with thermal–hydraulics, and energy transfer has been used for the demonstration of this method. MCNP6 is used to simulate the GCFBR design, and perform the necessary criticality calculations. Java is used to build and run input samples, and to extract data from the output files of MCNP6, and R is used to perform regression analysis and other multivariate variance, and analysis of the collinearity of data

  12. Safety of research reactors - A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    Due to historical reasons research reactors have received less regulatory attention in the world than nuclear power plants. This has given rise to several safety issues which, if not addressed immediately, may result in an undesirable situation. However, in Pakistan, research reactors and power reactors have received due attention from the regulatory authority. The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 has been under regulatory surveillance since 1965, the year of its commissioning. The second reactor has also undergone all the safety reviews and checks mandated by the licensing procedures. A brief description of the regulatory framework, the several safety reviews carried out have been briefly described in this paper. Significant activities of the regulatory authority have also been described in verifying the safety of research reactors in Pakistan along with the future activities. The views of the Pakistani regulatory authority on the specific issues identified by the IAEA have been presented along with specific recommendations to the IAEA. We are of the opinion that there are more Member States operating nuclear research reactors than nuclear power plants. Therefore, there should be more emphasis on the research reactor safety, which somehow has not been the case. In several recommendations made to the IAEA on the specific safety issues the emphasis has been, in general, to have a similar documentation and approach for maintaining and verifying operational safety at research reactors as is currently available for nuclear power reactors and may be planned for nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (author)

  13. Reactor containment and reactor safety in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouts, H.

    1986-01-01

    The reactor safety systems of two reactors are studied aiming at the reactor containment integrity. The first is a BWR type reactor and is called Peachbottom 2, and the second is a PWR type reactor, and is called surry. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Operation and maintenance of 1MW PUSPATI TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnan Bokhari; Mohammad Suhaimi Kassim

    2006-01-01

    The Malaysian Research Reactor, Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) has been successfully operated for 22 years for various experiments. Since its commissioning in June 1982 until December 2004, the 1MW pool-type reactor has accumulated more than 21143 hours of operation, corresponding to cumulative thermal energy release of about 14083 MW-hours. The reactor is currently in operation and normally operates on demand, which is normally up to 6 hours a day. Presently the reactor core is made up of standard TRIAGA fuel element consists of 8.5 wt%, 12 wt% and 20 wt% types; 20%-enriched and stainless steel clad. Several measures such as routine preventive maintenance and improving the reactor support systems have been taken toward achieving this long successful operation. Besides normal routine utilization like other TRIGA reactors, new strategies are implemented for effective increase in utilization. (author)

  15. Lead- or Lead-bismuth-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Courouau, J.L.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Martinelli, L.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.

    2014-01-01

    Lead-cooled fast reactors are one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. So far no lead-cooled reactors have existed in the world except lead-bismuth-cooled reactors in soviet submarines. Some problems linked to the use of the lead-bismuth eutectic appeared but were satisfactorily solved by a more rigorous monitoring of the chemistry of the lead-bismuth coolant. Lead presents various advantages as a coolant: no reactivity with water and the air,a high boiling temperature and low contamination when irradiated. The main asset of the lead-bismuth alloy is the drop of the fusion temperature from 327 C degrees to 125 C degrees. The main drawback of using lead (or lead-bismuth) is its high corrosiveness with metals like iron, chromium and nickel. The high corrosiveness of the coolant implies low flow velocities which means a bigger core and consequently a bigger reactor containment. Different research programs in the world (in Europe, Russia and the USA) are reviewed in the article but it appears that the development of this type of reactor requires technological breakthroughs concerning materials and the resistance to corrosion. Furthermore the concept of lead-cooled reactors seems to be associated to a range of low output power because of the compromise between the size of the reactor and its resistance to earthquakes. (A.C.)

  16. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  17. Lateral restraint assembly in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.; Gorholt, W.

