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Sample records for novo ultrascale atomistic

  1. De Novo Ultrascale Atomistic Simulations On High-End Parallel Supercomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, A; Kalia, R K; Nomura, K; Sharma, A; Vashishta, P; Shimojo, F; van Duin, A; Goddard, III, W A; Biswas, R; Srivastava, D; Yang, L H

    2006-09-04

    We present a de novo hierarchical simulation framework for first-principles based predictive simulations of materials and their validation on high-end parallel supercomputers and geographically distributed clusters. In this framework, high-end chemically reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations explore a wide solution space to discover microscopic mechanisms that govern macroscopic material properties, into which highly accurate quantum mechanical (QM) simulations are embedded to validate the discovered mechanisms and quantify the uncertainty of the solution. The framework includes an embedded divide-and-conquer (EDC) algorithmic framework for the design of linear-scaling simulation algorithms with minimal bandwidth complexity and tight error control. The EDC framework also enables adaptive hierarchical simulation with automated model transitioning assisted by graph-based event tracking. A tunable hierarchical cellular decomposition parallelization framework then maps the O(N) EDC algorithms onto Petaflops computers, while achieving performance tunability through a hierarchy of parameterized cell data/computation structures, as well as its implementation using hybrid Grid remote procedure call + message passing + threads programming. High-end computing platforms such as IBM BlueGene/L, SGI Altix 3000 and the NSF TeraGrid provide an excellent test grounds for the framework. On these platforms, we have achieved unprecedented scales of quantum-mechanically accurate and well validated, chemically reactive atomistic simulations--1.06 billion-atom fast reactive force-field MD and 11.8 million-atom (1.04 trillion grid points) quantum-mechanical MD in the framework of the EDC density functional theory on adaptive multigrids--in addition to 134 billion-atom non-reactive space-time multiresolution MD, with the parallel efficiency as high as 0.998 on 65,536 dual-processor BlueGene/L nodes. We have also achieved an automated execution of hierarchical QM

  2. Ultrascale Visualization of Climate Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dean N.; Bremer, Timo; Doutriaux, Charles; Patchett, John; Williams, Sean; Shipman, Galen; Miller, Ross; Pugmire, David R.; Smith, Brian; Steed, Chad; hide

    2013-01-01

    Fueled by exponential increases in the computational and storage capabilities of high-performance computing platforms, climate simulations are evolving toward higher numerical fidelity, complexity, volume, and dimensionality. These technological breakthroughs are coming at a time of exponential growth in climate data, with estimates of hundreds of exabytes by 2020. To meet the challenges and exploit the opportunities that such explosive growth affords, a consortium of four national laboratories, two universities, a government agency, and two private companies formed to explore the next wave in climate science. Working in close collaboration with domain experts, the Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) project aims to provide high-level solutions to a variety of climate data analysis and visualization problems.

  3. Ultra-Scale Visualization: Research and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, K-L; Ross, Robert; Huang Jian; Humphreys, Greg; Max, Nelson; Moreland, Kenneth; Owens, John D; Shen, H-W

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the science behind large-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments requires extracting meaning from data sets of hundreds of terabytes or more. Visualization is the most intuitive means for scientists to understand data at this scale, and the most effective way to communicate their findings with others. Even though visualization technology has matured over the past twenty years, it is still limited by the extent and scale of the data that it can be applied to, and also by the functionalities that were mostly designed for single-user, single-variable, and single-space investigation. The Institute for Ultra-Scale Visualization (IUSV), funded by the DOE SciDAC-2 program, has the mission to advance visualization technologies to enable knowledge discovery and dissemination for peta-scale applications. By working with the SciDAC application projects, Centers for Enabling Technology, and other Institutes, IUSV aims to lead the research innovation that can create new visualization capabilities needed for gleaning insights from data at petascale and beyond to solve forefront scientific problems. This paper outlines what we see as some of the biggest research challenges facing the visualization community, and how we can approach education and outreach to put successful research in the hands of scientists

  4. Ultrascale collaborative visualization using a display-rich global cyberinfrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Byungil; Leigh, Jason; Johnson, Andrew; Renambot, Luc; Brown, Maxine; Jagodic, Ratko; Nam, Sungwon; Hur, Hyejung

    2010-01-01

    The scalable adaptive graphics environment (SAGE) is high-performance graphics middleware for ultrascale collaborative visualization using a display-rich global cyberinfrastructure. Dozens of sites worldwide use this cyberinfrastructure middleware, which connects high-performance-computing resources over high-speed networks to distributed ultraresolution displays.

  5. A new high speed, Ultrascale+ based board for the ATLAS jet calorimeter trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A new high speed Ultrascale+ based board for the ATLAS jet calorimeter trigger system To cope with the enhanced luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2021, the ATLAS collaboration is planning a major detector upgrade. As a part of this, the Level 1 trigger based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit the fine granularity readout using a new system of Feature EXtractors (FEX), which each reconstruct different physics objects for the trigger selection. The jet FEX (jFEX) system is conceived to provide jet identification (including large area jets) and measurements of global variables within a latency budget of less then 400ns. It consists of 6 modules. A single jFEX module is an ATCA board with 4 large FPGAs of the Xilinx Ultrascale+ family, that can digest a total input data rate of ~3.6 Tb/s using up to 120 Multi Gigabit Transceiver (MGT), 24 electrical optical devices, board control and power on the mezzanines to allow flexibility in upgrading controls functions and components without aff...

  6. Parallel Atomistic Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HEFFELFINGER,GRANT S.

    2000-01-18

    Algorithms developed to enable the use of atomistic molecular simulation methods with parallel computers are reviewed. Methods appropriate for bonded as well as non-bonded (and charged) interactions are included. While strategies for obtaining parallel molecular simulations have been developed for the full variety of atomistic simulation methods, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo have received the most attention. Three main types of parallel molecular dynamics simulations have been developed, the replicated data decomposition, the spatial decomposition, and the force decomposition. For Monte Carlo simulations, parallel algorithms have been developed which can be divided into two categories, those which require a modified Markov chain and those which do not. Parallel algorithms developed for other simulation methods such as Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo, grand canonical molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo methods for protein structure determination are also reviewed and issues such as how to measure parallel efficiency, especially in the case of parallel Monte Carlo algorithms with modified Markov chains are discussed.

  7. Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Silva, Claudio [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Computer Science and Engineering Dept.

    2013-09-30

    For the past three years, a large analysis and visualization effort—funded by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)—has brought together a wide variety of industry-standard scientific computing libraries and applications to create Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) to serve the global climate simulation and observational research communities. To support interactive analysis and visualization, all components connect through a provenance application–programming interface to capture meaningful history and workflow. Components can be loosely coupled into the framework for fast integration or tightly coupled for greater system functionality and communication with other components. The overarching goal of UV-CDAT is to provide a new paradigm for access to and analysis of massive, distributed scientific data collections by leveraging distributed data architectures located throughout the world. The UV-CDAT framework addresses challenges in analysis and visualization and incorporates new opportunities, including parallelism for better efficiency, higher speed, and more accurate scientific inferences. Today, it provides more than 600 users access to more analysis and visualization products than any other single source.

  8. A new high speed, Ultrascale+ based board for the ATLAS jet calorimeter trigger system

    CERN Document Server

    Rocco, Elena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    To cope with the enhanced luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2021, the ATLAS collaboration is planning a major detector upgrade. As a part of this, the Level 1 trigger based on calorimeter data will be upgraded to exploit the fine granularity readout using a new system of Feature EXtractors (FEX), which each reconstruct different physics objects for the trigger selection. The jet FEX (jFEX) system is conceived to provide jet identification (including large area jets) and measurements of global variables within a latency budget of less then 400ns. It consists of 6 modules. A single jFEX module is an ATCA board with 4 large FPGAs of the Xilinx Ultrascale+ family, that can digest a total input data rate of ~3.6 Tb/s using up to 120 Multi Gigabit Transceiver (MGT), 24 electrical optical devices, board control and power on the mezzanines to allow flexibility in upgrading controls functions and components without affecting the main board. The 24-layers stack-up was carefully designed to preserve the s...

  9. Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-19

    A partnership across government, academic, and private sectors has created a novel system that enables climate researchers to solve current and emerging data analysis and visualization challenges. The Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) software project utilizes the Python application programming interface (API) combined with C/C++/Fortran implementations for performance-critical software that offers the best compromise between "scalability" and “ease-of-use.” The UV-CDAT system is highly extensible and customizable for high-performance interactive and batch visualization and analysis for climate science and other disciplines of geosciences. For complex, climate data-intensive computing, UV-CDAT’s inclusive framework supports Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallelism as well as taskfarming and other forms of parallelism. More specifically, the UV-CDAT framework supports the execution of Python scripts running in parallel using the MPI executable commands and leverages Department of Energy (DOE)-funded general-purpose, scalable parallel visualization tools such as ParaView and VisIt. This is the first system to be successfully designed in this way and with these features. The climate community leverages these tools and others, in support of a parallel client-server paradigm, allowing extreme-scale, server-side computing for maximum possible speed-up.

  10. 2014 Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Conference Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The climate and weather data science community met December 9–11, 2014, in Livermore, California, for the fourth annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Conference, hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UVCDATremain global collaborations committed to developing a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to simulated and observed data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure created under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change. In addition, the F2F conference fosters a stronger climate and weather data science community and facilitates a stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2014 F2F conference detailed the progress of ESGF, UV-CDAT, and other community efforts over the year and sets new priorities and requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects, such as the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase Six. Specifically discussed at the conference were project capabilities and enhancements needs for data distribution, analysis, visualization, hardware and network infrastructure, standards, and resources.

  11. Atomistic Properties of Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirdeshmukh, Dinker B; Subhadra, K G

    2011-01-01

    The book deals with atomistic properties of solids which are determined by the crystal structure, interatomic forces and atomic displacements influenced by the effects of temperature, stress and electric fields. The book gives equal importance to experimental details and theory. There are full chapters dedicated to the tensor nature of physical properties, mechanical properties, lattice vibrations, crystal structure determination and ferroelectricity. The other crystalline states like nano-, poly-, liquid- and quasi crystals are discussed. Several new topics like nonlinear optics and the Rietveld method are presented in the book. The book lays emphasis on the role of symmetry in crystal properties. Comprehensiveness is the strength of the book; this allows users at different levels a choice of chapters according to their requirements.

  12. Proceedings of the First PhD Symposium on Sustainable Ultrascale Computing Systems (NESUS PhD 2016)

    OpenAIRE

    Carretero Pérez, Jesús; García Blas, Javier; Petcu, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Proceedings of the First PhD Symposium on Sustainable Ultrascale Computing Systems (NESUS PhD 2016) Timisoara, Romania. February 8-11, 2016. The PhD Symposium was a very good opportunity for the young researchers to share information and knowledge, to present their current research, and to discuss topics with other students in order to look for synergies and common research topics. The idea was very successful and the assessment made by the PhD Student was very good. It also helped t...

  13. Passing waves from atomistic to continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Diaz, Adrian; Xiong, Liming; McDowell, David L.; Chen, Youping

    2018-02-01

    Progress in the development of coupled atomistic-continuum methods for simulations of critical dynamic material behavior has been hampered by a spurious wave reflection problem at the atomistic-continuum interface. This problem is mainly caused by the difference in material descriptions between the atomistic and continuum models, which results in a mismatch in phonon dispersion relations. In this work, we introduce a new method based on atomistic dynamics of lattice coupled with a concurrent atomistic-continuum method to enable a full phonon representation in the continuum description. This permits the passage of short-wavelength, high-frequency phonon waves from the atomistic to continuum regions. The benchmark examples presented in this work demonstrate that the new scheme enables the passage of all allowable phonons through the atomistic-continuum interface; it also preserves the wave coherency and energy conservation after phonons transport across multiple atomistic-continuum interfaces. This work is the first step towards developing a concurrent atomistic-continuum simulation tool for non-equilibrium phonon-mediated thermal transport in materials with microstructural complexity.

  14. Atomistic k ⋅ p theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pryor, Craig E., E-mail: craig-pryor@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Pistol, M.-E., E-mail: mats-erik.pistol@ftf.lth.se [NanoLund and Solid State Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-14

    Pseudopotentials, tight-binding models, and k ⋅ p theory have stood for many years as the standard techniques for computing electronic states in crystalline solids. Here, we present the first new method in decades, which we call atomistic k ⋅ p theory. In its usual formulation, k ⋅ p theory has the advantage of depending on parameters that are directly related to experimentally measured quantities, however, it is insensitive to the locations of individual atoms. We construct an atomistic k ⋅ p theory by defining envelope functions on a grid matching the crystal lattice. The model parameters are matrix elements which are obtained from experimental results or ab initio wave functions in a simple way. This is in contrast to the other atomistic approaches in which parameters are fit to reproduce a desired dispersion and are not expressible in terms of fundamental quantities. This fitting is often very difficult. We illustrate our method by constructing a four-band atomistic model for a diamond/zincblende crystal and show that it is equivalent to the sp{sup 3} tight-binding model. We can thus directly derive the parameters in the sp{sup 3} tight-binding model from experimental data. We then take the atomistic limit of the widely used eight-band Kane model and compute the band structures for all III–V semiconductors not containing nitrogen or boron using parameters fit to experimental data. Our new approach extends k ⋅ p theory to problems in which atomistic precision is required, such as impurities, alloys, polytypes, and interfaces. It also provides a new approach to multiscale modeling by allowing continuum and atomistic k ⋅ p models to be combined in the same system.

  15. Atomistic modeling of dropwise condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikarwar, B. S., E-mail: bssikarwar@amity.edu; Singh, P. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida (India); Muralidhar, K.; Khandekar, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kanpur (India)

    2016-05-23

    The basic aim of the atomistic modeling of condensation of water is to determine the size of the stable cluster and connect phenomena occurring at atomic scale to the macroscale. In this paper, a population balance model is described in terms of the rate equations to obtain the number density distribution of the resulting clusters. The residence time is taken to be large enough so that sufficient time is available for all the adatoms existing in vapor-phase to loose their latent heat and get condensed. The simulation assumes clusters of a given size to be formed from clusters of smaller sizes, but not by the disintegration of the larger clusters. The largest stable cluster size in the number density distribution is taken to be representative of the minimum drop radius formed in a dropwise condensation process. A numerical confirmation of this result against predictions based on a thermodynamic model has been obtained. Results show that the number density distribution is sensitive to the surface diffusion coefficient and the rate of vapor flux impinging on the substrate. The minimum drop radius increases with the diffusion coefficient and the impinging vapor flux; however, the dependence is weak. The minimum drop radius predicted from thermodynamic considerations matches the prediction of the cluster model, though the former does not take into account the effect of the surface properties on the nucleation phenomena. For a chemically passive surface, the diffusion coefficient and the residence time are dependent on the surface texture via the coefficient of friction. Thus, physical texturing provides a means of changing, within limits, the minimum drop radius. The study reveals that surface texturing at the scale of the minimum drop radius does not provide controllability of the macro-scale dropwise condensation at large timescales when a dynamic steady-state is reached.

  16. Atomistic computer simulations a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Brazdova, Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Many books explain the theory of atomistic computer simulations; this book teaches you how to run them This introductory ""how to"" title enables readers to understand, plan, run, and analyze their own independent atomistic simulations, and decide which method to use and which questions to ask in their research project. It is written in a clear and precise language, focusing on a thorough understanding of the concepts behind the equations and how these are used in the simulations. As a result, readers will learn how to design the computational model and which parameters o

  17. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches...

  18. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol....

  19. Ultrascalable petaflop parallel supercomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumrich, Matthias A [Ridgefield, CT; Chen, Dong [Croton On Hudson, NY; Chiu, George [Cross River, NY; Cipolla, Thomas M [Katonah, NY; Coteus, Paul W [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gara, Alan G [Mount Kisco, NY; Giampapa, Mark E [Irvington, NY; Hall, Shawn [Pleasantville, NY; Haring, Rudolf A [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Kopcsay, Gerard V [Yorktown Heights, NY; Ohmacht, Martin [Yorktown Heights, NY; Salapura, Valentina [Chappaqua, NY; Sugavanam, Krishnan [Mahopac, NY; Takken, Todd [Brewster, NY

    2010-07-20

    A massively parallel supercomputer of petaOPS-scale includes node architectures based upon System-On-a-Chip technology, where each processing node comprises a single Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) having up to four processing elements. The ASIC nodes are interconnected by multiple independent networks that optimally maximize the throughput of packet communications between nodes with minimal latency. The multiple networks may include three high-speed networks for parallel algorithm message passing including a Torus, collective network, and a Global Asynchronous network that provides global barrier and notification functions. These multiple independent networks may be collaboratively or independently utilized according to the needs or phases of an algorithm for optimizing algorithm processing performance. The use of a DMA engine is provided to facilitate message passing among the nodes without the expenditure of processing resources at the node.

  20. Atomistic and holistic understanding in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, A.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding means always reduction to the simpler. In the atomistic understanding the reduction is to the simpler objects. One asks the question: what does it consist of? For instance, one asks: What does the molecule consist of? and the answer is: The molecule consists of electrons and nuclei. Or: what does the nucleus consist of? And the answer is: The nucleus consists of protons and neutrons. The parts in the atomistic understanding are the constituents. In the holistic understanding, the reduction is to the simpler functions, the simpler motions. One asks the question: What does it do? What does the molecule do? What does the nucleus do? And the answer is: The molecule rotates and oscillates. The nucleus rotates and oscillates

  1. Power Efficient Design of DisplayPort (7.0) Using Low-voltage differential signaling IO Standard Via UltraScale Field Programming Gate Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Bhagwan; Abdullah, M.F.L.; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2017-01-01

    Port (7.0) need be reduced. In this paper, a power efficient design for DisplayPort (7.0) is proposed using LVDS IO Standard. The proposed design is tested for different frequencies; 500 MHz, 700 MHz, 1.0 GHz, and 1.6 GHz. The design is implemented using vhdl in UltraScale FPGA. It is determined...... the designed vhdl based design of DisplayPort (7.0) can reduced 92% using LVDS IO Standard for all frequencies; 500 MHz, 700 MHz, 1.0 GHz, and 1.6 GHz, compared to vhdl based design of DisplayPort (7.0) without using IO Standard. The proposed design of vhdl based design of DisplayPort (7.0) using LVDS IO...... Standard offers no power consumption for DisplayPort (7.0) in standby mode. The vhdl based design of DisplayPort (7.0) using LVDS IO Standard will be helpful to process the high resolution video at low power consumption....

  2. Atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegge, T.; Jacobsen, K.W.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss atomistic simulations of dislocation processes in copper based on effective medium theory interatomic potentials. Results on screw dislocation structures and processes are reviewed with particular focus on point defect mobilities and processes involving cross slip. For example......, the stability of screw dislocation dipoles is discussed. We show that the presence of jogs will strongly influence cross slip barriers and dipole stability. We furthermore present some new results on jogged edge dislocations and edge dislocation dipoles. The jogs are found to be extended, and simulations...

  3. Atomistic Galois insertions for flow sensitive integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2017-01-01

    Several program verification techniques assist in showing that software adheres to the required security policies. Such policies may be sensitive to the flow of execution and the verification may be supported by combinations of type systems and Hoare logics. However, this requires user assistance...... and to obtain full automation we shall explore the over-approximating nature of static analysis. We demonstrate that the use of atomistic Galois insertions constitutes a stable framework in which to obtain sound and fully automatic enforcement of flow sensitive integrity. The framework is illustrated...

  4. Addressing uncertainty in atomistic machine learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Andrew A.; Christensen, Rune; Khorshidi, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Machine-learning regression has been demonstrated to precisely emulate the potential energy and forces that are output from more expensive electronic-structure calculations. However, to predict new regions of the potential energy surface, an assessment must be made of the credibility of the predi......Machine-learning regression has been demonstrated to precisely emulate the potential energy and forces that are output from more expensive electronic-structure calculations. However, to predict new regions of the potential energy surface, an assessment must be made of the credibility...... of the predictions. In this perspective, we address the types of errors that might arise in atomistic machine learning, the unique aspects of atomistic simulations that make machine-learning challenging, and highlight how uncertainty analysis can be used to assess the validity of machine-learning predictions. We...... suggest this will allow researchers to more fully use machine learning for the routine acceleration of large, high-accuracy, or extended-time simulations. In our demonstrations, we use a bootstrap ensemble of neural network-based calculators, and show that the width of the ensemble can provide an estimate...

  5. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wüstner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC. We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  6. De Novo Glutamine Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiao; Shi, Xinchong; Zhang, Linqi; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of de novo glutamine (Gln) synthesis in the proliferation of C6 glioma cells and its detection with 13N-ammonia. Methods: Chronic Gln-deprived C6 glioma (0.06C6) cells were established. The proliferation rates of C6 and 0.06C6 cells were measured under the conditions of Gln deprivation along with or without the addition of ammonia or glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. 13N-ammonia uptake was assessed in C6 cells by gamma counting and in rats with C6 and 0.06C6 xenografts by micro–positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. The expression of GS in C6 cells and xenografts was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: The Gln-deprived C6 cells showed decreased proliferation ability but had a significant increase in GS expression. Furthermore, we found that low concentration of ammonia was sufficient to maintain the proliferation of Gln-deprived C6 cells, and 13N-ammonia uptake in C6 cells showed Gln-dependent decrease, whereas inhibition of GS markedly reduced the proliferation of C6 cells as well as the uptake of 13N-ammoina. Additionally, microPET/computed tomography exhibited that subcutaneous 0.06C6 xenografts had higher 13N-ammonia uptake and GS expression in contrast to C6 xenografts. Conclusion: De novo Gln synthesis through ammonia–glutamate reaction plays an important role in the proliferation of C6 cells. 13N-ammonia can be a potential metabolic PET tracer for Gln-dependent tumors. PMID:27118759

  7. Dynamic aspects of dislocation motion: atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitzek, Erik; Gumbsch, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of accelerating edge and screw dislocations were carried out to study the dynamics of dislocations in a face centered cubic metal. Using two different embedded atom potentials for nickel and a simple slab geometry, the Peierls stress, the effective mass, the line tension and the drag coefficient were determined. A dislocation intersecting an array of voids is used to study dynamic effects in dislocation-obstacle interactions. A pronounced effect caused by inertial overshooting is found. A dynamic line tension model is developed which reproduces the simulation results. The model can be used to easily estimate the magnitude of inertial effects in the interaction of dislocations with localized obstacles for different obstacle strengths, -spacings and temperatures

  8. Quantum Corrections to the 'Atomistic' MOSFET Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Slavcheva, G.; Kaya, S.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have introduced in a simple and efficient manner quantum mechanical corrections in our 3D 'atomistic' MOSFET simulator using the density gradient formalism. We have studied in comparison with classical simulations the effect of the quantum mechanical corrections on the simulation of random dopant induced threshold voltage fluctuations, the effect of the single charge trapping on interface states and the effect of the oxide thickness fluctuations in decanano MOSFETs with ultrathin gate oxides. The introduction of quantum corrections enhances the threshold voltage fluctuations but does not affect significantly the amplitude of the random telegraph noise associated with single carrier trapping. The importance of the quantum corrections for proper simulation of oxide thickness fluctuation effects has also been demonstrated.

  9. Scalable Atomistic Simulation Algorithms for Materials Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiichiro Nakano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A suite of scalable atomistic simulation programs has been developed for materials research based on space-time multiresolution algorithms. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms are presented for molecular dynamics (MD simulations and quantum-mechanical (QM calculations based on the density functional theory. Performance tests have been carried out on 1,088-processor Cray T3E and 1,280-processor IBM SP3 computers. The linear-scaling algorithms have enabled 6.44-billion-atom MD and 111,000-atom QM calculations on 1,024 SP3 processors with parallel efficiency well over 90%. production-quality programs also feature wavelet-based computational-space decomposition for adaptive load balancing, spacefilling-curve-based adaptive data compression with user-defined error bound for scalable I/O, and octree-based fast visibility culling for immersive and interactive visualization of massive simulation data.

  10. VisIO: enabling interactive visualization of ultra-scale, time-series data via high-bandwidth distributed I/O systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Jun [UCF

    2010-10-15

    Petascale simulations compute at resolutions ranging into billions of cells and write terabytes of data for visualization and analysis. Interactive visuaUzation of this time series is a desired step before starting a new run. The I/O subsystem and associated network often are a significant impediment to interactive visualization of time-varying data; as they are not configured or provisioned to provide necessary I/O read rates. In this paper, we propose a new I/O library for visualization applications: VisIO. Visualization applications commonly use N-to-N reads within their parallel enabled readers which provides an incentive for a shared-nothing approach to I/O, similar to other data-intensive approaches such as Hadoop. However, unlike other data-intensive applications, visualization requires: (1) interactive performance for large data volumes, (2) compatibility with MPI and POSIX file system semantics for compatibility with existing infrastructure, and (3) use of existing file formats and their stipulated data partitioning rules. VisIO, provides a mechanism for using a non-POSIX distributed file system to provide linear scaling of 110 bandwidth. In addition, we introduce a novel scheduling algorithm that helps to co-locate visualization processes on nodes with the requested data. Testing using VisIO integrated into Para View was conducted using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) on TACC's Longhorn cluster. A representative dataset, VPIC, across 128 nodes showed a 64.4% read performance improvement compared to the provided Lustre installation. Also tested, was a dataset representing a global ocean salinity simulation that showed a 51.4% improvement in read performance over Lustre when using our VisIO system. VisIO, provides powerful high-performance I/O services to visualization applications, allowing for interactive performance with ultra-scale, time-series data.

  11. Atomistic Simulation of Initiation in Hexanitrostilbene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Tzu-Ray; Wixom, Ryan; Yarrington, Cole; Thompson, Aidan

    2015-06-01

    We report on the effect of cylindrical voids on hot spot formation, growth and chemical reaction initiation in hexanitrostilbene (HNS) crystals subjected to shock. Large-scale, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed using the reactive force field (ReaxFF) as implemented in the LAMMPS software. The ReaxFF force field description for HNS has been validated previously by comparing the isothermal equation of state to available diamond anvil cell (DAC) measurements and density function theory (DFT) calculations and by comparing the primary dissociation pathway to ab initio calculations. Micron-scale molecular dynamics simulations of a supported shockwave propagating through the HNS crystal along the [010] orientation are performed with an impact velocity (or particle velocity) of 1.25 km/s, resulting in shockwave propagation at 4.0 km/s in the bulk material and a bulk shock pressure of ~ 11GPa. The effect of cylindrical void sizes varying from 0.02 to 0.1 μm on hot spot formation and growth rate has been studied. Interaction between multiple voids in the HNS crystal and its effect on hot spot formation will also be addressed. Results from the micron-scale atomistic simulations are compared with hydrodynamics simulations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Dynamic characteristics of nanoindentation using atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Te-Hua; Chang, Wen-Yang; Huang, Jian-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic simulations are used to investigate how the nanoindentation mechanism influences dislocation nucleation under molecular dynamic behavior on the aluminum (0 0 1) surface. The characteristics of molecular dynamics in terms of various nucleation criteria are explored, including various molecular models, a multi-step load/unload cycle, deformation mechanism of atoms, tilt angle of the indenter, and slip vectors. Simulation results show that both the plastic energy and the adhesive force increase with increasing nanoindentation depths. The maximum forces for all indentation depths decrease with increasing multi-step load/unload cycle time. Dislocation nucleation, gliding, and interaction occur along Shockley partials on (1 1 1) slip planes. The indentation force applied along the normal direction, a tilt angle of 0 o , is smaller than the force component that acts on the surface atoms. The corresponding slip vector of the atoms in the (1 1 1) plane has low-energy sessile stair-rod dislocations in the pyramid of intrinsic stacking faults.

  13. Dynamic characteristics of nanoindentation using atomistic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Te-Hua, E-mail: fang.tehua@msa.hinet.net [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wen-Yang [Microsystems Technology Center, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Huang, Jian-Jin [Institute of Mechanical and Electromechanical Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin 632, Taiwan (China)

    2009-06-15

    Atomistic simulations are used to investigate how the nanoindentation mechanism influences dislocation nucleation under molecular dynamic behavior on the aluminum (0 0 1) surface. The characteristics of molecular dynamics in terms of various nucleation criteria are explored, including various molecular models, a multi-step load/unload cycle, deformation mechanism of atoms, tilt angle of the indenter, and slip vectors. Simulation results show that both the plastic energy and the adhesive force increase with increasing nanoindentation depths. The maximum forces for all indentation depths decrease with increasing multi-step load/unload cycle time. Dislocation nucleation, gliding, and interaction occur along Shockley partials on (1 1 1) slip planes. The indentation force applied along the normal direction, a tilt angle of 0{sup o}, is smaller than the force component that acts on the surface atoms. The corresponding slip vector of the atoms in the (1 1 1) plane has low-energy sessile stair-rod dislocations in the pyramid of intrinsic stacking faults.

  14. An object oriented Python interface for atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynninen, T.; Himanen, L.; Parkkinen, V.; Musso, T.; Corander, J.; Foster, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Programmable simulation environments allow one to monitor and control calculations efficiently and automatically before, during, and after runtime. Environments directly accessible in a programming environment can be interfaced with powerful external analysis tools and extensions to enhance the functionality of the core program, and by incorporating a flexible object based structure, the environments make building and analysing computational setups intuitive. In this work, we present a classical atomistic force field with an interface written in Python language. The program is an extension for an existing object based atomistic simulation environment.

  15. Definition and detection of contact in atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    2015-01-01

    In atomistic simulations, contact depends on the accurate detection of contacting atoms as well as their contact area. While it is common to define contact between atoms based on the so-called ‘contact distance’ where the interatomic potential energy reaches its minimum, this discounts, for example,

  16. Definition and detection of contact in atomistic simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil; Vakis, Antonis I.

    In atomistic simulations, contact depends on the accurate detection of contacting atoms as well as their contact area. While it is common to define contact between atoms based on the so-called ‘contact distance’ where the interatomic potential energy reaches its minimum, this discounts, for example,

  17. Atomistic simulations of Mg-Cu metallic glasses: Mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms of plastic deformation in amorphous metals are far from being understood. We have derived potential parameters for molecular dynamics simulations of Mg-Cu amorphous alloys using the Effective Medium Theory. We have simulated the formation of alloys by cooling from the melt...

  18. Pesquisa de novos elementos Pesquisa de novos elementos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil Mário de Macedo Grassi

    1978-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the discovery of new elements synthesized by man. The introduction discusses in general the theories about nuclear transmutation, which is the method employed in these syntheses. The study shows the importance of the Periodical Table since it is through this table that one can reach a prevision of new elements and its, properties. The discoveries of the transuranic elements, together wich the data of their first preparations are also tabulated The stability of these elements is also discussed, and future speculations are showedNeste trabalho estuda-se, teoricamente, a descoberta de novos elementos sintetizados pelo homem Na introdução apresentamos um apanhado geral sobre as teorias a respeito da transmutação nuclear, que é o método utilizado nestas sínteses. Em seguida, mostramos a importância da Tabela Periódica, pois é através dela que se chega à previsão dos novos elementos e de suas propriedades. As descobertas dos transurânicos, Já realizadas com êxito, juntamente com os dados de suas primeiras preparações são tabelados. A estabilidade destes novos elementos também é discutida, e apresentadas futuras especulações.

  19. Ultrascale Visualization of Climate Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bremer, Peer-Timo [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doutriaux, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Patchett, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Williams, Sean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shipman, Galen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Ross G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pugmire, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Brian E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Steed, Chad A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Childs, Hank [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Krishnan, Harinarayan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Silva, Claudio T. [New York University, New York, NY (United States). Center for Urban Sciences; Santos, Emanuele [Universidade Federal do Ceara, Ceara (Brazil); Koop, David [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Ellqvist, Tommy [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Poco, Jorge [Polytechnic Institute of New York University, New York, NY (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Chaudhary, Aashish [Kitware Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bauer, Andy [Kitware Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Pletzer, Alexander [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Kindig, Dave [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Potter, Gerald [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, DC (United States); Maxwell, Thomas P. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    To support interactive visualization and analysis of complex, large-scale climate data sets, UV-CDAT integrates a powerful set of scientific computing libraries and applications to foster more efficient knowledge discovery. Connected through a provenance framework, the UV-CDAT components can be loosely coupled for fast integration or tightly coupled for greater functionality and communication with other components. This framework addresses many challenges in the interactive visual analysis of distributed large-scale data for the climate community.

  20. Adhesive contact: from atomistic model to continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Kang-Qi; Jia Jian-Yuan; Zhu Ying-Min; Zhang Xiu-Yan

    2011-01-01

    Two types of Lennard-Jones potential are widely used in modeling adhesive contacts. However, the relationships between the parameters of the two types of Lennard-Jones potential are not well defined. This paper employs a self-consistent method to derive the Lennard-Jones surface force law from the interatomic Lennard-Jones potential with emphasis on the relationships between the parameters. The effect of using correct parameters in the adhesion models is demonstrated in single sphere-flat contact via continuum models and an atomistic model. Furthermore, the adhesion hysteresis behaviour is investigated, and the S-shaped force-distance relation is revealed by the atomistic model. It shows that the adhesion hysteresis loop is generated by the jump-to-contact and jump-off-contact, which are illustrated by the S-shaped force-distance curve. (atomic and molecular physics)

  1. Atomistic modeling of carbon Cottrell atmospheres in bcc iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, R. G. A.; Perez, M.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations with an EAM interatomic potential were used to evaluate carbon-dislocation binding energies in bcc iron. These binding energies were then used to calculate the occupation probability of interstitial sites in the vicinity of an edge and a screw dislocation. The saturation concentration due to carbon-carbon interactions was also estimated by atomistic simulations in the dislocation core and taken as an upper limit for carbon concentration in a Cottrell atmosphere. We obtained a maximum concentration of 10 ± 1 at.% C at T = 0 K within a radius of 1 nm from the dislocation lines. The spatial carbon distributions around the line defects revealed that the Cottrell atmosphere associated with an edge dislocation is denser than that around a screw dislocation, in contrast with the predictions of the classical model of Cochardt and colleagues. Moreover, the present Cottrell atmosphere model is in reasonable quantitative accord with the three-dimensional atom probe data available in the literature.

  2. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  3. Dislocation climb models from atomistic scheme to dislocation dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Xiaohua; Luo, Tao; Lu, Jianfeng; Xiang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    We develop a mesoscopic dislocation dynamics model for vacancy-assisted dislocation climb by upscalings from a stochastic model on the atomistic scale. Our models incorporate microscopic mechanisms of (i) bulk diffusion of vacancies, (ii) vacancy exchange dynamics between bulk and dislocation core, (iii) vacancy pipe diffusion along the dislocation core, and (iv) vacancy attachment-detachment kinetics at jogs leading to the motion of jogs. Our mesoscopic model consists of the vacancy bulk dif...

  4. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: Atomistic battery discharge simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Müser, Martin H.

    2013-01-01

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each ...

  5. AACSD: An atomistic analyzer for crystal structure and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. R.; Zhang, R. F.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed an efficient command-line program named AACSD (Atomistic Analyzer for Crystal Structure and Defects) for the post-analysis of atomic configurations generated by various atomistic simulation codes. The program has implemented not only the traditional filter methods like the excess potential energy (EPE), the centrosymmetry parameter (CSP), the common neighbor analysis (CNA), the common neighborhood parameter (CNP), the bond angle analysis (BAA), and the neighbor distance analysis (NDA), but also the newly developed ones including the modified centrosymmetry parameter (m-CSP), the orientation imaging map (OIM) and the local crystallographic orientation (LCO). The newly proposed OIM and LCO methods have been extended for all three crystal structures including face centered cubic, body centered cubic and hexagonal close packed. More specially, AACSD can be easily used for the atomistic analysis of metallic nanocomposite with each phase to be analyzed independently, which provides a unique pathway to capture their dynamic evolution of various defects on the fly. In this paper, we provide not only a throughout overview on various theoretical methods and their implementation into AACSD program, but some critical evaluations, specific testing and applications, demonstrating the capability of the program on each functionality.

  6. Elastic dipoles of point defects from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvenne, Céline; Clouet, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    The interaction of point defects with an external stress field or with other structural defects is usually well described within continuum elasticity by the elastic dipole approximation. Extraction of the elastic dipoles from atomistic simulations is therefore a fundamental step to connect an atomistic description of the defect with continuum models. This can be done either by a fitting of the point-defect displacement field, by a summation of the Kanzaki forces, or by a linking equation to the residual stress. We perform here a detailed comparison of these different available methods to extract elastic dipoles, and show that they all lead to the same values when the supercell of the atomistic simulations is large enough and when the anharmonic region around the point defect is correctly handled. But, for small simulation cells compatible with ab initio calculations, only the definition through the residual stress appears tractable. The approach is illustrated by considering various point defects (vacancy, self-interstitial, and hydrogen solute atom) in zirconium, using both empirical potentials and ab initio calculations.

  7. A Public Trial De Novo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Jane Bjørn; Gad, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the concept of “industrial interests” and examines its role in a topical controversy about a large research grant from a private foundation, the Novo Nordisk Foundation, to the University of Copenhagen. The authors suggest that the debate took the form of a “public trial” w.......” The article ends with a discussion of some implications of the analysis, including that policy making, academic research, and public debates might benefit from more detailed accounts of interests and stakes.......This article addresses the concept of “industrial interests” and examines its role in a topical controversy about a large research grant from a private foundation, the Novo Nordisk Foundation, to the University of Copenhagen. The authors suggest that the debate took the form of a “public trial......” where the grant and close(r) intermingling between industry and public research was prosecuted and defended. First, the authors address how the grant was framed in the media. Second, they redescribe the case by introducing new “evidence” that, because of this framing, did not reach “the court...

  8. de novo computational enzyme design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanghellini, Alexandre

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in systems and synthetic biology as well as metabolic engineering are poised to transform industrial biotechnology by allowing us to design cell factories for the sustainable production of valuable fuels and chemicals. To deliver on their promises, such cell factories, as much as their brick-and-mortar counterparts, will require appropriate catalysts, especially for classes of reactions that are not known to be catalyzed by enzymes in natural organisms. A recently developed methodology, de novo computational enzyme design can be used to create enzymes catalyzing novel reactions. Here we review the different classes of chemical reactions for which active protein catalysts have been designed as well as the results of detailed biochemical and structural characterization studies. We also discuss how combining de novo computational enzyme design with more traditional protein engineering techniques can alleviate the shortcomings of state-of-the-art computational design techniques and create novel enzymes with catalytic proficiencies on par with natural enzymes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and 3rd Annual Earth System Grid Federation and Ultrascale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools Face-to-Face Meeting Report December 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-21

    The climate and weather data science community gathered December 3–5, 2013, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in Livermore, California, for the third annual Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT) Face-to-Face (F2F) Meeting, which was hosted by the Department of Energy, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the European Infrastructure for the European Network of Earth System Modelling, and the Australian Department of Education. Both ESGF and UV-CDAT are global collaborations designed to develop a new generation of open-source software infrastructure that provides distributed access and analysis to observed and simulated data from the climate and weather communities. The tools and infrastructure developed under these international multi-agency collaborations are critical to understanding extreme weather conditions and long-term climate change, while the F2F meetings help to build a stronger climate and weather data science community and stronger federated software infrastructure. The 2013 F2F meeting determined requirements for existing and impending national and international community projects; enhancements needed for data distribution, analysis, and visualization infrastructure; and standards and resources needed for better collaborations.

  10. Atomistically informed solute drag in Al–Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, F; Curtin, W A

    2008-01-01

    Solute drag in solute-strengthened alloys, caused by diffusion of solute atoms around moving dislocations, controls the stress at deformation rates and temperatures useful for plastic forming processes. In the technologically important Al–Mg alloys, the solute drag stresses predicted by classical theories are much larger than experiments, which is resolved in general by eliminating the singularity of the dislocation core via Peierls–Nabarro-type models. Here, the drag stress versus dislocation velocity is computed numerically using a realistic dislocation core structure obtained from an atomistic model to investigate the role of the core and obtain quantitative stresses for comparison with experiment. The model solves a discrete diffusion equation in a reference frame moving with the dislocation, with input solute enthalpies and diffusion activation barriers in the core computed by or estimated from atomistic studies. At low dislocation velocities, the solute drag stress is controlled by bulk solute diffusion because the core diffusion occurs too quickly. In this regime, the drag stress can be obtained using a Peierls–Nabarro model with a core spreading parameter tuned to best match the atomistic models. At intermediate velocities, both bulk and core diffusion can contribute to the drag, leading to a complex stress–velocity relationship showing two peaks in stress. At high velocities, the drag stress is controlled solely by diffusion within and across the core. Like the continuum models, the drag stress is nearly linear in solute concentration. The Orowan relationship is used to connect dislocation velocity to deformation strain rate. Accounting for the dependence of mobile dislocation density on stress, the simulations are in good agreement with experiments on Al–Mg alloys over a range of concentrations and temperatures

  11. Atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders

    2016-01-01

    realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via the I–V curve. In particular, it will be demonstrated how doping — and bias — modifies the Schottky barrier, and how finite size models (the slab approach) are unable to describe these interfaces......We present a general framework for simulating interfaces using an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's functions. The method includes all the relevant ingredients, such as doping and an accurate value of the semiconductor band gap, required to model...

