WorldWideScience

Sample records for nrc research activities

  1. Recent NRC research activities addressing valve and pump issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The mission of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to ensure the safe design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants and other facilities in the U.S.A. One of the main roles that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) plays in achieving the NRC mission is to plan, recommend, and implement research programs that address safety and technical issues deemed important by the NRC. The results of the research activities provide the bases for developing NRC positions or decisions on these issues. Also, RES performs confirmatory research for developing the basis to evaluate industry responses and positions on various regulatory requirements. This presentation summarizes some recent RES supported research activities that have addressed safety and technical issues related to valves and pumps. These activities include the efforts on determining valve and motor-operator responses under dynamic loads and pressure locking events, evaluation of monitoring equipment, and methods for detecting and trending aging of check valves and pumps. The role that RES is expected to play in future years to fulfill the NRC mission is also discussed.

  2. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    conducted the following activities in support of the subject contract: Outreach and Promotion The promotional schedule to advertise the NRC Research...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this reporting period, the NRC promoted research...Associateship Programs included the following: 1) attendance at meetings of major scientific and engineering professional societies; 2) advertising in

  3. IRIS and the National Research Council (NRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the 2011 National Academies’ National Research Council (NRC) review of the IRIS Program's assessment of Formaldehyde, EPA and NRC have had an ongoing relationship into the improvements of developing the IRIS Assessments.

  4. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    8. Curcumin : A Prototype Anti-inflammatory Therapeutic for Burn Pain and Wound Healing. Burn and Trauma Research Workgroup. BAMMC Burn Center 2014 9...from Burkholderia infection in mice. 9) PUBLICATIONS AND PAPERS RESULTING FROM NRC ASSOCIATESHIP RESEARCH Provide complete citations: author(s), title...PUBLICATIONS AND PAPERS RESULTING FROM NRC ASSOCIATESHIP RESEARCH Provide complete citations: author(s), title, full name of journal, volume number, page

  5. Overview of NRC PRA research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.A.; Drouin, M.T.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; VanderMolen, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC's research program in probabilistic risk analysis includes a set of closely-related elements, from basic research to regulatory applications. The elements of this program are as follows: (1) Development and demonstration of methods and advanced models and tools for use by the NRC staff and others performing risk assessments; (2) Support to agency staff on risk analysis and statistics issues; (3) Reviews of risk assessments submitted by licensees in support of regulatory applications, including the IPEs and IPEEEs. Each of these elements is discussed in the paper, providing highlights of work within an element, and, where appropriate, describing important support and feedback mechanisms among elements

  6. Human Reliability Assessment and Human Performance Evaluation: Research and Analysis Activities at the U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey-Smith, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The author indicates the themes of the six programs identified by the US NRC mission on human performance and human reliability activities. They aim at developing the technical basis to support human performance, at developing and updating a model of human performance and human reliability, at fostering national and international dialogue and cooperation efforts on human performance evaluation, at conducting operating events analysis and database development, and at providing support to human performance and human reliability inspection

  7. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    maintaining a presence on social media sites such as Facebook . The NRC attended a number of minority focused events in which we maintained exhibit booths...PROPOSAL The Use of Glial Inhibitors to Increase the Efficacy of Opioid Analgesics while Eliminating the Propensity for Addiction 7) SUMMARY OF RESEARCH

  8. Coupled processes in NRC high-level waste research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzi, F.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses NRC research effort in support of evaluating license applications for disposal of nuclear waste and for promulgating regulations and issuing guidance documents on nuclear waste management. In order to do this they fund research activities at a number of laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial organizations. One of our research efforts is the coupled processes study. This paper discusses interest in coupled processes and describes the target areas of research efforts over the next few years. The specific research activities relate to the performance objectives of NRC's high-level waste (HLW) regulation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) HLW standard. The general objective of the research program is to ensure the NRC has a sufficient independent technical base to make sound regulatory decisions

  9. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    2- 0010 Report Period: 02/06/2012-02/28/2018 4/11/2018, 12:17 PM During the reporting period, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering , and...to advertise the NRC Research Associateship Programs included the following: 1) attendance at meetings of major scientific and engineering ...professional societies; 2) advertising in programs and career centers for these and other professional society meetings; 3) direct mailing and emailing of

  10. The roles of NRC research in risk-informed, performance-based regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, D.L.; Murphy, J.A.; Hodges, M.W.; Cunningham, M.A.; Drouin, M.T.; Ramey-Smith, A.M.; VanderMolen, H.

    1997-01-01

    The NRC is expanding the use of probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) throughout the spectrum of its regulatory activities. The NRC's research program in PRA supports this expansion in a number of ways, from performing basic research to developing guidance for regulatory applications. The author provides an overview of the NRC's PRA research program, then focuses on two key activities - the review of individual plant examinations, and the development of guidance for use of PRA in reactor regulation

  11. The role of research in nuclear regulation: An NRC perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    The role of research in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was broadly defined by the US Congress in the Energy Reorganization Act of 1975. This Act empowered the Commission to do research that it deems necessary for the performance of its licensing and regulatory functions. Congress cited a need for an independent capability that would support the licensing and regulatory process through the development and analysis of technical information related to reactor safety, safeguards and environmental protection. Motivation for establishing such a safety research function within the regulatory agency is the need to address the defects, abnormal occurrences and shutdowns involving light water reactors. Congress further stated that the NRC should limit its research to open-quotes confirmatory assessmentclose quotes and that the Agency open-quotes should never be placed in a position to generate, and then have to defend, basic design data of its own.close quotes The author reviews the activities of the research arm as related to regulatory research, performed in the past, today, and projected for the future. NRC's public health and safety mission demands that its research products be developed independently from its licensees; be credible and of the highest technical quality as established through peer review; and open to the public scrutiny through publication in technical journals as well as NRC documents. A special trust is placed on regulatory research through the products it produces as well as the three dimensions that underlie the processes through which they are produced

  12. Changing emphasis at the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    One of the major objectives of the Office of Research is to ensure availability of sound technical information for timely decision making in support of the NRC's safety mission. The Office of Research is changing some of its emphasis to better meet the expected needs of the NRC's regulatory offices. Long-standing programs in support of operating reactors are nearing completion. These programs include plant aging and severe accident research for currently operating plants. This meeting will also address the new challenges faced by the NRC in its review of the advanced light water and non-light water reactors. As plant aging and severe accident research programs are nearing completion, the research activities are coming to focus on the emerging technologies, for example, digital instrumentation and control systems, both as replacement equipment for operating plants and as the technology of choice and necessity for the advanced reactors. Necessity, because analog equipment is becoming obsolete. Other examples include the use of new materials in operating plants, human factors considerations in the design and operation of the advanced plants, thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the advanced reactors, and new construction techniques

  13. Update of NRC uranium mill licensing activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    Increased vigilance must be given to controlling emissions from active milling operations, particularly windblown tailings, to assure that the soon-to-be-effective EPA Fuel Cycle Standard is met. Comprehensive environmental monitoring programs will have to be developed to confirm that, in fact, the limit is met. Just as was the case last year, tailings management and disposal is still the major item of concern relating to uranium milling operations. As stated earlier, the NRC feels that below-grade disposal is the preferred method of tailings disposal in that it provides the greatest assurances of long-term isolation. In any event, tailings must be disposed of in such a way that no active care is required of disposal sites, to avoid committing future generations to a significant, lingering obligation to care for wastes generated to produce benefits which they will only indirectly receive, if at all. While the primary means of providing long-term isolation of tailings must be by physical barriers, as a prudent, supplementary measure of control, we are concluding in the GEIS on Uranium Milling that ownership of disposal sites by a Government agency is desirable. We expect a low level of continued surveillance at disposal sites with small expense involved. We are concluding that requiring operators to contribute on the order of $100,000 per disposal site to cover ongoing expenses would be the most apropriate means of conforming to the principle that the waste generator should pay full costs of waste disposal. We feel such an arrangement would be fair, simple, and efficient, favoring it over complicated schemes involving such things as taxes on product or tailings generated and continued management of ear-marked funds. Legislation is now pending in the Congress which would give NRC direct regulatory control over mill tailings and put into place the authorities needed to implement the long-term control and funding arrangements discussed above

  14. U.S. NRC training for research and training reactor inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandquist, G.M.; Kunze, J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, a large number of license activities (Early Site Permits, Combined Operating License, reactor certifications, etc.), are pending for review before the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC). Much of the senior staff at the NRC is now committed to these review and licensing actions. To address this additional workload, the NRC has recruited a large number of new Regulatory Staff for dealing with these and other regulatory actions such as the US Fleet of Research and Test Reactors (RTRs). These reactors pose unusual demands on Regulatory Staff since the US Fleet of RTRs, although few (32 Licensed RTRs as of 2010), they represent a broad range of reactor types, operations, and research and training aspects that nuclear reactor power plants (such as the 104 LWRs) do not pose. The US NRC must inspect and regulate all these entities. This paper addresses selected training topics and regulatory activities provided US NRC Inspectors for US RTRs. (author)

  15. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    aspirate characterization for the support of large animal studies. Research in Veterinary Science; In preparation, expected submission February 2015...Activity of Norspermidine Against Clinical Orthopaedic Isolates. (Manuscript Submitted to BMC Microbiology ) Albach AM, Hardy SK, Chang DC, Garcia RG...American Society for Microbiology (ASM) General Meeting. San Francisco, CA. June 15-19,2012. Carlos J. Sanchez Jr. Biofilm-Derived Factors Reduce

  16. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    This report, the seventh in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1991. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  17. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report, the sixth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1990. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  18. NRC safety research in support of regulation--FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report, the fifth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1989. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  19. NRC safety research in support of regulation, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This report, the fourth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to Congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during 1988. The goal of this office is to ensure that safety-related research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This research is necessary to make certain that the regulations that are imposed on licensees provide an adequate margin of safety so as to protect the health and safety of the public. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  20. NRC/DAE reactor safety research Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.

    1982-01-01

    In 1976, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established the NRC/Division of Accident Evaluation (DAE) Data Bank to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. This program has since grown from the conceptual stage to a useful, usable service for computer code development, code assessment, and experimentation groups in meeting the needs of the nuclear industry. Data from 20 facilities are now processed and permanently stored in the Data Bank, which utilizes the Control Data Corporation (CDC) CYBER 176 computer system located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). New data and data sources are continually being added to the Data Bank. In addition to providing data storage and access software, the Data Bank program supplies data entry, documentation, and training and advisory services to users and the NRC. Management of the NRC/DAE Data Bank is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc

  1. Current NRC activities related to MQA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trottier, C.A.; Nellis, D.O. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) interest in measurement quality assurance (MQA) goes back to before 1963, when the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) published a notice in the Federal Register concerning the need for establishing a Film Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory, and also provided a set of minimum performance criteria to be used by the laboratory in evaluating film dosimetry services used by licensees. The proposed laboratory was not established, but in 1967 the AEC contracted with Battelle`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to evaluate film dosimeter performance criteria and provide a basis for establishing a Film Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory if the study showed that it was needed. Then, in 1973, the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), concerned with the state of dosimetry processing and the lack of adequate standards, recommended that the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) direct a performance testing program for personnel dosimetry processing services. Later, in 1976, NRC asked PNL to conduct a study to evaluate the four existing performance standards for personnel dosimetry processing. One result of this study was that the HPSSC standard, which later became ANSI N13.11, was recommended as the standard for use in a national dosimetry processing program. The rest is common knowledge. With the support of numerous other federal agencies and the CRCPD, NRC published a regulation, effective in 1988, that required all processors of personnel dosimeters be accredited under the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP), operated by the NBS, which is now called the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). At present, there are 75 dosimetry processing laboratories accredited under NVLAP. NRC has also been involved in extremity dosimeters, health physics survey instruments, bioassay measurements, electronic personnel dosimeters, and environmental monitoring around nuclear power plants.

  2. Overview of NRC's human factors regulatory research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.D. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The human factors research program is divided into distinct and interrelated program activities: (1) Personnel Performance measurement, (2) Personnel Subsystem, (3) Human-System Interface, (4) Organization and Management, and (5) a group of Reliability Assessment activities. The purpose of the Personnel Performance Measurement activity is to improve the Agency's understanding of the factors influencing personnel performance and the effects on the safety of nuclear operations and maintenance by developing improvements to methods for collecting and managing personnel performance data. Personnel Subsystem research will broaden the understanding of such factors as staffing, qualifications, and training that influence human performance in the nuclear system and will develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance to reduce any adverse impact of these influences on nuclear safety. Research in the Human-System Interface activity will provide the technical basis for ensuring that the interface between the system and the human user supports safe operations and maintenance. Organization and Management research will result in the development of tools for evaluating organization and management issues within the nuclear industry. And finally, the Reliability Assessment group of activities includes multidisciplinary research that will integrate human and hardware considerations for evaluating reliability and risk in NRC licensing, inspection, and regulatory decisions

  3. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this...with another U.S. government agency 0 Research/administrative position with foreign government agency 0 Research/teaching at US college/university 1

  4. NRC safety research in support of regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    This report, the ninth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1993. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with sound technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission's rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance

  5. HTGR safety research concerns at NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minogue, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    A general discussion of HTGR technical and safety-related problems is given. The broad areas of current research programs specific to the Fort St. Vrain reactor and applicable to HTGR technology are summarized

  6. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-27

    stem-cell released molecule as a therapy in blast-injured retina Miller, Christine 2/4/2013-2/3/2016 1 Optimized protocol to isolate, identify, and...derived self-formed optic cups in laser-injured retina 7) SUMMARY OF RESEARCH DURING TENURE Itemize significant findings in concise form, utilizing key...during retinogenesis 5) Formulate a research plan on using stem-cell released molecule as a therapy in blast-injured retina (USMA Davies Fellow: please

  7. NRC safety research in support of regulation. Selected highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    The report presents selected highlights of how research has contributed to the regulatory effort. It explains the research role of the NRC and nuclear safety research contributions in the areas of: pressure vessel integrity, piping, small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents, hydrogen and containment, source term analysis, seismic hazards and high-level waste management. The report also provides a summary of current and future research directions in support of regulation

  8. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    workshops and advertised in meeting literature, newsletters and websites or submitted materials for distribution. In addition, ads were placed in a...item follows: 9.8 Short-term value (lab)-Development of knowledge, skills, and research productivity at lab 9.7 Long-term value (career)-How your...REPORT 1) Associate Last or Family Name Cohen First Name Courtney M.I. A 2) FORWARDING Address (to which your tax statement will be mailed) Residence

  9. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    provided the administrative functions described in the contract Statement of Work. These functions included stipend payments, management of a major...Pain Management Clinic, focus on translational work from bench to bedside, clinical research involving opioid use and long term outcomes 2 Developed...They invited me to share American Holidays with them, like Thanksgiving, so that I had the possibility to experience traditions along with culinary

  10. NRC safety research in support of regulation - FY 1994. Volume 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report, the tenth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1994. The goal of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) is to ensure the availability of sound technical bases for timely rulemaking and related decisions in support of NRC regulatory/licensing/inspection activities. RES also has responsibilities related to the resolution of generic safety issues and to the review of licensee submittals regarding individual plant examinations. It is the responsibility of RES to conduct the NRC's rulemaking process, including the issuance of regulatory guides and rules that govern NRC licensed activities

  11. NRC safety research in support of regulation, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report is the second in a series of annual reports responding to congressional inquiries as to the utilization of nuclear regulatory research. NUREG-1175, ''NRC Safety Research in Support of Regulation,'' published in May 1986, reported major research accomplishments between about FY 1980 and FY 1985. This report narrates the accomplishments of FY 1986 and does not restate earlier accomplishments. Earlier research results are mentioned in the context of current results in the interest of continuity. Both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge and their regulatory applications, when there has been a definite regulatory outcome during FY 1986, have been described

  12. Comments on the NRC Safety Research Program budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This report includes comments on the budget levels and program plans for the supplemental request for FY 1980 to support research related to the accident at Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI) as well as for the FY 1981 Budget. For both budgets, the funding levels considered by the ACRS are the original requests by RES and the Budget Review Group (BRG) markup as of July 10, 1979. In its current review of the NRC research program, the ACRS has given special attention to both the short- and long-term implications of the TMI accident and their significance to research for both the short- and long-term research programs

  13. Examples of NRC research products used in regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, N.R.

    1987-01-01

    The key to effective research is a close relationship between information needs and research results. This can only be achieved by close cooperation between the researchers and the regulators. At the NRC, this relationship has matured over the years until now the researchers participate in definition of the information needs and the regulators help define the research programs. The more formal means of ensuring a close match between needs and results include joint research groups, oversight working groups, and a system of Research Information Letters (RILs). On an informal basis there are many day to day discussions and meetings on the various programs which ensure effective program guidance and early identification of significant findings. This paper describes both the formal and informal researcher/regulation interface and discusses some examples of how specific research programs are utilized in the regulatory process. Specific programs described are the pressurized thermal shock program, the seismic margins program and the Category 1 structures program. Other examples cited are the aging and life extension programs

  14. US NRC research on the integrity of piping in nuclear reactor primary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpan, C.Z. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    This paper has attempted to provide a ''snapshot'' of the activities underway in NRC on the subject of LWR piping integrity as of the summer and fall of 1983. The paper is necessarily vague on certain topics of policy because they are either under review or are under development and the outcome cannot be accurately forecast at this time. Particularly in the area of BWR pipe cracking, events are very rapid so that positions and actions described in this paper may well be obsolete by the time it is published. Nevertheless, the activities and positions are as accurate as possible at the time of writing. Certainly the longer-range aspects of the research program represent the current direction and intent of NRC; nevertheless, as results come in and actions occur in the licensing and regulation arena of operating reactors, the emphasis of the research programs will necessarily shift to accommodate them so as to remain as relevant as possible. Thus, this paper is useful to show the intentions of NRC in the area of research for LWR piping, and it is also useful to document the status of the regulations on piping for which the research is being performed. (orig.)

  15. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] safety research in support of regulation, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This report, the third in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during 1987. The goal of this office is to ensure that research provides the technical bases for rulemaking and for related decisions in support of NRC licensing and inspection activities. This report describes both the direct contributions to scientific and technical knowledge with regard to nuclear safety and their regulatory applications

  16. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, July--December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1977-03-01

    A bibliography of 148 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period July through December 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography.

  17. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC office of nuclear regulatory research, July--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1978-04-01

    A bibliography of 198 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period July through December 1977 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are arranged first by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography

  18. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, July--December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    A bibliography of 148 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period July through December 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography

  19. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC office of nuclear regulatory research, July--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1978-04-01

    A bibliography of 198 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period July through December 1977 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are arranged first by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography.

  20. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, November 1975--June 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1976-09-30

    A bibliography of 152 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period November 1975 through June 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography.

  1. Bibliography of reports on research sponsored by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, November 1975--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, J.R.

    1976-01-01

    A bibliography of 152 reports published by contractors of the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during the period November 1975 through June 1976 is presented along with abstracts from the Nuclear Safety Information Center computer file. The bibliography has been sorted into the subject categories used by NRC to organize the research program. Within the subject categories, the reports are sorted by contractor organization and then chronologically. A brief description of the NRC research program precedes the bibliography

  2. USA NRC/RSR Data Bank System and Reactor Safety Research Data Repository (RSRDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Bankert, S.F.

    1979-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through its Division of Reactor Safety Research (RSR) of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, has established the NRC/RSR Data Bank Program to collect, process, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. An increasing number of requests for data and/or calculations generated by NRC Contractors led to the initiation of the program which allows timely and direct access to water reactor safety data in a manner most useful to the user. The program consists of three main elements: data sources, service organizations, and a data repository

  3. Status report on NRC's current below regulatory concern activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragonette, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    The concept of below regulatory concern (BRC) is not new to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) or its predecessor agency, the Atomic Energy Commission. The regulations and licensing decisions have involved limited and de facto decisions on BRC since the beginning. For example, consumer products containing radioactive materials have been approved for distribution to persons exempt from licensing for some time and procedures for survey and release of equipment have traditionally been a part of many licensees' radiation safety programs. However, these actions have generally been ad hoc decisions in response to specific needs and have not been necessarily consistent. The need to deal with this regulatory matter has been receiving attention from both Congress and the NRC Commissioners. NRC response has grown from addressing specific waste streams, to generic rulemaking for wastes, and finally to efforts to develop a broad generic BRC policy. Section 10 of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 addressed NRC actions on specific waste streams. In response, NRC issued guidance on rulemaking petitions for specific wastes. NRC also issued an advance notice of proposed rulemaking indicating consideration of Commission initiated regulations to address BRC wastes in a generic manner. The Commissioners have directed staff to develop an umbrella policy for all agency decisions concerning levels of risk or dose that do not require government regulation

  4. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-12-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety.

  5. Risk-informed inservice test activities at the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.; Cheok, M.; Hsia, A.

    1996-01-01

    The operational readiness of certain safety-related components is vital to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Inservice testing (IST) is one of the mechanisms used by licensees to ensure this readiness. In the past, the type and frequency of IST have been based on the collective best judgment of the NRC and industry in an ASME Code consensus process and NRC rulemaking process. Furthermore, IST requirements have not explicitly considered unique component and system designs and contribution to overall plant risk. Because of the general nature of ASME Code test requirements and non-reliance on risk estimates, current IST requirements may not adequately emphasize testing those components that are most important to safety and may overly emphasize testing of less safety significant components. Nuclear power plant licensees are currently interested in optimizing testing by applying resources in more safety significant areas and, where appropriate, reducing measures in less safety-significant areas. They are interested in maintaining system availability and reducing overall maintenance costs in ways that do not adversely affect safety. The NRC has been interested in using probabilistic, as an adjunct to deterministic, techniques to help define the scope, type and frequency of IST. The development of risk-informed IST programs has the potential to optimize the use of NRC and industry resources without adverse affect on safety

  6. NRC inspections of licensee activities to improve the performance of motor-operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarbrough, T.G.

    1992-01-01

    The NRC regulations require that components important to the safe operation of a nuclear power plant be treated in a manner that provides assurance of their proper performance. Despite these regulatory requirements, operating experience and research programs have raised concerns regarding the performance of motor-operated valves (MOVs) in nuclear power plants. In June 1990, the staff issued NUREG-1352, Action Plans for Motor-Operated Valves and Check Valves, which contains planned actions to organize the activities aimed at resolving the concerns about MOV performance. A significant task of the MOV action plan is the staff's review of the implementation of Generic Letter (GL) 89-10 (June 28, 1989), 'Safety-Related Motor-Operated Valve Testing and Surveillance,' and its supplements, by nuclear power plant licensees. The NRC staff has issued several supplements to GL 89-10 to provide additional guidance for use by licensees in responding to the generic letter. The NRC staff has conducted initial inspections of the GL 89-10 programs at most licensee facilities. This paper outlines some of the more significant findings of those inspections. For example, licensees who have begun differential pressure and flow testing have found some MOVs to require more thrust to operate than predicted by the standard industry equation with typical valve factors assumed in the past. The NRC staff has found weaknesses in licensee procedures for conducting the differential pressure and flow tests, the acceptance criteria for the tests in evaluating the capability of the MOV to perform its safety function under design basis conditions, and feedback of the test results into the methodology used by the licensee in predicting the thrust requirements for other MOVs. Some licensees have not made adequate progress toward resolving the MOV issue for their facilities within the recommended schedule of GL 89-10

  7. Future of Nuclear Power: NRC emergency preparedness licensing activities agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    This talk summary addresses the issue of how future policies of the NRC will affect nuclear power in areas such as construction, emergency preparedness, and licensing. Specific topics covered include the following: Emergent EP licensing issues for operating nuclear Power Plants; 10CFR Part 52 and the process for licensing of Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs); and potential revisions to emergency preparedness programs for future nuclear power plants

  8. NRC's geotechnical engineering research needs for the high-level waste repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, D.C.; Philip, J.; Lorig, L.J.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    To develop the capability for independently assessing the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) geologic repository design within a limited time, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff needs to perform certain research well before receiving the license application. The NRC staff is using a number of factors to identify the areas that it needs to research. The staff assigns priorities to the needed research based on programmatic considerations and the significance of the work. In the geotechnical engineering field, the staff is conducting research in the following three areas: response of the repository to repeated strong ground motion, rock-mass sealing, and coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical interactions. In this paper, the NRC staff also presents the areas of additional research needed in the geotechnical engineering field

  9. Preparation for Scaling Studies of Ice-Crystal Icing at the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Fuleki, Dan; Knezevici, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes experiments conducted at the National Research Council (NRC) of Canadas Research Altitiude Test Facility between March 26 and April 11, 2012. The tests, conducted collaboratively between NASA and NRC, focus on three key aspects in preparation for later scaling work to be conducted with a NACA 0012 airfoil model in the NRC Cascade rig: (1) cloud characterization, (2) scaling model development, and (3) ice-shape profile measurements. Regarding cloud characterization, the experiments focus on particle spectra measurements using two shadowgraphy methods, cloud uniformity via particle scattering from a laser sheet, and characterization of the SEA Multi-Element probe. Overviews of each aspect as well as detailed information on the diagnostic method are presented. Select results from the measurements and interpretation are presented which will help guide future work.

  10. Summary of NRC LWR safety research programs on fuel behavior, metallurgy/materials and operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, G.L.

    1979-09-01

    The NRC light-water reactor safety-research program is part of the NRC regulatory program for ensuring the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper summarizes the results of NRC-sponsored research into fuel behavior, metallurgy and materials, and operational safety. The fuel behavior research program provides a detailed understanding of the response of nuclear fuel assemblies to postulated off-normal or accident conditions. Fuel behavior research includes studies of basic fuel rod properties, in-reactor tests, computer code development, fission product release and fuel meltdown. The metallurgy and materials research program provides independent confirmation of the safe design of reactor vessels and piping. This program includes studies on fracture mechanics, irradiation embrittlement, stress corrosion, crack growth, and nondestructive examination. The operational safety research provides direct assistance to NRC officials concerned with the operational and operational-safety aspects of nuclear power plants. The topics currently being addressed include qualification testing evaluation, fire protection, human factors, and noise diagnostics

  11. In vivo monitoring of nuclear research centre (NRC) workers. Vol. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomaa, M A; Ali, E M; Taha, T M [Radiation Protection Departion, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Occupational workers of Nuclear research center (NRC) of atomic energy authority (AEA) working with radio-nuclides such as (Cs-137, I-131, and I-125) are monitored yearly. Individuals involved in routine work in hot laboratories are examined every three months. When an incident occurs, the workers involved are examined promptly. In order to measure internal contamination, the modified NRC-AEA whole body counter is used. More than hundred occupational workers had been examined in 1994. Results indicated that the annual limit of intake as recommended by ICRP was not exceeded. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. NRC safety research in support of regulation, FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This report, the eighth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1992. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that a number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with the technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission's rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance

  13. 1994 - 1995 annual report of the NRC Biotechnology Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    One of the roles of the Biotechnology Research Institute is to promote leading edge research and development in biotechnology and molecular biology as they relate to industries in the natural resource sectors. To this end, researchers work with industry to develop less polluting, more efficient and economic processes and to solve environmental problems. Scientific studies undertaken in 1994 and 1995 included new analytical techniques and biosensors, bioprocesses for waste and ground water treatment, biopesticides, biodegradation of toxic compounds, biodesulfurization of bitumen, solvent- less sample preparation techniques to analyze environmental pollutants in soils and waste water, protocol for the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons, gene probes and their applications, biodegradation of energetic compounds, and biofiltration of air emissions. These, and other noteworthy projects undertaken by the Institute, were reviewed and presented ,combined with institutional data. 2 tabs.

  14. Summary and recommendations of the NRC/INEL Activated Carbon Testing Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpellino, C.D.; Sill, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) sponsored an interlaboratory testing program, round-robin, of nuclear-grade activated carbon. The results of this round-robin revealed gross differences in penetration of radio-labeled methyl iodide as measured by the various laboratories when using Method A of the ASTM D-3803-79 Standard. These differences prompted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to establish the NRC/INEL Activated Carbon Testing Program to determine the causes of these discrepancies and to provide recommendations that could lead to an accurate and reliable testing procedure that would ensure an adequate method for assessing the capability of activated carbon to remove radioiodine from gas streams within commercial nuclear power plants. The NRC/INEL Activated Carbon Testing Program has conducted formal and informal interlaboratory comparisons to identify problems with the test method and its application and to assess the effectiveness of changes to procedures and equipment voluntarily implemented by commercial laboratories to mitigate the disparity of test results. The results of the first formal NRC/INEL Interlaboratory Comparison (IC) essentially verified the CONAGT round-robin results despite the use of a detailed test protocol. This data indicated that many of the participating laboratories probably had been operating outside the ASTM specifications for relative humidity (RH) and flow. In addition, this process provided information which was used to modify the testing protocol employed for the second NRC/INEL Interlaboratory Comparison (IC-2) to make it more rugged and reliable. These changes to the protocol together with the results of INEL sensitivity testing are the basis for the recommendations presented

  15. 75 FR 10526 - In the Matter of Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [IA-09-068; NRC-2010-0085] In the Matter of Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm was employed as a... NIST-Boulder facility in accordance with the conditions specified therein. Mr. Grimm was listed on the...

  16. Annual technical meeting of the NRC cooperative severe accident research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.G.

    1993-01-01

    This brief report summarizes the 1992 annual technical meeting of the NRC Cooperative Severe Accident Research Program (CSARP-92) held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, May 4-8, 1992. The report is taken mainly from coverage of the meeting published in the June 5, 1992, issue of Atomic Energy Clearinghouse. Results of this meeting are formalized at the Water Reactor Safety Information Meetings (WRSIM) that are held annually in October. Nuclear Safety summarizes the annual WRSIM meetings and provides a list of the presentations that were given. Interested readers are encouraged to review listed topics to identify specific topic areas in severe accident research. Sessions were held on in-vessel core melt progression; fuel-coolant interactions; fission-product behavior; direct containment heating; and severe accident code development, assessment, and validation. Summaries of the individual technical sessions and the current state of the art in these areas were given by the chairmen

  17. Cohort Profile : The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R.; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A.

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved

  18. NRC sponsored rotating equipment vibration research: a program description and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzel, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently involved in a research project sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding operational vibration in rotating equipment. The object of this program is to assess the nature of vibrational failures and the effect that improved qualification standards may have in reducing the incidence of failure. In order to limit the scope of the initial effort, safety injection (SI) pumps were chosen as the component group for concentrated study. The task has been oriented to addressing the issues of whether certain SI pumps experience more failures than others, examining the dynamic environments in operation, examining the adequacy of current qualification standards, and examining what performance parameters could be used more efficiently to predict degradation or failure. Results of a literature search performed to survey SI pump failures indicate that failures are due to a diversity of causes, many of which may not be influenced by qualification criteria. Cooperative efforts have been undertaken with a limited number of nuclear utilities to describe the variety of possible operating environments and to analyze available data. The results of this analysis as they apply to the research issues are presented and possibilities for the future direction of the program are discussed

  19. NRC research on the application of advanced I and C technology to commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gollei, K.R.; Hon, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    The operational safety and efficiency of commercial nuclear power plants (NPP's) could possibly be enhanced by utilizing advanced instrumentation and control technology developed by other industries. The NRC is interested in learning about new I and C technology that probably will or could be applied to new or existing plants. This would enable the NRC to be better prepared to evaluate the application without undue delays. It would also help identify any appropriate changes in NRC regulations or guidance necessary to facilitate the application of advanced IandC technology to NPP's. The NRC has initiated a project to work cooperatively with the advanced technology industry, power industry, EPRI, and technical organizations such as ISA toward this goal. This paper describes the objectives and plans of this cooperative effort. It summarizes the highlights of some of the advanced technology already being evaluated by NRC such as microprocessor applications, instruments to detect inadequate core cooling and other two-phase flow measurements, reactor noise surveillance and diagnostic techniques. This paper also suggests potential candidates for consideration such as utilization of advanced instruments for LOCA experiments. It also identifies some of the potential challenges facing the application of advanced technology to NPP's. It concludes that close cooperation between NRC and industry is essential for the success of such applications

  20. NRC high-level radioactive waste research at CNWRA, July--December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, B.; Ababou, R.; Ahola, M.

    1993-07-01

    Progress from July 1 to December 31, 1992 on the nine NRC-sponsored research projects conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses is described. Ion-exchange experiments between clinoptilolite and aqueous solutions of Na + and Sr 2+ and three applications of reaction-path modeling are described in the Unsaturated Mass Transport (Geochemistry) project. Numerical simulation of a laboratory-scale non-isothermal two-phase flow is discussed in the Thermohydrology chapter. Methods for estimating rock joint roughness coefficient are the focus of the Seismic Rock Mechanics project for which the Tilt Test, Tse and Cruden's equations, and fractal-based equations were tested and found to be unsatisfactory. In the Integrated Waste Package Experiments chapter, investigations of pit initiation and repassivation potential for alloys 825 and C-22 and stainless steel 304L and 316L are described. Testing of the BIGFLOW computer code and visualization of fracture topology is the theme of the Stochastic Hydrology project. Preliminary analysis of field data from the Akrotiri site in Greece is developed in the Geochemical Analogs project. Mechanistic modeling of sorption using the MINTEQA2 code is investigated as part of the Sorption project. Adaptive gridding and ''modified equations'' methods for solving the flow and transport equations are described in the Performance Assessment chapter. Finally, the Volcanism chapter focuses on using nonhomogeneous Poisson processes for estimating probability of volcanic events at the potential repository site

  1. Insights gained from NRC research investigations at the Maxey Flats LLW SLB facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donnell, E.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC funded program of research at Maxey Flats was done to assist an Agreement State in assessing the performance of the site. That program has yielded both site specific insights and generic insights which are likely to be useful in licensing future sites. They are as follows: Site Specific Insights: (1) The principal pathway of water entry into burial trenches at Maxey Flats is through the trench caps. (2) Sampling of vegetation, soils, and streams adjoining the site indicates that the small but measureable amounts of radionuclides found offsite were from surface runoff or the site evaporator. (3) There is limited onsite subsurface movement of radionuclides where open fractures intersect burial trenches. Generic Insights: (1) Tritium in the plant transpiration stream appears useful for mapping trench boundaries. (2) Trees offer a promising means of monitoring subsurface radionuclide movement in fractured rocks of low permeability. (3) Complexing with EDTA appears to be a potentially important mechanism that increases mobility of such radionuclides as Co-60, Pu-238, Am-241, and Sr-90. (4) Changes in soil solution chemistry encountered as leachate moves from trenches generally reduce the solubility of migrating radionuclides. (5) Agronomic management techniques appear promising as a means to control deep water percolation through waste burial trench caps. 18 references

  2. 76 FR 40755 - Impact of Reduced Dose Limits on NRC Licensed Activities; Solicitation of Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... scientifically justified, to achieve greater alignment with the 2007 recommendations of the International... and image files of the NRC's public documents. If you do not have access to ADAMS or if there are... informed of all the benefits and burdens associated with further alignment of NRC's current radiation...

  3. 1996 NRC annual report. Volume 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This 22nd annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes accomplishments, activities, and plans made during Fiscal Year 1996 (FH 1996)--October 1, 1995, through September 30, 1996. Significant activities that occurred early in FY 1997 are also described, particularly changes in the Commission and organization of the NRC. The mission of the NRC is to ensure that civilian uses of nuclear materials in the US are carried out with adequate protection of public health and safety, the environment, and national security. These uses include the operation of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle plants and medical, industrial, and research applications. Additionally, the NRC contributes to combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons material worldwide. The NRC licenses and regulates commercial nuclear reactor operations and research reactors and other activities involving the possession and use of nuclear materials and wastes. It also protects nuclear materials used in operation and facilities from theft or sabotage. To accomplish its statutorily mandated regulatory mission, the NRC issues rules and standards, inspects facilities and operations, and issues any required enforcement actions.

  4. 1996 NRC annual report. Volume 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This 22nd annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) describes accomplishments, activities, and plans made during Fiscal Year 1996 (FH 1996)--October 1, 1995, through September 30, 1996. Significant activities that occurred early in FY 1997 are also described, particularly changes in the Commission and organization of the NRC. The mission of the NRC is to ensure that civilian uses of nuclear materials in the US are carried out with adequate protection of public health and safety, the environment, and national security. These uses include the operation of nuclear power plants and fuel cycle plants and medical, industrial, and research applications. Additionally, the NRC contributes to combating the proliferation of nuclear weapons material worldwide. The NRC licenses and regulates commercial nuclear reactor operations and research reactors and other activities involving the possession and use of nuclear materials and wastes. It also protects nuclear materials used in operation and facilities from theft or sabotage. To accomplish its statutorily mandated regulatory mission, the NRC issues rules and standards, inspects facilities and operations, and issues any required enforcement actions

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  6. EPA Response to the National Research Council (NRC) Report - A Review of the Technical Basis of the Chemical and Pathogen Regulations for Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NRC published two reports over a twenty year span. They concluded that there is no documented scientific evidence that sewage sludge regulations have failed to protect public health, but identified areas of research.

  7. Utilizing the National Research Council's (NRC) Conceptual Framework for the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS): A Self-Study in My Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvo, Arthur Francis

    Given the reality that active and competitive participation in the 21 st century requires American students to deepen their scientific and mathematical knowledge base, the National Research Council (NRC) proposed a new conceptual framework for K--12 science education. The framework consists of an integration of what the NRC report refers to as the three dimensions: scientific and engineering practices, crosscutting concepts, and core ideas in four disciplinary areas (physical, life and earth/spaces sciences, and engineering/technology). The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS ), which are derived from this new framework, were released in April 2013 and have implications on teacher learning and development in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). Given the NGSS's recent introduction, there is little research on how teachers can prepare for its release. To meet this research need, I implemented a self-study aimed at examining my teaching practices and classroom outcomes through the lens of the NRC's conceptual framework and the NGSS. The self-study employed design-based research (DBR) methods to investigate what happened in my secondary classroom when I designed, enacted, and reflected on units of study for my science, engineering, and mathematics classes. I utilized various best practices including Learning for Use (LfU) and Understanding by Design (UbD) models for instructional design, talk moves as a tool for promoting discourse, and modeling instruction for these designed units of study. The DBR strategy was chosen to promote reflective cycles, which are consistent with and in support of the self-study framework. A multiple case, mixed-methods approach was used for data collection and analysis. The findings in the study are reported by study phase in terms of unit planning, unit enactment, and unit reflection. The findings have implications for science teaching, teacher professional development, and teacher education.

  8. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations

  9. 77 FR 30332 - Mr. James Chaisson; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... industrial radiographic operations in accordance with conditions specified therein. The license was... NRC conducted a safety and security inspection of the use of byproduct material for industrial... requirements. Mr. Chaisson chose to store a radiographic exposure device at a leased facility on Elk Street in...