    1977-01-01

    A lateral restraint assembly is described for a reactor of, for example, the high temperature gas-cooled type which commonly includes a reactor core of relatively complex construction supported within a shell or vessel providing a shielded cavity for containing the reactor core. (U.K.)

  18. Method for filling a reactor with a catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for filling a reactor with a catalyst for the carbonylation of carbonylated compounds in the gas phase. According to said method, a SILP catalyst is covered with a filling agent which is liquid under normal conditions and is volatile under carbonylation reaction...... conditions, and a thus-treated catalyst is introduced into the reactor and the reactor is sealed....

  19. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  20. Design and installation of a hot water layer system at the Tehran research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmohammadi Sayedeh Leila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hot water layer system (HWLS is a novel system for reducing radioactivity under research reactor containment. This system is particularly useful in pool-type research reactors or other light water reactors with an open pool surface. The main purpose of a HWLS is to provide more protection for operators and reactor personnel against undesired doses due to the radio- activity of the primary loop. This radioactivity originates mainly from the induced radioactivity contained within the cooling water or probable minute leaks of fuel elements. More importantly, the bothersome radioactivity is progressively proportional to reactor power and, thus, the HWLS is a partial solution for mitigating such problems when power upgrading is planned. Following a series of tests and checks for different parameters, a HWLS has been built and put into operation at the Tehran research reactor in 2009. It underwent a series of comprehensive tests for a period of 6 months. Within this time-frame, it was realized that the HWLS could provide a better protection for reactor personnel against prevailing radiation under containment. The system is especially suitable in cases of abnormality, e. g. the spread of fission products due to fuel failure, because it prevents the mixing of pollutants developed deep in the pool with the upper layer and thus mitigates widespread leakage of radioactivity.

  1. Gas cooled thermal reactors with high temperatures (VHTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchter, J.C.; Dufour, P.; Guidez, J.; Latge, C.; Renault, C.; Rimpault, G.; Vasile, A.

    2014-01-01

    VHTR is one of the 6 concepts retained for the 4. generation of nuclear reactors, it is an upgraded version of the HTR-type reactor (High Temperature Reactors). 5 HTR reactors were operated in the world in the eighties, now 2 experimental HTR are working in China and Japan and 2 HTR with an output power of 100 MWe are being built in China. The purpose of the VHTR is to provide an helium at very high temperatures around 1000 Celsius degrees that could be used directly in a thermochemical way to produce hydrogen for instance. HTR reactors are interesting in terms of safety but it does not optimise the consumption of uranium and the production of wastes. This article presents a brief historical account of HTR-type reactors and their main design and safety features. The possibility of using HTR to burn plutonium is also presented as well as the possibility of closing the fuel cycle and of using thorium-uranium fuel. (A.C.)

  2. Methodology for the integral comparison of nuclear reactors: selecting a reactor for Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes R, R.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work it was built a methodology to compare nuclear reactors of third generation that can be contemplated for future electric planning in Mexico. This methodology understands the selection of the reactors to evaluate eliminating the reactors that still are not sufficiently mature at this time of the study. A general description of each reactor together with their main ones characteristic is made. It was carried out a study for to select the group of parameters that can serve as evaluation indicators, which are the characteristics of the reactors with specific values for each considered technology, and it was elaborated an evaluation matrix indicators including the reactors in the columns and those indicators in the lines. Since that none reactor is the best in all the indicators were necessary to use a methodology for multi criteria taking decisions that we are presented. It was used the 'Fuzzy Logic' technique, the which is based in those denominated diffuse groups and in a system of diffuse inference based on heuristic rules in the way 'If Then consequence> ', where the linguistic values of the condition and of the consequence is defined by diffuse groups, it is as well as the rules always they transform a diffuse group into another. Later on they combine all the diffuse outputs to create a single output and an inverse transformation is made that it transfers the output from the diffuse domain to the real one. They were carried out two studies one with the entirety of the indicators and another in which the indicators were classified in three approaches: the first one refers to indicators related with the planning of the plants inside the context of the general electric sector, the second approach includes indicators related with the characteristics of the fuel and the third it considers indicators related with the acting of the plant in safety and environmental impact. This second study allowed us to know the qualities of each reactor in each one of the