  12. Atomistic simulations of bulk, surface and interfacial polymer properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Upendra

    In chapter I, quasi-static molecular mechanics based simulations are used to estimate the activation energy of phenoxy rings flips in the amorphous region of a semicrystalline polyimide. Intra and intermolecular contributions to the flip activation energy, the torsional cooperativity accompanying the flip, and the effect of the flip on the motion in the glassy bulk state, are looked at. Also, comparison of the weighted mean activation energy is made with experimental data from solid state NMR measurements; the simulated value being 17.5 kcal/mol., while the experimental value was observed to be 10.5 kcal/mol. Chapter II deals with construction of random copolymer thin films of styrene-butadiene (SB) and styrene-butadiene-acrylonitrile (SBA). The structure and properties of the free surfaces presented by these thin films are analysed by, the atom mass density profiles, backbone bond orientation function, and the spatial distribution of acrylonitrile groups and styrene rings. The surface energies of SB and SBA are calculated using an atomistic equation and are compared with experimental data in the literature. In chapter III, simulations of polymer-polymer interfaces between like and unlike polymers, specifically cis-polybutadiene (PBD) and atatic polypropylene (PP), are presented. The structure of an incompatible polymer-polymer interface, and the estimation of the thermodynamic work of adhesion and interfacial energy between different incompatible polymers, form the focus here. The work of adhesion is calculated using an atomistic equation and is further used in a macroscopic equation to estimate the interfacial energy. The interfacial energy is compared with typical values for other immiscible systems in the literature. The interfacial energy compared very well with interfacial energy values for a few other immiscible hydrocarbon pairs. In chapter IV, the study proceeds to look at the interactions between nonpolar and polar small molecules with SB and SBA thin

  13. UniNovo: a universal tool for de novo peptide sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyowon; Kim, Sangtae; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2013-08-15

    Mass spectrometry (MS) instruments and experimental protocols are rapidly advancing, but de novo peptide sequencing algorithms to analyze tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra are lagging behind. Although existing de novo sequencing tools perform well on certain types of spectra [e.g. Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) spectra of tryptic peptides], their performance often deteriorates on other types of spectra, such as Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD), Higher-energy Collisional Dissociation (HCD) spectra or spectra of non-tryptic digests. Thus, rather than developing a new algorithm for each type of spectra, we develop a universal de novo sequencing algorithm called UniNovo that works well for all types of spectra or even for spectral pairs (e.g. CID/ETD spectral pairs). UniNovo uses an improved scoring function that captures the dependences between different ion types, where such dependencies are learned automatically using a modified offset frequency function. The performance of UniNovo is compared with PepNovo+, PEAKS and pNovo using various types of spectra. The results show that the performance of UniNovo is superior to other tools for ETD spectra and superior or comparable with others for CID and HCD spectra. UniNovo also estimates the probability that each reported reconstruction is correct, using simple statistics that are readily obtained from a small training dataset. We demonstrate that the estimation is accurate for all tested types of spectra (including CID, HCD, ETD, CID/ETD and HCD/ETD spectra of trypsin, LysC or AspN digested peptides). UniNovo is implemented in JAVA and tested on Windows, Ubuntu and OS X machines. UniNovo is available at http://proteomics.ucsd.edu/Software/UniNovo.html along with the manual.

  14. Atomistic Modeling of Corrosion Events at the Interface between a Metal and Its Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Taylor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation is a powerful tool for probing the structure and properties of materials and the nature of chemical reactions. Corrosion is a complex process that involves chemical reactions occurring at the interface between a material and its environment and is, therefore, highly suited to study by atomistic modeling techniques. In this paper, the complex nature of corrosion processes and mechanisms is briefly reviewed. Various atomistic methods for exploring corrosion mechanisms are then described, and recent applications in the literature surveyed. Several instances of the application of atomistic modeling to corrosion science are then reviewed in detail, including studies of the metal-water interface, the reaction of water on electrified metallic interfaces, the dissolution of metal atoms from metallic surfaces, and the role of competitive adsorption in controlling the chemical nature and structure of a metallic surface. Some perspectives are then given concerning the future of atomistic modeling in the field of corrosion science.

  15. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-08-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given.

  16. Atomistic simulations of surfactant adsorption kinetics at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskrenova, Eugeniya; Patnaik, Soumya

    2014-03-01

    Heat transfer control and enhancement is an important and challenging problem in a variety of industrial and technological applications including aircraft thermal management. The role of additives in nucleate boiling and phase change in general has long been recognized and studied experimentally and modeled theoretically but in-depth description and atomistic understanding of the multiscale processes involved are still needed for better prediction and control of the heat transfer efficiency. Surfactant additives have been experimentally observed to either enhance or inhibit the boiling heat transfer depending on the surfactant concentration and chemistry and, on a molecular level, their addition leads to dynamic surface tension and changes in interfacial and transfer properties, thus contributing to the complexity of the problem. We present our atomistic modeling study of the interfacial adsorption kinetics of aqueous surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) systems at a range of concentrations at room and boiling temperatures. Classical molecular dynamics and Umbrella Sampling simulations were used to study the surfactant transport properties and estimate the adsorption and desorption rates at liquid-vacuum and liquid-solid interfaces. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from AFOSR Thermal Science Program and the Air Force Research Laboratory DoD Supercomputing Resource Center for computing time and resources.

  17. Atomistic simulations of graphite etching at realistic time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussems, D U B; Bal, K M; Morgan, T W; van de Sanden, M C M; Neyts, E C

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogen-graphite interactions are relevant to a wide variety of applications, ranging from astrophysics to fusion devices and nano-electronics. In order to shed light on these interactions, atomistic simulation using Molecular Dynamics (MD) has been shown to be an invaluable tool. It suffers, however, from severe time-scale limitations. In this work we apply the recently developed Collective Variable-Driven Hyperdynamics (CVHD) method to hydrogen etching of graphite for varying inter-impact times up to a realistic value of 1 ms, which corresponds to a flux of ∼10 20 m -2 s -1 . The results show that the erosion yield, hydrogen surface coverage and species distribution are significantly affected by the time between impacts. This can be explained by the higher probability of C-C bond breaking due to the prolonged exposure to thermal stress and the subsequent transition from ion- to thermal-induced etching. This latter regime of thermal-induced etching - chemical erosion - is here accessed for the first time using atomistic simulations. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that accounting for long time-scales significantly affects ion bombardment simulations and should not be neglected in a wide range of conditions, in contrast to what is typically assumed.

  18. 3d visualization of atomistic simulations on every desktop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peled, Dan; Silverman, Amihai; Adler, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Once upon a time, after making simulations, one had to go to a visualization center with fancy SGI machines to run a GL visualization and make a movie. More recently, OpenGL and its mesa clone have let us create 3D on simple desktops (or laptops), whether or not a Z-buffer card is present. Today, 3D a la Avatar is a commodity technique, presented in cinemas and sold for home TV. However, only a few special research centers have systems large enough for entire classes to view 3D, or special immersive facilities like visualization CAVEs or walls, and not everyone finds 3D immersion easy to view. For maximum physics with minimum effort a 3D system must come to each researcher and student. So how do we create 3D visualization cheaply on every desktop for atomistic simulations? After several months of attempts to select commodity equipment for a whole room system, we selected an approach that goes back a long time, even predating GL. The old concept of anaglyphic stereo relies on two images, slightly displaced, and viewed through colored glasses, or two squares of cellophane from a regular screen/projector or poster. We have added this capability to our AViz atomistic visualization code in its new, 6.1 version, which is RedHat, CentOS and Ubuntu compatible. Examples using data from our own research and that of other groups will be given

  19. Self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo: fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haixuan; Osetsky, Yuri N; Stoller, Roger E

    2012-01-01

    The fundamentals of the framework and the details of each component of the self-evolving atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) are presented. The strength of this new technique is the ability to simulate dynamic processes with atomistic fidelity that is comparable to molecular dynamics (MD) but on a much longer time scale. The observation that the dimer method preferentially finds the saddle point (SP) with the lowest energy is investigated and found to be true only for defects with high symmetry. In order to estimate the fidelity of dynamics and accuracy of the simulation time, a general criterion is proposed and applied to two representative problems. Applications of SEAKMC for investigating the diffusion of interstitials and vacancies in bcc iron are presented and compared directly with MD simulations, demonstrating that SEAKMC provides results that formerly could be obtained only through MD. The correlation factor for interstitial diffusion in the dumbbell configuration, which is extremely difficult to obtain using MD, is predicted using SEAKMC. The limitations of SEAKMC are also discussed. The paper presents a comprehensive picture of the SEAKMC method in both its unique predictive capabilities and technically important details.

  20. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic protein in MARTINI water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavadlav, Julija; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Marrink, Siewert J.; Praprotnik, Matej

    2014-01-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of protein G in multiscale water. We couple atomistic water around the protein with mesoscopic water, where four water molecules are represented with one coarse-grained bead, farther away. We circumvent the difficulties that arise from coupling to the coarse-grained model via a 4-to-1 molecule coarse-grain mapping by using bundled water models, i.e., we restrict the relative movement of water molecules that are mapped to the same coarse-grained bead employing harmonic springs. The water molecules change their resolution from four molecules to one coarse-grained particle and vice versa adaptively on-the-fly. Having performed 15 ns long molecular dynamics simulations, we observe within our error bars no differences between structural (e.g., root-mean-squared deviation and fluctuations of backbone atoms, radius of gyration, the stability of native contacts and secondary structure, and the solvent accessible surface area) and dynamical properties of the protein in the adaptive resolution approach compared to the fully atomistically solvated model. Our multiscale model is compatible with the widely used MARTINI force field and will therefore significantly enhance the scope of biomolecular simulations

  1. Hierarchical Approach to 'Atomistic' 3-D MOSFET Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, Andrew R.; Davies, John H.; Saini, Subhash

    1999-01-01

    We present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled sub-0.1 micron MOSFET's. These devices are so small that their characteristics depend on the precise location of dopant atoms within them, not just on their average density. A full-scale three-dimensional drift-diffusion atomistic simulation approach is first described and used to verify more economical, but restricted, options. To reduce processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage, we have developed a self-consistent option based on a solution of the current continuity equation restricted to a thin slab of the channel. This is coupled to the solution of the Poisson equation in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison to the full self-consistent solution. At low drain voltage, a single solution of the nonlinear Poisson equation is sufficient to extract the current with satisfactory accuracy. In this case, the current is calculated by solving the current continuity equation in a drift approximation only, also in a thin slab containing the MOSFET channel. The regions of applicability for the different components of this hierarchical approach are illustrated in example simulations covering the random dopant-induced threshold voltage fluctuations, threshold voltage lowering, threshold voltage asymmetry, and drain current fluctuations.

  2. Atomistically-informed dislocation dynamics in FCC crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, E.; Marian, J.; Arsenlis, A.; Victoria, M.; Martinez, E.; Victoria, M.; Perlado, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. We will present a nodal dislocation dynamics (DD) model to simulate plastic processes in fcc crystals. The model explicitly accounts for all slip systems and Burgers vectors observed in fcc systems, including stacking faults and partial dislocations. We derive simple conservation rules that describe all partial dislocation interactions rigorously and allow us to model and quantify cross-slip processes, the structure and strength of dislocation junctions, and the formation of fcc-specific structures such as stacking fault tetrahedra. The DD framework is built upon isotropic non-singular linear elasticity, and supports itself on information transmitted from the atomistic scale. In this fashion, connection between the meso and micro scales is attained self-consistently with core parameters fitted to atomistic data. We perform a series of targeted simulations to demonstrate the capabilities of the model, including dislocation reactions and dissociations and dislocation junction strength. Additionally we map the four-dimensional stress space relevant for cross-slip and relate our fundings to the plastic behaviour of' monocrystalline fcc metals. (authors)

  3. Amp: A modular approach to machine learning in atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Alireza; Peterson, Andrew A.

    2016-10-01

    Electronic structure calculations, such as those employing Kohn-Sham density functional theory or ab initio wavefunction theories, have allowed for atomistic-level understandings of a wide variety of phenomena and properties of matter at small scales. However, the computational cost of electronic structure methods drastically increases with length and time scales, which makes these methods difficult for long time-scale molecular dynamics simulations or large-sized systems. Machine-learning techniques can provide accurate potentials that can match the quality of electronic structure calculations, provided sufficient training data. These potentials can then be used to rapidly simulate large and long time-scale phenomena at similar quality to the parent electronic structure approach. Machine-learning potentials usually take a bias-free mathematical form and can be readily developed for a wide variety of systems. Electronic structure calculations have favorable properties-namely that they are noiseless and targeted training data can be produced on-demand-that make them particularly well-suited for machine learning. This paper discusses our modular approach to atomistic machine learning through the development of the open-source Atomistic Machine-learning Package (Amp), which allows for representations of both the total and atom-centered potential energy surface, in both periodic and non-periodic systems. Potentials developed through the atom-centered approach are simultaneously applicable for systems with various sizes. Interpolation can be enhanced by introducing custom descriptors of the local environment. We demonstrate this in the current work for Gaussian-type, bispectrum, and Zernike-type descriptors. Amp has an intuitive and modular structure with an interface through the python scripting language yet has parallelizable fortran components for demanding tasks; it is designed to integrate closely with the widely used Atomic Simulation Environment (ASE), which

  4. Emergence of linear elasticity from the atomistic description of matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cakir, Abdullah, E-mail: acakir@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Pica Ciamarra, Massimo [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, CNR–SPIN, Università di Napoli Federico II, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-08-07

    We investigate the emergence of the continuum elastic limit from the atomistic description of matter at zero temperature considering how locally defined elastic quantities depend on the coarse graining length scale. Results obtained numerically investigating different model systems are rationalized in a unifying picture according to which the continuum elastic limit emerges through a process determined by two system properties, the degree of disorder, and a length scale associated to the transverse low-frequency vibrational modes. The degree of disorder controls the emergence of long-range local shear stress and shear strain correlations, while the length scale influences the amplitude of the fluctuations of the local elastic constants close to the jamming transition.

  5. Atomistic simulations of contact area and conductance at nanoscale interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Martini, Ashlie

    2017-11-09

    Atomistic simulations were used to study conductance across the interface between a nanoscale gold probe and a graphite surface with a step edge. Conductance on the graphite terrace was observed to increase with load and be approximately proportional to contact area calculated from the positions of atoms in the interface. The relationship between area and conductance was further explored by varying the position of the contact relative to the location of the graphite step edge. These simulations reproduced a previously-reported current dip at step edges measured experimentally and the trend was explained by changes in both contact area and the distribution of distances between atoms in the interface. The novel approach reported here provides a foundation for future studies of the fundamental relationships between conductance, load and surface topography at the atomic scale.

  6. An Atomistic View on Human Hemoglobin Carbon Monoxide Migration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M. Fátima; Guallar, Víctor

    2012-01-01

    A significant amount of work has been devoted to obtaining a detailed atomistic knowledge of the human hemoglobin mechanism. Despite this impressive research, to date, the ligand diffusion processes remain unclear and controversial. Using recently developed computational techniques, PELE, we are capable of addressing the ligand migration processes. First, the methodology was tested on myoglobin's CO migration, and the results were compared with the wealth of theoretical and experimental studies. Then, we explored both hemoglobin tense and relaxed states and identified the differences between the α-and β-subunits. Our results indicate that the proximal site, equivalent to the Xe1 cavity in myoglobin, is never visited. Furthermore, strategically positioned residues alter the diffusion processes within hemoglobin's subunits and suggest that multiple pathways exist, especially diversified in the α-globins. A significant dependency of the ligand dynamics on the tertiary structure is also observed. PMID:22385860

  7. Atomistic simulation of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Bačová, Petra; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2016-01-01

    Polymer/graphene nanostructured systems are hybrid materials which have attracted great attention the last years both for scientific and technological reasons. In the present work atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed for the study of graphene-based polymer nanocomposites composed of pristine, hydrogenated and carboxylated graphene sheets dispersed in polar (PEO) and nonpolar (PE) short polymer matrices (i.e., matrices containing chains of low molecular weight). Our focus is twofold; the one is the study of the structural and dynamical properties of short polymer chains and the way that they are affected by functionalized graphene sheets while the other is the effect of the polymer matrices on the behavior of graphene sheets.

  8. Diffusion in energy materials: Governing dynamics from atomistic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, D.; Kordatos, A.; Filippatos, P. P.; Chroneos, A.

    2017-09-01

    Understanding diffusion in energy materials is critical to optimising the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and batteries both of which are of great technological interest as they offer high efficiency for cleaner energy conversion and storage. In the present review, we highlight the insights offered by atomistic modelling of the ionic diffusion mechanisms in SOFCs and batteries and how the growing predictive capability of high-throughput modelling, together with our new ability to control compositions and microstructures, will produce advanced materials that are designed rather than chosen for a given application. The first part of the review focuses on the oxygen diffusion mechanisms in cathode and electrolyte materials for SOFCs and in particular, doped ceria and perovskite-related phases with anisotropic structures. The second part focuses on disordered oxides and two-dimensional materials as these are very promising systems for battery applications.

  9. Emergence of linear elasticity from the atomistic description of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cakir, Abdullah; Pica Ciamarra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of the continuum elastic limit from the atomistic description of matter at zero temperature considering how locally defined elastic quantities depend on the coarse graining length scale. Results obtained numerically investigating different model systems are rationalized in a unifying picture according to which the continuum elastic limit emerges through a process determined by two system properties, the degree of disorder, and a length scale associated to the transverse low-frequency vibrational modes. The degree of disorder controls the emergence of long-range local shear stress and shear strain correlations, while the length scale influences the amplitude of the fluctuations of the local elastic constants close to the jamming transition.

  10. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase γ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Euro, Liliya; Haapanen, Outi; Róg, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    of replisomal interactions, and functional effects of patient mutations that do not affect direct catalysis have remained elusive. Here we report the first atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations of the human Pol γ replicative complex. Our simulation data show that DNA binding triggers remarkable......DNA polymerase γ (Pol γ) is a key component of the mitochondrial DNA replisome and an important cause of neurological diseases. Despite the availability of its crystal structures, the molecular mechanism of DNA replication, the switch between polymerase and exonuclease activities, the site...... changes in the enzyme structure, including (1) completion of the DNA-binding channel via a dynamic subdomain, which in the apo form blocks the catalytic site, (2) stabilization of the structure through the distal accessory β-subunit, and (3) formation of a putative transient replisome-binding platform...

  11. Redox reactions with empirical potentials: atomistic battery discharge simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapp, Wolf B; Müser, Martin H

    2013-08-14

    Batteries are pivotal components in overcoming some of today's greatest technological challenges. Yet to date there is no self-consistent atomistic description of a complete battery. We take first steps toward modeling of a battery as a whole microscopically. Our focus lies on phenomena occurring at the electrode-electrolyte interface which are not easily studied with other methods. We use the redox split-charge equilibration (redoxSQE) method that assigns a discrete ionization state to each atom. Along with exchanging partial charges across bonds, atoms can swap integer charges. With redoxSQE we study the discharge behavior of a nano-battery, and demonstrate that this reproduces the generic properties of a macroscopic battery qualitatively. Examples are the dependence of the battery's capacity on temperature and discharge rate, as well as performance degradation upon recharge.

  12. Quantum-based Atomistic Simulation of Transition Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, J A; Benedict, L X; Glosli, J N; Hood, R Q; Orlikowski, D A; Patel, M V; Soderlind, P; Streitz, F H; Tang, M; Yang, L H

    2005-01-01

    First-principles generalized pseudopotential theory (GPT) provides a fundamental basis for transferable multi-ion interatomic potentials in d-electron transition metals within density-functional quantum mechanics. In mid-period bcc metals, where multi-ion angular forces are important to structural properties, simplified model GPT or MGPT potentials have been developed based on canonical d bands to allow analytic forms and large-scale atomistic simulations. Robust, advanced-generation MGPT potentials have now been obtained for Ta and Mo and successfully applied to a wide range of structural, thermodynamic, defect and mechanical properties at both ambient and extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. Recent algorithm improvements have also led to a more general matrix representation of MGPT beyond canonical bands allowing increased accuracy and extension to f-electron actinide metals, an order of magnitude increase in computational speed, and the current development of temperature-dependent potentials

  13. Atomistic modeling of ion beam induced amorphization in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Lopez, Pedro; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam induced amorphization in Si has attracted significant interest since the beginning of the use of ion implantation for the fabrication of Si devices. Nowadays, a renewed interest in the modeling of amorphization mechanisms at atomic level has arisen due to the use of preamorphizing implants and high dopant implantation doses for the fabrication of nanometric-scale Si devices. In this work, we briefly describe the existing phenomenological and defect-based amorphization models. We focus on the atomistic model we have developed to describe ion beam induced amorphization in Si. In our model, the building block for the amorphous phase is the bond defect or IV pair, whose stability increases with the number of surrounding IV pairs. This feature explains the regrowth behavior of different damage topologies and the kinetics of the crystalline to amorphous transition. The model provides excellent quantitative agreement with experimental results

  14. de novo'' aneurysms following endovascular procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briganti, F.; Cirillo, S.; Caranci, F.; Esposito, F.; Maiuri, F.

    2002-01-01

    Two personal cases of ''de novo'' aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) occurring 9 and 4 years, respectively, after endovascular carotid occlusion are described. A review of the 30 reported cases (including our own two) of ''de novo'' aneurysms after occlusion of the major cerebral vessels has shown some features, including a rather long time interval after the endovascular procedure of up to 20-25 years (average 9.6 years), a preferential ACoA (36.3%) and internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) (33.3%) location of the ''de novo'' aneurysms, and a 10% rate of multiple aneurysms. These data are compared with those of the group of reported spontaneous ''de novo'' aneurysms after SAH or previous aneurysm clipping. We agree that the frequency of ''de novo'' aneurysms after major-vessel occlusion (two among ten procedures in our series, or 20%) is higher than commonly reported (0 to 11%). For this reason, we suggest that patients who have been submitted to endovascular major-vessel occlusion be followed up for up to 20-25 years after the procedure, using non-invasive imaging studies such as MR angiography and high-resolution CT angiography. On the other hand, periodic digital angiography has a questionable risk-benefit ratio; it may be used when a ''de novo'' aneurysm is detected or suspected on non-invasive studies. The progressive enlargement of the ACoA after carotid occlusion, as described in our case 1, must be considered a radiological finding of risk for ''de novo'' aneurysm formation. (orig.)

  15. Experimentally driven atomistic model of 1,2 polybutadiene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkourmpis, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.gkourmpis@borealisgroup.com [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Mitchell, Geoffrey R. [Polymer Science Centre, J. J. Thomson Physical Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AF (United Kingdom); Centre for Rapid and Sustainable Product Development, Institute Polytechnic Leiria, Marinha Grande (Portugal)

    2014-02-07

    We present an efficient method of combining wide angle neutron scattering data with detailed atomistic models, allowing us to perform a quantitative and qualitative mapping of the organisation of the chain conformation in both glass and liquid phases. The structural refinement method presented in this work is based on the exploitation of the intrachain features of the diffraction pattern and its intimate linkage with atomistic models by the use of internal coordinates for bond lengths, valence angles, and torsion rotations. Atomic connectivity is defined through these coordinates that are in turn assigned by pre-defined probability distributions, thus allowing for the models in question to be built stochastically. Incremental variation of these coordinates allows for the construction of models that minimise the differences between the observed and calculated structure factors. We present a series of neutron scattering data of 1,2 polybutadiene at the region 120–400 K. Analysis of the experimental data yields bond lengths for Cî—¸C and C î—» C of 1.54 Å and 1.35 Å, respectively. Valence angles of the backbone were found to be at 112° and the torsion distributions are characterised by five rotational states, a three-fold trans-skew± for the backbone and gauche± for the vinyl group. Rotational states of the vinyl group were found to be equally populated, indicating a largely atactic chan. The two backbone torsion angles exhibit different behaviour with respect to temperature of their trans population, with one of them adopting an almost all trans sequence. Consequently, the resulting configuration leads to a rather persistent chain, something indicated by the value of the characteristic ratio extrapolated from the model. We compare our results with theoretical predictions, computer simulations, RIS models and previously reported experimental results.

  16. Inter-ribbon tunneling in graphene: An atomistic Bardeen approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Put, Maarten L., E-mail: maarten.vandeput@uantwerpen.be; Magnus, Wim [Department of Physics, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); imec, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Material Science, University of Texas at Dallas, Texas 75080 (United States); Sorée, Bart [Department of Physics, Universiteit Antwerpen, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); imec, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, KU Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2016-06-07

    A weakly coupled system of two crossed graphene nanoribbons exhibits direct tunneling due to the overlap of the wavefunctions of both ribbons. We apply the Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian formalism, using atomistic band structure calculations to account for the effect of the atomic structure on the tunneling process. The strong quantum-size confinement of the nanoribbons is mirrored by the one-dimensional character of the electronic structure, resulting in properties that differ significantly from the case of inter-layer tunneling, where tunneling occurs between bulk two-dimensional graphene sheets. The current-voltage characteristics of the inter-ribbon tunneling structures exhibit resonance, as well as stepwise increases in current. Both features are caused by the energetic alignment of one-dimensional peaks in the density-of-states of the ribbons. Resonant tunneling occurs if the sign of the curvature of the coupled energy bands is equal, whereas a step-like increase in the current occurs if the signs are opposite. Changing the doping modulates the onset-voltage of the effects as well as their magnitude. Doping through electrostatic gating makes these structures promising for application towards steep slope switching devices. Using the atomistic empirical pseudopotentials based Bardeen transfer Hamiltonian method, inter-ribbon tunneling can be studied for the whole range of two-dimensional materials, such as transition metal dichalcogenides. The effects of resonance and of step-like increases in the current we observe in graphene ribbons are also expected in ribbons made from these alternative two-dimensional materials, because these effects are manifestations of the one-dimensional character of the density-of-states.

  17. Atomistic simulation of CO 2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2013-01-01

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide

  18. The Paradox of Migration and the Interests of the Atomistic Nation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Paradox of Migration and the Interests of the Atomistic Nation- States: The Southern ... Internationally as well as regionally, States are concerned with issues of ... within the nationstates in general, and in their labour markets in particular.

  19. Physically representative atomistic modeling of atomic-scale friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yalin

    Nanotribology is a research field to study friction, adhesion, wear and lubrication occurred between two sliding interfaces at nano scale. This study is motivated by the demanding need of miniaturization mechanical components in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), improvement of durability in magnetic storage system, and other industrial applications. Overcoming tribological failure and finding ways to control friction at small scale have become keys to commercialize MEMS with sliding components as well as to stimulate the technological innovation associated with the development of MEMS. In addition to the industrial applications, such research is also scientifically fascinating because it opens a door to understand macroscopic friction from the most bottom atomic level, and therefore serves as a bridge between science and engineering. This thesis focuses on solid/solid atomic friction and its associated energy dissipation through theoretical analysis, atomistic simulation, transition state theory, and close collaboration with experimentalists. Reduced-order models have many advantages for its simplification and capacity to simulating long-time event. We will apply Prandtl-Tomlinson models and their extensions to interpret dry atomic-scale friction. We begin with the fundamental equations and build on them step-by-step from the simple quasistatic one-spring, one-mass model for predicting transitions between friction regimes to the two-dimensional and multi-atom models for describing the effect of contact area. Theoretical analysis, numerical implementation, and predicted physical phenomena are all discussed. In the process, we demonstrate the significant potential for this approach to yield new fundamental understanding of atomic-scale friction. Atomistic modeling can never be overemphasized in the investigation of atomic friction, in which each single atom could play a significant role, but is hard to be captured experimentally. In atomic friction, the

  20. DeNovoGUI: an open source graphical user interface for de novo sequencing of tandem mass spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth, Thilo; Weilnböck, Lisa; Rapp, Erdmann; Huber, Christian G; Martens, Lennart; Vaudel, Marc; Barsnes, Harald

    2014-02-07

    De novo sequencing is a popular technique in proteomics for identifying peptides from tandem mass spectra without having to rely on a protein sequence database. Despite the strong potential of de novo sequencing algorithms, their adoption threshold remains quite high. We here present a user-friendly and lightweight graphical user interface called DeNovoGUI for running parallelized versions of the freely available de novo sequencing software PepNovo+, greatly simplifying the use of de novo sequencing in proteomics. Our platform-independent software is freely available under the permissible Apache2 open source license. Source code, binaries, and additional documentation are available at http://denovogui.googlecode.com .

  1. Microscopic theory for coupled atomistic magnetization and lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, J.; Thonig, D.; Bessarab, P. F.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Hellsvik, J.; Nordström, L.

    2017-12-01

    A coupled atomistic spin and lattice dynamics approach is developed which merges the dynamics of these two degrees of freedom into a single set of coupled equations of motion. The underlying microscopic model comprises local exchange interactions between the electron spin and magnetic moment and the local couplings between the electronic charge and lattice displacements. An effective action for the spin and lattice variables is constructed in which the interactions among the spin and lattice components are determined by the underlying electronic structure. In this way, expressions are obtained for the electronically mediated couplings between the spin and lattice degrees of freedom, besides the well known interatomic force constants and spin-spin interactions. These former susceptibilities provide an atomistic ab initio description for the coupled spin and lattice dynamics. It is important to notice that this theory is strictly bilinear in the spin and lattice variables and provides a minimal model for the coupled dynamics of these subsystems and that the two subsystems are treated on the same footing. Questions concerning time-reversal and inversion symmetry are rigorously addressed and it is shown how these aspects are absorbed in the tensor structure of the interaction fields. By means of these results regarding the spin-lattice coupling, simple explanations of ionic dimerization in double-antiferromagnetic materials, as well as charge density waves induced by a nonuniform spin structure, are given. In the final parts, coupled equations of motion for the combined spin and lattice dynamics are constructed, which subsequently can be reduced to a form which is analogous to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations for spin dynamics and a damped driven mechanical oscillator for the ionic motion. It is important to notice, however, that these equations comprise contributions that couple these descriptions into one unified formulation. Finally, Kubo-like expressions for

  2. Modular Engineering Concept at Novo Nordisk Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moelgaard, Gert; Miller, Thomas Dedenroth

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the concept of a new engineering method at Novo Nordisk Engineering: Modular Engineering (ME). Three tools are designed to support project phases with different levels of detailing and abstraction. ME supports a standard, cross-functional breakdown of projects that facilitates...

  3. An atomistic study of the deformation behavior of tungsten nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shuozhi [University of California, California NanoSystems Institute, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Su, Yanqing [University of California, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Chen, Dengke [Georgia Institute of Technology, GWW School of Mechanical Engineering, Atlanta, GA (United States); Li, Longlei [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Large-scale atomistic simulations are performed to study tensile and compressive left angle 112 right angle loading of single-crystalline nanowires in body-centered cubic tungsten (W). Effects of loading mode, wire cross-sectional shape, wire size, strain rate, and crystallographic orientations of the lateral surfaces are explored. Uniaxial deformation of a W bulk single crystal is also investigated for reference. Our results reveal a strong tension-compression asymmetry in both the stress-strain response and the deformation behavior due to different yielding/failure modes: while the nanowires fail by brittle fracture under tensile loading, they yield by nucleation of dislocations from the wire surface under compressive loading. It is found that (1) nanowires have a higher strength than the bulk single crystal; (2) with a cross-sectional size larger than 10 nm, there exists a weak dependence of strength on wire size; (3) when the wire size is equal to or smaller than 10 nm, nanowires buckle under compressive loading; (4) the cross-sectional shape, strain rate, and crystallographic orientations of the lateral surfaces affect the strength and the site of defect initiation but not the overall deformation behavior. (orig.)

  4. Atomistic simulation of hydrogen dynamics near dislocations in vanadium hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen–dislocation interaction was simulated by molecular dynamics method. • Different distribution of H atoms were observed at edge and screw dislocation. • Planner distribution of hydrogen may be caused by partialized edge dislocation. • Hydrogen diffusivity was reduced in both edge and screw dislocation models. • Pipe diffusion was observed for edge dislocation but not for screw dislocation. - Abstract: Kinetics of interstitial hydrogen atoms near dislocation cores were analyzed by atomistic simulation. Classical molecular dynamics method was applied to model structures of edge and screw dislocations in α-phase vanadium hydride. Simulation showed that hydrogen atoms aggregate near dislocation cores. The spatial distribution of hydrogen has a planner shape at edge dislocation due to dislocation partialization, and a cylindrical shape at screw dislocation. Simulated self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen atoms in dislocation models were a half- to one-order lower than that of dislocation-free model. Arrhenius plot of self-diffusivity showed slightly different activation energies for edge and screw dislocations. Directional dependency of hydrogen diffusion near dislocation showed high and low diffusivity along edge and screw dislocation lines, respectively, hence so called ‘pipe diffusion’ possibly occur at edge dislocation but does not at screw dislocation

  5. Compression deformation of WC: atomistic description of hard ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qing; Song, Xiaoyan; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Shuhua; Wang, Haibin; Nie, Zuoren

    2017-11-01

    The deformation characteristics of WC, as a typical hard ceramic material, were studied on the nanoscale using atomistic simulations for both the single-crystal and polycrystalline forms under uniaxial compression. In particular, the effects of crystallographic orientation, grain boundary coordination and grain size on the origin of deformation were investigated. The deformation behavior of the single-crystal and polycrystalline WC both depend strongly on the orientation towards the loading direction. The grain boundaries play a significant role in the deformation coordination and the potential high fracture toughness of the nanocrystalline WC. In contrast to conventional knowledge of ceramics, maximum strength was obtained at a critical grain size corresponding to the turning point from a Hall-Petch to an inverse Hall-Petch relationship. For this the mechanism of the combined effect of dislocation motion within grains and the coordination of stress concentration at the grain boundaries were proposed. The present work has moved forward our understanding of plastic deformability and the possibility of achieving a high strength of nanocrystalline ceramic materials.

  6. Critical assessment of Pt surface energy - An atomistic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Seol, Donghyuk; Lee, Byeong-Joo

    2018-04-01

    Despite the fact that surface energy is a fundamental quantity in understanding surface structure of nanoparticle, the results of experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for the surface energy of pure Pt show a wide range of scattering. It is necessary to further ensure the surface energy of Pt to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration in Pt bimetallic nanoparticles accurately. In this article, we critically assess and optimize the Pt surface energy using a semi-empirical atomistic approach based on the second nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method interatomic potential. That is, the interatomic potential of pure Pt was adjusted in a way that the surface segregation tendency in a wide range of Pt binary alloys is reproduced in accordance with experimental information. The final optimized Pt surface energy (mJ/m2) is 2036 for (100) surface, 2106 for (110) surface, and 1502 for (111) surface. The potential can be utilized to find the equilibrium shape and atomic configuration of Pt bimetallic nanoparticles more accurately.

  7. Thermodynamics of grain boundary premelting in alloys. II. Atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P.L.; Mishin, Y.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the semi-grand-canonical Monte Carlo method with an embedded-atom potential to study grain boundary (GB) premelting in Cu-rich Cu-Ag alloys. The Σ5 GB chosen for this study becomes increasingly disordered near the solidus line while its local chemical composition approaches the liquidus composition at the same temperature. This behavior indicates the formation of a thin layer of the liquid phase in the GB when the grain composition approaches the solidus. The thickness of the liquid layer remains finite and the GB can be overheated/oversaturated to metastable states slightly above the solidus. The premelting behavior found by the simulations is qualitatively consistent with the phase-field model of the same binary system presented in Part I of this work [Mishin Y, Boettinger WJ, Warren JA, McFadden GB. Acta Mater, in press]. Although this agreement is encouraging, we discuss several problems arising when atomistic simulations are compared with phase-field modeling.

  8. Atomistic simulations of the yielding of gold nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao Jiankuai; Gall, Ken; Dunn, Martin L.; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    We performed atomistic simulations to study the effect of free surfaces on the yielding of gold nanowires. Tensile surface stresses on the surfaces of the nanowires cause them to contract along the length with respect to the bulk face-centered cubic lattice and induce compressive stress in the interior. When the cross-sectional area of a nanowire is less than 2.45 nm x 2.45 nm, the wire yields under its surface stresses. Under external forces and surface stresses, nanowires yield via the nucleation and propagation of the {1 1 1} partial dislocations. The magnitudes of the tensile and compressive yield stress of nanowires increase and decrease, respectively, with a decrease of the wire width. The magnitude of the tensile yield stress is much larger than that of the compressive yield stress for small nanowires, while for small nanowires, tensile and compressive yield stresses have similar magnitudes. The critical resolved shear stress (RSS) by external forces depends on wire width, orientation and loading condition (tension vs. compression). However, the critical RSS in the interior of the nanowires, which is exerted by both the external force and the surface-stress-induced compressive stress, does not change significantly with wire width for same orientation and same loading condition, and can thus serve as a 'local' criterion. This local criterion is invoked to explain the observed size dependence of yield behavior and tensile/compressive yield stress asymmetry, considering surface stress effects and different slip systems active in tensile and compressive yielding

  9. Edge dislocations in dicalcium silicates: Experimental observations and atomistic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Chen, Lu; Tao, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding defects and influence of dislocations on dicalcium silicates (Ca 2 SiO 4 ) is a challenge in cement science. We report a high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of edge dislocations in Ca 2 SiO 4 , followed by developing a deep atomic understanding of the edge dislocation-mediated properties of five Ca 2 SiO 4 polymorphs. By decoding the interplay between core dislocation energies, core structures, and nucleation rate of reactivity, we find that γ-C2S and α-C2S polymorphs are the most favorable polymorphs for dislocations in Ca 2 SiO 4 , mainly due to their large pore channels which take away majority of the distortions imposed by edge dislocations. Furthermore, in the context of edge dislocation, while α-C2S represents the most active polymorph for reactivity and crystal growth, β-C2S represents the most brittle polymorph suitable for grinding. This work is the first report on the atomistic-scale analysis of edge dislocation-mediated properties of Ca 2 SiO 4 and may open up new opportunities for tuning fracture and reactivity processes of Ca 2 SiO 4 and other cement components.

  10. Atomistic modelling of diffusional phase transformations with elastic strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, D R; Rudd, R E; Sutton, A P

    2004-01-01

    Phase transformations in 2xxx series aluminium alloys (Al-Cu-Mg) are investigated with an off-lattice atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation incorporating the effects of strain around misfitting atoms and vacancies. Atomic interactions are modelled by Finnis-Sinclair potentials constructed for these simulations. Vacancy diffusion is modelled by comparing the energies of trial states, where the system is partially relaxed for each trial state. No special requirements are made about the description of atomic interactions, making our approach suitable for more fundamentally based models such as tight binding if sufficient computational resources are available. Only a limited precision is required for the energy of each trial state, determined by the value of k B T. Since the change in the relaxation displacement field caused by a vacancy hop decays as 1/r 3 , it is sufficient to determine the next move by relaxing only those atoms in a sphere of finite radius centred on the moving vacancy. However, once the next move has been selected, the entire system is relaxed. Simulations of the early stages of phase separation in Al-Cu with elastic relaxation show an enhanced rate of clustering compared to those performed on the same system with a rigid lattice

  11. Fluorinated Phosphorene: Electrochemical Synthesis, Atomistic Fluorination, and Enhanced Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xian; Liang, Weiyuan; Zhao, Jinlai; Li, Zhongjun; Qiu, Meng; Fan, Taojian; Luo, Crystal Shaojuan; Zhou, Ye; Li, Yu; Guo, Zhinan; Fan, Dianyuan; Zhang, Han

    2017-12-01

    Phosphorene has attracted great interest due to its unique electronic and optoelectronic properties owing to its tunable direct and moderate band-gap in association with high carrier mobility. However, its intrinsic instability in air seriously hinders its practical applications, and problems of technical complexity and in-process degradation exist in currently proposed stabilization strategies. A facile pathway in obtaining and stabilizing phosphorene through a one-step, ionic liquid-assisted electrochemical exfoliation and synchronous fluorination process is reported in this study. This strategy enables fluorinated phosphorene (FP) to be discovered and large-scale, highly selective few-layer FP (3-6 atomic layers) to be obtained. The synthesized FP is found to exhibit unique morphological and optical characteristics. Possible atomistic fluorination configurations of FP are revealed by core-level binding energy shift calculations in combination with spectroscopic measurements, and the results indicate that electrolyte concentration significantly modulates the fluorination configurations. Furthermore, FP is found to exhibit enhanced air stability thanks to the antioxidation and antihydration effects of the introduced fluorine adatoms, and demonstrate excellent photothermal stability during a week of air exposure. These findings pave the way toward real applications of phosphorene-based nanophotonics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Atomistic minimal model for estimating profile of electrodeposited nanopatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharpour Hassankiadeh, Somayeh; Sadeghi, Ali

    2018-06-01

    We develop a computationally efficient and methodologically simple approach to realize molecular dynamics simulations of electrodeposition. Our minimal model takes into account the nontrivial electric field due a sharp electrode tip to perform simulations of the controllable coating of a thin layer on a surface with an atomic precision. On the atomic scale a highly site-selective electrodeposition of ions and charged particles by means of the sharp tip of a scanning probe microscope is possible. A better understanding of the microscopic process, obtained mainly from atomistic simulations, helps us to enhance the quality of this nanopatterning technique and to make it applicable in fabrication of nanowires and nanocontacts. In the limit of screened inter-particle interactions, it is feasible to run very fast simulations of the electrodeposition process within the framework of the proposed model and thus to investigate how the shape of the overlayer depends on the tip-sample geometry and dielectric properties, electrolyte viscosity, etc. Our calculation results reveal that the sharpness of the profile of a nano-scale deposited overlayer is dictated by the normal-to-sample surface component of the electric field underneath the tip.

  13. Peridynamics as a rigorous coarse-graining of atomistics for multiscale materials design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehoucq, Richard B.; Aidun, John Bahram; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Sears, Mark P.; Kamm, James R.; Parks, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes activities undertaken during FY08-FY10 for the LDRD Peridynamics as a Rigorous Coarse-Graining of Atomistics for Multiscale Materials Design. The goal of our project was to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. The goal of our project is to develop a coarse-graining of finite temperature molecular dynamics (MD) that successfully transitions from statistical mechanics to continuum mechanics. Our coarse-graining overcomes the intrinsic limitation of coupling atomistics with classical continuum mechanics via the FEM (finite element method), SPH (smoothed particle hydrodynamics), or MPM (material point method); namely, that classical continuum mechanics assumes a local force interaction that is incompatible with the nonlocal force model of atomistic methods. Therefore FEM, SPH, and MPM inherit this limitation. This seemingly innocuous dichotomy has far reaching consequences; for example, classical continuum mechanics cannot resolve the short wavelength behavior associated with atomistics. Other consequences include spurious forces, invalid phonon dispersion relationships, and irreconcilable descriptions/treatments of temperature. We propose a statistically based coarse-graining of atomistics via peridynamics and so develop a first of a kind mesoscopic capability to enable consistent, thermodynamically sound, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale material simulation. Peridynamics (PD) is a microcontinuum theory that assumes nonlocal forces for describing long-range material interaction. The force interactions occurring at finite distances are naturally accounted for in PD. Moreover, PDs nonlocal force model is entirely consistent with those used by atomistics methods, in stark contrast to classical continuum mechanics. Hence, PD can be employed for mesoscopic phenomena that are beyond the realms of classical continuum mechanics and

  14. Construction and in vivo assembly of a catalytically proficient and hyperthermostable de novo enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daniel W; Jenkins, Jonathan M X; Grayson, Katie J; Wood, Nicola; Steventon, Jack W; Le Vay, Kristian K; Goodwin, Matthew I; Mullen, Anna S; Bailey, Henry J; Crump, Matthew P; MacMillan, Fraser; Mulholland, Adrian J; Cameron, Gus; Sessions, Richard B; Mann, Stephen; Anderson, J L Ross

    2017-08-25

    Although catalytic mechanisms in natural enzymes are well understood, achieving the diverse palette of reaction chemistries in re-engineered native proteins has proved challenging. Wholesale modification of natural enzymes is potentially compromised by their intrinsic complexity, which often obscures the underlying principles governing biocatalytic efficiency. The maquette approach can circumvent this complexity by combining a robust de novo designed chassis with a design process that avoids atomistic mimicry of natural proteins. Here, we apply this method to the construction of a highly efficient, promiscuous, and thermostable artificial enzyme that catalyzes a diverse array of substrate oxidations coupled to the reduction of H 2 O 2 . The maquette exhibits kinetics that match and even surpass those of certain natural peroxidases, retains its activity at elevated temperature and in the presence of organic solvents, and provides a simple platform for interrogating catalytic intermediates common to natural heme-containing enzymes.Catalytic mechanisms of enzymes are well understood, but achieving diverse reaction chemistries in re-engineered proteins can be difficult. Here the authors show a highly efficient and thermostable artificial enzyme that catalyzes a diverse array of substrate oxidations coupled to the reduction of H 2 O 2 .