  10. Comparison between Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and National Research Council, Canada (NRC) of the absorbed dose in water using Fricke dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salata, Camila; David, Mariano Gazineu; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo de

    2014-01-01

    The absorbed dose to water standards for HDR brachytherapy dosimetry developed by the Radiology Science Laboratory, Brazil (LCR) and the National Research Council, Canada (NRC), were compared. The two institutions have developed absorbed dose standards based on the Fricke dosimetry system. There are significant differences between the two standards as far as the preparation and readout of the Fricke solution and irradiation geometry of the holder. Measurements were done at the NRC laboratory using a single Ir-192 source. The comparison of absorbed dose measurements was expressed as the ratio Dw(NRC)/Dw(LCR), which was found to be 1.026. (author)

  11. SSI sensitivity studies and model improvements for the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Benda, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a US NRC-funded program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Its goal is to develop a complete fully coupled analysis procedure for estimating the risk of an earthquake-induced radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. In Phase II of the SSMRP, the methodology was applied to the Zion nuclear power plant. Three topics in the SSI analysis of Zion were investigated and reported here - flexible foundation modeling, structure-to-structure interaction, and basemat uplift. The results of these investigations were incorporated in the SSMRP seismic risk analysis. 14 references, 51 figures, 13 tables

  12. Dependent failure analysis research for the US NRC Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Stack, D.W.; Campbell, D.J.; Rooney, J.J.; Rasmuson, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    The Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP), which is being performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Sandia National Laboratories, has the goals of developing new risk assessment methods and integrating the new and existing methods in a uniform procedure for performing an in-depth probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) with consistent levels of analysis for internal, external, and dependent failure scenarios. An important part of RMIEP is the recognition of the crucial importance of dependent common cause failures (CCFs) and the pressing need to develop effective methods for analyzing CCFs as part of a PRA. The NRC-sponsored Integrated Dependent Failure Methodology Program at Sandia is addressing this need. This paper presents a preliminary approach for analyzing CCFs as part of a PRA. A nine-step procedure for efficiently screening and analyzing dependent failure scenarios is presented, and each step is discussed

  13. Survey by senior NRC management to obtain veiwpoints on the safety impact of regulatory activities from representative utilities operating and constructing nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-08-01

    A survey of licensee staff members representing the several organizational elements in different licensee corporate and plant staffs was conducted by senior NRC management to obtain licensee views on the potential safety consequences and impact of NRC regulatory activities. The comments received addressed the full scope of NRC activities and the negative impact of agency actions on licensee resources, staff performance, planning and scheduling, and organizational effectiveness. The findings of the survey is that the pace and nature of regulatory actions have created a potential safety problem which deserves further evaluation by the agency

  14. NRC closing remarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.

    1994-01-01

    This section contains the edited transcript of the NRC closing remarks made by Mr. Franklin Coffman (Chief, Human Factors Branch, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research) and Dr. Cecil Thomas (Deputy Director, Division of Reactor Controls and Human Factors, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation). This editing consisted of minimal editing to correct grammar and remove extraneous references to microphone volume, etc

  15. The NRC activities concerning Boraflex use in spent-fuel storage racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopp, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued several generic communications to the nuclear industry identifying two issues with respect to using Boraflex in spent-fuel storage racks. The first issue related to gamma-radiation-induced shrinkage of Boraflex and the potential to develop tears or gaps in the material. This phenomenon is typically accounted for in criticality analyses of spent-fuel storage racks. The second issue concerned long-term Boraflex performance throughout the intended service life of the racks as a result of both gamma irradiation and exposure to the wet pool environment

  16. Summary of Chernobyl followup research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    In NUREG-1251, ''Implications of the Accident at Chernobyl for Safety Regulation of Commercial Nuclear Power Plants in the United States,'' April 1989, the NRC staff concluded that no immediate changes in NRC's regulations regarding design or operation of US commercial reactors were needed; however, it recommended that certain issues be considered further. NRC's Chernobyl followup research program consisted of the research tasks undertaken in response to the recommendations in NUREG-1251. It included 23 tasks that addressed potential lessons to be learned from the Chernobyl accident. This report presents summaries of NRC's Chernobyl followup research tasks. For each task, the Chernobyl-related issues are indicated, the work is described, and the staff's findings and conclusions are presented. More detailed reports concerning the work are referenced where applicable. This report closes out NRC's Chernobyl followup research program as such, but additional research will be conducted on some issues as needed. The report includes remarks concerning significant further activity with respect to the issues addressed

  17. NRC overview: Repository QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is on the threshold of an extensive program for characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada to determine if it is a suitable site for the permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Earlier this year, the DOE published the Consultation Draft Site Characterization Plan for the Nevada site, which describes in some detail the studies that need to be performed to determine if the site is acceptable. In the near future, the final site characterization plan (SCP) is expected to be issued and large-scale site characterization activities to begin. The data and analyses that will result from the execution of that plan are expected to be the primary basis for the license application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Because of the importance of these data and analyses in the assessment of the suitability of the site and in the demonstration of that suitability in the NRC licensing process, the NRC requires in 10CFR60 that site characterization be performed under a quality assurance (QA) program. The QA program is designed to provide confidence that data are valid, retrievable, and reproducible. The documentation produced by the program will form an important part of the record on which the suitability of the site is judged in licensing. In addition, because the NRC staff can review only a selected portion of the data collected, the staff will need to rely on the system of controls in the DOE QA program

  18. NRC nuclear waste geochemistry 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.H.; Birchard, G.F.

    1984-05-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to present results from NRC-sponsored research and to identify regulatory research issues which need to be addressed prior to licensing a high-level waste repository. Important summaries of technical issues and recommendations are included with each paper. The issue reflect areas of technical uncertainty addressed by the NRC Research program in geochemistry. The objectives of the NRC Research Program in geochemistry are to provide a technical basis for waste management rulemaking, to provide the NRC Waste Management Licensing Office with information that can be used to support sound licensing decisions, and to identify investigations that need to be conducted by DOE to support a license application. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  19. NRC safety research in support of regulation. Volume 8, FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This report, the ninth in a series of annual reports, was prepared in response to congressional inquiries concerning how nuclear regulatory research is used. It summarizes the accomplishments of the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research during FY 1993. A special emphasis on accomplishments in nuclear power plant aging research reflects recognition that number of plants are entering the final portion of their original 40-year operating licenses and that, in addition to current aging effects, a focus on safety considerations for license renewal becomes timely. The primary purpose of performing regulatory research is to develop and provide the Commission and its staff with sound technical bases for regulatory decisions on the safe operation of licensed nuclear reactors and facilities, to find unknown or unexpected safety problems, and to develop data and related information for the purpose of revising the Commission`s rules, regulatory guides, or other guidance.

  20. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through July 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.

    1992-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through July 1992 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  1. NRC Research Program on Plant Aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through June 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.; Hill, E.L.

    1991-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear power plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for the implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through June 1991 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject. 102 refs

  2. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and summaries of reports issued through May 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.; Hill, E.L.

    1990-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented engineering research program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear plants. The NPAR program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. In addition, it provides recommendations for effective maintenance to manage aging and for the implementation of the research results in the regulatory process. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through May 1990 and summaries of those reports. Each summary describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  3. NRC Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Program: Overview of Consultation and Monitoring Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Savannah River Site - What We Have Learned - 12470

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suber, Gregory [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In 2005 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) began to implement a new set of responsibilities under the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of Fiscal Year 2005. Section 3116 of the NDAA requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the NRC for certain non-high level waste determinations and also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations. In Fiscal Year 2005, the NRC staff began consulting with DOE and completed reviews of draft waste determinations for salt waste at the Savannah River Site. In 2006, a second review was completed on tank waste residuals including sodium-bearing waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm at the Idaho National Laboratory. Monitoring Plans were developed for these activities and the NRC is actively monitoring disposal actions at both sites. NRC is currently in consultation with DOE on the F-Area Tank Farm closure and anticipates entering consultation on the H-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. This paper presents, from the NRC perspective, an overview of how the consultation and monitoring process has evolved since its conception in 2005. It addresses changes in methods and procedures used to collect and develop information used by the NRC in developing the technical evaluation report and monitoring plan under consultation and the implementation the plan under monitoring. It will address lessons learned and best practices developed throughout the process. The NDAA has presented significant challenges for the NRC and DOE. Past and current successes demonstrate that the NDAA can achieve its intended goal of facilitating tank closure at DOE legacy defense waste sites. The NRC believes many of the challenges in performing the WD reviews have been identified and addressed. Lessons learned have been collected and documented throughout the review process. Future success will be contingent on each agencies commitment to

  4. Summary of ORNL work on NRC-sponsored HTGR safety research, July 1974-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, S.J.; Cleveland, J.C.; Conklin, J.C.; Delene, J.G.; Harrington, R.M.; Hatta, M.; Hedrick, R.A.; Johnson, L.G.; Sanders, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    A summary is presented of the major accomplishments of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) research program on High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) safety. This report is intended to help the nuclear Regulatory Commission establish goals for future research by comparing the status of the work here (as well as at other laboratories) with the perceived safety needs of the large HTGR. The ORNL program includes extensive work on dynamics-related safety code development, use of codes for studying postulated accident sequences, and use of experimental data for code verification. Cooperative efforts with other programs are also described. Suggestions for near-term and long-term research are presented

  5. Comments on the NRC Safety Research Program Budget for Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The comments are divided into three parts. Section 2 relates generally to programs for which greater effort or emphasis is needed. Section 3 provides specific comments on the proposed programs in each Decision Unit and, in most cases, for individual Subelements within each Decision Unit. Specific recommendations regarding the Research Program Support Budget are given in Section 4

  6. NRC research program on plant aging: Listing and abstracts of reports issued through February 1, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondic, N.N.

    1989-08-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is conducting the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. This is a comprehensive hardware-oriented program focused on understanding the aging mechanisms of components and systems in nuclear plants. The NPAR Program also focuses on methods for simulating and monitoring the aging-related degradation of these components and systems. This document contains a listing and index of reports generated in the NPAR Program that were issued through February 1, 1989, and abstracts of those reports. Each abstract describes the elements of the research covered in the report and outlines the significant results. For the convenience of the user, the reports are indexed by personal author, corporate author, and subject

  7. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition

  8. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition

  9. Reports distributed under the NRC Light-Water Reactor Safety Research Foreign Technical Exchange Program. Volume III, January--June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.S.; Cottrell, W.B.

    1977-09-19

    Lists of documents exchanged during the first half of 1977 under agreements between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the governments of France, Federal Republic of Germany, and Japan are presented. During this period, the NRC received 41 reports from France, 29 from F. R. Germany, and 24 from Japan, and in return sent 107 U.S. reports to each of these three countries.

  10. Reports distributed under the NRC Light-Water Reactor Safety Research Foreign Technical Exchange Program. Volume III, January--June 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.S.; Cottrell, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Lists of documents exchanged during the first half of 1977 under agreements between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the governments of France, Federal Republic of Germany, and Japan are presented. During this period, the NRC received 41 reports from France, 29 from F. R. Germany, and 24 from Japan, and in return sent 107 U.S. reports to each of these three countries

  11. NRC performance indicator program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The performance indicator development work of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) interoffice task group involved several major activities that included selection of candidate indicators for a trial program, data collection and review, validation of the trial indicators, display method development, interactions with the industry, and selection of an optimum set of indicators for the program. After evaluating 27 potential indicators against certain ideal attributes, the task group selected 17 for the trial program. The pertinent data for these indicators were then collected from 50 plants at 30 sites. The validation of the indicators consisted of two primary processes: logical validity and statistical analysis. The six indicators currently in the program are scrams, safety system actuations, significant events, safety system failures, forced outage rate, and equipment forced outages per 100 critical hours. A report containing data on the six performance indicators and some supplemental information is issued on a quarterly basis. The NRC staff is also working on refinements of existing indicators and development of additional indicators as directed by the commission

  12. NRC/UBC Node

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis-Perry, B. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Yogendran, Y. [NRC Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' In the search for cleaner, more sustainable energy sources, many of the most promising breakthroughs have been in hydrogen technology. However, this promise will remain unfulfilled without public interest and enthusiasm, and without the infrastructure to support the technology. In order to get there, we have to test, perfect, and demonstrate technology that is safe and affordable, and we must do so in practical, familiar settings. Ideally, such settings should be easily accessible to the engineers, planners, and architects of tomorrow while providing a showcase for hydrogen technology that will attract the general public. This place is the NRC/UBC Hydrogen Node. The UBC campus in Point Grey is home to leading edge, internationally recognized researchers in a range of disciplines, both within the University and at the NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation. On average, 40,000 students, faculty, and staff use the campus every day; UBC graduates go on to leadership positions in communities around the globe. Its spectacular setting makes UBC a popular destination for thousands of visitors from around the world. In 2006 UBC will host the World Urban Forum, and in 2010 it will be one of the sites for the Vancouver-Whistler Olympic Games. UBC and its South Campus neighbourhoods are developing as a model sustainable community, offering an excellent opportunity to develop and showcase hydrogen infrastructure and technology in a real-life, attractive setting that will be seen by thousands of people around the world. UBC's facilities, location, and Trek 2010 commitment to excellence in learning, research, and sustainability make it an ideal location for such a project. The H2 Village at UBC will be an integrated hydrogen demonstration project, linked to the hydrogen highway. This project is bringing together leading companies, researchers, and government agencies committed to making the refinement and early adoption of safe hydrogen technology a

  13. NRC/UBC Node

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis-Perry, B.; Yogendran, Y.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' In the search for cleaner, more sustainable energy sources, many of the most promising breakthroughs have been in hydrogen technology. However, this promise will remain unfulfilled without public interest and enthusiasm, and without the infrastructure to support the technology. In order to get there, we have to test, perfect, and demonstrate technology that is safe and affordable, and we must do so in practical, familiar settings. Ideally, such settings should be easily accessible to the engineers, planners, and architects of tomorrow while providing a showcase for hydrogen technology that will attract the general public. This place is the NRC/UBC Hydrogen Node. The UBC campus in Point Grey is home to leading edge, internationally recognized researchers in a range of disciplines, both within the University and at the NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation. On average, 40,000 students, faculty, and staff use the campus every day; UBC graduates go on to leadership positions in communities around the globe. Its spectacular setting makes UBC a popular destination for thousands of visitors from around the world. In 2006 UBC will host the World Urban Forum, and in 2010 it will be one of the sites for the Vancouver-Whistler Olympic Games. UBC and its South Campus neighbourhoods are developing as a model sustainable community, offering an excellent opportunity to develop and showcase hydrogen infrastructure and technology in a real-life, attractive setting that will be seen by thousands of people around the world. UBC's facilities, location, and Trek 2010 commitment to excellence in learning, research, and sustainability make it an ideal location for such a project. The H2 Village at UBC will be an integrated hydrogen demonstration project, linked to the hydrogen highway. This project is bringing together leading companies, researchers, and government agencies committed to making the refinement and early adoption of safe hydrogen technology a reality

  14. Significant NRC Enforcement Actions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — This dataset provides a list of Nuclear Regulartory Commission (NRC) issued significant enforcement actions. These actions, referred to as "escalated", are issued by...

  15. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapter 1, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  16. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapters 2--13, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  17. 77 FR 49835 - Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities; In the Matter of Mr. Joseph Quintanilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-17

    ... governmental entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139; August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... procedures described below. To comply with the procedural requirements of E-Filing, at least 10 days prior to...

  18. 78 FR 66970 - In the Matter of Michael J. Buhrman; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... governmental entities participating under 10 CFR 2.315(c), must be filed in accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires participants to submit and serve all... procedures described below. To comply with the procedural requirements of E-Filing, at least ten 10 days...

  19. NRC's license renewal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akstulewicz, Francis

    1991-01-01

    In order to provide for the continuity of the current generation of nuclear power plant operating licenses and at the same time ensure the health and safety of the public, and the quality of the environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a goal of developing and issuing regulations and regulatory guidance for license renewal in the early 1990s. This paper will discuss some of those activities underway to achieve this goal. More specifically, this paper will discuss the Commission's regulatory philosophy for license renewal and the two major license renewal rule makings currently underway. The first is the development of a new Part 54 to address procedural and technical requirements for license renewal; the second is a revision to existing Part 51 to exclude environmental issues and impacts from consideration during the license renewal process. (author)

  20. NRC quarterly [status] report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report covers the third quarter of calendar year 1987. The NRC licensing activity during the period of this report included the issuance of a full-power license for Beaver Valley 2 on August 14, 1987, and operating license restricted to five percent power for South Texas Unit 1 on August 21, 1987. Additional licensing delay for Shoreham is projected due to complex litigation. Also, licensing delay may occur for Comanche Peak Unit 1, because the duration of the hearing is uncertain. Although a license authorizing fuel loading and precriticality testing for Seabrook Unit 1 has been issued, there is a projected delay for low-power licensing. Full-power licensing for Seabrook Unit 1 will be delayed due to offsite emergency preparedness issues. The length of the delay is not known at this time. With the exception of Seabrook and Shoreham, regulatory delays in this report are not impacted by the schedules for resolving off-site emergency preparedness issues

  1. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  2. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  3. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  4. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  5. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action or has proposed, or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  6. NRC/RSR Data Bank Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankert, S.F.

    1979-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program to collect, store, and make available data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. Local direction of the program is provided by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program provides a central computer storage mechanism and access software for data to be used by code development and assessment groups in meeting the code and correlation needs of the nuclear industry. The administrative portion of the program provides data entry, documentation, and training and advisory services to users and the NRC. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program and the capabilities of the data access software are described

  7. NRC antitrust licensing actions, 1978--1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, S.J.; Simpson, J.J.

    1997-09-01

    NUREG-0447, Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants, was published in May 1978 and includes a compilation and discussion of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proceedings and activity involving the NRC's competitive review program through February 1978, NUREG-0447 is an update of an earlier discussion of the NRC's antitrust review of nuclear power plants, NR-AIG-001, The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants: The Conditioning of Licenses, which reviewed the Commission's antitrust review function from its inception in December 1970 through April 1976. This report summarizes the support provided to NRC staff in updating the compilation of the NRC's antitrust licensing review activities for commercial nuclear power plants that have occurred since February 1978. 4 refs., 4 tabs

  8. NRC antitrust licensing actions, 1978--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, S.J.; Simpson, J.J.

    1997-09-01

    NUREG-0447, Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants, was published in May 1978 and includes a compilation and discussion of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proceedings and activity involving the NRC`s competitive review program through February 1978, NUREG-0447 is an update of an earlier discussion of the NRC`s antitrust review of nuclear power plants, NR-AIG-001, The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Antitrust Review of Nuclear Power Plants: The Conditioning of Licenses, which reviewed the Commission`s antitrust review function from its inception in December 1970 through April 1976. This report summarizes the support provided to NRC staff in updating the compilation of the NRC`s antitrust licensing review activities for commercial nuclear power plants that have occurred since February 1978. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  9. Reports distributed under the NRC Light-Water Reactor Safety Research Foreign Technical Exchange Program. Volume IV, July--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.S.; Cottrell, W.B.

    1978-01-01

    Lists of documents exchanged during the second half of 1977 under agreements between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the governments of France, Federal Republic of Germany, Japan, and the United Kingdom are presented. During this period, the NRC received 1 report from France, 40 from the Federal Republic of Germany, and 11 from Japan, and in return sent 112 U.S. reports to each of these three countries and 23 reports to the United Kingdom

  10. Scientific activities 1980 Nuclear Research Center ''Democritos''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritos for the year 1980 are presented in the form of a list of 76 projects giving title, objectives, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 16 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritos NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Scientific Directorate, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications, Radioimmunoassay and Training. (N.C.)

  11. NCR Research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltracchi, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper identifies and describes safety issues related to the design, development, and qualification of reliable digital computer systems for nuclear power plants. It also describes the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's research program on these issues. The paper discusses an evaluation of the initial standards for hard-wired based safety systems. The lessons learned in developing these standards provides guidance in the design and use of digital technology in nuclear power plants. Also, this evaluation discusses how the content of the standards should lead to a framework of design criteria and the related acceptance criteria that can be used for computer-based safety systems. The opinions and viewpoints expressed herein are the author's personal ones and they do not necessarily reflect the criteria, requirements, and guidelines of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

  12. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated...

  13. The NRC measurement verification program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, T.N.; Ong, L.D.Y.

    1995-01-01

    A perspective is presented on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approach for effectively monitoring the measurement methods and directly testing the capability and performance of licensee measurement systems. A main objective in material control and accounting (MC and A) inspection activities is to assure the accuracy and precision of the accounting system and the absence of potential process anomalies through overall accountability. The primary means of verification remains the NRC random sampling during routine safeguards inspections. This involves the independent testing of licensee measurement performance with statistical sampling plans for physical inventories, item control, and auditing. A prospective cost-effective alternative overcheck is also discussed in terms of an externally coordinated sample exchange or ''round robin'' program among participating fuel cycle facilities in order to verify the quality of measurement systems, i.e., to assure that analytical measurement results are free of bias

  14. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter. The rules on which final action has been taken since March 31, 1993 are: Repeal of NRC standards of conduct; Fitness-for-duty requirements for licensees who possess, use, or transport Category I material; Training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel; Monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants; Licensing requirements for land disposal of radioactive wastes; and Licensees' announcements of safeguards inspections

  15. NRC new sustainable building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semczyszyn, D.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The National Research Council Institute For Fuel Cell Innovation is relocating to a purpose-built 71,343 sq. Ft. (6598 sq. M) Research, Testing, Evaluation, and Industry Incubation Facility in the spring of 2006. The new facility will contain Hydrogen-ready laboratories, the existing relocated Hydrogen Safe Environmental Test Chamber, a hydrogen vehicle maintenance bay, a hydrogen vehicle refuelling station, and the following demonstration projects and features: 1. A Ground Source Heat Pump: This long-proven natural-source heating and cooling technology to provide climate control for the new IFCI's atrium and galleria. It is being designed by Keen Engineering of North Vancouver, BC. 2. 5 KW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System: Fuelled by natural gas and in the future, from biomass, the fuel cell will also produce approximately 15 kW of waste heat, which will be captured and used to supply heat for the building. The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell will be supplied by Fuel Cell Technologies in Kingston, ON. 3. LEED Building certification: Attaining LEED 'green building' certification is considered an important complement to the plans for the new NRC-IFCI, because it will provide respected third-party verification of government's commitment to efficient building design and construction. Project architects Bunting Coady of Vancouver, BC believe the IFCI has strong potential to earn gold LEED certification. 4. Photovoltaic hydrogen source for back-up power fuel cell system: A photovoltaic array will capture energy from sunlight to power an electrolyzer that will produce and store hydrogen for a PEM fuel cell emergency backup power system. The electrolyzer will be provided by Hydrogenics of Mississauga, ON. Photovoltaics are being designed and installed by the British Columbia Institute of Technology. (author)

  16. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Current perspectives on performance assessment at the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coplan, S.M.; Eisenberg, N.A.; Federline, M.V.; Randall, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is engaging in a number of activities involving performance assessment in order to support NRC's program in high-level waste management. Broad areas of activity include: (1) reactive work responding to products and activities of the Department of Energy (DOE), (2) proactive work, including development of an independent performance assessment capability, development of guidance for DOE, support for technical and programmatic integration, (3) a program of regulatory research, and (4) participation in a number of international activities. As the U.S. high-level waste program continues to mature, performance assessment is seen as playing a more prominent role in evaluating safety and focussing technical activities

  18. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This document compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rule making which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  19. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considered action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  20. NRC Regulatory Agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This document is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  1. NRC regulatory agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This document provides a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  2. NRC inventory of dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lear, G.E.; Thompson, O.O.

    1983-01-01

    The NRC Inventory of Dams has been prepared as required by the charter of the NRC Dam Safety Officer. The inventory lists 51 dams associated with nuclear power plant sites and 14 uranium mill tailings dams (licensed by NRC) in the US as of February 1, 1982. Of the 85 listed nuclear power plants (148 units), 26 plants obtain cooling water from impoundments formed by dams. The 51 dams associated with the plants are: located on a plant site (29 dams at 15 plant sites); located off site but provide plant cooling water (18 dams at 11 additional plant sites); and located upstream from a plant (4 dams) - they have been identified as dams whose failure, and ensuing plant flooding, could result in a radiological risk to the public health and safety. The dams that might be considered NRC's responsibility in terms of the federal dam safety program are identified. This group of dams (20 on nuclear power plant sites and 14 uranium mill tailings dams) was obtained by eliminating dams that do not pose a flooding hazard (e.g., submerged dams) and dams that are regulated by another federal agency. The report includes the principal design features of all dams and related useful information

  3. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.J.

    1980-07-01

    The NRC plan defines the functional role of the NRC in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 to assure that agency regulatory responsibilities and objectives will be fulfilled. The plan outlines NRC functions in TMI-2 cleanup operations in the following areas: (1) the functional relationship of NRC to other government agencies, the public, and the licensee to coordinate activities, (2) the functional roles of these organizations in cleanup operations, (3) the NRC review and decision-making procedure for the licensee's proposed cleanup operation, (4) the NRC/licensee estimated schedule of major actions, and (5) NRC's functional role in overseeing implementation of approved licensee activities

  4. NRC performance assessment program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coplan, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) performance assessment program includes the development of guidance to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on preparation of a license application and on conducting the studies to support a license application. The nature of the licensing requirements of 10 CFR Part 60 create a need for performance assessments by the DOE. The NRC and DOE staffs each have specific roles in assuring the adequacy of those assessments. Performance allocation is an approach for determining what testing and analysis will be needed during site characterization to assure that an adequate data base is available to support the necessary performance assessments. From the standpoint of establishing is implementable methodology, the most challenging performance assessment needed for licensing is the one that will be used to determine compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) containment requirement

  5. NRC/RSR Data Bank Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankert, S.F.; Evans, C.D.; Hardy, H.A.; Litteer, G.L.; Schulz, G.L.; Smith, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The program provides the means of collecting, storing, and making available experimental data from the many water reactor safety research programs in the United States and other countries. The program collects qualified engineering data on a prioritized basis from experimental program data bases, stores the data in a single data bank in a common format, and makes the data available to users

  6. NRC/RSR Data Bank Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankert, S.F.; Evans, C.D.; Hardy, H.A.; Litteer, G.L.; Schulz, G.L.; Smith, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program to provide a means of collecting, processing, and making available experimental data from the many domestic and foreign water reactor safety research programs. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program collects qualified engineering data from experimental program data bases, stores the data in a single data bank in a common format, and makes the data available to users. The program is designed to be user oriented to minimize the effort required to obtain and manipulate data of interest. The data bank concept and structure embodied in the data bank processing system are applicable to any program where large quantities of scientific (numeric) data are generated and require compiling, storage, and accessing in order to be collected and made available to multiple users. 3 figures

  7. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  8. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  9. NRC perspective and experience on valve testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eapen, P.K.

    1990-01-01

    Testing of safety related valves is one of the major activities at commercial nuclear power plants. In addition to Technical Specification, valve testing is required in 10 CFR 50.55a and 10 CFR 50 Appendix J. NRC inspectors (both resident and specialists) spend a considerable amount of time in following the valve test activities as part of their routine business. In the past, depending on a licensee's organizational structure, a valve could be tested more than three times to verify conformance with Technical Specifications, 10 CFR 50.55a, and 10 CFR 50 Appendix J. The regulatory reviewers were isolated from each other. Licensee test personnel were also not communicating among themselves. As a result, NRC inspectors found that certain valves in the IST program were inadequately tested. The typical licensee response was to say that this valve is exempted from testing under Appendix J. Others would say that the technical specification does not require fast closure of a valve in question. In addition to the above, the inspectors had to deal with exemption requests that were not dispositioned by the NRC. In the seventies there was a gentlemen's agreement to allow the licensee to do the testing in accordance with the exception, without waiting for the NRC approval. Needless to say when the new NRC inspection procedure was issued in March 1989 for implementation, the Regional inspectors had extremely difficult time to cope with the gray areas of valve testing. In August 1987, NRC Region I was reorganized and the special test program section was established to perform inspections in the IST area. This section was chartered to optimize resources and develop a meaningful inspection plan. The perspectives and insights used in the development of a detailed inspection plan is discussed below

  10. The use of NPAR [Nuclear Plant Aging Research] results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1989-01-01

    The US NRC's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. Equipment and systems which have a propensity for age related degradation are identified, and methods for detecting and mitigating aging effects have been evaluated. As plants age, it becomes increasingly important that NRC inspectors be cognizant of plant aging phenomena. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides a mechanism for making pertinent research available to the inspectors. 7 refs., 2 figs

  11. NRC Licensing Status Summary Report for NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne Leland [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, is based on research and development activities supported by the Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. The NGNP will be licensed for construction and operation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). However, not all elements of current regulations (and their related implementation guidance) can be applied to HTGR technology at this time. Certain policies established during past LWR licensing actions must be realigned to properly accommodate advanced HTGR technology. A strategy for licensing HTGR technology was developed and executed through the cooperative effort of DOE and the NRC through the NGNP Project. The purpose of this report is to provide a snapshot of the current status of the still evolving pre-license application regulatory framework relative to commercial HTGR technology deployment in the U.S. The following discussion focuses on (1) describing what has been accomplished by the NGNP Project up to the time of this report, and (2) providing observations and recommendations concerning actions that remain to be accomplished to enable the safe and timely licensing of a commercial HTGR facility in the U.S.

  12. NRC regulation of DOE facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.; Edgar, G.; Silverman, D.; Murley, T.

    1997-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), its contractors, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are in for major changes if the DOE follows through on its intentions announced December 20, 1996. The DOE is seeking legislation to establish the NRC as the regulatory agency with jurisdiction over nuclear health, safety, and security at a wide range of DOE facilities. At this stage, it appears that as many as 200 (though not all) DOE facilities would be affected. On March 28, 1997, the NRC officially endorsed taking over the responsibility for regulatory oversight of DOE nuclear facilities as the DOE had proposed, contingent upon adequate funding, staffing resources, and a clear delineation of NRC authority. This article first contrasts the ways in which the NRC and the DOE carry out their basic regulatory functions. Next, it describes the NRC's current authority over DOE facilities and the status of the DOE's initiative to expand that authority. Then, it discusses the basic changes and impacts that can be expected in the regulation of DOE facilities. The article next describes key lessons learned from the recent transition of the GDPs from DOE oversight to NRC regulation and the major regulatory issues that arose in that transition. Finally, some general strategies are suggested for resolving issues likely to arise as the NRC assumes regulatory authority over DOE facilities

  13. NRC influences on nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    NRC influences on utility training programs through prescriptive requirements and evaluation of industry self-initiatives are discussed. NRC regulation and industry initiatives are complimentary and in some instances industry initiatives are replacing NRC requirements. Controls and feedback mechanisms designed to enhance positive NRC influences and minimize or eliminate negative influences are discussed. Industry and NRC efforts to reach an acceptable mix between regulator oversight and self-initiatives by the industry are recognized. Problem areas for continued cooperation to enhance training and minimize conflicting signals to industry are discussed. These areas include: requalification examination scope and content, depth of training and examination on emergency procedures; improved learning objectives as the basis for training and examination, and severe accident training

  14. NRC/RSR data bank program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankert, S.F.; Evans, C.D.; Hardy, H.A.; Litteer, G.L.; Schulz, G.L.; Smith, N.C.

    1978-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) the NRC/Reactor Safety Research (RSR) Data Bank Program. The program is under the direction of EG and G Idaho, Inc., and is intended to provide the means of collecting, processing, and making available experimental data from the many water reactor safety research programs. The NRC/RSR Data Bank Program collects qualified engineering data on a prioritized basis from experimental program data bases, stores the data in a single data bank in a common format, and makes the data available to users. The NRC/RSR Data Bank specializes in water reactor safety experimental data, but it has a number of other scientific applications where large amounts of numeric data are or will be available. As an example of size, a single water reactor safety test may generate 10 million data words. Future examples of the use of a data bank might be in gathering data on low head hydraulics, solar projects, and liquid metal reactor safety data

  15. NRC regulatory uses of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The publication in 1975 of WASH-1400, with its new probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology, had the effect of presenting a pair of eyeglasses to a man with poor eyesight. Suddenly, it gave us a view of nuclear safety with a new clarity, and it allowed us to sort out the important safety issues from the unimportant. In the intervening years, PSA insights have permeated the fabric of nearly all our safety judgments. This acceptance can be seen from the following list of broad areas where the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff uses PSA insights and methodology: evaluating the safety significance of operating events and recommending safety improvements where warranted; requesting licensees to systematically look for design vulnerabilities in each operating reactor; evaluating the safety significance of design weaknesses or non-compliances when judging the time frame for necessary improvements; conducting sensitivity analyses to judge where safety improvements are most effective; assessing the relative safety benefits of design features for future reactors. In judging where PSA methodology can be improved to give better safety insights, it is believed that the following areas need more attention: better modeling of cognitive errors; more comprehensive modeling of accident sequences initiated from conditions other than full power; more comprehensive modeling of inter-system loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) sequences. Although PSA is widely used in the staff's regulatory activities, the NRC deliberately chooses not to include probabilistic prescriptions in regulations or guidance documents. The staff finds the bottom line risk estimates to be one of the least reliable products of a PSA. The reason for this view is that PSA cannot adequately address cognitive errors nor assess the effects of a pervasive poor safety attitude

  16. 75 FR 60485 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2008-0497] NRC Enforcement Policy Revision AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy statement. SUMMARY: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or Commission) is publishing a major revision to its Enforcement Policy (Enforcement Policy or Policy) to...

  17. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program

  18. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume I is a concise description of the need for the human performance investigation process, the process' components, the methods used to develop the process, the methods proposed to test the process, and conclusions on the process' usefulness

  19. Development of the NRC's Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L.; Haas, P.; Terranova, M.

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique

  20. Results from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research Program: Their use in inspection activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The US NCR's Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program has determined the susceptibility to aging of components and systems, and the potential for aging to impact plant safety and availability. The NPAR Program also identified methods for detecting and mitigating aging in components. This report describes the NPAR results which can enhance NRC inspection activities. Recommendations are provided for communicating pertinent information to NRC inspectors. These recommendations are based on a detailed assessment of the NRC's Inspection Program, and feedback from resident and regional inspectors as described within. Examples of NPAR report summaries and aging inspection guides for components and systems are included. 13 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. NRC regulatory information conference: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This volume of the report provides the proceedings from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Information Conference that was held at the Mayflower Hotel, Washington, DC, on April 18, 19, and 20, 1989. This conference was held by the NRC and chaired by Dr. Thomas E. Mosley, Director, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations (NRR) and coordinated by S. Singh Bajwa, Chief, Technical Assistance Management Section, NRR. There were approximately 550 participants from nine countries at the conference. The countries represented were Canada, England, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Spain, Taiwan, Yugoslavia, and the United States. The NRC staff discussed with nuclear industry its regulatory philosophy and approach and the bases on which they have been established. Furthermore, the NRC staff discussed several initiatives that have been implemented recently and their bases as well as NRC's expectations for new initiatives to further improve safety. The figures contained in Appendix A to the volume correspond to the slides that were shown during the presentations. Volume 2 of this report contains the formal papers that were distributed at the beginning of the Regulatory Information Conference and other information about the conference

  2. The use of NPAR [Nuclear Plant Aging Research] results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. A review of the NRC Inspection Program and discussions with NRC inspection personnel have revealed several areas where NPAR research results would be valuable to the inspector. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides alternatives for making these pertinent research results available to the inspectors. The NRC Inspection Program emphasis is on evaluating the performance of licensees by focusing on requirements and standards associated with administrative, managerial, engineering, and operational aspects of licensee activities. The Program recognizes that licensees may satisfy NRC requirements differently, and therefore expresses inspection guidance in the form of performance objectives and evaluation criteria. for the resident and regional inspectors, procedures have been written covering various subject areas, such as operations, maintenance, and surveillance. Some of these procedures contain guidance related to aging degradation. The types of information generated by NPAR which were found to be relevant to inspection needs include the following: functional indicators; failure modes, causes, effects; stresses which cause degradation; maintenance recommendations; inspection prioritization. 3 refs

  3. Validation of seismic soil-structure interaction analysis methods: EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute]/NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] cooperation in Lotung, Taiwan, experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Y.K.; Kassawara, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    The cooperative program between NRC/ANL and EPRI on the validation of soil-structure interaction analysis methods with actual seismic response data is described. A large scale-model of a containment building has been built by EPRI/Taipower in a highly seismic region of Taiwan. Vibration tests were performed, first on the basemat before the superstructure was built and then on the completed structure. Since its completion, the structure has experienced many earthquakes. The site and structural response to these earthquakes have been recorded with field (surface and downhole) and structural instrumentation. The validation program involves blind predictions of site and structural response during vibration tests and a selected seismic event, and subsequent comparison between the predictions and measurements. The predictive calculations are in progress. The results of the correlation are expected to lead to the evaluation of the methods as to their conservatisms and sensitivities

  4. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    Effective January 1, 1982, NRC will institute records retention and disposal practices in accordance with the approved Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule (CRDS). CRDS is comprised of NRC Schedules (NRCS) 1 to 4 which apply to the agency's program or substantive records and General Records Schedules (GRS) 1 to 22 which apply to housekeeping or facilitative records. The schedules are assembled functionally/organizationally to facilitate their use. Preceding the records descriptions and disposition instructions for both NRCS and GRS, there are brief statements on the organizational units which accumulate the records in each functional area, and other information regarding the schedules' applicability

  5. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this reporting period, the NRC promoted research opportunities at AMRMC institutes through a... productivity of these Associates is listed in the technical report. 15. SUBJECT TERMS- Associateship program, post-doc, awards 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...following activities in support of the subject contract: Outreach and Promotion The promotional schedule to advertise the NRC Research Associateship

  6. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    Effective January 1, 1982, NRC will institute records retention and disposal practives in accordance with the approved Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule (CRDS). CRDS is comprised of NRC Schedules (NRCS) 1 to 4 which apply to the agency's program or substantive records and General Records Schedules (GRS) 1 to 24 which apply to housekeeping or facilitative records. NRCS-I applies to records common to all or most NRC offices; NRCS-II applies to program records as found in the various offices of the Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, and the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Panel; NRCS-III applies to records accumulated by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; and NRCS-IV applies to records accumulated in the various NRC offices under the Executive Director for Operations. The schedules are assembled functionally/organizationally to facilitate their use. Preceding the records descriptions and disposition instructions for both NRCS and GRS, there are brief statements on the organizational units which accumulate the records in each functional area, and other information regarding the schedules' applicability

  7. Perspective of the waste management research program at NRC on modeling phenomena related to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, J.D.; Costanzi, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Modeling the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste falls short of ideal for a variety of reasons. The understanding of the physical processes involved may be incomplete or incorrect. It may not be possible to specify mathematically all relationships among the processes involved. The initial conditions or boundary conditions may not be known or directly measurable. Further, often it is impossible to obtain exact solutions to the mathematical relationships that constitute the mathematical model. Finally, many simplifications, approximations, and assumptions will be needed to make the models both understandable and calculationally tractable. Yet, modeling is the only means available by which any quantitative estimation of the expected performance of a geologic repository over the long term can be made. If modeling estimates of the performance of a geologic repository are to provide effective support for an NRC finding of reasonable assurance of no unreasonable risk to the public health and safety, then the strengths and limitations of the modeling process, the models themselves, and the use of the models must be understood and explored fully

  8. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1991-12-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facilities throughout the country for the third quarter of 1991

  9. 76 FR 54986 - NRC Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Chapter I [NRC-2011-0209] NRC Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed enforcement policy revision; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is soliciting comments from interested...

  10. 76 FR 76192 - NRC Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0273] NRC Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Proposed enforcement policy revision; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear... licensees, vendors, and contractors), on proposed revisions to the NRC's Enforcement Policy (the Policy) and...

  11. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    Title 44 United States Code, ''Public Printing and Documents,'' regulations cited in the General Services Administration's (GSA) ''Federal Information Resources Management Regulations'' (FIRMR), Part 201-9, ''Creation, Maintenance, and Use of Records,'' and regulation issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter XII, Subchapter B, ''Records Management,'' require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA's General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 2, contains ''NRC's Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,'' and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 2 totally reorganizes the records schedules from a functional arrangement to an arrangement by the host office. A subject index and a conversion table have also been developed for the NRC schedules to allow staff to identify the new schedule numbers easily and to improve their ability to locate applicable schedules

  12. 76 FR 57006 - Proposed Generic Communications; Draft NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX; NRC Regulation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 30 and 150 [NRC-2011-0146] Proposed Generic Communications; Draft NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX; NRC Regulation of Military Operational Radium-226... published for public comment the proposed draft RIS 2011-XX; NRC Regulation of Military Operational Radium...