  3. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance

  4. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance in the

  5. Nuclear Reactor Sharing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) is licensed to operate at a maximum power level of 500 kW. A pool-type reactor using flat-plate, low enriched fuel elements, the OSURR provides several experimental facilities including two 6-inch i.d. beam ports, a graphite thermal column, several graphite-isotope-irradiation elements, a pneumatic transfer system (Rabbit), various dry tubes, and a Central Irradiation Facility (CIF). The core arrangement and accessibility facilitates research programs involving material activation or core parameter studies. The OSURR control room is large enough to accommodate laboratory groups which can use control instrumentation for monitoring of experiments. The control instrumentation is relatively simple, without a large amount of duplication. This facilitates opportunities for hands-on experience in reactor operation by nuclear engineering students making reactor parameter measurements. For neutron activation analysis and analyses of natural environmental radioactivity, the NRL maintains the gamma ray spectroscopy system (GRSS). It is comprised of two PC-based 8192-channel multichannel analyzers (MCAs) with all the required software for quantitative analysis. A 3 double-prime x 3 double-prime NaI(Tl), a 14 percent Ge(Li), and a High Purity Germanium detector are currently available for use with the spectroscopy system

  6. General aspects to be considered in a research reactor decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 200 research reactors that have either not operated for a considerable period of time and may never return to operation or, are close to permanent shutdown. Many countries do not have a decommissioning policy, and like Brazil not all installations have their decommissioning plan as part of the licensing documentation. Brazil is signatory of Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, but until now there is no decommissioning policy, and specifically for research reactor there is no decommissioning guidelines in the standards. The Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG) has a TRIGA Mark I Research Reactor IPR-R1 in operation for 47 years with 3.6% average fuel burn-up. The original power was 100 kW and it is being licensed for 250 kW, and it needs the decommissioning plan as part of the licensing requirements. In the paper it is presented general aspects and contents of a Research Reactors Decommissioning Plan. As the Brazilian regulatory body so far does not have a decommissioning policy established neither a regulatory framework in this issue, individual efforts are being integrated to establish a National Decommissioning Group (matrix structure) to perform the decommissioning planning and activities. The approach used for IPR-R1 is presented as suggestions to develop the national regulatory standards on this issue and applied to Brazilian Research Reactors and other nuclear facilities. (author)

  7. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    reactors of the future, the body of research aimed at developing liquid metal cooled fast reactors, national plans for work in 1976 on developing fast reactors - these were some of the topics discussed in connection with the national programmes. The development of power reactors involves a wide range of problems in the fields of nuclear and reactor physics, the thermophysics, chemistry, physics and technology of the cooling system, structural materials and nuclear fuel, the fabrication of reliable fuel elements and operating equipment, reactor monitoring and control, spent fuel reprocessing, the economics of constructing fast power reactors, nuclear safety, etc. The IWGFR, as at previous meetings, therefore paid great attention to the matter of holding international specialists' meetings. The working group recommended that the IAEA should organize the following IWGFR meetings in 1976: (1) In-Service Inspection and Monitoring (Bensberg, FRG, March 1976). (2) Cavitation in Sodium and Studies of Analogy with Water as Compared to Sodium (Cadarache, France, April 1976). (3) High Temperature Structural Design Technology (United States, May 1976) (4) Aerosol Formation, Vapour Deposits and Sodium Vapour Trapping (France, September-December 1976). The Group welcomed the IAEA's proposal to hold specialists' meetings on 'Fast Reactor Instrumentation' and 'Fuel Reprocessing and Recycling Techniques' within the framework of the Agency's programme of working groups in 1976. After discussing questions of co-ordinating and organizing international conferences on fast reactors, the IWGFR agreed to send representatives to the joint meeting of the American Nuclear Society and the American Institute of Metallurgical Engineers on 'Liquid Metal Technology', to be held at Champion, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. from 3-6 May 1976, and recommended that the IAEA should organize an international symposium on the 'Design, Construction and Operating Experience of Demonstration Fast Power Reactors' at Bologna

  8. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  9. Revisiting homogeneous suspension reactors for production of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasqualini, E.E.