  15. A coupled atomistics and discrete dislocation plasticity simulation of nanoindentation into single crystal thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Shilkrot, L.E.; Curtin, William A.

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of 2D nanoindentation of circular 'Brinell' indenter into a single crystal metal thin film bonded to a rigid substrate is investigated. The simulation method is the coupled atomistics and discrete dislocation (CADD) model recently developed by the authors. The CADD model couples a continuum region containing any number of discrete dislocations to an atomistic region, and permits accurate, automatic detection and passing of dislocations between the atomistic and continuum regions. The CADD model allows for a detailed study of nanoindentation to large penetration depths (up to 60 A here) using only a small region of atoms just underneath the indenter where dislocation nucleation, cross-slip, and annihilation occur. Indentation of a model hexagonal aluminum crystal shows: (i) the onset of homogeneous dislocation nucleation at points away from the points of maximum resolved shear stress; (ii) size-dependence of the material hardness, (iii) the role of dislocation dissociation on deformation; (iv) reverse plasticity, including nucleation of dislocations on unloading and annihilation; (v) permanent deformation, including surface uplift, after full unloading; (vi) the effects of film thickness on the load-displacement response; and (vii) the differences between displacement and force controlled loading. This application demonstrates the power of the CADD method in capturing both long-range dislocation plasticity and short-range atomistic phenomena. The use of CADD permits for a clear study of the physical and mechanical influence of both complex plastic flow and non-continuum atomistic-level processes on the macroscopic response of material under indentation loading

  16. Atomistic simulation of fatigue in face centred cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Zhengxuan

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the major damage mechanisms of metals. It is characterized by strong environmental effects and wide lifetime dispersions which must be better understood. Different face centred cubic metals, al, Cu, Ni, and Ag are analyzed. The mechanical behaviour of surface steps naturally created by the glide of dislocations subjected to cyclic loading is examined using molecular dynamics simulations in vacuum and in air for Cu and Ni. an atomistic reconstruction phenomenon is observed at these surface steps which can induce strong irreversibility. Three different mechanisms of reconstruction are defined. Surface slip irreversibility under cyclic loading is analyzed. all surface steps are intrinsically irreversible under usual fatigue laboratory loading amplitude without the arrival of opposite sign dislocations on direct neighbor plane.With opposite sign dislocations on non direct neighbour planes, irreversibility cumulates cycle by cycle and a micro-notch is produced whose depth gradually increases.Oxygen environment affects the surface (first stage of oxidation) but does not lead to higher irreversibility as it has no major influence on the different mechanisms linked to surface relief evolution.a rough estimation of surface irreversibility is carried out for pure edge dislocations in persistent slip bands in so-called wavy materials. It gives an irreversibility fraction between 0.5 and 0.75 in copper in vacuum and in air, in agreement with recent atomic force microscopy measurements.Crack propagation mechanisms are simulated in inert environment. Cracks can propagate owing to the irreversibility of generated dislocations because of their mutual interactions up to the formation of dislocation junctions. (author) [fr

  17. Radiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: Atomistic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terentyev, Dmitry; Malerba, Lorenzo; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    High-Cr ferritic-martensitic steels are the most promising candidate structural materials for future advanced fission reactors, as well as for fusion systems, due to their better thermomechanical properties and higher radiation resistance as compared to austenitic steels. The performance of these steels, especially under irradiation, appears to be largely determined by the Cr content. For instance, the current choice of steel compositions around ∼9 wt% Cr is mainly based on the observation of a local minimum in the ductile-brittle transition temperature shift at this composition. On the other hand, reduced void swelling is observed between 3 and 12 wt% Cr. The origin of these and other Cr-dependent effects remained unexplained for a long time, thereby calling for a physical modelling effort addressing these questions. In this presentation, an overview is given on the effort made in recent years to construct a whole modelling framework, from ab initio to dislocations, to provide explanations to the above-mentioned issues. Ab initio calculations combined to the development of the interatomic potentials capable of grasping key features of Cr atoms embedded in perfect and defected Fe matrix, were required. Primary damage, defect migration, Cr mass transport, phase separation, Cr-defect segregation and dislocation-defect interactions could then be studied using fully atomistic approaches. Our research shows that many of the effects of Cr content on the behaviour of these alloys under irradiation can be attributed to the only recently highlighted high solubility of Cr in Fe (∼10 wt%), below which, in addition, Cr atoms tend to order. The presentation will clarify how this aspect, combined with the high affinity between Cr atoms and self-interstitials defects, influences and partly explain both microstructure evolution and mechanical behaviour of high-Cr steels under irradiation. (author)

  18. Extreme-Scale De Novo Genome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georganas, Evangelos [Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Hofmeyr, Steven [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Buluc, Aydin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Oliker, Leonid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Rokhsar, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Yelick, Katherine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.

    2017-09-26

    De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequence from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments and is one of the most important computations in modern genomics. This work presents HipMER, a high-quality end-to-end de novo assembler designed for extreme scale analysis, via efficient parallelization of the Meraculous code. Genome assembly software has many components, each of which stresses different components of a computer system. This chapter explains the computational challenges involved in each step of the HipMer pipeline, the key distributed data structures, and communication costs in detail. We present performance results of assembling the human genome and the large hexaploid wheat genome on large supercomputers up to tens of thousands of cores.

  19. Wegener's granulomatosis occurring de novo during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfhaily, F; Watts, R; Leather, A

    2009-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is rarely diagnosed during the reproductive years and uncommonly manifests for the first time during pregnancy. We report a case of de novo WG presenting at 30 weeks gestation with classical symptoms of WG (ENT, pulmonary). The diagnosis was confirmed by radiological, laboratory, and histological investigations. With a multidisciplinary approach, she had a successful vaginal delivery of a healthy baby. She was treated successfully by a combination of steroids, azathioprine and intravenous immunoglobulin in the active phase of disease for induction of remission and by azathioprine and steroids for maintenance of remission. The significant improvement in her symptoms allowed us to continue her pregnancy to 37 weeks when delivery was electively induced. Transplacental transmission of PR3-ANCA occurred but the neonate remained well. This case of de novo WG during pregnancy highlights the seriousness of this disease and the challenge in management of such patients.

  20. MRUniNovo: an efficient tool for de novo peptide sequencing utilizing the hadoop distributed computing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuang; Chen, Tao; He, Qiang; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Kenli

    2017-03-15

    Tandem mass spectrometry-based de novo peptide sequencing is a complex and time-consuming process. The current algorithms for de novo peptide sequencing cannot rapidly and thoroughly process large mass spectrometry datasets. In this paper, we propose MRUniNovo, a novel tool for parallel de novo peptide sequencing. MRUniNovo parallelizes UniNovo based on the Hadoop compute platform. Our experimental results demonstrate that MRUniNovo significantly reduces the computation time of de novo peptide sequencing without sacrificing the correctness and accuracy of the results, and thus can process very large datasets that UniNovo cannot. MRUniNovo is an open source software tool implemented in java. The source code and the parameter settings are available at http://bioinfo.hupo.org.cn/MRUniNovo/index.php. s131020002@hnu.edu.cn ; taochen1019@163.com. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  1. Fermi-level effects in semiconductor processing: A modeling scheme for atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Bragado, I.; Castrillo, P.; Jaraiz, M.; Pinacho, R.; Rubio, J. E.; Barbolla, J.; Moroz, V.

    2005-09-01

    Atomistic process simulation is expected to play an important role for the development of next generations of integrated circuits. This work describes an approach for modeling electric charge effects in a three-dimensional atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo process simulator. The proposed model has been applied to the diffusion of electrically active boron and arsenic atoms in silicon. Several key aspects of the underlying physical mechanisms are discussed: (i) the use of the local Debye length to smooth out the atomistic point-charge distribution, (ii) algorithms to correctly update the charge state in a physically accurate and computationally efficient way, and (iii) an efficient implementation of the drift of charged particles in an electric field. High-concentration effects such as band-gap narrowing and degenerate statistics are also taken into account. The efficiency, accuracy, and relevance of the model are discussed.

  2. Comparison of continuum and atomistic methods for the analysis of InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barettin, D.; Pecchia, A.; Penazzi, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comparison of continuum k · p and atomistic empirical Tight Binding methods for the analysis of the optoelectronic properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots.......We present a comparison of continuum k · p and atomistic empirical Tight Binding methods for the analysis of the optoelectronic properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots....

  3. Ionic diffusion in quartz studied by transport measurements, SIMS and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartbaeva, Asel; Wells, Stephen A; Redfern, Simon A T; Hinton, Richard W; Reed, Stephen J B

    2005-01-01

    Ionic diffusion in the quartz-β-eucryptite system is studied by DC transport measurements, SIMS and atomistic simulations. Transport data show a large transient increase in ionic current at the α-β phase transition of quartz (the Hedvall effect). The SIMS data indicate two diffusion processes, one involving rapid Li + motion and the other involving penetration of Al and Li atoms into quartz at the phase transition. Atomistic simulations explain why the fine microstructure of twin domain walls in quartz near the transition does not hinder Li + diffusion

  4. Atomistic modeling of BN nanofillers for mechanical and thermal properties: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Parashar, Avinash

    2016-01-07

    Due to their exceptional mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and a wide band gap (5-6 eV), boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets have promising applications in the field of engineering and biomedical science. Accurate modeling of failure or fracture in a nanomaterial inherently involves coupling of atomic domains of cracks and voids as well as a deformation mechanism originating from grain boundaries. This review highlights the recent progress made in the atomistic modeling of boron nitride nanofillers. Continuous improvements in computational power have made it possible to study the structural properties of these nanofillers at the atomistic scale.

  5. Scalable and portable visualization of large atomistic datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-10-01

    A scalable and portable code named Atomsviewer has been developed to interactively visualize a large atomistic dataset consisting of up to a billion atoms. The code uses a hierarchical view frustum-culling algorithm based on the octree data structure to efficiently remove atoms outside of the user's field-of-view. Probabilistic and depth-based occlusion-culling algorithms then select atoms, which have a high probability of being visible. Finally a multiresolution algorithm is used to render the selected subset of visible atoms at varying levels of detail. Atomsviewer is written in C++ and OpenGL, and it has been tested on a number of architectures including Windows, Macintosh, and SGI. Atomsviewer has been used to visualize tens of millions of atoms on a standard desktop computer and, in its parallel version, up to a billion atoms. Program summaryTitle of program: Atomsviewer Catalogue identifier: ADUM Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADUM Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: 2.4 GHz Pentium 4/Xeon processor, professional graphics card; Apple G4 (867 MHz)/G5, professional graphics card Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Windows 2000/XP, Mac OS 10.2/10.3, SGI IRIX 6.5 Programming languages used: C++, C and OpenGL Memory required to execute with typical data: 1 gigabyte of RAM High speed storage required: 60 gigabytes No. of lines in the distributed program including test data, etc.: 550 241 No. of bytes in the distributed program including test data, etc.: 6 258 245 Number of bits in a word: Arbitrary Number of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized: No Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: Scientific visualization of atomic systems Method of solution: Rendering of atoms using computer graphic techniques, culling algorithms for data

  6. De novo malignancy after pancreas transplantation in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimaru, Y; Ito, T; Marubashi, S; Kawamoto, K; Tomokuni, A; Asaoka, T; Wada, H; Eguchi, H; Mori, M; Doki, Y; Nagano, H

    2015-04-01

    Long-term immunosuppression is associated with an increased risk of cancer. Especially, the immunosuppression in pancreas transplantation is more intensive than that in other organ transplantation because of its strong immunogenicity. Therefore, it suggests that the risk of post-transplant de novo malignancy might increase in pancreas transplantation. However, there have been few studies of de novo malignancy after pancreas transplantation. The aim of this study was to analyze the incidence of de novo malignancy after pancreas transplantation in Japan. Post-transplant patients with de novo malignancy were surveyed and characterized in Japan. Among 107 cases receiving pancreas transplantation in Japan between 2001 and 2010, de novo malignancy developed in 9 cases (8.4%): post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in 6 cases, colon cancer in 1 case, renal cancer in 1 case, and brain tumor in 1 case. We clarified the incidence of de novo malignancy after pancreas transplantation in Japan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Novos paradigmas literários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Azevedo Duarte Guimarães

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo estuda a emergência de novos paradigmas literários, procurando refletir acerca das textualidades contemporâneas. Focaliza os hipertextos informatizados e a poesia multimídia, com o intuito de desvendar como estão sendo criados novos procedimentos expressivos e em que medida eles podem ser identificados com reflexões teóricas anteriores acerca do texto literário impresso. Remete a questões ligadas à leitura dos diferentes tipos de signos e aos modos como eles se integram para a constituição dessas novíssimas linguagens híbridas em novos suportes.El artículo estudia la emergencia de nuevos paradigmas literarios, procurando reflejar acerca de las textualidades contemporáneas. Enfoca los hipertextos informatizados y la poesía multimedia, intentando desvendar cómo están siendo creados nuevos procedimientos expresivos y en qué medida ellos pueden ser identificados a reflexiones teóricas anteriores acerca del texto literario impreso. Remite a cuestiones ligadas a la lectura de los diferentes tipos de signos y a los modos cómo ellos se interaccionan para la constitución de los novísimos lenguajes híbridos en nuevos supuestos.This article investigates the emergence of new literary paradigms as it tries to understand new contemporary textualities. It analyses some hypertexts and multimedia poetry trying to trace how new expressive procedures are being created. How can these new languages be identified and what are their relations to previous theories which dealt with the literary printed text? This study approaches questions linked to the reading of different types of signs and the modes they function towards the fabrication of these new hybrid languages.

  8. De novo autoimmune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Norman, Christina; Burdelski, Martin

    2007-10-01

    The Kings College group was the first to describe a clinical syndrome similar to autoimmune hepatitis in children and young adults transplanted for non-immune mediated liver diseases. They coined the term "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Several other liver transplant centres confirmed this observation. Even though the condition is uncommon, patients with de novo AIH are now seen in most of the major transplant centres. The disease is usually characterized by features of acute hepatitis in otherwise stable transplant recipients. The most characteristic laboratory hallmark is a marked hypergammaglobulinaemia. Autoantibodies are common, mostly ANA. We described also a case of LKM1-positivity in a patients transplanted for Wilson's disease, however this patients did not develop clinical or histological features of AIH. Development of SLA/LP-autoantibodies is also not described. Therefore, serologically de novo AIH appears to correspond to type 1 AIH. Like classical AIH patients respond promptly to treatment with increased doses of prednisolone and azathioprine, while the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine or tacrolimus areof very limited value - which is not surprising, as almost all patients develop de novo AIH while receiving these drugs. Despite the good response to treatment, most patients remain a clinical challenge as complete stable remissions are uncommon and flares, relapses and chronic disease activity can often occur. Pathogenetically this syndrome is intriguing. It is not clear, if the immune response is directed against allo-antigens, neo-antigens in the liver, or self-antigens, possibly shared by donor and host cells. It is very likely that the inflammatory milieu due to alloreactive cells in the transplanted organ contribute to the disease process. Either leading to aberrant antigen presentation, or providing co-stimulatory signals leading to the breaking of self-tolerance. The development of this disease in the presence of treatment with calcineurin

  9. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M.n.; Marrink, S.j.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MAR- TINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell

  10. Atomistic simulation studies of iron sulphide, platinum antimonide and platinum arsenide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngoepe, PE

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the results of atomistic simulations using derived interatomic potentials for the pyrite-structured metal chalcogenides FeS2, PtSb2 and PtAs2. Structural and elastic constants were calculated and compared with experimental...

  11. Crystalline cellulose elastic modulus predicted by atomistic models of uniform deformation and nanoscale indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiawa Wu; Robert J. Moon; Ashlie Martini

    2013-01-01

    The elastic modulus of cellulose Iß in the axial and transverse directions was obtained from atomistic simulations using both the standard uniform deformation approach and a complementary approach based on nanoscale indentation. This allowed comparisons between the methods and closer connectivity to experimental measurement techniques. A reactive...

  12. Robust mode space approach for atomistic modeling of realistically large nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun Z.; Ilatikhameneh, Hesameddin; Povolotskyi, Michael; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2018-01-01

    Nanoelectronic transistors have reached 3D length scales in which the number of atoms is countable. Truly atomistic device representations are needed to capture the essential functionalities of the devices. Atomistic quantum transport simulations of realistically extended devices are, however, computationally very demanding. The widely used mode space (MS) approach can significantly reduce the numerical cost, but a good MS basis is usually very hard to obtain for atomistic full-band models. In this work, a robust and parallel algorithm is developed to optimize the MS basis for atomistic nanowires. This enables engineering-level, reliable tight binding non-equilibrium Green's function simulation of nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with a realistic cross section of 10 nm × 10 nm using a small computer cluster. This approach is applied to compare the performance of InGaAs and Si nanowire n-type MOSFETs (nMOSFETs) with various channel lengths and cross sections. Simulation results with full-band accuracy indicate that InGaAs nanowire nMOSFETs have no drive current advantage over their Si counterparts for cross sections up to about 10 nm × 10 nm.

  13. Molecular cooperativity and compatibility via full atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan Yang, Kenny

    Civil engineering has customarily focused on problems from a large-scale perspective, encompassing structures such as bridges, dams, and infrastructure. However, present day challenges in conjunction with advances in nanotechnology have forced a re-focusing of expertise. The use of atomistic and molecular approaches to study material systems opens the door to significantly improve material properties. The understanding that material systems themselves are structures, where their assemblies can dictate design capacities and failure modes makes this problem well suited for those who possess expertise in structural engineering. At the same time, a focus has been given to the performance metrics of materials at the nanoscale, including strength, toughness, and transport properties (e.g., electrical, thermal). Little effort has been made in the systematic characterization of system compatibility -- e.g., how to make disparate material building blocks behave in unison. This research attempts to develop bottom-up molecular scale understanding of material behavior, with the global objective being the application of this understanding into material design/characterization at an ultimate functional scale. In particular, it addresses the subject of cooperativity at the nano-scale. This research aims to define the conditions which dictate when discrete molecules may behave as a single, functional unit, thereby facilitating homogenization and up-scaling approaches, setting bounds for assembly, and providing a transferable assessment tool across molecular systems. Following a macro-scale pattern where the compatibility of deformation plays a vital role in the structural design, novel geometrical cooperativity metrics based on the gyration tensor are derived with the intention to define nano-cooperativity in a generalized way. The metrics objectively describe the general size, shape and orientation of the structure. To validate the derived measures, a pair of ideal macromolecules

  14. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial peptide capsids of de novo design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Emiliana; Alkassem, Hasan; Lamarre, Baptiste; Faruqui, Nilofar; Bella, Angelo; Noble, James E; Micale, Nicola; Ray, Santanu; Burns, Jonathan R; Yon, Alexander R; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Ryadnov, Maxim G

    2017-12-22

    The spread of bacterial resistance to antibiotics poses the need for antimicrobial discovery. With traditional search paradigms being exhausted, approaches that are altogether different from antibiotics may offer promising and creative solutions. Here, we introduce a de novo peptide topology that-by emulating the virus architecture-assembles into discrete antimicrobial capsids. Using the combination of high-resolution and real-time imaging, we demonstrate that these artificial capsids assemble as 20-nm hollow shells that attack bacterial membranes and upon landing on phospholipid bilayers instantaneously (seconds) convert into rapidly expanding pores causing membrane lysis (minutes). The designed capsids show broad antimicrobial activities, thus executing one primary function-they destroy bacteria on contact.

  16. De novo pathway-based biomarker identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcaraz, Nicolas; List, Markus; Batra, Richa

    2017-01-01

    in a large cohort of breast cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that MGs are considerably more stable than SG models, while also providing valuable insight into the cancer hallmarks that drive them. In addition, when tested on an independent benchmark non-TCGA dataset, MG features......Gene expression profiles have been extensively discussed as an aid to guide the therapy by predicting disease outcome for the patients suffering from complex diseases, such as cancer. However, prediction models built upon single-gene (SG) features show poor stability and performance on independent...... on their molecular subtypes can provide a detailed view of the disease and lead to more personalized therapies. We propose and discuss a novel MG approach based on de novo pathways, which for the first time have been used as features in a multi-class setting to predict cancer subtypes. Comprehensive evaluation...

  17. Atomistic nucleation sites of Pt nanoparticles on N-doped carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chia-Liang; Pao, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Ray, Sekhar C; Wang, Houng-Wei; Hayashi, Michitoshi; Chen, Li-Chyong; Lin, Hong-Ji; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Chang, Li; Tsai, Min-Hsiung; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Pong, Way-Faung

    2013-08-07

    The atomistic nucleation sites of Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) on N-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) were investigated using C and N K-edge and Pt L3-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES)/extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy and XANES/EXAFS results revealed that the self-organized Pt NPs on N-CNTs are uniformly distributed because of the relatively high binding energies of the adsorbed Pt atoms at the imperfect sites. During the atomistic nucleation process of Pt NPs on N-CNTs, stable Pt-C and Pt-N bonds are presumably formed, and charge transfer occurs at the surface/interface of the N-CNTs. The findings in this study were consistent with density functional theory calculations performed using cluster models for the undoped, substitutional-N-doped and pyridine-like-N-doped CNTs.

  18. Effect of Single-Electron Interface Trapping in Decanano MOSFETs: A 3D Atomistic Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Balasubramaniam, R.; Brown, A. R.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    We study the effect of trapping/detrapping of a single-electron in interface states in the channel of n-type MOSFETs with decanano dimensions using 3D atomistic simulation techniques. In order to highlight the basic dependencies, the simulations are carried out initially assuming continuous doping charge, and discrete localized charge only for the trapped electron. The dependence of the random telegraph signal (RTS) amplitudes on the device dimensions and on the position of the trapped charge in the channel are studied in detail. Later, in full-scale, atomistic simulations assuming discrete charge for both randomly placed dopants and the trapped electron, we highlight the importance of current percolation and of traps with strategic position where the trapped electron blocks a dominant current path.

  19. Relaxation of a steep density gradient in a simple fluid: Comparison between atomistic and continuum modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourali, Meisam; Maghari, Ali; Meloni, Simone; Magaletti, Francesco; Casciola, Carlo Massimo; Ciccotti, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We compare dynamical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and continuum simulations of the dynamics of relaxation of a fluid system characterized by a non-uniform density profile. Results match quite well as long as the lengthscale of density nonuniformities are greater than the molecular scale (∼10 times the molecular size). In presence of molecular scale features some of the continuum fields (e.g., density and momentum) are in good agreement with atomistic counterparts, but are smoother. On the contrary, other fields, such as the temperature field, present very large difference with respect to reference (atomistic) ones. This is due to the limited accuracy of some of the empirical relations used in continuum models, the equation of state of the fluid in the present example

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon/Phenolic Composite Thermal Protection Materials: Atomistic to Effective Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Murthy, Pappu L.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Lawson, John W.; Monk, Joshua D.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Next generation ablative thermal protection systems are expected to consist of 3D woven composite architectures. It is well known that composites can be tailored to achieve desired mechanical and thermal properties in various directions and thus can be made fit-for-purpose if the proper combination of constituent materials and microstructures can be realized. In the present work, the first, multiscale, atomistically-informed, computational analysis of mechanical and thermal properties of a present day - Carbon/Phenolic composite Thermal Protection System (TPS) material is conducted. Model results are compared to measured in-plane and out-of-plane mechanical and thermal properties to validate the computational approach. Results indicate that given sufficient microstructural fidelity, along with lowerscale, constituent properties derived from molecular dynamics simulations, accurate composite level (effective) thermo-elastic properties can be obtained. This suggests that next generation TPS properties can be accurately estimated via atomistically informed multiscale analysis.

  1. Dynamic coarse-graining fills the gap between atomistic simulations and experimental investigations of mechanical unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoch, Fabian; Schäfer, Ken; Diezemann, Gregor; Speck, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    We present a dynamic coarse-graining technique that allows one to simulate the mechanical unfolding of biomolecules or molecular complexes on experimentally relevant time scales. It is based on Markov state models (MSMs), which we construct from molecular dynamics simulations using the pulling coordinate as an order parameter. We obtain a sequence of MSMs as a function of the discretized pulling coordinate, and the pulling process is modeled by switching among the MSMs according to the protocol applied to unfold the complex. This way we cover seven orders of magnitude in pulling speed. In the region of rapid pulling, we additionally perform steered molecular dynamics simulations and find excellent agreement between the results of the fully atomistic and the dynamically coarse-grained simulations. Our technique allows the determination of the rates of mechanical unfolding in a dynamical range from approximately 10-8/ns to 1/ns thus reaching experimentally accessible time regimes without abandoning atomistic resolution.

  2. Fatigue mechanisms in an austenitic steel under cyclic loading: Experiments and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soppa, E.A., E-mail: ewa.soppa@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Kohler, C., E-mail: christopher.kohler@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de; Roos, E., E-mail: eberhard.roos@mpa.uni-stuttgart.de

    2014-03-01

    Experimental investigations on the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 (AISI – 347) and concomitant atomistic simulations of a FeNi nanocrystalline model system have been performed in order to understand the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage under cyclic loading. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) the influence of deformation induced martensitic transformation and NbC size distribution on the fatigue crack formation has been demonstrated. The martensite nucleates prevalently at grain boundaries, triple points and at the specimen free surface and forms small (∼1 µm sized) differently oriented grains. The atomistic simulations show the role of regions of a high density of stacking faults for the martensitic transformation.

  3. A continuum-atomistic simulation of heat transfer in micro- and nano-flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jin; Chen Shiyi; Nie Xiaobo; Robbins, Mark O.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a hybrid atomistic-continuum scheme for simulating micro- and nano-flows with heat transfer. The approach is based on spatial 'domain decomposition' in which molecular dynamics (MD) is used in regions where atomistic details are important, while classical continuum fluid dynamics is used in the remaining regions. The two descriptions are matched in a coupling region where we ensure continuity of mass, momentum, energy and their fluxes. The scheme for including the energy equation is implemented in 1-D and 2-D, and used to study steady and unsteady heat transfer in channel flows with and without nano roughness. Good agreement between hybrid results and analytical or pure MD results is found, demonstrating the accuracy of this multiscale method and its potential applications in thermal engineering

  4. Atomistic characterization of pseudoelasticity and shape memory in NiTi nanopillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Yuan; Gall, Ken; Zhu Ting

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the atomistic mechanisms governing the pseudoelasticity and shape memory in nickel–titanium (NiTi) nanostructures. For a 〈1 1 0〉 – oriented nanopillar subjected to compressive loading–unloading, we observe either a pseudoelastic or shape memory response, depending on the applied strain and temperature that control the reversibility of phase transformation and deformation twinning. We show that irreversible twinning arises owing to the dislocation pinning of twin boundaries, while hierarchically twinned microstructures facilitate the reversible twinning. The nanoscale size effects are manifested as the load serration, stress plateau and large hysteresis loop in stress–strain curves that result from the high stresses required to drive the nucleation-controlled phase transformation and deformation twinning in nanosized volumes. Our results underscore the importance of atomistically resolved modeling for understanding the phase and deformation reversibilities that dictate the pseudoelasticity and shape memory behavior in nanostructured shape memory alloys.

  5. Charge Transport and Phase Behavior of Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquid Crystals from Fully Atomistic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevillon, Michael J; Whitmer, Jonathan K

    2018-01-02

    Ionic liquid crystals occupy an intriguing middle ground between room-temperature ionic liquids and mesostructured liquid crystals. Here, we examine a non-polarizable, fully atomistic model of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate family using molecular dynamics in the constant pressure-constant temperature ensemble. These materials exhibit a distinct "smectic" liquid phase, characterized by layers formed by the molecules, which separate the ionic and aliphatic moieties. In particular, we discuss the implications this layering may have for electrolyte applications.

  6. Analysis of Twisting of Cellulose Nanofibrils in Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paavilainen, S.; Rog, T.; Vattulainen, I.

    2011-01-01

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the crystal structure of cellulose nanofibrils, whose sizes are comparable with the crystalline parts in commercial nanocellulose. The simulations show twisting, whose rate of relaxation is strongly temperature dependent. Meanwhile......, no significant bending or stretching of nanocellulose is discovered. Considerations of atomic-scale interaction patterns bring about that the twisting arises from hydrogen bonding within and between the chains in a fibril....

  7. Multiscale methods coupling atomistic and continuum mechanics: analysis of a simple case

    OpenAIRE

    Blanc , Xavier; Le Bris , Claude; Legoll , Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The description and computation of fine scale localized phenomena arising in a material (during nanoindentation, for instance) is a challenging problem that has given birth to many multiscale methods. In this work, we propose an analysis of a simple one-dimensional method that couples two scales, the atomistic one and the continuum mechanics one. The method includes an adaptive criterion in order to split the computational domain into two subdomains, that are described...

  8. Atomistic calculation of size effects on elastic coefficients in nanometre-sized tungsten layers and wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villain, P.; Beauchamp, P.; Badawi, K.F.; Goudeau, P.; Renault, P.-O.

    2004-01-01

    Equilibrium state and elastic coefficients of nanometre-sized single crystal tungsten layers and wires are investigated by atomistic simulations. The variations of the equilibrium distances as a function of the layer thickness or wire cross-section are mainly due to elastic effects of surface tension forces. A strong decrease of the Young's modulus is observed when the transverse dimensions are reduced below 2-3 nm

  9. Adaptive spacetime method using Riemann jump conditions for coupled atomistic-continuum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraczek, B.; Miller, S.T.; Haber, R.B.; Johnson, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    We combine the Spacetime Discontinuous Galerkin (SDG) method for elastodynamics with the mathematically consistent Atomistic Discontinuous Galerkin (ADG) method in a new scheme that concurrently couples continuum and atomistic models of dynamic response in solids. The formulation couples non-overlapping continuum and atomistic models across sharp interfaces by weakly enforcing jump conditions, for both momentum balance and kinematic compatibility, using Riemann values to preserve the characteristic structure of the underlying hyperbolic system. Momentum balances to within machine-precision accuracy over every element, on each atom, and over the coupled system, with small, controllable energy dissipation in the continuum region that ensures numerical stability. When implemented on suitable unstructured spacetime grids, the continuum SDG model offers linear computational complexity in the number of elements and powerful adaptive analysis capabilities that readily bridge between atomic and continuum scales in both space and time. A special trace operator for the atomic velocities and an associated atomistic traction field enter the jump conditions at the coupling interface. The trace operator depends on parameters that specify, at the scale of the atomic spacing, the position of the coupling interface relative to the atoms. In a key finding, we demonstrate that optimizing these parameters suppresses spurious reflections at the coupling interface without the use of non-physical damping or special boundary conditions. We formulate the implicit SDG-ADG coupling scheme in up to three spatial dimensions, and describe an efficient iterative solution scheme that outperforms common explicit schemes, such as the Velocity Verlet integrator. Numerical examples, in 1dxtime and employing both linear and nonlinear potentials, demonstrate the performance of the SDG-ADG method and show how adaptive spacetime meshing reconciles disparate time steps and resolves atomic-scale signals in

  10. Structural and functional analysis of glycoprotein butyrylcholinesterase using atomistic molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Austen; Faller, Roland

    Atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) has proven to be a powerful tool for studying the structure and dynamics of biological systems on nanosecond to microsecond time scales and nanometer length scales. In this work we study the effects of modifying the glycan distribution on the structure and function of full length monomeric butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). BChE exists as a monomer, dimer, or tetramer, and is a therapeutic glycoprotein with nine asparagine glycosylation sites per monomer. Each monomer acts as a stoichiometric scavenger for organophosphorus (OP) nerve agents (e.g. sarin, soman). Glycan distributions are highly heterogeneous and have been shown experimentally to affect certain glycoproteins' stability and reactivity. We performed structural analysis of various biologically relevant glycoforms of BChE using classical atomistic MD. Functional analysis was performed through binding energy simulations using umbrella sampling with BChE and OP cofactors. Additionally, we assess the quality of the glycans' conformational sampling. We found that the glycan distribution has a significant effect on the structure and function of BChE on timescales available to atomistic MD. This project is funded by the DTRA Grant HDTRA1-15-1-0054.

  11. Concurrent atomistic and continuum simulation of bi-crystal strontium titanate with tilt grain boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengfeng; Chen, Youping

    2015-03-08

    In this paper, we present the development of a concurrent atomistic-continuum (CAC) methodology for simulation of the grain boundary (GB) structures and their interaction with other defects in ionic materials. Simulation results show that the CAC simulation allows a smooth passage of cracks through the atomistic-continuum interface without the need for additional constitutive rules or special numerical treatment; both the atomic-scale structures and the energies of the four different [001] tilt GBs in bi-crystal strontium titanate obtained by CAC compare well with those obtained by existing experiments and density function theory calculations. Although 98.4% of the degrees of freedom of the simulated atomistic system have been eliminated in a coarsely meshed finite-element region, the CAC results, including the stress-strain responses, the GB-crack interaction mechanisms and the effect of the interaction on the fracture strength, are comparable with that of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation results. In addition, CAC simulation results show that the GB-crack interaction has a significant effect on the fracture behaviour of bi-crystal strontium titanate; not only the misorientation angle but also the atomic-level details of the GB structure influence the effect of the GB on impeding crack propagation.

  12. Coupling Strategies Investigation of Hybrid Atomistic-Continuum Method Based on State Variable Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Different configurations of coupling strategies influence greatly the accuracy and convergence of the simulation results in the hybrid atomistic-continuum method. This study aims to quantitatively investigate this effect and offer the guidance on how to choose the proper configuration of coupling strategies in the hybrid atomistic-continuum method. We first propose a hybrid molecular dynamics- (MD- continuum solver in LAMMPS and OpenFOAM that exchanges state variables between the atomistic region and the continuum region and evaluate different configurations of coupling strategies using the sudden start Couette flow, aiming to find the preferable configuration that delivers better accuracy and efficiency. The major findings are as follows: (1 the C→A region plays the most important role in the overlap region and the “4-layer-1” combination achieves the best precision with a fixed width of the overlap region; (2 the data exchanging operation only needs a few sampling points closer to the occasions of interactions and decreasing the coupling exchange operations can reduce the computational load with acceptable errors; (3 the nonperiodic boundary force model with a smoothing parameter of 0.1 and a finer parameter of 20 can not only achieve the minimum disturbance near the MD-continuum interface but also keep the simulation precision.

  13. Controllable atomistic graphene oxide model and its application in hydrogen sulfide removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Liangliang; Gubbins, Keith E.; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Lu, Xiaohua

    2013-01-01

    The determination of an atomistic graphene oxide (GO) model has been challenging due to the structural dependence on different synthesis methods. In this work we combine temperature-programmed molecular dynamics simulation techniques and the ReaxFF reactive force field to generate realistic atomistic GO structures. By grafting a mixture of epoxy and hydroxyl groups to the basal graphene surface and fine-tuning their initial concentrations, we produce in a controllable manner the GO structures with different functional groups and defects. The models agree with structural experimental data and with other ab initio quantum calculations. Using the generated atomistic models, we perform reactive adsorption calculations for H 2 S and H 2 O/H 2 S mixtures on GO materials and compare the results with experiment. We find that H 2 S molecules dissociate on the carbonyl functional groups, and H 2 O, CO 2 , and CO molecules are released as reaction products from the GO surface. The calculation reveals that for the H 2 O/H 2 S mixtures, H 2 O molecules are preferentially adsorbed to the carbonyl sites and block the potential active sites for H 2 S decomposition. The calculation agrees well with the experiments. The methodology and the procedure applied in this work open a new door to the theoretical studies of GO and can be extended to the research on other amorphous materials

  14. Los "intelectuales" y el Estado Novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís REIS TORGAL

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: El concepto de “intelectual” es difícil de definir y sin duda se debate constantemente. Sin embargo, es importante reflexionar sobre él a fin de comprender su significado y los problemas que implica. Sea como fuere, a un Estado autoritario “moderno” se le supone una única ideología que tiene que difundirse por medio de una propaganda bien organizada, proceso en el que los intelectuales desempeñan un papel significativo. El “Nuevo Estado” de Salazar encaja en esta categoría y sin duda el conocimiento acerca de sus “intelectuales” es fundamental. En este artículo, el objetivo es proporcionar algunos ejemplos interesantes de “intelectuales” o de simples “funcionarios políticos” con inclinación intelectual a fin de indicar el sentido y complejidad de un estudio con una dimensión distinta sobre este asunto. A este fin han sido seleccionadas tres personalidades responsables de la actividad ideológica y cultural de gran relieve en el Estado de Salazar: António Ferro, João Ameal y Costa Brochado. Palabras clave: Estado Novo; Authotitarianism; Salazar, António de Oliveira; Intellectuals; Ferro, António; Brochado, Idalino da Costa; Ameal, João. ABSTRACT: The concept of the “intellectual” is difficult to define and undoubtedly constantly debated. It is nevertheless important to reflect on it in order to understand its meaning and the problems involved with it. Be that as it may, a “modern” authoritarian State presumes a single ideology which has to be diffused by means of well-organised propaganda, in which process “intellectuals” play a significant role. Salazar’s “New State” fits this category and, undoubtedly, knowledge about its “intellectuals” is fundamental. The objective in this article is to provide some interesting examples of “intellectuals” or simple “political functionar- ies” with an intellectual bent so as to indicate the sense and complexity of a study of a

  15. Icarus: visualizer for de novo assembly evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheenko, Alla; Valin, Gleb; Prjibelski, Andrey; Saveliev, Vladislav; Gurevich, Alexey

    2016-11-01

    : Data visualization plays an increasingly important role in NGS data analysis. With advances in both sequencing and computational technologies, it has become a new bottleneck in genomics studies. Indeed, evaluation of de novo genome assemblies is one of the areas that can benefit from the visualization. However, even though multiple quality assessment methods are now available, existing visualization tools are hardly suitable for this purpose. Here, we present Icarus-a novel genome visualizer for accurate assessment and analysis of genomic draft assemblies, which is based on the tool QUAST. Icarus can be used in studies where a related reference genome is available, as well as for non-model organisms. The tool is available online and as a standalone application. http://cab.spbu.ru/software/icarus CONTACT: aleksey.gurevich@spbu.ruSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. [Diagnosis and management of de novo epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louise, Tyvaert

    2018-03-01

    The diagnosis of de novo epilepsy is complex. An accurate diagnostic approach has to be followed based on specific key steps. Epileptic seizure or non-epileptic malaise: risk of diagnosis error around 20%. Facing a first unprovoked seizure, the practitioner has to know the risk factors specifically linked to an increase risk of seizure recurrence. In presence of these factors, an antiepileptic drug would be indicated. The first antiepileptic drug has to be highly selected according to the epilepsy type and causes but also to the patient characteristics (sex, age, comorbidities, associated drugs, profession, and way of life…) An exhaustive patient Education needs to support the first antiepileptic drug prescription: (sleep and nutritional advices, benefit of observance, antiepileptic drugs features and side effects, follow-up, prognosis…) A regular follow-up is essential to control the observance, tolerability and efficacy of the antiepileptic drug, and to control also the good acceptance of the disease. A systematic research of common comorbidities may be also performed. Electroencephalogram and antiepileptic drugs levels are unnecessary in the classical follow up of known epileptic patients (except specific cases). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. De novo origin of human protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA-seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes.

  18. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  19. Identifying wrong assemblies in de novo short read primary ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-05

    Aug 5, 2016 ... Most of these assemblies are done using some de novo short read assemblers and other related approaches. .... benchmarking projects like Assemblathon 1, Assemblathon ... from a large insert library (at least 1000 bases).

  20. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-01-01

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In general

  1. Ion beam processing of surfaces and interfaces. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liedke, Bartosz

    2011-03-24

    Self-organization of regular surface pattern under ion beam erosion was described in detail by Navez in 1962. Several years later in 1986 Bradley and Harper (BH) published the first self-consistent theory on this phenomenon based on the competition of surface roughening described by Sigmund's sputter theory and surface smoothing by Mullins-Herring diffusion. Many papers that followed BH theory introduced other processes responsible for the surface patterning e.g. viscous flow, redeposition, phase separation, preferential sputtering, etc. The present understanding is still not sufficient to specify the dominant driving forces responsible for self-organization. 3D atomistic simulations can improve the understanding by reproducing the pattern formation with the detailed microscopic description of the driving forces. 2D simulations published so far can contribute to this understanding only partially. A novel program package for 3D atomistic simulations called TRIDER (TRansport of Ions in matter with DEfect Relaxation), which unifies full collision cascade simulation with atomistic relaxation processes, has been developed. The collision cascades are provided by simulations based on the Binary Collision Approximation, and the relaxation processes are simulated with the 3D lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method. This allows, without any phenomenological model, a full 3D atomistic description on experimental spatiotemporal scales. Recently discussed new mechanisms of surface patterning like ballistic mass drift or the dependence of the local morphology on sputtering yield are inherently included in our atomistic approach. The atomistic 3D simulations do not depend so much on experimental assumptions like reported 2D simulations or continuum theories. The 3D computer experiments can even be considered as 'cleanest' possible experiments for checking continuum theories. This work aims mainly at the methodology of a novel atomistic approach, showing that: (i) In

  2. Arginine de novo and nitric oxide production in disease states

    OpenAIRE

    Luiking, Yvette C.; Ten Have, Gabriella A. M.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine is derived from dietary protein intake, body protein breakdown, or endogenous de novo arginine production. The latter may be linked to the availability of citrulline, which is the immediate precursor of arginine and limiting factor for de novo arginine production. Arginine metabolism is highly compartmentalized due to the expression of the enzymes involved in arginine metabolism in various organs. A small fraction of arginine enters the NO synthase (NOS) pathway. Tetrahydrobiopterin ...