  13. Planning and Conducting Research Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Some directions and influences on dental research activities in the near future are discussed. Current challenges include international competition, fellowships, and equipment. Potential research activity includes preventive medicine, epidemiology, chronic illness, the elderly, bioengineering, materials research, nutrition, soft tissue research,…

  14. General administrative activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    Significant safety-related activities reported during September and October, which are not covered elsewhere in this issue, are summarized here. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has adopted an interim statement of policy on the licensing of nuclear power plants. Four speeches by NRC Commissioners are summarized. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) issued a review of the NRC Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The NRC also issued a policy statement on emergency planning guidance. Two Research Informantion Letters (RILs) issued during the report period are summarized. Last is a listing of developments on a variety os safety-related topics

  15. NRC plan for cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, R.; Snyder, B.

    1982-02-01

    This NRC Plan, which defines NRC's functional role in cleanup operations at Three Mile Island Unit 2 and outlines NRC's regulatory responsibilities in fulfilling this role, is the first revision to the initial plan issued in July 1980 (NUREG-0698). Since 1980, a number of policy developments have occurred which will have an impact on the course of cleanup operations. This revision reflects these developments in the area of NRC's review and approval process with regard to cleanup operations as well as NRC's interface with the Department of Energy's involvement in the cleanup and waste disposal. This revision is also intended to update the cleanup schedule by presenting the cleanup progress that has taken place and NRC's role in ongoing and future cleanup activities

  16. NRC Reviewer Aid for Evaluating the Human Factors Engineering Aspects of Small Modular Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Small modular reactors (SMRs) are a promising approach to meeting future energy needs. Although the electrical output of an individual SMR is relatively small compared to that of typical commercial nuclear plants, they can be grouped to produce as much energy as a utility demands. Furthermore, SMRs can be used for other purposes, such as producing hydrogen and generating process heat. The design characteristics of many SMRs differ from those of current conventional plants and may require a distinct concept of operations (ConOps). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted research to examine the human factors engineering (HFE) and the operational aspects of SMRs. The research identified thirty potential human-performance issues that should be considered in the NRC's reviews of SMR designs and in future research activities. The purpose of this report is to support NRC HFE reviewers of SMR applications by identifying some of the questions that can be asked of applicants whose designs have characteristics identified in the issues. The questions for each issue were identified and organized based on the review elements and guidance contained in Chapter 18 of the Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800), and the Human Factors Engineering Program Review Model (NUREG-0711).

  17. Activities of the research committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, A.; Shirai, T.; Nakagawa, M.; Osugi, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Ishida, T.; Shimazaki, J. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-01-01

    The department of Nuclear Energy System serves as a secretarial of the following four research committees organized by JAERI; Japanese Nuclear Data Committee, Atomic and Molecular Data Research Committee, Research Committee on Reactor Physics and Research Committee on Marine Reactors. The purpose and the expected task of each committee are summarized here. The detailed activities of each committee are presented in this paper. (author)

  18. Nuclear Security: Action May Be Needed to Reassess the Security of NRC-Licensed Research Reactors. Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-403

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloise, Gene

    2008-01-01

    There are 37 research reactors in the United States, mostly located on college campuses. Of these, 33 reactors are licensed and regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Four are operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) and are located at three national laboratories. Although less powerful than commercial nuclear power reactors,…

  19. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaggs, B.J.; Fairchild, C.I.; DeField, J.D.; Hack, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A project of the Health, Safety and Environment Division is described. The project provides the NRC with information of respiratory protective devices and programs for their licensee personnel. The following activities were performed during FY 1983: selection of alternate test aerosols for quality assurance testing of high-efficiency particulate air respirator filters; evaluation of MAG-1 spectacles for use with positive and negative-pressure respirators; development of a Manual of Respiratory Protection in Emergencies Involving Airborne Radioactive Materials, and technical assistance to NRC licensees regarding respirator applications. 2 references, 1 figure

  20. NRC licensing requirements: DOD options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, W.J.; O'Reilly, P.D.

    1982-09-01

    This report describes the licensing process (both safety and environmental) that would apply if the Department of Defense (DOD) chooses to obtain licenses from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for using nuclear energy for power and luminous sources. The specific nuclear energy sources being considered include: small or medium-size nuclear power reactors; radioisotopic thermoelectric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; radioisotopic dynamic electric generators with 90 Sr or 238 Pu; and applications of radioisotopes for luminous sources (lights) with 3 H, 85 Kr, or 147 Pm. The steps of the licensing process are summarized in the following sections, with particular attention given to the schedule and level of effort necessary to support the process

  1. The NRC and utility finances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byus, L.C.

    1992-01-01

    In a speech before the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners in November 1991, Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Ivan Selin presented what he called an open-quotes expansion of the concept of safety beyond our previous narrow bounds.close quotes He went on to explain, open-quotes To be seen as successful and safe operators of nuclear facilities, utilities must have safe and predictable cash flows.close quotes While there is little disagreement that the concepts of successful plant operations and financial strength go hand in hand, the relationship between the two is not clear. Which came first, successful operation of generating plants or financial strength? Selin's views on NRC involvement in financial aspects of utility operation in the United States are sure to stimulate debate on the issue

  2. NRC perspectives on fuel cycle and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, K.R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper discusses NRC's mandate in the field of safeguards and the thoughts of NRC on other newly emerging policy considerations. The status of some of the current issues facing the nuclear community and the regulatory staff in particular is touched on

  3. Report to Congress on NRC emergency communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1980-09-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island highlighted the need for improved communications among the NRC and other organizations which respond to such emergencies. This report summarizes the communication problems identified by several major review groups after the accident, the status of corrective actions, and NRC plans to improve communications still further. (author)

  4. 78 FR 5838 - NRC Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0014] NRC Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Policy revision; issuance and request for comments. SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy,'' December 30, 2009 (ADAMS Accession No. ML093200520);(2...

  5. Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Injaian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an "expert" in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity.

  6. REVIEW OF NRC APPROVED DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markman, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary design concepts for the proposed Subsurface Repository at Yucca Mountain indicate extensive reliance on modern, computer-based, digital control technologies. The purpose of this analysis is to investigate the degree to which the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has accepted and approved the use of digital control technology for safety-related applications within the nuclear power industry. This analysis reviews cases of existing digitally-based control systems that have been approved by the NRC. These cases can serve as precedence for using similar types of digitally-based control technologies within the Subsurface Repository. While it is anticipated that the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) will not contain control systems as complex as those required for a nuclear power plant, the review of these existing NRC approved applications will provide the YMP with valuable insight into the NRCs review process and design expectations for safety-related digital control systems. According to the YMP Compliance Program Guidance, portions of various NUREGS, Regulatory Guidelines, and nuclear IEEE standards the nuclear power plant safety related concept would be applied to some of the designs on a case-by-case basis. This analysis will consider key design methods, capabilities, successes, and important limitations or problems of selected control systems that have been approved for use in the Nuclear Power industry. An additional purpose of this analysis is to provide background information in support of further development of design criteria for the YMP. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify and research the extent and precedence of digital control and remotely operated systems approved by the NRC for the nuclear power industry. Help provide a basis for using and relying on digital technologies for nuclear related safety critical applications. (2) Identify the basic control architecture and methods of key digital control

  7. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    this is the first malaria vaccine to be able to show this. 4 Examined needleless approcahes to vaccine delivery, including pleuronic lecithin ...mechanisms of EG shedding and systemic responses to hemorrhage and resuscitation therapy ; 3 Compared to baseline and to the sham group, there was a 50...the first malaria vaccine to be able to show this. 4) Examined needleless approcahes to vaccine delivery, including pleuronic lecithin organogel

  8. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    pnenotypes of SAÞN-speciiic f- ielt populations ano proüeä thäi Coa+ T-cells fiöm mice immuniied I with SAPN are able to, by themselves, induce sterile...knowledge and skills to my repertoire. Publishable results followed shortly and the opportunity to write book chapters also markedly increased. LONGTERMVALUE...vaccine efficacy resulting from the addition of mosquito saliva 6) The youngest investigator at the WRAIR to successfully write and complete a non

  9. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Science magazine, the Chronicle of Higher Education ); and, 6) maintaining a presence on social media sites such as Facebook. The Academies attended...provided 17) (For J-1 visa holders only) SUMMARY OF CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE DURING TENURE Itemize experiences that your laboratory (LPR and/or...with responded prompty and were very friendly and knowledgeable. I especially want to point out Peggy who was such an immense help while transitioning

  10. Agency procedures for the NRC incident response plan. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    The NRC Incident Response Plan, NUREG-0728/MC 0502 describes the functions of the NRC during an incident and the kinds of actions that comprise an NRC response. The NRC response plan will be activated in accordance with threshold criteria described in the plan for incidents occurring at nuclear reactors and fuel facilities involving materials licensees; during transportation of licensed material, and for threats against facilities or licensed material. In contrast to the general overview provided by the Plan, the purpose of these agency procedures is to delineate the manner in which each planned response function is performed; the criteria for making those response decisions which can be preplanned; and the information and other resources needed during a response. An inexperienced but qualified person should be able to perform functions assigned by the Plan and make necessary decisions, given the specified information, by becoming familiar with these procedures. This rule of thumb has been used to determine the amount of detail in which the agency procedures are described. These procedures form a foundation for the training of response personnel both in their normal working environment and during planned emergency exercises. These procedures also form a ready reference or reminder checklist for technical team members and managers during a response

  11. Activities as a research resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Regina Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Activities play a guiding central role in occupational therapy, articulating to its utilization, the understanding and assessment of its capabilities in numerous and different interventions arising from this field. In this study, we aim to present the use of activities as a research methodology resource. Considering the pathways studied in a master’s research followed by a PhD work, some applications of this resource are reported as a powerful strategy of investigation for the occupational therapy researcher. It is about structuring, systematizing, and analyzing the activities proposed in professional practice by the theoretical and methodological rigor used in the research works. It emphasizes how the use of these activities can be considered important data, records, instruments and sources for different research methods, especially for qualitative analyses. Workshop activities were offered in the above mentioned studies; they were used as communication instruments and expressions of personal and collective experiences, supplying data to understand the actions of subjects and collectives. Furthermore, this strategy was applied as spaces of experimentation, learning and expression, where each participant was conceived as an active being of the process, in a way that the proposal could result in democratic experiences that reflected greater interest and participation, and a more complex presentation of the research data. It is worth mentioning that other methodological procedures, which substantiated the analyses and interpretation of the data collected, were also used. It was possible to conclude that activities, mainly as a qualitative research resource, constituted materialities in different languages and expressions that enriched the analyses arising from micro-realities, producing a repertoire of information that supported the interpretations required for the investigative processes.

  12. NRC methods for evaluation of industry training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisseau, D.S.; Koontz, J.L.; Persensky, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    On March 20, 1985, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission published the Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. The Policy Statement endorsed the INPO-managed Training Accreditation Program because it encompasses the five elements of performance-based training. This paper described the multiple methods that the NRC is using to monitor industry efforts to improve training and implement the NRC Policy Statement on Training and Qualification. The results of the evaluation of industry training improvement programs will be reviewed by the Commissioners in April 1987 to determine the nature of continuing NRC policy and programs for ensuring effective training for the US nuclear industry

  13. Public citizen slams NRC on nuclear inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, P.

    1993-01-01

    Charging the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with open-quotes abandoning tough regulation of the nuclear power industry,close quotes Public Citizen's Critical Mass Energy Project on Wednesday released a report asserting that NRC is shielding sensitive internal nuclear industry self-evaluations from public scrutiny. Based on their review of 56 Institute of Nuclear Power Operations reports and evaluations and comparing these to the NRC's Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance reports for the same plants, it was concluded that the NRC failed to address issues raised in all eight areas evaluated by the INPO reports

  14. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 3, Development documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause events at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume III, is a detailed documentation of the development effort and the pilot training program.

  15. Impacts of NRC programs on state and local governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nussbaumer, D.A.; Lubenau, J.O.

    1983-12-01

    This document reports the results of an NRC staff examination of the impacts of NRC regulatory programs on State and local governments. Twenty NRC programs are identified. For each, the source of the program (e.g., statutory requirement) and NRC funding availability are described and the impacts upon State and local governments are assessed. Recommendations for NRC monitoring and assessing impacts and for enhancing NRC staff awareness of the impacts are offered

  16. NRC Information No. 89-89: Event notification worksheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    The NRC ''Event Notification Worksheet,'' NRC Form 361, has been revised to assist the NRC Headquarters Operations Officers in obtaining adequate information for evaluation of significant events reported to the NRC Operations Center. The new forms more accurately reflect the event classifications and the 10 CFR 50.72 categories that must be reported. A copy of the new worksheet is enclosed for your reference. NRC Form 361 can be ordered from the NRC Information and Records Management Branch

  17. A prioritization of research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittman, J.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report presents the results of the efforts in prioritizing the activities in the Office of Research. The purpose of this prioritization is to provide a basis on which to make management decisions. The report describes also the methodology and criteria upon which the priority rankings are based. Each activity was evaluated against four attributes. These attributes are: safety assurance, usefulness, appropriateness and resources. This report will be periodically revised to include the prioritization of new activities, deletion of completed activities and to reflect changes in budget allocations and projections. 3 refs., 5 figs

  18. Presentation on NRC Regulatory Positions and guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.T.

    1994-01-01

    The NRC staff recognizes the potential for enhanced safety and reliability that digital systems bring to the nuclear industry. The staff also recognizes the challenges to safety that are unique to digital systems implementation

  19. Typical NRC inspection procedures for model plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaylock, J.

    1984-01-01

    A summary of NRC inspection procedures for a model LEU fuel fabrication plant is presented. Procedures and methods for combining inventory data, seals, measurement techniques, and statistical analysis are emphasized

  20. Activities report of PTT Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the field of postal infrastructure research, activities were performed on postcode readers, radiolabels, and techniques of operations research and artificial intelligence. In the field of telecommunication, transportation, and information, research was made on multipurpose coding schemes, speech recognition, hypertext, a multimedia information server, security of electronic data interchange, document retrieval, improvement of the quality of user interfaces, domotics living support (techniques), and standardization of telecommunication prototcols. In the field of telecommunication infrastructure and provisions research, activities were performed on universal personal telecommunications, advanced broadband network technologies, coherent techniques, measurement of audio quality, near field facilities, local beam communication, local area networks, network security, coupling of broadband and narrowband integrated services digital networks, digital mapping, and standardization of protocols.

  1. The NRC weighs public input on plant cleanup standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.

    1993-01-01

    In the wake of seven public open-quotes work-shopsclose quotes held around the country over the past several months, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing to develop radiological criteria for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The criteria will apply to plants that operate for their normal lifespan, those that shut down prematurely, as well as a range of other NRC-licensed facilities, including materials licensees, fuel reprocessing and fabrication plants, and independent spent fuel storage installations. The criteria have been years in the making, and their progress is being monitored closely by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which shares with the NRC the authority to regulate radiological hazards. Both agencies have made abortive attempts to promulgate standards in the past. The EPA's most recent proposal, dating from 1986, has yet to reach the final rule stage. The NCRC's 1990 policy statement, open-quotes Below Regulatory Concern,close quotes was overturned by the Energy Policy Act of 1992, a setback that prompted the Commission's call for open-quotes enhanced participatory rulemakingclose quotes-a.k.a., public meetings-last December. In its Rulemaking Issues Paper, the NRC outlined for discussion four open-quotes fundamentalclose quotes objectives as a basis for developing decommissioning criteria: (1) establishing limits above which the risks to the public are deemed open-quotes unacceptableclose quotes; (2) establishing open-quotes goalsclose quotes below which the risks to the public are deemed open-quotes trivialclose quotes; (3) establishing criteria for what is achievable using the open-quotes best availableclose quotes cleanup technology; and (4) removing all radioactivity attributable to plant activity. The NRC expects to publish a proposed rule and a draft generic environmental impact statement in April 1994; the final rule is scheduled for May 1995

  2. NRC perspectives on the digital system review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauck, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    Since about 1988, the USNRC has been involved in the review of digital retrofits to instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in nuclear power plants. Initially, this involvement was limited but with the advent of the 1990s, NRC involvement has become greater because of increased interest in and application of digital systems as existing analog systems become obsolete. Criteria for the design of such systems to ensure safety has been promulgated over the years and the USNRC has been actively involved both nationally and internationally with this effort. With the publication of the Zion Eagle 21 Safety Evaluation Report in 1992, Generic Letter 95-02 in April 1995 which endorses EPRI guidance document TR-102348 on digital upgrades and the latest revision to Regulatory Guide 1.152 which endorses IEEE 7.4.3.2-1993; a basic digital system review process was established. The NRC supplemented this review process with recently issued inspection procedures for use by NRC inspectors when conducting onsite reviews of digital modifications. In addition, the NRC undertook a major effort to codify the above guidance and the experience gained from digital system reviews of both operating plant modifications and advanced reactor designs, over these years into a revision to Standard Review Plan, (SRP), NUREG-0800, Chapter 7, Instrumentation and Control. This SRP revision was published in June, 1997, and included new SRP sections, branch technical positions and six new regulatory guides endorsing IEEE standards on software quality. The NRC staff believes that a stable digital system review process is now in place. (author)

  3. NRC's object-oriented simulator instructor station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.I.; Griffin, J.P.

    1995-06-01

    As part of a comprehensive simulator upgrade program, the simulator computer systems associated with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) nuclear power plant simulators were replaced. Because the original instructor stations for two of the simulators were dependent on the original computer equipment, it was necessary to develop and implement new instructor stations. This report describes the Macintosh-based Instructor Stations developed by NRC engineers for the General Electric (GE) and Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) simulators

  4. Assessment of the NRC Enforcement Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.; Coblentz, L.

    1995-04-01

    On May 12, 1994, the Executive Director for Operations (EDO) established a Review Team composed of senior NRC managers to re-examine the NRC enforcement program. A copy of the Review Team's charter is enclosed as Appendix A. This report presents the Team's assessment. The purpose of this review effort are: (1) to perform an assessment of the NRC's enforcement program to determine whether the defined purposes of the enforcement program are appropriate; (2) to determine whether the NRC's enforcement practices and procedures for issuing enforcement actions are consistent with those purposes; and (3) to provide recommendations on any changes the Review Team believes advisable. In accordance with its charter, the Review Team considered the following principal issues in conducting its assessment of the enforcement program: the balance between providing deterrence and incentives (both positive and negative) for the identification and correction of violations; the appropriateness of NRC sanctions; whether the commission should seek statutory authority to increase the amount of civil penalties; whether the NRC should use different enforcement policies and practices for different licensees (e.g., materials licensees in contrast to power reactors or large fuel facilities); and whether the commission should establish open enforcement conferences as the normal practice

  5. NRC ARDC Guidance Support Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report provides a summary that reflects the progress and status of proposed regulatory design criteria for advanced non-light water reactor (LWR) designs in accordance with the Level 3 milestone M3AT-17IN2001013 in work package AT-17IN200101. These criteria have been designated as advanced reactor design criteria (ARDC) and they provide guidance to future applicants for addressing the general design criteria (GDC) that are currently applied specifically to LWR designs. This report provides a summary of Phase 2 activities related to the various tasks associated with ARDC development and the subsequent development of ARDC regulatory guidance for sodium fast reactor (SFR) and modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. Status Report Organization: Section 2 discusses the origin of the GDC and their application to LWRs. Section 3 addresses the objective of this initiative and how it benefits the advanced non-LWR reactor vendors. Section 4 discusses the scope and structure of the initiative. Section 5 provides background on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARDC team’s original development of the proposed ARDC that were submitted to the NRC for consideration. Section 6 provides a summary of recent ARDC Phase 2 activities. Appendices A through E document the DOE ARDC team’s public comments on various sections of the NRC’s draft regulatory guide DG–1330, “Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Non-Light Water Reactors.”

  6. NRC ARDC Guidance Support Status Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holbrook, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    This report provides a summary that reflects the progress and status of proposed regulatory design criteria for advanced non-light water reactor (LWR) designs in accordance with the Level 3 milestone M3AT-17IN2001013 in work package AT-17IN200101. These criteria have been designated as advanced reactor design criteria (ARDC) and they provide guidance to future applicants for addressing the general design criteria (GDC) that are currently applied specifically to LWR designs. This report provides a summary of Phase 2 activities related to the various tasks associated with ARDC development and the subsequent development of ARDC regulatory guidance for sodium fast reactor (SFR) and modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs. Status Report Organization: Section 2 discusses the origin of the GDC and their application to LWRs. Section 3 addresses the objective of this initiative and how it benefits the advanced non-LWR reactor vendors. Section 4 discusses the scope and structure of the initiative. Section 5 provides background on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ARDC team’s original development of the proposed ARDC that were submitted to the NRC for consideration. Section 6 provides a summary of recent ARDC Phase 2 activities. Appendices A through E document the DOE ARDC team’s public comments on various sections of the NRC’s draft regulatory guide DG–1330, “Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Non-Light Water Reactors.”

  7. Research activities of Sumitomo Electric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-07-01

    Research activities of Sumitomo Electric Co. are described and illustrated with numerous photographs. The ehv laboratory is provided with high voltage and heavy current testing facilities such as 1000 kV direct current testing equipment, and a 3000-kV impulse voltage generator.

  8. Inspection methods for physical protection Task III review of other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Task I of this project, the current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) position-on physical security practices and procedures at research reactors were reviewed. In the second task, a sampling of the physical security plans was presented and the three actual reactor sites described in the security plans were visited. The purpose of Task III is to review other agencies' physical security activities for research reactors. During this phase, the actions, procedures and policies of two domestic and two foreign agencies other than the NRC that relate to the research reactor community were examined. The agencies examined were: International Atomic Energy Agency; Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board; Department of Energy; and American Nuclear Insurers

  9. Recommendations for NEAMS Engagement with the NRC: Preliminary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernholdt, David E.

    2012-01-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring a new generation of analytic tools to the nuclear engineering community in order to facilitate students, faculty, industry and laboratory researchers in investigating advanced reactor and fuel cycle designs. Although primarily targeting at advance nuclear technologies, it is anticipated that these new capabilities will also become interesting and useful to the nuclear regulator Consequently, the NEAMS program needs to engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the software is being developed to ensure that they are familiar with and ready to respond to this novel approach when the need arises. Through discussions between key NEAMS and NRC staff members, we tentatively recommend annual briefings to the Division of Systems Analysis in the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. However the NEAC subcommittee review of the NEAMS program may yield recommendations that would need to be considered before finalizing this plan.

  10. Recommendations for NEAMS Engagement with the NRC: Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring a new generation of analytic tools to the nuclear engineering community in order to facilitate students, faculty, industry and laboratory researchers in investigating advanced reactor and fuel cycle designs. Although primarily targeting at advance nuclear technologies, it is anticipated that these new capabilities will also become interesting and useful to the nuclear regulator Consequently, the NEAMS program needs to engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the software is being developed to ensure that they are familiar with and ready to respond to this novel approach when the need arises. Through discussions between key NEAMS and NRC staff members, we tentatively recommend annual briefings to the Division of Systems Analysis in the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. However the NEAC subcommittee review of the NEAMS program may yield recommendations that would need to be considered before finalizing this plan.

  11. Occupational radiation exposures at NRC-licensed facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    For the past ten years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its predecessor, the Atomic Energy Commission, have required certain licensees to routinely submit two types of occupational radiation exposure reports: termination and annual reports. Each licensee engaged in any one of the activities: (1) operation of nuclear power reactors, (2) industrial radiography, (3) fuel fabrication, processing and reprocessing, and (4) large supply of byproduct material, is required to submit an annual statistical report and a termination report for each monitored employee who ends his employment or work assignment. A new regulation now requires all NRC licensees to submit annual reports for the years 1978 and 1979. These reports have been collected, computerized and maintained by the Commission at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. They are useful to the NRC in the evaluation of the risk of radiation exposure associated with the related activities. (author)

  12. NRC regulatory agenda: Quarterly report, April-June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. General administrative activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottrell, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Significant safety-related activities reported during March and April, which are not covered elsewhere in this issue, are summarized here. The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) issued several reports on a variety of topics of current concern to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A recent NRC draft report identifies preliminary ranking of safety issues. The NRC is establishing a new Office of Investigations. The NRC also released a list of plants now under construction which it suspects will be canceled or indefinitely deferred. Four speeches by NRC Commissioners are summarized, as is the only Research Information Letter issued during the report period. Last is a listing of a variety of safety-related topics

  14. NRC policy on future reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-07-01

    On April 13, 1983, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued for public comment a ''Proposed Commission Policy Statement on Severe Accidents and Related Views on Nuclear Reactor Regulation'' (48 FR 16014). This report presents and discusses the Commission's final version of that policy statement now entitled, ''Policy Statement on Severe Reactor Accidents Regarding Future Designs and Existing Plants.'' It provides an overview of comments received from the public and the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and the staff response to these. In addition to the Policy Statement, the report discusses how the policies of this statement relate to other NRC programs including the Severe Accident Research Program; the implementation of safety measures resulting from lessons learned in the accident at Three Mile Island; safety goal development; the resolution of Unresolved Safety Issues and other Generic Safety Issues; and possible revisions of rules or regulatory requirements resulting from the Severe Accident Source Term Program. Also discussed are the main features of a generic decision strategy for resolving Regulatory Questions and Technical Issues relating to severe accidents; the development and regulatory use of new safety information; the treatment of uncertainty in severe accident decision making; and the development and implementation of a Systems Reliability Program for both existing and future plants to ensure that the realized level of safety is commensurate with the safety analyses used in regulatory decisions

  15. Applications of probabilistic techniques at NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thadani, A.; Rowsome, F.; Speis, T.

    1984-01-01

    The NRC is currently making extensive use of probabilistic safety assessment in the reactor regulation. Most of these applications have been introduced in the regulatory activities in the past few years. Plant Probabilistic Safety Studies are being utilized as a design tool for applications for standard designs and for assessment of plants located in regions of particularly high population density. There is considerable motivation for licenses to perform plant-specific probabilistic studies for many, if not all, of the existing operating nuclear power plants as a tool for prioritizing the implementation of the many outstanding licensing actions of these plants as well as recommending the elimination of a number of these issues which are judged to be insignificant in terms of their contribution to safety and risk. Risk assessment perspectives are being used in the priorization of generic safety issues, development of technical resolution of unresolved safety issues, assessing safety significance of proposed new regulatory requirements, assessment of safety significance of some of the occurrences at operating facilities and in environmental impact analyses of license applicants as required by the National Environmental Policy Act. (orig.)

  16. 10 CFR 2.709 - Discovery against NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discovery against NRC staff. 2.709 Section 2.709 Energy... Rules for Formal Adjudications § 2.709 Discovery against NRC staff. (a)(1) In a proceeding in which the NRC staff is a party, the NRC staff will make available one or more witnesses, designated by the...

  17. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained......BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  18. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, H.L.; Larsen, B.; Ingwersen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched...... Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained....... RESULTS: 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry...

  19. NRC approach to evaluating training effectiveness in accordance with the policy statement on training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persensky, J.J.; Blumer, A.H.

    1985-01-01

    The activity of the past two years has provided an opportunity for the NRC to examine and realign the way in which it views the training process. In the process, it has provided the industry with an incentive to emphasize training as an opportunity for enlightened self-regulation. As a result, the NRC and industry perspectives on training have, for all intents and purposes, merged into a single performance orientation. This cooperation should provide the needed momentum towards improvements in training effectiveness. It is the NRC's goal to monitor this momentum and to encourage progress toward the ideal of systematic, performance-based training for all essential personnel in the nuclear industry

  20. NRC nuclear-plant-analyzer concept and status at INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, F.; Wagner, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    The Office of Research of the US NRC has proposed development of a software-hardware system called the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA). This paper describes how we of the INEL envision the nuclear-plant analyzer. The paper also describes a pilot RELAP5 plant-analyzer project completed during the past year and current work. A great deal of analysis is underway to determine nuclear-steam-system response. System transient analysis being so complex, there is the need to present analytical results in a way that interconnections among phenomena and all the nuances of the transient are apparent. There is the need for the analyst to dynamically control system calculations to simulate plant operation in order to perform what if studies as well as the need to perform system analysis within hours of a plant emergency to diagnose the state of the stricken plant and formulate recovery actions. The NRC-proposed nuclear-plant analyzer can meet these needs

  1. Fusion research activities in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xiwen

    1998-01-01

    The fusion program in China has been executed in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion for more than 30 years. Basing on the situation of the power supply requirements of China, the fusion program is becoming an important and vital component of the nuclear power program in China. This paper reviews the status of fusion research and next step plans in China. The motivation and goal of the Chinese fusion program is explained. Research and development on tokamak physics and engineering in the southwestern institute of physics (SWIP) and the institute of plasma physics of Academic Sinica (ASIPP) are introduced. A fusion breeder program and a pure fusion reactor design program have been supported by the state science and technology commission (SSTC) and the China national nuclear corporation (CNNC), respectively. Some features and progress of fusion reactor R and D activities are reviewed. Non fusion applications of plasma science are an important part of China fusion research; a brief introduction about this area is given. Finally, an introductional collaboration network on fusion research activities in China is reported. (orig.)

  2. Shift technical advisors: in the eyes of the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocker, L.P.

    1981-01-01

    Since January 1, 1980, the NRC has required that Shift Technical Advisors be on-shift at all operating nuclear power plants. The objective of the requirement is to assure that technical expertise is immediately available to each operating shift to assess off-normal events and to provide advice to control room personnel. Further, this advice and assistance is to be provided by an individual not responsible for control manipulations or for directing the activities of reactor operators. The long-term requirement for on-shift technical expertise is firm. However, the exact manner in which this expertise must be furnished has not been determined. Licensees have proposed various alternatives to meet this requirement. These proposals still are being reviewed by the NRC staff

  3. Overview of the NRC performance monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, E.L.

    1987-01-01

    In response to the accident at Three Mile Island, the NRC developed the Systematic Assessment of Licensee Performance (SALP) Program to aid in the identification of those licensees that were more likely than others to have safety problems and to provide a rational basis for allocation of inspection resources. The NRC also has an ongoing program of screening and evaluating operating reactor event reports on a daily basis for promptly identifying safety problems. Although the SALP and event report evaluation programs have been successful in identifying potential performance problems, a concern developed recently about the adequacy and timeliness of NRC programs to detect poor or declining performance. The performance indicator program as approved by the commission is in the implementation phase. The program is expected to undergo refinements as new indicators are developed and experience is gained in the use of indicators

  4. NRC licensing criteria for portable radwaste systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, J.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The shortcomings of various components of the liquid and solid radwaste systems at nuclear power reactors has resulted in the contracting of the functions performed by these systems to various contractors who utilize portable equipment. In addition, some streams, for which treatment was not originally anticipated, have been processed by portable equipment. The NRC criteria applicable to portable liquid and solid radwaste systems is presented along with discussion on what is required to provide an adequate 10 CFR Part 50.59 review for those situations where changes are made to an existing system. The criteria the NRC is considering for facilities which may intend to utilize portable incinerators is also presented

  5. NRC program of inspection and enforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeDoux, J.C.; Rehfuss, C.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates civilian uses of nuclear materials to ensure the protection of the public health and safety and the environment. The Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE) develops and implements the inspection, investigation, and enforcement programs for the NRC. The IE conducts inspection programs for reactors under construction and in operation, nuclear industry vendors, fuel facilities and users of nuclear materials, and all aspects of the safeguarding of facilities and materials. Recently the IE began implementing a program that will place inspectors on site at nuclear power reactors and will provide for national appraisal of licensee performance and for an evaluation of the effectiveness of the inspection programs

  6. Medical issues and research activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orecchia, R.; Solcia, E.; Fossati, P.

    2006-01-01

    We want to report on the CNAO Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) Foundation activity aiming to create the clinical conditions that will enable CNAO to work in the most advantageous way. CNAO Foundation is taking care to inform the population, patients and medical community on the existence, potentiality and limits of hadrontherapy. To achieve this goal it has created a website that gives general information on hadrontherapy and a medical service that advises on specific clinical cases; it has moreover promoted seminars and courses for residents and specialists. Disease specific working groups have been created to define protocols on patients selection criteria, indications, dose and fractionation and to design clinical trials that will be carried out at CNAO. These protocols and trials are a working tool that will permit a more rational clinical activity. CNAO Foundation is promoting training of personnel that will work at CNAO and in the next few months physicians and physicists will be send abroad to learn the practical aspects of hadrontherapy in foreign facilities where hadrons are already in clinical use. CNAO Foundation is sponsoring research activity in the fields of precision patient positioning, organ motion management, in vivo dosimetry with in room positron emission tomography (PET) scan and radiobiology. These activities will help to take full advantage of the facility under construction and to better define the role of hadrontherapy in cancer care. (author)

  7. Overview of the NRC nuclear waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaro, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    The NRC has firmly established waste management as a high-priority effort and has made the commitment to act rapidly and methodically to establish a sound regulatory base for licensing waste management activities. We believe the priorities for NRC work in waste management are consistent with the needs of the overall national waste management program. Present licensing procedures and criteria are adequate for the short term, and priority attention is being given to the longer term, when the quantities of waste to be managed will be greater and licensing demands will increase. Recognizing that its decision will affect industry, other governmental jurisdictions, private interest groups, and the public at large, NRC has encouraged and will continue to encourage their participation in planning our program. We also recognize that the problems of nuclear waste management are international in scope. Many waste management problems (e.g., potential for contamination of oceans and atmosphere, need for isolation of some wastes for longer periods than governments and political boundaries have remained stable in the past), require a set of internationally acceptable and accepted solutions. The wastes from the U.S. nuclear industry will account for only about one third of the nuclear waste generated in the world. Therefore, we propose to cooperate and where appropriate take the lead in establishing acceptable worldwide policies, standards and procedures for handling nuclear wastes

  8. NRC Support for the Kalinin (VVER) probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bley, D.; Diamond, D.J.; Chu, T.L.; Azarm, A.; Pratt, W.T.; Johnson, D.; Szukiewicz, A.; Drouin, M.; El-Bassioni, A.; Su, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of the Russian Federation have been working together since 1994 to carry out a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a VVER-1000 in the Russian Federation. This was a recognition by both parties that this technology has had a profound effect on the discipline of nuclear reactor safety in the West and that the technology should be transferred to others so that it can be applied to Soviet-designed plants. The NRC provided funds from the Agency for International Development and technical support primarily through Brookhaven National Laboratory and its subcontractors. The latter support was carried out through workshops, by documenting the methodology to be used in a set of guides, and through periodic review of the technical activity. The result of this effort to date includes a set of procedure guides, a draft final report on the Level 1 PRA for internal events (excluding internal fires and floods), and progress reports on the fire, flood, and seismic analysis. It is the authors belief that the type of assistance provided by the NRC has been instrumental in assuring a quality product and transferring important technology for use by regulators and operators of Soviet-designed reactors. After a thorough review, the report will be finalized, lessons learned will be applied in the regulatory and operational regimes in the Russian Federation, and consideration will be given to supporting a containment analysis in order to complete a simplified Level 2 PRA

  9. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  10. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC's Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff's current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff's uses of PRA

  11. Nuclear plant aging research program activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissenberg, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this program is to provide recommendations for use by NRC regarding the availability and capability of diagnostic methods for assuring the operational readiness of NPP safety systems and components

  12. Thorium research activities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasa, Toshinobu

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear energy policy in Japan is based on the Uranium-Plutonium fuel cycle with Light Water Reactors (LWR) and Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR). After the accident at Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, the Japanese government recognizes the importance to ensure the flexibility for future nuclear power generation and then, it was specified in the latest Japanese strategic energy plan. Two research groups related to thorium fuelled nuclear systems and fuel cycle was set up in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan in 2013. One is a 'Research Committee on Nuclear Applications of Molten Salt'. The committee was established to discuss the current molten-salt technology including molten-salt cooled reactor, molten-salt fuelled reactor, accelerator driven system, fusion reactor blankets and dry reprocessing processes. Throughout two years discussion, the committee summarizes a current state of the art and issues of molten-salt application systems. Committee also discussed the handling technologies for molten-salt reactors especially in China and United Kingdom, issues of molten-salt application to fusion reactor, dry reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, and non-nuclear application of molten-salt. Term of the committee will be extended for further research activities

  13. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    Title 44 US Code, ''Public Printing and Documents,'' regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ''Management and Use of Information and Records,'' and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ''Records Management,'' require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA's General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ''NRC's Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,'' and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA's General Records Schedule (dated August 1995)

  14. Abstracts: NRC Waste Management Program reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckman, R.A.; Minichino, C.

    1979-11-01

    This document consists of abstracts of all reports published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). It will be updated at regular intervals. Reports are arranged in numerical order, within each category. Unless otherwise specified, authors are LLL scientists and engineers.

  15. Abstracts: NRC Waste Management Program reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.A.; Minichino, C.

    1979-11-01

    This document consists of abstracts of all reports published by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Waste Management Program at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). It will be updated at regular intervals. Reports are arranged in numerical order, within each category. Unless otherwise specified, authors are LLL scientists and engineers

  16. 77 FR 33786 - NRC Enforcement Policy Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... methods: Federal Rulemaking Web site: Go to http://www.regulations.gov and search for Docket ID NRC-2011... search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems... either 2.3.2.a. or b. must be met for the disposition of a violation as an NCV.'' The following new...

  17. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1994-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1993. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  18. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1993-03-01

    This report present the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1992. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  19. 48 CFR 2009.100 - NRC policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... noncompetitive award of contracts to organizations where former NRC employees have dominant management interests...) Contracts awarded noncompetitively under the Small Business Administration's 8(a) Program; (2) Individual... consulting with the Executive Director for Operations. This is in addition to any justification and approvals...

  20. 76 FR 48919 - NRC Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    .... In all such cases when a licensee determines that an unplanned change during construction associated..., States, members of the public, and the regulated industry (i.e., reactor and materials licensees, vendors, and contractors), on construction-related topics addressed in this notice that the NRC staff is...

  1. NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    Title 44 US Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ``Management and Use of Information and Records,`` and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA`s General Records Schedule (dated August 1995).

  2. [Research activity in clinical biochemistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Henrik L; Larsen, Birger; Ingwersen, Peter; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2008-09-01

    Quantitative bibliometric measurements of research activity are frequently used, e.g. for evaluating applicants for academic positions. The purpose of this investigation is to assess research activity within the medical speciality of Clinical Biochemistry by comparing it with a matched control group from other medical specialities in Denmark. A list of all physicians registered in Denmark (23,127 persons) was drawn from the database "Laeger.dk". Of these, 5,202 were generalists (not included) while 11,691 were from other specialities. Of the 126 specialists from Clinical Biochemistry, 57 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Each of these 57 was matched according to medical title with two randomly chosen specialists from other specialities, totaling 114. Using Medline and the Web of Science, the number of publications and the number of citations were then ascertained. 25% of the 11,691 specialists held a PhD degree or doctoral degree, DMSci, (Clinical Biochemistry: 61%). The 171 specialists included in the study had 9,823 papers in Medline and 10,140 papers in the Web of Science. The number of Medline papers per specialist was 71 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 51 for the control group. The number of citations per specialist was 1,844 for Clinical Biochemistry compared to 816 for the control group. The top ten H-indices (of which 8 were in Clinical Biochemistry) ranged from 30 to 69. Both the number of papers and the number of citations were higher for Clinical Biochemistry than for the control group. The difference was most pronounced among professors.

  3. Clean Coal Program Research Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Baxter; Eric Eddings; Thomas Fletcher; Kerry Kelly; JoAnn Lighty; Ronald Pugmire; Adel Sarofim; Geoffrey Silcox; Phillip Smith; Jeremy Thornock; Jost Wendt; Kevin Whitty

    2009-03-31

    Although remarkable progress has been made in developing technologies for the clean and efficient utilization of coal, the biggest challenge in the utilization of coal is still the protection of the environment. Specifically, electric utilities face increasingly stringent restriction on the emissions of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}, new mercury emission standards, and mounting pressure for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, an environmental challenge that is greater than any they have previously faced. The Utah Clean Coal Program addressed issues related to innovations for existing power plants including retrofit technologies for carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) or green field plants with CCS. The Program focused on the following areas: simulation, mercury control, oxycoal combustion, gasification, sequestration, chemical looping combustion, materials investigations and student research experiences. The goal of this program was to begin to integrate the experimental and simulation activities and to partner with NETL researchers to integrate the Program's results with those at NETL, using simulation as the vehicle for integration and innovation. The investigators also committed to training students in coal utilization technology tuned to the environmental constraints that we face in the future; to this end the Program supported approximately 12 graduate students toward the completion of their graduate degree in addition to numerous undergraduate students. With the increased importance of coal for energy independence, training of graduate and undergraduate students in the development of new technologies is critical.