    2010-01-01

    Some 50 years ago in Geneva Conferences I, II and III (1955. 1958 and 1964) on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, and also in Vienna Symposium on Reactor Experiments (1961), several papers where presented by different countries referring to advances in homogeneous suspension reactors. In particular the Dutch KEMA Suspension Test Reactor (KSTR) was developed, built and successfully operated in the sixties and seventies. It was a 1MWth reactor in which a suspension (6 microns spheres) of mixed UO 2 /ThO 2 in light water was circulated in a closed loop through a sphere-shaped vessel. One of the basic ideas on these suspension reactors was to apply the fission recoil separation effect as a means of purification of the fuel: the non-volatile fission products can be adsorbed in dispersed active charcoal and removed from the liquid. Undoubtedly, this method can present some advantages and better yields for the production of Mo-99 and other short lived radioisotopes, since they have to be extracted from a liquid in which practically no uranium is present. Details are mentioned of the different aspects that have been taken into account and which ones could be added in the corresponding actualization of suspension reactors for radioisotope production. In recent years great advances have been made in nanotechnology that can be used in the tailoring of fuel particles and adsorbent media. Recently, in CNEA Buenos Aires, a new facility has been inaugurated and is being equipped and licensed for laboratory experiments and preparative synthesis of nuclear nanoparticles. RA-6 and RA-3 experimental reactors in Argentina can be used for in-pile testing. (author)

  10. ISIS Training Reactor: A Reactor Dedicated to Education and Training for Students and Professionals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulon, F.

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: • INSTN strategy: complete theoretical courses by practical courses on the ISIS research reactor. • Training courses integrated both in Academic degree programs and continuing education. • 27 hours of training courses have been developed focusing on the practical and safety aspects of reactor operation. • The Education and Training activity became the main activity of ISIS reactor: 400 trainees/year; 360 hours/year; 40% in English. • Remote access to the Training courses: Internet Reactor Laboratory under development to be started from 2014 to broadcast training courses from ISIS reactor to guest institutions

  11. Zircaloy behaviour in high temperature irradiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanic, V.F.

    1982-04-01

    The corrosion and hydriding of Zircaloy during irradiation in high temperature water is strongly dependent on the oxygen concentration of the water. Corrosion tests in the NRX and NRU research reactors using small samples have demonstrated the importance of water chemistry in maintaining Zircaloy corrosion and hydriding within acceptable limits. Zircaloy fuel cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides during irradiation in hich temperature water containing dissolved oxygen. Results from examinations of prototype fuel cladding irradiated in the research reactors are presented to show how local variations in coolant flow, fast neutron flux, metallurgical structure and surface condition can influence the onset of non-uniform corrosion under these conditions. Destructive examinations of CANDU-PHW reactor fuel cladding have emphasized the importance of good chemistry control, especially the dissolved oxygen concentration of the water. When reactor coolants are maintained under normal reducing conditions at high pH (5 to 10 cm 3 D 2 /kg D 2 O; 2 /kg D 2 O; pH > 10 with LiOD), Zircaloy cladding develops non-uniform, patch-type oxides. These patch-type oxides tend to coalesce with time to form a thick, uniform oxide layer after extended exposure. Under reducing coolant conditions, Zircaloy cladding absorbs less than 200 mg D/kg Zr (approximately 2.5 mg/dm 2 equivalent hydrogen) in about 500 days. With oxygen in the coolant, deuterium absorption is considerably less despite the significant increase in corrosion under such conditions

  12. Simulation of a marine nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Kyouya, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Hideo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1995-01-01