  3. De Novo Collapsing Glomerulopathy in a Renal Allograft Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanodia K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Collapsing glomerulopathy (CG, characterized histologically by segmental/global glomerular capillary collapse, podocyte hypertrophy and hypercellularity and tubulo-interstitial injury; is characterized clinically by massive proteinuria and rapid progressive renal failure. CG is known to recur in renal allograft and rarely de novo. We report de novo CG 3 years post-transplant in a patient who received renal allograft from haplo-identical type donor.

  4. Language and national identity in Novo Cinema Galego

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brais ROMERO SUÁREZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The talk of town since its inception in 2010, the Cinema Novo Galego has been successful in all competitions and festivals that has been present. From the FIPRESCI prize in Cannes to the Best Emerging Director at Locarno, this new wave of cinema places Galicia in the world film stage. But does Novo Cinema Galego an accurate representation of Galicia? What's the role of Galicia in this movement?

  5. Clinicopathologic factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tiansheng; Siegal, Gene P; Wei, Shi

    2016-12-01

    While breast cancers with distant metastasis at presentation (de novo metastasis) harbor significantly inferior clinical outcomes, there have been limited studies analyzing the clinicopathologic characteristics in this subset of patients. In this study, we analyzed 6126 breast cancers diagnosed between 1998 and 2013 to identify factors associated with de novo metastatic breast cancer. When compared to patients without metastasis at presentation, race, histologic grade, estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR) and HER2 statuses were significantly associated with de novo metastasis in the entire cohort, whereas age, histologic grade, PR and HER2 status were the significant parameters in the subset of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (Stage IIB/III). The patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer had a significant older mean age and a lower proportion of HER2-positive tumors when compared to those with metastatic recurrence. Further, the HER2-rich subtype demonstrated a drastically higher incidence of de novo metastasis when compared to the luminal and triple-negative breast cancers in the entire cohort [odds ratio (OR)=5.68 and 2.27, respectively] and in the patients with locally advanced disease (OR=4.02 and 2.12, respectively), whereas no significant difference was seen between de novo metastatic cancers and those with metastatic recurrence. Moreover, the luminal and HER2-rich subtypes showed bone-seeking (OR=1.92) and liver-homing (OR=2.99) characteristics, respectively, for the sites of de novo metastasis, while the latter was not observed in those with metastatic recurrence. Our data suggest that an algorithm incorporating clinicopathologic factors, especially histologic grade and receptor profile, remains of significant benefit during decision making in newly diagnosed breast cancer in the pursuit of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. NovoPen Echo® insulin delivery device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyllested-Winge J

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacob Hyllested-Winge,1 Thomas Sparre,2 Line Kynemund Pedersen2 1Novo Nordisk Pharma Ltd, Tokyo, Japan; 2Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark Abstract: The introduction of insulin pen devices has provided easier, well-tolerated, and more convenient treatment regimens for patients with diabetes mellitus. When compared with vial and syringe regimens, insulin pens offer a greater clinical efficacy, improved quality of life, and increased dosing accuracy, particularly at low doses. The portable and discreet nature of pen devices reduces the burden on the patient, facilitates adherence, and subsequently contributes to the improvement in glycemic control. NovoPen Echo® is one of the latest members of the NovoPen® family that has been specifically designed for the pediatric population and is the first to combine half-unit increment (=0.5 U of insulin dosing with a simple memory function. The half-unit increment dosing amendments and accurate injection of 0.5 U of insulin are particularly beneficial for children (and insulin-sensitive adults/elders, who often require small insulin doses. The memory function can be used to record the time and amount of the last dose, reducing the fear of double dosing or missing a dose. The memory function also provides parents with extra confidence and security that their child is taking insulin at the correct doses and times. NovoPen Echo is a lightweight, durable insulin delivery pen; it is available in two different colors, which may help to distinguish between different types of insulin, providing more confidence for both users and caregivers. Studies have demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction, with 80% of users preferring NovoPen Echo to other pediatric insulin pens. Keywords: NovoPen Echo®, memory function, half-unit increment dosing, adherence, children, adolescents 

  7. Simulating Surface-Enhanced Hyper-Raman Scattering Using Atomistic Electrodynamics-Quantum Mechanical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongwei; Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2016-12-13

    Surface-enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS) is the two-photon analogue of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), which has proven to be a powerful tool to study molecular structures and surface enhancements. However, few theoretical approaches to SEHRS exist and most neglect the atomistic descriptions of the metal surface and molecular resonance effects. In this work, we present two atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models to simulate SEHRS. The first is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which combines an atomistic electrodynamics model of the nanoparticle with a time-dependent density functional theory description of the molecule. The second model is a dressed-tensors method that describes the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object interacting with the enhanced local field and field-gradients (FG) from the nanoparticle. In both of these models, the resonance effects are treated efficiently by means of damped quadratic response theory. Using these methods, we simulate SEHRS spectra for benzene and pyridine. Our results show that the FG effects in SEHRS play an important role in determining both the surface selection rules and the enhancements. We find that FG effects are more important in SEHRS than in SERS. We also show that the spectral features of small molecules can be accurately described by accounting for the interactions between the molecule and the local field and FG of the nanoparticle. However, at short distances between the metal and molecule, we find significant differences in the SEHRS enhancements predicted using the DIM/QM and the dressed-tensors methods.

  8. SCT: a suite of programs for comparing atomistic models with small-angle scattering data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Perkins, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering techniques characterize proteins in solution and complement high-resolution structural studies. They are of particular utility when large proteins cannot be crystallized or when the structure is altered by solution conditions. Atomistic models of the averaged structure can be generated through constrained modelling, a technique in which known domain or subunit structures are combined with linker models to produce candidate global conformations. By randomizing the configuration adopted by the different elements of the model, thousands of candidate structures are produced. Next, theoretical scattering curves are generated for each model for trial-and-error fits to the experimental data. From these, a small family of best-fit models is identified. In order to facilitate both the computation of theoretical scattering curves from atomistic models and their comparison with experiment, the SCT suite of tools was developed. SCT also includes programs that provide sequence-based estimates of protein volume (either incorporating hydration or not) and add a hydration layer to models for X-ray scattering modelling. The original SCT software, written in Fortran, resulted in the first atomistic scattering structures to be deposited in the Protein Data Bank, and 77 structures for antibodies, complement proteins and anionic oligosaccharides were determined between 1998 and 2014. For the first time, this software is publicly available, alongside an easier-to-use reimplementation of the same algorithms in Python. Both versions of SCT have been released as open-source software under the Apache 2 license and are available for download from https://github.com/dww100/sct.

  9. Atomistic simulations of materials: Methods for accurate potentials and realistic time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwary, Pratyush

    This thesis deals with achieving more realistic atomistic simulations of materials, by developing accurate and robust force-fields, and algorithms for practical time scales. I develop a formalism for generating interatomic potentials for simulating atomistic phenomena occurring at energy scales ranging from lattice vibrations to crystal defects to high-energy collisions. This is done by fitting against an extensive database of ab initio results, as well as to experimental measurements for mixed oxide nuclear fuels. The applicability of these interactions to a variety of mixed environments beyond the fitting domain is also assessed. The employed formalism makes these potentials applicable across all interatomic distances without the need for any ambiguous splining to the well-established short-range Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark universal pair potential. We expect these to be reliable potentials for carrying out damage simulations (and molecular dynamics simulations in general) in nuclear fuels of varying compositions for all relevant atomic collision energies. A hybrid stochastic and deterministic algorithm is proposed that while maintaining fully atomistic resolution, allows one to achieve milliseconds and longer time scales for several thousands of atoms. The method exploits the rare event nature of the dynamics like other such methods, but goes beyond them by (i) not having to pick a scheme for biasing the energy landscape, (ii) providing control on the accuracy of the boosted time scale, (iii) not assuming any harmonic transition state theory (HTST), and (iv) not having to identify collective coordinates or interesting degrees of freedom. The method is validated by calculating diffusion constants for vacancy-mediated diffusion in iron metal at low temperatures, and comparing against brute-force high temperature molecular dynamics. We also calculate diffusion constants for vacancy diffusion in tantalum metal, where we compare against low-temperature HTST as well

  10. Atomistic Simulation of Intrinsic Defects and Trivalent and Tetravalent Ion Doping in Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo D. S. Santos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation techniques have been employed in order to investigate key issues related to intrinsic defects and a variety of dopants from trivalent and tetravalent ions. The most favorable intrinsic defect is determined to be a scheme involving calcium and hydroxyl vacancies. It is found that trivalent ions have an energetic preference for the Ca site, while tetravalent ions can enter P sites. Charge compensation is predicted to occur basically via three schemes. In general, the charge compensation via the formation of calcium vacancies is more favorable. Trivalent dopant ions are more stable than tetravalent dopants.

  11. Near-ideal strength in metal nanotubes revealed by atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mingfei; Xiao, Fei [Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Deng, Chuang, E-mail: dengc@ad.umanitoba.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Manitoba, 15Gillson Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5V6 (Canada)

    2013-12-02

    Here we report extraordinary mechanical properties revealed by atomistic simulations in metal nanotubes with hollow interior that have been long overlooked. Particularly, the yield strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotubes is found to be up to 60% higher than the corresponding solid Au nanowire, which approaches the theoretical ideal strength in Au. Furthermore, a remarkable transition from sharp to smooth yielding is observed in Au nanotubes with decreasing wall thickness. The ultrahigh tensile strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotube might originate from the repulsive image force exerted by the interior surface against dislocation nucleation from the outer surface.

  12. FROM ATOMISTIC TO SYSTEMATIC COARSE-GRAINED MODELS FOR MOLECULAR SYSTEMS

    KAUST Repository

    Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2017-10-03

    The development of systematic (rigorous) coarse-grained mesoscopic models for complex molecular systems is an intense research area. Here we first give an overview of methods for obtaining optimal parametrized coarse-grained models, starting from detailed atomistic representation for high dimensional molecular systems. Different methods are described based on (a) structural properties (inverse Boltzmann approaches), (b) forces (force matching), and (c) path-space information (relative entropy). Next, we present a detailed investigation concerning the application of these methods in systems under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. Finally, we present results from the application of these methods to model molecular systems.

  13. Visualization and analysis of atomistic simulation data with OVITO–the Open Visualization Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stukowski, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    The Open Visualization Tool (OVITO) is a new 3D visualization software designed for post-processing atomistic data obtained from molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations. Unique analysis, editing and animations functions are integrated into its easy-to-use graphical user interface. The software is written in object-oriented C++, controllable via Python scripts and easily extendable through a plug-in interface. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://ovito.sourceforge.net/

  14. Cationic Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and Dioleoyloxytrimethylammonium Propane Lipid Bilayers: Atomistic Insight for Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, W.; Gurtovenko, A. A.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    We performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers consisting of a mixture of cationic dioleoyloxytrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP) and zwitterionic dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids at different DOTAP fractions. Our primary focus was the specific effects...... of unsaturated lipid chains on structural and dynamic properties of mixed cationic bilayers. The bilayer area, as well as the ordering of lipid tails, shows a pronounced nonmonotonic behavior when TAP lipid fraction increases. The minimum in area (maximum in ordering) was observed for a bilayer with TAP fraction...... lipids, which were found to form PC-PC and PC-TAP pairs, and the formation of lipid clusters....

  15. Atomistic simulations of dislocation-precipitate interactions emphasize importance of cross-slip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.V.; Mateos, A.J.; Warner, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    This work examines the interaction of screw dislocations with Guinier-Preston (GP) zones using atomistic simulations. Both Orowan looping and cross-slip mechanisms are found to control the interactions. Cross-slip, occurring both at zero and finite temperatures, is found to either significantly reduce or enhance precipitate strengthening, depending upon the orientation of the dislocation-GP zone interaction. The orientation dependence, and its dependence on temperature, provides a micromechanical explanation for the experiments of Muraishi et al. (Philos. Mag. A 82 (2002) 2755).

  16. Irradiation-induced void evolution in iron: A phase-field approach with atomistic derived parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuan-Yuan; Ding Jian-Hua; Huang Shao-Song; Zhao Ji-Jun; Liu Wen-Bo; Ke Xiao-Qin; Wang Yun-Zhi; Zhang Chi

    2017-01-01

    A series of material parameters are derived from atomistic simulations and implemented into a phase field (PF) model to simulate void evolution in body-centered cubic (bcc) iron subjected to different irradiation doses at different temperatures. The simulation results show good agreement with experimental observations — the porosity as a function of temperature varies in a bell-shaped manner and the void density monotonically decreases with increasing temperatures; both porosity and void density increase with increasing irradiation dose at the same temperature. Analysis reveals that the evolution of void number and size is determined by the interplay among the production, diffusion and recombination of vacancy and interstitial. (paper)

  17. Using a scalar parameter to trace dislocation evolution in atomistic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinbo [ORNL; Zhang, Z F [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A scalar gamma-parameter is proposed from the Nye tensor. Its maximum value occurs along a dislocation line, either straight or curved, when the coordinate system is purposely chosen. This parameter can be easily obtained from the Nye tensor calculated at each atom in atomistic modeling. Using the gamma-parameter, a fully automated approach is developed to determine core atoms and the Burgers vectors of dislocations simultaneously. The approach is validated by revealing the smallest dislocation loop and by tracing the whole formation process of complicated dislocation networks on the fly.

  18. Control of density fluctuations in atomistic-continuum simulations of dense liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E.M.; Walther, Jens Honore; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-01-01

    with a continuum solver for the simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. The lack of periodic boundary conditions in the molecular dynamics simulations hinders the proper accounting for the virial pressure leading to spurious density fluctuations at the continuum-atomistic interface. An ad hoc boundary force...... is usually employed to remedy this situation.We propose the calculation of this boundary force using a control algorithm that explicitly cancels the density fluctuations. The results demonstrate that the present approach outperforms state-of-the-art algorithms. The conceptual and algorithmic simplicity...

  19. Atomistic switch of giant magnetoresistance and spin thermopower in graphene-like nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that the giant magnetoresistance can be switched off (on) in even- (odd-) width zigzag graphene-like nanoribbons by an atomistic gate potential or edge disorder inside the domain wall in the antiparallel (ap) magnetic configuration. A strong magneto-thermopower effect is also predicted that the spin thermopower can be greatly enhanced in the ap configuration while the charge thermopower remains low. The results extracted from the tight-binding model agree well with those obtained by first-principles simulations for edge doped graphene nanoribbons. Analytical expressions in the simplest case are obtained to facilitate qualitative analyses in general contexts. PMID:27857156

  20. Atomistic simulation of dislocation nucleation barriers from cracktips in α-Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Peter A; Neeraj, T; Luton, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that activation pathways for dislocation loop nucleation from cracktips can be explored with full atomistic detail using an efficient form of the nudged elastic band method. The approach is demonstrated in detail with an example of edge emission from an Fe crack under mode II loading, wherein activation energy barriers are obtained as a function of sub-critical stress intensity and the energy barriers for loop formation are compared with 2D calculations. Activation energy barriers are also computed for an intrinsically ductile cracktip orientation under mode I loading, from which we can infer the frequency of nucleation from the cracktip

  1. De novo status epilepticus with isolated aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flügel, Dominique; Kim, Olaf Chan-Hi; Felbecker, Ansgar; Tettenborn, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sudden onset of aphasia is usually due to stroke. Rapid diagnostic workup is necessary if reperfusion therapy is considered. Ictal aphasia is a rare condition but has to be excluded. Perfusion imaging may differentiate acute ischemia from other causes. In dubious cases, EEG is required but is time-consuming and laborious. We report a case where we considered de novo status epilepticus as a cause of aphasia without any lesion even at follow-up. A 62-year-old right-handed woman presented to the emergency department after nurses found her aphasic. She had undergone operative treatment of varicosis 3 days earlier. Apart from hypertension and obesity, no cardiovascular risk factors and no intake of medication other than paracetamol were reported. Neurological examination revealed global aphasia and right pronation in the upper extremity position test. Computed tomography with angiography and perfusion showed no abnormalities. Electroencephalogram performed after the CT scan showed left-sided slowing with high-voltage rhythmic 2/s delta waves but no clear ictal pattern. Intravenous lorazepam did improve EEG slightly, while aphasia did not change. Lumbar puncture was performed which likely excluded encephalitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cortical pathological diffusion imaging (restriction) and cortical hyperperfusion in the left parietal region. Intravenous anticonvulsant therapy under continuous EEG resolved neurological symptoms. The patient was kept on anticonvulsant therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging after 6 months showed no abnormalities along with no clinical abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were only subtle, and EEG was without clear ictal pattern, so the diagnosis of aphasic status remains with some uncertainty. However, status epilepticus can mimic stroke symptoms and has to be considered in patients with aphasia even when no previous stroke or structural lesions are detectable and EEG shows no epileptic discharges. Epileptic origin is

  2. Biophysical characterization of a de novo elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Kelly Nicole

    Natural human elastin is found in tissue such as the lungs, arteries, and skin. This protein is formed at birth with no mechanism present to repair or supplement the initial quantity formed. As a result, the functionality and durability of elastin's elasticity is critically important. To date, the mechanics of this ability to stretch and recoil is not fully understood. This study utilizes de novo protein design to create a small library of simplistic versions of elastin-like proteins, demonstrate the elastin-like proteins, maintain elastin's functionality, and inquire into its structure using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Elastin is formed from cross-linked tropoelastin. Therefore, the first generation of designed proteins consisted of one protein that utilized homogony of interspecies tropoelastin by using three common domains, two hydrophobic and one cross-linking domains. Basic modifications were made to open the hydrophobic region and also to make the protein easier to purify and characterize. The designed protein maintained its functionality, self-aggregating as the temperature increased. Uniquely, the protein remained self-aggregated as the temperature returned below the critical transition temperature. Self-aggregation was additionally induced by increasing salt concentrations and by modifying the pH. The protein appeared to have little secondary structure when studied with solution NMR. These results fueled a second generation of designed elastin-like proteins. This generation contained variations designed to study the cross-linking domain, one specific hydrophobic domain, and the effect of the length of the elastin-like protein. The cross-linking domain in one variation has been significantly modified while the flanking hydrophobic domains have remained unchanged. This characterization of this protein will answer questions regarding the specificity of the homologous nature of the cross-linking domain of tropoelastin across species. A second

  3. Solid solution hardening in face centered binary alloys: Gliding statistics of a dislocation in random solid solution by atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patinet, S.

    2009-12-01

    The glide of edge and screw dislocation in solid solution is modeled through atomistic simulations in two model alloys of Ni(Al) and Al(Mg) described within the embedded atom method. Our approach is based on the study of the elementary interaction between dislocations and solutes to derive solid solution hardening of face centered cubic binary alloys. We identify the physical origins of the intensity and range of the interaction between a dislocation and a solute atom. The thermally activated crossing of a solute atom by a dislocation is studied at the atomistic scale. We show that hardening of edge and screw segments are similar. We develop a line tension model that reproduces quantitatively the atomistic calculations of the flow stress. We identify the universality class to which the dislocation depinning transition in solid solution belongs. (author)

  4. DoGlycans-Tools for Preparing Carbohydrate Structures for Atomistic Simulations of Glycoproteins, Glycolipids, and Carbohydrate Polymers for GROMACS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danne, Reinis; Poojari, Chetan; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2017-01-01

    Carbohydrates constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group of biological molecules and macromolecules. In cells they are involved in, e.g., energy storage, signaling, and cell-cell recognition. All of these phenomena take place in atomistic scales, thus atomistic simulation would...... be the method of choice to explore how carbohydrates function. However, the progress in the field is limited by the lack of appropriate tools for preparing carbohydrate structures and related topology files for the simulation models. Here we present tools that fill this gap. Applications where the tools...

  5. Purine biosynthesis de novo by lymphocytes in gout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoun, P.; Chanard, J.; Brami, M.; Funck-Brentano, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    A method of measurement in vitro of purine biosynthesis de novo in human circulating blood lymphocytes is proposed. The rate of early reactions of purine biosynthesis de novo was determined by the incorporation of [ 14 C]formate into N-formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide when the subsequent reactions of the metabolic pathway were completely inhibited by the antibiotic azaserine. Synthesis of 14 C-labelled N-formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide by lymphocytes was measured in healthy control subjects and patients with primary gout or hyperuricaemia secondary to renal failure, with or without allopurinol therapy. The average synthesis was higher in gouty patients without therapy than in control subjects, but the values contained overlap the normal range. In secondary hyperuricaemia the synthesis was at same value as in control subjects. These results are in agreement with the inconstant acceleration of purine biosynthesis de novo in gouty patients as seen by others with measurement of [ 14 C]glycine incorporation into urinary uric acid. (author)

  6. Protocols for atomistic modeling of water uptake into zeolite crystals for thermal storage and other applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasano, Matteo; Borri, Daniele; Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Asinari, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical protocols for modeling water adsorption and infiltration into zeolite. • A priori screening of new materials for heat storage and desalination is possible. • Water uptake isotherms for bridging atomistic and engineering scales. - Abstract: We report numerical protocols for describing the water uptake process into microporous materials, with special emphasis on zeolite crystals. A better understanding and more predictive tools of the latter process are critical for a number of modern engineering applications, ranging from the optimization of loss free and compact thermal storage plants up to more efficient separation processes. Water sorption (and desorption) is indeed the key physical phenomenon to consider when designing several heat storage cycles, whereas water infiltration is to be studied when concerned with sieving through microporous materials for manufacturing selective membranes (e.g. water desalination by reverse osmosis). Despite the two quite different applications above, in this article we make an effort for illustrating a comprehensive numerical framework for predicting the engineering performances of microporous materials, based on detailed atomistic models. Thanks to the nowadays spectacular progresses in synthesizing an ever increasing number of new materials with desired properties such as zeolite with various concentrations of hydrophilic defects, we believe that the reported tools can possibly guide engineers in choosing and optimizing innovative materials for (thermal) engineering applications in the near future.

  7. Atomistic simulation and continuum modeling of graphene nanoribbons under uniaxial tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Qiang; Gao, Wei; Huang, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic simulations are performed to study the nonlinear mechanical behavior of graphene nanoribbons under quasistatic uniaxial tension, emphasizing the effects of edge structures (armchair and zigzag, without and with hydrogen passivation) on elastic modulus and fracture strength. The numerical results are analyzed within a theoretical model of thermodynamics, which enables determination of the bulk strain energy density, the edge energy density and the hydrogen adsorption energy density as nonlinear functions of the applied strain based on static molecular mechanics simulations. These functions can be used to describe mechanical behavior of graphene nanoribbons from the initial linear elasticity to fracture. It is found that the initial Young's modulus of a graphene nanoribbon depends on the ribbon width and the edge chirality. Furthermore, it is found that the nominal strain to fracture is considerably lower for graphene nanoribbons with armchair edges than for ribbons with zigzag edges. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal two distinct fracture nucleation mechanisms: homogeneous nucleation for the zigzag-edged graphene nanoribbons and edge-controlled heterogeneous nucleation for the armchair-edged ribbons. The modeling and simulations in this study highlight the atomistic mechanisms for the nonlinear mechanical behavior of graphene nanoribbons with the edge effects, which is potentially important for developing integrated graphene-based devices

  8. Comparison of atomistic and elasticity approaches for carbon diffusion near line defects in {alpha}-iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiga, R.G.A., E-mail: rgaveiga@gmail.com [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Perez, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA Lyon, Laboratoire MATEIS, UMR CNRS 5510, 25 Avenue Jean Capelle, F69621, Villeurbanne (France); Becquart, C.S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Lille, UMR CNRS 8207, Bat. C6, F59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France); Clouet, E. [Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Domain, C. [EDF, Recherche et Developpement, Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, F77250 Moret sur Loing (France); Laboratoire commun EDF-CNRS Etude et Modelisation des Microstructures pour le Vieillissement des Materiaux (EM2VM) (France)

    2011-10-15

    Energy barriers for carbon migration in the neighborhood of line defects in body-centered cubic iron have been obtained by atomistic simulations. For this purpose, molecular statics with an Fe-C interatomic potential, based on the embedded atom method, has been employed. Results of these simulations have been compared to the predictions of anisotropic elasticity theory. The agreement is better for a carbon atom sitting on an octahedral site (energy minimum) than one on a tetrahedral site (saddle point). Absolute differences in the energy barriers obtained by the two methods are usually below 5 meV at distances larger than 1.5 nm from a screw dislocation and 2 nm (up to 4 nm in the glide plane) from the edge dislocation. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations performed at T = 300 K and additional analysis based on the activation energies obtained by both methods show that they are in good qualitative agreement, despite some important quantitative discrepancies due to the large absolute errors found near the dislocation cores.

  9. An atomistic model for cross-linked HNBR elastomers used in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Nicola; Sutton, Adrian; Stevens, John; Mostofi, Arash

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) is one of the most common elastomeric materials used for seals in the oil and gas industry. These seals sometimes suffer ``explosive decompression,'' a costly problem in which gases permeate a seal at the elevated temperatures and pressures pertaining in oil and gas wells, leading to rupture when the seal is brought back to the surface. The experimental evidence that HNBR and its unsaturated parent NBR have markedly different swelling properties suggests that cross-linking may occur during hydrogenation of NBR to produce HNBR. We have developed a code compatible with the LAMMPS molecular dynamics package to generate fully atomistic HNBR configurations by hydrogenating initial NBR structures. This can be done with any desired degree of cross-linking. The code uses a model of atomic interactions based on the OPLS-AA force-field. We present calculations of the dependence of a number of bulk properties on the degree of cross-linking. Using our atomistic representations of HNBR and NBR, we hope to develop a better molecular understanding of the mechanisms that result in explosive decompression.

  10. NanoPSE: Nanoscience Problem Solving Environment for atomistic electronic structure of semiconductor nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Wesley B; Bester, Gabriel; Canning, Andrew; Franceschetti, Alberto; Graf, Peter A; Kim, Kwiseon; Langou, Julien; Wang Linwang; Dongarra, Jack; Zunger, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and their collaborators have developed over the past ∼10 years a set of algorithms for an atomistic description of the electronic structure of nanostructures, based on plane-wave pseudopotentials and configurationinteraction. The present contribution describes the first step in assembling these various codes into a single, portable, integrated set of software packages. This package is part of an ongoing research project in the development stage. Components of NanoPSE include codes for atomistic nanostructure generation and passivation, valence force field model for atomic relaxation, code for potential field generation, empirical pseudopotential method solver, strained linear combination of bulk bands method solver, configuration interaction solver for excited states, selection of linear algebra methods, and several inverse band structure solvers. Although not available for general distribution at this time as it is being developed and tested, the design goal of the NanoPSE software is to provide a software context for collaboration. The software package is enabled by fcdev, an integrated collection of best practice GNU software for open source development and distribution augmented to better support FORTRAN

  11. Temperature specification in atomistic molecular dynamics and its impact on simulation efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    Temperature is a vital thermodynamical function for physical systems. Knowledge of system temperature permits assessment of system ergodicity, entropy, system state and stability. Rapid theoretical and computational developments in the fields of condensed matter physics, chemistry, material science, molecular biology, nanotechnology and others necessitate clarity in the temperature specification. Temperature-based materials simulations, both standalone and distributed computing, are projected to grow in prominence over diverse research fields. In this article we discuss the apparent variability of temperature modeling formalisms used currently in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, with respect to system energetics,dynamics and structural evolution. Commercial simulation programs, which by nature are heuristic, do not openly discuss this fundamental question. We address temperature specification in the context of atomistic molecular dynamics. We define a thermostat at 400K relative to a heat bath at 300K firstly using a modified ab-initio Newtonian method, and secondly using a Monte-Carlo method. The thermostatic vacancy formation and cohesion energies, equilibrium lattice constant for FCC copper is then calculated. Finally we compare and contrast the results.

  12. Ab-initio and atomistic study of the ferroelectric properties of Cu doped potassium niobate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerbel, Sabine; Elsaesser, Christian [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik IWM, Woehlerstrasse 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    KNbO{sub 3} is one end member of the solid solution (K,Na)NbO{sub 3} (KNN), which has promising ferroelectric properties to become a future lead-free substitute for lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) in piezoelectric actors and sensors. Both KNN and PZT exhibit a phase transition with composition and a morphotropic phase boundary, at which enhanced piezoelectric coefficients are obtained. The material properties of PZT and KNN are commonly optimized by doping. E.g., CuO can be added when fabricating KNN as a sintering aid. Ab initio density functional theory and atomistic simulation using a classical shell model potential have been combined to investigate low Cu concentrations in the KNbO{sub 3}-CuNbO{sub 3} system. The atomistic model predicts a morphotropic phase boundary at a few percent Cu, analogous to the one found in the LiNbO{sub 3}-KNbO{sub 3} system.

  13. Mechanical properties of silicon in subsurface damage layer from nano-grinding studied by atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Chen, Pei; Qin, Fei; An, Tong; Yu, Huiping

    2018-05-01

    Ultra-thin silicon wafer is highly demanded by semi-conductor industry. During wafer thinning process, the grinding technology will inevitably induce damage to the surface and subsurface of silicon wafer. To understand the mechanism of subsurface damage (SSD) layer formation and mechanical properties of SSD layer, atomistic simulation is the effective tool to perform the study, since the SSD layer is in the scale of nanometer and hardly to be separated from underneath undamaged silicon. This paper is devoted to understand the formation of SSD layer, and the difference between mechanical properties of damaged silicon in SSD layer and ideal silicon. With the atomistic model, the nano-grinding process could be performed between a silicon workpiece and diamond tool under different grinding speed. To reach a thinnest SSD layer, nano-grinding speed will be optimized in the range of 50-400 m/s. Mechanical properties of six damaged silicon workpieces with different depths of cut will be studied. The SSD layer from each workpiece will be isolated, and a quasi-static tensile test is simulated to perform on the isolated SSD layer. The obtained stress-strain curve is an illustration of overall mechanical properties of SSD layer. By comparing the stress-strain curves of damaged silicon and ideal silicon, a degradation of Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and strain at fracture is observed.

  14. An Atomistic Carbide-Derived Carbon Model Generated Using ReaxFF-Based Quenched Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Thompson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel atomistic model of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs, which are nanoporous carbons with high specific surface areas, synthesis-dependent degrees of graphitization, and well-ordered, tunable porosities. These properties make CDCs viable substrates in several energy-relevant applications, such as gas storage media, electrochemical capacitors, and catalytic supports. These materials are heterogenous, non-ideal structures and include several important parameters that govern their performance. Therefore, a realistic model of the CDC structure is needed in order to study these systems and their nanoscale and macroscale properties with molecular simulation. We report the use of the ReaxFF reactive force field in a quenched molecular dynamics routine to generate atomistic CDC models. The pair distribution function, pore size distribution, and adsorptive properties of this model are reported and corroborated with experimental data. Simulations demonstrate that compressing the system after quenching changes the pore size distribution to better match the experimental target. Ring size distributions of this model demonstrate the prevalence of non-hexagonal carbon rings in CDCs. These effects may contrast the properties of CDCs against those of activated carbons with similar pore size distributions and explain higher energy densities of CDC-based supercapacitors.

  15. Atomistic theory of excitonic fine structure in InAs/InP nanowire quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świderski, M.; Zieliński, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nanowire quantum dots have peculiar electronic and optical properties. In this work we use atomistic tight binding to study excitonic spectra of artificial molecules formed by a double nanowire quantum dot. We demonstrate a key role of atomistic symmetry and nanowire substrate orientation rather than cylindrical shape symmetry of a nanowire and a molecule. In particular for [001 ] nanowire orientation we observe a nonvanishing bright exciton splitting for a quasimolecule formed by two cylindrical quantum dots of different heights. This effect is due to interdot coupling that effectively reduces the overall symmetry, whereas single uncoupled [001 ] quantum dots have zero fine structure splitting. We found that the same double quantum dot system grown on [111 ] nanowire reveals no excitonic fine structure for all considered quantum dot distances and individual quantum dot heights. Further we demonstrate a pronounced, by several orders of magnitude, increase of the dark exciton optical activity in a quantum dot molecule as compared to a single quantum dot. For [111 ] systems we also show spontaneous localization of single particle states in one of nominally identical quantum dots forming a molecule, which is mediated by strain and origins from the lack of the vertical inversion symmetry in [111 ] nanostructures of overall C3 v symmetry. Finally, we study lowering of symmetry due to alloy randomness that triggers nonzero excitonic fine structure and the dark exciton optical activity in realistic nanowire quantum dot molecules of intermixed composition.

  16. Atomistic simulations in Si processing: Bridging the gap between atoms and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes; Lopez, Pedro; Aboy, Maria; Santos, Ivan; Barbolla, Juan

    2005-01-01

    With devices shrinking to nanometric scale, process simulation tools have to shift from continuum models to an atomistic description of the material. However, the limited sizes and time scales accessible for detailed atomistic techniques usually lead to the difficult task of relating the information obtained from simulations to experimental data. The solution consists of the use of a hierarchical simulation scheme: more fundamental techniques are employed to extract parameters and models that are then feed into less detailed simulators which allow direct comparison with experiments. This scheme will be illustrated with the modeling of the amorphization and recrystallization of Si, which has been defined as a key challenge in the last edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors. The model is based on the bond defect or IV pair, which is used as the building block of the amorphous phase. The properties of this defect have been studied using ab initio methods and classical molecular dynamics techniques. It is shown that the recombination of this defect depends on the surrounding bond defects, which accounts for the cooperative nature of the amorphization and recrystallization processes. The implementation of this model in a kinetic Monte Carlo code allows extracting data directly comparable with experiments. This approach provides physical insight on the amorphization and recrystallization mechanisms and a tool for the optimization of solid-phase epitaxial-related processes

  17. Multi-scale modelling of ions in solution: from atomistic descriptions to chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ions in solution play a fundamental role in many physical, chemical, and biological processes. The PUREX process used in the nuclear industry to the treatment of spent nuclear fuels is considered as an example. For industrial applications these systems are usually described using simple analytical models which are fitted to reproduce the available experimental data. In this work, we propose a multi-scale coarse graining procedure to derive such models from atomistic descriptions. First, parameters for classical force-fields of ions in solution are extracted from ab-initio calculations. Effective (McMillan-Mayer) ion-ion potentials are then derived from radial distribution functions measured in classical molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to define an implicit solvent model of electrolytes. Finally, perturbation calculations are performed to define the best possible representation for these systems, in terms of charged hard-sphere models. Our final model is analytical and contains no free 'fitting' parameters. It shows good agreement with the exact results obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations for the thermodynamic and structural properties. Development of a similar model for the electrolyte viscosity, from information derived from atomistic descriptions, is also introduced. (author)

  18. An atomistic fingerprint algorithm for learning ab initio molecular force fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu-Hang; Zhang, Dongkun; Karniadakis, George Em

    2018-01-01

    Molecular fingerprints, i.e., feature vectors describing atomistic neighborhood configurations, is an important abstraction and a key ingredient for data-driven modeling of potential energy surface and interatomic force. In this paper, we present the density-encoded canonically aligned fingerprint algorithm, which is robust and efficient, for fitting per-atom scalar and vector quantities. The fingerprint is essentially a continuous density field formed through the superimposition of smoothing kernels centered on the atoms. Rotational invariance of the fingerprint is achieved by aligning, for each fingerprint instance, the neighboring atoms onto a local canonical coordinate frame computed from a kernel minisum optimization procedure. We show that this approach is superior over principal components analysis-based methods especially when the atomistic neighborhood is sparse and/or contains symmetry. We propose that the "distance" between the density fields be measured using a volume integral of their pointwise difference. This can be efficiently computed using optimal quadrature rules, which only require discrete sampling at a small number of grid points. We also experiment on the choice of weight functions for constructing the density fields and characterize their performance for fitting interatomic potentials. The applicability of the fingerprint is demonstrated through a set of benchmark problems.

  19. Atomistic nature in band-to-band tunneling in two-dimensional silicon pn tunnel diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabe, Michiharu; Tan, Hoang Nhat; Mizuno, Takeshi; Muruganathan, Manoharan; Anh, Le The; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nuryadi, Ratno; Moraru, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We study low-temperature transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) Si tunnel diodes, or Si Esaki diodes, with a lateral layout. In ordinary Si Esaki diodes, interband tunneling current is severely limited because of the law of momentum conservation, while nanoscale Esaki diodes may behave differently due to the dopants in the narrow depletion region, by atomistic effects which release such current limitation. In thin-Si lateral highly doped pn diodes, we find clear signatures of interband tunneling between 2D-subbands involving phonon assistance. More importantly, the tunneling current is sharply enhanced in a narrow voltage range by resonance via a pair of a donor- and an acceptor-atom in the pn junction region. Such atomistic behavior is recognized as a general feature showing up only in nanoscale tunnel diodes. In particular, a donor-acceptor pair with deeper ground-state energies is likely to be responsible for such a sharply enhanced current peak, tunable by external biases.

  20. Prediction of Material Properties of Nanostructured Polymer Composites Using Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkley, J.A.; Clancy, T.C.; Frankland, S.J.V.

    2009-01-01

    Atomistic models of epoxy polymers were built in order to assess the effect of structure at the nanometer scale on the resulting bulk properties such as elastic modulus and thermal conductivity. Atomistic models of both bulk polymer and carbon nanotube polymer composites were built. For the bulk models, the effect of moisture content and temperature on the resulting elastic constants was calculated. A relatively consistent decrease in modulus was seen with increasing temperature. The dependence of modulus on moisture content was less consistent. This behavior was seen for two different epoxy systems, one containing a difunctional epoxy molecule and the other a tetrafunctional epoxy molecule. Both epoxy structures were crosslinked with diamine curing agents. Multifunctional properties were calculated with the nanocomposite models. Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between the carbon nanotube and the surrounding epoxy matrix. These estimated values were used in a multiscale model in order to predict the thermal conductivity of a nanocomposite as a function of the nanometer scaled molecular structure.

  1. An atomistic interpretation of Planck's 1900 derivation of his radiation law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irons, F.E.

    2000-01-01

    In deriving his radiation law in 1900, Max Planck employed a simple harmonic oscillator to model the exchange of energy between radiation and matter. Traditionally the harmonic oscillator has been viewed as modelling an entity which is itself oscillating, although a suitable oscillating entity has not been forthcoming. (Opinion is divided between a material oscillator, an imaginary oscillator and a need to revise Planck's derivation to apply to cavity modes of oscillation). We offer a novel, atomistic interpretation of Planck's derivation wherein the harmonic oscillator models a transition between the internal quantum states of an atom|not a normal electronic atom characterised by possible energies 0 and hν, but an atom populated by subatomic bosons (such as pions) and characterised by multiple occupancy of quantum states and possible energies nhν (n = 0;1;2; ...). We show how Planck's derivation can be varied to accommodate electronic atoms. A corollary to the atomistic interpretation is that Planck's derivation can no longer be construed as support for the postulate that material oscillating entities can have only those energies that are multiples of hν. Copyright (2000) CSIRO Australia

  2. Optimal kernel shape and bandwidth for atomistic support of continuum stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulz, Manfred H; Moran, Sean J

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of atomistic scale interactions via molecular dynamics simulations has recently found favour for multiscale modelling within engineering. The estimation of stress at a continuum point on the atomistic scale requires a pre-defined kernel function. This kernel function derives the stress at a continuum point by averaging the contribution from atoms within a region surrounding the continuum point. This averaging volume, and therefore the associated stress at a continuum point, is highly dependent on the bandwidth and shape of the kernel. In this paper we propose an effective and entirely data-driven strategy for simultaneously computing the optimal shape and bandwidth for the kernel. We thoroughly evaluate our proposed approach on copper using three classical elasticity problems. Our evaluation yields three key findings: firstly, our technique can provide a physically meaningful estimation of kernel bandwidth; secondly, we show that a uniform kernel is preferred, thereby justifying the default selection of this kernel shape in future work; and thirdly, we can reliably estimate both of these attributes in a data-driven manner, obtaining values that lead to an accurate estimation of the stress at a continuum point. (paper)

  3. Mechanical properties of silicon in subsurface damage layer from nano-grinding studied by atomistic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin silicon wafer is highly demanded by semi-conductor industry. During wafer thinning process, the grinding technology will inevitably induce damage to the surface and subsurface of silicon wafer. To understand the mechanism of subsurface damage (SSD layer formation and mechanical properties of SSD layer, atomistic simulation is the effective tool to perform the study, since the SSD layer is in the scale of nanometer and hardly to be separated from underneath undamaged silicon. This paper is devoted to understand the formation of SSD layer, and the difference between mechanical properties of damaged silicon in SSD layer and ideal silicon. With the atomistic model, the nano-grinding process could be performed between a silicon workpiece and diamond tool under different grinding speed. To reach a thinnest SSD layer, nano-grinding speed will be optimized in the range of 50-400 m/s. Mechanical properties of six damaged silicon workpieces with different depths of cut will be studied. The SSD layer from each workpiece will be isolated, and a quasi-static tensile test is simulated to perform on the isolated SSD layer. The obtained stress-strain curve is an illustration of overall mechanical properties of SSD layer. By comparing the stress-strain curves of damaged silicon and ideal silicon, a degradation of Young’s modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and strain at fracture is observed.