  4. Information to licensees regarding two NRC Inspection Manual sections on resolution of degraded and nonconforming conditions and on operability (Generic Letter 91-18)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partlow, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    The NRC staff has issued two sections to be included in Part 9900, Technical Guidance, of the NRC Inspection Manual. The first is, ''Resolution of Degraded and Nonconforming Conditions.'' The second is, ''Operable/Operability: Ensuring the Functional Capability of a System or Component.'' Copies of the additions to the NRC Inspection Manual are provided for information only. No specific licensee actions are required. The additions to the NRC Inspection Manual are based upon previously issued guidance. However, because of the complexity involved in operability determinations and the resolution of degraded and nonconforming conditions, there have been differences in application by NRC staff during past inspection activities. Thus, the purpose of publishing this guidance is to ensure consistency in application of this guidance by the NRC. Regional inspection personnel have been briefed on this guidance. The NRC will conduct further training on these topics to ensure uniform staff understanding

  5. NRC Regulatory Agenda: Quarterly report, October--December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules which the NRC has proposed or is considering action on, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission

  6. 10 CFR 2.1505 - Role of the NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Role of the NRC staff. 2.1505 Section 2.1505 Energy... Legislative Hearings § 2.1505 Role of the NRC staff. The NRC staff shall be available to answer any Commission or presiding officer's questions on staff-prepared documents, provide additional information or...

  7. 10 CFR 51.40 - Consultation with NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Consultation with NRC staff. 51.40 Section 51.40 Energy....40 Consultation with NRC staff. (a) A prospective applicant or petitioner for rulemaking is encouraged to confer with NRC staff as early as possible in its planning process before submitting...

  8. Review of NRC Regulatory processes and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has spent much time over many years observing and examining the NRC licensing process. The Committee is, consequently, in a position to comment on the situation, and it believes this review will be helpful to those examining the regulatory process by discussing how it works, where it is weak, and the opportunities for improvement. The Committee's review may also help put current proposals and discussions in perspective

  9. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1991-04-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1990. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. NRC's limit on intake of uranium-ore dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, S.A.

    1983-04-01

    In 1960 the Atomic Energy Commission adopted an interim limit on the intake by inhalation of airborne uranium-ore dust. This report culminates two decades of research aimed at establishing the adequacy of that limit. The report concludes that the AEC underestimated the time that thorium-230, a constituent of uranium-ore dust, would remain in the human lung. The AEC assumed that thorium-230 in ore dust would behave like uranium with a 120-day biological half-life in the lung. This report concludes that the biological half-life is actually on the order of 1 year. Correcting the AEC's underestimate would cause a reduction in the permitted airborne concentration of uranium-ore dust. However, another factor that cancels the need for that reduction was found. The uranium ore dust in uranium mills was found to occur with very large particle sizes (10-micron activity median aerodynamic diameter). The particles are so large that relatively few of them are deposited in the pulmonary region of the lung, where they would be subject to long-term retention. Instead they are trapped in the upper regions of the respiratory tract, subsequently swallowed, and then rapidly excreted from the body through the gastrointestinal tract. The two effects are of about the same magnitude but in opposing directions. Thus the present uranium-ore dust intake limit in NRC regulations should provide a level of protection consistent with that provided for other airborne radioactive materials. The report recalculates the limit on intake of uranium-ore dust using the derived air concentrations (DAC) from the International Commission on Radiological Protection's recent Publication 30. The report concludes that the silica contained in uranium-ore dust is a greater hazard to workers than the radiological hazard

  11. Development of the NRC`s Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP). Volume 2, Investigators`s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradies, M.; Unger, L. [System Improvements, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Haas, P.; Terranova, M. [Concord Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The three volumes of this report detail a standard investigation process for use by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) personnel when investigating human performance related events at nuclear power plants. The process, called the Human Performance Investigation Process (HPIP), was developed to meet the special needs of NRC personnel, especially NRC resident and regional inspectors. HPIP is a systematic investigation process combining current procedures and field practices, expert experience, NRC human performance research, and applicable investigation techniques. The process is easy to learn and helps NRC personnel perform better field investigations of the root causes of human performance problems. The human performance data gathered through such investigations provides a better understanding of the human performance issues that cause event at nuclear power plants. This document, Volume II, is a field manual for use by investigators when performing event investigations. Volume II includes the HPIP Procedure, the HPIP Modules, and Appendices that provide extensive documentation of each investigation technique.

  12. Nuclear regulation. NRC's security clearance program can be strengthened

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fultz, Keith O.; Kruslicky, Mary Ann; Bagnulo, John E.

    1988-12-01

    Because of the national security implications of its programs, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) investigates the background of its employees and consultants as well as others to ensure that they are reliable and trustworthy. If the investigation indicates that an employee will not endanger national security, NRC grants a security clearance that allows access to classified information, material, and facilities. NRC also requires periodic checks for some clearance holders to ensure their continued clearance eligibility. The Chairman, Subcommittee on Environment, Energy, and Natural Resources, House Committee on Government Operations, asked GAO to review NRC's personnel security clearance program and assess the procedures that NRC uses to ensure that those who operate nuclear power plants do not pose a threat to the public. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 requires NRC to conduct background investigations of its employees and consultants as well as others who have access to classified information, material, or facilities. To do this, NRC established a personnel security clearance program. Under NRC policies, a security clearance is granted after the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) or the Federal Bureau of Investigation checks the background of those applying for an NRC clearance. NRC also periodically reassesses the integrity of those holding the highest level clearance. NRC employees, consultants, contractors, and licensees as well as other federal employees hold approximately 10,600 NRC clearances. NRC does not grant clearances to commercial nuclear utility employees unless they require access to classified information or special nuclear material. However, the utilities have voluntarily established screening programs to ensure that their employees do not pose a threat to nuclear plants. NRC faces a dilemma when it hires new employees. Although its policy calls for new hires to be cleared before they start work, the security clearance process takes so long

  13. NRC study of control room habitability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, J.J. Jr.; Muller, D.R.; Gammill, W.P.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1980, the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has held several meetings with the NRC staff to discuss the subject of control room habitability. Several meetings between the ACRS and the staff have resulted in ACRS letters that express specific concerns, and the staff has provided responses in reports and meetings. In June of 1983, the NRC Executive Director for Operations directed the Offices of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and Inspection and Enforcement to develop a plan to handle the issues raised by the ACRS and to report to him specific proposed courses of action to respond to the ACRS's concerns. The NRC control room habitability working group has reviewed the subject in such areas as NRR review process, transformation of control room habitability designs to as-built systems, and determination of testing protocol. The group has determined that many of the ACRS concerns and recommendations are well founded, and has recommended actions to be taken to address these as well as other concerns which were raised independent of the ACRS. The review has revealed significant areas where the approach presently utilized in reviews should be altered

  14. NRC perspective on alternative disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittiglio, C.L.; Tokar, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper is discussed an NRC staff strategy for the development of technical criteria and procedures for the licensing of various alternatives for disposal of low-level radioactive waste. Steps taken by the staff to identify viable alternative disposal methods and to comply with the requirements of the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act (LLRWPAA) of 1985 are also discussed. The strategy proposed by the NRC staff is to focus efforts in FY 87 on alternative concepts that incorporate concrete materials with soil or rock cover (e.g., below ground vaults and earth-mounded concrete bunkers), which several State and State Compacts have identified as preferred disposal options. While the NRC staff believes that other options, such as above ground vaults and mined cavities, are workable and licensable, the staff also believes, for reasons addressed in the paper, that it is in the best interest of the industry and the public to encourage standardization and to focus limited resources on a manageable number of alternative options. Therefore, guidance on above ground vaults, which are susceptible to long-term materials degradation due to climatological effects, and mined cavities, which represent a significant departure from the current experience base for low-level radioactive waste disposal, will receive minimal attention. 6 references

  15. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1992-06-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network is operated by the NRC in cooperation with participating states to provide continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. Ambient radiation levels result from naturally occurring radionuclides present in the soil, cosmic radiation constantly bombarding the earth from outer space, and the contribution, if any, from the monitored facilities and other man-made sources. The Network is intended to measure radiation levels during routine facility operations and to establish background radiation levels used to assess the radiological impact of an unusual condition, such as an accident. This report presents the radiation levels measured around all facilities in the Network for the first quarter of 1992. All radiation measurements are made using small, passive detectors called thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which provide a quantitative measurement of the radiation levels in the area in which they are placed. Each site is monitored by arranging approximately 40 to 50 TLD stations in two concentric rings extending to about five miles from the facility. All TLD stations are outside the site boundary of the facility

  16. ETSON strategic orientations on research activities. ETSON research group activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dorseelaere, J.P.; Barrachin, M. [IRSN, Saint Paul les Durance (France). Centre de Cadarache; Millington, D. [Wood RSD, Warrington (United Kingdom); and others

    2018-01-15

    In 2011, ETSON published the ''Position Paper of the Technical Safety Organizations: Research Needs in Nuclear Safety for Gen 2 and Gen 3 NPPs''. This paper, published only a few months after the Fukushima-Daiichi severe accidents, presented the priorities for R and D on the main pending safety issues. It was produced by the ETSON Research Group (ERG) that has the mandate of identifying and prioritizing safety research needs, sharing information on research projects in which ETSON members are involved, defining and launching new research projects and disseminating knowledge among ETSON members. Six years after this publication, many R and D international projects finished in diverse frames, and other ones have started. In particular a lot of work was done (and is going on..) on the analysis of the Fukushima-Daiichi severe accidents. Meanwhile a roadmap on research on Gen. 2 and 3 nuclear power plants (NPP), including safety aspects, was produced by the NUGENIA association, followed by a more detailed document as ''NUGENIA global vision''. It was also demonstrated that the ETSON R and D priorities were consistent with the implementation of the 2014 Euratom Directive on safety of nuclear installations.

  17. The NRC perspective on low-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.L. Jr.; Knapp, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) actions in response to the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act (the Act) and NRC's assistance to States and Compacts working to discharge their responsibilities under the Act. Three of NRC's accomplishments which respond explicitly to direction in the Act are highlighted. These are: development of the capability of expedited handling of petitions addressing wastes below regulatory concern (BRC); development of capability to review and process an application within fifteen months; and development of guidance on alternatives to shallow land burial. Certain NRC efforts concerning special topics related to the Act as well as NRC efforts to assist States and Compacts are summarized

  18. NRC assessment of the high-level waste repository quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    As part of its licensing responsibilities, the NRC is independently reviewing the DOE quality assurance program applied to the site characterization phase activities. Data collected and other information generated during this phase of the program will ultimately be used in a license application to demonstrate the suitability of one site for long-term isolation of waste. They must therefore fall under the quality assurance program to provide confidence in their adequacy. This NRC review consists of three main activities: development of staff guidance on quality assurance measures appropriate for site characterization activities; review of DOE QA plans and procedures; and audits and other reviews of the implementation of the program

  19. Annual report on the activities of National Reference Centers established on the basis of regional public health authorities of the Slovak Republic and the Office of Public Health of the Slovak Republic in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the National Reference Centers (NRC) established on the basis of regional public health authorities of the Slovak Republic and the Office of Public Health of the Slovak Republic in 2009 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) NRC for influenza; (2) NRC for arbovirus and hemorrhagic fever; (3) NRC for poliomyelitis; (4) NRC for meningococci; (5) NRC to monitor the resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics; (6) NRC for evaluation of late effects of chemical substances, methods of genetic toxicology; (7) NRC for hydrobiology; (8) NRC for ecotoxicology; (9) NRC for non-ionizing radiation; (10) NRC for hydrothermal microclimate; (11) NRC for exposure tests xenobiotics; (12) NRC for morbilli, rubella and parotitis; (13) NRC for environmental microbiology; (14) NRC on pesticide residues; (15) NRC for salmonella; (16) NRC health issues for urban air pollution; (17) NRC for microbial autovaccines; (18) NRC for noise and vibration; (19) Information Center for bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons; (20) NRC for impact assessment of ambient air and air of enclosed spaces non-productive nature of population health; (21) NRC for toxoplasmosis; (22) NRC for exposure assessment and health risk; (23) NRC for pertussis and parapertussis; (24) NRC for syphilis; (25) NRC for hygienic drinking water problems; (26) NRC for listeriosis; (27) NRC for intestinal parasitosis; (28) NRC for diphtheria; (29) NRC for vibrionaceae; (30) NRC for environmental mycology; (31) NRC issues for fibrous dusts; (32) NRC for thermotolerant amoebae; (33) NRC issues for coal mines; (34) NRC for articles of daily use and packing materials; (35) NRC for haemophilus infections; (36) NRC for Legionella in the environment.

  20. Annual report on the activities of National Reference Centers established on the basis of regional public health authorities of the Slovak Republic and the Office of Public Health of the Slovak Republic in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    A brief account of activities carried out by the National Reference Centers (NRC) established on the basis of regional public health authorities of the Slovak Republic and the Office of Public Health of the Slovak Republic in 2008 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) NRC for influenza; (2) NRC for arbovirus and hemorrhagic fever; (3) NRC for poliomyelitis; (4) NRC for meningococci; (5) NRC to monitor the resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics; (6) NRC for evaluation of late effects of chemical substances, methods of genetic toxicology; (7) NRC for hydrobiology; (8) NRC for ecotoxicology; (9) NRC for non-ionizing radiation; (10) NRC for hydrothermal microclimate; (11) NRC for exposure tests xenobiotics; (12) NRC for morbilli, rubella and parotitis; (13) NRC for environmental microbiology; (14) NRC on pesticide residues; (15) NRC for salmonella; (16) NRC for microbial autovaccines; (17) NRC health issues for urban air pollution; (18) NRC for noise and vibration; (19) Information Center for bacteriological (biological) and toxin weapons; (20) NRC for impact assessment of ambient air and air of enclosed spaces non-productive nature of population health; (21) NRC for toxoplasmosis; (22) NRC for exposure assessment and health risk; (23) NRC for pertussis and parapertussis; (24) NRC for syphilis; (25) NRC for hygienic drinking water problems; (26) NRC for listeriosis; (27) NRC for intestinal parasitosis; (28) NRC for diphtheria; (29) NRC for vibrionaceae; (30) NRC for environmental mycology; (31) NRC issues for fibrous dusts; (32) NRC for thermotolerant amoebae; (33) NRC issues for coal mines; (34) NRC for packaging materials; (35) NRC for haemophilus infections; (36) NRC for Legionella.

  1. Active Learning in Aging Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singelis, Theodore M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the involvement of undergraduate students in research at the California State University (CSU), Chico funded through an Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). CSU, Chico is a "teaching" university and has students with a variety of motivations and abilities. The…

  2. Tritium research activities in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Ki Jung, E-mail: kjjung@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun, E-mail: shyun@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Min Ho; Kang, Hyun-Goo; Chung, Dongyou; Cho, Seungyon; Lee, Hyeon Gon [National Fusion Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hongsuk; Choi, Woo-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kyu-Min; Moon, Chang-Bae [Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Euy Soo [Dongguk University, Jung-gu, Seoul, 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jungho; Kim, Dong-Sun [Kongju National University, Cheonan, Chungnam, 330-717 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hung-Man [Daesung Industrial Gases Co., Ltd., Danwon-gu, Ansan-si, Gyeonggi-do, 425-090 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Seung Jeong [Dankook University, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ju, Hyunchul [Inha University, Nam-gu, Incheon, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Tae-Whan [Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju, Chungbuk, 380-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • NFRI, KAERI and KHNP CRI are major leading group for the ITER tritium SDS design; studying engineering, simulation of hydride bed, risk analysis (on safety, HAZOP), basic study, control logic & sequential operation, and others. KHNP has WTRF which gives favorable experiences for collaboration researchers. • Supplementary research partners: Five Universities (Dongguk University and POSTECH, Inha University, Dankook University, Korea National Transport University, and Kongju National University) and one industrial company (Daesung Industrial Gases Co., Ltd.); studying on basic and engineering, programming & simulation on the various topics for ITER tritium SDS, TEP, ISS, ADS, and etc. - Abstract: Major progress in tritium research in the Republic of Korea began when Korea became responsible for ITER tritium Storage and Delivery System (SDS) procurement package which is part of the ITER Fuel Cycle. To deliver the tritium SDS package, a variety of research institutes, universities and industry have respectively taken roles and responsibilities in developing technologies that have led to significant progress. This paper presents the current work and status of tritium related technological research and development (R&D) in Korea and introduces future R&D plans in the area of fuel cycle systems for fusion power generation.

  3. Grinding the Antitesting Ax: More Bias than Evidence behind NRC Panel's Conclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    In all the acrimonious discussion surrounding No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), surprisingly little attention has been given to the actual impact of that legislation and other accountability systems on student performance. Now a reputable body, a committee set up by the National Research Council (NRC), the research arm of the National…

  4. Funding for reactor decommissioning: the NRC perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The cost of decommissioning a nuclear power plant is discussed. Four funding approaches that have received the most attention from the NRC are: prepayment into a trust fund of estimated decommissioning funds at the start of facility operation; annual contributions into a trust fund outside the control of the utility over the estimated life of a facility; internal reserve or sinking fund amortizations over the estimated life of a facility; and insurance or other surety mechanisms used separately or in conjunction with any of the first three mechanisms

  5. The Geotechnical Board National Research Council. [Annual] activities report, March 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeallie, P.H.

    1993-08-11

    This report covers the activities of the Geotechnical Board and its two national committees, the US National Committee for Rock Mechanics (USNC/RM) and the US National Committee on Tunneling Technology (USNC/TT), for the period from March 1, 1991 to June 30, 1992. The report covers a 16-month period, through June of this year, to bring the reporting period in line with the National Research Council`s (NRC) fiscal year. Subsequent reports will cover the 12-month period July 1--June 30, unless individual contracts require otherwise. A description of the Geotechnical Board and its committees within the context of the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council, as well as lists of current members of the board and national committees can be found in Attachment A.

  6. NRC Perspectives on Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Consultations and Monitoring - 13398

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Christepher A.; Suber, Gregory F.; Felsher, Harry D.; Mohseni, Aby [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Mail Stop T8F5, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste (HLW) determinations. The NDAA also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations to assess compliance with NRC regulations in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. The NDAA applies to DOE activities that will remain within the States of South Carolina and Idaho. DOE has chosen to, under DOE Order 435.1, engage in consultation with NRC for similar activities in the State of Washington and New York, however, the NRC has no monitoring responsibilities. In 2007, the NRC developed a draft Final Report for Interim Use entitled, NUREG-1854: NRC Staff Guidance for Activities Related to U.S. Department of Energy Waste Determinations. Since the law was enacted, the DOE and NRC have consulted on three waste determinations within the affected States: (1) the Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) within the State of South Carolina in 2005, (2) the INTEC Tank Farm at the Idaho National Laboratory within the State of Idaho in 2006, and (3) the F Tank Farm at SRS in 2011. After the end of consultation and issuance by DOE of the final waste determination, monitoring began at each of these sites, including the development of monitoring plans. In addition to the NDAA sites, DOE has requested NRC consultation support on both individual tanks and the entire C Tank Farm at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the State of Washington. DOE also requested consultation of waste determinations performed on the melter and related feed tanks at the West Valley site in New York that would be disposed offsite. In the next few years, NRC and DOE will consult on the last of the NDAA waste determinations for a while, the H Tank Farm waste determination at SRS. DOE may identify other activities in the future but

  7. NRC Perspectives on Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Consultations and Monitoring - 13398

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, Christepher A.; Suber, Gregory F.; Felsher, Harry D.; Mohseni, Aby

    2013-01-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste (HLW) determinations. The NDAA also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations to assess compliance with NRC regulations in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. The NDAA applies to DOE activities that will remain within the States of South Carolina and Idaho. DOE has chosen to, under DOE Order 435.1, engage in consultation with NRC for similar activities in the State of Washington and New York, however, the NRC has no monitoring responsibilities. In 2007, the NRC developed a draft Final Report for Interim Use entitled, NUREG-1854: NRC Staff Guidance for Activities Related to U.S. Department of Energy Waste Determinations. Since the law was enacted, the DOE and NRC have consulted on three waste determinations within the affected States: (1) the Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) within the State of South Carolina in 2005, (2) the INTEC Tank Farm at the Idaho National Laboratory within the State of Idaho in 2006, and (3) the F Tank Farm at SRS in 2011. After the end of consultation and issuance by DOE of the final waste determination, monitoring began at each of these sites, including the development of monitoring plans. In addition to the NDAA sites, DOE has requested NRC consultation support on both individual tanks and the entire C Tank Farm at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the State of Washington. DOE also requested consultation of waste determinations performed on the melter and related feed tanks at the West Valley site in New York that would be disposed offsite. In the next few years, NRC and DOE will consult on the last of the NDAA waste determinations for a while, the H Tank Farm waste determination at SRS. DOE may identify other activities in the future but largely

  8. NRC proposes changes to nuke decommissioning funding rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed to amend its regulations to allow self-guarantee as a means of assuring adequate funding for nuclear plant decommissioning. It acted in response to a rulemaking petition filed by General Electric Co. and Westinghouse Electric Corp. The proposal would allow self-guarantees if certain conditions are met: Tangible net worth of at least $1 billion; Tangible net worth at least 10 times the present decommissioning cost estimate for all activities the utility is responsible for as a self-guaranteeing licensee and as parent guarantor; Domestic assets amounting to at least 90 percent of total assets or at least 10 times the present decommissioning cost estimate; A credit rating for the utility's most recent bond issuance of AAA, AA, or A (Standard ampersand Poor's), or Aaa, Aa, or A (Moody's). Additional requirements include that the utility licensee must have at least one class of equity securities registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and that an independent auditor must verify that the utility met the financial test. A utility also would be responsible for reporting any change in circumstances affecting the criteria used to meet the financial test, and would be responsible for meeting that test within 90 days of each financial year. The NRC will accept written comments until March 29, 1993

  9. NRC Response to an Act or Threat of Terrorism at an NRC-Licensed Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank Congel

    2000-01-01

    The mandated response to a threat or act of terrorism at a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facility was examined through a tabletop exercise in May 2000 and a limited field exercise in August 2000. This paper describes some of the new issues addressed and lessons learned from those exercises

  10. Atomic Energy Research benchmark activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.

    1998-01-01

    The test problems utilized in the validation and verification process of computer programs in Atomic Energie Research are collected into one bunch. This is the first step towards issuing a volume in which tests for VVER are collected, along with reference solutions and a number of solutions. The benchmarks do not include the ZR-6 experiments because they have been published along with a number of comparisons in the Final reports of TIC. The present collection focuses on operational and mathematical benchmarks which cover almost the entire range of reaktor calculation. (Author)

  11. Reassessment of the NRC's program for protecting allegers against retaliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    On July 6, 1993, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Executive Director for Operations established a review team to reassess the NRC's program for protecting allegers against retaliation. The team evaluated the current system, and solicited comments from various NRC offices, other Federal agencies, licensees, former allegers, and the public. This report is subject to agency review. The report summarizes current processes and gives an overview of current problems. It discusses: (1) ways in which licensees can promote a quality-conscious work environment, in which all employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retaliation; (2) ways to improve the NRC's overall handling of allegations; (3) the NRC's involvement in the Department of Labor process; (4) related NRC enforcement practices; and (5) methods other than investigation and enforcement that may be useful in treating allegations of potential or actual discrimination. Recommendations are given in each area

  12. NRC Monitoring of Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site - 13147

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Karen E.; Ridge, A. Christianne; Alexander, George W.; Barr, Cynthia S.; Devaser, Nishka J.; Felsher, Harry D. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2013-07-01

    As part of monitoring required under Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), the NRC staff reviewed an updated DOE performance assessment (PA) for salt waste disposal at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The NRC staff concluded that it has reasonable assurance that waste disposal at the SDF meets the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives for protection of individuals against intrusion (chap.61.42), protection of individuals during operations (chap.61.43), and site stability (chap.61.44). However, based on its evaluation of DOE's results and independent sensitivity analyses conducted with DOE's models, the NRC staff concluded that it did not have reasonable assurance that DOE's disposal activities at the SDF meet the performance objective for protection of the general population from releases of radioactivity (chap.61.41) evaluated at a dose limit of 0.25 mSv/yr (25 mrem/yr) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE). NRC staff also concluded that the potential dose to a member of the public is expected to be limited (i.e., is expected to be similar to or less than the public dose limit in chap.20.1301 of 1 mSv/yr [100 mrem/yr] TEDE) and is expected to occur many years after site closure. The NRC staff used risk insights gained from review of the SDF PA, its experience monitoring DOE disposal actions at the SDF over the last 5 years, as well as independent analysis and modeling to identify factors that are important to assessing whether DOE's disposal actions meet the performance objectives. Many of these factors are similar to factors identified in the NRC staff's 2005 review of salt waste disposal at the SDF. Key areas of interest continue to be waste form and disposal unit degradation, the effectiveness of infiltration and erosion controls, and estimation of the radiological inventory. Based on these factors, NRC is revising its plan for monitoring salt waste disposal at the SDF in

  13. NRC Monitoring of Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site - 13147

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkston, Karen E.; Ridge, A. Christianne; Alexander, George W.; Barr, Cynthia S.; Devaser, Nishka J.; Felsher, Harry D.

    2013-01-01

    As part of monitoring required under Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA), the NRC staff reviewed an updated DOE performance assessment (PA) for salt waste disposal at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The NRC staff concluded that it has reasonable assurance that waste disposal at the SDF meets the 10 CFR 61 performance objectives for protection of individuals against intrusion (chap.61.42), protection of individuals during operations (chap.61.43), and site stability (chap.61.44). However, based on its evaluation of DOE's results and independent sensitivity analyses conducted with DOE's models, the NRC staff concluded that it did not have reasonable assurance that DOE's disposal activities at the SDF meet the performance objective for protection of the general population from releases of radioactivity (chap.61.41) evaluated at a dose limit of 0.25 mSv/yr (25 mrem/yr) total effective dose equivalent (TEDE). NRC staff also concluded that the potential dose to a member of the public is expected to be limited (i.e., is expected to be similar to or less than the public dose limit in chap.20.1301 of 1 mSv/yr [100 mrem/yr] TEDE) and is expected to occur many years after site closure. The NRC staff used risk insights gained from review of the SDF PA, its experience monitoring DOE disposal actions at the SDF over the last 5 years, as well as independent analysis and modeling to identify factors that are important to assessing whether DOE's disposal actions meet the performance objectives. Many of these factors are similar to factors identified in the NRC staff's 2005 review of salt waste disposal at the SDF. Key areas of interest continue to be waste form and disposal unit degradation, the effectiveness of infiltration and erosion controls, and estimation of the radiological inventory. Based on these factors, NRC is revising its plan for monitoring salt waste disposal at the SDF in coordination with South

  14. NRC concerns about steam generator tube U-bend failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillon, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper concerns itself with genralized NRC regulatory policy regarding SGT failures and staff reports and opinions which may tend to influence the developing policy specific to U-bend failures. The most significant analysis at hand in predicting NRC policy on SGT U-bend failures is Marsh's Evaluation of Steam Generator Tube Rupture Events. Marsh sets out to describe and analyze the five steam generator tube ruptures that are known to NRC. All have occurred in the period 1975 to 1980

  15. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages: Report of NRC Approved Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  16. New security measures are proposed for N-plants: Insider Rule package is issued by NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    New rules proposed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will require background investigations and psychological assessments of new job candidates and continual monitoring of the behavior of all power plant workers with access to sensitive areas. Licensees will have to submit an ''access authorization'' program for approval describing how they will conduct these security activities. The employee checks will go back five years to examine credit, educational, and criminal histories. Implementation of the rules could involve the Edison Electric Institute as an intermediary to funnel criminal checks from the Justice Department and FBI. The NRC is also considering a clarification of areas designated as ''vital'' because current designations may be too strict

  17. Water reactor safety research program. A description of current and planned research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsors confirmatory safety research on lightwater reactors in support of the NRC regulatory program. The principal responsibility of the NRC, as implemented through its regulatory program is to ensure that public health, public safety, and the environment are adequately protected. The NRC performs this function by defining conditions for the use of nuclear power and by ensuring through technical review, audit, and follow-up that these conditions are met. The NRC research program provides technical information, independent of the nuclear industry, to aid in discharging these regulatory responsibilities. The objectives of NRC's research program are the following: (1) to maintain a confirmatory research program that supports assurance of public health and safety, and public confidence in the regulatory program, (2) to provide objectively evaluated safety data and analytical methods that meet the needs of regulatory activities, (3) to provide better quantified estimates of the margins of safety for reactor systems, fuel cycle facilities, and transportation systems, (4) to establish a broad and coherent exchange of safety research information with other Federal agencies, industry, and foreign organization. Current and planned research toward these goals is described

  18. An Integrated Extravehicular Activity Research Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Ross, Amy J.; Cupples, J. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Multiple organizations within NASA and outside of NASA fund and participate in research related to extravehicular activity (EVA). In October 2015, representatives of the EVA Office, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD), and the Human Research Program (HRP) at NASA Johnson Space Center agreed on a formal framework to improve multi-year coordination and collaboration in EVA research. At the core of the framework is an Integrated EVA Research Plan and a process by which it will be annually reviewed and updated. The over-arching objective of the collaborative framework is to conduct multi-disciplinary cost-effective research that will enable humans to perform EVAs safely, effectively, comfortably, and efficiently, as needed to enable and enhance human space exploration missions. Research activities must be defined, prioritized, planned and executed to comprehensively address the right questions, avoid duplication, leverage other complementary activities where possible, and ultimately provide actionable evidence-based results in time to inform subsequent tests, developments and/or research activities. Representation of all appropriate stakeholders in the definition, prioritization, planning and execution of research activities is essential to accomplishing the over-arching objective. A formal review of the Integrated EVA Research Plan will be conducted annually. External peer review of all HRP EVA research activities including compilation and review of published literature in the EVA Evidence Book is already performed annually. Coordination with stakeholders outside of the EVA Office, CTSD, and HRP is already in effect on a study-by-study basis; closer coordination on multi-year planning with other EVA stakeholders including academia is being actively pursued. Details of the current Integrated EVA Research Plan are presented including description of ongoing and planned research activities in the areas of: Benchmarking; Anthropometry and Suit Fit; Sensors; Human

  19. Manomaterials research activities at the SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2005-01-01

    The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan started the 'Nanotechnology Support Project' from 2002 for the purpose to support nanotechnology researches. As part of the nanotechnology support project, SPring-8 has supported nanotechnology researches using synchrotron radiation. In this article, some research activities of the project are introduced. (author)

  20. NRC systematic evaluation program: seismic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The NRC Systematic Evaluation Program is currently making an assessment of the seismic design safety of 11 older nuclear power plant facilities. The general review philosophy and review criteria relative to seismic input, structural response, and equipment functionability are presented, including the rationale for the development of these guidelines considering the significant evolution of seismic design criteria since these plants were originally licensed. Technical approaches thought more realistic in light of current knowledge are utilized. Initial findings for plants designed to early seismic design procedures suggest that with minor exceptions, these plants possess adequate seismic design margins when evaluated against the intent of current criteria. However, seismic qualification of electrical equipment has been identified as a subject which requires more in-depth evaluation

  1. Design basis for the NRC Operations Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindell, M.K.; Wise, J.A.; Griffin, B.N.; Desrosiers, A.E.; Meitzler, W.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report documents the development of a design for a new NRC Operations Center (NRCOC). The project was conducted in two phases: organizational analysis and facility design. In order to control the amount of traffic, congestion and noise within the facility, it is recommended that information flow in the new NRCOC be accomplished by means of an electronic Status Information Management System. Functional requirements and a conceptual design for this system are described. An idealized architectural design and a detailed design program are presented that provide the appropriate amount of space for operations, equipment and circulation within team areas. The overall layout provides controlled access to the facility and, through the use of a zoning concept, provides each team within the NRCOC the appropriate balance of ready access and privacy determined from the organizational analyses conducted during the initial phase of the project.

  2. Design basis for the NRC Operations Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M.K.; Wise, J.A.; Griffin, B.N.; Desrosiers, A.E.; Meitzler, W.D.

    1983-05-01

    This report documents the development of a design for a new NRC Operations Center (NRCOC). The project was conducted in two phases: organizational analysis and facility design. In order to control the amount of traffic, congestion and noise within the facility, it is recommended that information flow in the new NRCOC be accomplished by means of an electronic Status Information Management System. Functional requirements and a conceptual design for this system are described. An idealized architectural design and a detailed design program are presented that provide the appropriate amount of space for operations, equipment and circulation within team areas. The overall layout provides controlled access to the facility and, through the use of a zoning concept, provides each team within the NRCOC the appropriate balance of ready access and privacy determined from the organizational analyses conducted during the initial phase of the project

  3. Activation Theory and Uses and Gratifications Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, E. D.

    Uses and gratifications research involves a critical appraisal of conceptual and theoretical issues in mass communication and is concerned with what audience members do with the media. Activation theory understands people as active manipulators of their environment. (Activation refers to that level of psychological and physiological excitement an…

  4. U.S. NRC's generic issues program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffman, J.V.; Foster, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has a Generic Issues Program (GIP) to address Generic Issues (GI). A GI is defined as 'a regulatory matter involving the design, construction, operation, or decommissioning of several, or a class of, NRC licensees or certificate holders that is not sufficiently addressed by existing rules, guidance, or programs'. This rather legalistic definition has several practical corollaries: First, a GI must involve safety. Second, the issue must involve at least two plants, or it would be a plant-specific issue rather than a GI. Third, the potential safety question must not be covered by existing regulations and guidance (compliance). Thus, the effect of a GI is to potentially change the body of regulations and associated guidance (e.g., regulatory guides). The GIP was started in 1976, thus it is a relatively mature program. Approximately 850 issues have been processed by the program to date. More importantly, even after 30 years, new GIs continue to be proposed. The entire set of Generic Issues (GIs) is updated annually in NUREG-0933, 'A Prioritization of Generic Safety Issues'. GIs normally involve complex questions of safety and regulation. Efficient and effective means of addressing these issues are very important for regulatory effectiveness. If an issue proves to pose a genuine, significant safety question, then swift, effective, enforceable, and cost-effective action needs to be taken. Conversely, if an issue is of little safety significance, the issue should be dismissed in an expeditious manner, avoiding unnecessary expenditure of resources and regulatory burden or uncertainty. This paper provides a summary of the 5-stage program, from identification through the regulatory assessment stage. The paper also includes a discussion of the program's seven criteria, sources of proposed GIs, recent improvements, publicly available information, historical performance, and status of current GIs. (authors)

  5. NRC licensing of uranium enrichment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.

    1991-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is preparing a rule making that establishes the licensing requirements for low-enriched uranium enrichment plants. Although implementation of this rule making is timed to correspond with receipt of a license application for the Louisiana Energy Services centrifuge enrichment plant, the rule making is applicable to all uranium enrichment technologies. If ownership of the US gaseous diffusion plants and/or atomic vapor laser isotope separation is transferred to a private or government corporation, these plants also would be licensable under the new rule making. The Safeguards Studies Department was tasked by the NRC to provide technical assistance in support of the rule making and guidance preparation process. The initial and primary effort of this task involved the characterization of the potential safeguards concerns associated with a commercial enrichment plant, and the licensing issues associated with these concerns. The primary safeguards considerations were identified as detection of the loss of special nuclear material, detection of unauthorized production of material of low strategic significance, and detection of production of uranium enriched to >10% 235 U. The primary safeguards concerns identified were (1) large absolute limit of error associated with the material balance closing, (2) the inability to shutdown some technologies to perform a cleanout inventory of the process system, and (3) the flexibility of some technologies to produce higher enrichments. Unauthorized production scenarios were identified for some technologies that could prevent conventional material control and accounting programs from detecting the production and removal of 5 kg 235 U as highly enriched uranium. Safeguards techniques were identified to mitigate these concerns

  6. The development of the advanced cryogenic radiometer facility at NRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamouras, A.; Todd, A. D. W.; Côté, É.; Rowell, N. L.

    2018-02-01

    The National Research Council (NRC) of Canada has established a next generation facility for the primary realization of optical radiant power. The main feature of this facility is a new cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer with a closed-cycle helium cryocooler. A monochromator-based approach allows for detector calibrations at any desired wavelength. A custom-designed motion apparatus includes two transfer standard radiometer mounting ports which has increased our measurement capability by allowing the calibration of two photodetectors in one measurement cycle. Measurement uncertainties have been improved through several upgrades, including newly designed and constructed transimpedance amplifiers for the transfer standard radiometers, and a higher power broadband light source. The most significant improvements in uncertainty arise from the enhanced characteristics of the new cryogenic radiometer including its higher cavity absorptance and reduced non-equivalence effects.

  7. Berkeley Lab Pilot on External Regulation of DOE National Laboratories by the U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Gary H.

    1999-01-01

    The US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission entered into an agreement in November 1997 to pursue external regulation of radiation safety at DOE national laboratories through a Pilot Program of simulated regulation at 6-10 sites over a 2 year period. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the oldest of the DOE national laboratories, volunteered and was selected as the first Pilot site. Based on the similarities and linkages between Berkeley Lab and nearby university research laboratories, Berkeley Lab seemed a good candidate for external regulation and a good first step in familiarizing NRC with the technical and institutional issues involved in regulating laboratories in the DOE complex. NRC and DOE team members visited Berkeley Lab on four occasions between October 1997 and January 1998 to carry out the Pilot. The first step was to develop a detailed Work Plan, then to carry out both a technical review of the radiation safety program and an examination of policy and regulatory issues. The Pilot included a public meeting held in Oakland, CA in December 1997. The Pilot concluded with NRC's assessment that Berkeley Lab has a radiation protection program adequate to protect workers, the public and the environment, and that it is ready to be licensed by the NRC with minor programmatic exceptions. A draft final report of the Pilot was prepared and circulated for comment as a NUREG document (dated May 7, 1998). The report's recommendations include extending NRC regulatory authority to cover all ionizing radiation sources (including accelerators, x-ray units, NARM) at Berkeley Lab. Questions remaining to be resolved include: who should be the licensee (DOE, the Lab, or both)?; dealing with legacy issues and NRC D and D requirements; minimizing dual oversight; quantifying value added in terms of cost savings, enhanced safety, and improved public perception; extrapolating results to other national laboratories; and

  8. NRC Regulatory Agenda: Quarterly report, July-September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The NRC Regulatory agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the commission. The regulatory agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  9. NRC Regulatory Agenda quarterly report, July--September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The NRC Regulator Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  10. NRC regualtory agenda. Semiannual report, July 1997--December 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a semiannual compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and of all petitions for rulemaking that the NRC has received that are pending disposition

  11. NRC regulatory agenda: Quarterly report, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued each quarter

  12. NRC regulatory agenda. Seminnual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rule making which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The regulatory Agenda is updated and issued semiannually

  13. Using Random Numbers in Science Research Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the importance of science process skills and describes ways to select sets of random numbers for selection of subjects for a research study in an unbiased manner. Presents an activity appropriate for grades 5-12. (JRH)

  14. Safeguards at NRC licensed facilities: Are we doing enough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselstine, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Safeguards at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) facilities are discussed in this paper. The NRC is pursuing a number of initiatives in the safeguards area. The Commission is conducting a reassessment of its safeguards design basis threat statements to consider the possible implications of an explosive-laden vehicle for U.S. nuclear safeguards and to examine the comparability of safeguards features at NRC-licensed and DOE facilities. The Commission is also completing action on measures to protect against the sabotage threat from an insider at NRC-licensed facilities, and is examining the potential safety implications of safeguards measures. Finally, the NRC has developed measures to reduce the theft potential for high-enriched uranium

  15. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  16. Building beef cow nutritional programs with the 1996 NRC beef cattle requirements model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, G P; Adams, D C; Klopfenstein, T J; Patterson, H H

    2004-01-01

    Designing a sound cow-calf nutritional program requires knowledge of nutrient requirements, diet quality, and intake. Effectively using the NRC (1996) beef cattle requirements model (1996NRC) also requires knowledge of dietary degradable intake protein (DIP) and microbial efficiency. Objectives of this paper are to 1) describe a framework in which 1996NRC-applicable data can be generated, 2) describe seasonal changes in nutrients on native range, 3) use the 1996NRC to predict nutrient balance for cattle grazing these forages, and 4) make recommendations for using the 1996NRC for forage-fed cattle. Extrusa samples were collected over 2 yr on native upland range and subirrigated meadow in the Nebraska Sandhills. Samples were analyzed for CP, in vitro OM digestibility (IVOMD), and DIP. Regression equations to predict nutrients were developed from these data. The 1996NRC was used to predict nutrient balances based on the dietary nutrient analyses. Recommendations for model users were also developed. On subirrigated meadow, CP and IVOMD increased rapidly during March and April. On native range, CP and IVOMD increased from April through June but decreased rapidly from August through September. Degradable intake protein (DM basis) followed trends similar to CP for both native range and subirrigated meadow. Predicted nutrient balances for spring- and summer-calving cows agreed with reported values in the literature, provided that IVOMD values were converted to DE before use in the model (1.07 x IVOMD - 8.13). When the IVOMD-to-DE conversion was not used, the model gave unrealistically high NE(m) balances. To effectively use the 1996NRC to estimate protein requirements, users should focus on three key estimates: DIP, microbial efficiency, and TDN intake. Consequently, efforts should be focused on adequately describing seasonal changes in forage nutrient content. In order to increase use of the 1996NRC, research is needed in the following areas: 1) cost-effective and

  17. Research activities of STUK 1995 - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salomaa, S.; Mustonen, R.

    2000-08-01

    The primary goal of STUK, the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, is to prevent and limit the harmful effects of radiation. The research conducted by STUK yields new information related to the use, occurrence and effects of radiation. The present report summarises STUK's own research activities related to radiation protection in 1995 - 1999. The research and its organisation, scientific strategy and priorities, the impact of results, publications, and the functions of research laboratories are all reviewed. This has been done to provide as background material for an international evaluation of research to be carried out in autumn 2000. (orig.)