    A Nuclear-powered ship Engineering Simulation SYstem (NESSY) has been developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute as an advanced design tool for research and development of future marine reactors. A marine reactor must respond to changing loads and to the ship's motions because of the ship's maneuvering and its presence in a marine environment. The NESSY has combined programs for the reactor plant behavior calculations and the ship's motion calculations. Thus, it can simulate reactor power fluctuations caused by changing loads and the ship's motions. It can also simulate the behavior of water in the pressurizer and steam generators. This water sloshes in response to the ship's motions. The performance of NESSY has been verified by comparing the simulation calculations with the measured data obtained by experiments performed using the nuclear ship Mutsu. The effects of changing loads and the ship's motions on the reactor behavior can be accurately simulated by NESSY

  13. Improved nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. A generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounds the reactor vessel and a central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and supports the bottom wall of the reactor vessel and the reactor core. The periphery of the reactor vessel bore is supported by an annular structure which allows thermal expansion but not seismic motion of the vessel, and a bed of thermally insulating material uniformly supports the vessel base whilst allowing expansion thereof. A guard ring prevents lateral seismic motion of the upper end of the reactor vessel. The periphery of the core is supported by an annular structure supported by the vessel base and keyed to the vessel wall so as to be able to expand but not undergo seismic motion. A deck is supported on the containment structure above the reactor vessel open top by annular bellows, the deck carrying the reactor control rods such that heating of the reactor vessel results in upward expansion against the control rods. (author)

  14. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  15. Control of reactor coolant flow path during reactor decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsbedt, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a sodium cooled reactor of the type having a reactor hot pool, a slightly lower pressure reactor cold pool and a reactor vessel liner defining a reactor vessel liner flow gap separating the hot pool and the cold pool along the reactor vessel sidewalls and wherein the normal sodium circuit in the reactor includes main sodium reactor coolant pumps having a suction on the lower pressure sodium cold pool and an outlet to a reactor core; the reactor core for heating the sodium and discharging the sodium to the reactor hot pool; a heat exchanger for receiving sodium from the hot pool, and removing heat from the sodium and discharging the sodium to the lower pressure cold pool; the improvement across the reactor vessel liner comprising: a jet pump having a venturi installed across the reactor vessel liner, the jet pump having a lower inlet from the reactor vessel cold pool across the reactor vessel liner and an upper outlet to the reactor vessel hot pool

  16. Fast reactor development programme in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Rigoleur, C [Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires, CEA Centre d` Etudes de Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    1998-04-01

    First the general situation regarding production of electricity in France is briefly described. Then in the field of Fast Reactors, the main events of 1996 are presented. At the end of February 1996, the PHENIX reactor was ready for operation. After review meetings, the Safety Authority has requested safety improvements and technical demonstrations, before it examines the possibility of authorizing a new start-up of PHENIX. The year 1996 was devoted to this work. In 1996, SUPERPHENIX was characterized by excellent operation throughout the year. The reactor was restarted at the end of 1995 after a number of minor incidents. The reactor power was increased by successive steps: 30% Pn up to February 6, followed by 50% Pn up to May then 60% up to October and 90% Pn during the last months. A programmed shutdown period occurred during May, June and mid-July 1996. The reactor has been shutdown at the end of 1996 for the decenial control of the steam generators. The status of the CAPRA project, aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of a fast reactor to burn plutonium at as high a rate as possible and the status of the European Fast Reactor are presented as well as their evolution. Finally the R and D in support of the operation of PHENIX and SUPERPHENIX, in support of the ````knowledge-acquisition```` programme, and CAPRA and EFR programmes is presented, as well as the present status of the stage 2 dismantling of the RAPSODIE experimental fast reactor. (author). 4 refs, figs, 2 tabs.