  4. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  5. Airline Maintenance Manpower Optimization from the De Novo Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, James J. H.; Tzeng, Gwo-Hshiung

    Human resource management (HRM) is an important issue for today’s competitive airline marketing. In this paper, we discuss a multi-objective model designed from the De Novo perspective to help airlines optimize their maintenance manpower portfolio. The effectiveness of the model and solution algorithm is demonstrated in an empirical study of the optimization of the human resources needed for airline line maintenance. Both De Novo and traditional multiple objective programming (MOP) methods are analyzed. A comparison of the results with those of traditional MOP indicates that the proposed model and solution algorithm does provide better performance and an improved human resource portfolio.

  6. Persistent hyperthyroidism and de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wei Lin; Loh, Wann Jia; Lee, Lianne Ai Ling; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient with Graves' disease who remained persistently hyperthyroid after a total thyroidectomy and also developed de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy 5 months after surgery. She was subsequently found to have a mature cystic teratoma containing struma ovarii after undergoing a total hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy for an incidental ovarian lesion. It is important to investigate for other causes of primary hyperthyroidism when thyrotoxicosis persists after total thyroidectomy.TSH receptor antibody may persist after total thyroidectomy and may potentially contribute to the development of de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  7. Demanda dos principais metais e novos materiais : analise de tendencias

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson Trigueiro de Sousa

    1990-01-01

    Resumo: Neste trabalho são analisadas algumas tendências na área de novos materiais na tentativa de obter um melhor entendimento das repercussões das atuais inovações tecnológicas para o setor mineral. Inicialmente são revisados os principais estudos sobre as mudanças ocorridas por volta de 1972/74 no comportamento da demanda dos metais mais importantes. Entre as possíveis causas, está o progresso técnico, que tornou possível o surgimento de novos materiais e o aperfeiçoamento de outros em us...

  8. Atomistic simulation of the premelting of iron and aluminum : Implications for high-pressure melting-curve measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starikov, Sergey V.; Stegailov, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    Using atomistic simulations we show the importance of the surface premelting phenomenon for the melting-curve measurements at high pressures. The model under consideration mimics the experimental conditions deployed for melting studies with diamond-anvil cells. The iron is considered in this work

  9. Fully Atomistic Understanding of the Electronic and Optical Properties of a Prototypical Doped Charge-Transfer Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brivio, Gian Paolo; Baby, Anu; Gruenewald, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The current study generates profound atomistic insights into doping-induced changes of the optical and electronic properties of the prototypical PTCDA/Ag(111) interface. For doping K atoms are used, as KxPTCDA/Ag(111) has the distinct advantage of forming well-defined stoichiometric phases...

  10. Model-Based GUI Testing Using Uppaal at Novo Nordisk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    H. Hjort, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Jacob Illum; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2009-01-01

    This paper details a collaboration between Aalborg University and Novo Nordiskin developing an automatic model-based test generation tool for system testing of the graphical user interface of a medical device on an embedded platform. The tool takes as input an UML Statemachine model and generates...

  11. Engineering and introduction of de novo disulphide bridges in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The engineeringof de novo disulphide bridges has been explored as a means to increase the thermal stability of enzymes in the rationalmethod of protein engineering. In this study, Disulphide by Design software, homology modelling and moleculardynamics simulations were used to select appropriate amino acid pairs for ...

  12. De novo synthesis of milk triglycerides in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammary gland (MG) de novo lipogenesis contributes significantly to milk fat in animals but little is known in humans. Objective: To test the hypothesis that the incorporation of 13C carbons from [U-13C]glucose into fatty acids (FA) and glycerol in triglycerides (TG) will be greater: 1) in milk tha...

  13. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  14. Foldability of a Natural De Novo Evolved Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungard, Dixie; Copple, Jacob S; Yan, Jing; Chhun, Jimmy J; Kumirov, Vlad K; Foy, Scott G; Masel, Joanna; Wysocki, Vicki H; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2017-11-07

    The de novo evolution of protein-coding genes from noncoding DNA is emerging as a source of molecular innovation in biology. Studies of random sequence libraries, however, suggest that young de novo proteins will not fold into compact, specific structures typical of native globular proteins. Here we show that Bsc4, a functional, natural de novo protein encoded by a gene that evolved recently from noncoding DNA in the yeast S. cerevisiae, folds to a partially specific three-dimensional structure. Bsc4 forms soluble, compact oligomers with high β sheet content and a hydrophobic core, and undergoes cooperative, reversible denaturation. Bsc4 lacks a specific quaternary state, however, existing instead as a continuous distribution of oligomer sizes, and binds dyes indicative of amyloid oligomers or molten globules. The combination of native-like and non-native-like properties suggests a rudimentary fold that could potentially act as a functional intermediate in the emergence of new folded proteins de novo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Towards accurate de novo assembly for genomes with repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucur, Doina

    2017-01-01

    De novo genome assemblers designed for short k-mer length or using short raw reads are unlikely to recover complex features of the underlying genome, such as repeats hundreds of bases long. We implement a stochastic machine-learning method which obtains accurate assemblies with repeats and

  16. On the performance of de novo pathway enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batra, Richa; Alcaraz, Nicolas; Gitzhofer, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    De novo pathway enrichment is a powerful approach to discover previously uncharacterized molecular mechanisms in addition to already known pathways. To achieve this, condition-specific functional modules are extracted from large interaction networks. Here, we give an overview of the state...

  17. De Novo Coding Variants Are Strongly Associated with Tourette Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willsey, A Jeremy; Fernandez, Thomas V; Yu, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) and de novo variant detection have proven a powerful approach to gene discovery in complex neurodevelopmental disorders. We have completed WES of 325 Tourette disorder trios from the Tourette International Collaborative Genetics cohort and a replication sample of 186 ...

  18. Illumina-based de novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, we used Illumina HiSeq technology to perform de novo assembly of heart and musk gland transcriptomes from the Chinese forest musk deer. A total of 239,383 transcripts and 176,450 unigenes were obtained, of which 37,329 unigenes were matched to known sequences in the NCBI nonredundant ...

  19. De novo structural modeling and computational sequence analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different bioinformatics tools and machine learning techniques were used for protein structural classification. De novo protein modeling was performed by using I-TASSER server. The final model obtained was accessed by PROCHECK and DFIRE2, which confirmed that the final model is reliable. Until complete biochemical ...

  20. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  1. Particulated articular cartilage: CAIS and DeNovo NT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Jack; Cole, Brian J; Sherman, Seth; Karas, Vasili

    2012-03-01

    Cartilage Autograft Implantation System (CAIS; DePuy/Mitek, Raynham, MA) and DeNovo Natural Tissue (NT; ISTO, St. Louis, MO) are novel treatment options for focal articular cartilage defects in the knee. These methods involve the implantation of particulated articular cartilage from either autograft or juvenile allograft donor, respectively. In the laboratory and in animal models, both CAIS and DeNovo NT have demonstrated the ability of the transplanted cartilage cells to "escape" from the extracellular matrix, migrate, multiply, and form a new hyaline-like cartilage tissue matrix that integrates with the surrounding host tissue. In clinical practice, the technique for both CAIS and DeNovo NT is straightforward, requiring only a single surgery to affect cartilage repair. Clinical experience is limited, with short-term studies demonstrating both procedures to be safe, feasible, and effective, with improvements in subjective patient scores, and with magnetic resonance imaging evidence of good defect fill. While these treatment options appear promising, prospective randomized controlled studies are necessary to refine the indications and contraindications for both CAIS and DeNovo NT.

  2. Finite element analysis of an atomistically derived cohesive model for brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, J T; McDowell, D L; Zimmerman, J A; Jones, R E; Zhou, X W

    2011-01-01

    In order to apply information from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in problems governed by engineering length and time scales, a coarse graining methodology must be used. In previous work by Zhou et al (2009 Acta Mater. 57 4671–86), a traction-separation cohesive model was developed using results from MD simulations with atomistic-to-continuum measures of stress and displacement. Here, we implement this cohesive model within a combined finite element/cohesive surface element framework (referred to as a finite element approach or FEA), and examine the ability for the atomistically informed FEA to directly reproduce results from MD. We find that FEA shows close agreement of both stress and crack opening displacement profiles at the cohesive interface, although some differences do exist that can be attributed to the stochastic nature of finite temperature MD. The FEA methodology is then used to study slower loading rates that are computationally expensive for MD. We find that the crack growth process initially exhibits a rate-independent relationship between crack length and boundary displacement, followed by a rate-dependent regime where, at a given amount of boundary displacement, a lower applied strain rate produces a longer crack length. Our method is also extended to larger length scales by simulating a compact tension fracture-mechanics specimen with sub-micrometer dimensions. Such a simulation shows a computational speedup of approximately four orders of magnitude over conventional atomistic simulation, while exhibiting the expected fracture-mechanics response. Finally, differences between FEA and MD are explored with respect to ensemble and temperature effects in MD, and their impact on the cohesive model and crack growth behavior. These results enable us to make several recommendations to improve the methodology used to derive cohesive laws from MD simulations. In light of this work, which has critical implications for efforts to derive continuum laws

  3. Genome-wide patterns and properties of de novo mutations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francioli, Laurent C.; Polak, Paz P.; Koren, Amnon; Menelaou, Androniki; Chun, Sung; Renkens, Ivo; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Swertz, Morris; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gertjan; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor; Arndt, Peter F.; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    Mutations create variation in the population, fuel evolution and cause genetic diseases. Current knowledge about de novo mutations is incomplete and mostly indirect(1-10). Here we analyze 11,020 de novo mutations from the whole genomes of 250 families. We show that de novo mutations in the offspring

  4. Genome-wide patterns and properties of de novo mutations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francioli, L.C.; Polak, P.P.; Koren, A.; Menelaou, A.; Chun, S.; Renkens, I.; van Duijn, C.M.; Swertz, M.A.; Wijmenga, C.; van Ommen, G.J.; Slagboom, P.E.; Boomsma, D.I.; Ye, K.; Guryev, V.; Arndt, P.F.; Kloosterman, W.P.; Bakker, P.I.W.; Sunyaev, S.R.; Dijk, F.; Neerincx, P.B.T.; Pulit, S.L.; Deelen, P.; Elbers, C.C.; Palamara, P.F.; Pe'er, I.; Abdellaoui, A.; van Oven, M.; Vermaat, M.; Li, M.; Laros, J.F.J.; Stoneking, M.; de Knijff, P.; Kayser, M.; Veldink, J.H.; Van den Berg, L.H.; Byelas, H.; den Dunnen, J.T.; Dijkstra, M.; Amin, N.; van der Velde, K.J.; Hottenga, J.J.; van Setten, J.; van Leeuwen, E.M.; Kanterakis, A.; Kattenberg, V.M.; Karssen, L.C.; van Schaik, B.D.C.; Bot, J.; Nijman, I.J.; van Enckevort, D.; Mei, H.; Koval, V.; Estrada, K.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Lameijer, E.W.; Moed, M.H.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Handsaker, R.E.; McCarroll, S.A.; Vuzman, D.; Sohail, M.; Hormozdiari, F.; Marschall, T.; Schönhuth, A.; Beekman, M.; de Craen, A.J.; Suchiman, H.E.D.; Hofman, A.; Oostra, B.; Isaacs, A.; Rivadeneira, F.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Willemsen, G.; Platteel, M.; Pitts, S.J.; Potluri, S.; Sundar, P.; Cox, D.R.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Du, Y.; Chen, R.; Cao, H.; Li, N.; Cao, S.; Wang, J.; Bovenberg, J.A.; Brandsma, M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations create variation in the population, fuel evolution and cause genetic diseases. Current knowledge about de novo mutations is incomplete and mostly indirect. Here we analyze 11,020 de novo mutations from the whole genomes of 250 families. We show that de novo mutations in the offspring of

  5. An atomistic analysis of the interface mobility in a massive transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, C.; Sommer, F.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    A new multi-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method has been used for an atomistic study on the interpretation of the interface mobility parameter for a massive face-centred cubic (fcc) to body-centred cubic (bcc) transformation in a single element system. For lateral growth of bcc in a system with an fcc(111)//bcc(110) and fcc[112-bar ]//bcc[001-bar ] interface orientation the overall activation energy for the interface mobility parameter is governed by energetically unfavourable atomic jumps. The atoms on the fcc lattice often cannot jump directly to bcc lattice sites because neighbouring atoms block the empty bcc sites. By single unfavourable jumps and by groups of unfavourable jumps a path from fcc to bcc is created. The necessity of these unfavourable jumps leads to an overall activation energy considerably larger than the activation energy barrier for a single atomic jump

  6. An atomistic vision of the Mass Action Law: Prediction of carbon/oxygen defects in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenet, G.; Timerkaeva, D.; Caliste, D.; Pochet, P. [CEA, INAC-SP2M, Atomistic Simulation Laboratory, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, L-Sim, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Sgourou, E. N.; Londos, C. A. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece)

    2015-09-28

    We introduce an atomistic description of the kinetic Mass Action Law to predict concentrations of defects and complexes. We demonstrate in this paper that this approach accurately predicts carbon/oxygen related defect concentrations in silicon upon annealing. The model requires binding and migration energies of the impurities and complexes, here obtained from density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Vacancy-oxygen complex kinetics are studied as a model system during both isochronal and isothermal annealing. Results are in good agreement with experimental data, confirming the success of the methodology. More importantly, it gives access to the sequence of chain reactions by which oxygen and carbon related complexes are created in silicon. Beside the case of silicon, the understanding of such intricate reactions is a key to develop point defect engineering strategies to control defects and thus semiconductors properties.

  7. Theoretical modeling of zircon's crystal morphology according to data of atomistic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromalova, Natalia; Nikishaeva, Nadezhda; Eremin, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    Zircon is an essential mineral that is used in the U-Pb dating. Moreover, zircon is highly resistant to radioactive exposure. It is of great interest in solving both fundamental and applied problems associated with the isolation of high-level radioactive waste. There is significant progress in forecasting of the most energetically favorable crystal structures at the present time. Unfortunately, the theoretical forecast of crystal morphology at high technological level is under-explored nowadays, though the estimation of crystal equilibrium habit is extremely important in studying the physical and chemical properties of new materials. For the first time, the thesis about relation of the equilibrium shape of a crystal with its crystal structure was put forward in the works by O.Brave. According to it, the idealized habit is determined in the simplest case by a correspondence with the reticular densities Rhkl of individual faces. This approach, along with all subsequent corrections, does not take into account the nature of atoms and the specific features of the chemical bond in crystals. The atomistic calculations of crystal surfaces are commonly performed using the energetic characteristics of faces, namely, the surface energy (Esurf), which is a measure of the thermodynamic stability of the crystal face. The stable crystal faces are characterized by small positive values of Esurf. As we know from our previous research (Gromalova et al.,2015) one of the constitutive factors affecting the value of the surface energy in calculations is a choice of potentials model. In this regard, we studied several sets of parameters of atomistic interatomic potentials optimized previously. As the first test model («Zircon 1») were used sets of interatomic potentials of interaction Zr-O, Si-O and O-O in the form of Buckingham potentials. To improve playback properties of zircon additionally used Morse potential for a couple of Zr-Si, as well as the three-particle angular harmonic

  8. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability

  9. Permutation invariant potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions using atomistic neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Brian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Li, Jun [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 401331 (China); Jiang, Bin [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-06-14

    The applicability and accuracy of the Behler-Parrinello atomistic neural network method for fitting reactive potential energy surfaces is critically examined in three systems, H + H{sub 2} → H{sub 2} + H, H + H{sub 2}O → H{sub 2} + OH, and H + CH{sub 4} → H{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}. A pragmatic Monte Carlo method is proposed to make efficient choice of the atom-centered mapping functions. The accuracy of the potential energy surfaces is not only tested by fitting errors but also validated by direct comparison in dynamically important regions and by quantum scattering calculations. Our results suggest this method is both accurate and efficient in representing multidimensional potential energy surfaces even when dissociation continua are involved.

  10. Permutation invariant potential energy surfaces for polyatomic reactions using atomistic neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, Brian; Zhao, Bin; Guo, Hua; Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The applicability and accuracy of the Behler-Parrinello atomistic neural network method for fitting reactive potential energy surfaces is critically examined in three systems, H + H 2 → H 2 + H, H + H 2 O → H 2 + OH, and H + CH 4 → H 2 + CH 3 . A pragmatic Monte Carlo method is proposed to make efficient choice of the atom-centered mapping functions. The accuracy of the potential energy surfaces is not only tested by fitting errors but also validated by direct comparison in dynamically important regions and by quantum scattering calculations. Our results suggest this method is both accurate and efficient in representing multidimensional potential energy surfaces even when dissociation continua are involved.

  11. Atomistic studies of nucleation of He clusters and bubbles in bcc iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Deng, H.Q.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Hu, S.Y.; Li, Y.L.; Zu, X.T.

    2013-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the nucleation of He clusters and bubbles in bcc iron at 800 K have been carried out using the newly developed Fe–Fe interatomic potential, along with Ackland potential for the Fe–Fe interactions. Microstructure changes were analyzed in detail. We found that a He cluster with four He atoms is able to push out an iron interstitial from the cluster, creating a Frenkel pair. Small He clusters and self-interstitial atom (SIA) can migrate in the matrix, but He-vacancy (He-V) clusters are immobile. Most SIAs form clusters, and only the dislocation loops with a Burgers vector of b = 1/2 appear in the simulations. SIA clusters (or loops) are attached to He-V clusters for He implantation up to 1372 appm, while the He-V cluster–loop complexes with more than one He-V cluster are formed at the He concentration of 2057 appm and larger

  12. Computer code for the atomistic simulation of lattice defects and dynamics. [COMENT code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffgens, J.O.; Graves, N.J.; Oster, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    This document has been prepared to satisfy the need for a detailed, up-to-date description of a computer code that can be used to simulate phenomena on an atomistic level. COMENT was written in FORTRAN IV and COMPASS (CDC assembly language) to solve the classical equations of motion for a large number of atoms interacting according to a given force law, and to perform the desired ancillary analysis of the resulting data. COMENT is a dual-purpose intended to describe static defect configurations as well as the detailed motion of atoms in a crystal lattice. It can be used to simulate the effect of temperature, impurities, and pre-existing defects on radiation-induced defect production mechanisms, defect migration, and defect stability.

  13. Atomistic Force Field for Pyridinium-Based Ionic Liquids: Reliable Transport Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voroshylova, I. V.; Chaban, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable force field (FF) is a central issue in successful prediction of physical chemical properties via computer simulations. This work introduces refined FF parameters for six popular ionic liquids (ILs) of the pyridinium family (butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)......Reliable force field (FF) is a central issue in successful prediction of physical chemical properties via computer simulations. This work introduces refined FF parameters for six popular ionic liquids (ILs) of the pyridinium family (butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate, bis......(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, dicyanamide, hexafluorophosphate, triflate, chloride). We elaborate a systematic procedure, which allows accounting for specific cationanion interactions in the liquid phase. Once these interactions are described accurately, all experimentally determined transport properties can be reproduced. We prove...... and elevated temperature. The developed atomistic models provide a systematic refinement upon the well-known Canongia LopesPadua (CL&P) FF. Together with the original CL&P parameters the present models foster a computational investigation of ionic liquids....

  14. Grain-Boundary Resistance in Copper Interconnects: From an Atomistic Model to a Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Daniel; Wilson, Evan; Jiang, Zhengping; Valencia-Zapata, Gustavo A.; Wang, Kuang-Chung; Klimeck, Gerhard; Povolotskyi, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Orientation effects on the specific resistance of copper grain boundaries are studied systematically with two different atomistic tight-binding methods. A methodology is developed to model the specific resistance of grain boundaries in the ballistic limit using the embedded atom model, tight- binding methods, and nonequilibrium Green's functions. The methodology is validated against first-principles calculations for thin films with a single coincident grain boundary, with 6.4% deviation in the specific resistance. A statistical ensemble of 600 large, random structures with grains is studied. For structures with three grains, it is found that the distribution of specific resistances is close to normal. Finally, a compact model for grain-boundary-specific resistance is constructed based on a neural network.

  15. Atomistic computer simulations of FePt nanoparticles. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, M.

    2007-12-20

    In the present dissertation, a hierarchical multiscale approach for modeling FePt nanoparticles by atomistic computer simulations is developed. By describing the interatomic interactions on different levels of sophistication, various time and length scales can be accessed. Methods range from static quantum-mechanic total-energy calculations of small periodic systems to simulations of whole particles over an extended time by using simple lattice Hamiltonians. By employing these methods, the energetic and thermodynamic stability of non-crystalline multiply twinned FePt nanoparticles is investigated. Subsequently, the thermodynamics of the order-disorder transition in FePt nanoparticles is analyzed, including the influence of particle size, composition and modified surface energies by different chemical surroundings. In order to identify processes that reduce or enhance the rate of transformation from the disordered to the ordered state, the kinetics of the ordering transition in FePt nanoparticles is finally investigated by assessing the contributions of surface and volume diffusion. (orig.)

  16. Atomistic spin dynamics simulations on Mn-doped GaAs and CuMn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellsvik, Johan, E-mail: johan.hellsvik@fysik.uu.s [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Uppsala University, Box 530, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic dynamical behavior of two random alloys have been investigated in atomistic spin dynamics (ASD) simulations. For both materials, magnetic exchange parameters calculated with first principles electronic structure methods were used. From experiments it is well known that CuMn is a highly frustrated magnetic system and a good manifestation of a Heisenberg spin glass. In our ASD simulations the behavior of the autocorrelation function indicate spin glass behavior. The diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) Mn-doped GaAs is engineered with hopes of high enough Curie temperatures to operate in spintronic devices. Impurities such as As antisites and Mn interstitials change the exhange couplings from being mainly ferromagnetic to also have antiferromagnetic components. We explore how the resulting frustration affects the magnetization dynamics for a varying rate of As antisites.

  17. Atomistic modeling of the structural components of the blood-brain barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhova, O. E.; Grishina, O. A.; Slepchenkov, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier, which is a barrage system between the brain and blood vessels, plays a key role in the "isolation" of the brain of unnecessary information, and reduce the "noise" in the interneuron communication. It is known that the barrier function of the BBB strictly depends on the initial state of the organism and changes significantly with age and, especially in developing the "vascular accidents". Disclosure mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function will develop new ways to deliver neurotrophic drugs to the brain in the newborn. The aim of this work is the construction of atomistic models of structural components of the blood-brain barrier to reveal the mechanisms of regulation of the barrier function.

  18. Study of the embedded atom method of atomistic calculations for metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    Two projects were completed in the past year. The stability of a series of binary alloys was calculated using the embedded-atom method (EAM) with an analytic form for two-body potentials derived previously. Both disordered alloys and intermetallic compounds with the L1 0 and L1 2 structures were studied. The calculated heats of solution of alloys of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, and Pt were satisfactory, while results for alloys containing Pd were too high. Atomistic calculations using the EAM were also carried out for point defects in hcp metals. By comparison with results in the literature, it was found that many body effects from the EAM significantly alter predicted physical properties of hcp metals. For example, the EAM calculations yield anisotropic vacancy diffusion with greater vacancy mobility in the basal plane, and imply that diffusion will start at a lower fraction of the melting temperature

  19. Atomistic studies of cation transport in tetragonal ZrO2 during zirconium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is a significant degradation mechanism of these alloys. During corrosion, the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously, it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cations is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO 2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO 2 . The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration of Zr interstitials at a grain boundary is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  20. Atomistic study of lipid membranes containing chloroform: looking for a lipid-mediated mechanism of anesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Reigada

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of general anesthesia is still a controversial issue. Direct effect by linking of anesthetics to proteins and indirect action on the lipid membrane properties are the two hypotheses in conflict. Atomistic simulations of different lipid membranes subjected to the effect of small volatile organohalogen compounds are used to explore plausible lipid-mediated mechanisms. Simulations of homogeneous membranes reveal that electrostatic potential and lateral pressure transversal profiles are affected differently by chloroform (anesthetic and carbon tetrachloride (non-anesthetic. Simulations of structured membranes that combine ordered and disordered regions show that chloroform molecules accumulate preferentially in highly disordered lipid domains, suggesting that the combination of both lateral and transversal partitioning of chloroform in the cell membrane could be responsible of its anesthetic action.

  1. Atomistic modeling of defect evolution in Si for amorphizing and subamorphizing implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Pedro; Pelaz, Lourdes; Marques, Luis A.; Santos, Ivan; Aboy, Maria; Barbolla, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial regrowth of pre-amorphizing implants has received significant attention as a method to achieve high dopant activation with minimal diffusion at low implant temperatures and suppress channelling. Therefore, a good understanding of the amorphization and regrowth mechanisms is required in process simulators. We present an atomistic amorphization and recrystallization model that uses the interstitial-vacancy (I-V) pair as a building block to describe the amorphous phase. I-V pairs are locally characterized by the number of neighbouring I-V pairs. This feature captures the damage generation and the dynamical annealing during ion implantation, and also explains the annealing behaviour of amorphous layers and amorphous pockets

  2. Phonon dispersion and thermal conductivity of nanocrystal superlattices using three-dimensional atomistic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanjani, Mehdi B.; Lukes, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    A computational study of thermal conductivity and phonon dispersion of gold nanocrystal superlattices is presented. Phonon dispersion curves, reported here for the first time from combined molecular dynamics and lattice dynamics calculations, show multiple phononic band gaps and consist of many more dispersion branches than simple atomic crystals. Fully atomistic three dimensional molecular dynamics calculations of thermal conductivity using the Green Kubo method are also performed for the first time on these materials. Thermal conductivity is observed to increase for increasing nanocrystal core size and decrease for increasing surface ligand density. Our calculations predict values in the range 0.1–1 W/m K that are consistent with reported experimental results

  3. Modelling phase separation in Fe-Cr system using different atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castin, N.; Bonny, G.; Terentyev, D.; Lavrentiev, M.Yu.; Nguyen-Manh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations were performed to study α-α' phase separation in Fe-Cr alloys. Two different energy models and two approaches to estimate the local vacancy migration barriers were used. The energy models considered are a two-band model Fe-Cr potential and a cluster expansion, both fitted to ab initio data. The classical Kang-Weinberg decomposition, based on the total energy change of the system, and an Artificial Neural Network (ANN), employed as a regression tool were used to predict the local vacancy migration barriers 'on the fly'. The results are compared with experimental thermal annealing data and differences between the applied AKMC approaches are discussed. The ability of the ANN regression method to accurately predict migration barriers not present in the training list is also addressed by performing cross-check calculations using the nudged elastic band method.

  4. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aijanen, T.; Koivuniemi, A.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides) and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity...... and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics...... simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site...

  5. Atomistic modeling of L10 FePt: path to HAMR 5Tb/in2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tianran; Benakli, Mourad; Rea, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) is a promising approach for increasing the storage density of hard disk drives. To increase data density, information must be written in small grains, which requires materials with high anisotropy energy such as L10 FePt. On the other hand, high anisotropy implies high coercivity, making it difficult to write the data with existing recording heads. This issue can be overcome by the technique of HAMR, where a laser is used to heat the recording medium to reduce its coercivity while retaining good thermal stability at room temperature due to the large anisotropy energy. One of the keys to the success of HAMR is the precise control of writing process. In this talk, I will propose a Monte Carlo simulation, based on an atomistic model, that would allow us to study the magnetic properties of L10 FePt and dynamics of spin reversal for the writing process in HAMR.

  6. Long-time atomistic simulations with the Parallel Replica Dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Danny

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) -- the numerical integration of atomistic equations of motion -- is a workhorse of computational materials science. Indeed, MD can in principle be used to obtain any thermodynamic or kinetic quantity, without introducing any approximation or assumptions beyond the adequacy of the interaction potential. It is therefore an extremely powerful and flexible tool to study materials with atomistic spatio-temporal resolution. These enviable qualities however come at a steep computational price, hence limiting the system sizes and simulation times that can be achieved in practice. While the size limitation can be efficiently addressed with massively parallel implementations of MD based on spatial decomposition strategies, allowing for the simulation of trillions of atoms, the same approach usually cannot extend the timescales much beyond microseconds. In this article, we discuss an alternative parallel-in-time approach, the Parallel Replica Dynamics (ParRep) method, that aims at addressing the timescale limitation of MD for systems that evolve through rare state-to-state transitions. We review the formal underpinnings of the method and demonstrate that it can provide arbitrarily accurate results for any definition of the states. When an adequate definition of the states is available, ParRep can simulate trajectories with a parallel speedup approaching the number of replicas used. We demonstrate the usefulness of ParRep by presenting different examples of materials simulations where access to long timescales was essential to access the physical regime of interest and discuss practical considerations that must be addressed to carry out these simulations. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  7. Atomic force microscope adhesion measurements and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations at different humidities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppä, Jeremias; Sairanen, Hannu; Korpelainen, Virpi; Husu, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Lassila, Antti; Reischl, Bernhard; Raiteri, Paolo; Rohl, Andrew L; Nordlund, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Due to their operation principle atomic force microscopes (AFMs) are sensitive to all factors affecting the detected force between the probe and the sample. Relative humidity is an important and often neglected—both in experiments and simulations—factor in the interaction force between AFM probe and sample in air. This paper describes the humidity control system designed and built for the interferometrically traceable metrology AFM (IT-MAFM) at VTT MIKES. The humidity control is based on circulating the air of the AFM enclosure via dryer and humidifier paths with adjustable flow and mixing ratio of dry and humid air. The design humidity range of the system is 20–60 %rh. Force–distance adhesion studies at humidity levels between 25 %rh and 53 %rh are presented and compared to an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The uncertainty level of the thermal noise method implementation used for force constant calibration of the AFM cantilevers is 10 %, being the dominant component of the interaction force measurement uncertainty. Comparing the simulation and the experiment, the primary uncertainties are related to the nominally 7 nm radius and shape of measurement probe apex, possible wear and contamination, and the atomistic simulation technique details. The interaction forces are of the same order of magnitude in simulation and measurement (5 nN). An elongation of a few nanometres of the water meniscus between probe tip and sample, before its rupture, is seen in simulation upon retraction of the tip in higher humidity. This behaviour is also supported by the presented experimental measurement data but the data is insufficient to conclusively verify the quantitative meniscus elongation. (paper)

  8. Modelling of radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe alloys at the atomistic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochaud, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, under irradiation internal structures are subject of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking which is influenced by radiation induced segregation (RIS). In this work RIS of 316 stainless steels is modelled considering a model ternary Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy. For this purpose we have built an Fe-Ni-Cr pair interaction model to simulate RIS at the atomistic level using an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The pair interactions have been deduced from density functional theory (DFT) data available in the pure fcc systems but also from DFT calculations we have performed in the Fe-10Ni-20Cr target alloy. Point defect formation energies were calculated and found to depend strongly on the local environment of the defect. As a consequence, a rather good estimation of these energies can be obtained from the knowledge of the number and respective positions of the Ni and Cr atoms in the vicinity of the defect. This work shows that a model based only on interaction parameters between elements positioned in perfect lattice sites (solute atoms and vacancy) cannot capture alone both the thermodynamic and the kinetic aspect of RIS. A more accurate of estimating the barriers encountered by the diffusing species is required than the one used in our model, which has to depend on the saddle point environment. This study therefore shows thus the need to estimate point defect migration energies using the DFT approach to calibrate a model that can be used in the framework of atomic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We also found that the reproduction by our pair interaction model of DFT data for the self-interstitial atoms was found to be incompatible with the modelling of RIS under electron irradiation. (author)

  9. An atomistic methodology of energy release rate for graphene at nanoscale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Lee, James D.; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-01-01

    Graphene is a single layer of carbon atoms packed into a honeycomb architecture, serving as a fundamental building block for electric devices. Understanding the fracture mechanism of graphene under various conditions is crucial for tailoring the electrical and mechanical properties of graphene-based devices at atomic scale. Although most of the fracture mechanics concepts, such as stress intensity factors, are not applicable in molecular dynamics simulation, energy release rate still remains to be a feasible and crucial physical quantity to characterize the fracture mechanical property of materials at nanoscale. This work introduces an atomistic simulation methodology, based on the energy release rate, as a tool to unveil the fracture mechanism of graphene at nanoscale. This methodology can be easily extended to any atomistic material system. We have investigated both opening mode and mixed mode at different temperatures. Simulation results show that the critical energy release rate of graphene is independent of initial crack length at low temperature. Graphene with inclined pre-crack possesses higher fracture strength and fracture deformation but smaller critical energy release rate compared with the graphene with vertical pre-crack. Owing to its anisotropy, graphene with armchair chirality always has greater critical energy release rate than graphene with zigzag chirality. The increase of temperature leads to the reduction of fracture strength, fracture deformation, and the critical energy release rate of graphene. Also, higher temperature brings higher randomness of energy release rate of graphene under a variety of predefined crack lengths. The energy release rate is independent of the strain rate as long as the strain rate is small enough

  10. Melhoramento do cafeeiro: IV - Café Mundo Novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carvalho

    1952-06-01

    Full Text Available Em um conjunto de cafeeiros existentes em Mundo Novo, hoje Urupês, na região Araraquarense do Estado de São Paulo, foram feitas seleções de vários cafeeiros baseando-se no seu aspecto vegetativo, na produção existente na época da seleção e na provável produção do ano seguinte. Estudou-se a origem da plantação inicial desse café, tanto em Urupês como em Jaú, chegando-se à conclusão de que é provavelmente originário desta última localidade. Progênies do café "Mundo Novo", anteriormente conhecido por "Sumatra" e derivado de plantas selecionadas em Urupês e Jaú, acham-se em estudo em seis localidades do Estado : Campinas, Ribeirão Prêto, Pindorama, Mococa, Jaú e Monte Alegre do Sul. No presente trabalho são apenas aproveitados dados referentes à variabilidade morfológica e característicos da produção das progênies dos primeiros cafeeiros selecionados em Urupês e estudados em Campinas, Jaú, Pindorama e Mococa. Em tôdas as localidades, observou-se variação nos caracteres morfológicos das progênies, verificando-se a ocorrência de plantas quase improdutivas. A maioria das progênies, no entanto, se caracteriza por acentuado vigor vegetativo. Foram estudadas as produções totais das progénies e das plantas, no período 1946-1951, notando-se que algumas progénies se salientaram pela elevada produção em tôdas as localidades. Os tipos de sementes "moca", "concha" e "chato" foram determinados em amostras de tôdas as plantas, por um período de três anos, notando-se que a variação ocorrida é da mesma ordem que a encontrada em outros cafeeiros em seleção. Procurou-se eliminar, pela seleção, cafeeiros com elevada produção de frutos sem sementes em uma ou duas lojas, característico êsse que parece ser hereditário. Os resultados obtidos de cruzamento entre os melhores cafeeiros "Mundo Novo" de Campinas e plantas da variedade murta, indicaram que esses cafeeiros são do tipo bourbon. Provavelmente

  11. Recurrence risk in de novo structural chromosomal rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Benno; Kotzot, Dieter

    2007-08-01

    According to the textbook of Gardner and Sutherland [2004], the standard on genetic counseling for chromosome abnormalities, the recurrence risk of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosome rearrangements is less than 0.5-2% and takes into account recurrence by chance, gonadal mosaicism, and somatic-gonadal mosaicism. However, these figures are roughly estimated and neither any systematic study nor exact or evidence-based risk calculations are available. To address this question, an extensive literature search was performed and surprisingly only 29 case reports of recurrence of de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements were found. Thirteen of them were with a trisomy 21 due to an i(21q) replacing one normal chromosome 21. In eight of them low-level mosaicism in one of the parents was found either in fibroblasts or in blood or in both. As a consequence of the low number of cases and theoretical considerations (clinical consequences, mechanisms of formation, etc.), the recurrence risk should be reduced to less than 1% for a de novo i(21q) and to even less than 0.3% for all other de novo structural or combined structural and numeric chromosomal rearrangements. As the latter is lower than the commonly accepted risk of approximately 0.3% for indicating an invasive prenatal diagnosis and as the risk of abortion of a healthy fetus after chorionic villous sampling or amniocentesis is higher than approximately 0.5%, invasive prenatal investigation in most cases is not indicated and should only be performed if explicitly asked by the parents subsequent to appropriate genetic counseling. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Novos encontros de anofelíneos em recipientes artificiais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Paulo Forattini

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Assinalam-se novos encontros de anofelíneos em recipientes artificiais. Um deles diz respeito a formas imaturas de Anopheles bellator em criadouros experimentais e outro é concernente ao achado de An. albitarsis l.s., em recipiente abandonado. Tecem-se considerações sobre a pressão seletiva representada pela produção, cada vez maior, de objetos descartáveis.

  13. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stein, Airton Tetelbom [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Grupo Hospitalar Conceição (GHC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Luterana do Brasil (ULBRA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Pellanda, Lucia Campos, E-mail: luciapell.pesquisa@cardiologia.org.br [Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia (IC/FUC), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre (UFCSPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  14. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Andrade Brum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. Objective: To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. Methods: This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Results: Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%, which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. Conclusion: It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality.

  15. Generative Recurrent Networks for De Novo Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anvita; Müller, Alex T; Huisman, Berend J H; Fuchs, Jens A; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2018-01-01

    Generative artificial intelligence models present a fresh approach to chemogenomics and de novo drug design, as they provide researchers with the ability to narrow down their search of the chemical space and focus on regions of interest. We present a method for molecular de novo design that utilizes generative recurrent neural networks (RNN) containing long short-term memory (LSTM) cells. This computational model captured the syntax of molecular representation in terms of SMILES strings with close to perfect accuracy. The learned pattern probabilities can be used for de novo SMILES generation. This molecular design concept eliminates the need for virtual compound library enumeration. By employing transfer learning, we fine-tuned the RNN's predictions for specific molecular targets. This approach enables virtual compound design without requiring secondary or external activity prediction, which could introduce error or unwanted bias. The results obtained advocate this generative RNN-LSTM system for high-impact use cases, such as low-data drug discovery, fragment based molecular design, and hit-to-lead optimization for diverse drug targets. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Infant Mortality in Novo Hamburgo: Associated Factors and Cardiovascular Causes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brum, Camila de Andrade; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2015-01-01

    Infant mortality has decreased in Brazil, but remains high as compared to that of other developing countries. In 2010, the Rio Grande do Sul state had the lowest infant mortality rate in Brazil. However, the municipality of Novo Hamburgo had the highest infant mortality rate in the Porto Alegre metropolitan region. To describe the causes of infant mortality in the municipality of Novo Hamburgo from 2007 to 2010, identifying which causes were related to heart diseases and if they were diagnosed in the prenatal period, and to assess the access to healthcare services. This study assessed infants of the municipality of Novo Hamburgo, who died, and whose data were collected from the infant death investigation records. Of the 157 deaths in that period, 35.3% were reducible through diagnosis and early treatment, 25% were reducible through partnership with other sectors, 19.2% were non-preventable, 11.5% were reducible by means of appropriate pregnancy monitoring, 5.1% were reducible through appropriate delivery care, and 3.8% were ill defined. The major cause of death related to heart disease (13.4%), which was significantly associated with the variables ‘age at death’, ‘gestational age’ and ‘birth weight’. Regarding access to healthcare services, 60.9% of the pregnant women had a maximum of six prenatal visits. It is mandatory to enhance prenatal care and newborn care at hospitals and basic healthcare units to prevent infant mortality

  17. General atomistic approach for modeling metal-semiconductor interfaces using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stradi, Daniele; Martinez, Umberto; Blom, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Metal-semiconductor contacts are a pillar of modern semiconductor technology. Historically, their microscopic understanding has been hampered by the inability of traditional analytical and numerical methods to fully capture the complex physics governing their operating principles. Here we introduce...... an atomistic approach based on density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function, which includes all the relevant ingredients required to model realistic metal-semiconductor interfaces and allows for a direct comparison between theory and experiments via I-Vbias curve simulations. We apply...... interfaces as it neglects electron tunneling, and that finite-size atomistic models have problems in describing these interfaces in the presence of doping due to a poor representation of space-charge effects. Conversely, the present method deals effectively with both issues, thus representing a valid...

  18. An efficient atomistic quantum mechanical simulation on InAs band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Lin-Wang, E-mail: lwwang@lbl.gov [Material Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-03-24

    We have presented a fully atomistic quantum mechanical simulation method on band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) field-effect transistors (FETs). Our simulation approach is based on the linear combination of bulk band method with empirical pseudopotentials, which is an atomist method beyond the effective-mass approximation or k.p perturbation method, and can be used to simulate real-size devices (∼10{sup 5} atoms) efficiently (∼5 h on a few computational cores). Using this approach, we studied the InAs dual-gate BTBT FETs. The I-V characteristics from our approach agree very well with the tight-binding non-equilibrium Green's function results, yet our method costs much less computationally. In addition, we have studied ways to increase the tunneling current and analyzed the effects of different mechanisms for that purpose.

  19. An efficient atomistic quantum mechanical simulation on InAs band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhi; Jiang, Xiang-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2014-01-01

    We have presented a fully atomistic quantum mechanical simulation method on band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) field-effect transistors (FETs). Our simulation approach is based on the linear combination of bulk band method with empirical pseudopotentials, which is an atomist method beyond the effective-mass approximation or k.p perturbation method, and can be used to simulate real-size devices (∼10 5 atoms) efficiently (∼5 h on a few computational cores). Using this approach, we studied the InAs dual-gate BTBT FETs. The I-V characteristics from our approach agree very well with the tight-binding non-equilibrium Green's function results, yet our method costs much less computationally. In addition, we have studied ways to increase the tunneling current and analyzed the effects of different mechanisms for that purpose

  20. ORAC: a molecular dynamics simulation program to explore free energy surfaces in biomolecular systems at the atomistic level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Simone; Signorini, Giorgio Federico; Chelli, Riccardo; Marchi, Massimo; Procacci, Piero

    2010-04-15

    We present the new release of the ORAC engine (Procacci et al., Comput Chem 1997, 18, 1834), a FORTRAN suite to simulate complex biosystems at the atomistic level. The previous release of the ORAC code included multiple time steps integration, smooth particle mesh Ewald method, constant pressure and constant temperature simulations. The present release has been supplemented with the most advanced techniques for enhanced sampling in atomistic systems including replica exchange with solute tempering, metadynamics and steered molecular dynamics. All these computational technologies have been implemented for parallel architectures using the standard MPI communication protocol. ORAC is an open-source program distributed free of charge under the GNU general public license (GPL) at http://www.chim.unifi.it/orac. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Atomistic simulation of the coupled adsorption and unfolding of protein GB1 on the polystyrenes nanoparticle surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, HuiFang; Huang, Bin; Yao, Ge; Kang, WenBin; Gong, Sheng; Pan, Hai; Cao, Yi; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the processes of protein adsorption/desorption on nanoparticles' surfaces is important for the development of new nanotechnology involving biomaterials; however, an atomistic resolution picture for these processes and for the simultaneous protein conformational change is missing. Here, we report the adsorption of protein GB1 on a polystyrene nanoparticle surface using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations. Enabled by metadynamics, we explored the relevant phase space and identified three protein states, each involving both the adsorbed and desorbed modes. We also studied the change of the secondary and tertiary structures of GB1 during adsorption and the dominant interactions between the protein and surface in different adsorption stages. The results we obtained from simulation were found to be more adequate and complete than the previous one. We believe the model presented in this paper, in comparison with the previous ones, is a better theoretical model to understand and explain the experimental results.