  18. Research activities of STUK 1995 - 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S.; Mustonen, R. [eds.

    2000-08-01

    The primary goal of STUK, the Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, is to prevent and limit the harmful effects of radiation. The research conducted by STUK yields new information related to the use, occurrence and effects of radiation. The present report summarises STUK's own research activities related to radiation protection in 1995 - 1999. The research and its organisation, scientific strategy and priorities, the impact of results, publications, and the functions of research laboratories are all reviewed. This has been done to provide as background material for an international evaluation of research to be carried out in autumn 2000. (orig.)

  19. Research Activities on Special Propulsion in BUAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Haibin; Wang Haixing; Liu Chang; Xiang Min; Yao Jie; Liu Yu

    2007-01-01

    An overview is presented of special propulsion research carried out in Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics of China. The research activities are supported by NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China), other governmental agencies and industrial partners, which include experimental, analytical and numerical work related to arcjet thrusters, ion thrusters, plasma sail and other new concept propulsions

  20. Research on Mobile Learning Activities Applying Tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Juskeviciene, Anita; Bireniene, Virginija

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present current research on mobile learning activities in Lithuania while implementing flagship EU-funded CCL project on application of tablet computers in education. In the paper, the quality of modern mobile learning activities based on learning personalisation, problem solving, collaboration, and flipped class methods is…

  1. USNRC HTGR safety research program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulds, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is given of current activities and planned research efforts of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) HTGR Safety Program. On-going research at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory are outlined. Tables include: HTGR Safety Issues, Program Tasks, HTGR Computer Code Library, and Milestones for Long Range Research Plan

  2. NRC Seismic Design Margins Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, G.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Budnitz, R.J.

    1985-08-01

    Recent studies estimate that seismically induced core melt comes mainly from earthquakes in the peak ground acceleration range from 2 to 4 times the safe shutdown earthquake (SSE) acceleration used in plant design. However, from the licensing perspective of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, there is a continuing need for consideration of the inherent quantitative seismic margins because of, among other things, the changing perceptions of the seismic hazard. This paper discusses a Seismic Design Margins Program Plan, developed under the auspices of the US NRC, that provides the technical basis for assessing the significance of design margins in terms of overall plant safety. The Plan will also identify potential weaknesses that might have to be addressed, and will recommend technical methods for assessing margins at existing plants. For the purposes of this program, a general definition of seismic design margin is expressed in terms of how much larger that the design basis earthquake an earthquake must be to compromise plant safety. In this context, margin needs to be determined at the plant, system/function, structure, and component levels. 14 refs., 1 fig

  3. NRC Confirmatory Testing Program for SBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.; Bessette, D.E.; Shotkin, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the NRC Confirmatory Testing Program for SBWR is to provide integral data for code assessment, which reasonably reproduce the important phenomena and processes expected in the SBWR under various loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) and transient conditions. To achieve this objective, the Program consists of four coupled elements: (1) to design and construct an integral, carefully-scaled SBWR test facility at Purdue Univ., (2) to provide pre-construction RELAP5/CONTAIN predictions of the facility design, (3) to provide confirmatory data for code assessment, and (4) to assess the RELAP5/CONTAIN code with data. A description of the open-quotes preliminary designclose quotes of the Purdue test facility and test matrix is presented. The facility is scheduled to be built by December 1994. Approximately 50 tests will be performed from April 1995 through April 1996 and documented by interim data reports. A final and complete data report is scheduled to be published by July 31, 1996

  4. Strategic Planning and NRC Decadal Survey Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbacher, C. C., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Strategic planning exercises are routinely undertaken by a wide variety of organizations that span the private, public and academic sectors and with a wide variety of corporate goals. It is difficult to single out best procedures as the purposes of strategic planning are as varied as the organizations. As a former head of a governmental agency that requested such a NRC study, namely the first "Earth Sciences and Applications from Space" study, I will examine the process, provide my definitions and assessments of the good and the not-so-good, and compare to my experiences with other similar strategic planning exercises during my Navy, NOAA, and private sector careers. I find that there is always room for improvement, but there is no one process or procedure that can guarantee success. Overarching initial considerations that can position the effort for overall "success" will be defined and applied to the recent NSC Study: "Sea Change: 2015-2025 Decadal Survey of Ocean Science", for which I was neither an initiator nor a participant, but a very interested observer.

  5. Finnish nurses' views on their research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuppelomäki, Merja; Tuomi, Jouni

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to describe Finnish nurses' research and publication activities, as well as their views on the availability and utilization of research results in nursing practice. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire in which obstacles to the utilization of research results were measured with a previously developed instrument. A total of 400 nurses from community health centres, a central hospital and a central university hospital took part. Most of the nurses had carried out research on their own. Age, experience, training in research and development and other further training, as well as reading the nursing literature, were associated with doing research. Some of the reasons why the nurses had not carried out research were revealed. Publication of results was very rare. There were problems with the availability of research results. The most common obstacles to research utilization had to do with the presentation of results and the setting. In research utilization, respondents received most support from the ward manager and least support from doctors. If we want to encourage nurses to do research and increase the utilization of research results, greater effort should be invested in teaching research methodology, in introducing more flexible working hours and in developing other support systems.

  6. Activation Analysis and Nuclear Research in Burma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiele, R. W.

    1971-07-01

    Research endeavours in the field of Nuclear Sciences in Burma appear to be concentrated in three main Institutions. These are the Chemistry and Physics Departments of the Rangoon Arts & Science University and the Union of Burma Applied Research Institute (UBARI). In view of possible forthcoming developments an expanded research programme, which is to be implemented on the basis of a five year plan, has been drawn up. Research topics included in this programme are predominantly of practical interest and aimed at a contribution by nuclear methods, in particular activation analysis, to the technological and industrial needs of the country.

  7. ITAAC Development for APR1400 NRC Design Certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kwon; Kim, Myoung Ki

    2013-01-01

    ITAAC (Inspections, Tests, Analyses and Acceptance Criteria) is essential document for Design Certification, which is certified by NRC and ruled as the Appendix of the 10 CFR Part 52. Approximately 870 ITAAC items were selected for APR1400 Design Certification to be submitted to NRC. In this paper, the code and standard related to ITAAC and process of ITACC development are discussed to seek the way to complete the best ITAAC to get the Design Certification of APR1400 from NRC through the lessons learned from other competitive applicants. For saving the time and manpower to complete ITAAC of APR1400 NRC DC and reduction of the RAIs (Request Additional Information) from NRC, we took advantage of the lessons learned from the competitive designs like US-APWR and AP1000 based on KNGR ITAAC. Finally new and different ITAAC from ITAAC of KNGR was developed for APR1400 DC from NRC. RG 1.206 and SRPs were applied first in Korea to the APR1400 DCD preparation. For testability and acceptability check, ITAAC V and V table was completed by the system designers. APR1400 DCD will be submitted by the end of September this year and we hope that NRC issues lees RAIs on ITAAC document

  8. 76 FR 10072 - Proposed Generic Communications; Draft NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX, Adequacy of Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0013] Proposed Generic Communications; Draft NRC Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX, Adequacy of Station Electric Distribution System Voltages; Reopening of... (NRC's) Draft Regulatory Issue Summary 2011-XX, Adequacy of Station Electric Distribution System...

  9. Application of PLUTO Test Facility for U. S. NRC Licensing of a Fuel Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Dongseok; Shin, Changhwan; Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The fuel assembly of the PLUS-7 loaded in the APR-1400 follows the same schedule. Meanwhile, In July 1998, the U.S. NRC adopted a research plan to address the effects of high burnup from a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). From these programs, several important technical findings for rule revision were obtained. Based on the technical findings, the U. S. NRC has amended the 10 CFR 50.46 which will be proclaimed sooner or later. Through the amendment, a LOCA analysis on the fuel assembly has to show the safety at both a fresh and End of Life (EOL) state. The U. S. NRC has already required EOL effects on seismic/LOCA performance for a fuel assembly since 1998. To obtain U.S NRC licensing of a fuel assembly, based on the amendment of 10CFR50.46, a LOCA analysis of the fuel assembly has to show safety both fresh and EOL states. The proper damping factor of the fuel assembly measured at the hydraulic test loop for a dynamic model in a LOCA and a seismic analysis code are at least required. In this paper, we have examined the damping technologies and compared the test facility of PLUTO with others in terms of performance. PLUTO has a better performance on the operating conditions than any others.

  10. Status of ECCS Acceptance Criteria Revision in U. S. NRC and Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joosuk; Woo, Swengwoong

    2013-01-01

    Subsequently the NRC had conducted a fuel cladding research program to investigate the behavior of high burnup fuel cladding under LOCA conditions. This research program conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as well as conducted as jointly-funded programs at the Kurchatov Institute and the Halden Reactor. From these programs, several important technical findings, listed in following section, for rule revision were obtained. On March 14, 2000, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) submitted a petition for rulemaking (PRM) requesting that the NRC amend its regulations in 50.44 and 50.46 (PRM 50-71). The NEI petition stated that these regulations apply to only two specific zirconium-alloy fuel cladding materials (zircaloy and ZIRLO TM ). The NRC resolved PRM-50-71 by deciding that it should be considered in the following rulemaking process. Meanwhile, on March 15, 2007, Mark Leyse submitted a PRM to the NRC (PRM 50-84). The petitioner requests that the NRC conduct rulemaking in the following areas: Establish regulations that require licensees to operate light-water power reactors under conditions that are effective in limiting the thickness of crud and/or oxide layers. Amend Appendix K to Part 50 to explicitly require that steady-state temperature distribution and stored energy in the reactor fuel at the onset of a postulated LOCA be calculated by factoring in the role of the thermal resistance of crud and oxide layers. Amend 50.46 to specify a maximum allowable percentage of hydrogen content in the cladding. The NRC resolved PRM-50-84 by deciding that the petitioner's issues should be considered in the rulemaking process. On August 13, 2009, the NRC published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) to obtain stakeholder views on issues associated with amending 50.46. On March 1, 2012, and subsequently modified by the staff's June 1, 2012, SECY-12-0034 was submitted to the Commission to obtain approval to publish for public comment, and it was approved

  11. Status of ECCS Acceptance Criteria Revision in U. S. NRC and Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joosuk; Woo, Swengwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Subsequently the NRC had conducted a fuel cladding research program to investigate the behavior of high burnup fuel cladding under LOCA conditions. This research program conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as well as conducted as jointly-funded programs at the Kurchatov Institute and the Halden Reactor. From these programs, several important technical findings, listed in following section, for rule revision were obtained. On March 14, 2000, the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) submitted a petition for rulemaking (PRM) requesting that the NRC amend its regulations in 50.44 and 50.46 (PRM 50-71). The NEI petition stated that these regulations apply to only two specific zirconium-alloy fuel cladding materials (zircaloy and ZIRLO{sup TM}). The NRC resolved PRM-50-71 by deciding that it should be considered in the following rulemaking process. Meanwhile, on March 15, 2007, Mark Leyse submitted a PRM to the NRC (PRM 50-84). The petitioner requests that the NRC conduct rulemaking in the following areas: Establish regulations that require licensees to operate light-water power reactors under conditions that are effective in limiting the thickness of crud and/or oxide layers. Amend Appendix K to Part 50 to explicitly require that steady-state temperature distribution and stored energy in the reactor fuel at the onset of a postulated LOCA be calculated by factoring in the role of the thermal resistance of crud and oxide layers. Amend 50.46 to specify a maximum allowable percentage of hydrogen content in the cladding. The NRC resolved PRM-50-84 by deciding that the petitioner's issues should be considered in the rulemaking process. On August 13, 2009, the NRC published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) to obtain stakeholder views on issues associated with amending 50.46. On March 1, 2012, and subsequently modified by the staff's June 1, 2012, SECY-12-0034 was submitted to the Commission to obtain approval to publish for public comment, and it

  12. Spent nuclear fuel project multi-canister overpack, additional NRC requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), established in the K Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Regulatory Policy, dated August 4, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the Policy), the requirement for new Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities to achieve nuclear safety equivalency to comparable US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed facilities. For activities other than during transport, when the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) is used and resides in the Canister Storage Building (CSB), Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) facility or Hot Conditioning System, additional NRC requirements will also apply to the MCO based on the safety functions it performs and its interfaces with the SNF Project facilities. An evaluation was performed in consideration of the MCO safety functions to identify any additional NRC requirements needed, in combination with the existing and applicable DOE requirements, to establish nuclear safety equivalency for the MCO. The background, basic safety issues and general comparison of NRC and DOE requirements for the SNF Project are presented in WHC-SD-SNF-DB-002

  13. Optimization Conditions of Extracellular Proteases Production from a Newly Isolated Streptomyces Pseudogrisiolus NRC-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed E. Mostafa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial protease represents the most important industrial enzymes, which have an active role in biotechnological processes. The objective of this study was to isolate new strain of Streptomyces that produce proteolytic enzymes with novel properties and the development of the low-cost medium. An alkaline protease producer strain NRC-15 was isolated from Egyptian soil sample. The cultural, morphological, physiological characters and chemotaxonomic evidence strongly indicated that the NRC-15 strain represents a novel species of the genus Streptomyces, hence the name Strptomyces pseudogrisiolus NRC-15. The culture conditions for higher protease production by NRC-15 were optimized with respect to carbon and nitrogen sources, metal ions, pH and temperature. Maximum protease production was obtained in the medium supplemented with 1% glucose, 1% yeast extract, 6% NaCl and 100 μmol/L of Tween 20, initial pH 9.0 at 50 °C for 96 h. The current results confirm that for this strain, a great ability to produce alkaline proteases, which supports the use of applications in industry.

  14. Safeguards at NRC licensed facilities: Are we doing enough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselstine, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is pursuing a number of initiatives in the safeguards area. The Commission is conducting a reassessment of its safeguards design basis threat statements to consider the possible implications of an explosive-laden vehicle for U.S. nuclear safeguards and to examine the comparability of safeguards features at NRC-licensed and DOE facilities. The Commission is also completing action on measures to protect against the sabotage threat from an insider at NRC-licensed facilities, and is examining the potential safety implications of safeguards measures. Finally, the NRC has developed measures to reduce the theft potential for high-enriched uranium

  15. Radiochemistry teaching and research activities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Saiki, M.

    2006-01-01

    Much concern has been expressed lately about the decline of teaching and research activities in radiochemistry in many countries, as was discussed in an IAEA Technical Meeting in Antalya, Turkey, in 2002, and also at MTAA-11 in Guildford, UK. In the IAEA meeting, a survey was presented about the current situation in different regions of the world (Eastern Europe, East and West Asia, Africa, North America and Latin America) by experts of each region. In the case of Brazil, which has nuclear research reactors and also cyclotrons in operation, the teaching and research activities in radiochemistry are concentrated in the three main institutes of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, in the University of Sao Paulo and in other universities, in different regions of the country. In the present paper, a closer look is given to the radiochemistry teaching and research activities that are being conducted nowadays in Brazil, comprising: number of radiochemistry courses and students being formed, main research areas being conducted, as well as research and production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine, using nuclear reactors and cyclotrons. (author)

  16. European commission research activities on iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loggia, E. della

    1996-01-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs

  17. European commission research activities on iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loggia, E della [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs.

  18. Quality assurance records system for research and development activities in support of geologic repository programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.W.; Ryder, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), which is operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy, is conducting site-specific research for all three candidate sites for the first geologic high-level waste repository, as well as generic research for the second repository. In conjunction with this effort, PNL has developed a quality assurance (QA) program that is applicable to all organizations that are performing research and development (R and D) activities in support of the repository programs. This QA program meets the basic and supplemental requirements of ANSI/ASME NQA-1-1983 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Review Plan for QA Programs for Site Characterization of High Level Nuclear Waste Repositories. A key part of this program is the handling of QA records that may ultimately support the licensing process for the repository. This paper describes a QA records system that is flexible enough to accommodate several types of research, such as paper studies, test method development, site characterization studies, software development, and hardware design. In addition, the QA records system is acceptable to a variety of sponsors who have licensing concerns. The QA procedures and their relation to the requirements are described. Most important is the discussion on the approaches used to assure that the records are organized such that the user can readily recreate or defend data, conclusions, and recommendations resulting from the research

  19. 48 CFR 2009.570 - NRC organizational conflicts of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... conflicts of interest. 2009.570 Section 2009.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION COMPETITION AND ACQUISITION PLANNING CONTRACTOR QUALIFICATIONS Organizational Conflicts of Interest 2009.570 NRC organizational conflicts of interest. ...

  20. 38 CFR 1.488 - Research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... any potential risks to patient confidentiality posed by the disclosure of records. (b) A person... PROVISIONS Disclosures Without Patient Consent § 1.488 Research activities. Subject to the provisions of 38 U... requirements of § 1.466 of this part (or more stringent requirements); and (ii) Will not be redisclosed except...

  1. EPRI research on accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehlberg, R.N.; Chao, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper discusses Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) efforts regarding severe reactor accident management and the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (NUMAEX), activities. (EPRI) Electric Power Research Institute accident management program consists of the two products just mentioned plus one related to severe accident plant status information and the MAAP 4.0 computer code. These are briefly discussed

  2. Amalgamation of performance indicators to support NRC senior management reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wreathall, J.; Schurman, D.; Modarres, M.; Mosleh, A.; Anderson, N.; Reason, J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a methodology for amalgamating performance indicators to provide an overall perspective on plant safety, as one input to Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) senior management reviews of plant safety. These reviews are used to adjust the level of oversight by NRC. Work completed to date includes the development of frameworks for relating indicator measures to safety, a classification scheme for performance indicators, and a mapping process to portray indicators in the frameworks

  3. Regulatory decision with EPA/NRC/DOE/State Session (Panel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donnell, E.

    1995-12-31

    This panel will cover the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) proposed radiation limits in the Branch Technical Position on Low-Level Radioactive Waste Performance Assessment and the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) draft regulation in Part 193. Representatives from NRC and EPA will discuss the inconsistencies in these two regulations. DOE and state representatives will discuss their perspective on how these regulations will affect low-level radioactive waste performance assessments.

  4. Staged licensing: An essential element of the NRC's revised regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echols, F.S.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past several years, Congress has directed the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to abandon their efforts to assess an array of potential candidate geologic repository sites for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear reactor fuel and high level radioactive waste, to develop generally applicable requirements for licensing geologic repositories, and to develop generally applicable radiation protection standards for geologic repositories, and instead to focus their efforts to determine whether a single site located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada can be developed as a geologic repository which providing reasonable assurance that public health and safety and the environment will be adequately protected. If the Yucca Mountain site is found to be suitable for development as a geologic repository, then at each stage of development DOE will have to provide the NRC with progressively more detailed information regarding repository design and long-term performance. NRC regulations reflect the fact that it will not be until the repository has been operated for a number of years that the NRC will be able to make a final determination as to long-term repository performance. Nevertheless, the NRC will be able to allow DOE to construct and operate a repository, provided that the NRC believes that the documented results of existing studies, together with the anticipated results from continuing and future studies, will enable the NRC to make a final determination that it has reasonable assurance that the repository system's long-term performance will not cause undue risk to the public. Thus, in its efforts to revise its current regulations to assure that the technical criteria are specifically applicable to the Yucca Mountain site, the NRC should also make sure that it preserves and clarifies the concept of staged repository development

  5. Electromechanically active polymer transducers: research in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpi, Federico; Graz, Ingrid; Jager, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Smart materials and structures based on electromechanically active polymers (EAPs) represent a fast growing and stimulating field of research and development. EAPs are materials capable of changing dimensions and/or shape in response to suitable electrical stimuli. They are commonly classified...... usages from the micro- to the macro-scale, spanning several disciplines, such as mechatronics, robotics, automation, biotechnology and biomedical engineering, haptics, fluidics, optics and acoustics. Currently, the EAP field is just undergoing its initial transition from academic research...... worldwide. The rapid expansion of the EAP field in Europe, where it historically has strong roots, has stimulated the creation of the 'European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles—ESNAM', entirely focused on EAPs and gathering the most active research institutes, as well as key industrial developers...

  6. CNRS researchers' popularization activities: a progress report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Croissant

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the popularization activities undertaken by ten thousand CNRS researchers by means of their annual reports for the years 2004, 2005 and 2006. This is the first time that such an extensive statistical study on science popularization practices is carried out. Our main findings are : - the majority of researchers is not involved in popularization (51% has not done any popularization over the three-year period, two thirds have been involved in no more than one popularization action. - popularization practices are extremely diverse, both at the individual level (we have identified three subpopulations that feature distinctive attitudes towards popularization, and at the level of scientific disciplines (researchers in Humanities are twice as active as the average, as well as in laboratories or geographical regions. - the number of actions reported in 2005 greatly increased compared to 2004 (+ 26%, while they slightly diminished in 2006.

  7. Safety Second: the NRC and America's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adato, M.; MacKenzie, J.; Pollard, R.; Weiss, E.

    1987-01-01

    In 1975, Congress created the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Its primary responsibility was to be the regulation of the nuclear power industry in order to maintain public health and safety. On March 28, 1979, in the worst commercial nuclear accident in US history, the plant at Three Mile Island began to leak radioactive material. How was Three Mile Island possible? Where was the NRC? This analysis by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) of the NRC's first decade, points specifically to the factors that contributed to the accident at Three Mile Island. The NRC, created as a watchdog of the nuclear power industry, suffers from problems of mindset, says the UCS. The commission's problems are political, not technical; it repeatedly ranks special interests above the interest of public safety. This book critiques the NRC's performance in four specific areas. It charges that the agency has avoided tackling the most pervasive safety issues; has limited public participation in decision making and power plant licensing; has failed to enforce safety standards or conduct adequate regulation investigations; and, finally, has maintained a fraternal relationship with the industry it was created to regulate, serving as its advocate rather than it adversary. The final chapter offers recommendations for agency improvement that must be met if the NRC is to fulfill its responsibility for safety first

  8. Web-Based Training on Reviewing Dose Modeling Aspects of NRC Decommissioning and License Termination Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Arnish, J.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2008-01-01

    related to training, developing, and transferring knowledge to NRC staff on how to review dose-modeling portions of licensee-submitted DPs and LTPs. This project identified specific cases and examples, created easily updateable educational modules, represented material in an engaging format through animations, video, and graphics, and distributed information on how to perform these reviews in an accessible, web-based format. WBT promotes consistency in reviews and has the advantage of being able to be used as a resource to staff at any time. The WBT will provide reviewers with knowledge needed to perform risk-informed analyses (e.g., information related to development of realistic scenarios and use of probabilistic analysis). WBT on review of LTP or DP dose modeling will promote staff development, efficiency, and effectiveness in performing risk-informed, performance-based reviews of decommissioning activities at NRC-licensed facilities. One of the key advantages of this type of web-based training is that it can be loaded on-demand and can be reused indefinitely. In addition to the benefits of on-demand training, the modules can also be used for reference. The presentations are hosted on a web server that can be accessed by registered users at any time. Staff can return to a particular module to review the material long after they have completed the course

  9. NRC Consultation and Monitoring at the Savannah River Site: Focusing Reviews of Two Different Disposal Actions - 12181

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridge, A. Christianne; Barr, Cynthia S.; Pinkston, Karen E.; Parks, Leah S.; Grossman, Christopher J.; Alexander, George W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consult with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for certain non-high level waste determinations. The NDAA also requires NRC to monitor DOE's disposal actions related to those determinations. In Fiscal Year 2011, the NRC staff reviewed DOE performance assessments for tank closure at the F-Tank Farm (FTF) Facility and salt waste disposal at the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of consultation and monitoring, respectively. Differences in inventories, waste forms, and key barriers led to different areas of focus in the NRC reviews of these two activities at the SRS. Because of the key role of chemically reducing grouts in both applications, the evaluation of chemical barriers was significant to both reviews. However, radionuclide solubility in precipitated metal oxides is expected to play a significant role in FTF performance whereas release of several key radionuclides from the SDF is controlled by sorption or precipitation within the cementitious wasteform itself. Similarly, both reviews included an evaluation of physical barriers to flow, but differences in the physical configurations of the waste led to differences in the reviews. For example, NRC's review of the FTF focused on the modeled degradation of carbon steel tank liners while the staff's review of the SDF performance included a detailed evaluation of the physical degradation of the saltstone wasteform and infiltration-limiting closure cap. Because of the long time periods considered (i.e., tens of thousands of years), the NRC reviews of both facilities included detailed evaluation of the engineered chemical and physical barriers. The NRC staff reviews of residual waste disposal in the FTF and salt waste disposal in the SDF focused on physical barriers to flow and chemical barriers to

  10. Research of fault activity in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, T.; Nakatsuka, N.; Takeda, S.

    2004-01-01

    Six hundreds and eighty earthquakes causing significant damage have been recorded since the 7. century in Japan. It is important to recognize faults that will or are expected to be active in future in order to help reduce earthquake damage, estimate earthquake damage insurance and siting of nuclear facilities. Such faults are called 'active faults' in Japan, the definition of which is a fault that has moved intermittently for at least several hundred thousand years and is expected to continue to do so in future. Scientific research of active faults has been ongoing since the 1930's. Many results indicated that major earthquakes and fault movements in shallow crustal regions in Japan occurred repeatedly at existing active fault zones during the past. After the 1995 Southern Hyogo Prefecture Earthquake, 98 active fault zones were selected for fundamental survey, with the purpose of efficiently conducting an active fault survey in 'Plans for Fundamental Seismic Survey and Observation' by the headquarters for earthquake research promotion, which was attached to the Prime Minister's office of Japan. Forty two administrative divisions for earthquake disaster prevention have investigated the distribution and history of fault activity of 80 active fault zones. Although earthquake prediction is difficult, the behaviour of major active faults in Japan is being recognised. Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) submitted a report titled 'H12: Project to Establish the. Scientific and Technical Basis for HLW Disposal in Japan' to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) of Japan for official review W. The Guidelines, which were defined by AEC, require the H12 Project to confirm the basic technical feasibility of safe HLW disposal in Japan. In this report the important issues relating to fault activity were described that are to understand the characteristics of current fault movements and the spatial extent and magnitude of the effects caused by these movements, and to

  11. Initial demonstration of the NRC`s capability to conduct a performance assessment for a High-Level Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codell, R.; Eisenberg, N.; Fehringer, D.; Ford, W.; Margulies, T.; McCartin, T.; Park, J.; Randall, J.

    1992-05-01

    In order to better review licensing submittals for a High-Level Waste Repository, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff has expanded and improved its capability to conduct performance assessments. This report documents an initial demonstration of this capability. The demonstration made use of the limited data from Yucca Mountain, Nevada to investigate a small set of scenario classes. Models of release and transport of radionuclides from a repository via the groundwater and direct release pathways provided preliminary estimates of releases to the accessible environment for a 10,000 year simulation time. Latin hypercube sampling of input parameters was used to express results as distributions and to investigate model sensitivities. This methodology demonstration should not be interpreted as an estimate of performance of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. By expanding and developing the NRC staff capability to conduct such analyses, NRC would be better able to conduct an independent technical review of the US Department of Energy (DOE) licensing submittals for a high-level waste (HLW) repository. These activities were divided initially into Phase 1 and Phase 2 activities. Additional phases may follow as part of a program of iterative performance assessment at the NRC. The NRC staff conducted Phase 1 activities primarily in CY 1989 with minimal participation from NRC contractors. The Phase 2 activities were to involve NRC contractors actively and to provide for the transfer of technology. The Phase 2 activities are scheduled to start in CY 1990, to allow Sandia National Laboratories to complete development and transfer of computer codes and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) to be in a position to assist in the acquisition of the codes.

  12. NRC high-level radioactive waste program. Annual progress report: Fiscal Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagar, B.

    1997-01-01

    This annual status report for fiscal year 1996 documents technical work performed on ten key technical issues (KTI) that are most important to performance of the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. This report has been prepared jointly by the staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Waste Management and the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses. The programmatic aspects of restructuring the NRC repository program in terms of KTIs is discussed and a brief summary of work accomplished is provided. The other ten chapters provide a comprehensive summary of the work in each KTI. Discussions on probability of future volcanic activity and its consequences, impacts of structural deformation and seismicity, the nature of of the near-field environment and its effects on container life and source term, flow and transport including effects of thermal loading, aspects of repository design, estimates of system performance, and activities related to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standard are provided

  13. Pressure Vessel Steel Research: Belgian Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.; Fabry, A.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Chaouadi, R.; D'hondt, P.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Van Ransbeeck, T.; Gerard, R.

    1994-03-01

    A review of the Belgian research activities on Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels (RPVS) and on related Neutron Dosimetry Aspects is presented. Born out of the surveillance programmes of the Belgian nuclear power plants, this research has lead to the development of material saving techniques, like reconstitution and miniaturization, and to improved neutron dosimetry techniques. A physically- justified RPVS fracture toughness indexation methodology, supported by micro-mechanistic modelling, is based on the elaborate use of the instrumented Charpy impact signal. Computational tools for neutron dosimetry allow to reduce the uncertainties on surveillance capsule fluences significantly

  14. Pressure Vessel Steel Research: Belgian Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E; Fabry, A; Ait Abderrahim, H; Chaouadi, R; D` hondt, P; Puzzolante, J L; Van de Velde, J; Van Ransbeeck, T [Centre d` Etude de l` Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Gerard, R [TRACTEBEL, Brussels (Belgium)

    1994-03-01

    A review of the Belgian research activities on Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels (RPVS) and on related Neutron Dosimetry Aspects is presented. Born out of the surveillance programmes of the Belgian nuclear power plants, this research has lead to the development of material saving techniques, like reconstitution and miniaturization, and to improved neutron dosimetry techniques. A physically- justified RPVS fracture toughness indexation methodology, supported by micro-mechanistic modelling, is based on the elaborate use of the instrumented Charpy impact signal. Computational tools for neutron dosimetry allow to reduce the uncertainties on surveillance capsule fluences significantly.

  15. Reports distributed in 1976 under the NRC Light-Water Reactor Safety Technical Exchange. Volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.S.; Cottrell, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Lists of documents exchanged in 1976 under agreement between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the governments of France, Federal Republic of Germany, and Japan are presented. In 1976 the NRC received 25 reports from France, 74 from F.R. Germany, and 39 from Japan, and in return sent 119 U.S. reports to France, 154 to F.R. Germany, and 155 to Japan

  16. Research of the Nature of Leadership Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jankurová

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Professional literature on leadership mostly states that a leader should be like (personality traits and describes different leadership styles and types. However, very little is known about what leaders do in their everyday practice, or how they do it. Leadership should be seen more widely and should be explored along the characteristics and style of leadership and how leaders are manifested externally through their work, which means to explore the nature of leadership work. The aim of the research project was to gain more knowledge about the activities undertaken by leaders to answer a simple, but yet not too clearly answered question: „What does a leader really do?“ This finding will help reveal important activities on which best leaders focus and determine which elements are really important for leadership. The research project was managed as a combination of interviews conducted with leaders, people on senior management positions along with a questionnaire survey.

  17. Research activities at the TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, K.; Trautmann, N.

    2002-01-01

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Mainz University became first critical on August 3, 1965. It can be operated in the steady state mode with a maximum power of 100 kW and in the pulse mode with a peak power of 250 MW. The TRIGA Mainz is mainly used for neutron activation analysis, isotope production, basic research in nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics as well as for education and training

  18. Research activities of Academician Frantisek Behounek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spurny, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The biography and research and development activities are reviewed of the Czech physicists, Academician Frantisek Behounek. Discussed in more detail are Behounek's scientific contribution during the North Pole Expedition of the Italia airship commanded by U. Nobile, leading to the discovery of the so-called width effect of cosmic radiation and his scientific work in the post-World War II period in the dosimetry and protection of personnel handling ionizing radiation. (B.S.)

  19. Research reactor operations for neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tv'ehlov, Yu.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA Special Manual devoted to quality control during neutron activation analysis (NAA) on research and test reactors is discussed. Three parts of the publication involve presentation of common rules for performance of NAA, quantitative and qualitative analyses, statistic and systematic errors, safety regulations and radioactive waste management. Besides, the publication contains practical manual for the performance of NAA, and examples of different NAA regulating registration forms are presented [ru

  20. MPD thruster research issues, activities, strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The following activities and plans in the MPD thruster development are summarized: (1) experimental and theoretical research (magnetic nozzles at present and high power levels, MPD thrusters with applied fields extending into the thrust chamber, and improved electrode performance); and (2) tools (MACH2 code for MPD and nozzle flow calculation, laser diagnostics and spectroscopy for non-intrusive measurements of flow conditions, and extension to higher power). National strategies are also outlined.

  1. Research nurse manager perceptions about research activities performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carolynn Thomas; Hastings, Clare; Wilson, Lynda Law

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited research to document differences in roles between nurses and non-nurses who assume clinical research coordination and management roles. Several authors have suggested that there is no acknowledged guidance for the licensure requirements for research study coordinators and that some non-nurse research coordinators may be assuming roles that are outside of their legal scopes of practice. There is a need for further research on issues related to the delegation of clinical research activities to non-nurses. This study used nominal group process focus groups to identify perceptions of experienced research nurse managers at an academic health science center in the Southern United States about the clinical research activities that are being performed by non-nurse clinical research coordinators without supervision that they believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the supervision of a nurse. A total of 13 research nurse managers volunteered to be contacted about the study. Of those, 8 participated in two separate nominal group process focus group sessions. The group members initially identified 22 activities that they felt should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. After discussion and clarification of results, activities were combined into 12 categories of clinical research activities that participants believed should only be performed by a nurse or under the direct supervision of a nurse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. NRC/UBC fuelling station with intelligent compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dada, A.; Boyd, B.; Law, L.; Semczyszyn, D.

    2004-01-01

    BOC Canada Ltd. will design, integrate and construct the second fueling station on the Hydrogen Highway. This station will be located at the National Research Council's Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation on the campus of the University of British Columbia. BOC's design will bring together an existing alkaline electrolyser, new compression, storage and dispensing. The station will be designed to serve fuel cell passenger vehicles using 350-bar storage. However, the flexible design concept will allow for many other user needs including the potential for servicing larger vehicles, as well as filling portable storage systems for use at satellite stations. The novel station design also offers the potential to fuel from multiple hydrogen sources. Together with NRC, this fueling station will be used to increase public, consumer and investor awareness of hydrogen technologies. Design and construction of this facility will assist in the development of industry codes and standards and familiarize authorities having jurisdiction with hydrogen fueling. The system concept offers the utmost attention to safety, novelty and flexibility. (author)

  3. 10 CFR 2.1202 - Authority and role of NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of NRC staff. 2.1202 Section 2.1202... ORDERS Informal Hearing Procedures for NRC Adjudications § 2.1202 Authority and role of NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings in its...

  4. Do recent data from the Seychelles Islands alter the conclusions of the NRC Report on the toxicological effects of methylmercury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobson Joseph L

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2000, the National Research Council (NRC, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences, released a report entitled, "Toxicological Effects of Methylmercury." The overall conclusion of that report was that, at levels of exposure in some fish- and marine mammal-consuming communities (including those in the Faroe Islands and New Zealand, subtle but significant adverse effects on neuropsychological development were occurring as a result of in utero exposure. Since the release of that report, there has been continuing discussion of the public health relevance of current levels of exposure to Methylmercury. Much of this discussion has been linked to the release of the most recent longitudinal update of the Seychelles Island study. It has recently been posited that these findings supercede those of the NRC committee, and that based on the Seychelles findings, there is little or no risk of adverse neurodevelopmental effects at current levels of exposure. In this commentary, members of the NRC committee address the conclusions from the NRC report in light of the recent Seychelles data. We conclude that no evidence has emerged since the publication of the NRC report that alters the findings of that report.

  5. Current activities at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Harling, Otto K.; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ames, Michael; Olmez, Ilhan

    1998-01-01

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a MW nuclear research reactor that is owned and operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to further its educational and research goals at both the undergraduate and graduate level. The reactor first achieved criticality in 1958. It was largely rebuilt in 1973/1974 by MIT staff and students, and its current license expires in August 1999. The current facility, which is designated as the MITR-H, uses a compact core with finned, aluminum-clad, plate-type fuel that is cooled and moderated by light water and reflected by heavy water. The reactor core can hold twenty-seven fuel elements. However, the normal configuration is twenty-four elements. A maximum of four fuel elements can be replaced with in-core experimental facilities. A unique feature of the MITR-II's design is that fixed absorber plates can be inserted in the upper half of the core. These cause the flux to peak in the lower half which benefits experimenters and also facilitates a fuel strategy that involves inversion of fuel elements midway through their life cycle. The MITR-II currently operates continuously for four weeks followed by shutdown of a few days for maintenance. This paper provides an overview of current activities at the MITR including preparations for re-licensing. The status of an on-going Phase-I clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy for both glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma is described as well as the design of a fission converter facility for BNCT. Environmental research using neutron activation analysis is summarized as well as in-pile research focussed on LWR water chemistry and structural materials. (author)

  6. Estimated incremental costs for NRC licensees to implement the US/IAEA safeguards agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.; Brouns, R.J.; Chockie, A.D.; Davenport, L.C.; Merrill, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A study was recently completed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commision (NRC) by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to identify the incremental cost of implementing the US/IAEA safeguards treaty agreement to eligible NRC licensees. Sources for the study were cost estimates from several licensees who will be affected by the agreement and cost analyses by PNL staff. The initial cost to all eligible licensees to implement the agreement is estimated by PNL to range from $1.9 to $7.2 million. The annual cost to these same licensees for the required accounting and reporting activities is estimated at $0.5 to $1.5 million. Annual inspection costs to the industry for the limited IAEA inspection being assumed is estimated at $80,000 to $160,000

  7. NRC/FEMA operational response procedures for response to a commercial nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    Procedures have been developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which provide the response teams of both agencies with the steps to be taken in responding to an emergency at a commercial nuclear power plant. The emphasis of these procedures is mainly on the interface between NRC and FEMA at their respective Headquarters and Regional Offices and at the various sites at which such an emergency could occur. Detailed procedures are presented that cover for both agencies, notification schemes and manner of activation, organizations at Headquaters and the site, interface procedures, coordination of onsite and offsite operations, the role of the Senior FEMA Official, and the cooperative efforts of each agency's public information staff

  8. NRC/FEMA operational response procedures for response to a commercial nuclear reactor accident. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    Procedures have been developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which provide the response teams of both agencies with the steps to be taken in responding to an emergency at a commercial nuclear power plant. The emphasis of these procedures is mainly on the interface between NRC and FEMA at their respective Headquarters and Regional Offices and at the various sites at which such an emergency could occur. Detailed procedures are presented that cover for both agencies, notification schemes and manner of activation, organizations at Headquarters and the site, interface procedures, coordination of onsite and offsite operations, the role of the Senior FEMA Official, and the cooperative efforts of each agency's public information staff

  9. EPRI/NRC-RES fire PRA guide for nuclear power facilities. Volume 1, summary and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report documents state-of-the-art methods, tools, and data for the conduct of a fire Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) for a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) application. The methods have been developed under the Fire Risk Re-quantification Study. This study was conducted as a joint activity between EPRI and the U. S. NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) under the terms of an EPRI/RES Memorandum of Understanding (RS.1) and an accompanying Fire Research Addendum (RS.2). Industry participants supported demonstration analyses and provided peer review of this methodology. The documented methods are intended to support future applications of Fire PRA, including risk-informed regulatory applications. The documented method reflects state-of-the-art fire risk analysis approaches. The primary objective of the Fire Risk Study was to consolidate recent research and development activities into a single state-of-the-art fire PRA analysis methodology. Methodological issues raised in past fire risk analyses, including the Individual Plant Examination of External Events (IPEEE) fire analyses, have been addressed to the extent allowed by the current state-of-the-art and the overall project scope. Methodological debates were resolved through a consensus process between experts representing both EPRI and RES. The consensus process included a provision whereby each major party (EPRI and RES) could maintain differing technical positions if consensus could not be reached. No cases were encountered where this provision was invoked. While the primary objective of the project was to consolidate existing state-of-the-art methods, in many areas, the newly documented methods represent a significant advancement over previously documented methods. In several areas, this project has, in fact, developed new methods and approaches. Such advances typically relate to areas of past methodological debate.