  17. Irradiation of a CANDU UOsub(2) fuel element with twenty-three machined slits cut through the zircaloy sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DaSilva, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    A CANDU fuel element was purposely defected, exposing a minimum UOsub(2) fuel stack area of 272 mmsup(2), by machining 23 longitudinal slits through the Zircaloy-4 sheathing. The element was then irradiated in the X-2 loop of the NRX reactor for a period of 14.64 effective full power days at a linear heat rating of 48 kW/m to investigate the relationship between fission product release and UOsub(2) oxidation behaviour in an element with minimal fuel-to-gap fission gas trapping. The fission product releases, as measured by on-line gamma-ray spectroscopy, revealed that the noble gases and radioiodines are both released from the UOsub(2) fuel matrix directly to the coolant via simple diffusion kinetics, and that their diffusivities in hyperstoichiometric UOsub(2) are approximately equal. The oxidation of UOsub(2) to the higher states UOsub(2+x), Usub(4)Osub(9) and Usub(3)Osub(8), was accompanied by substantial fuel swelling and sheath deformation preferentially located in the lower powered end of the element. The spalling and erosion behaviour of the fuel pellets was correlated to the rate of fuel oxidation

  18. A review of the UK fast reactor programme. April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramman, J I [International Relations Department, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Risley, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    1992-07-01

    Total energy consumption in the UK in 1991 was 351.6 million tones of coal or coal equivalent, an increase of 2.1% on 1990. Nuclear electricity accounted for 19.5% of the total electricity consumption of about 300 TWh. The technical part of the report is principally concerned with progress with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) and its associated fuel reprocessing plant and with some aspects of international cooperation on fast reactors. The total gross electrical generation of PFR for 1991 was 34,767 MWd, equivalent to annual load factor of 41.6%. The principal factor depressing the load factor figure was an ingress of lubricating oil from bearing on primary sodium pump 2 into the primary coolant which led to the station being out of service for six months. Two PFR fuel reprocessing campaigns were undertaken during the year. In the first, 18 subassemblies at burnup levels up to 12%, plus some loose pins from the fuel post-irradiation examination facility, were processed. In the second, a further 7 subassemblies at burnup levels up to 17.3%, plus some more loose pins were dealt with. The cumulative total amount of fuel reprocessed to date is now 17.99 tons of heavy metal, containing 3.17 tonnes of plutonium. The reduction of Government funding to the fast reactor research and development programme since 1989 has led to termination of fuel cycle research and development work. However, valuable information continues to be obtained from operation of the PFR fuel reprocessing plant and its support facilities and from development work on the manufacture of thermal MOX fuel. Information exchanges and cooperative work programmes conducted under the UKAEA's agreements with Japan (PNC and JAERI), the USA (US Department of energy), and the CIS are now coordinated with those of the UKAEA's European Fast Reactor research and development partners.

  19. A review of the UK fast reactor programme. April 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramman, J.I.

    1992-01-01

    Total energy consumption in the UK in 1991 was 351.6 million tones of coal or coal equivalent, an increase of 2.1% on 1990. Nuclear electricity accounted for 19.5% of the total electricity consumption of about 300 TWh. The technical part of the report is principally concerned with progress with the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) and its associated fuel reprocessing plant and with some aspects of international cooperation on fast reactors. The total gross electrical generation of PFR for 1991 was 34,767 MWd, equivalent to annual load factor of 41.6%. The principal factor depressing the load factor figure was an ingress of lubricating oil from bearing on primary sodium pump 2 into the primary coolant which led to the station being out of service for six months. Two PFR fuel reprocessing campaigns were undertaken during the year. In the first, 18 subassemblies at burnup levels up to 12%, plus some loose pins from the fuel post-irradiation examination facility, were processed. In the second, a further 7 subassemblies at burnup levels up to 17.3%, plus some more loose pins were dealt with. The cumulative total amount of fuel reprocessed to date is now 17.99 tons of heavy metal, containing 3.17 tonnes of plutonium. The reduction of Government funding to the fast reactor research and development programme since 1989 has led to termination of fuel cycle research and development work. However, valuable information continues to be obtained from operation of the PFR fuel reprocessing plant and its support facilities and from development work on the manufacture of thermal MOX fuel. Information exchanges and cooperative work programmes conducted under the UKAEA's agreements with Japan (PNC and JAERI), the USA (US Department of energy), and the CIS are now coordinated with those of the UKAEA's European Fast Reactor research and development partners