  2. A Bayesian framework for adaptive selection, calibration, and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Kathryn, E-mail: kfarrell@ices.utexas.edu; Oden, J. Tinsley, E-mail: oden@ices.utexas.edu; Faghihi, Danial, E-mail: danial@ices.utexas.edu

    2015-08-15

    A general adaptive modeling algorithm for selection and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems is presented. A Bayesian framework is developed to address uncertainties in parameters, data, and model selection. Algorithms for computing output sensitivities to parameter variances, model evidence and posterior model plausibilities for given data, and for computing what are referred to as Occam Categories in reference to a rough measure of model simplicity, make up components of the overall approach. Computational results are provided for representative applications.

  3. A Bayesian framework for adaptive selection, calibration, and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kathryn; Oden, J. Tinsley; Faghihi, Danial

    2015-08-01

    A general adaptive modeling algorithm for selection and validation of coarse-grained models of atomistic systems is presented. A Bayesian framework is developed to address uncertainties in parameters, data, and model selection. Algorithms for computing output sensitivities to parameter variances, model evidence and posterior model plausibilities for given data, and for computing what are referred to as Occam Categories in reference to a rough measure of model simplicity, make up components of the overall approach. Computational results are provided for representative applications.

  4. PF2fit: Polar Fast Fourier Matched Alignment of Atomistic Structures with 3D Electron Microscopy Maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna Bettadapura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There continue to be increasing occurrences of both atomistic structure models in the PDB (possibly reconstructed from X-ray diffraction or NMR data, and 3D reconstructed cryo-electron microscopy (3D EM maps (albeit at coarser resolution of the same or homologous molecule or molecular assembly, deposited in the EMDB. To obtain the best possible structural model of the molecule at the best achievable resolution, and without any missing gaps, one typically aligns (match and fits the atomistic structure model with the 3D EM map. We discuss a new algorithm and generalized framework, named PF(2 fit (Polar Fast Fourier Fitting for the best possible structural alignment of atomistic structures with 3D EM. While PF(2 fit enables only a rigid, six dimensional (6D alignment method, it augments prior work on 6D X-ray structure and 3D EM alignment in multiple ways: Scoring. PF(2 fit includes a new scoring scheme that, in addition to rewarding overlaps between the volumes occupied by the atomistic structure and 3D EM map, rewards overlaps between the volumes complementary to them. We quantitatively demonstrate how this new complementary scoring scheme improves upon existing approaches. PF(2 fit also includes two scoring functions, the non-uniform exterior penalty and the skeleton-secondary structure score, and implements the scattering potential score as an alternative to traditional Gaussian blurring. Search. PF(2 fit utilizes a fast polar Fourier search scheme, whose main advantage is the ability to search over uniformly and adaptively sampled subsets of the space of rigid-body motions. PF(2 fit also implements a new reranking search and scoring methodology that considerably improves alignment metrics in results obtained from the initial search.

  5. Lattice Thermal Conductivity of Ultra High Temperature Ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 from Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murray, Daw S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Atomistic Green-Kubo simulations are performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of the ultra high temperature ceramics ZrB2 and HfB2 for a range of temperatures. Recently developed interatomic potentials are used for these simulations. Heat current correlation functions show rapid oscillations which can be identified with mixed metal-Boron optical phonon modes. Agreement with available experimental data is good.

  6. Assessing the fracture strength of geological and related materials via an atomistically based J-integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. E.; Criscenti, L. J.; Rimsza, J.

    2016-12-01

    Predicting fracture initiation and propagation in low-permeability geomaterials is a critical yet un- solved problem crucial to assessing shale caprocks at carbon dioxide sequestration sites, and controlling fracturing for gas and oil extraction. Experiments indicate that chemical reactions at fluid-geomaterial interfaces play a major role in subcritical crack growth by weakening the material and altering crack nu- cleation and growth rates. Engineering the subsurface fracture environment, however, has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the mechanisms relating chemical environment to mechanical outcome, and a lack of capability directly linking atomistic insight to macroscale observables. We have developed a fundamental atomic-level understanding of the chemical-mechanical mecha- nisms that control subcritical cracks through coarse-graining data from reactive molecular simulations. Previous studies of fracture at the atomic level have typically been limited to producing stress-strain curves, quantifying either the system-level stress or energy at which fracture propagation occurs. As such, these curves are neither characteristic of nor insightful regarding fracture features local to the crack tip. In contrast, configurational forces, such as the J-integral, are specific to the crack in that they measure the energy available to move the crack and truly quantify fracture resistance. By development and use of field estimators consistent with the continuum conservation properties we are able to connect the data produced by atomistic simulation to the continuum-level theory of fracture mechanics and thus inform engineering decisions. In order to trust this connection we have performed theoretical consistency tests and validation with experimental data. Although we have targeted geomaterials, this capability can have direct impact on other unsolved technological problems such as predicting the corrosion and embrittlement of metals and ceramics. Sandia National

  7. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Martin L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Talmage, Mellisa J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McDowell, David L. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); West, Neil [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Gullett, Philip Michael [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Miller, David C. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Spark, Kevin [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Diao, Jiankuai [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Horstemeyer, Mark F. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States); Zimmerman, Jonathan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gall, K. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-10-01

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project

  8. Crystal plasticity model for BCC iron atomistically informed by kinetics of correlated kinkpair nucleation on screw dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sankar; McDowell, David L.; Zhu, Ting

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of dislocation in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is controlled by the thermally activated nucleation of kinks along the dislocation core. By employing a recent interatomic potential and the Nudged Elastic Band method, we predict the atomistic saddle-point state of 1/2 screw dislocation motion in BCC iron that involves the nucleation of correlated kinkpairs and the resulting double superkinks. This unique process leads to a single-humped minimum energy path that governs the one-step activation of a screw dislocation to move into the adjacent {110} Peierls valley, which contrasts with the double-humped energy path and the two-step transition predicted by other interatomic potentials. Based on transition state theory, we use the atomistically computed, stress-dependent kinkpair activation parameters to inform a coarse-grained crystal plasticity flow rule. Our atomistically-informed crystal plasticity model quantitatively predicts the orientation dependent stress-strain behavior of BCC iron single crystals in a manner that is consistent with experimental results. The predicted temperature and strain-rate dependencies of the yield stress agree with experimental results in the 200-350 K temperature regime, and are rationalized by the small activation volumes associated with the kinkpair-mediated motion of screw dislocations.

  9. Atomistic-level non-equilibrium model for chemically reactive systems based on steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Guanchen; Al-Abbasi, Omar; Von Spakovsky, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines an atomistic-level framework for modeling the non-equilibrium behavior of chemically reactive systems. The framework called steepest- entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEA-QT) is based on the paradigm of intrinsic quantum thermodynamic (IQT), which is a theory that unifies quantum mechanics and thermodynamics into a single discipline with wide applications to the study of non-equilibrium phenomena at the atomistic level. SEA-QT is a novel approach for describing the state of chemically reactive systems as well as the kinetic and dynamic features of the reaction process without any assumptions of near-equilibrium states or weak-interactions with a reservoir or bath. Entropy generation is the basis of the dissipation which takes place internal to the system and is, thus, the driving force of the chemical reaction(s). The SEA-QT non-equilibrium model is able to provide detailed information during the reaction process, providing a picture of the changes occurring in key thermodynamic properties (e.g., the instantaneous species concentrations, entropy and entropy generation, reaction coordinate, chemical affinities, reaction rate, etc). As an illustration, the SEA-QT framework is applied to an atomistic-level chemically reactive system governed by the reaction mechanism F + H 2 ↔ FH + H

  10. Web Access to Digitised Content of the Exhibition Novo Mesto 1848-1918 at the Dolenjska Museum, Novo Mesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majda Pungerčar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available EXTENDED ABSTRACTFor the first time, the Dolenjska museum Novo mesto provided access to digitised museum resources when they took the decision to enrich the exhibition Novo mesto 1848-1918 by adding digital content. The following goals were identified: the digital content was created at the time of exhibition planning and design, it met the needs of different age groups of visitors, and during the exhibition the content was accessible via touch screen. As such, it also served for educational purposes (content-oriented lectures or problem solving team work. In the course of exhibition digital content was accessible on the museum website http://www.novomesto1848-1918.si. The digital content was divided into the following sections: the web photo gallery, the quiz and the game. The photo gallery was designed in the same way as the exhibition and the print catalogue and extended by the photos of contemporary Novo mesto and accompanied by the music from the orchestron machine. The following themes were outlined: the Austrian Empire, the Krka and Novo mesto, the town and its symbols, images of the town and people, administration and economy, social life and Novo mesto today followed by digitised archive materials and sources from that period such as the Commemorative book of the Uniformed Town Guard, the National Reading Room Guest Book, the Kazina guest book, the album of postcards and the Diploma of Honoured Citizen Josip Gerdešič. The Web application was also a tool for a simple and on line selection of digitised material and the creation of new digital content which proved to be much more convenient for lecturing than Power Point presentations. The quiz consisted of 40 questions relating to the exhibition theme and the catalogue. Each question offered a set of three answers only one of them being correct and illustrated by photography. The application auto selected ten questions and valued the answers immediately. The quiz could be accessed

  11. Hierarchical Statistical 3D ' Atomistic' Simulation of Decanano MOSFETs: Drift-Diffusion, Hydrodynamic and Quantum Mechanical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenov, Asen; Brown, A. R.; Slavcheva, G.; Davies, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    When MOSFETs are scaled to deep submicron dimensions the discreteness and randomness of the dopant charges in the channel region introduces significant fluctuations in the device characteristics. This effect, predicted 20 year ago, has been confirmed experimentally and in simulation studies. The impact of the fluctuations on the functionality, yield, and reliability of the corresponding systems shifts the paradigm of the numerical device simulation. It becomes insufficient to simulate only one device representing one macroscopical design in a continuous charge approximation. An ensemble of macroscopically identical but microscopically different devices has to be characterized by simulation of statistically significant samples. The aims of the numerical simulations shift from predicting the characteristics of a single device with continuous doping towards estimating the mean values and the standard deviations of basic design parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, transconductance, drive current, etc. for the whole ensemble of 'atomistically' different devices in the system. It has to be pointed out that even the mean values obtained from 'atomistic' simulations are not identical to the values obtained from continuous doping simulations. In this paper we present a hierarchical approach to the 'atomistic' simulation of aggressively scaled decanano MOSFETs. A full scale 3D drift-diffusion'atomostic' simulation approach is first described and used for verification of the more economical, but also more restricted, options. To reduce the processor time and memory requirements at high drain voltage we have developed a self-consistent option based on a thin slab solution of the current continuity equation only in the channel region. This is coupled to the Poisson's equation solution in the whole simulation domain in the Gummel iteration cycles. The accuracy of this approach is investigated in comparison with the full self-consistent solution. At low drain

  12. Components for Atomistic-to-Continuum Multiscale Modeling of Flow in Micro- and Nanofluidic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgi Adalsteinsson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanofluidics pose a series of significant challenges for science-based modeling. Key among those are the wide separation of length- and timescales between interface phenomena and bulk flow and the spatially heterogeneous solution properties near solid-liquid interfaces. It is not uncommon for characteristic scales in these systems to span nine orders of magnitude from the atomic motions in particle dynamics up to evolution of mass transport at the macroscale level, making explicit particle models intractable for all but the simplest systems. Recently, atomistic-to-continuum (A2C multiscale simulations have gained a lot of interest as an approach to rigorously handle particle-level dynamics while also tracking evolution of large-scale macroscale behavior. While these methods are clearly not applicable to all classes of simulations, they are finding traction in systems in which tight-binding, and physically important, dynamics at system interfaces have complex effects on the slower-evolving large-scale evolution of the surrounding medium. These conditions allow decomposition of the simulation into discrete domains, either spatially or temporally. In this paper, we describe how features of domain decomposed simulation systems can be harnessed to yield flexible and efficient software for multiscale simulations of electric field-driven micro- and nanofluidics.

  13. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  14. Nucleation of ripplocations through atomistic modeling of surface nanoindentation in graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiberg, D.; Barsoum, M. W.; Tucker, G. J.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we study the nucleation and subsequent evolution behavior of ripplocations - a newly proposed strain accommodating defect in layered materials where one, or more, layers buckle orthogonally to the layers - using atomistic modeling of graphite. To that effect, we model the response to cylindrical indenters with radii R of 50, 100, and 250 nm, loaded edge-on into graphite layers and the strain gradient effects beneath the indenter are quantified. We show that the response is initially elastic followed by ripplocation nucleation, and growth of multiple fully reversible ripplocation boundaries below the indenter. In the elastic region, the stress is found to be a function of indentation volume; beyond the elastic regime, the interlayer strain gradient emerges as paramount in the onset of ripplocation nucleation and subsequent in-plane stress relaxation. Furthermore, ripplocation boundaries that nucleate from the alignment of ripplocations on adjacent layers are exceedingly nonlocal and propagate, wavelike, away from the indented surface. This work not only provides a critical understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings of the deformation of layered solids and formation of kink boundaries, but also provides a more complete description of the nucleation mechanics of ripplocations and their strain field dependence.

  15. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D., E-mail: alejandro.rey@mcgill.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal H3A 0C5 (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  16. The Gibbs free energy of homogeneous nucleation: From atomistic nuclei to the planar limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bingqing; Tribello, Gareth A; Ceriotti, Michele

    2017-09-14

    In this paper we discuss how the information contained in atomistic simulations of homogeneous nucleation should be used when fitting the parameters in macroscopic nucleation models. We show how the number of solid and liquid atoms in such simulations can be determined unambiguously by using a Gibbs dividing surface and how the free energy as a function of the number of solid atoms in the nucleus can thus be extracted. We then show that the parameters (the chemical potential, the interfacial free energy, and a Tolman correction) of a model based on classical nucleation theory can be fitted using the information contained in these free-energy profiles but that the parameters in such models are highly correlated. This correlation is unfortunate as it ensures that small errors in the computed free energy surface can give rise to large errors in the extrapolated properties of the fitted model. To resolve this problem we thus propose a method for fitting macroscopic nucleation models that uses simulations of planar interfaces and simulations of three-dimensional nuclei in tandem. We show that when the chemical potentials and the interface energy are pinned to their planar-interface values, more precise estimates for the Tolman length are obtained. Extrapolating the free energy profile obtained from small simulation boxes to larger nuclei is thus more reliable.

  17. Ash'arite's atomistic conception of the physical world: A restatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozi, Firdaus; Othman, Mohd Yusof [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia and Institute of Islam Hadhari, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Mohamed, Faizal [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Atomism plays an important role in the history of human thought. It can be traced back from Democritus atomos in the 500 BC to particle physics and quantum theory in the 21{sup st} century. However, as it being rejected and developed in the course of history of science, it still brings the fundamental question that perplexes physicists. It gives the views that the world is eternal; that the laws of nature is immutable and eternal therefore all phenomena can be determined through the laws and that there is no reality behind the quantum world. In this paper, we shall briefly describe all these three views on the nature of the physical world or universe and this include on the nature of matter. Then, we shall explain our stand on those conceptions based on the Ash'arites atomistic conception of the physical world. We hope this paper can shed a light on several fundamental issues in the conception of the universe and gives the proper response to them.

  18. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  19. Atomistic study of the hardening of ferritic iron by Ni-Cr decorated dislocation loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, G.; Bakaev, A.; Terentyev, D.; Zhurkin, E.; Posselt, M.

    2018-01-01

    The exact nature of the radiation defects causing hardening in reactor structural steels consists of several components that are not yet clearly determined. While generally, the hardening is attributed to dislocation loops, voids and secondary phases (radiation-induced precipitates), recent advanced experimental and computational studies point to the importance of solute-rich clusters (SRCs). Depending on the exact composition of the steel, SRCs may contain Mn, Ni and Cu (e.g. in reactor pressure vessel steels) or Ni, Cr, Si, Mn (e.g. in high-chromium steels for generation IV and fusion applications). One of the hypotheses currently implied to explain their formation is the process of radiation-induced diffusion and segregation of these elements to small dislocation loops (heterogeneous nucleation), so that the distinction between SRCs and loops becomes somewhat blurred. In this work, we perform an atomistic study to investigate the enrichment of loops by Ni and Cr solutes and their interaction with an edge dislocation. The dislocation loops decorated with Ni and Cr solutes are obtained by Monte Carlo simulations, while the effect of solute segregation on the loop's strength and interaction mechanism is then addressed by large scale molecular dynamics simulations. The synergy of the Cr-Ni interaction and their competition to occupy positions in the dislocation loop core are specifically clarified.

  20. Atomistic modeling of zirconium hydride precipitation: methodology for deriving a tight-binding potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The zirconium-hydrogen system is of nuclear safety interest, as the hydride precipitation leads to the cladding embrittlement, which is made of zirconium-based alloys. The cladding is the first safety barrier confining the radioactive products: its integrity shall be kept during the entire fuel-assemblies life, in reactor, including accidental situation, and post-operation (transport and storage). Many uncertainties remain regarding the hydrides precipitation kinetics and the local stress impact on their precipitation. The atomic scale modeling of this system would bring clarifications on the relevant mechanisms. The usual atomistic modeling methods are based on thermo-statistic approaches, whose precision and reliability depend on the interatomic potential used. However, there was no potential allowing a rigorous study of the Zr-H system. The present work has indeed addressed this issue: a new tight-binding potential for zirconium hydrides modeling is now available. Moreover, this thesis provides a detailed manual for deriving such potentials accounting for spd hybridization, and fitted here on DFT results. This guidebook has be written in light of modeling a pure transition metal followed by a metal-covalent coupling (metallic carbides, nitrides and silicides). (author)

  1. Atomistic description of large nanostructures based on III-nitride semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Sanchez, Alejandro; Garcia-Cristobal, Alberto; Cantarero, Andres [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Terentjevs, Aleksandrs; Cicero, Giancarlo [Physics and Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Departments, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Semiconductor nanocolumns exhibiting a growth without dislocations and high crystalline quality are of great interest in nanotechnology applications. Specifically, InN-based nanocolumns are good candidates to develop multi-junction solar cells due to their small gap, 0.67 eV, and the possibility of alloying with other nitrides (as GaN and AlN) to cover the entire solar spectrum. A proper description of optical properties of the nanostructures described above can start with an atomistic treatment of the electronic structure in order to keep the essential geometry and symmetry of the objects. Unfortunately, the best description realized with ab initio electronic structure software is strongly limited by the nanocolumn diameter to a few nanometers. By using a combination of ab initio and empirical tight-binding methods, we can connect the quality of the first principles calculations (performed with the Espresso code), with the versatility of an empirical approach. Once we have an ab initio quality parameter set for the empirical tight-binding code, we can study larger nanostructures with this approach, reducing the computation time in orders of magnitude.

  2. Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of microchemical evolutions driven by diffusion processes under irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soisson, F.; Becquart, C. S.; Castin, N.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.; Vincent, E.

    2010-11-01

    Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations are a powerful tool to study the microstructural and microchemical evolution of alloys controlled by diffusion processes, under irradiation and during thermal ageing. In the framework of the FP6 Perfect program, two main approaches have been applied to binary and multicomponent iron based alloys. The first one is based on a diffusion model which takes into account vacancy and self-interstitial jumps, using simple rigid lattice approximation and broken-bond models to compute the point-defect jump frequencies. The corresponding parameters are fitted on ab initio calculations of a few typical configurations and migration barriers. The second method uses empirical potentials to compute a much larger number of migration barriers, including atomic relaxations, and Artificial Intelligence regression methods to predict the other ones. It is somewhat less rapid than the first one, but significantly more than simulations using "on-the-fly" calculations of all the barriers. We review here the recent advances and perspectives concerning these techniques.

  3. Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo studies of microchemical evolutions driven by diffusion processes under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soisson, F.; Becquart, C.S.; Castin, N.; Domain, C.; Malerba, L.; Vincent, E.

    2010-01-01

    Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations are a powerful tool to study the microstructural and microchemical evolution of alloys controlled by diffusion processes, under irradiation and during thermal ageing. In the framework of the FP6 Perfect program, two main approaches have been applied to binary and multicomponent iron based alloys. The first one is based on a diffusion model which takes into account vacancy and self-interstitial jumps, using simple rigid lattice approximation and broken-bond models to compute the point-defect jump frequencies. The corresponding parameters are fitted on ab initio calculations of a few typical configurations and migration barriers. The second method uses empirical potentials to compute a much larger number of migration barriers, including atomic relaxations, and Artificial Intelligence regression methods to predict the other ones. It is somewhat less rapid than the first one, but significantly more than simulations using 'on-the-fly' calculations of all the barriers. We review here the recent advances and perspectives concerning these techniques.

  4. Atomistic Simulations of Small-scale Materials Tests of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Chan Sun; Jin, Hyung Ha; Kwon, Jun Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials properties under neutron irradiation is one of the key issues affecting the lifetime of nuclear reactors. Evaluating the property changes of materials due to irradiations and understanding the role of microstructural changes on mechanical properties are required for ensuring reliable and safe operation of a nuclear reactor. However, high dose of neuron irradiation capabilities are rather limited and it is difficult to discriminate various factors affecting the property changes of materials. Ion beam irradiation can be used to investigate radiation damage to materials in a controlled way, but has the main limitation of small penetration depth in the length scale of micro meters. Over the past decade, the interest in the investigations of size-dependent mechanical properties has promoted the development of various small-scale materials tests, e.g. nanoindentation and micro/nano-pillar compression tests. Small-scale materials tests can address the issue of the limitation of small penetration depth of ion irradiation. In this paper, we present small-scale materials tests (experiments and simulation) which are applied to study the size and irradiation effects on mechanical properties. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation and nanopillar compression tests. These atomistic simulations are expected to significantly contribute to the investigation of the fundamental deformation mechanism of small scale irradiated materials

  5. Atomistic Insight on the Charging Energetics in Sub-nanometer Pore Supercacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Rui [ORNL; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Feng, Guang [Clemson University

    2010-01-01

    Electrodes featuring sub-nanometer pores can significantly enhance the capacitance and energy density of supercapacitors. However, ions must pay an energy penalty to enter sub-nanometer pores as they have to shed part of their solvation shell. The magnitude of such energy penalty plays a key role in determining the accessibility and charging/discharging of these sub-nanometer pores. Here we report on the atomistic simulation of Na+ and Cl ions entering a polarizable slit pore with a width of 0.82 nm. We show that the free energy penalty for these ions to enter the pore is less than 14 kJ/mol for both Na+ and Cl ions. The surprisingly small energy penalty is caused by the van der Waals attractions between ion and pore walls, the image charge effects, the moderate (19-26%) de-hydration of the ions inside the pore, and the strengthened interactions between ions and their hydration water molecules in the sub-nanometer pore. The results provide strong impetus for further developing nanoporous electrodes featuring sub- nanometer pores.

  6. Calculation of phonon dispersion in carbon nanotubes using a continuum-atomistic finite element approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Leamy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Dispersion calculations are presented for cylindrical carbon nanotubes using a manifold-based continuum-atomistic finite element formulation combined with Bloch analysis. The formulated finite elements allow any (n,m chiral nanotube, or mixed tubes formed by periodically-repeating heterojunctions, to be examined quickly and accurately using only three input parameters (radius, chiral angle, and unit cell length and a trivial structured mesh, thus avoiding the tedious geometry generation and energy minimization tasks associated with ab initio and lattice dynamics-based techniques. A critical assessment of the technique is pursued to determine the validity range of the resulting dispersion calculations, and to identify any dispersion anomalies. Two small anomalies in the dispersion curves are documented, which can be easily identified and therefore rectified. They include difficulty in achieving a zero energy point for the acoustic twisting phonon, and a branch veering in nanotubes with nonzero chiral angle. The twisting mode quickly restores its correct group velocity as wavenumber increases, while the branch veering is associated with a rapid exchange of eigenvectors at the veering point, which also lessens its impact. By taking into account the two noted anomalies, accurate predictions of acoustic and low-frequency optical branches can be achieved out to the midpoint of the first Brillouin zone.

  7. Anharmonic phonon-phonon scattering modeling of three-dimensional atomistic transport: An efficient quantum treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Bescond, M.; Logoteta, D.; Cavassilas, N.; Lannoo, M.; Luisier, M.

    2018-05-01

    We propose an efficient method to quantum mechanically treat anharmonic interactions in the atomistic nonequilibrium Green's function simulation of phonon transport. We demonstrate that the so-called lowest-order approximation, implemented through a rescaling technique and analytically continued by means of the Padé approximants, can be used to accurately model third-order anharmonic effects. Although the paper focuses on a specific self-energy, the method is applicable to a very wide class of physical interactions. We apply this approach to the simulation of anharmonic phonon transport in realistic Si and Ge nanowires with uniform or discontinuous cross sections. The effect of increasing the temperature above 300 K is also investigated. In all the considered cases, we are able to obtain a good agreement with the routinely adopted self-consistent Born approximation, at a remarkably lower computational cost. In the more complicated case of high temperatures (≫300 K), we find that the first-order Richardson extrapolation applied to the sequence of the Padé approximants N -1 /N results in a significant acceleration of the convergence.

  8. An adhesive contact mechanics formulation based on atomistically induced surface traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Houfu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ren, Bo [Livermore Software Technology Corporation, 7374 Las Positas Road, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Li, Shaofan, E-mail: shaofan@berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel multiscale computational contact formulation based on the generalized Derjuguin approximation for continua that are characterized by atomistically enriched constitutive relations in order to study macroscopic interaction between arbitrarily shaped deformable continua. The proposed adhesive contact formulation makes use of the microscopic interaction forces between individual particles in the interacting bodies. In particular, the double-layer volume integral describing the contact interaction (energy, force vector, matrix) is converted into a double-layer surface integral through a mathematically consistent approach that employs the divergence theorem and a special partitioning technique. The proposed contact model is formulated in the nonlinear continuum mechanics framework and implemented using the standard finite element method. With no large penalty constant, the stiffness matrix of the system will in general be well-conditioned, which is of great significance for quasi-static analysis. Three numerical examples are presented to illustrate the capability of the proposed method. Results indicate that with the same mesh configuration, the finite element computation based on the surface integral approach is faster and more accurate than the volume integral based approach. In addition, the proposed approach is energy preserving even in a very long dynamic simulation.

  9. Spontaneous Formation of A Nanotube From A Square Ag Nanowire: An Atomistic View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuk Onat, Mine; Durukanoglu, Sondan

    2012-02-01

    We have performed molecular static calculations to investigate the recently observed phenomenon of the spontaneous formation of a nanotube from a regular, square Ag nanowire[1]. In the simulations, atoms are allowed to interact via the model potential obtained from the modified embedded atom method. Our simulations predict that this particular type of structural phase transformation is controlled by the nature of applied strain, length of the wire and initial cross-sectional shape. For such a perfect structural transformation, the axially oriented fcc nanowire needs (1) to be formed by stacking A and B layers of an fcc crystal, both possessing the geometry of two interpenetrating one-lattice-parameter-wide squares, containing four atoms each, (2) to have an optimum length of eight layers, and (3) to be exposed to a combination of low and high stress along the length direction. The results further offer insights into atomistic nature of this specific structural transformation into a nanotube with the smallest possible cross-section. [1] M.J. Lagos et al., Nature Nanotech. 4, 149 (2009).

  10. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena ePapaleo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  12. Atomistic simulation of MgO nanowires subject to electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xianqiao; Lee, James D

    2010-01-01

    This work is concerned with the application of atomistic field theory (AFT) in modeling and simulation of polarizable materials under an electromagnetic (EM) field. AFT enables us to express an atomic scale local property of a multi-element crystalline (which has more than one kind of atom in the unit cell) system in terms of the distortions of lattice cells and the rearrangement of atoms within the lattice cell, thereby making AFT suitable to fully reproduce both acoustic and optical branches in phonon dispersion relations. Due to the applied EM field, the inhomogeneous motions of discrete atoms in the polarizable crystal give rise to the rearrangement of microstructure and polarization. The AFT and its corresponding finite element implementation are briefly introduced. Single-crystal MgO nanowires under an EM field is modeled and simulated. The numerical results have demonstrated that AFT can serve as a tool to analyze the electromagnetic phenomena of multi-element crystal materials at micro/nano-level within a field framework

  13. In situ observations of the atomistic mechanisms of Ni catalyzed low temperature graphene growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patera, Laerte L; Africh, Cristina; Weatherup, Robert S; Blume, Raoul; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Castellarin-Cudia, Carla; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schloegl, Robert; Comelli, Giovanni; Hofmann, Stephan; Cepek, Cinzia

    2013-09-24

    The key atomistic mechanisms of graphene formation on Ni for technologically relevant hydrocarbon exposures below 600 °C are directly revealed via complementary in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. For clean Ni(111) below 500 °C, two different surface carbide (Ni2C) conversion mechanisms are dominant which both yield epitaxial graphene, whereas above 500 °C, graphene predominantly grows directly on Ni(111) via replacement mechanisms leading to embedded epitaxial and/or rotated graphene domains. Upon cooling, additional carbon structures form exclusively underneath rotated graphene domains. The dominant graphene growth mechanism also critically depends on the near-surface carbon concentration and hence is intimately linked to the full history of the catalyst and all possible sources of contamination. The detailed XPS fingerprinting of these processes allows a direct link to high pressure XPS measurements of a wide range of growth conditions, including polycrystalline Ni catalysts and recipes commonly used in industrial reactors for graphene and carbon nanotube CVD. This enables an unambiguous and consistent interpretation of prior literature and an assessment of how the quality/structure of as-grown carbon nanostructures relates to the growth modes.

  14. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Saurav; Luo, Xichun; Reuben, Robert L; Rashid, Waleed Bin

    2011-11-11

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear.

  15. Lattice Thermal Conductivity from Atomistic Simulations: ZrB2 and HfB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Daw, Murray S.; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) including ZrB2 and HfB2 have a number of properties that make them attractive for applications in extreme environments. One such property is their high thermal conductivity. Computational modeling of these materials will facilitate understanding of fundamental mechanisms, elucidate structure-property relationships, and ultimately accelerate the materials design cycle. Progress in computational modeling of UHTCs however has been limited in part due to the absence of suitable interatomic potentials. Recently, we developed Tersoff style parameterizations of such potentials for both ZrB2 and HfB2 appropriate for atomistic simulations. As an application, Green-Kubo molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity for single crystals of ZrB2 and HfB2. The atomic mass difference in these binary compounds leads to oscillations in the time correlation function of the heat current, in contrast to the more typical monotonic decay seen in monoatomic materials such as Silicon, for example. Results at room temperature and at elevated temperatures will be reported.

  16. Atomistic simulation of CO 2 solubility in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing

    2013-10-02

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations coupled with thermodynamic integration to obtain the excess chemical potential and pressure-composition phase diagrams for CO2 in poly(ethylene oxide) oligomers. Poly(ethylene oxide) dimethyl ether, CH3O(CH 2CH2O)nCH3 (PEO for short) is a widely applied physical solvent that forms the major organic constituent of a class of novel nanoparticle-based absorbents. Good predictions were obtained for pressure-composition-density relations for CO2 + PEO oligomers (2 ≤ n ≤ 12), using the Potoff force field for PEO [J. Chem. Phys. 136, 044514 (2012)] together with the TraPPE model for CO2 [AIChE J. 47, 1676 (2001)]. Water effects on Henrys constant of CO2 in PEO have also been investigated. Addition of modest amounts of water in PEO produces a relatively small increase in Henrys constant. Dependence of the calculated Henrys constant on the weight percentage of water falls on a temperature-dependent master curve, irrespective of PEO chain length. © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

  17. Artificial intelligence applied to atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in Fe-Cu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djurabekova, F.G. [Reactor Materials Research Unit, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Domingos, R. [Reactor Materials Research Unit, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Cerchiara, G. [Department of Nuclear and Production Engineering, University of Pisa (Italy); Castin, N. [Catholic University of Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Vincent, E. [LMPGM UMR-8517, University of Lille I, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Malerba, L. [Reactor Materials Research Unit, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)]. E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be

    2007-02-15

    Vacancy migration energies as functions of the local atomic configuration (LAC) in Fe-Cu alloys have been systematically tabulated using an appropriate interatomic potential for the alloy of interest. Subsets of these tabulations have been used to train an artificial neural network (ANN) to predict all vacancy migration energies depending on the LAC. The error in the prediction of the ANN has been evaluated by a fuzzy logic system (FLS), allowing a feedback to be introduced for further training, to improve the ANN prediction. This artificial intelligence (AI) system is used to develop a novel approach to atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations, aimed at providing a better description of the kinetic path followed by the system through diffusion of solute atoms in the alloy via vacancy mechanism. Fe-Cu has been chosen because of the importance of Cu precipitation in Fe in connection with the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels of existing nuclear power plants. In this paper the method is described in some detail and the first results of its application are presented and briefly discussed.

  18. Multiscale modeling of dislocation processes in BCC tantalum: bridging atomistic and mesoscale simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L H; Tang, M; Moriarty, J A

    2001-01-01

    Plastic deformation in bcc metals at low temperatures and high-strain rates is controlled by the motion of a/2 screw dislocations, and understanding the fundamental atomistic processes of this motion is essential to develop predictive multiscale models of crystal plasticity. The multiscale modeling approach presented here for bcc Ta is based on information passing, where results of simulations at the atomic scale are used in simulations of plastic deformation at mesoscopic length scales via dislocation dynamics (DD). The relevant core properties of a/2 screw dislocations in Ta have been obtained using quantum-based interatomic potentials derived from model generalized pseudopotential theory and an ab-initio data base together with an accurate Green's-function simulation method that implements flexible boundary conditions. In particular, the stress-dependent activation enthalpy for the lowest-energy kink-pair mechanism has been calculated and fitted to a revealing analytic form. This is the critical quantity determining dislocation mobility in the DD simulations, and the present activation enthalpy is found to be in good agreement with the previous empirical form used to explain the temperature dependence of the yield stress

  19. Ash'arite's atomistic conception of the physical world: A restatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozi, Firdaus; Othman, Mohd Yusof; Mohamed, Faizal

    2013-01-01

    Atomism plays an important role in the history of human thought. It can be traced back from Democritus atomos in the 500 BC to particle physics and quantum theory in the 21 st century. However, as it being rejected and developed in the course of history of science, it still brings the fundamental question that perplexes physicists. It gives the views that the world is eternal; that the laws of nature is immutable and eternal therefore all phenomena can be determined through the laws and that there is no reality behind the quantum world. In this paper, we shall briefly describe all these three views on the nature of the physical world or universe and this include on the nature of matter. Then, we shall explain our stand on those conceptions based on the Ash'arites atomistic conception of the physical world. We hope this paper can shed a light on several fundamental issues in the conception of the universe and gives the proper response to them

  20. Atomistic modeling trap-assisted tunneling in hole tunnel field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Pengyu; Huang, Jun Z.; Povolotskyi, Michael; Sarangapani, Prasad; Valencia-Zapata, Gustavo A.; Kubis, Tillmann; Rodwell, Mark J. W.; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2018-05-01

    Tunnel Field Effect Transistors (FETs) have the potential to achieve steep Subthreshold Swing (S.S.) below 60 mV/dec, but their S.S. could be limited by trap-assisted tunneling (TAT) due to interface traps. In this paper, the effect of trap energy and location on OFF-current (IOFF) of tunnel FETs is evaluated systematically using an atomistic trap level representation in a full quantum transport simulation. Trap energy levels close to band edges cause the highest leakage. Wave function penetration into the surrounding oxide increases the TAT current. To estimate the effects of multiple traps, we assume that the traps themselves do not interact with each other and as a whole do not modify the electrostatic potential dramatically. Within that model limitation, this numerical metrology study points to the critical importance of TAT in the IOFF in tunnel FETs. The model shows that for Dit higher than 1012/(cm2 eV) IO F F is critically increased with a degraded IO N/IO F F ratio of the tunnel FET. In order to have an IO N/IO F F ratio higher than 104, the acceptable Dit near Ev should be controlled to no larger than 1012/(cm2 eV) .

  1. Artificial intelligence applied to atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations in Fe-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djurabekova, F.G.; Domingos, R.; Cerchiara, G.; Castin, N.; Vincent, E.; Malerba, L.

    2007-01-01

    Vacancy migration energies as functions of the local atomic configuration (LAC) in Fe-Cu alloys have been systematically tabulated using an appropriate interatomic potential for the alloy of interest. Subsets of these tabulations have been used to train an artificial neural network (ANN) to predict all vacancy migration energies depending on the LAC. The error in the prediction of the ANN has been evaluated by a fuzzy logic system (FLS), allowing a feedback to be introduced for further training, to improve the ANN prediction. This artificial intelligence (AI) system is used to develop a novel approach to atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (AKMC) simulations, aimed at providing a better description of the kinetic path followed by the system through diffusion of solute atoms in the alloy via vacancy mechanism. Fe-Cu has been chosen because of the importance of Cu precipitation in Fe in connection with the embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels of existing nuclear power plants. In this paper the method is described in some detail and the first results of its application are presented and briefly discussed

  2. On the atomistic mechanisms of alkane (methane-pentane) separation by distillation: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2007-11-01

    Insights into the liquid-vapor transformation of methane-pentane mixtures were obtained from transition path sampling molecular dynamics simulations. This case study of the boiling of non-azeotropic mixtures demonstrates an unprejudiced identification of the atomistic mechanisms of phase separation in the course of vaporization which form the basis of distillation processes. From our simulations we observe spontaneous segregation events in the liquid mixture to trigger vapor nucleation. The formation of vapor domains stabilizes and further promotes the separation process by preferential evaporation of methane molecules. While this discrimination holds for all mixtures of different composition studied, a full account of the boiling process requires a more complex picture. At low methane concentration the nucleation of the vapor domains includes both methane and pentane molecules. The pentane molecules, however, tend to form small aggregates and undergo rapid re-condensation within picoseconds to nanoseconds scales. Accordingly, two aspects of selectivity accounting for methane-pentane separation in the course of liquid-vapor transformations were made accessible to molecular dynamics simulations: spontaneous segregation in the liquid phase leading to selective vapor nucleation and growth favoring methane vaporization and selective re-condensation of pentane molecules.

  3. Atomistic simulations of highly conductive molecular transport junctions under realistic conditions

    KAUST Repository

    French, William R.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Rungger, Ivan; Souza, Amaury Melo; Sanvito, Stefano; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    We report state-of-the-art atomistic simulations combined with high-fidelity conductance calculations to probe structure-conductance relationships in Au-benzenedithiolate (BDT)-Au junctions under elongation. Our results demonstrate that large increases in conductance are associated with the formation of monatomic chains (MACs) of Au atoms directly connected to BDT. An analysis of the electronic structure of the simulated junctions reveals that enhancement in the s-like states in Au MACs causes the increases in conductance. Other structures also result in increased conductance but are too short-lived to be detected in experiment, while MACs remain stable for long simulation times. Examinations of thermally evolved junctions with and without MACs show negligible overlap between conductance histograms, indicating that the increase in conductance is related to this unique structural change and not thermal fluctuation. These results, which provide an excellent explanation for a recently observed anomalous experimental result [Bruot et al., Nat. Nanotechnol., 2012, 7, 35-40], should aid in the development of mechanically responsive molecular electronic devices. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. De novo assembly of highly diverse viral populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive genetic diversity in viral populations within infected hosts and the divergence of variants from existing reference genomes impede the analysis of deep viral sequencing data. A de novo population consensus assembly is valuable both as a single linear representation of the population and as a backbone on which intra-host variants can be accurately mapped. The availability of consensus assemblies and robustly mapped variants are crucial to the genetic study of viral disease progression, transmission dynamics, and viral evolution. Existing de novo assembly techniques fail to robustly assemble ultra-deep sequence data from genetically heterogeneous populations such as viruses into full-length genomes due to the presence of extensive genetic variability, contaminants, and variable sequence coverage. Results We present VICUNA, a de novo assembly algorithm suitable for generating consensus assemblies from genetically heterogeneous populations. We demonstrate its effectiveness on Dengue, Human Immunodeficiency and West Nile viral populations, representing a range of intra-host diversity. Compared to state-of-the-art assemblers designed for haploid or diploid systems, VICUNA recovers full-length consensus and captures insertion/deletion polymorphisms in diverse samples. Final assemblies maintain a high base calling accuracy. VICUNA program is publicly available at: http://www.broadinstitute.org/scientific-community/science/projects/viral-genomics/ viral-genomics-analysis-software. Conclusions We developed VICUNA, a publicly available software tool, that enables consensus assembly of ultra-deep sequence derived from diverse viral populations. While VICUNA was developed for the analysis of viral populations, its application to other heterogeneous sequence data sets such as metagenomic or tumor cell population samples may prove beneficial in these fields of research.

  5. Uncovering Clinical Features of De Novo Philadelphia Positive Myelodysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Aristides; Chen, Chen; Mims, Martha; Rivero, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is cytogenetically heterogeneous and retains variable risk for acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Though not yet fully understood, there is an association between genetic abnormalities and defects in gene expression. The functional role for infrequent cytogenetic alteration remains unclear. An uncommon chromosomic abnormality is the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. Here, we report a patient with Ph+ MDS treated with low dose Dasatinib who achieved hematologic response for 7 months. In addition, we also examined the English literature on all de novo Ph + MDS cases between 1996 and 2015 to gain insight into clinical features and outcome.