  10. Assessment of current NRC/IE professional training program and recommendations for improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartley, H.J.; Hagerup, J.E.; Harrison, O.J.; Heyer, F.H.K.; Kaas, I.W.; Schwartz, E.G.

    1978-05-01

    This document is the General Research Corporation (GRC) report on Task III: to assess the current NRC/IE professional training program and to provide recommendations for improvement. The major objectives of this task were to determine the overall effectiveness of the NRC/IE training program and to provide recommendations for improvements where appropriate. The research involved a review of course manuals and of student critiques, observation in the classroom and person to person interviews; it also included an evaluation of the assignment of instructors to the Career Management Branch. Findings addressed refresher training, retread training and initial training--with emphasis on the last of these. Conclusions are that: (1) The curriculum provides, in general, types and levels of training needed; (2) the mix of training methods used is correct; and (3) the training management is effective. However, the training facilities do not reflect a commitment to quality instruction nor is assignment as instructor to the Career Management Branch attractive to inspectors. Recommendations presented in the report are based upon the findings; all lie within the implementing authority of Headquarters NRC/IE

  11. Friction correction for model ship resistance and propulsion tests in ice at NRC's OCRE-RC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Lau

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the result of a preliminary analysis on the influence of hull-ice friction coefficient on model resistance and power predictions and their correlation to full-scale measurements. The study is based on previous model-scale/full-scale correlations performed on the National Research Council - Ocean, Coastal, and River Engineering Research Center's (NRC/OCRE-RC model test data. There are two objectives for the current study: (1 to validate NRC/OCRE-RC's modeling standards in regarding to its practice of specifying a CFC (Correlation Friction Coefficient of 0.05 for all its ship models; and (2 to develop a correction methodology for its resistance and propulsion predictions when the model is prepared with an ice friction coefficient slightly deviated from the CFC of 0.05. The mean CFC of 0.056 and 0.050 for perfect correlation as computed from the resistance and power analysis, respectively, have justified NRC/OCRE-RC's selection of 0.05 for the CFC of all its models. Furthermore, a procedure for minor friction corrections is developed. Keywords: Model test, Ice resistance, Power, Friction correction, Correlation friction coefficient

  12. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Pre-review report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research program of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  13. Assessment report on research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Interim report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-15

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research programs and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of two years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research programs of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  14. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: advanced science research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consults an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') during the period of two years from October 2005 to September 2007. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC, the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders, and interviews from group members through on-site visits by the Committee members. One CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  15. Research activities by INS cyclotron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    Research activities made by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at Institute for Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo, have been reviewed in terms of the associated scientific publications. This publication list, which is to be read as a continuation of INS-Rep.-608 (October, 1986), includes experimental works on low-energy nuclear physics, accelerator technology, instrumental developments, radiation physics and other applications in interdisciplinary fields. The publications are classified into the following four categories. (A) : Internal reports published in INS. (B) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental research works done by the cyclotron facility and the related apparatuses at INS. Those made by outside users are also included. (C) : Publications in international scientific journals on experimental low-energy nuclear physics, which have been done by the staff of INS Nuclear Physics Division using facilities outside INS. (D) : Contributions to international conferences. (author)

  16. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 1, Revision 17: Report of NRC approved packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  17. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages: Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  18. Recent developments in NRC guidelines for atmosphere cleanup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) maintains the policy of updating when necessary, its published guidance for the design of engineered safety feature (ESF) and normal ventilation systems. The guidance is disseminated by means of issuing new, or revisions to, existing Regulatory Guides, Standard Review Plans, Branch Technical Positions and Technical Specifications. A revised Regulatory Guide, new Technical Specifications and new Standard Review Plans with Branch Technical Positions for atmosphere cleanup systems are discussed. Regulatory Guide 1.52, ''Design, Testing and Maintenance Criteria for Atmosphere Cleanup System Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Plants,'' was issued in July 1973. The major comments received from the nuclear industry since the guide was issued, NRC's experience in implementing the guide in recent license applications, status of operating plants in meeting the guidelines and NRC's continuing assessment of operating data and laboratory tests to assure that the guide reflects the latest technology are discussed

  19. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madison, A.L. [Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  20. Congress, NRC mull utility access to FBI criminal files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultroska, D.

    1984-01-01

    Experiences at Alabama Power Company and other nuclear utilities have promped a request for institutionalizing security checks of personnel in order to eliminated convicted criminals and drug users. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), which could provide FBI criminal history information by submitting fingerprints, does not do so, and would require new legislation to take on that duty. Believing that current malevolent employees can be managed with existing procedures, NRC allows criminal background checks only on prospective employees in order to avoid a negative social impact on personnel. Legislation to transfer criminal histories to nuclear facilities is now pending, and NRC is leaning toward a request for full disclosure, partly because of terrorist threats and partly to save manpower time and costs in reviewing case histories

  1. Initial experience with the NRC significance determination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madison, A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has revamped its inspection, assessment, and enforcement programs for commercial nuclear power plants. The new oversight process uses more objective, timely, and safety-significant criteria in assessing performance, while seeking to more effectively and efficiently regulate the industry. The NRC tested the new process at thirteen reactors at nine sites across the country on a pilot basis in 1999 to identify what things worked well and what improvements were called for before beginning Initial Implementation at all US nuclear power plants on April 2, 2000. After a year of experience has been gained with the new oversight process at all US plants, the NRC anticipates making further improvements based on this wider experience. (author)

  2. Transition from Consultation to Monitoring-NRC's Increasingly Focused Review of Factors Important to F-Area Tank Farm Facility Performance - 13153

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Cynthia; Grossman, Christopher; Alexander, George; Parks, Leah; Fuhrmann, Mark; Shaffner, James; McKenney, Christepher [U.S. NRC, Rockville, MD (United States); Pabalan, Roberto; Pickett, David [Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States); Dinwiddie, Cynthia [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In consultation with the NRC, DOE issued a waste determination for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) facility in March 2012. The FTF consists of 22 underground tanks, each 2.8 to 4.9 million liters in capacity, used to store liquid high-level waste generated as a result of spent fuel reprocessing. The waste determination concluded stabilized waste residuals and associated tanks and auxiliary components at the time of closure are not high-level and can be disposed of as LLW. Prior to issuance of the final waste determination, during the consultation phase, NRC staff reviewed and provided comments on DOE's revision 0 and revision 1 FTF PAs that supported the waste determination and produced a technical evaluation report documenting the results of its multi-year review in October 2011. Following issuance of the waste determination, NRC began to monitor DOE disposal actions to assess compliance with the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C. To facilitate its monitoring responsibilities, NRC developed a plan to monitor DOE disposal actions. NRC staff was challenged in developing a focused monitoring plan to ensure limited resources are spent in the most cost-effective manner practical. To address this challenge, NRC prioritized monitoring areas and factors in terms of risk significance and timing. This prioritization was informed by NRC staff's review of DOE's PA documentation, independent probabilistic modeling conducted by NRC staff, and NRC-sponsored research conducted by the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses in San Antonio, TX. (authors)

  3. Yucca Mountain program summary of research and technical review activities, July 1988--June 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI), through its Water Resources Center (WRC), since 1984 has supported the State of Nevada Nuclear Waste Project Office's activities related to the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This effort is directed at providing the State Office with an unbiased evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) investigations performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The overall objective is to determine independently whether or not the site meets the performance criteria defined by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and amendments for isolating and containing the wastes during emplacement and the proposed life of the repository. A particularly important area of concern with the proposed repository is the site's hydrology. The faculty of the DRI have long been involved with research throughout the State and have particular expertise in groundwater studies related to radionuclide migration and hydrologic safety of underground nuclear testing by DOE and predecessor agencies. In addition, we utilize laboratory personnel for chemical and isotopic analyses in both of the DRI-WMC water chemistry laboratories

  4. Terrestrial Analogs to Mars: NRC Community Panel Decadal Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.

    2002-12-01

    A report was completed recently by a Community Panel for the NRC Decadal Study of Solar System Exploration. The desire was for a review of the current state of knowledge and for recommendations for action over the next decade. The topic of this panel, Terrestrial Analogs to Mars, was chosen to bring attention to the need for an increase in analog studies in support of the increased pace of Mars exploration. It is well recognized that interpretations of Mars must begin with the Earth as a reference. The most successful comparisons have focused on understanding geologic processes on the Earth well enough to extrapolate to Mars' environment. Several facets of terrestrial analog studies have been pursued and are continuing. These studies include field workshops, characterization of terrestrial analog sites, instrument tests, laboratory measurements (including analysis of martian meteorites), and computer and laboratory modeling. The combination of all of these activities allows scientists to constrain the processes operating in specific terrestrial environments and extrapolate how similar processes could affect Mars. The Terrestrial Analogs for Mars Community Panel has considered the following two key questions: (1) How do terrestrial analog studies tie in to the overarching science questions about life, past climate, and geologic evolution of Mars, and (2) How can future instrumentation be used to address these questions. The panel considered the issues of data collection and archiving, value of field workshops, laboratory measurements and modeling, human exploration issues, association with other areas of solar system exploration, and education and public outreach activities. Parts of this work were performed under contract to NASA.

  5. Electromechanically active polymer transducers: research in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Federico; Graz, Ingrid; Jager, Edwin; Ladegaard Skov, Anne; Vidal, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Smart materials and structures based on electromechanically active polymers (EAPs) represent a fast growing and stimulating field of research and development. EAPs are materials capable of changing dimensions and/or shape in response to suitable electrical stimuli. They are commonly classified in two major families: ionic EAPs (activated by an electrically induced transport of ions and/or solvent) and electronic EAPs (activated by electrostatic forces). These polymers show interesting properties, such as sizable active strains and/or stresses in response to electrical driving, high mechanical flexibility, low density, structural simplicity, ease of processing and scalability, no acoustic noise and, in most cases, low costs. Since many of these characteristics can also describe natural muscle tissues from an engineering standpoint, it is not surprising that EAP transducers are sometimes also referred to as 'muscle-like smart materials' or 'artificial muscles'. They are used not only to generate motion, but also to sense or harvest energy from it. In particular, EAP electromechanical transducers are studied for applications that can benefit from their 'biomimetic' characteristics, with possible usages from the micro- to the macro-scale, spanning several disciplines, such as mechatronics, robotics, automation, biotechnology and biomedical engineering, haptics, fluidics, optics and acoustics. Currently, the EAP field is just undergoing its initial transition from academic research into commercialization, with companies starting to invest in this technology and the first products appearing on the market. This focus issue is intentionally aimed at gathering contributions from the most influential European groups working in the EAP field. In fact, today Europe hosts the broadest EAP community worldwide. The rapid expansion of the EAP field in Europe, where it historically has strong roots, has stimulated the creation of the 'European Scientific Network for Artificial

  6. Development of Mitigation Strategy for Beyond Design Basis External Events for NRC Design Certification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hak; Lee, Jae Jong; Kim, Myung Ki [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, how to develop FLEX strategy for beyond-design-basis external events for U. S. NRC design certification is examined. The development method of FLEX strategy for U. S. NRC design certification is examined. The applicants should make unit-specific FLEX strategy and establish the minimum coping capabilities consistent with unit-specific evaluation of the potential impacts and responses to BDBEEs. NEI 12-06 outlines the process to define and deploy the diverse and flexible mitigation strategies(FLEX strategy) that will increase defense-in-depth for beyond-design-basis scenarios to address the extended loss of alternating current (ac) power (ELAP) and loss of normal access to the ultimate heat sink (LUHS) occurring simultaneously at all units on a site. The order (EA-12-049) is issued to all reactor licensees, including holders of active, Construction Permit (CP) holders, and Combined License (COL) holders. Applicants for the new reactor design certification should prepare and submit FLEX strategy for NRC staff's review. Site-specific data related with the new reactor can't be determined during the new reactor design certification applications so that the unit-specific FLEX strategy should be developed.

  7. Development of Mitigation Strategy for Beyond Design Basis External Events for NRC Design Certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Hak; Lee, Jae Jong; Kim, Myung Ki

    2013-01-01

    In this study, how to develop FLEX strategy for beyond-design-basis external events for U. S. NRC design certification is examined. The development method of FLEX strategy for U. S. NRC design certification is examined. The applicants should make unit-specific FLEX strategy and establish the minimum coping capabilities consistent with unit-specific evaluation of the potential impacts and responses to BDBEEs. NEI 12-06 outlines the process to define and deploy the diverse and flexible mitigation strategies(FLEX strategy) that will increase defense-in-depth for beyond-design-basis scenarios to address the extended loss of alternating current (ac) power (ELAP) and loss of normal access to the ultimate heat sink (LUHS) occurring simultaneously at all units on a site. The order (EA-12-049) is issued to all reactor licensees, including holders of active, Construction Permit (CP) holders, and Combined License (COL) holders. Applicants for the new reactor design certification should prepare and submit FLEX strategy for NRC staff's review. Site-specific data related with the new reactor can't be determined during the new reactor design certification applications so that the unit-specific FLEX strategy should be developed

  8. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages; Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, and index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material using these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.393a and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them--that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  9. PRA research and the development of risk-informed regulation at the U.S. nuclear regulatory commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, Nathan; Collins, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Over the years, Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) research activities conducted at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have played an essential role in support of the agency's move towards risk-informed regulation. These research activities have provided the technical basis for NRC's regulatory activities in key areas; provided PRA methods, tools, and data enabling the agency to meet future challenges; supported the implementation of NRC's 1995 PRA Policy Statement by assessing key sources of risk; and supported the development of necessary technical and human resources supporting NRC's risk-informed activities. PRA research aimed at improving the NRC's understanding of risk can positively affect the agency's regulatory activities, as evidenced by three case studies involving research on fire PRA, Human Reliability Analysis (HRA), and Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS) PRA. These case studies also show that such research can take a considerable amount of time, and that the incorporation of research results into regulatory practice can take even longer. The need for sustained effort and appropriate lead time is an important consideration in the development of a PRA research program aimed at helping the agency address key sources of risk for current and potential future facilities

  10. Stakeholder confidence in effective safety regulation. A regulator's view on the role of independent research capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotra, Janet; Mohanty, Sitakanto

    2006-01-01

    Analyses (CNWRA) as a conflict-free body of experts to assist the NRC in making independent judgements about the safety case of the nation's first geological repository for high-level radioactive waste. The CNWRA supports the NRC's regulatory mission with a wide range of independent technical expertise, computers, laboratories and field research. In addition to providing broad technical support to the NRC, CNWRA experts support the NRC's public meetings, open houses and other public outreach activities, assisting with the identification of key technical concepts and plain language communications concerning research findings and limitations. NRC sought to create a centre that would provide expertise that: - is competent, employing recognized experts, scientists and engineers, with in-depth knowledge of the scientific and technical issues related to the potential repository at Yucca Mountain; - is independent of the DOE, free from any potential conflict of interest, or appearance of such conflicts; - assures long-term continuity of technical support and the maintenance of corporate memory of the evolution of repository safety and regulatory issues; and - complements NRC's skill sets, avoiding gaps and overlaps in expertise between the NRC and CNWRA. NRC's reliance on independent expertise will assist in conveying to stakeholders that the NRC is able to challenge DOE assumptions and assertions and arrive at objective conclusions about the safety of the potential repository

  11. NRC Regulatory Agenda. Quarterly report, July-September 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed, or is considering action as well as those on which it has recently completed action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received and are pending disposition by the Commission

  12. NRC Regulatory Agenda: Quarterly report, January--March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed, or is considering action as well as those on which it has recently completed action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received and are pending disposition by the Commission

  13. 75 FR 6063 - Availability of NRC Open Government Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... ( http://www.nrc.gov/open ) will be available by February 6, 2010, and directs that, after February 10... http://www.regulations.gov Web site. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James B. Schaeffer, Deputy..., 2010, and provided options for submitting comments by mail, fax, or at http://www.regulations.gov , but...

  14. IAU Project and Research Activity in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Suman

    2015-08-01

    The second half of the twentieth century has witnessed a tremendous development in the field of astronomy and space exploration. The large telescope both on the land and in the orbit, using the whole range of the electromagnetic spectra from radio waves to gamma rays are extending their range of exploration, right to the edge of the observable universe, and making astounding discoveries in the process. Many large international telescope facilities and global plans are accessible to all astronomers throughout the world, providing an inexpensive entry to cutting- edge international research for developing countries.Nepal is a mountainous country it has a wide range of climatic and altitude variations which varies from an elevation of 200 meter to ≥ 4000 meter. The average temperature varies from ≥ 25 o C to ≤ 0 to 5oC. Because of these diverse weather and climatic variation there is the potential for the establishment of sophisticated observatory/ data centre and link with each other. So, the future possible opportunity of astronomy in Nepal will be discussed. Besides Education and Research activities conducted in Tribhuvan University, Nepal under the support of International Astronomical Union (IAU) will also be highlighted. The importance brought by those two workshops conducted on data simulation supported by IAU under TF1 will also be discussed which is believed to play a vital role for the promotion and development of astronomy and astrophysics in developing countries.

  15. Advanced ASON prototyping research activities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, WeiSheng; Jin, Yaohui; Guo, Wei; Su, Yikai; He, Hao; Sun, Weiqiang

    2005-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of prototyping research activities of automatically switched optical networks and transport networks (ASONs/ASTNs) in China. In recent years, China has recognized the importance and benefits of the emerging ASON/ASTN techniques. During the period of 2001 and 2002, the national 863 Program of China started the preliminary ASON research projects with the main objectives to build preliminary ASON testbeds, develop control plane protocols and test their performance in the testbeds. During the period of 2003 and 2004, the 863 program started ASTN prototyping equipment projects for more practical applications. Totally 12 ASTN equipments are being developed by three groups led by Chinese venders: ZTE with Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), Wuhan Research Institute of Posts and Telecommunication (WRI) with Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU), and Huawei Inc. Meanwhile, as the ASTN is maturing, some of the China"s carries are participating in the OIF"s World Interoperability Demonstration, carrying out ASTN test, or deploying ASTN backbone networks. Finally, several ASTN backbone networks being tested or deployed now will be operated by the carries in 2005. The 863 Program will carry out an ASTN field trail in Yangtse River Delta, and finally deploy the 3TNET. 3TNET stands for Tbps transmission, Tbps switching, and Tbps routing, as well as a network integrating the above techniques. A task force under the "863" program is responsible for ASTN equipment specifications and interoperation agreements, technical coordination among all the participants, schedule of the whole project during the project undergoing, and organization of internetworking of all the equipments in the laboratories and field trials.

  16. Assessment report on research and development activities. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as “JAEA”) consulted an assessment committee, “Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research” (hereinafter referred to as “Committee”) for interim assessment of “Advanced Science Research,” in accordance with “General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities” by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, “Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology” and “Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities” by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research programs and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as “ASRC”) for the period of two years from April 2010. The Committee evaluated the management and the research programs of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the result of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached from page 7. (author)

  17. Assessment report of research and development activities. Activity: 'Nuclear science and engineering research' (Interim report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consults an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Nuclear Science and Engineering' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for interim assessment of 'Nuclear Science and Engineering,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by the JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research program of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Directorate (hereinafter referred to as 'NSED') and Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (hereinafter referred to as 'CCSE') during the period of about four years from September 2008 to September 2012. The Committee evaluated the management and research activities of the NSED and the CCSE based on explanatory documents prepared by the NSED and the CCSE, and oral presentations with questions-and-answers by unit managers etc. A CD-ROM is attached as an appendix. (J.P.N.)

  18. Decommissioning activities for Salaspils research reactor - 59055

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenkovs, A.; Malnacs, J.

    2012-01-01

    In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor (SRR). The reactor is out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study for the decommissioning of SRR has been carried out by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH at 1998-1999. The Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to 'green field' in October 26, 1999. The upgrade of decommissioning and dismantling plan was performed in 2003-2004 years, which change the main goal of decommissioning to the 'brown field'. The paper deals with the SRR decommissioning experience during 1999-2010. The main decommissioning stages are discussed including spent fuel and radioactive wastes management. The legal aspects and procedures for decommissioning of SRR are described in the paper. It was found, that the involvement of stakeholders at the early stages significantly promotes the decommissioning of nuclear facility. Radioactive waste management's main efforts were devoted to collecting and conditioning of 'historical' radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside of reactor hall. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons) were conditioned in concrete containers for disposal in the radioactive wastes repository 'Radons' at Baldone site. The dismantling of contaminated and activated components of SRR systems is discussed in paper. The cementation of dismantled radioactive wastes in concrete containers is discussed. Infrastructure of SRR, including personal protective and radiation measurement equipment, for decommissioning purposes was upgraded significantly. Additional attention was devoted to the free release measurement's technique. The certified laboratory was installed for supporting of all decommissioning activities. All non-radioactive equipments and materials outside of reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reusing or conventional disposing. Weakly contaminated materials from reactor hall were collected

  19. Instrumental neutron activation analysis in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruin, M. de.

    1985-01-01

    The main characteristics of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA),relevant for environmental research and monitoring, was reviewed and discussed-sensitivity, suitable for detection of many toxic elements, the low risks of contamination of element loss, lack of matrix effects, lack of light element interference except for 24 Na, capability for multi-element determination, comparatively low costs. A detailed description of the IRI analysis system for routine INAA is given. The system is based on the single comparator method of standartization to take full advantage of multi-element without preparation and use the trace element standards. Zinc was used as mono element standard, the element concentrations are calculated on the basis of 65 Zn and 69m Zn-activities. The irradiations were carried out in a thermal neutron flux of 1.10 13 n/cm 2 .s. The gamma spectra is converted into element concentrations using a set of dedicated software, performing the following functions: spectrum analysis and interpretation, comparison and combination of the intermediate results from different decay times, generation of the final report, bookkeeping of the results obtained. The main applications of the INAA system mentioned are: identification of sources of heavy metal air pollution using air filters or biological indicators such as mosses, lichens, toe-nails, bird feathers, molusks and waterplants; and study of the uptake and translocation of heavy element in plants. Special attention was paid to mathematical techniques for a reliable interpretation of the element concentration patterns observed in sets of lichen samples. Future developments in INAA in environmental science are briefly mentioned

  20. SU-A-210-02: Medical Physics Opportunities at the NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abogunde, M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the

  1. SU-A-210-02: Medical Physics Opportunities at the NRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abogunde, M. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the

  2. Armenian nuclear power plant: US NRC assistance programme for seismic upgrade and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simos, N.; Perkins, K.; Jo, J.; Carew, J.; Ramsey, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (US NRC) technical support program activities associated with the Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) safety upgrade. The US NRC program, integrated within the overall IAEA-led initiative for safety re-evaluation of the WWER plants, has as its main thrust the technical support to the Armenian Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ANRA) through close collaboration with the scientific staff at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Several major technical areas of support to ANRA form the basis of the NRC program. These include the seismic re-evaluation and upgrade of the ANPP, safety evaluation of critical systems, and the generation of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR). Specifically, the seismic re-evaluation of the ANPP is part of a broader activity that involves the re-assessment of the seismic hazard at the site, the identification of the Safe Shutdown Equipment at the plant and the evaluation of their seismic capacity, the detailed modeling and analysis of the critical facilities at ANPP, and the generation of the Floor Response Spectra (FRS). Based on the new spectra that incorporate all new findings (hazard, site soil, structure, etc.), the overall capacity of the main structures and the seismic capacity of the critical systems are being re-evaluated. In addition, analyses of critical safe shutdown systems and safe shutdown processes are being performed to ensure both the capabilities of the operating systems and the enhancement of safety due to system upgrades. At present, one of the principal goals of the US NRC's regulatory assistance activities with ANRA is enhancing ANRA's regulatory oversight of high-priority safety issues (both generic and plant-specific) associated with operation of the ANPP. As such, assisting ANRA in understanding and assessing plant-specific seismic and other safety issues associated with the ANPP is a high priority given the ANPP's being located in a seismically active area

  3. Session Report - S. Smith (US NRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    - environment needed for safety functions; some degree of flexibility in regulatory review and assessment; education of workers: identify differences as compared to conventional rock engineering; applicability of mining regulations. In Sweden the site selection process for the final repository for spent nuclear fuel was initiated in 1992 and resulted, in June 2009, in the selection of Forsmark as the selected site for the final repository. Nuclear facilities require permits in accordance with the Swedish Environmental Code and the Nuclear Activities Act. SKB has submitted two applications to SSM (the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority) according to the Nuclear Activities Act and one to the Environmental Court according to the Environmental Code. The application according the Environmental Code includes the whole KBS-3-system - the final repository in Forsmark, the existing interim storage facility and the encapsulation plant in Oskarshamn. The challenges for the implementer and the regulator are the following: number of documents to elaborate and structure of these documents; right of veto of municipalities; management of a complex licensing process; change from R and D to industrial operations implying the creation of a sizeable construction department in SKB; strengthening of technical bases; application of regulatory framework in a different situation compared to conventional process type nuclear facilities; understanding and addressing constraints from post-closure safety related to the construction and operation of the repository; management of the time frames of repository operation requiring flexibility and continued development of disposal concept; flexible regulations: first use as basis for licensing a new nuclear facility; making adjustments for structural changes during construction and operation; ensuring excavation/construction/backfill activities do not jeopardize conditions for passive post-closure; application of general regulations for a KBS-3 type repository

  4. Active Provenance in Data-intensive Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuso, Alessandro; Mihajlovski, Andrej; Filgueira, Rosa; Atkinson, Malcolm

    2017-04-01

    Scientific communities are building platforms where the usage of data-intensive workflows is crucial to conduct their research campaigns. However managing and effectively support the understanding of the 'live' processes, fostering computational steering, sharing and re-use of data and methods, present several bottlenecks. These are often caused by the poor level of documentation on the methods and the data and how users interact with it. This work wants to explore how in such systems, flexibility in the management of the provenance and its adaptation to the different users and application contexts can lead to new opportunities for its exploitation, improving productivity. In particular, this work illustrates a conceptual and technical framework enabling tunable and actionable provenance in data-intensive workflow systems in support of reproducible science. It introduces the concept of Agile data-intensive systems to define the characteristic of our target platform. It shows a novel approach to the integration of provenance mechanisms, offering flexibility in the scale and in the precision of the provenance data collected, ensuring its relevance to the domain of the data-intensive task, fostering its rapid exploitation. The contributions address aspects of the scale of the provenance records, their usability and active role in the research life-cycle. We will discuss the use of dynamically generated provenance types as the approach for the integration of provenance mechanisms into a data-intensive workflow system. Enabling provenance can be transparent to the workflow user and developer, as well as fully controllable and customisable, depending from their expertise and the application's reproducibility, monitoring and validation requirements. The API that allows the realisation and adoption of a provenance type is presented, especially for what concerns the support of provenance profiling, contextualisation and precision. An actionable approach to provenance

  5. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] direct radiation monitoring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1989-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the second quarter of 1989

  6. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, January-March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first quarter of 1988

  7. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the second quarter of 1988

  8. Activity report of Computing Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-07-01

    On April 1997, National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo (INS), and Meson Science Laboratory, Faculty of Science, University of Tokyo began to work newly as High Energy Accelerator Research Organization after reconstructing and converting their systems, under aiming at further development of a wide field of accelerator science using a high energy accelerator. In this Research Organization, Applied Research Laboratory is composed of four Centers to execute assistance of research actions common to one of the Research Organization and their relating research and development (R and D) by integrating the present four centers and their relating sections in Tanashi. What is expected for the assistance of research actions is not only its general assistance but also its preparation and R and D of a system required for promotion and future plan of the research. Computer technology is essential to development of the research and can communize for various researches in the Research Organization. On response to such expectation, new Computing Research Center is required for promoting its duty by coworking and cooperating with every researchers at a range from R and D on data analysis of various experiments to computation physics acting under driving powerful computer capacity such as supercomputer and so forth. Here were described on report of works and present state of Data Processing Center of KEK at the first chapter and of the computer room of INS at the second chapter and on future problems for the Computing Research Center. (G.K.)

  9. Data Management Activities of Canada's National Science Library - 2010 Update and Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Zborowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available NRC-CISTI serves Canada as its National Science Library (as mandated by Canada's Parliament in 1924 and also provides direct support to researchers of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC. By reason of its mandate, vision, and strategic positioning, NRC-CISTI has been rapidly and effectively mobilizing Canadian stakeholders and resources to become a lead player on both the Canadian national and international scenes in matters relating to the organization and management of scientific research data. In a previous communication (CODATA International Conference, 2008, the orientation of NRC-CISTI towards this objective and its short- and medium-term plans and strategies were presented. Since then, significant milestones have been achieved. This paper presents NRC-CISTI's most recent activities in these areas, which are progressing well alongside a strategic organizational redesign process that is realigning NRC-CISTI's structure, mission, and mandate to better serve its clients. Throughout this transformational phase, activities relating to data management remain vibrant.

  10. Research Training, Institutional Support, and Self-Efficacy: Their Impact on Research Activity of Social Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Thomas Lynch

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available While the expectations for social work practitioners to do research have increased, their involvement is still limited. We know little about what factors influence involvement in research. The present study proposes a theoretical model that hypothesizes research training and institutional support for research as the exogenous variables, research self-efficacy as an intervening variable, and research activity as the endogenous variable. The study tests the model using data collected from a random sample of social workers. To a large degree the data support the model. Research self-efficacy has a significant effect on research activity. It is also an important mediating variable for the effect of institutional support on research activity. Although institutional support for research has no direct effect, it has an indirect effect via self-efficacy on research activity. However, research training has no effect on research activity and self-efficacy in research. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Action Research as a Professional Development Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Reflective teachers are always searching for ways to improve their teaching. When this reflection becomes intentional and systematic, they are engaging in teacher research. This type of research, sometimes called "action research", can help bridge the gap between theory and practice by addressing topics that are relevant to practicing teachers.…

  12. 76 FR 57767 - Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-16

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0204] Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... FR 54507), that requested public comment on Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011- XX: Seismic Risk...

  13. 10 CFR 2.1403 - Authority and role of the NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of the NRC staff. 2.1403 Section 2.1403... ORDERS Expedited Proceedings with Oral Hearings § 2.1403 Authority and role of the NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings in its own...

  14. 10 CFR 2.1316 - Authority and role of NRC staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority and role of NRC staff. 2.1316 Section 2.1316... ORDERS Procedures for Hearings on License Transfer Applications § 2.1316 Authority and role of NRC staff. (a) During the pendency of any hearing under this subpart, consistent with the NRC staff's findings...

  15. NRC wants plant-specific responses on Thermo-Lag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    Dissatisfied with recent industry-backed efforts to assure fire safety at nuclear power plants, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission announced on November 24 that it would direct all nuclear plant owners to specify the actions they would take to assure that the use of the Thermo-Lag 330 fire barrier material would not lead to insufficient protection of electrical cables connected to safe-shutdown systems. Previously, the NRC had been content to let the matter wait until tests sponsored by the Nuclear Management and Resources Council (Numarc) could show whether Thermo-Lag, used and installed in certain ways, would provide sufficient protection, but the NRC and Numarc have disagreed over the test methodology, and the Numarc tests are now considered to be several months behind schedule

  16. NRC Regulatory Agenda. Quarterly report, July-September 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The Regulatory Agenda is a quarterly compilation of all rules on which the NRC has proposed or is considering action and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received and are pending disposition by the Commission. The agenda consists of two sections. Section I, Rules, includes: (1) rules on which final action has been taken since June 30, the cutoff date of the last Regulatory Agenda; (2) rules published previously as proposed rules and on which the Commission has not taken final action; (3) rules published as advance notices of proposed rulemaking and for which neither a proposed nor final rule has been issued; and (4) unpublished rules on which the NRC expects to take action. Section II, Petitions for Rulemaking, includes: (1) Petitions incorporated into final rules or petitions denied since the cutoff date of the last Regulatory Agenda; (2) Petitions incorporated into proposed rules, (3) Petitions pending staff review; and (4) Petitions with deferred action

  17. Evaluation of NRC maintenance team inspection reports for managing aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresco, A.; Gunther, W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear power plant's maintenance program is the principal vehicle through which age-related degradation is managed. Over the past two years, the NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] has evaluated the maintenance program of every nuclear power plant in the U.S. The reports issued on these in-depth team inspections have been reviewed to ascertain the strengths and weaknesses of the programs as related to the need to understand and manage the effects of aging on nuclear power plant systems, structures, and components. Selected results of this review are presented in this paper, including examples of inspection and monitoring techniques successfully used by utilities to detect degradation due to aging. Attributes of plant maintenance programs where the NRC inspectors felt that improvement was needed to properly address the aging issue are also discussed. 6 refs., 1 tab

  18. NRC drug-free workplace plan. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    On September 15, 1986, President Reagan signed Executive Order 12564, establishing the goal of a Drug-Free Federal Workplace. The Order made it a condition of employment that all Federal employees refrain from using illegal drugs on or off duty. On July 11, 1987, Congress passed legislation affecting implementation of the Executive Order under Section 503 of the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1987, Public Law 100-71 (the Act). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission first issued the NRC Drug Testing Plan to set forth objectives, policies, procedures, and implementation guidelines to achieve a drug-free Federal workplace, consistent with the Executive Order and Section 503 of the Act. Revision 1, titled, ``NRC Drug-Free Workplace Plan,`` supersedes the previous version and its supplements and incorporates changes to reflect current guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as other guidance.

  19. Implementation study for the NRC Application and Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, R.J.; Ross, D.J.; Sasser, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed the desire to establish an Application and Development Facility (ADF) for NRC Headquarters. The ADF is a computer system which will provide safeguards analysts access to safeguards analysis computer software. This report analyzes the issues, requirements and options available in the establishment of an ADF. The purpose and goals of the ADF are presented, along with some general issues to be considered in the implementation of such a system. A phased approach for ADF implementation, which will allow for the earliest possible access to existing codes and also allow for future expansion, is outlined. Several options for central computers are discussed, along with the characteristics and approximate costs for each. The report concludes with recommended actions proposed to start the development of the ADF

  20. NRC drug-free workplace plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    On September 15, 1986, President Reagan signed Executive Order 12564, establishing the goal of a Drug-Free Federal Workplace. The Order made it a condition of employment that all Federal employees refrain from using illegal drugs on or off duty. On July 11, 1987, Congress passed legislation affecting implementation of the Executive Order under Section 503 of the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1987, Public Law 100-71 (the Act). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission first issued the NRC Drug Testing Plan to set forth objectives, policies, procedures, and implementation guidelines to achieve a drug-free Federal workplace, consistent with the Executive Order and Section 503 of the Act. Revision 1, titled, ''NRC Drug-Free Workplace Plan,'' supersedes the previous version and its supplements and incorporates changes to reflect current guidance from the Department of Justice, the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as other guidance

  1. NRC Enforcement Policy Review, July 1995-July 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, J.; Pedersen, R.M.

    1998-04-01

    On June 30, 1995, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a complete revision of its General Statement of Policy and Procedure for Enforcement Action (Enforcement Policy) (60 FR 34381). In approving the 1995 revision to the Enforcement Policy, the Commission directed the staff to perform a review of its implementation of the Policy after approximately 2 years of experience and to consider public comments. This report represents the results of that review

  2. Research Note: Comparative antibacterial activities of oil-palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Note: Comparative antibacterial activities of oil-palm Elaeis ... The antimicrobial activities liquid pyrolysates (obtained by destructive distillation), their ... respective chloroform fractions which showed higher activities than the crude ...

  3. Handbook for value-impact assessments of NRC regulatory actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, M.F.; DiPalo, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    According to current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) procedures, value-impact (cost-benefit) assessments must be prepared for all rulemaking actions and for a broad range of other regulatory requirements and guidance. Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods furnish an important part of the information base for these assessments. PRA methods are frequently the principal quantitative tool for estimating the benefits (e.g., public risk reduction) of proposed regulatory actions. In December 1983, the NRC published A Handbook for Value-Impact Assessment, NUREG/CR-3568, which provides a set of systematic procedures for performing value-impact assessments. The Handbook contains methods, data, and sources of information that can assist the regulatory analyst in conducting such assessments. The use of probabilistic risk analysis to estimate the benefits of proposed regulatory actions is described. Procedures and methods are also given for evaluating the costs and other consequences associated with regulatory actions. The Handbook has been adopted by the NRC as the recommended guideline for value impact assessments. This paper presents the background, objectives, and scope of the Handbook, describes the value-impact assessment methods (including the use of probabilistic risk assessment to estimate benefits), and discusses a selection of current and planned applications, with examples to illustrate how the methods are used

  4. Karlsruhe nuclear research center. Main activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on problems of securing the fuel supply for nuclear power generation, on reprocessing and ultimate storage of radioactive material, on the safety of nuclear facilities, on new technologies and basic research, and on the infrastructure of the Karlsruhe nuclear research center, as well as finance and administration. (HK) [de

  5. The use of NPAR results in plant inspection activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunther, W.; Taylor, J.