  20. Reactor core for LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masumi, Ryoji; Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Bando, Masaru; Watari, Yoshio.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the power distribution fluctuations and obtain flat and stable power distribution throughout the operation period in an LMFBR type reactor. Constitution: In the inner reactor core region and the outer reactor core region surrounding the same, the thickness of the inner region is made smaller than the axial height of the reactor core region and the radial width thereof is made smaller than that of the reactor core region and the volume thereof is made to 30 - 50 % for the reactor core region. Further, the amount of the fuel material per unit volume in the inner region is made to 70 - 90 % of that in the outer region. The difference in the neutron infinite multiplication factor between the inner region and the outer region is substantially constant irrespective of the burnup degree and the power distribution fluctuation can be reduced to about 2/3, by which the effect of thermal striping to the reactor core upper mechanisms can be moderated. Further, the maximum linear power during operation can be reduced by 3 %, by which the thermal margin in the reactor core is increased and the reactor core fuels can be saved by 3 %. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Reduced membrane fouling in a novel bio-entrapped membrane reactor for treatment of food and beverage processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kok-Kwang; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Andy Hong, Pui-Kwan; Yang, Ping-Yi

    2011-08-01

    A novel Bio-Entrapped Membrane Reactor (BEMR) packed with bio-ball carriers was constructed and investigated for organics removal and membrane fouling by soluble microbial products (SMP). An objective was to evaluate the stability of the filtration process in membrane bioreactors through backwashing and chemical cleaning. The novel BEMR was compared to a conventional membrane bioreactor (CMBR) on performance, with both treating identical wastewater from a food and beverage processing plant. The new reactor has a longer sludge retention time (SRT) and lower mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) content than does the conventional. Three different hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 6, 9, and 12 h were studied. The results show faster rise of the transmembrane pressure (TMP) with decreasing hydraulic retention time (HRT) in both reactors, where most significant membrane fouling was associated with high SMP (consisting of carbohydrate and protein) contents that were prevalent at the shortest HRT of 6 h. Membrane fouling was improved in the new reactor, which led to a longer membrane service period with the new reactor. Rapid membrane fouling was attributed to increased production of biomass and SMP, as in the conventional reactor. SMP of 10-100 kDa from both MBRs were predominant with more than 70% of the SMP <100 kDa. Protein was the major component of SMP rather than carbohydrate in both reactors. The new reactor sustained operation at constant permeate flux that required seven times less frequent chemical cleaning than did the conventional reactor. The new BEMR offers effective organics removal while reducing membrane fouling. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Performance of a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henquin, E.R.; Bisang, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → For this reactor configuration the current distribution is uniform. → For this reactor configuration with bipolar connection the leakage current is small. → The mass-transfer conditions are closely uniform along the electrode. → The fluidodynamic behaviour can be represented by the dispersion model. → This reactor represents a suitable device for laboratory trials. - Abstract: This paper reports on a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor with an innovative design feature, which is based on a filter press arrangement with inclined segmented electrodes and under a modular assembly. Under bipolar connection, the fraction of leakage current is lower than 4%, depending on the bipolar Wagner number, and the current distribution is closely uniform. When a turbulence promoter is used, the local mass-transfer coefficient shows a variation of ±10% with respect to its mean value. The fluidodynamics of the reactor responds to the dispersion model with a Peclet number higher than 10. It is concluded that this reactor is convenient for laboratory research.

  3. Research and development of a super fast reactor (12). Considerations for the reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    A research program aimed at developing the Super Fast Reactor (Super FR) has been entrusted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan since December 2005. It includes the following three projects. (A) Development of the Super Fast Reactor concept. (B)Thermal-hydraulic experiments. (C) Materials development. Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) has joined this program and works on part (A) together with the University of Tokyo. From the utility's viewpoint, it is important to consider the most desirable characteristics for Super FR to have. Four issues were identified in project (A), (1) Fuel d