  6. Perspective on Biotransformation and De Novo Biosynthesis of Licorice Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yujia; Lv, Bo; Feng, Xudong; Li, Chun

    2017-12-27

    Licorice, an important herbal medicine, is derived from the dried roots and rhizomes of Glycyrrhiza genus plants. It has been widely used in food, pharmaceutical, tobacco, and cosmetics industries with high economic value. However, overexploitation of licorice resources has severely destroyed the local ecology. Therefore, producing bioactive compounds of licorice through the biotransformation and bioengineering methods is a hot spot in recent years. In this perspective, we comprehensively summarize the biotransformation of licorice constituents into high-value-added derivatives by biocatalysts. Furthermore, successful cases and the strategies for de novo biosynthesizing compounds of licorice in microbes have been summarized. This paper will provide new insights for the further research of licorice.

  7. De Novo and Recurrence of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis After Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Matthew; Abdelmalek, Manal

    2017-05-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developing countries. Approximately 25% of patients with NAFLD develop nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH-related cirrhosis is now a leading listing indication for liver transplantation in the United States. Although posttransplant survival for NASH-related cirrhosis is comparable with that of other liver diseases, many patients have features of metabolic syndrome, which can contribute to a recurrence of NAFLD or NASH. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of de novo and recurrence of NASH after liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The historical town core and traffic in Novo mesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilijana Jankovič

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical town core of Novo mesto is subject to intolerable traffic conditions. Individual car use is suffocating the town core, but simultaneously good access is essential for shopkeepers and other inhabitants since buses don’t go there. The project proposes changes to the traffic regime, its basic goals are to redesign the town square into a pedestrian place and to eliminate transitory traffic by rerouting vehicles to less burdened side roads. It introduces short-term parking, smaller parking garages in the core and larger parking spaces on the edge and routes the buses through the town core.

  9. Model-Based GUI Testing Using Uppaal at Novo Nordisk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjort, Ulrik H.; Illum, Jacob; Larsen, Kim G.; Petersen, Michael A.; Skou, Arne

    This paper details a collaboration between Aalborg University and Novo Nordiskin developing an automatic model-based test generation tool for system testing of the graphical user interface of a medical device on an embedded platform. The tool takes as input an UML Statemachine model and generates a test suite satisfying some testing criterion, such as edge or state coverage, and converts the individual test case into a scripting language that can be automatically executed against the target. The tool has significantly reduced the time required for test construction and generation, and reduced the number of test scripts while increasing the coverage.

  10. Novo-desenvolvimento, capital social e desigualdade social

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina de Oliveira Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo aborda a tendência de enfrentamento da desigualdade social a partir, no campo econômico, da versão do novo-desenvolvimentismo e, no campo político e ideológico, a partir da noção de capital social, na tentativa de realizar um "capitalismo com face mais humana". Discutiremos duas ordens de questões, considerando a especificidade da formação social brasileira de capitalismo dependente: 1 a “construção de Estados fortes” para

    assegurar as condições de acumulação do capital, ampliando as margens do mercado de consumo, aliviando a pobreza e controlando possíveis tensões políticas e 2 a difusão da necessidade de construir uma sociedade em harmonia, que se traduz na incorporação da ética empreendedora dos empresários em todas as esferas sociais. Entendemos que este escopo político-econômico revela uma nova pedagogia da hegemonia, sustentada numa suposta alternativa
    de gerenciamento das novas expressões da “questão social”, voltada para educar o conformismo e ocultar o conflito de classes.
    Palavras-chave:  questão social; novo-desenvolvimentismo; capital social; inclusão forçada

  11. De novo biosynthesis of anthocyanins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenberger, Michael; Hansson, Anders; Fischer, David; Dürr, Lara; Naesby, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are plant secondary metabolites responsible for most of the red, purple and blue colors of flowers, fruits and vegetables. They are increasingly used in the food and beverage industry as natural alternative to artificial colorants. Production of these compounds by fermentation of microorganisms would provide an attractive alternative. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered for de novo production of the three basic anthocyanins, as well as the three main trans-flavan-3-ols. Enzymes from different plant sources were screened and efficient variants found for most steps of the biosynthetic pathway. However, the anthocyanidin synthase was identified as a major obstacle to efficient production. In yeast, this enzyme converts the majority of its natural substrates leucoanthocyanidins into the off-pathway flavonols. Nonetheless, de novo biosynthesis of ACNs was shown for the first time in yeast and for the first time in a single microorganism. It provides a framework for optimizing the activity of anthocyanidin synthase and represents an important step towards sustainable industrial production of these highly relevant molecules in yeast.

  12. Origins of De Novo Genes in Human and Chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Orera, Jorge; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Chiva, Cristina; Sabidó, Eduard; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald; Marqués-Bonet, Tomàs; Albà, M Mar

    2015-12-01

    The birth of new genes is an important motor of evolutionary innovation. Whereas many new genes arise by gene duplication, others originate at genomic regions that did not contain any genes or gene copies. Some of these newly expressed genes may acquire coding or non-coding functions and be preserved by natural selection. However, it is yet unclear which is the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of de novo gene emergence. In order to obtain a comprehensive view of this process, we have performed in-depth sequencing of the transcriptomes of four mammalian species--human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse--and subsequently compared the assembled transcripts and the corresponding syntenic genomic regions. This has resulted in the identification of over five thousand new multiexonic transcriptional events in human and/or chimpanzee that are not observed in the rest of species. Using comparative genomics, we show that the expression of these transcripts is associated with the gain of regulatory motifs upstream of the transcription start site (TSS) and of U1 snRNP sites downstream of the TSS. In general, these transcripts show little evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that many of them are not functional. However, we find signatures of selection in a subset of de novo genes which have evidence of protein translation. Taken together, the data support a model in which frequently-occurring new transcriptional events in the genome provide the raw material for the evolution of new proteins.

  13. A simple method suitable to study de novo root organogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available De novo root organogenesis is the process in which adventitious roots regenerate from detached or wounded plant tissues or organs. In tissue culture, appropriate types and concentrations of plant hormones in the medium are critical for inducing adventitious roots. However, in natural conditions, regeneration from detached organs is likely to rely on endogenous hormones. To investigate the actions of endogenous hormones and the molecular mechanisms guiding de novo root organogenesis, we developed a simple method to imitate natural conditions for adventitious root formation by culturing Arabidopsis thaliana leaf explants on B5 medium without additive hormones. Here we show that the ability of the leaf explants to regenerate roots depends on the age of the leaf and on certain nutrients in the medium. Based on these observations, we provide examples of how this method can be used in different situations, and how it can be optimized. This simple method could be used to investigate the effects of various physiological and molecular changes on the regeneration of adventitious roots. It is also useful for tracing cell lineage during the regeneration process by differential interference contrast observation of -glucuronidase staining, and by live imaging of proteins labeled with fluorescent tags.

  14. De novo transcriptome assembly of Setatria italica variety Taejin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhwa Jo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Foxtail millet (Setaria italica belonging to the family Poaceae is an important millet that is widely cultivated in East Asia. Of the cultivated millets, the foxtail millet has the longest history and is one of the main food crops in South India and China. Moreover, foxtail millet is a model plant system for biofuel generation utilizing the C4 photosynthetic pathway. In this study, we carried out de novo transcriptome assembly for the foxtail millet variety Taejin collected from Korea using next-generation sequencing. We obtained a total of 8.676 GB raw data by paired-end sequencing. The raw data in this study can be available in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRR3406552. The Trinity program was used to de novo assemble 145,332 transcripts. Using the TransDecoder program, we predicted 82,925 putative proteins. BLASTP was performed against the Swiss-Prot protein sequence database to annotate the functions of identified proteins, resulting in 20,555 potentially novel proteins. Taken together, this study provides transcriptome data for the foxtail millet variety Taejin by RNA-Seq.

  15. De novo transcriptome assembly of the mycoheterotrophic plant Monotropa hypopitys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V. Beletsky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Monotropa hypopitys (pinesap is a non-photosynthetic obligately mycoheterotrophic plant of the family Ericaceae. It obtains the carbon and other nutrients from the roots of surrounding autotrophic trees through the associated mycorrhizal fungi. In order to understand the evolutionary changes in the plant genome associated with transition to a heterotrophic lifestyle, we performed de novo transcriptomic analysis of M. hypopitys using next-generation sequencing. We obtained the RNA-Seq data from flowers, flower bracts and roots with haustoria using Illumina HiSeq2500 platform. The raw data obtained in this study can be available in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRP069226. A total of 10.3 GB raw sequence data were obtained, corresponding to 103,357,809 raw reads. A total of 103,025,683 reads were filtered after removing low-quality reads and trimming the adapter sequences. The Trinity program was used to de novo assemble 98,349 unigens with an N50 of 1342 bp. Using the TransDecoder program, we predicted 43,505 putative proteins. 38,416 unigenes were annotated in the Swiss-Prot protein sequence database using BLASTX. The obtained transcriptomic data will be useful for further studies of the evolution of plant genomes upon transition to a non-photosynthetic lifestyle and the loss of photosynthesis-related functions.

  16. Investigating dislocation motion through a field of solutes with atomistic simulations and reaction rate theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroukhani, S.; Warner, D.H.

    2017-01-01

    The rate of thermally activated dislocation motion across a field of solutes is studied using traditional and modern atomistically informed rate theories. First, the accuracy of popular variants of the Harmonic Transition State Theory, as the most common approach, is examined by comparing predictions to direct MD simulations. It is shown that HTST predictions are grossly inaccurate due to the anharmonic effect of thermal softening. Next, the utility of the Transition Interface Sampling was examined as the method was recently shown to be effective for predicting the rate of dislocation-precipitate interactions. For dislocation-solute interactions studied here, TIS is found to be accurate only when the dislocation overcomes multiple obstacles at a time, i.e. jerky motion, and it is inaccurate in the unpinning regime where the energy barrier is of diffusive nature. It is then shown that the Partial Path TIS method - designed for diffusive barriers - provides accurate predictions in the unpinning regime. The two methods are then used to study the temperature and load dependence of the rate. It is shown that Meyer-Neldel (MN) rule prediction of the entropy barrier is not as accurate as it is in the case of dislocation-precipitate interactions. In response, an alternative model is proposed that provides an accurate prediction of the entropy barrier. This model can be combined with TST to offer an attractively simple rate prediction approach. Lastly, (PP)TIS is used to predict the Strain Rate Sensitivity (SRS) factor at experimental strain rates and the predictions are compared to experimental values.

  17. Atomistic modelling study of lanthanide incorporation in the crystal lattice of an apatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis-Achille, V.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of natural and synthetic apatites allow to propose such crystals as matrix for nuclear waste storage. The neodymium substituted britholite, Ca 9 Nd(PO 4 ) 5 (SiO 4 )F 2 . is a model for the trivalent actinide storage Neodymium can be substituted in two types of sites. The aim of this thesis is to compare the chemical nature of this two sites in fluoro-apatite Ca 9 (PO 4 ) 6 F 2 and then in britholite, using ab initio atomistic modeling. Two approaches are used: one considers the infinite crystals and the second considers clusters. The calculations of the electronic structure for both were performed using Kohn and Sham density functional theory in the local approximation. For solids, pseudopotentials were used, and wave functions are expanded in plane waves. For clusters, a frozen core approximation was used, and the wave functions are expanded in a linear combination of Slater type atomic orbitals. The pseudopotential is semi-relativistic for neodymium, and the Hamiltonian is scalar relativistic for the clusters. The validation of the solid approach is performed using two test cases: YPO 4 and ScPO 4 . Two numerical tools were developed to compute electronic deformation density map, and calculate partial density of stases. A full optimisation of the lattice parameters with a relaxation of the atomic coordinates leads to correct structural and thermodynamic properties for the fluoro-apatite, compared to experience. The electronic deformation density maps do not show any significant differences. between the two calcium sites. but Mulliken analysis on the solid and on the clusters point out the more ionic behavior of the calcium in site 2. A neodymium substituted britholite is then studied. Neodymium location only induces local modifications in; the crystalline structure and few changes in the formation enthalpy. The electronic study points out an increase of the covalent character the bonding involving neodymium compared with the one related to calcium

  18. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-07-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  19. Are current atomistic force fields accurate enough to study proteins in crowded environments?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drazen Petrov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The high concentration of macromolecules in the crowded cellular interior influences different thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins, including their structural stabilities, intermolecular binding affinities and enzymatic rates. Moreover, various structural biology methods, such as NMR or different spectroscopies, typically involve samples with relatively high protein concentration. Due to large sampling requirements, however, the accuracy of classical molecular dynamics (MD simulations in capturing protein behavior at high concentration still remains largely untested. Here, we use explicit-solvent MD simulations and a total of 6.4 µs of simulated time to study wild-type (folded and oxidatively damaged (unfolded forms of villin headpiece at 6 mM and 9.2 mM protein concentration. We first perform an exhaustive set of simulations with multiple protein molecules in the simulation box using GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7 force fields together with different types of electrostatics treatment and solution ionic strengths. Surprisingly, the two villin headpiece variants exhibit similar aggregation behavior, despite the fact that their estimated aggregation propensities markedly differ. Importantly, regardless of the simulation protocol applied, wild-type villin headpiece consistently aggregates even under conditions at which it is experimentally known to be soluble. We demonstrate that aggregation is accompanied by a large decrease in the total potential energy, with not only hydrophobic, but also polar residues and backbone contributing substantially. The same effect is directly observed for two other major atomistic force fields (AMBER99SB-ILDN and CHARMM22-CMAP as well as indirectly shown for additional two (AMBER94, OPLS-AAL, and is possibly due to a general overestimation of the potential energy of protein-protein interactions at the expense of water-water and water-protein interactions. Overall, our results suggest that current MD force fields

  20. Thermodynamics of low-temperature phyllosilicates: from a macroscopic perspective towards achieving atomistic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubacq, B.

    2008-12-01

    suggest several improvements to these methods. We used atomistic simulation to calculate the mixing enthalpy along two solid solutions binaries of interest in low-temperature petrology. Results are in agreement with observations in natural systems and confirm the importance of hydration in clay minerals stability. (author)

  1. From HADES to PARADISE-atomistic simulation of defects in minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Stephen C; Cooke, David J; Kerisit, Sebastien; Marmier, Arnaud S; Taylor, Sarah L; Taylor, Stuart N [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-14

    The development of the HADES code by Michael Norgett in the 1970s enabled, for the first time, the routine simulation of point defects in inorganic solids at the atomic scale. Using examples from current research we illustrate how the scope and applications of atomistic simulations have widened with time and yet still follow an approach readily identifiable with this early work. Firstly we discuss the use of the Mott-Littleton methodology to study the segregation of various isovalent cations to the (00.1) and (01.2) surfaces of haematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The results show that the size of the impurities has a considerable effect on the magnitude of the segregation energy. We then extend these simulations to investigate the effect of the concentration of the impurities at the surface on the segregation process using a supercell approach. We consider next the effect of segregation to stepped surfaces illustrating this with recent work on segregation of La{sup 3+} to CaF{sub 2} surfaces, which show enhanced segregation to step edges. We discuss next the application of lattice dynamics to modelling point defects in complex oxide materials by applying this to the study of hydrogen incorporation into {beta}-Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. Finally our attention is turned to a method for considering the surface energy of physically defective surfaces and we illustrate its approach by considering the low index surfaces of {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  2. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schebarchov, D.; Schulze, T. P.; Hendy, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level

  3. Degenerate Ising model for atomistic simulation of crystal-melt interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schebarchov, D., E-mail: Dmitri.Schebarchov@gmail.com [University Chemical Laboratories, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Schulze, T. P., E-mail: schulze@math.utk.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1300 (United States); Hendy, S. C. [The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2014-02-21

    One of the simplest microscopic models for a thermally driven first-order phase transition is an Ising-type lattice system with nearest-neighbour interactions, an external field, and a degeneracy parameter. The underlying lattice and the interaction coupling constant control the anisotropic energy of the phase boundary, the field strength represents the bulk latent heat, and the degeneracy quantifies the difference in communal entropy between the two phases. We simulate the (stochastic) evolution of this minimal model by applying rejection-free canonical and microcanonical Monte Carlo algorithms, and we obtain caloric curves and heat capacity plots for square (2D) and face-centred cubic (3D) lattices with periodic boundary conditions. Since the model admits precise adjustment of bulk latent heat and communal entropy, neither of which affect the interface properties, we are able to tune the crystal nucleation barriers at a fixed degree of undercooling and verify a dimension-dependent scaling expected from classical nucleation theory. We also analyse the equilibrium crystal-melt coexistence in the microcanonical ensemble, where we detect negative heat capacities and find that this phenomenon is more pronounced when the interface is the dominant contributor to the total entropy. The negative branch of the heat capacity appears smooth only when the equilibrium interface-area-to-volume ratio is not constant but varies smoothly with the excitation energy. Finally, we simulate microcanonical crystal nucleation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium Wulff shape, demonstrating the model's utility in tracking crystal-melt interfaces at the atomistic level.

  4. Atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study of atomic layer deposition derived from density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mahdi; Elliott, Simon D

    2014-01-30

    To describe the atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions of HfO2 from Hf(N(CH3)2)4 and H2O, a three-dimensional on-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo model is developed. In this model, all atomistic reaction pathways in density functional theory (DFT) are implemented as reaction events on the lattice. This contains all steps, from the early stage of adsorption of each ALD precursor, kinetics of the surface protons, interaction between the remaining precursors (steric effect), influence of remaining fragments on adsorption sites (blocking), densification of each ALD precursor, migration of each ALD precursors, and cooperation between the remaining precursors to adsorb H2O (cooperative effect). The essential chemistry of the ALD reactions depends on the local environment at the surface. The coordination number and a neighbor list are used to implement the dependencies. The validity and necessity of the proposed reaction pathways are statistically established at the mesoscale. The formation of one monolayer of precursor fragments is shown at the end of the metal pulse. Adsorption and dissociation of the H2O precursor onto that layer is described, leading to the delivery of oxygen and protons to the surface during the H2O pulse. Through these processes, the remaining precursor fragments desorb from the surface, leaving the surface with bulk-like and OH-terminated HfO2, ready for the next cycle. The migration of the low coordinated remaining precursor fragments is also proposed. This process introduces a slow reordering motion (crawling) at the mesoscale, leading to the smooth and conformal thin film that is characteristic of ALD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. How anacetrapib inhibits the activity of the cholesteryl ester transfer protein? Perspective through atomistic simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Äijänen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP mediates the reciprocal transfer of neutral lipids (cholesteryl esters, triglycerides and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in human blood plasma. A novel molecular agent known as anacetrapib has been shown to inhibit CETP activity and thereby raise high density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol and decrease low density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, thus rendering CETP inhibition an attractive target to prevent and treat the development of various cardiovascular diseases. Our objective in this work is to use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to shed light on the inhibitory mechanism of anacetrapib and unlock the interactions between the drug and CETP. The results show an evident affinity of anacetrapib towards the concave surface of CETP, and especially towards the region of the N-terminal tunnel opening. The primary binding site of anacetrapib turns out to reside in the tunnel inside CETP, near the residues surrounding the N-terminal opening. Free energy calculations show that when anacetrapib resides in this area, it hinders the ability of cholesteryl ester to diffuse out from CETP. The simulations further bring out the ability of anacetrapib to regulate the structure-function relationships of phospholipids and helix X, the latter representing the structural region of CETP important to the process of neutral lipid exchange with lipoproteins. Altogether, the simulations propose CETP inhibition to be realized when anacetrapib is transferred into the lipid binding pocket. The novel insight gained in this study has potential use in the development of new molecular agents capable of preventing the progression of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Shape evolution of nanostructures by thermal and ion beam processing. Modeling and atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roentzsch, L.

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline nanostructures often exhibit gradients of surface (and/or interface) curvature that emerge from fabrication and growth processes or from thermal fluctuations. Thus, the system-inherent capillary force can initiate morphological transformations during further processing steps or during operation at elevated temperature. Therefore and because of the ongoing miniaturization of functional structures which causes a general rise in surface-to-volume ratios, solid-state capillary phenomena will become increasingly important: On the one hand diffusion-mediated capillary processes can be of practical use in view of non-conventional nanostructure fabrication methods based on self-organization mechanisms, on the other hand they can destroy the integrity of nanostructures which can go along with the failure of functionality. Additionally, capillarity-induced shape transformations are effected and can thereby be controlled by applied fields and forces (guided or driven evolution). With these prospects and challenges at hand, formation and shape transformation of single-crystalline nanostructures due to the system-inherent capillary force in combination with external fields or forces are investigated in the frame of this dissertation by means of atomistic computer simulations. For the exploration (search, description, and prediction) of reaction pathways of nanostructure shape transformations, kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations are the method of choice. Since the employed KMC code is founded on a cellular automaton principle, the spatio-temporal development of lattice-based N-particle systems (N up to several million) can be followed for time spans of several orders of magnitude, while considering local phenomena due to atomic-scale effects like diffusion, nucleation, dissociation, or ballistic displacements. In this work, the main emphasis is put on nanostructures which have a cylindrical geometry, for example, nanowires (NWs), nanorods, nanotubes etc

  7. Atomistic structure of cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles for catalytic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Liang; Piccinin, Simone; Laio, Alessandro; Fabris, Stefano

    2012-12-21

    Solar-driven water splitting is a key photochemical reaction that underpins the feasible and sustainable production of solar fuels. An amorphous cobalt-phosphate catalyst (Co-Pi) based on earth-abundant elements has been recently reported to efficiently promote water oxidation to protons and dioxygen, a main bottleneck for the overall process. The structure of this material remains largely unknown. We here exploit ab initio and classical atomistic simulations combined with metadynamics to build a realistic and statistically meaningful model of Co-Pi nanoparticles. We demonstrate the emergence and stability of molecular-size ordered crystallites in nanoparticles initially formed by a disordered Co-O network and phosphate groups. The stable crystallites consist of bis-oxo-bridged Co centers that assemble into layered structures (edge-sharing CoO(6) octahedra) as well as in corner- and face-sharing cubane units. These layered and cubane motifs coexist in the crystallites, which always incorporate disordered phosphate groups at the edges. Our computational nanoparticles, although limited in size to ~1 nm, can contain more than one crystallite and incorporate up to 18 Co centers in the cubane/layered structures. The crystallites are structurally stable up to high temperatures. We simulate the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of our nanoparticles. Those containing several complete and incomplete cubane motifs-which are believed to be essential for the catalytic activity-display a very good agreement with the experimental EXAFS spectra of Co-Pi grains. We propose that the crystallites in our nanoparticles are reliable structural models of the Co-Pi catalyst surface. They will be useful to reveal the origin of the catalytic efficiency of these novel water-oxidation catalysts.

  8. Atomistically determined phase-field modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, dislocation slip, and reactions in fcc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei Mianroodi, Jaber; Svendsen, Bob

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the current work is the development of a phase field model for dislocation dissociation, slip and stacking fault formation in single crystals amenable to determination via atomistic or ab initio methods in the spirit of computational material design. The current approach is based in particular on periodic microelasticity (Wang and Jin, 2001; Bulatov and Cai, 2006; Wang and Li, 2010) to model the strongly non-local elastic interaction of dislocation lines via their (residual) strain fields. These strain fields depend in turn on phase fields which are used to parameterize the energy stored in dislocation lines and stacking faults. This energy storage is modeled here with the help of the "interface" energy concept and model of Cahn and Hilliard (1958) (see also Allen and Cahn, 1979; Wang and Li, 2010). In particular, the "homogeneous" part of this energy is related to the "rigid" (i.e., purely translational) part of the displacement of atoms across the slip plane, while the "gradient" part accounts for energy storage in those regions near the slip plane where atomic displacements deviate from being rigid, e.g., in the dislocation core. Via the attendant global energy scaling, the interface energy model facilitates an atomistic determination of the entire phase field energy as an optimal approximation of the (exact) atomistic energy; no adjustable parameters remain. For simplicity, an interatomic potential and molecular statics are employed for this purpose here; alternatively, ab initio (i.e., DFT-based) methods can be used. To illustrate the current approach, it is applied to determine the phase field free energy for fcc aluminum and copper. The identified models are then applied to modeling of dislocation dissociation, stacking fault formation, glide and dislocation reactions in these materials. As well, the tensile loading of a dislocation loop is considered. In the process, the current thermodynamic picture is compared with the classical mechanical

  9. Atomistic modelling of scattering data in the Collaborative Computational Project for Small Angle Scattering (CCP-SAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Stephen J; Wright, David W; Zhang, Hailiang; Brookes, Emre H; Chen, Jianhan; Irving, Thomas C; Krueger, Susan; Barlow, David J; Edler, Karen J; Scott, David J; Terrill, Nicholas J; King, Stephen M; Butler, Paul D; Curtis, Joseph E

    2016-12-01

    The capabilities of current computer simulations provide a unique opportunity to model small-angle scattering (SAS) data at the atomistic level, and to include other structural constraints ranging from molecular and atomistic energetics to crystallography, electron microscopy and NMR. This extends the capabilities of solution scattering and provides deeper insights into the physics and chemistry of the systems studied. Realizing this potential, however, requires integrating the experimental data with a new generation of modelling software. To achieve this, the CCP-SAS collaboration (http://www.ccpsas.org/) is developing open-source, high-throughput and user-friendly software for the atomistic and coarse-grained molecular modelling of scattering data. Robust state-of-the-art molecular simulation engines and molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo force fields provide constraints to the solution structure inferred from the small-angle scattering data, which incorporates the known physical chemistry of the system. The implementation of this software suite involves a tiered approach in which GenApp provides the deployment infrastructure for running applications on both standard and high-performance computing hardware, and SASSIE provides a workflow framework into which modules can be plugged to prepare structures, carry out simulations, calculate theoretical scattering data and compare results with experimental data. GenApp produces the accessible web-based front end termed SASSIE-web , and GenApp and SASSIE also make community SAS codes available. Applications are illustrated by case studies: (i) inter-domain flexibility in two- to six-domain proteins as exemplified by HIV-1 Gag, MASP and ubiquitin; (ii) the hinge conformation in human IgG2 and IgA1 antibodies; (iii) the complex formed between a hexameric protein Hfq and mRNA; and (iv) synthetic 'bottlebrush' polymers.

  10. Combined "de novo" and "ex novo" lipid fermentation in a mix-medium of corncob acid hydrolysate and soybean oil by Trichosporon dermatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Luo, Mu-Tan; Chen, Xue-Fang; Qi, Gao-Xiang; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Can; Li, Hai-Long; Chen, Xin-De

    2017-01-01

    Microbial oil is one important bio-product for its important function in energy, chemical, and food industry. Finding suitable substrates is one key issue for its industrial application. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates can be utilized by oleaginous microorganisms with two different bio-pathways (" de novo " lipid fermentation and " ex novo " lipid fermentation). To date, most of the research on lipid fermentation has focused mainly on only one fermentation pathway and little work was carried out on both " de novo " and " ex novo " lipid fermentation simultaneously; thus, the advantages of both lipid fermentation cannot be fulfilled comprehensively. In this study, corncob acid hydrolysate with soybean oil was used as a mix-medium for combined " de novo " and " ex novo " lipid fermentation by oleaginous yeast Trichosporon dermatis . Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates (sugars and soybean oil) in the medium can be utilized simultaneously and efficiently by T. dermatis . Different fermentation modes were compared and the batch mode was the most suitable for the combined fermentation. The influence of soybean oil concentration, inoculum size, and initial pH on the lipid fermentation was evaluated and 20 g/L soybean oil, 5% inoculum size, and initial pH 6.0 were suitable for this bioprocess. By this technology, the lipid composition of extracellular hydrophobic substrate (soybean oil) can be modified. Although adding emulsifier showed little beneficial effect on lipid production, it can modify the intracellular lipid composition of T. dermatis . The present study proves the potential and possibility of combined " de novo " and " ex novo " lipid fermentation. This technology can use hydrophilic and hydrophobic sustainable bio-resources to generate lipid feedstock for the production of biodiesel or other lipid-based chemical compounds and to treat some special wastes such as oil-containing wastewater.

  11. Interplay between De Novo Biosynthesis and Sequestration of Cyanogenic Glucosides in Arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürstenberg-Hägg, Joel

    (Zygaenidae, Lepidoptera) both sequester (take up and accumulate) the CNglcs linamarin and lotaustralin from their food plants (Fabacea) and biosynthesize them de novo from valine and isoleucine. The presented research demonstrates that de novo biosynthesis of CNglcs in Z. filipendulae is dependent...

  12. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0689] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process... for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process (Evaluation of...

  13. De novo mutation in the dopamine transporter gene associates dopamine dysfunction with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, P J; Campbell, N G; Sharma, S

    2013-01-01

    De novo genetic variation is an important class of risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recently, whole-exome sequencing of ASD families has identified a novel de novo missense mutation in the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) gene, which results in a Thr to Met substitution...

  14. Simulating subsurface flow and transport on ultrascale computers using PFLOTRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Richard Tran; Lu, Chuan; Lichtner, Peter C; Hammond, Glenn E

    2007-01-01

    We describe PFLOTRAN, a recently developed code for modeling multi-phase, multi-component subsurface flow and reactive transport using massively parallel computers. PFLOTRAN is built on top of PETSc, the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation. Leveraging PETSc has allowed us to develop-with a relatively modest investment in development effort-a code that exhibits excellent performance on the largest-scale supercomputers. Very significant enhancements to the code are planned during our SciDAC-2 project. Here we describe the current state of the code, present an example of its use on Jaguar, the Cray XT3/4 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consisting of 11706 dual-core Opteron processor nodes, and briefly outline our future plans for the code

  15. Simulating subsurface flow and transport on ultrascale computers using PFLOTRAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Richard Tran [Computational Earth Sciences Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6015 (United States); Lu, Chuan [Hydrology, Geochemistry, and Geology Group, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lichtner, Peter C [Hydrology, Geochemistry, and Geology Group, Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hammond, Glenn E [Hydrology Group, Environmental Technology Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    We describe PFLOTRAN, a recently developed code for modeling multi-phase, multi-component subsurface flow and reactive transport using massively parallel computers. PFLOTRAN is built on top of PETSc, the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation. Leveraging PETSc has allowed us to develop-with a relatively modest investment in development effort-a code that exhibits excellent performance on the largest-scale supercomputers. Very significant enhancements to the code are planned during our SciDAC-2 project. Here we describe the current state of the code, present an example of its use on Jaguar, the Cray XT3/4 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory consisting of 11706 dual-core Opteron processor nodes, and briefly outline our future plans for the code.

  16. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p...... = 8.2 × 10(-4)), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have...... analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  17. Genes from scratch--the evolutionary fate of de novo genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Although considered an extremely unlikely event, many genes emerge from previously noncoding genomic regions. This review covers the entire life cycle of such de novo genes. Two competing hypotheses about the process of de novo gene birth are discussed as well as the high death rate of de novo genes. Despite the high death rate, some de novo genes are retained and remain functional, even in distantly related species, through their integration into gene networks. Further studies combining gene expression with ribosome profiling in multiple populations across different species will be instrumental for an improved understanding of the evolutionary processes operating on de novo genes. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Peptide de novo sequencing of mixture tandem mass spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorshkov, Vladimir; Hotta, Stéphanie Yuki Kolbeck; Braga, Thiago Verano

    2016-01-01

    they decrease the identification performance using database search engines. De novo sequencing approaches are expected to be even more sensitive to the reduction in mass spectrum quality resulting from peptide precursor co-isolation and thus prone to false identifications. The deconvolution approach matched...... complementary b-, y-ions to each precursor peptide mass, which allowed the creation of virtual spectra containing sequence specific fragment ions of each co-isolated peptide. Deconvolution processing resulted in equally efficient identification rates but increased the absolute number of correctly sequenced...... peptides. The improvement was in the range of 20–35% additional peptide identifications for a HeLa lysate sample. Some correct sequences were identified only using unprocessed spectra; however, the number of these was lower than those where improvement was obtained by mass spectral deconvolution. Tight...

  19. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Esther [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Schraner, Elisabeth M. [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Sonda, Sabrina [Institute of Parasitology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Kaech, Andres [Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Lucas, Miriam S. [Electron Microscopy ETH Zuerich (EMEZ), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Ackermann, Mathias [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Wild, Peter, E-mail: pewild@access.uzh.ch [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  20. De-novo design of antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Zeitler

    Full Text Available This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of "healthy" food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  1. De novo SOX11 mutations cause Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Koshimizu, Eriko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Phadke, Shubha; Kou, Ikuyo; Shiina, Masaaki; Suzuki, Toshifumi; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Shintaro; Yamashita, Michiaki; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kodera, Hirofumi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Ogata, Kazuhiro; Ikegawa, Shiro; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-06-02

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS) is a congenital disorder characterized by growth deficiency, intellectual disability, microcephaly, characteristic facial features and hypoplastic nails of the fifth fingers and/or toes. We previously identified mutations in five genes encoding subunits of the BAF complex, in 55% of CSS patients. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing in additional CSS patients, identifying de novo SOX11 mutations in two patients with a mild CSS phenotype. sox11a/b knockdown in zebrafish causes brain abnormalities, potentially explaining the brain phenotype of CSS. SOX11 is the downstream transcriptional factor of the PAX6-BAF complex, highlighting the importance of the BAF complex and SOX11 transcriptional network in brain development.

  2. De novo transcriptome assembly of shrimp Palaemon serratus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Perina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The shrimp Palaemon serratus is a coastal decapod crustacean with a high commercial value. It is harvested for human consumption. In this study, we used Illumina sequencing technology (HiSeq 2000 to sequence, assemble and annotate the transcriptome of P. serratus. RNA was isolated from muscle of adults individuals and, from a pool of larvae. A total number of 4 cDNA libraries were constructed, using the TruSeq RNA Sample Preparation Kit v2. The raw data in this study was deposited in NCBI SRA database with study accession number of SRP090769. The obtained data were subjected to de novo transcriptome assembly using Trinity software, and coding regions were predicted by TransDecoder. We used Blastp and Sma3s to annotate the identified proteins. The transcriptome data could provide some insight into the understanding of genes involved in the larval development and metamorphosis.

  3. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  4. Application of Generative Autoencoder in De Novo Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Thomas; Olivecrona, Marcus; Engkvist, Ola; Bajorath, Jürgen; Chen, Hongming

    2018-01-01

    A major challenge in computational chemistry is the generation of novel molecular structures with desirable pharmacological and physiochemical properties. In this work, we investigate the potential use of autoencoder, a deep learning methodology, for de novo molecular design. Various generative autoencoders were used to map molecule structures into a continuous latent space and vice versa and their performance as structure generator was assessed. Our results show that the latent space preserves chemical similarity principle and thus can be used for the generation of analogue structures. Furthermore, the latent space created by autoencoders were searched systematically to generate novel compounds with predicted activity against dopamine receptor type 2 and compounds similar to known active compounds not included in the trainings set were identified. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. De novo development of artistic creativity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Ambar

    2011-10-01

    The case of an 82-year-old female with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), who developed unusual artistic creativity after development of her disease, is described. The possible pathogenetic mechanism is discussed. The patient showed no inclination toward visual arts during her premorbid years. However, 4 years after development of AD suggestive symptoms she started painting beautiful pictures rather impulsively. Some such paintings have been appreciated even by a qualified art expert. Such de novo development of artistic creativity had been described earlier in subjects with the semantic form of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not in AD. The prevailing concept of lateralized compromise and paradoxical functional facilitation, proposed in connection with FTD subjects, may not be applicable in AD subjects where the affection is more diffuse and more posterior in the brain. Hence, the likely pathogenetic mechanism involved in the case described may remain uncertain. Possibilities are discussed.

  6. Novo teste para diagnóstico das afasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Albernaz

    1953-06-01

    Full Text Available Um novo teste para diagnóstico e contrôle do tratamento das diferentes formas de afasia, especialmente adaptado para a língua portuguêsa, é apresentado e descrito em detalhe. O teste, que será de valor para clínicos e psicólogos interessados no tratamento e reabilitação de pacientes afásicos, se executa em cêrca de 30 minutos, interpreta-se fàcilmente e fornece os elementos necessários para o planejamento da reeducação da linguagem. Além disso, a repetição do teste de tempos em tempos indicará os progressos do paciente e sugerirá modificações do plano de tratamento no momento oportuno.

  7. De novo identification of viral pathogens from cell culture hologenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patowary Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fast, specific identification and surveillance of pathogens is the cornerstone of any outbreak response system, especially in the case of emerging infectious diseases and viral epidemics. This process is generally tedious and time-consuming thus making it ineffective in traditional settings. The added complexity in these situations is the non-availability of pure isolates of pathogens as they are present as mixed genomes or hologenomes. Next-generation sequencing approaches offer an attractive solution in this scenario as it provides adequate depth of sequencing at fast and affordable costs, apart from making it possible to decipher complex interactions between genomes at a scale that was not possible before. The widespread application of next-generation sequencing in this field has been limited by the non-availability of an efficient computational pipeline to systematically analyze data to delineate pathogen genomes from mixed population of genomes or hologenomes. Findings We applied next-generation sequencing on a sample containing mixed population of genomes from an epidemic with appropriate processing and enrichment. The data was analyzed using an extensive computational pipeline involving mapping to reference genome sets and de-novo assembly. In depth analysis of the data generated revealed the presence of sequences corresponding to Japanese encephalitis virus. The genome of the virus was also independently de-novo assembled. The presence of the virus was in addition, verified using standard molecular biology techniques. Conclusions Our approach can accurately identify causative pathogens from cell culture hologenome samples containing mixed population of genomes and in principle can be applied to patient hologenome samples without any background information. This methodology could be widely applied to identify and isolate pathogen genomes and understand their genomic variability during outbreaks.