    1990-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program is a hardware oriented research program which has produced a large data base of equipment and system operating, maintenance, and testing information. Equipment and systems which have a propensity for age related degradation are identified, and methods for detecting and mitigating aging effects have been evaluated. As plants age, it becomes increasingly important that NRC inspectors be cognizant of plant aging phenomena. This paper describes the NPAR information which can enhance inspection activities, and provides a mechanism for making pertinent research available to the inspectors

  6. Memorandum of Understanding Between U.S. EPA Superfund and U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) are responsible for implementing the 'Memorandum of Understanding Between the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission: Consultation and Finality on Decommissioning and Decontamination of Contaminated Sites'. This paper provides a brief overview of the origin of the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), the major features of the MOU, and how the MOU has been implemented site specifically. EPA and NRC developed the MOU in response to direction from the House Committee on Appropriations to EPA and NRC to work together to address the potential for dual regulation. The MOU was signed by EPA on September 30, 2002 and NRC on October 9, 2002. The two agencies had worked on the MOU since March 2000. While both EPA and NRC have statutory authority to clean up these sites, the MOU provides consultation procedures between EPA and NRC to eliminate dual regulation. Under the MOU, EPA and NRC identified the interactions of the two agencies for the decommissioning and decontamination of NRC-licensed sites and the ways in which those responsibilities will be exercised. Except for Section VI, which addresses corrective action under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), this MOU is limited to the coordination between EPA, when acting under its CERCLA authority, and NRC, when a facility licensed by the NRC is undergoing decommissioning, or when a facility has completed decommissioning, and the NRC has terminated its license. EPA believes that implementation of the MOU between the two agencies will ensure that future confusion about dual regulation does not occur regarding the cleanup and reuse of NRC-licensed sites. NRC and EPA have so far exchanged MOU consultation letters on eight NRC-licensed sites. EPA has responded to each consultation request with a letter expressing its views on actions

  7. Fast reactor research activities in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, A.

    1998-01-01

    Fast reactor activities in Brazil have the objective of establishing a consistent knowledge basis which can serve as a support for a future transitions to the activities more directly related to design, construction and operation of an experimental fast reactor, although its materialization is still far from being decided. Due to the present economic difficulties and uncertainties, the program is modest and all efforts have been directed towards its consolidation, based on the understanding that this class of reactors will play an important role in the future and Brazil needs to be minimally prepared. The text describes the present status of those activities, emphasizing the main progress made in 1996. (author)

  8. Beef Species Symposium: an assessment of the 1996 Beef NRC: metabolizable protein supply and demand and effectiveness of model performance prediction of beef females within extensive grazing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, R C; Caton, J S; Löest, C A; Petersen, M K; Roberts, A J

    2014-07-01

    Interannual variation of forage quantity and quality driven by precipitation events influence beef livestock production systems within the Southern and Northern Plains and Pacific West, which combined represent 60% (approximately 17.5 million) of the total beef cows in the United States. The beef cattle requirements published by the NRC are an important tool and excellent resource for both professionals and producers to use when implementing feeding practices and nutritional programs within the various production systems. The objectives of this paper include evaluation of the 1996 Beef NRC model in terms of effectiveness in predicting extensive range beef cow performance within arid and semiarid environments using available data sets, identifying model inefficiencies that could be refined to improve the precision of predicting protein supply and demand for range beef cows, and last, providing recommendations for future areas of research. An important addition to the current Beef NRC model would be to allow users to provide region-specific forage characteristics and the ability to describe supplement composition, amount, and delivery frequency. Beef NRC models would then need to be modified to account for the N recycling that occurs throughout a supplementation interval and the impact that this would have on microbial efficiency and microbial protein supply. The Beef NRC should also consider the role of ruminal and postruminal supply and demand of specific limiting AA. Additional considerations should include the partitioning effects of nitrogenous compounds under different physiological production stages (e.g., lactation, pregnancy, and periods of BW loss). The intent of information provided is to aid revision of the Beef NRC by providing supporting material for changes and identifying gaps in existing scientific literature where future research is needed to enhance the predictive precision and application of the Beef NRC models.

  9. NRC confirmatory safety system testing in support of AP600 design review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, G.S.; Bessette, D.E.; Shotkin, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation has submitted the Advanced Passive 600 MWe (AP600) nuclear power plant design to the NRC for design certification. The Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research is proceeding to conduct confirmatory testing to help the NRC staff evaluate the AP600 safety system design. For confirmatory testing, it was determined that the cost-effective route was to modify an existing full-height, full-pressure test facility rather than build a new one. Thus, all the existing integral effects test facilities, both in the US and abroad, were screened to select the best candidate. As a result, the ROSA-V (Rig of Safety Assessment-V) test facility located in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was chosen. However, because of some differences in design between the existing ROSA-V facility and the AP600, the ROSA-V is being modified to conform to the AP600 safety system design. The modification work will be completed by the end of this year. A series of facility characterization tests will then be performed in January 1994 for the modified part of the facility before the main test series is initiated in February 1994. A total of 12 tests will be performed in 1994 under Phase I of this cooperative program with JAERI. Phase II testing is being considered to be conducted in 1995 mainly for beyond-design-basis accident evaluation

  10. Boost-phase discrimination research activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David M.; Deiwert, George S.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical research in two areas was performed. The aerothermodynamics research focused on the hard-body and rocket plume flows. Analytical real gas models to describe finite rate chemistry were developed and incorporated into the three-dimensional flow codes. New numerical algorithms capable of treating multi-species reacting gas equations and treating flows with large gradients were also developed. The computational chemistry research focused on the determination of spectral radiative intensity factors, transport properties and reaction rates. Ab initio solutions to the Schrodinger equation provided potential energy curves transition moments (radiative probabilities and strengths) and potential energy surfaces. These surfaces were then coupled with classical particle reactive trajectories to compute reaction cross-sections and rates.

  11. Effect of information sharing on research and teaching activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of Information sharing on research and teaching activities of Academic Scientists in Federal Universities in the North- East Nigeria. Investigation was done on the activities of information sharing and the effect of information sharing on teaching and research activities. Survey ...

  12. Chemical countermeasures: Dispersants overview of dispersant use (including application) and research issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    I will attempt in twenty minutes to summarize the state of research on oil spill dispersants as I perceive it. The expertise I bring to this task includes 20 years of experience with the fate and effects of petroleum in the marine environment, including participation in the 1973 and 1981 NRC studies and three years as chairman of the NRC committee on oil spill dispersants. I More recently I served on a committee of the International Maritime Organization which reviewed the open-quotes Impact of oil and related chemicals and wastes on the marine environment.close quotes That report will be published this year. However, my statements in this paper are not made as a representative of either NRC or IMO. They are my own interpretation of scientific literature cited in the above reviews. Dispersants are chemical formulations, which include surface active agents, designed to decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water. Because the first attempts to disperse oil on a large scale, at the Torrey Canyon spill of 1967, used highly toxic degreasing agents, dispersants have an undeserved reputation for toxicity. In fact, for twenty years dispersant formulations have been developed with an emphasis on reducing their toxicity to marine life. The dispersal of oil in water has been documented in the laboratory by dozens of papers (see references in NRC 1989, pp 70-79), and in the field by dozens of studies (NRC 1989, pp 165- 193). The toxicity of commercial dispersant formulations (NRC 1989, pp 81-123) and dispersed oil (NRC 1989, pp 123-147) has been tested on a wide variety of marine organisms ranging from algae to salmonid fishes. The NRC review has been updated by the IMO/GESAMP (1992) study, but the conclusions remain unchanged

  13. Research activities: magic bullet and all that

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basten, Tony.

    1990-01-01

    The Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology is the brain-child of the University of Sydney and its campus teaching hospital, Royal Prince Alfred. At present its research portfolio includes studies of cancer, autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis or multiple sclerosis (in which white cells or antibodies attack our own tissues), and certain infections diseases, including leprosy and AIDS. Experiments involving radioactively labelled monoclonal antibodies in immunological and molecular biology studies are briefly presented. ills

  14. Preparing students for research activities in the context of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Content of the innovative didactics of the technical university presented as a ... tasks, comprehensive, end-to-end research projects, interactive forms and methods; ... for research activities, program-target management system, resource model ...

  15. How Work Positions Affect the Research Activity and Information Behaviour of Laboratory Scientists in the Research Lifecycle: Applying Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nahyun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study was conducted to investigate the characteristics of research and information activities of laboratory scientists in different work positions throughout a research lifecycle. Activity theory was applied as the conceptual and analytical framework. Method: Taking a qualitative research approach, in-depth interviews and field…

  16. 48 CFR 27.408 - Cosponsored research and development activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....408 Cosponsored research and development activities. (a) In contracts involving cosponsored research... objectives of the contract. Since the purpose of the cosponsored research and development, the legitimate... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cosponsored research and...

  17. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program (1993)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The summary reports of activities under visiting research program in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, in fiscal year 1992 are included. In this report, 104 summaries of researches using the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) and 9 summaries of the researches using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA) are collected. (J.P.N.)

  18. Risk-based regulation - an NRC perspective and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, T.L.; Murphy, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The consideration of risk in regulatory decision making has traditionally been part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) policy and practice. In the early days of regulation, this consideration was more qualitative in nature and was reflected in prescriptive/deterministic regulatory requirements. However, with the development of quantitative risk assessment methods, more detailed and comprehensive (although not complete) risk information on nuclear power plants is available to the designer, operator, and regulator. The availability of such information provides an opportunity to assess the need for change in the current regulatory structure and to develop future regulatory requirements in a less prescriptive, more performance-oriented fashion

  19. Neutron spectral characterization of the NRC-HSST experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiation experiments are being performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program. Results of dosimetry performed in the second experiment have been previously reported. Similar procedures were followed in the third experiment. The experiences gained in these two experiments have led to modifications in the composition and distribution of foil dosimeters which monitor the neutron flux-spectra in the irradiated steel specimens. It is expected that in the new experiments much higher accuracies than previously possible can be achieved in the determination of irradiation damage parameters

  20. Neutron spectral characterization of the NRC-HSST experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F. W.; Kam, F. B.K.

    1979-01-01

    Irradiation experiments are being performed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) program. Results of dosimetry performed in the second experiment have been previously reported. Similar procedures were followed in the third experiment. The experiences gained in these two experiments have led to modifications in the composition and distribution of foil dosimeters which monitor the neutron flux-spectra in the irradiated steel specimens. It is expected that in the new experiments much higher accuracies than previously possible can be achieved in the determination of irradiation damage parameters.

  1. Software for automated tracking of open items at NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWispelare, A.R.; Mackin, P.C.; Johnson, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The Open Item Tracking System (OITS) was developed in response to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) need for a reliable, easy to use automated database system, to track all open (awaiting resolution) items related to regulatory, institutional, and technical uncertainties for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) high-level waste (HLW) disposal program. The OITS system was integrated with the Regulatory Program Database (RPD) Version 1.1, resulting in the RPD/OITS Version 2.0 system. RPD/OITS is a network bases system with client server architecture and a graphical user interface. This paper outlines the system and results of its implementation

  2. The Impact of the Physical Activity Policy Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manteiga, Alicia M; Eyler, Amy A; Valko, Cheryl; Brownson, Ross C; Evenson, Kelly R; Schmid, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Lack of physical activity is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. The Physical Activity Policy Research Network (PAPRN) is a thematic network established in 2004 to identify determinants, implementation, and outcomes of policies that are effective in increasing physical activity. The purpose of this study is to describe the products of PAPRN and make recommendations for future research and best practices. A mixed methods approach was used to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data on the network. First, in 2014, PAPRN's dissemination products from 2004 to 2014 were extracted and reviewed, including 57 publications and 56 presentations. Next, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 key network participants from 17 locations around the U.S. The transcripts were transcribed and coded. The results of the interviews indicated that the research network addressed several components of its mission, including the identification of physical activity policies, determinants of these policies, and the process of policy implementation. However, research focusing on physical activity policy outcomes was limited. Best practices included collaboration between researchers and practitioners and involvement of practitioners in research design, data collection, and dissemination of results. PAPRN is an example of a productive research network and has contributed to both the process and content of physical activity policy research over the past decade. Future research should emphasize physical activity policy outcomes. Additionally, increased partnerships with practitioners for collaborative, cross-sectoral physical activity policy research should be developed. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. Research Activities of Geotechnical Research Group of NIIS from the Past to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, N.; Toyosawa, Y.; Tamate, S.; Itoh, K.

    In this paper, firstly the memories of Prof. Tatsuoka's laboratory and research works carried out when the first author visited Prof. Tatsuoka's laboratory as a visiting researcher from May 1986 for about 1 year are described. Secondly, the research activities of Geotechnical Research Group of NIIS are introduced. Main emphasis is given on the research activities conducted using old geotechnical centrifuge (NIIS Mark-I centrifuge) and newly developed geotechnical centrifuge (NIIS Mark-II centrifuge).

  4. Managing aging in nuclear power plants: Insights from NRC maintenance team inspection reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fresco, A.; Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W.; Grove, E.; Taylor, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    A plant`s maintenance program is the principal vehicle through which age-related degradation is managed. From 1988 to 1991, the NRC evaluated the maintenance program of every nuclear power plant in the United States. Forty-four out of a total of 67 of the reports issued on these in-depth team inspections were reviewed for insights into the strengths and weaknesses of the programs as related to the need to understand and manage the effects of aging on nuclear plant systems, structures, and components. Relevant information was extracted from these inspection reports and sorted into several categories, including Specific Aging Insights, Preventive Maintenance, Predictive Maintenance and Condition Monitoring, Post Maintenance Testing, Failure Trending, Root Cause Analysis and Usage of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in the Maintenance Process. Specific examples of inspection and monitoring techniques successfully used by utilities to detect degradation due to aging have been identified. The information also was sorted according to systems and components, including: Auxiliary Feedwater, Main Feedwater, High Pressure Injection for both BWRs and PWRs, Service Water, Instrument Air, and Emergency Diesel Generator Air Start Systems, and Emergency Diesel Generators Air Start Systems, emergency diesel generators, electrical components such as switchgear, breakers, relays, and motor control centers, motor operated valves and check valves. This information was compared to insights gained from the Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Attributes of plant maintenance programs where the NRC inspectors felt that improvement was needed to properly address the aging issue also are discussed.

  5. CISTI'S Activities in Support of Scientific Data Management in Canada 2008-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Zborowski

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the Canadian research environment, it is difficult for researchers to effectively discover, access, and use data sets, except for those that are the most well known. Several recent reports have discussed the issues around "lost" data sets: those which are intended to be shared but cannot be identified and utilized effectively because of insufficient associated metadata. Both problems are approaching critical levels in Canada and internationally, a situation that is unacceptable because these data sets are often generated as a result of public funding. Solutions may involve providing support and training for researchers on how they can best collect and manage their data sets or developing gateways to scientific data sets. NRC-CISTI is the largest comprehensive source of scientific, technical, and medical information in North America, with a mandate to serve as Canada's national science library. Through its publishing arm, NRC Research Press, it is also Canada's foremost scientific publisher. NRC-CISTI is an organization with demonstrated expertise in metadata management, which, until recently, focused primarily on library and publishing contexts. However in November 2007, it formally committed to expand its agenda to address the management of scientific research data and the related critical needs of the research community. This paper presents NRC-CISTI's activities in this area. NRC-CISTI has begun by hosting forums in which the critical players (including the granting agencies mapped out targets and approaches. It has strengthened its own internal expertise regarding metadata and management of scientific data sets. Finally, NRC-CISTI is developing a gateway Web site which will provide access to Canadian scientific data sets and related metadata, tools, educational resources, and other informative and collaborative tools urgently needed by Canadian and international researchers. NRC-CISTI is the sponsoring body for the Canadian National

  6. Aging research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The USNRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has developed a program for nuclear plant aging research (NPAR) to achieve an understanding of nuclear plant aging, its potential effects on safety, and methods for its detection and mitigation, sufficient for addressing safety and regulatory issues and supporting regulatory decisions on issues. Specifically, the NRC has aggressive research and regulatory programs associated with aging effects on piping, steam generators, containments, structures, and electrical and mechanical systems and components. In addition to safety assessment for the original license period for nuclear power plants, this aging information will be extremely useful in providing technical bases for efficient and effective regulation associated with possible license extension. This paper discusses the major activities of USNRC sponsored aging research program and recommends an approach to manage and handle aging at nuclear power plants

  7. Working draft regulatory guide on release criteria for decommissioning: NRC staff's draft for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, M.C.; Huffert, A.; Cardile, F.; Malaro, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR 20 are being amended to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E establishes criteria for the remediation of contaminated sites or facilities that will allow their release for future use with or without restrictions. The criteria include a Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) limit of 15 mrem/year (0.15 mSv/y) that should not be exceeded by an average individual among those who could potentially receive the greatest exposure from any residual activity within a facility or on a site. The criteria also require a licensee to reduce any residual radioactivity to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. This staff draft guide describes acceptable procedures for determining the predicted dose level (PDL) from any residual radioactivity at the site. It describes the basic features of the calculational models and the associated default assumptions and parameter values the NRC staff would find acceptable in calculating PDLs. Appendices A, B, and C provide numerical values that can be used to estimate the dose from residual radioactivity remaining at a site. Since 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E introduces several new concepts, definitions and discussions are included in a regulatory position concepts section of the guide to assist licensees in understanding some of the philosophy underlying the rule

  8. Critical power prediction by CATHARE2 of the OECD/NRC BFBT benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutsanych, Sergii, E-mail: s.lutsanych@ing.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122, San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy); Sabotinov, Luben, E-mail: luben.sabotinov@irsn.fr [Institut for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), 31 avenue de la Division Leclerc, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); D’Auria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dauria@dimnp.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122, San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We used CATHARE code to calculate the critical power exercises of the OECD/NRC BFBT benchmark. • We considered both steady-state and transient critical power tests of the benchmark. • We used both the 1D and 3D features of the CATHARE code to simulate the experiments. • Acceptable prediction of the critical power and its location in the bundle is obtained using appropriate modelling. - Abstract: This paper presents an application of the French best estimate thermal-hydraulic code CATHARE 2 to calculate the critical power and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) exercises of the International OECD/NRC BWR Fuel Bundle Test (BFBT) benchmark. The assessment activity is performed comparing the code calculation results with available in the framework of the benchmark experimental data from Japanese Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC). Two-phase flow calculations on prediction of the critical power have been carried out both in steady state and transient cases, using one-dimensional and three-dimensional modelling. Results of the steady-state critical power tests calculation have shown the ability of CATHARE code to predict reasonably the critical power and its location, using appropriate modelling.

  9. Activity report on neutron scattering research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, M.; Tawata, N.; Fujii, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The experiments performed on the thirteen university-owned spectrometers installed at JRR-3M of JAERI in the fiscal year of 1997 were described in this report. The latest ''Neutron News'' (vol. 9, issue 3, 1998) has featured highlights of the activities based on the JRR-3M and its cover displays a graph showing an endless increase of the number of proposals to the users program in the fiscal 1997. The university-owned spectrometers are available for general users all over Japan. The users' requirement for a higher flux beam reactor became larger and larger with time. Thus, JAERI has refurbished JRR-3 to satisfy these demands. In 1997, a joint project between Chiba University and Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP) started to build a new 4-cycle diffractometer for crystal physics/chemistry at T 2-2 beam port on a thermal guide. (M.N.)

  10. Research activities at the TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, K.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental programme at the TRIGA Mainz covers a wide range of applications in different fields. Two of the four beam tubes are used for the development of fast and mainly continuous chemical separation procedures. These procedures are applied for the investigation of short-lived nuclides and for studies of the chemical behaviour of the heaviest elements. At the third beam tube an on-line mass-separator facility with a microwave-induced plasma as an ion source is installed. Very recently the fourth beam tube has been modified for the production of polarized neutrons by interaction with optically pumped 3 He atoms. The other irradiation facilities are used for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of different samples, among them geological and environmental ones, tracer production for chemical investigations, neutron irradiations of rat brain tissue to explore the utility of 157 Gd for cancer therapy and γ-ray irradiations for biological purposes. (author)

  11. MHTGR demonstration role in the NRC design certification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelley, A.P. Jr.; Jones, G.

    1986-01-01

    A modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) design is being developed by the US HTGR Program. Because of the small size of the individual modules that would make up a commercial facility, it appears feasible to design and construct a single-module demonstration plant within the funding constraints on the public and private-sector program participants. Furthermore, the safety margins that can be made inherent to the design permit full-scale testing that could supply a new basis for demonstrating investment protection and safety adequacy to the public, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and potential users. With this in mind, a Project Definition Study was sponsored by Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates and the Tennessee Valley Authority to study the potential benefits of undertaking such a demonstration project. One of the areas investigated was the potential benefits of such a facility in supporting the NRC design certification process, which is envisioned as a necessary commercialization step for the MHTGR

  12. Analysis of NRC Regulatory Guide 1.21 Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Il; Yook, Dae Sik; Lee, Byung Soo [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It is essential to have a degree of uniformity in the methods used for measuring, evaluating, recording, and reporting data on radioactive material in effluents and solid wastes. For this purpose, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) released a revised version of the Regulatory Guide 1.21 'Measuring, evaluating, and reporting radioactive material in liquid and gaseous effluents and solid waste' (revision 2) in 2009, updating the revision 1 version released in 1974. This study compares the previous revision 1 (1974) version with the revision 2 (2009) version to elaborate on the application of the guidelines to Korea. This study consists of an analysis of the 2009 Revision 2 version of the U.S. NRC Regulatory Guidelines 1.21 and an exposition of methods for its application in the domestic environment. Major revisions were made to allow for the adoption of a risk informed approach. Radionuclides with lower than 1% contribution to emission or radiation levels can be selected as principal radionuclides. Requirements for analysis of leaks and spills have been reinforced, with additional groundwater monitoring and hydrological data analysis becoming necessary.

  13. NRC Task Force report on review of the federal/state program for regulation of commercial low-level radioactive waste burial grounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The underlying issue explored in this report is that of Federal vs State regulation of commercial radioactive waste burial grounds. The need for research and development, a comprehensive set of standards and criteria, a national plan for low-level waste management, and perpetual care funding are closely related to the central issue and are also discussed. Five of the six commercial burial grounds are regulated by Agreement States; the sixth is regulated solely by the NRC (NRC also regulates Special Nuclear Material at the sites). The sites are operated commercially. The operators contribute to the perpetual care funds for the sites at varying rates. The States have commitments for the perpetual care of the decommissioned sites except for one site, located on Federally owned land. Three conclusions are reached. Federal control over the disposal of low-level waste should be increased by requiring joint Federal/State site approval, NRC licensing, Federal ownership of the land, and a Federally administered perpetual care program. The NRC should accelerate the development of its regulatory program for the disposal of low-level waste. The undisciplined proliferation of low-level burial sites must be avoided. NRC should evaluate alternative disposal methods, conduct necessary studies, and develop a comprehensive low-level waste regulatory program (i.e., accomplish the above recommendations) prior to the licensing of new disposal sites

  14. Research activities on fast reactors in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogli, R.; Dones, R.; Hudina, M.; Pelloni, S.

    1996-01-01

    The current domestic Swiss electricity supply is primarily based on hydro power (approximately 61%) and nuclear power (about 37%). The contribution of fossil systems is, consequently, minimal (the remaining 2%). In addition, long-term (but limited in time) contracts exist, securing imports of electricity of nuclear origin from France. During the last two years, the electricity consumption has been almost stagnant, although the 80s recorded an average annual increase rate of 2.7%. The future development of the electricity demand is a complex function of several factors with possibly competing effects, like increased efficiency of applications, changes in the industrial structure of the country, increase of population, further automation of industrial processes and services. Due to decommissioning of the currently operating nuclear power plants and expiration of long-term electricity import contracts there will eventually open a gap between the postulated electricity demand and the base supply. The assumed projected demand cases, high and low, as well as the secured yearly electric energy supply are shown. The physics aspects of plutonium burning fast reactor configurations are described including first results of the CIRANO experimental program. Swiss research related to residual heat removal in fast breeder reactors is presented. It consists of experimental ana analytic investigations on the mixing between two horizontal fluid layers of different velocities and temperatures. Development of suitable computer codes for mixing layer calculation are aimed to accurately predict the flow and temperature distribution in the pools. A satisfactory codes validation based on experimental data should be done

  15. Research-active clinical nurses: against all odds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Albert, Nancy M

    2017-03-01

    To develop a theoretical understanding of factors that impact decisions of clinical nurses to conduct a research study. Only a small percentage of all nurses are research-active and even fewer clinical nurses are research-active. Several researchers have explored barriers to research activity by clinical nurses, but few have examined why, in spite of all odds, some clinical nurses are research-active. As the purpose of this study was to develop a theoretical understanding of the research-active nurse, a grounded theory approach was used. The sample interviewed for this study consisted of registered nurses (n = 26) who worked in a hospital or ambulatory setting, had daily direct patient contact and had participated as principal investigator on at least one completed clinical nursing research study that was not in fulfilment of an educational requirement. The interviews were digitally recorded and analysed by two researchers using the constant comparative method. The findings from this study suggest that the conduct of research by clinical nurses was the direct result of a clinical trigger, characteristics and beliefs of the nurse about research and their role in generating knowledge, and the presence of support conditions, such as a research mentor. Clinical nurses can and do conduct research, in spite of constraints due to a lack of time, money and/or knowledge, if they have access to research mentors and are practising in a research-supportive environment. Nurses at the bedside are in a unique position to identify problems most in need of solutions. Findings from this study provide a foundation upon which to develop and test various programmes that seek to increase the number of clinical nurses who are research-active. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Narratives and Activity Theory as Reflective Tools in Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Kaz

    2012-01-01

    Narratives and activity theory are useful as socially constructed data collection tools that allow a researcher access to the social, cultural and historical meanings that research participants place on events in their lives. This case study shows how these tools were used to promote reflection within a cultural-historical activity theoretically…

  17. Informal presentations by fuel fabricators and others [contributed by W. Ross, U.S. NRC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, W.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is representing the the attitude of only one of the major offices of NRC. This is Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulations. Under this office regulates all phases, safety and environmental and safeguard aspects, of about 70 power reactors and about 70 non-power reactors. Another portion of NRC is the Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards. Under this office is regulated the licensing activities of around 600 licensees of all types. Including all licenses of transportation, import-export, and such as this, as well as special nuclear materials not related to the use of reactors. So when we talk about regulating the use and the protection of special nuclear materials, we are talking about all types of special nuclear materials, not just the type that is used in a reactor. Consequently, when a review is being made, such as now being made at the direction of the Commission to see if relaxation of regulations can be given to reduced enrichment, it is not only under the auspices of the Office of nuclear reactor regulations, but also of this other office. Therefore, it has to be more or less a policy statement of the Commission. As far as current regulations are concerned, the NRC has one threshold: it's either above 20% enrichment or it's below 20% enrichment. We are going to look and see if the SNM license in this area as well as the SNM license in that area can be changed so that some intermediate regulations can be applied to the steps in between 90% and 20%. We also regulate on the basis of the kilogram formula quantity. Most of our most stringent regulations are based on te possession of kilograms of highly enriched uranium. If uranium enrichment is dropped to the 45-50% level, then the composition of the alloys would have to increase from 21 wt.% (NRU) or 28 wt.% (NRX) to somewhere in region of 40 to 50%, possibly more. We know that the Al-40 wt.% U alloy can be extruded to the required diameter. We also know that the alloy is more brittle than the

  18. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Brown, Tyish S.; Collier, Scott R.; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. PMID:28052867

  19. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O 2 , and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Reassessment of the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    On July 6, 1993, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Executive Director for Operations established a review team to reassess the NRC`s program for protecting allegers against retaliation. The team evaluated the current system, and solicited comments from various NRC offices, other Federal agencies, licensees, former allegers, and the public. This report is subject to agency review. The report summarizes current processes and gives an overview of current problems. It discusses: (1) ways in which licensees can promote a quality-conscious work environment, in which all employees feel free to raise concerns without fear of retaliation; (2) ways to improve the NRC`s overall handling of allegations; (3) the NRC`s involvement in the Department of Labor process; (4) related NRC enforcement practices; and (5) methods other than investigation and enforcement that may be useful in treating allegations of potential or actual discrimination. Recommendations are given in each area.

  1. Pilot program: NRC severe reactor accident incident response training manual: US Nuclear Regulatory Commission response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakenas, C.A.; McKenna, T.J.; Perkins, K.; Miller, C.W.; Hively, L.M.; Sharpe, R.W.; Giitter, J.G.; Watkins, R.M.

    1987-02-01

    This pilot training manual has been written to fill the need for a general text on NRC response to reactor accidents. The manual is intended to be the foundation for a course for all NRC response personnel. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Response is the fifth in a series of volumes that collectively summarize the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) emergency response during severe power reactor accidents and provide necessary background information. This volume describes NRC response modes, organizations, and official positions; roles of other federal agencies are also described briefly. Each volume serves, respectively, as the text for a course of instruction in a series of courses for NRC response personnel. These materials do not provide guidance or license requirements for NRC licensees. Each volume is accompanied by an appendix of slides that can be used to present this material. The slides are called out in the text

  2. Human Research Program Science Management: Overview of Research and Development Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    2007-01-01

    An overview of research and development activities of NASA's Human Research Science Management Program is presented. The topics include: 1) Human Research Program Goals; 2) Elements and Projects within HRP; 3) Development and Maintenance of Priorities; 4) Acquisition and Evaluation of Research and Technology Proposals; and 5) Annual Reviews

  3. Recent Activities on the Experimental Research Programme Using Small Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.; Bosco, E. del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2006-01-01

    A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is discussed in this paper. Besides the presentation of the recent activities on the experimental research programme using small tokamaks and scientific results achieved at the participating laboratories, information is provided about the organisation of the co-ordinated research project. Future plans of the co-ordinated activities within the CRP are discussed

  4. Status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masoud, M.M.

    1997-01-01

    The status of plasma physics research activities in Egypt is reviewed. There are nine institutes with plasma research activities. The largest is the Atomic energy Authority (AEA), which has activities in fundamental plasma studies, fusion technology, plasma and laser applications, and plasma simulation. The experiments include Theta Pinches, a Z Pinch, a coaxial discharge, a glow discharge, a CO 2 laser, and the EGYPTOR tokamak. (author)

  5. 48 CFR 927.408 - Cosponsored research and development activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Cosponsored research and development activities. Because of the Department of Energy's statutory duties to disseminate data first produced under its contracts for research, development, and demonstration, the... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cosponsored research and...

  6. Teacher research as self-study and collaborative activity

    OpenAIRE

    Gade, Sharada

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights two insightful methods for advancing teacher research: practitioner self-study in relation to a range of texts, with which to examine one’s educational landscape; and classroom interventions conceived as a Vygotskian activity, via teacher-researcher collaboration. Both approaches allow teachers and collaborating researchers to share individual expertise across institutional boundaries and engage in creative local action.

  7. Steps toward validity in active living research: research design that limits accusations of physical determinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, William

    2014-03-01

    "Active living research" has been accused of being overly "physically deterministic" and this article argues that urban planners must continue to evolve research and address biases in this area. The article first provides background on how researchers have dealt with the relationship between the built environment and health over years. This leads to a presentation of how active living research might be described as overly deterministic. The article then offers lessons for researchers planning to embark in active-living studies as to how they might increase validity and minimize criticism of physical determinism. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 14: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This directory contains a Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Materials Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on Quality Assurance Programs and Packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR section 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure themselves that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program

  9. Applying risk insights in US NRC reviews of integral pressurized water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, M.A.; Hilsmeier, T.; Kevern, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    In its Staff Requirements Memorandum (SRM) on COMGBJ-10-0004/COMGEA-10-0001, 'Use of Risk Insights to Enhance Safety Focus of Small Modular Reactor Reviews,' dated August 31, 2010 (ML102510405), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) directed the NRC staff to more fully integrate the use of risk insights into pre-application activities and the review of small modular reactor (SMR) applications with near-term focus on integral pressurized water reactor (iPWR) designs. The Commission's objective is to align the review focus and resources with the risk-significant systems, structures, and components (SSCs) and other aspects of the design, that contribute most to safety in order to enhance the efficiency of the review process while still enabling a decision of reasonable assurance of the design's safety. The staff was directed to develop a design-specific, risk-informed review plan for each SMR to address pre-application and application review activities. The NRC staff submitted a response to the Commission which describes its approach for (1) using risk insights, consistent with current regulatory requirements, to assign SSCs to one of a limited set of graded categories, and (2) adjusting the scope and depth of current review plans--where possible--consistent with regulatory requirements and consistent with the applicable graded category. Because the staff's review constitutes an independent audit of the application, the staff may emphasize or de-emphasize particular aspects of its review guidance (i.e., Standard Review Plan), as appropriate and consistent with regulatory requirements, for the application being reviewed. The staff may propose justifications for not performing certain sections of the reviews called for by the applicable review plan. Examples of acceptable variations in the scope of a review can include reduced emphasis on SSC attributes such as reliability, availability, or functional performance when the SSC will be in the scope of a program

  10. Encouraging entrepreneurship in university labs: Research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates how the encouragement of entrepreneurship within university research labs relates with research activities, research outputs, and early doctorate careers. Utilizing a panel survey of 6,840 science & engineering doctoral students at 39 R1 research universities, this study shows that entrepreneurship is widely encouraged across university research labs, ranging from 54% in biomedical engineering to 18% in particle physics, while only a small share of labs openly discoura...

  11. On the research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first egyptian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    A review on the most important research activities in reactor and neutron physics using the first Egyptian Research Reactor (ET-RR-1) is given. An out look on: neutron cross-sections, neutron flux, neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy, neutron activation analysis, neutron diffraction and radiation shielding experiments, is presented

  12. The Survival and Resistance of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus hamelinensis, and Halococcus morrhuae to Simulated Outer Space Solar Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Domingos, C; Parpart, A; Reitz, G; Rettberg, P

    2015-11-01

    Solar radiation is among the most prominent stress factors organisms face during space travel and possibly on other planets. Our analysis of three different halophilic archaea, namely Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Halococcus hamelinensis, which were exposed to simulated solar radiation in either dried or liquid state, showed tremendous differences in tolerance and survivability. We found that Hcc. hamelinensis is not able to withstand high fluences of simulated solar radiation compared to the other tested organisms. These results can be correlated to significant differences in genomic integrity following exposure, as visualized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. In contrast to the other two tested strains, Hcc. hamelinensis accumulates compatible solutes such as trehalose for osmoprotection. The addition of 100 mM trehalose to the growth medium of Hcc. hamelinensis improved its survivability following exposure. Exposure of cells in liquid at different temperatures suggests that Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 is actively repairing cellular and DNA damage during exposure, whereas Hcc. morrhuae exhibits no difference in survival. For Hcc. morrhuae, the high resistance against simulated solar radiation may be explained with the formation of cell clusters. Our experiments showed that these clusters shield cells on the inside against simulated solar radiation, which results in better survival rates at higher fluences when compared to Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 and Hcc. hamelinensis. Overall, this study shows that some halophilic archaea are highly resistant to simulated solar radiation and that they are of high astrobiological significance. Halophiles-Solar radiation-Stress resistance-Survival.

  13. Directory of Certificates of Compliance for Radioactive Materials Packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  14. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1. Revision 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and Corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Sections 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure them that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  15. Directory of certificates of compliance for radioactive materials packages. Summary report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    This directory contains a Summary Report of NRC Approved Packages (Volume 1), Certificates of Compliance (Volume 2), and a Summary Report of NRC Approved Quality Assurance Programs for Radioactive Material Packages (Volume 3). The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance number is included at the back of each volume of the directory. The Summary Report includes a listing of all users of each package design prior to the publication date of the directory. Shipments of radioactive material utilizing these packagings must be in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR 173.471 and 10 CFR Part 71, as applicable. In satisfying the requirements of Section 71.12, it is the responsibility of the licensees to insure that they have a copy of the current approval and conduct their transportation activities in accordance with an NRC approved quality assurance program. Copies of the current approval may be obtained from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Public Document Room files (see Docket No. listed on each certificate) at 1717 H Street, Washington, DC 20555. Note that the general license of 10 CFR 71.12 does not authorize the receipt, possession, use or transfer of byproduct source, or special nuclear material; such authorization must be obtained pursuant to 10 CFR Parts 30 to 36, 40, 50, or 70

  16. Research engagement of health sciences librarians: a survey of research-related activities and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessick, Susan; Perryman, Carol; Billman, Brooke L; Alpi, Kristine M; De Groote, Sandra L; Babin, Ted D

    2016-04-01

    The extent to which health sciences librarians are engaged in research is a little-studied question. This study assesses the research activities and attitudes of Medical Library Association (MLA) members, including the influence of work affiliation. An online survey was designed using a combination of multiple-choice and open-ended questions and distributed to MLA members. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and significance testing. The authors used statistical tools and categorized open-ended question topics by the constant comparative method, also applying the broad subject categories used in a prior study. Pearson's chi-square analysis was performed on responses to determine significant differences among respondents employed in three different institutional environments. Analysis showed that 79% of respondents read research articles at least once a month; 58% applied published research studies to practice; 44% had conducted research; 62% reported acting on research had enhanced their libraries; 38% had presented findings; and 34% had authored research articles. Hospital librarians were significantly less likely than academic librarians to have participated in research activities. Highly ranked research benefits, barriers, and competencies of health sciences librarians are described. Findings indicate that health sciences librarians are actively engaged in research activities. Practice implications for practitioners, publishers, and stakeholders are discussed. Results suggest that practitioners can use published research results and results from their own research to affect practice decisions and improve services. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, including the need for intervention studies to increase research and writing productivity.

  17. Data report for the NRC/PNL Halden assembly IFA-431

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hann, C.R.; Bradley, E.R.; Cunningham, M.E.; Lanning, D.D.; Marshall, R.K.; Williford, R.E.

    1978-04-01

    The report presents the in-reactor data collected from the NRC/PNL Halden Assembly IFA-431 as a part of the program entitled ''Experimental Verification of Steady State Fuel Codes,'' sponsored by the Fuel Behavior Research Branch of the USNRC. The purpose of this program is to reduce the uncertainties of calculating the thermal stored energy in an operating nuclear fuel rod. The report presents fuel centerline thermocouple readings, cladding elongation monitor readings, rod internal pressure readings, and neutron detector readings. The neutron detector readings were corrected to represent rod local powers at the thermocouple locations. These data are presented in the form of plots of the variables versus time during the irradiation period from June 1975 to February 1976. Also included are descriptions of the test rationale, assembly and rod designs, test facility, instrument array and calibration, and data processing methods. Topical reports discussing specific aspects and results of the data analysis are referenced

  18. LHCb - A SciFi production center in NRC KI FOR LHCb upgrade

    CERN Multimedia

    Shevchenko, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The Scintillating Fiber Tracker, SciFi for short, will be the main new tracking detector in LHCb. It will provide better than 100 µm spatial resolution, and high rate capability and radiation hardness enabling a fast, 40 MHz, trigger rate with a capability to withstand 50 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity, delivered by LHC, without a major performance degradation. The main active element of the tracker is a scintillating fiber ribbon with the SiPM readout. The ribbons consist of 6 layers of the 250 µm scintillating fibers Kuraray SCSF-78MJ, assembled by winding and bound together by the epoxy glue. NRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, together with the colleagues from ITEP, CERN, TU of Dortmund and RWTH of Aachen are developing dedicated production centers with the aim to reach by 2016 production rate one ribbon per day per center, necessary to supply more than 1300 fibre ribbons (mats) needed for the new LHCb tracker.

  19. NRC-BNL Benchmark Program on Evaluation of Methods for Seismic Analysis of Coupled Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.; DeGrassi, G.; Xu, J.

    1999-01-01

    A NRC-BNL benchmark program for evaluation of state-of-the-art analysis methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of coupled structures with non-classical damping is described. The program includes a series of benchmarking problems designed to investigate various aspects of complexities, applications and limitations associated with methods for analysis of non-classically damped structures. Discussions are provided on the benchmarking process, benchmark structural models, and the evaluation approach, as well as benchmarking ground rules. It is expected that the findings and insights, as well as recommendations from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems

  20. Research and development activity in support of LCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubell, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The research and development activity (RDAC) established in support of the Large Coil Program (LCP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is described. Some experimental results are presented and the importance of the RDAC to the magnet community is discussed

  1. Bling My Research! A Mock Grant Panel Activity Illustrating the Importance of Basic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leander, Celeste A.; Whitton, Jeannette

    2010-01-01

    First-year university students have misconceptions about the source and dynamics of publicly funded research money. We designed an activity in which students take part in a mock grant panel. The results indicated a strong tendency toward student funding of applied medical research at the expense of basic research. Exposure to a few examples of…

  2. Prevention Research Matters-Communities Working to Improve Physical Activity

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2018-02-15

    We know that children who are physically active every day are less likely to develop chronic diseases as adults, including obesity. Dr. Sandy Slater, a researcher with the University of Illinois, Chicago Prevention Research Center, discusses how a park improvement project in Chicago helped engage communities to improve areas for play and activity.  Created: 2/15/2018 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/15/2018.

  3. Conceptualizing Policy Work as Activity and Field of Research

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Kohoutek; Martin Nekola; Vilém Novotný

    2013-01-01

    The area of policy work and policy workers within government bureaucracies is encompassing a large field of activities and research. This article aims to provide a synthesised perspective on policy work in relating theoretical and empirical accounts of policy workers, identifying points of convergence and linking them to essential assumptions on research in policy work. We conceptualize policy work as activity within government bureaucracies from three interrelated perspectives: the professio...

  4. MutS and MutL are dispensable for maintenance of the genomic mutation rate in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney R Busch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genome of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 encodes for homologs of MutS and MutL, which are key proteins of a DNA mismatch repair pathway conserved in Bacteria and Eukarya. Mismatch repair is essential for retaining the fidelity of genetic information and defects in this pathway result in the deleterious accumulation of mutations and in hereditary diseases in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We calculated the spontaneous genomic mutation rate of H. salinarum NRC-1 using fluctuation tests targeting genes of the uracil monophosphate biosynthesis pathway. We found that H. salinarum NRC-1 has a low incidence of mutation suggesting the presence of active mechanisms to control spontaneous mutations during replication. The spectrum of mutational changes found in H. salinarum NRC-1, and in other archaea, appears to be unique to this domain of life and might be a consequence of their adaption to extreme environmental conditions. In-frame targeted gene deletions of H. salinarum NRC-1 mismatch repair genes and phenotypic characterization of the mutants demonstrated that the mutS and mutL genes are not required for maintenance of the observed mutation rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We established that H. salinarum NRC-1 mutS and mutL genes are redundant to an alternative system that limits spontaneous mutation in this organism. This finding leads to the puzzling question of what mechanism is responsible for maintenance of the low genomic mutation rates observed in the Archaea, which for the most part do not have MutS and MutL homologs.

  5. Top 10 research questions related to children physical activity motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ang

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is critical to healthy development of children. It is well documented that helping children develop and sustain a physically active lifestyle requires children to become motivated. Many studies have been conducted in the past 2.5 decades on determinants and correlates for children and adolescents' physical activity motivation. The findings have informed researchers and practitioners about motivation sources for children and effective strategies to motivate children in given physical activity settings. Built on the extensive knowledge base and theoretical platforms formed by these research studies, the purpose of this article is to take a look at the current research landscape and provide subjective thoughts about what we still need to know about children's physical activity motivation. The product of this subjective thinking process rendered 10 potential questions for future research on children's physical activity motivation in both in-school and out-of-school settings. These topics encompass those focusing on children's physical activity motivation as a mental dispositional process, those conceptualizing the motivation as an outcome of person-environment interactions, and those attempting to dissect the motivation as an outcome of social-cultural influences and educational policies. It is hoped that the topics can serve researchers interested in children's physical activity motivation as starting blocks from which they can extend their conceptual thinking and identify research questions that are personally meaningful. It is also hoped that the list of potential questions can be helpful to researchers in accomplishing the imperative and significant mission to motivate children to be physically active in the 21st century and beyond.

  6. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  7. IAEA activities supporting the applications of research reactors in 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peld, N.D.; Ridikas, D.

    2014-01-01

    As the underutilization of research reactors around the world persists as a primary topic of concern among facility owners and operators, the IAEA responded in 2013 with a broad range of activities to address the planning, execution and improvement of many experimental techniques. The revision of two critical documents for planning and diversifying a facility's portfolio of applications, TECDOC 1234 'The Applications of Research Reactors' and TECDOC 1212 'Strategic Planning for Research Reactors', is in progress in order to keep this information relevant, corresponding to the dynamism of experimental techniques and research capabilities. Related to the latter TECDOC, the IAEA convened a meeting in 2013 for the expert review of a number of strategic plans submitted by research reactor operators in developing countries. A number of activities focusing on specific applications are either continuing or beginning as well. In neutron activation analysis, a joint round of inter-comparison proficiency testing sponsored by the IAEA Technical Cooperation Department will be completed, and facility progress in measurement accuracy is described. Also, a training workshop in neutron imaging and Coordinated Research Projects in reactor benchmarks, automation of neutron activation analysis and neutron beam techniques for material testing intend to advance these activities as more beneficial services to researchers and other users. (author)

  8. Termination of past nuclear activities at the nuclear research institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Krizman, M.

    2006-01-01

    Many countries, particularly in Europe, started with nuclear programs in the fifties of the last century. As a consequence nuclear research institutes were established, among them also the Institute Jozef Stefan (IJS) in Slovenia. The nuclear activities at the IJS were related to the development of uranium ore processing technology and technologies comprising uranium oxide and hexafluoride. After very intensive period of nuclear activities the decline began step by step due to different reasons. Various approaches of the termination and decommissioning of facilities were used. The inspectors of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), the responsible authority, started intensive activities at the IJS at the end of 2004. All together 22 research laboratories or research units were included in the inspection program and around 50 researchers of the IJS were involved into the inspection procedures. The inspection was very intensive in the laboratories and storages where past nuclear activities took place and were later on abandoned. As a result several contaminated equipments and sites in addition to around 200 unregistered sources were found. The majority of these sources is related to past nuclear activities. The inspection program related to the terminated research activities is still in progress. The IJS immediately started with the remediation activities including the development of methodology related to decontamination of radioactive liquids. The decontamination of two nuclear laboratories and three different storages of radioactive waste at its sites is in progress. Sixty of the above mentioned sources have been already stored in the Central Interim Storage for Radioactive Waste. (author)

  9. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 55 NRC-licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first half of 1981. The program objectives, scope, and methodology are given. The TLD system, dosimeter location, data processing scheme, and quality assurance program are outlined

  10. NRC Regulatory Agenda semiannual report, July--December 1995. Volume 14, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued semianually

  11. NRC regulatory agenda: Semiannual report, July--December 1996. Volume 15, Number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    The NRC Regulatory Agenda is a compilation of all rules on which the NRC has recently completed action, or has proposed action, or is considering action, and all petitions for rulemaking which have been received by the Commission and are pending disposition by the Commission. The Regulatory Agenda is updated and issued semiannually

  12. 10 CFR 51.104 - NRC proceeding using public hearings; consideration of environmental impact statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... environmental impact statement. 51.104 Section 51.104 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED....104 NRC proceeding using public hearings; consideration of environmental impact statement. (a)(1) In... scope of NEPA and this subpart are in issue, the NRC staff may not offer the final environmental impact...

  13. 76 FR 54507 - Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0204] Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic... functions. SSCs in operating nuclear power plants are designed either in accordance with, or have been... nuclear reactors. The background information relevant to this GL includes the individual plant...

  14. Canister storage building compliance assessment SNF project NRC equivalency criteria - HNF-SD-SNF-DB-003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with the SNF Project NRC Equivalency Criteria - HNF-SD-SNF-DE-003, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Path Forward Additional NRC Requirements. No non-compliances are shown. The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion

  15. Assessment of use of library resources on research activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Library resources use contribute immensely to the research output of agricultural scientists and also play significant roles in supporting agricultural development but resources are inadequately provided. The main objective of the study was to assess the use of library resources on research activities of scientists in three ...

  16. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT THE US EPA'S GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this talk was to present an overview of research activities at the US EPA's Office of Research and Development, Gulf Ecology Division located on Pensacola Beach, Florida. The talk was organized into three major sections. The first section covered my educational b...

  17. Assessment report of research and development activities FY2014. Activity: 'Advanced science research' (Final report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-09-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (hereinafter referred to as 'JAEA') consulted an assessment committee, 'Evaluation Committee of Research Activities for Advanced Science Research' (hereinafter referred to as 'Committee') for final evaluation and prior assessment of 'Advanced Science Research,' in accordance with 'General Guideline for the Evaluation of Government Research and Development (R and D) Activities' by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan, 'Guideline for Evaluation of R and D in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology' and 'Regulation on Conduct for Evaluation of R and D Activities' by JAEA. In response to the JAEA's request, the Committee assessed the research programs and activities of the Advanced Science Research Center (hereinafter referred to as 'ASRC') for the period of five years from April 2010 and the research programs from April 2015. The Committee evaluated the management and the research programs of the ASRC based on the explanatory documents prepared by the ASRC and the oral presentations with questions-and-answers by the Director and the research group leaders. This report summarizes the results of the assessment by the Committee with the Committee report attached. (author)

  18. Building confidence in nuclear waste regulation: how NRC is adapting in response to stakeholder concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotra, Janet P.

    2004-01-01

    Increasing public confidence in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as an effective and independent regulator is an explicit goal of the Agency. When developing new, site-specific regulations for the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, NRC sought to improve its efforts to inform and involve the public in NRC's decision-making process. To this end, NRC has made, and continues to make significant organizational, process and policy changes. NRC successfully applied these changes as it completed final regulations for Yucca Mountain, when introducing a draft license review plan for public comment, and when responding to public requests for information on NRC's licensing and hearing process. It should be understood, however, that these changes emerged, and continue to be applied, in the context of evolving agency concern for increasing stakeholder confidence reflected in institutional changes within the agency as a whole. (author)

  19. Danish research-active clinical nurses overcome barriers in research utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamsen, Lis; Larsen, Kristian; Bjerregaard, Lene; Madsen, Jan K

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether there was a difference between clinical nurses who were research-active, and clinical nurses who were nonresearch-active in utilization of research. A further aim was to identify the most significant barriers faced by a group of Danish clinical nurses in their use of research. Discrepancy between the improved quality of research results and the lack of implementing them was the starting point for a series of studies which showed the types of barriers clinical nurses found especially cumbersome when applying the research results of other researchers. This study investigates whether the clinical nurses' own engagement in research had any impact on their perception of research utilization. The study had an exploratory and descriptive design. Seventy-nine Danish clinical nurses participated and semi-structured interviewing was used as the research method. There was a statistically significant difference between the research-active and nonresearch-active nurses on various variables. The study showed that, to a larger extent, research-active nurses used evidence-based knowledge and were generally more internationally orientated. Furthermore, two important barriers for research utilization were identified by all 79 clinical nurses included in the study, i.e. 90% of the nurses explained that the quantity of research results was overwhelming, and 75% of them found that they were unable to evaluate the quality of the research. Clinical nurses, who were research-active themselves, experienced more success in overcoming some of the barriers, which existed in applying research to practice. The research potential found amongst clinical nurses in Denmark needed to be further supported through training and guidance in research methodology, establishing introductory stipends and part-time research positions. By doing so, some of the barriers affecting research utilization and the so-called theory-practice gap might be reduced. Further

  20. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's coordinated research activities

  1. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's coordinated research activities

  2. Collaboration between physical activity researchers and transport planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crist, Katie; Bolling, Khalisa; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2018-01-01

    Collaboration between physical activity (PA) researchers and transport planners is a recommended strategy to combat the physical inactivity epidemic. Data collected by PA researchers could be used to identify, implement and evaluate active transport (AT) projects. However, despite aligned interests......, researchers and transport planners rarely collaborate. This study utilized qualitative methods to 1) gain an in-depth understanding of the data utilized in AT planning, 2) explore the utility of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and accelerometer data in supporting the planning process, 3) identify...... expertise in health or transport planning. A thematic analysis was conducted following structural coding by two researchers. The analysis revealed that geographic and physical activity data that are current, local, objective and specific to individual AT trips would improve upon currently available data...

  3. Integrating research evidence and physical activity policy making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, Arja R.; Bertram, Maja; Hämäläinen, Riitta-Maija

    2016-01-01

    Evidence shows that regular physical activity is enhanced by supporting environment. Studies are needed to integrate research evidence into health enhancing, cross-sector physical activity (HEPA) policy making. This article presents the rationale, study design, measurement procedures...... and the initial results of the first phase of six European countries in a five-year research project (2011-2016), REsearch into POlicy to enhance Physical Activity (REPOPA). REPOPA is programmatic research; it consists of linked studies; the first phase studied the use of evidence in 21 policies in implementation...... to learn more in depth from the policy making process and carried out 86 qualitative stakeholder interviews. The second, ongoing phase builds on the central findings of the first phase in each country; it consists of two sets of interventions: game simulations to study cross-sector collaboration...

  4. Applied superconductivity and cryogenic research activities in NIFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Sagara, A.; Imagawa, S.; Yamada, S.; Takahata, K.; Yanagi, N.; Chikaraishi, H.; Maekawa, R.; Iwamoto, A.; Hamaguchi, S.; Sato, M.; Noda, N.; Yamauchi, K.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.

    2006-01-01

    Since the foundation of National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in 1989, the primary mission of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches has been focused on the development of the large helical device (LHD): the largest fusion experimental apparatus exclusively utilizing superconducting technologies. The applied superconductivity and cryogenics group in NIFS was organized to be responsible for this activity. As a result of extensive research activities, the construction of LHD was completed in 1997. Since then, the LHD superconducting system has been demonstrating high availability of more than 97% during eight years operation and it keeps proving high reliability of large-scale superconducting systems. This paper describes the extensive activities of the applied superconductivity and cryogenic researches in NIFS during and after the development of LHD and the fundamental researches that aim at realizing a helical-type fusion reactor

  5. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities contained

  6. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    Article III of the IAEA Statute authorises the Agency to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful purposes throughout the world and to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information, as well as the exchange of scientists in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. The Agency's Coordinated Research Activities stimulate and coordinate the undertaking of research in selected nuclear fields by scientists in IAEA Member States. The research supported by the Agency is within the framework of the Agency's programmes, sub-programmes and projects that are listed in the approved Programme and Budget of the Agency. These Coordinated Research Activities are normally implemented through Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on the research topic of interest. The Agency may also respond to proposals from institutes for participation in the research activities by awarding individual research contracts not related to a CRP. A small portion of available funds is used to finance individual projects, which deal with topics covered by the Agency's scientific programme. The Agency also supports Doctoral CRPs, which are designed to strengthen promotion of research on nuclear technologies in developing Member States through pair building between agreement holders and contract holders. These CRPs include a PhD training programme at the contract holders' institutions. Three doctoral CRPs currently implemented by the Human Health programme address the management of liver cancer using radionuclide methods, improvement of radiotherapy outcomes in AIDS cancer patients and isotopic and complementary tools for the study of micronutrient status and interactions in developing country populations exposed to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Further information on the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities contained

  7. A plan for research by the atmospheric research section in support of Ontario Hydro's nuclear activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogram, G.L.; Melo, O.T.

    1984-01-01

    A plan for nuclear studies by the Atmospheric Research Section is presented. The need for research is discussed and research objectives are established. Recommended research activities include the study of fundamental processes governing the fate of emissions released to the atmosphere by Hydro's nuclear facilities and the development of improved transport models describing the fate of these emissions. A Sectional goal of providing technical expertise in the atmospheric sciences in support of Ontario Hydro's present and future nuclear activities is proposed. The plan covers a five-year time frame (1984-1988)

  8. Summary reports of activities under visiting research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report is published any time by summarizing in the form of an interim report the data required for research and experiment such as the results of the functional test on various experimental facilities, the test results of the products manufactured for trial, the state of radiation control and waste management, and the report of study meetings in the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, the conspicuous results obtained halfway in research, new techniques, discussion on other papers and reports and others. In this report, the gists of 71 papers on the research activities under visiting research program performed in the second half of 1984 are collected, and the subject number, the title of research reporters, and the summary of report for each research are given. (Kako, I.)

  9. Nuclear power reactor safety research activities in CIAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pu Shendi; Huang Yucai; Xu Hanming; Zhang Zhongyue

    1994-01-01

    The power reactor safety research activities in CIAE are briefly reviewed. The research work performed in 1980's and 1990's is mainly emphasised, which is closely related to the design, construction and licensing review of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant and the safety review of Guangdong Nuclear Power Station. Major achievements in the area of thermohydraulics, nuclear fuel, probabilistic safety assessment and severe accident researches are summarized. The foreseeable research plan for the near future, relating to the design and construction of 600 MWe PWR NPP at Qinshan Site (phase II development) is outlined

  10. Instructor-Created Activities to Engage Undergraduate Nursing Research Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Linda L; Reuille, Kristina M

    2018-03-01

    In flipped or blended classrooms, instruction intentionally shifts to a student-centered model for a problem-based learning approach, where class time explores topics in greater depth, creating meaningful learning opportunities. This article describes instructor-created activities focused on research processes linked to evidence-based practice that engage undergraduate nursing research students. In the classroom, these activities include individual and team work to foster critical thinking and stimulate student discussion of topic material. Six activities for small and large student groups are related to quantitative, qualitative, and both research processes, as well as applying research evidence to practice. Positive student outcomes included quantitative success on assignments and robust student topic discussions, along with instructor-noted overall group engagement and interest. Using these activities can result in class time for the construction of meaning, rather than primarily information transmission. Instructors may adopt these activities to involve and stimulate students' critical thinking about research and evidence-based practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):174-177.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. IAEA activities in the field of research reactors safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciuculescu, C.; Boado Magan, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IAEA activities in the field of research reactor safety are included in the programme of the Division of Nuclear Installations Safety. Following the objectives of the Division, the results of the IAEA missions and the recommendations from International Advisory Groups, the IAEA has conducted in recent years a certain number of activities aiming to enhance the safety of research reactors. The following activities will be presented: (a) the new Requirements for the Safety of Research Reactors, main features and differences with previous standards (SS-35-S1 and SS-35-S2) and the grading approach for implementation; (b) new documents being developed (safety guides, safety reports and TECDOC's); (c) activities related to the Incident Reporting System for Research Reactor (IRSRR); (d) the new features implemented for the INSARR missions; (e) the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactors adopted by the Board of Governors on 8 March 2004, following the General Conference Resolution GC(45)/RES/10; and (f) the survey on the safety of research reactors published on the IAEA website on February 2003 and the results obtained. (author)

  12. Human Factors Regulatory Research Program Plan, FY 1989--FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.; Persensky, J.; Ryan, T.; Ramey-Smith, A.; Goodman, C.; Serig, D.; Trager, E; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC; Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC

    1989-10-01

    This report describes the currently ongoing (FY 1989) and planned (FY 1989-1992) Human Factors Regulatory Research Program in the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES). Examples of the influence of human factors on nuclear safety are presented, and the role of personnel is discussed. Current regulatory issues associated with human factors in the nuclear system and the purpose of the research plan are provided. The report describes the research process applied to the human factors research issues and the program activities: Personnel Performance Measurement, Personnel Subsystem, Human-System Interface. Organization and Management, and Reliability Assessment. The research being conducted within each activity is summarized along with the objectives, background information, and expected regulatory products. Budget and personnel forecasts are provided along with a summary of contractors performing some of the ongoing research. Appendices contain a chronology of human factors research at NRC, a description of the research approach, an update on human factors programs and initiatives in RES and other NRC offices, and the integration among these programs. 46 refs., 5 tabs

  13. Research engagement of health sciences librarians: a survey of research-related activities and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Lessick, MA, MLS, AHIP, FMLA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The extent to which health sciences librarians are engaged in research is a little-studied question. This study assesses the research activities and attitudes of Medical Library Association (MLA members, including the influence of work affiliation. Methods: An online survey was designed using a combination of multiple-choice and open-ended questions and distributed to MLA members. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and significance testing. The authors used statistical tools and categorized openended question topics by the constant comparative method, also applying the broad subject categories used in a prior study. Pearson’s chi-square analysis was performed on responses to determine significant differences among respondents employed in three different institutional environments. Results: Analysis showed that 79% of respondents read research articles at least once a month; 58% applied published research studies to practice; 44% had conducted research; 62% reported acting on research had enhanced their libraries; 38% had presented findings; and 34% had authored research articles. Hospital librarians were significantly less likely than academic librarians to have participated in research activities. Highly ranked research benefits, barriers, and competencies of health sciences librarians are described. Conclusions: Findings indicate that health sciences librarians are actively engaged in research activities. Practice implications for practitioners, publishers, and stakeholders are discussed. Results suggest that practitioners can use published research results and results from their own research to affect practice decisions and improve services. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, including the need for intervention studies to increase research and writing productivity.

  14. NRC source term assessment for incident response dose projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easley, P.; Pasedag, W.

    1984-01-01

    The NRC provides advice and assistance to licensees and State and local authorities in responding to accidents. The TACT code supports this function by providing source term projections for two situations during early (15 to 60 minutes) accident response: (1) Core/containment damage is indicated, but there are no measured releases. Quantification of a predicted release permits emergency response before people are exposed. With TACT, response personnel can estimate releases based on fuel and cladding conditions, coolant boundary and containment integrity, and mitigative systems operability. For this type of estimate, TACT is intermediate between default assumptions and time-consuming mechanistic codes. (2) A combination of plant status and limited release data are available. For this situation, iterations between predictions based on known conditions which are compared to measured releases gives reasonable confidence in supplemental source term information otherwise unavailable: nuclide mix, releases not monitored, and trending or abrupt changes. The assumptions and models used in TACT, and examples of its use, are given in this paper

  15. The Applied Behavior Analysis Research Paradigm and Single-Subject Designs in Adapted Physical Activity Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegele, Justin A; Hodge, Samuel Russell

    2015-10-01

    There are basic philosophical and paradigmatic assumptions that guide scholarly research endeavors, including the methods used and the types of questions asked. Through this article, kinesiology faculty and students with interests in adapted physical activity are encouraged to understand the basic assumptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) methodology for conducting, analyzing, and presenting research of high quality in this paradigm. The purposes of this viewpoint paper are to present information fundamental to understanding the assumptions undergirding research methodology in ABA, describe key aspects of single-subject research designs, and discuss common research designs and data-analysis strategies used in single-subject studies.

  16. Publish literature on the research activities using the JMRT (II). Publication as JAERI research reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Ishii, Tadahiko; Niimi, Motoji; Fujiki, Kazuo; Takahashi, Hidetake (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2002-11-01

    The published reports on the research and development activities using the JMTR since 1971 to date have been surveyed by the search of literature database and questionnaire survey. This report compiles the title lists and abstracts of reports published by JAERI and survey the trend of the research and development in JAERI using the JMTR. (author)

  17. Published literature on the research activities using the JMRT (II). Publication as JAERI research reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Ishii, Tadahiko; Niimi, Motoji; Fujiki, Kazuo; Takahashi, Hidetake

    2002-11-01

    The published reports on the research and development activities using the JMTR since 1971 to date have been surveyed by the search of literature database and questionnaire survey. This report compiles the title lists and abstracts of reports published by JAERI and survey the trend of the research and development in JAERI using the JMTR. (author)

  18. Transportation research activities in support of nuclear waste management programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, G.C. Jr.; Cashwell, J.W.; Jefferson, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    Transportation Technology Center has been conducting a wide range of technical research activities to assure the ability to transport radioactive materials in a safe, reliable manner. These activities include tasks in basic, analysis methodology and system research areas. Recently, the requirements of defense waste shipments have served as a focal point for development tasks with the expectation that they would serve as a precursor for commercial activities. The passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act has placed additional responsibility on the Department of Energy for concerns involving the shipments of civilian materials. The development of additional research responsibilities is expected to proceed concurrently with the evolution of the transportation mission plan for civilian spent fuel and high-level wastes

  19. University Research and Development Activities: The Federal Income Tax Consequences of Research Contracts, Research Subsidiaries and Joint Ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertz, Consuelo Lauda; Hasson, James K., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Features of the federal income tax law applying to income received from commercially funded university-based scientific research and development activities are discussed, including: industry-sponsored research contracts, separately incorporated entities, partnerships and joint ventures, subsidiaries and unrelated income consequences of…

  20. Research activities at nuclear research institute in water chemistry and corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kysela, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Research activities at Nuclear Research Institute Rez (NRI) are presented. They are based on former heavy water reactor program and now on pressurized reactors VVER types which are operated on Czech republic. There is LVR-15 research reactor operated in NRI. The reactor and its experimental facilities is utilized for water chemistry and corrosion studies. NRI services for power plants involve water chemistry optimalization, radioactivity build-up, fuel corrosion and structural materials corrosion tests. (author)

  1. Web-based training related to NRC staff review of dose modeling aspects of license termination and decommissioning plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D.; Arnish, J.; Cheng, J.J.; Kamboj, S.; Richmond, P.; Chen, S.Y.; Barr, C.; McKenney, C.

    2007-01-01

    final status surveys are addressed in the WBT. Realistic case examples are presented and analyzed including the abstraction of a realistic site into a conceptual model and computer model. A case history is also used to demonstrate development of NRC review documents such as requests for additional information (RAIs). To enhance the web-based training experience, audio, animations, linked documents, quizzes, and scripts are being integrated with a commercial web-based training package that supports simple navigation. The course is also being integrated into both existing and state-of-the-art learning management systems. A testing group is being utilized to identify and help resolve training issues prior to deployment of the course. When completed, the course can be accessed for credited training with required modules dependent on the job category of the training participant. The modules will also be accessible to NRC staff for review or refresher following initial course completion. WBT promotes consistency in reviews and has the advantage of being able to be used as a resource to staff at any time. The WBT provides reviewers with knowledge needed to perform risk-informed analyses (e.g., information related to development of realistic scenarios and use of probabilistic analysis). WBT on review of LTP or DP dose modeling promotes staff development, efficiency, and effectiveness in performing risk-informed, performance-based reviews of decommissioning activities at NRC-licensed facilities.

  2. Performance testing of dosimetry processors, status of NRC rulemaking for improved personnel dosimetry processing, and some beta dosimetry and instrumentation problems observed by NRC regional inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, N.A.; Kinneman, J.D.; Costello, F.M.; White, J.R.; Nimitz, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Early dosimetry processor performance studies conducted between 1967 and 1979 by several different investigators indicated that a significant percentage of personnel dosimetry processors may not be performing with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Results of voluntary performance testing of US personnel dosimetry processors against the final Health Physics Society Standard, Criteria for Testing Personnel Dosimetry Performance by the University of Michigan for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will be summarized with emphasis on processor performance in radiation categories involving beta particles and beta particles and photon mixtures. The current status of the NRC's regulatory program for improved personnel dosimetry processing will be reviewed. The NRC is proposing amendments to its regulations, 10 CFR Part 20, that would require its licensees to utilize specified personnel dosimetry services from processors accredited by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program of the National Bureau of Standards. Details of the development and schedule for implementation of the program will be highlighted. Finally, selected beta dosimetry and beta instrumentation problems observed by NRC Regional Staff during inspections of NRC licensed facilities will be discussed

  3. Recommendations for NRC policy on shift scheduling and overtime at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.M.

    1985-07-01

    This report contains the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) recommendations to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for an NRC policy on shift scheduling and hours of work (including overtime) for control room operators and other safety-related personnel in nuclear power plants. First, it is recommended that NRC make three additions to its present policy on overtime: (1) limit personnel to 112 hours of work in a 14-day period, 192 hours in 28 days, and 2260 hours in one year; exceeding these limits would require plant manager approval; (2) add a requirement that licensees obtain approval from NRC if plant personnel are expected to exceed 72 hours of work in a 7-day period, 132 hours in 14 days, 228 hours in 28 days, and 2300 hours in one year; and (3) make the policy a requirement, rather than a nonbinding recommendation. Second, it is recommended that licensees be required to obtain NRC approval to adopt a routine 12-hour/day shift schedule. Third, it is recommended that NRC add several nonbinding recommendations concerning routine 8-hour/day schedules. Finally, because additional data can strengthen the basis for future NRC policy on overtime, five methods are suggested for collecting data on overtime and its effects. 44 refs., 10 tabs.

  4. Recommendations for NRC policy on shift scheduling and overtime at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, P.M.

    1985-07-01

    This report contains the Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL's) recommendations to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for an NRC policy on shift scheduling and hours of work (including overtime) for control room operators and other safety-related personnel in nuclear power plants. First, it is recommended that NRC make three additions to its present policy on overtime: (1) limit personnel to 112 hours of work in a 14-day period, 192 hours in 28 days, and 2260 hours in one year; exceeding these limits would require plant manager approval; (2) add a requirement that licensees obtain approval from NRC if plant personnel are expected to exceed 72 hours of work in a 7-day period, 132 hours in 14 days, 228 hours in 28 days, and 2300 hours in one year; and (3) make the policy a requirement, rather than a nonbinding recommendation. Second, it is recommended that licensees be required to obtain NRC approval to adopt a routine 12-hour/day shift schedule. Third, it is recommended that NRC add several nonbinding recommendations concerning routine 8-hour/day schedules. Finally, because additional data can strengthen the basis for future NRC policy on overtime, five methods are suggested for collecting data on overtime and its effects. 44 refs., 10 tabs

  5. Summary of activities of the Research Branch during 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-11-01

    A summary of the activities performed during 1983 by the C.N.E.A.'s Research Branch in basic and applied research is given. The main activities and achievements obtained are shown in the following areas: 1) Physics Department: Tandar Project; Experimental Nuclear Physics; Theoretical Nuclear Physics; Solid State Physics; Technical Assistance and Engineering. 2) Reactor's Chemistry Department with its divisions: Radiation Chemistry; Chemical Control; Moderator and Coolant Physical Chemistry. 3) Radiobiology Department: Radiation Pathology; Genetics; Molecular Genetics; Somatic Effects; Radiomicrobiology; Irradiation and Dosimetry; Bioterium. 4) Prospective Department and Special Studies; Nuclear Fusion and Solar Energy and also, Biomathematics; Labelled Molecules and Radiochemistry. (M.E.L.) [es

  6. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-15

    In 2007, a total of Euro 6 606 194 were obligated for the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities (Euro 6 515 957 from the regular budget and Euro 90 237 from extrabudgetary resources). Most of the Coordinated Research Activities are carried out via Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) which bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. At the end of 2007, work was being carried out on 115 CRPs, 37 in Major Programme 1 - Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Science, 71 in Major Programme 2 - Nuclear Techniques for Development and Environmental Protection, and 7 in Major Programme 3 - Nuclear Safety and Security. The total amount obligated for these activities in 2007 was 15% more than in 2006, largely due to the implementation of 28 new CRPs. At the end of 2007 work was being carried out under 976 contracts and 562 agreements with institutes in 110 Member States. 72% of the funds obligated for contracts in 2007 were in respect of institutions in developing countries, primarily in the areas of food and agriculture and human health. During 2007, 21% of the Chief Scientific Investigators participating in Agency CRPs were female researchers. Efforts will continue to increase the participation of women and younger researcher in the Coordinated Research Activities. The forty two completed CRPs evaluated in Appendix E resulted in 9 PhDs, one masters degree and in the publishing of about 800 articles and reports, scientific papers, proceedings of scientific conferences and contribution to international conferences, as well as 13 IAEA TECDOCs, and various scientific databases and websites. Detailed evaluation reports on the outputs, effectiveness, impact, recommended future action, and resulting publications of these completed CRPs are included in in Appendix E of this report. (author)

  7. Accelerator and Fusion Research Division: Summary of activities, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report contains a summary of activities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Accelerator and Fusion Research Division for the year 1986. Topics and facilities investigated in individual papers are: 1-2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source, the Center for X-Ray Optics, Accelerator Operations, High-Energy Physics Technology, Heavy-Ion Fusion Accelerator Research and Magnetic Fusion Energy. Six individual papers have been indexed separately

  8. Activities report 1991-1992: Nuclear Research Center of Strasbourg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This activities report of the Nuclear Research Centre of Strasbourg for the years 1991 and 1992, presents nine research axis: theoretical physics, mechanisms of reactions and nuclear structure, extreme forms of nuclei, exotic nuclei, hot and dense nuclear matter, ultra-relativistic heavy ions, physics of LEP (European Large Electron-Positron storage ring) at 'DELPHI', chemistry and physics of radiations, physics and applications of semi-conductors

  9. Coordinated research activities: Annual report and statistics for 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-07-01

    In 2007, a total of Euro 6 606 194 were obligated for the Agency's Coordinated Research Activities (Euro 6 515 957 from the regular budget and Euro 90 237 from extrabudgetary resources). Most of the Coordinated Research Activities are carried out via Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) which bring together research institutes in both developing and developed Member States to collaborate on research topics of common interest. At the end of 2007, work was being carried out on 115 CRPs, 37 in Major Programme 1 - Nuclear Power, Fuel Cycle and Nuclear Science, 71 in Major Programme 2 - Nuclear Techniques for Development and Environmental Protection, and 7 in Major Programme 3 - Nuclear Safety and Security. The total amount obligated for these activities in 2007 was 15% more than in 2006, largely due to the implementation of 28 new CRPs. At the end of 2007 work was being carried out under 976 contracts and 562 agreements with institutes in 110 Member States. 72% of the funds obligated for contracts in 2007 were in respect of institutions in developing countries, primarily in the areas of food and agriculture and human health. During 2007, 21% of the Chief Scientific Investigators participating in Agency CRPs were female researchers. Efforts will continue to increase the participation of women and younger researcher in the Coordinated Research Activities. The forty two completed CRPs evaluated in Appendix E resulted in 9 PhDs, one masters degree and in the publishing of about 800 articles and reports, scientific papers, proceedings of scientific conferences and contribution to international conferences, as well as 13 IAEA TECDOCs, and various scientific databases and websites. Detailed evaluation reports on the outputs, effectiveness, impact, recommended future action, and resulting publications of these completed CRPs are included in in Appendix E of this report. (author)

  10. Institute of Nuclear Physics, mission and scientific research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoto, J.; Zaganjori, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) was established in 1971 as a scientific research institution with main goal basic scientific knowledge transmission and transfer the new methods and technologies of nuclear physics to the different economy fields. The organizational structure and main research areas of the Institute are described. The effects of the long transition period of the Albanian society and economy on the Institution activity are also presented

  11. Activity report of the Neutrino Research Group. Year 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    For the last two decades, neutrino physics has been producing major discoveries including neutrino oscillations. These results gave clear confirmation that active neutrinos oscillate and therefore have mass with three different mass states. This is a very important result showing that the Minimal Standard Model is incomplete and requires an extension which is not yet known. The neutrino research field is very broad and active, at the frontier of today's particle physics. The Neutrino Research Group (GDR) was created in January 2005 with the aim of gathering CEA and CNRS research teams working on Neutrino Physics on experimental or theoretical level. This document is the 2006 activity report of the research group, two years after its creation. It presents the results of the 5 working groups: 1 - Determination of neutrino parameters; 2 - Physics beyond the standard model; 3 - Neutrinos in the universe; 4 - Accelerators, detection means, R and D and valorisation; 5 - Common tools to all working groups. The proposed neutrino physics road-map and the actual and future short-, medium- and long-term projects are presented in appendixes. The Neutrino research group organization, the Memphys specific mission group, the research group participating laboratories and teams, as well as the Memphys project are presented too

  12. International cooperation during radiological emergencies. NRC program guidance for the provision of technical advice to foreign counterpart organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senseney, R.

    1986-04-01

    This report defines the scope, application, and limits of the technical cooperation the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) would provide, upon request, to a foreign regulatory agency in a nuclear emergency. It outlines the basis for such cooperation, offers a model written agreement, and describes recent cases of NRC assistance. It also identifies non-NRC sources of emergency advisory assistance available to foreign organizations

  13. Physical activity and pediatric multiple sclerosis: Developing a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, E Ann; Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; Grover, Stephanie A; Motl, Robert W

    2015-11-01

    Three-quarters of children with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience fatigue or depression, and progressive neurocognitive decline may be seen as early as two years after MS diagnosis. Furthermore, a higher magnetic resonance imaging disease burden is seen in pediatric-onset MS compared with adult-onset MS. To date, limited knowledge exists regarding behavioral methods for managing symptoms and disease progression in pediatric MS. To that end, this paper builds an evidence-based argument for the possible symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of exercise and physical activity in pediatric MS. This will be accomplished through: (a) a review of pediatric MS and its consequences; (b) a brief overview of physical activity and its consequences in children and adults with MS; and (c) a selective review of research on the neurological benefits of physical activity in pediatric populations. This topical review concludes with a list of 10 questions to guide future research on physical activity and pediatric MS. The objective of this paper is the provision of a research interest, focus and agenda involving pediatric MS and its lifelong management though exercise and physical activity behavior. Such an agenda is critical as the effects and maintenance of physical activity and exercise track across the lifespan, particularly when developed in the early stages of life. © The Author(s), 2015.

  14. Research for the energy turnaround. Phase transitions actively shape. Contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczepanski, Petra; Wunschick, Franziska; Martin, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    The Annual Conference 2014 of the Renewable Energy Research Association was held in Berlin on 6 and 7 November 2014. This book documents the contributions of the conference on research for the energy turnaround, phase transitions actively shape. After an introduction and two contributions to the political framework, the contributions to the economic phases of the energy transition, the phase of the current turn, the phases of social energy revolution, the stages of heat turnaround (Waermewende), and the stages of the mobility turn deal with the stages of development of the energy system. Finally, the Research Association Renewable Energy is briefly presented. [de

  15. NRC Information No. 91-29: Deficiencies identified during electrical distribution system functional inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    During multidisciplinary inspections, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has identified many deficiencies related to the electrical distribution system. To address these deficiencies, the NRC has developed an inspection to specifically evaluate the electrical distribution system. During the last year, the NRC completed eight EDSFIs, performing at least one in each of the several common deficiencies in the licensees' programs and in the electrical distribution systems as designed and configured at each plant. These deficiencies included inadequate ac voltages at the 480 Vac and 120 Vac distribution levels, inadequate procedures to test circuit breakers, and inadequate determinations and evaluations of setpoints

  16. Perspective on US NRC Policy Issues Concerning Use of Risk Insights for Non-LWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jun Su; Kim, In Goo; Huh, Chang Wook; Kim, Kyun Tae

    2011-01-01

    Since the PRA Implementation plan of US NRC (1994), PRA has been applied to all NPPs in USA and risk insights have been used for the regulation as a complement of the deterministic approaches. RIRIP (Risk-Informed Regulation Implementation Plan, 2000) and RPP (Risk-Informed and Performance-Based Plan, 2007) were announced by US NRC thereafter, which recommended enhanced use of risk insights. In the meantime, there have been lots of policy issues concerning use of risk insights for licensing Non-LWR designs, which will be discussed in this paper to understand the stream of perspectives on US NRC's approach

  17. Current status of research and related activities in NAA application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ab Khalik bin Haji Wood

    1999-01-01

    Current activities of Analytical Chemistry Group of MINT (Malaysia Institute for Nuclear Technology Research) laboratory for elemental analysis of trace amounts in environmental samples such as air particulate matter (on air filter), soils/sediments, water, flora/fauna, oil sludge/waste sludge, and tailing/blasting slag and others, utilizing particularly NAA (Neutron Activation Analysis) method are reviewed. The laboratory participates in the IAEA-organized Interlaboratory Comparison Studies to ensure the analytical system. Other activities include analytical chemistry services with ICP-mass spectrometry and GC/GCMS to compliment the NAA and, moreover, air and marine pollution studies with participation in the UNDP/RCA/IAEA project. (S. Ohno)

  18. Neutron activation measurements in research reactor concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Bozic, M.

    2001-01-01

    The results of activation measurement inside TRIGA research reactor concrete shielding are given. Samples made of ordinary and barytes concrete together with gold and nickel foils were irradiated in the reactor body. Long-lived neutron-induced gamma-ray-emitting radioactive nuclides in the samples were measured with HPGe detector. The most active longlived radioactive nuclides in ordinary concrete samples were found to be 60 Co and 152 Eu and in barytes concrete samples 60 Co, 152 Eu and 133 Ba. Measured activity density of all nuclides was found to decrease almost linearly with depth in logarithmic scale.(author)

  19. Considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in research activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Diego A; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    There are several factors that are known to affect research productivity; some of them imply the need for large financial investments and others are related to work styles. There are some articles that provide suggestions for early career scientists (PhD students and postdocs) but few publications are oriented to professors about scientific leadership. As academic mentoring might be useful at all levels of experience, in this note we suggest several key considerations for higher efficiency and productivity in academic and research activities. More research is needed into the main work style features that differentiate highly productive scientists and research groups, as some of them could be innate and others could be transferable. As funding agencies, universities and research centers invest large amounts of money in order to have a better scientific productivity, a deeper understanding of these factors will be of high academic and societal impact.

  20. Scientific activities 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The scientific activities and achievements of the Nuclear Research Center Democritus for the year 1979 are presented in the form of a list of 78 projects giving title, objectives, commencement year, responsible of each project, developed activities and the pertaining lists of publications. The 15 chapters of this work cover the activities of the main Divisions of the Democritus NRC: Electronics, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Health Physics, Reactor, Radioisotopes, Environmental Radioactivity, Soil Science, Computer Center, Uranium Exploration, Medical Service, Technological Applications and Training. (T.A.)