  8. The limits of de novo DNA motif discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Simcha

    Full Text Available A major challenge in molecular biology is reverse-engineering the cis-regulatory logic that plays a major role in the control of gene expression. This program includes searching through DNA sequences to identify "motifs" that serve as the binding sites for transcription factors or, more generally, are predictive of gene expression across cellular conditions. Several approaches have been proposed for de novo motif discovery-searching sequences without prior knowledge of binding sites or nucleotide patterns. However, unbiased validation is not straightforward. We consider two approaches to unbiased validation of discovered motifs: testing the statistical significance of a motif using a DNA "background" sequence model to represent the null hypothesis and measuring performance in predicting membership in gene clusters. We demonstrate that the background models typically used are "too null," resulting in overly optimistic assessments of significance, and argue that performance in predicting TF binding or expression patterns from DNA motifs should be assessed by held-out data, as in predictive learning. Applying this criterion to common motif discovery methods resulted in universally poor performance, although there is a marked improvement when motifs are statistically significant against real background sequences. Moreover, on synthetic data where "ground truth" is known, discriminative performance of all algorithms is far below the theoretical upper bound, with pronounced "over-fitting" in training. A key conclusion from this work is that the failure of de novo discovery approaches to accurately identify motifs is basically due to statistical intractability resulting from the fixed size of co-regulated gene clusters, and thus such failures do not necessarily provide evidence that unfound motifs are not active biologically. Consequently, the use of prior knowledge to enhance motif discovery is not just advantageous but necessary. An implementation of

  9. From empirical to ab initio: transferable potentials in the atomistic simulation of amorphous carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, N.A.; Goringe, C.M.; McKenzie, D.R.; McCulloch, D.G.; Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, VIC

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Silicon is often described as the prototype covalent material, and when it comes to developing atomistic models this situation is well described by the sentiment that 'everything works for silicon'. The same cannot be said for carbon though, where the interaction potential has always proved problematical, be it with empirical, tight-binding or ab initio methods. Thus far the most decisive contributions to understanding amorphous carbon networks have come from ab initio simulations using the Car-Parrinello method, where the fully quantum treatment of the valence electrons has provided unexpected insight into the local structure. However such first principles calculations are restricted spatially and temporally to systems with approximately 100 atoms and times of order one picosecond. There is therefore demand for less expensive techniques capable of resolving important questions whose solution can only to found with larger simulations running for longer times. In the case of tetrahedral amorphous carbon, such issues include the release of compressive stress through annealing, the origin of graphitic surface layers and the nature of the film growth process and thermal spike. Against this background tight-binding molecular dynamics has emerged as a popular alternative to first principles methods, and our group has an ongoing program to understand film growth using one of the efficient variants of tight-binding. Another direction of research is a new empirical potential based on the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential (EDIP) recently developed for silicon. The EDIP approach represents a promising direction for empirical potentials through its use of ab initio data to motivate the functional form as well as the more conventional parametrisation. By inverting ab initio cohesive energy curves the authors of EDIP arrived at a pair potential expression which reduces to the well-known Stillinger-Weber form at integer coordination, while providing

  10. Feasible and realiable ab initio atomistic modeling for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beridze, George

    2016-07-01

    The studies in this PhD dissertation focus on finding a computationally feasible ab initio methodology which would make the reliable first principle atomistic modeling of nuclear materials possible. Here we tested the performance of the different DFT functionals and the DFT-based methods that explicitly account for the electronic correlations, such as the DFT+U approach, for prediction of structural and thermochemical properties of lanthanide- and actinide-bearing materials. In the previous studies, the value of the Hubbard U parameter, required by the DFT+U method, was often guessed or empirically derived. We applied and extensively tested the recently developed ab initio methods such as the constrained local density approximation (cLDA) and the constrained random phase approximation (cRPA), to compute the Hubbard U parameter values from first principles, thus making the DFT+U method a real it ab initio parameter free approach. Our successful benchmarking studies of the parameter-free DFT+U method, for prediction of the structures and the reaction enthalpies of actinide- and lanthanide-bearing molecular compounds and solids indicate, that the linear response method (cLDA) provides a very good, and consistent with the cRPA prediction, estimate of the Hubbard U parameter. In particular, we found that the Hubbard U parameter value, which describes the strength of the on-site Coulomb repulsion between f-electrons, depends strongly on the oxidation state of the f-element, its local bonding environment and crystalline structure of the materials, which has never been considered in such detail before. We have shown, that the applied computational approach substantially, if not dramatically, reduces the error of the predicted reaction enthalpies making the accuracy of the prediction comparable with the uncertainty of the computational unfeasible, higher order methods of quantum chemistry, and experiments. The derived methodology resulted in various, already published

  11. Feasible and realiable ab initio atomistic modeling for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beridze, George

    2016-01-01

    The studies in this PhD dissertation focus on finding a computationally feasible ab initio methodology which would make the reliable first principle atomistic modeling of nuclear materials possible. Here we tested the performance of the different DFT functionals and the DFT-based methods that explicitly account for the electronic correlations, such as the DFT+U approach, for prediction of structural and thermochemical properties of lanthanide- and actinide-bearing materials. In the previous studies, the value of the Hubbard U parameter, required by the DFT+U method, was often guessed or empirically derived. We applied and extensively tested the recently developed ab initio methods such as the constrained local density approximation (cLDA) and the constrained random phase approximation (cRPA), to compute the Hubbard U parameter values from first principles, thus making the DFT+U method a real it ab initio parameter free approach. Our successful benchmarking studies of the parameter-free DFT+U method, for prediction of the structures and the reaction enthalpies of actinide- and lanthanide-bearing molecular compounds and solids indicate, that the linear response method (cLDA) provides a very good, and consistent with the cRPA prediction, estimate of the Hubbard U parameter. In particular, we found that the Hubbard U parameter value, which describes the strength of the on-site Coulomb repulsion between f-electrons, depends strongly on the oxidation state of the f-element, its local bonding environment and crystalline structure of the materials, which has never been considered in such detail before. We have shown, that the applied computational approach substantially, if not dramatically, reduces the error of the predicted reaction enthalpies making the accuracy of the prediction comparable with the uncertainty of the computational unfeasible, higher order methods of quantum chemistry, and experiments. The derived methodology resulted in various, already published

  12. Automated Algorithms for Quantum-Level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations: LDRD Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Crozier, Paul; Moore, Stan Gerald; Swiler, Laura Painton; Stephens, John Adam; Trott, Christian Robert; Foiles, Stephen Martin; Tucker, Garritt J. (Drexel University)

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes the result of LDRD project 12-0395, titled "Automated Algorithms for Quantum-level Accuracy in Atomistic Simulations." During the course of this LDRD, we have developed an interatomic potential for solids and liquids called Spectral Neighbor Analysis Poten- tial (SNAP). The SNAP potential has a very general form and uses machine-learning techniques to reproduce the energies, forces, and stress tensors of a large set of small configurations of atoms, which are obtained using high-accuracy quantum electronic structure (QM) calculations. The local environment of each atom is characterized by a set of bispectrum components of the local neighbor density projected on to a basis of hyperspherical harmonics in four dimensions. The SNAP coef- ficients are determined using weighted least-squares linear regression against the full QM training set. This allows the SNAP potential to be fit in a robust, automated manner to large QM data sets using many bispectrum components. The calculation of the bispectrum components and the SNAP potential are implemented in the LAMMPS parallel molecular dynamics code. Global optimization methods in the DAKOTA software package are used to seek out good choices of hyperparameters that define the overall structure of the SNAP potential. FitSnap.py, a Python-based software pack- age interfacing to both LAMMPS and DAKOTA is used to formulate the linear regression problem, solve it, and analyze the accuracy of the resultant SNAP potential. We describe a SNAP potential for tantalum that accurately reproduces a variety of solid and liquid properties. Most significantly, in contrast to existing tantalum potentials, SNAP correctly predicts the Peierls barrier for screw dislocation motion. We also present results from SNAP potentials generated for indium phosphide (InP) and silica (SiO 2 ). We describe efficient algorithms for calculating SNAP forces and energies in molecular dynamics simulations using massively parallel computers

  13. Large scale atomistic approaches to thermal transport and phonon scattering in nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana

    2012-02-01

    Decreasing the thermal conductivity of bulk materials by nanostructuring and dimensionality reduction, or by introducing some amount of disorder represents a promising strategy in the search for efficient thermoelectric materials [1]. For example, considerable improvements of the thermoelectric efficiency in nanowires with surface roughness [2], superlattices [3] and nanocomposites [4] have been attributed to a significantly reduced thermal conductivity. In order to accurately describe thermal transport processes in complex nanostructured materials and directly compare with experiments, the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can account for both anharmonic and disorder effects in large samples is highly desirable. We will first summarize the strengths and weaknesses of the standard atomistic approaches to thermal transport (molecular dynamics [5], Boltzmann transport equation [6] and Green's function approach [7]) . We will then focus on the methods based on the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation, that are computationally too demanding, at present, to treat large scale systems and thus to investigate realistic materials. We will present a Monte Carlo method [8] to solve the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation [9], that enables computation of the thermal conductivity of ordered and disordered systems with a number of atoms up to an order of magnitude larger than feasible with straightforward integration. We will present a comparison between exact and Monte Carlo Boltzmann transport results for small SiGe nanostructures and then use the Monte Carlo method to analyze the thermal properties of realistic SiGe nanostructured materials. This work is done in collaboration with Davide Donadio, Francois Gygi, and Giulia Galli from UC Davis.[4pt] [1] See e.g. A. J. Minnich, M. S. Dresselhaus, Z. F. Ren, and G. Chen, Energy Environ. Sci. 2, 466 (2009).[0pt] [2] A. I. Hochbaum et al, Nature 451, 163 (2008).[0pt

  14. Elucidating the atomistic mechanisms underpinning plasticity in Li-Si nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xin; Gouissem, Afif; Guduru, Pradeep R.; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-10-01

    Amorphous lithium-silicon (a-Li-Si), especially in nanostructure form, is an attractive high-capacity anode material for next-generation Li-ion batteries. During cycles of charging and discharging, a-Li-Si undergoes substantive inelastic deformation and exhibits microcracking. The mechanical response to repeated lithiation-delithiation eventually results in the loss of electrical contact and consequent decrease of capacity, thus underscoring the importance of studying the plasticity of a-Li-Si nanostructures. In recent years, a variety of phenomenological continuum theories have been introduced that purport to model plasticity and the electro-chemo-mechanical behavior of a-Li-Si. Unfortunately, the micromechanisms and atomistic considerations underlying plasticity in Li-Si material are not yet fully understood and this impedes the development of physics-based constitutive models. Conventional molecular dynamics, although extensively used to study this material, is grossly inadequate to resolve this matter. As is well known, conventional molecular dynamics simulations can only address phenomena with characteristic time scales of (at most) a microsecond. Accordingly, in such simulations, the mechanical behavior is deduced under conditions of very high strain rates (usually, 108s-1 or even higher). This limitation severely impacts a realistic assessment of rate-dependent effects. In this work, we attempt to circumvent the time-scale bottleneck of conventional molecular dynamics and provide novel insights into the mechanisms underpinning plastic deformation of Li-Si nanostructures. We utilize an approach that allows imposition of slow strain rates and involves the employment of a new and recently developed potential energy surface sampling method—the so-called autonomous basin climbing—to identify the local minima in the potential energy surface. Combined with other techniques, such as nudged elastic band, kinetic Monte Carlo and transition state theory, we assess

  15. Atomistic simulations of screw dislocations in bcc tungsten: From core structures and static properties to interaction with vacancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ke [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Niu, Liang-Liang [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Jin, Shuo, E-mail: jinshuo@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Shu, Xiaolin [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Xie, Hongxian [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Wang, Lifang; Lu, Guang-Hong [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Materials and Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Atomistic simulations have been used to investigate the core structures, static properties of isolated 1/2 <1 1 1> screw dislocations, and their interaction with vacancies in bcc tungsten (W) based on three empirical interatomic potentials. Differential displacement maps show that only one embedded atom method potential is able to reproduce the compact non-degenerate core as evidenced by ab initio calculations. The obtained strain energy and stress distribution from atomistic simulations are, in general, consistent with elasticity theory predictions. In particular, one component of the calculated shear stress, which is not present according to elasticity theory, is non-negligible in the core region of our dislocation model. The differences between the results calculated from three interatomic potentials are in details, such as the specific value and the symmetry, but the trend of spatial distributions of static properties in the long range are close to each other. By calculating the binding energies between the dislocations and vacancies, we demonstrate that the dislocations act as vacancy sinks, which may be important for the nucleation and growth of hydrogen bubbles in W under irradiation.

  16. Comparative simulations of microjetting using atomistic and continuous approaches in the presence of viscosity and surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, O.; Jaouen, S.; Soulard, L.; Heuzé, O.; Colombet, L.

    2017-10-01

    We compare, at similar scales, the processes of microjetting and ejecta production from shocked roughened metal surfaces by using atomistic and continuous approaches. The atomistic approach is based on very large scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with systems containing up to 700 × 106 atoms. The continuous approach is based on Eulerian hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive mesh refinement; the simulations take into account the effects of viscosity and surface tension, and the equation of state is calculated from the MD simulations. The microjetting is generated by shock-loading above its fusion point a three-dimensional tin crystal with an initial sinusoidal free surface perturbation, the crystal being set in contact with a vacuum. Several samples with homothetic wavelengths and amplitudes of defect are simulated in order to investigate the influence of viscosity and surface tension of the metal. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic code reproduces with very good agreement the profiles, calculated from the MD simulations, of the ejected mass and velocity along the jet. Both codes also exhibit a similar fragmentation phenomenology of the metallic liquid sheets ejected, although the fragmentation seed is different. We show in particular, that it depends on the mesh size in the continuous approach.

  17. Atomistic approach to predict the glass-forming ability in Zr–Cu–Al ternary metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.Y. [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu, X.J. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, G.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Niu, X.R. [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Liu, C.T., E-mail: chainliu@cityu.edu.hk [Center for Advanced Structural Materials, Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • An atomistic approach has been developed to predict the glass forming ability (GFA) in Zr–Cu–Al ternary alloy system. • Both of the thermodynamic and structure-dependent kinetic effects to glass formation have been taken into account. • The first-principles calculation and molecular dynamics simulation have been performed. • The approach predicts the best glass former in the model Zr–Cu–Al alloy system. • The predicted GFA is consistent with various experimental results. - Abstract: Prediction of composition-dependent glass-forming ability (GFA) remains to be a key scientific challenge in the metallic-glass community, especially in multi-component alloy systems. In the present study, we apply an atomistic approach to predict the trend of GFA effectively in the Zr–Cu–Al ternary alloy system from alloy compositions alone. This approach is derived from the first-principles calculations based on the density-functional theory and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. By considering of both the thermodynamic and atomic-structure induced kinetic effects, the predicted GFA trend from this approach shows an excellent agreement with experimental data available in this alloy system, manifesting its capability of seeking metallic glasses with superior GFA in ternary alloy systems.

  18. Evaluation of Alternative Atomistic Models for the Incipient Growth of ZnO by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Manh-Hung; Tian, Liang; Chaker, Ahmad; Skopin, Evgenii; Cantelli, Valentina; Ouled, Toufik; Boichot, Raphaël; Crisci, Alexandre; Lay, Sabine; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Thomas, Olivier; Deschanvres, Jean-Luc; Renevier, Hubert; Fong, Dillon; Ciatto, Gianluca

    2017-03-20

    ZnO thin films are interesting for applications in several technological fields, including optoelectronics and renewable energies. Nanodevice applications require controlled synthesis of ZnO structures at nanometer scale, which can be achieved via atomic layer deposition (ALD). However, the mechanisms governing the initial stages of ALD had not been addressed until very recently. Investigations into the initial nucleation and growth as well as the atomic structure of the heterointerface are crucial to optimize the ALD process and understand the structure-property relationships for ZnO. We have used a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron x-ray techniques to investigate both the structural and chemical evolution during ZnO growth by ALD on two different substrates, i.e., SiO2 and Al2O3, which led us to formulate an atomistic model of the incipient growth of ZnO. The model relies on the formation of nanoscale islands of different size and aspect ratio and consequent disorder induced in the Zn neighbors' distribution. However, endorsement of our model requires testing and discussion of possible alternative models which could account for the experimental results. In this work, we review, test, and rule out several alternative models; the results confirm our view of the atomistic mechanisms at play, which influence the overall microstructure and resulting properties of the final thin film.

  19. Atomistic Simulation of the Rate-Dependent Ductile-to-Brittle Failure Transition in Bicrystalline Metal Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weiwei; Cao, Penghui; Park, Harold S

    2018-02-14

    The mechanical properties and plastic deformation mechanisms of metal nanowires have been studied intensely for many years. One of the important yet unresolved challenges in this field is to bridge the gap in properties and deformation mechanisms reported for slow strain rate experiments (∼10 -2 s -1 ), and high strain rate molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (∼10 8 s -1 ) such that a complete understanding of strain rate effects on mechanical deformation and plasticity can be obtained. In this work, we use long time scale atomistic modeling based on potential energy surface exploration to elucidate the atomistic mechanisms governing a strain-rate-dependent incipient plasticity and yielding transition for face centered cubic (FCC) copper and silver nanowires. The transition occurs for both metals with both pristine and rough surfaces for all computationally accessible diameters (ductile-to-brittle transition in failure mode similar to previous experimental studies on bicrystalline silver nanowires is observed, which is driven by differences in dislocation activity and grain boundary mobility as compared to the high strain rate case.

  20. Cinema utópico: a construção de um novo homem e um novo mundo

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Savernini Lopes

    2011-01-01

    O cinema, desde seus primórdios, prefigurou o espaço cibernético como um novo espaço imaterial construído coletivamente. A concepção desse outro lugar não físico para o qual o homem poderia migrar estabelece para o cinema e para o ciberespaço uma relação direta com as utopias. Na acepção do romance filosófico de Thomas More, a Utopia define-se como um outro espaço não-existente, irrealizável e ideal que diagnostica o atual. O cinema carregaria caracteres fundamentais da Utopia tanto no que se...

  1. Thermodynamic description of polymorphism in Q- and N-rich peptide aggregates revealed by atomistic simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Joshua T; Radford, Sheena E; Harris, Sarah A

    2009-07-08

    Amyloid fibrils are long, helically symmetric protein aggregates that can display substantial variation (polymorphism), including alterations in twist and structure at the beta-strand and protofilament levels, even when grown under the same experimental conditions. The structural and thermodynamic origins of this behavior are not yet understood. We performed molecular-dynamics simulations to determine the thermodynamic properties of different polymorphs of the peptide GNNQQNY, modeling fibrils containing different numbers of protofilaments based on the structure of amyloid-like cross-beta crystals of this peptide. We also modeled fibrils with new orientations of the side chains, as well as a de novo designed structure based on antiparallel beta-strands. The simulations show that these polymorphs are approximately isoenergetic under a range of conditions. Structural analysis reveals a dynamic reorganization of electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in the main and side chains of the Gln and Asn residues that characterize this peptide sequence. Q/N-rich stretches are found in several amyloidogenic proteins and peptides, including the yeast prions Sup35-N and Ure2p, as well as in the human poly-Q disease proteins, including the ataxins and huntingtin. Based on our results, we propose that these residues imbue a unique structural plasticity to the amyloid fibrils that they comprise, rationalizing the ability of proteins enriched in these amino acids to form prion strains with heritable and different phenotypic traits.

  2. On the Origin of De Novo Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Wen; Chen, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Hagmann, Jörg; Han, Ting-Shen; Zou, Yu-Pan; Ge, Song; Guo, Ya-Long

    2016-08-03

    De novo genes, which originate from ancestral nongenic sequences, are one of the most important sources of protein-coding genes. This origination process is crucial for the adaptation of organisms. However, how de novo genes arise and become fixed in a population or species remains largely unknown. Here, we identified 782 de novo genes from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and divided them into three types based on the availability of translational evidence, transcriptional evidence, and neither transcriptional nor translational evidence for their origin. Importantly, by integrating multiple types of omics data, including data from genomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, and translatomes, we found that epigenetic modifications (DNA methylation and histone modification) play an important role in the origination process of de novo genes. Intriguingly, using the transcriptomes and methylomes from the same population of 84 accessions, we found that de novo genes that are transcribed in approximately half of the total accessions within the population are highly methylated, with lower levels of transcription than those transcribed at other frequencies within the population. We hypothesized that, during the origin of de novo gene alleles, those neutralized to low expression states via DNA methylation have relatively high probabilities of spreading and becoming fixed in a population. Our results highlight the process underlying the origin of de novo genes at the population level, as well as the importance of DNA methylation in this process. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Glucagon infusion increases rate of purine synthesis de novo in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itakura, Mitsuo; Maeda, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masami; Yamashita, Kamejiro

    1987-01-01

    Based on the parallel increases of glucagon, the second peak of hepatic cAMP, and the rate of purine synthesis de novo in the prereplicative period in regenerating rate liver after a 70% hepatectomy, it was hypothesized that glucagon is responsible for the increased rate of purine synthesis de novo. To test this hypothesis, the effect of glucagon or dibutyryl cAMP infusion on the rate of purine synthesis de novo in rat liver was studied. Glucagon infusion but not insulin or glucose infusion increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo, which was assayed by [ 14 C]glycine or [ 14 C]formate incorporation, by 2.7- to 4.3-fold. Glucagon infusion increased cAMP concentrations by 4.9-fold and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate concentrations by 1.5-fold in liver but did not change the specific activity of amidophosphoribosyltransferase or purine ribonucleotide concentrations. Dibutyryl cAMP infusion also increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo by 2.2- to 4.0-fold. Because glucagon infusion increased the rate of purine synthesis de novo in the presence of unchanged purine ribonucleotide concentrations, it is concluded that glucagon after infusion or in animals after a 70% hepatectomy is playing an anabolic role to increase the rate of purine synthesis de novo by increasing cAMP and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate concentrations

  4. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taipale

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a correlation analysis and a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May–August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 200, 290, 180, and 200 μg m−2 h−1. The emissions were partly light dependent, probably due to de novo biosynthesis. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30 % and 46 %. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, suggesting that the role of de novo biosynthesis was observable. Given the uncertainties in this study, we conclude that more accurate estimates of the contribution of de novo emissions are required for improving monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  5. Sequencing and de novo assembly of 150 genomes from Denmark as a population reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maretty, Lasse; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Petersen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    or by performing local assembly. However, these approaches are biased against discovery of structural variants and variation in the more complex parts of the genome. Hence, large-scale de novo assembly is needed. Here we show that it is possible to construct excellent de novo assemblies from high......-coverage sequencing with mate-pair libraries extending up to 20 kilobases. We report de novo assemblies of 150 individuals (50 trios) from the GenomeDenmark project. The quality of these assemblies is similar to those obtained using the more expensive long-read technology. We use the assemblies to identify a rich set...

  6. Eculizumab for drug-induced de novo posttransplantation thrombotic microangiopathy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safa, Kassem; Logan, Merranda S; Batal, Ibrahim; Gabardi, Steven; Rennke, Helmut G; Abdi, Reza

    2015-02-01

    De novo thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) following renal transplantation is a severe complication associated with high rates of allograft failure. Several immunosuppressive agents are associated with TMA. Conventional approaches to managing this entity, such as withdrawal of the offending agent and/or plasmapheresis, often offer limited help, with high rates of treatment failure and graft loss. We herein report a case of drug induced de novo TMA successfully treated using the C5a inhibitor eculizumab in a renal transplant patient. This report highlights a potentially important role for eculizumab in settings where drug-induced de novo TMA is refractory to conventional therapies.

  7. De novo assembly and phasing of a Korean human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Sun; Rhie, Arang; Kim, Junsoo; Lee, Sangjin; Sohn, Min-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Uk; Hastie, Alex; Cao, Han; Yun, Ji-Young; Kim, Jihye; Kuk, Junho; Park, Gun Hwa; Kim, Juhyeok; Ryu, Hanna; Kim, Jongbum; Roh, Mira; Baek, Jeonghun; Hunkapiller, Michael W; Korlach, Jonas; Shin, Jong-Yeon; Kim, Changhoon

    2016-10-13

    Advances in genome assembly and phasing provide an opportunity to investigate the diploid architecture of the human genome and reveal the full range of structural variation across population groups. Here we report the de novo assembly and haplotype phasing of the Korean individual AK1 (ref. 1) using single-molecule real-time sequencing, next-generation mapping, microfluidics-based linked reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) sequencing approaches. Single-molecule sequencing coupled with next-generation mapping generated a highly contiguous assembly, with a contig N50 size of 17.9 Mb and a scaffold N50 size of 44.8 Mb, resolving 8 chromosomal arms into single scaffolds. The de novo assembly, along with local assemblies and spanning long reads, closes 105 and extends into 72 out of 190 euchromatic gaps in the reference genome, adding 1.03 Mb of previously intractable sequence. High concordance between the assembly and paired-end sequences from 62,758 BAC clones provides strong support for the robustness of the assembly. We identify 18,210 structural variants by direct comparison of the assembly with the human reference, identifying thousands of breakpoints that, to our knowledge, have not been reported before. Many of the insertions are reflected in the transcriptome and are shared across the Asian population. We performed haplotype phasing of the assembly with short reads, long reads and linked reads from whole-genome sequencing and with short reads from 31,719 BAC clones, thereby achieving phased blocks with an N50 size of 11.6 Mb. Haplotigs assembled from single-molecule real-time reads assigned to haplotypes on phased blocks covered 89% of genes. The haplotigs accurately characterized the hypervariable major histocompatability complex region as well as demonstrating allele configuration in clinically relevant genes such as CYP2D6. This work presents the most contiguous diploid human genome assembly so far, with extensive investigation of

  8. Natural sciences in the focus IV. Foundations of atomistics, quantum mechanics, and chemistry; Naturwissenschaften im Fokus IV. Grundlagen der Atomistik, Quantenmechanik und Chemie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Christian

    2017-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: The electronic structure of the atom, the structure of the atomic nucleus together with radioactive decays, fission, and fusion, the elementary particles together with the standard model, the atomistic foundations of chemistrytogether with the binding types, and inorganic and organic chemistry. (HSI)

  9. 3D atomistic studies of fatigue behaviour of edge crack (0 0 1) in bcc iron loaded in mode i and II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Anna; Pokluda, J.; Uhnáková, Alena; Hora, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 66, September (2014), s. 11-19 ISSN 0142-1123 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/0698 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : fatigue crack growth * bcc iron * 3D atomistic simulations * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 2.275, year: 2014 www.elsevier.com/locate/ijfatigue

  10. Insights into the charge carrier terahertz mobility in polyfluorenes from large-scale atomistic simulations and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vukmirović, N.; Ponseca, C.S.; Němec, Hynek; Yartsev, A.; Sundström, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 37 (2012), s. 19665-1972 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : charge carrier mobility * time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy * multiscale atomistic calculations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.814, year: 2012

  11. An atomistic geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration for DNA-radiation interaction simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, M. A.; Sikansi, D.; Cavalcante, F.; Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V.; Francis, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an atomistic geometrical model for the B-DNA configuration is explained. This model accounts for five organization levels of the DNA, up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. However, fragments of this fiber can be used to construct the whole genome. The algorithm developed in this work is capable to determine which is the closest atom with respect to an arbitrary point in space. It can be used in any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed, for instance, in investigations related to the effects of ionizing radiations on the human genetic material. Successful consistency checks were carried out to test the proposed model. Catalogue identifier: AEPZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6574 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN. Computer: Any. Operating system: Multi-platform. RAM: 2 Gb Classification: 3. Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the interaction of ionizing radiation with the human genetic material in order to determine DNA damage yields per unit absorbed dose. To accomplish this task, an algorithm to determine if a given energy deposition lies within a given target is needed. This target can be an atom or any other structure of the genetic material. Solution method: This is a stand-alone subroutine describing an atomic-resolution geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration. It is able to determine the closest atom to an arbitrary point in space. This model accounts for five organization levels of the human genetic material, from the nucleotide pair up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. This subroutine carries out a series of coordinate transformations

  12. Atomistic simulations of cation hydration in sodium and calcium montmorillonite nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guomin; Neretnieks, Ivars; Holmboe, Michael

    2017-08-01

    During the last four decades, numerous studies have been directed to the swelling smectite-rich clays in the context of high-level radioactive waste applications and waste-liners for contaminated sites. The swelling properties of clay mineral particles arise due to hydration of the interlayer cations and the diffuse double layers formed near the negatively charged montmorillonite (MMT) surfaces. To accurately study the cation hydration in the interlayer nanopores of MMT, solvent-solute and solvent-clay surface interactions (i.e., the solvation effects and the shape effects) on the atomic level should be taken into account, in contrast to many recent electric double layer based methodologies using continuum models. Therefore, in this research we employed fully atomistic simulations using classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the software package GROMACS along with the CLAYFF forcefield and the SPC/E water model. We present the ion distributions and the deformation of the hydrated coordination structures, i.e., the hydration shells of Na+ and Ca2+ in the interlayer, respectively, for MMT in the first-layer, the second-layer, the third-layer, the fourth-layer, and the fifth-layer (1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, and 5W) hydrate states. Our MD simulations show that Na+ in Na-MMT nanopores have an affinity to the ditrigonal cavities of the clay layers and form transient inner-sphere complexes at about 3.8 Å from clay midplane at water contents less than the 5W hydration state. However, these phenomena are not observed in Ca-MMT regardless of swelling states. For Na-MMT, each Na+ is coordinated to four water molecules and one oxygen atom of the clay basal-plane in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state, and with five to six water molecules in the first hydration shell within a radius of 3.1 Å at all higher water contents. In Ca-MMT, however each Ca2+ is coordinated to approximately seven water molecules in the first hydration shell at the 1W hydration state and

  13. Time-Domain Ab Initio Analysis of Excitation Dynamics in a Quantum Dot/Polymer Hybrid: Atomistic Description Rationalizes Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-07-08

    Hybrid organic/inorganic polymer/quantum dot (QD) solar cells are an attractive alternative to the traditional cells. The original, simple models postulate that one-dimensional polymers have continuous energy levels, while zero-dimensional QDs exhibit atom-like electronic structure. A realistic, atomistic viewpoint provides an alternative description. Electronic states in polymers are molecule-like: finite in size and discrete in energy. QDs are composed of many atoms and have high, bulk-like densities of states. We employ ab initio time-domain simulation to model the experimentally observed ultrafast photoinduced dynamics in a QD/polymer hybrid and show that an atomistic description is essential for understanding the time-resolved experimental data. Both electron and hole transfers across the interface exhibit subpicosecond time scales. The interfacial processes are fast due to strong electronic donor-acceptor, as evidenced by the densities of the photoexcited states which are delocalized between the donor and the acceptor. The nonadiabatic charge-phonon coupling is also strong, especially in the polymer, resulting in rapid energy losses. The electron transfer from the polymer is notably faster than the hole transfer from the QD, due to a significantly higher density of acceptor states. The stronger molecule-like electronic and charge-phonon coupling in the polymer rationalizes why the electron-hole recombination inside the polymer is several orders of magnitude faster than in the QD. As a result, experiments exhibit multiple transfer times for the long-lived hole inside the QD, ranging from subpicoseconds to nanoseconds. In contrast, transfer of the short-lived electron inside the polymer does not occur beyond the first picosecond. The energy lost by the hole on its transit into the polymer is accommodated by polymer's high-frequency vibrations. The energy lost by the electron injected into the QD is accommodated primarily by much lower-frequency collective and

  14. De novo transcriptome assembly of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deden Derajat Matra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia mangostana L. (Mangosteen, of the family Clusiaceae, is one of the economically important tropical fruits in Indonesia. In the present study, we performed de novo transcriptomic analysis of Garcinia mangostana L. through RNA-Seq technology. We obtained the raw data from 12 libraries through Ion Proton System. Clean reads of 191,735,809 were obtained from 307,634,890 raw reads. The raw data obtained in this study can be accessible in DDBJ database with accession number of DRA005014 with bioproject accession number of PRJDB5091. We obtained 268,851 transcripts as well as 155,850 unigenes, having N50 value of 555 and 433 bp, respectively. Transcript/unigene length ranged from 201 to 5916 bp. The unigenes were annotated with two main databases from NCBI and UniProtKB, respectively having annotated-sequences of 73,287 and 73,107, respectively. These transcriptomic data will be beneficial for studying transcriptome of Garcinia mangostana L.

  15. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    KAUST Repository

    Chevalier, Aaron; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Hicks, Derrick R.; Vergara, Renan; Murapa, Patience; Bernard, Steffen M.; Zhang, Lu; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Bahl, Christopher D.; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Goreshnik, Inna; Fuller, James T.; Koday, Merika T.; Jenkins, Cody M.; Colvin, Tom; Carter, Lauren; Bohn, Alan; Bryan, Cassie M.; Ferná ndez-Velasco, D. Alejandro; Stewart, Lance; Dong, Min; Huang, Xuhui; Jin, Rongsheng; Wilson, Ian A.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Baker, David

    2017-01-01

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37-43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing.

  16. Sequencing and De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Brachypodium sylvaticum (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Fox

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We report the de novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptomes of Brachypodium sylvaticum (slender false-brome accessions from native populations of Spain and Greece, and an invasive population west of Corvallis, Oregon, USA. Methods and Results: More than 350 million sequence reads from the mRNA libraries prepared from three B. sylvaticum genotypes were assembled into 120,091 (Corvallis, 104,950 (Spain, and 177,682 (Greece transcript contigs. In comparison with the B. distachyon Bd21 reference genome and GenBank protein sequences, we estimate >90% exome coverage for B. sylvaticum. The transcripts were assigned Gene Ontology and InterPro annotations. Brachypodium sylvaticum sequence reads aligned against the Bd21 genome revealed 394,654 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and >20,000 simple sequence repeat (SSR DNA sites. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first report of transcriptome sequencing of invasive plant species with a closely related sequenced reference genome. The sequences and identified SNP variant and SSR sites will provide tools for developing novel genetic markers for use in genotyping and characterization of invasive behavior of B. sylvaticum.

  17. LESSONS IN DE NOVO PEPTIDE SEQUENCING BY TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Chalkley, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become the method of choice for the qualitative and quantitative characterization of protein mixtures isolated from all kinds of living organisms. The raw data in these studies are MS/MS spectra, usually of peptides produced by proteolytic digestion of a protein. These spectra are “translated” into peptide sequences, normally with the help of various search engines. Data acquisition and interpretation have both been automated, and most researchers look only at the summary of the identifications without ever viewing the underlying raw data used for assignments. Automated analysis of data is essential due to the volume produced. However, being familiar with the finer intricacies of peptide fragmentation processes, and experiencing the difficulties of manual data interpretation allow a researcher to be able to more critically evaluate key results, particularly because there are many known rules of peptide fragmentation that are not incorporated into search engine scoring. Since the most commonly used MS/MS activation method is collision-induced dissociation (CID), in this article we present a brief review of the history of peptide CID analysis. Next, we provide a detailed tutorial on how to determine peptide sequences from CID data. Although the focus of the tutorial is de novo sequencing, the lessons learned and resources supplied are useful for data interpretation in general. PMID:25667941

  18. De novo transcriptome assembly of a sour cherry cultivar, Schattenmorelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhwa Jo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sour cherry (Prunus cerasus in the genus Prunus in the family Rosaceae is one of the most popular stone fruit trees worldwide. Of known sour cherry cultivars, the Schattenmorelle is a famous old sour cherry with a high amount of fruit production. The Schattenmorelle was selected before 1650 and described in the 1800s. This cultivar was named after gardens of the Chateau de Moreille in which the cultivar was initially found. In order to identify new genes and to develop genetic markers for sour cherry, we performed a transcriptome analysis of a sour cherry. We selected the cultivar Schattenmorelle, which is among commercially important cultivars in Europe and North America. We obtained 2.05 GB raw data from the Schattenmorelle (NCBI accession number: SRX1187170. De novo transcriptome assembly using Trinity identified 61,053 transcripts in which N50 was 611 bp. Next, we identified 25,585 protein coding sequences using TransDecoder. The identified proteins were blasted against NCBI's non-redundant database for annotation. Based on blast search, we taxonomically classified the obtained sequences. As a result, we provide the transcriptome of sour cherry cultivar Schattenmorelle using next generation sequencing.

  19. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  20. De novo protein structure generation from incomplete chemical shift assignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yang [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States); Vernon, Robert; Baker, David [University of Washington, Department of Biochemistry and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Bax, Ad [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)], E-mail: bax@nih.gov

    2009-02-15

    NMR chemical shifts provide important local structural information for proteins. Consistent structure generation from NMR chemical shift data has recently become feasible for proteins with sizes of up to 130 residues, and such structures are of a quality comparable to those obtained with the standard NMR protocol. This study investigates the influence of the completeness of chemical shift assignments on structures generated from chemical shifts. The Chemical-Shift-Rosetta (CS-Rosetta) protocol was used for de novo protein structure generation with various degrees of completeness of the chemical shift assignment, simulated by omission of entries in the experimental chemical shift data previously used for the initial demonstration of the CS-Rosetta approach. In addition, a new CS-Rosetta protocol is described that improves robustness of the method for proteins with missing or erroneous NMR chemical shift input data. This strategy, which uses traditional Rosetta for pre-filtering of the fragment selection process, is demonstrated for two paramagnetic proteins and also for two proteins with solid-state NMR chemical shift assignments.

  1. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    KAUST Repository

    Chevalier, Aaron

    2017-09-26

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37-43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing.

  2. De novo transcriptome assembly of Sorghum bicolor variety Taejin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhwa Jo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, also known as great millet, is one of the most popular cultivated grass species in the world. Sorghum is frequently consumed as food for humans and animals as well as used for ethanol production. In this study, we conducted de novo transcriptome assembly for sorghum variety Taejin by next-generation sequencing, obtaining 8.748 GB of raw data. The raw data in this study can be available in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRX1715644. Using the Trinity program, we identified 222,161 transcripts from sorghum variety Taejin. We further predicted coding regions within the assembled transcripts by the TransDecoder program, resulting in a total of 148,531 proteins. We carried out BLASTP against the Swiss-Prot protein sequence database to annotate the functions of the identified proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first transcriptome data for a sorghum variety derived from Korea, and it can be usefully applied to the generation of genetic markers.

  3. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Aaron; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Hicks, Derrick R.; Vergara, Renan; Murapa, Patience; Bernard, Steffen M.; Zhang, Lu; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Yao, Guorui; Bahl, Christopher D.; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Goreshnik, Inna; Fuller, James T.; Koday, Merika T.; Jenkins, Cody M.; Colvin, Tom; Carter, Lauren; Bohn, Alan; Bryan, Cassie M.; Fernández-Velasco, D. Alejandro; Stewart, Lance; Dong, Min; Huang, Xuhui; Jin, Rongsheng; Wilson, Ian A.; Fuller, Deborah H.; Baker, David

    2018-01-01

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37–43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing. PMID:28953867

  4. De novo malignancy is associated with renal transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Kun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Hu, Rey-Heng; Lee, Po-Huang

    2011-04-01

    Despite the objections to transplant tourism raised by the transplant community, many patients continue travel to other countries to receive commercial transplants. To evaluate some long-term complications, we reviewed medical records of 215 Taiwanese patients (touring group) who received commercial cadaveric renal transplants in China and compared them with those of 321 transplant recipients receiving domestic cadaveric renal transplants (domestic group) over the same 20-year period. Ten years after transplant, the graft and patient survival rates of the touring group were 55 and 81.5%, respectively, compared with 60 and 89.3%, respectively, of the domestic group. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. The 10-year cumulative cancer incidence of the touring group (21.5%) was significantly higher than that of the domestic group (6.8%). Univariate and multivariate stepwise regression analyses (excluding time on immunosuppression, an uncontrollable factor) indicated that transplant tourism was associated with significantly higher cancer incidence. Older age at transplantation was associated with a significantly increased cancer risk; however, the risk of de novo malignancy significantly decreased with longer graft survival. Thus, renal transplant tourism may be associated with a higher risk of post-transplant malignancy, especially in patients of older age at transplantation. © 2011 International Society of Nephrology

  5. Programming peptidomimetic syntheses by translating genetic codes designed de novo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Anthony C; Tan, Zhongping; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Lin, Hening; Qu, Hui; Cornish, Virginia W; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2003-05-27

    Although the universal genetic code exhibits only minor variations in nature, Francis Crick proposed in 1955 that "the adaptor hypothesis allows one to construct, in theory, codes of bewildering variety." The existing code has been expanded to enable incorporation of a variety of unnatural amino acids at one or two nonadjacent sites within a protein by using nonsense or frameshift suppressor aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) as adaptors. However, the suppressor strategy is inherently limited by compatibility with only a small subset of codons, by the ways such codons can be combined, and by variation in the efficiency of incorporation. Here, by preventing competing reactions with aa-tRNA synthetases, aa-tRNAs, and release factors during translation and by using nonsuppressor aa-tRNA substrates, we realize a potentially generalizable approach for template-encoded polymer synthesis that unmasks the substantially broader versatility of the core translation apparatus as a catalyst. We show that several adjacent, arbitrarily chosen sense codons can be completely reassigned to various unnatural amino acids according to de novo genetic codes by translating mRNAs into specific peptide analog polymers (peptidomimetics). Unnatural aa-tRNA substrates do not uniformly function as well as natural substrates, revealing important recognition elements for the translation apparatus. Genetic programming of peptidomimetic synthesis should facilitate mechanistic studies of translation and may ultimately enable the directed evolution of small molecules with desirable catalytic or pharmacological properties.

  6. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. De Novo Design of Bioactive Small Molecules by Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merk, Daniel; Friedrich, Lukas; Grisoni, Francesca; Schneider, Gisbert

    2018-01-01

    Generative artificial intelligence offers a fresh view on molecular design. We present the first-time prospective application of a deep learning model for designing new druglike compounds with desired activities. For this purpose, we trained a recurrent neural network to capture the constitution of a large set of known bioactive compounds represented as SMILES strings. By transfer learning, this general model was fine-tuned on recognizing retinoid X and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists. We synthesized five top-ranking compounds designed by the generative model. Four of the compounds revealed nanomolar to low-micromolar receptor modulatory activity in cell-based assays. Apparently, the computational model intrinsically captured relevant chemical and biological knowledge without the need for explicit rules. The results of this study advocate generative artificial intelligence for prospective de novo molecular design, and demonstrate the potential of these methods for future medicinal chemistry. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. De novo Biosynthesis of "Non-Natural" Thaxtomin Phytotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Michael; Francis, Daniel; Micklefield, Jason

    2018-03-30

    Thaxtomins are diketopiperazine phytotoxins produced by Streptomyces scabies and other actinobacterial plant pathogens that inhibit cellulose biosynthesis in plants. Due to their potent bioactivity and novel mode of action there has been considerable interest in developing thaxtomins as herbicides for crop protection. To address the need for more stable derivatives, we have developed a new approach for structural diversification of thaxtomins. Genes encoding the thaxtomin NRPS from S. scabies, along with genes encoding a promiscuous tryptophan synthase (TrpS) from Salmonella typhimurium, were assembled in a heterologous host Streptomyces albus. Upon feeding indole derivatives to the engineered S. albus strain, tryptophan intermediates with alternative substituents are biosynthesized and incorporated by the NRPS to deliver a series of thaxtomins with different functionalities in place of the nitro group. The approach described herein, demonstrates how genes from different pathways and different bacterial origins can be combined in a heterologous host to create a de novo biosynthetic pathway to "non-natural" product target compounds. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. De novo DNA methylation during monkey pre-implantation embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Niu, Yuyu; Sun, Yi Eve; Lu, Hanlin; Chen, Yongchang; Li, Siguang; Kang, Yu; Luo, Yuping; Si, Chenyang; Yu, Juehua; Li, Chang; Sun, Nianqin; Si, Wei; Wang, Hong; Ji, Weizhi; Tan, Tao

    2017-04-01

    Critical epigenetic regulation of primate embryogenesis entails DNA methylome changes. Here we report genome-wide composition, patterning, and stage-specific dynamics of DNA methylation in pre-implantation rhesus monkey embryos as well as male and female gametes studied using an optimized tagmentation-based whole-genome bisulfite sequencing method. We show that upon fertilization, both paternal and maternal genomes undergo active DNA demethylation, and genome-wide de novo DNA methylation is also initiated in the same period. By the 8-cell stage, remethylation becomes more pronounced than demethylation, resulting in an increase in global DNA methylation. Promoters of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation are preferentially remethylated at the 8-cell stage, suggesting that this mode of energy metabolism may not be favored. Unlike in rodents, X chromosome inactivation is not observed during monkey pre-implantation development. Our study provides the first comprehensive illustration of the 'wax and wane' phases of DNA methylation dynamics. Most importantly, our DNA methyltransferase loss-of-function analysis indicates that DNA methylation influences early monkey embryogenesis.

  10. A crise financeira global e depois: um novo capitalismo?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Bresser-Pereira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A crise financeira global de 2008 foi conseqüência do processo de financeirização, a criação maciça de riqueza financeira fictícia iniciada da década de 1980, e da hegemonia de uma ideologia reacionária, o neoliberalismo, baseada em mercados auto-regulados e eficientes. Dessa crise emergirá um novo capitalismo, embora sua natureza seja de difícil previsão. Não será financeirizado, mas serão retomadas as tendências presentes nos trinta anos dourados em direção ao capitalismo global e baseado no conhecimento, além da tendência de expansão da democracia, tornando-a mais social e participativa.The 2008 global financial crisis was a consequence of the processes of financialization, the massive creation of fictitious financial wealth which began in the 1980's, and of the hegemony of a reactionary ideology, neoliberalism, based on the belief of the self-regulating capacity and efficiency of markets. From this crisis a new capitalism will emerge, althought its chacarteristics are hard to foresee. It will not be financial, but the tendencies of the 30 "golden years" toward global and knowledge-based capitalism, and the tendency of expansion of democracy will be among them.

  11. Enzyme-like replication de novo in a microcontroller environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangen, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    The desire to start evolution from scratch inside a computer memory is as old as computing. Here we demonstrate how viable computer programs can be established de novo in a Precambrian environment without supplying any specific instantiation, just starting with random bit sequences. These programs are not self-replicators, but act much more like catalysts. The microcontrollers used in the end are the result of a long series of simplifications. The objective of this simplification process was to produce universal machines with a human-readable interface, allowing software and/or hardware evolution to be studied. The power of the instruction set can be modified by introducing a secondary structure-folding mechanism, which is a state machine, allowing nontrivial replication to emerge with an instruction width of only a few bits. This state-machine approach not only attenuates the problems of brittleness and encoding functionality (too few bits available for coding, and too many instructions needed); it also enables the study of hardware evolution as such. Furthermore, the instruction set is sufficiently powerful to permit external signals to be processed. This information-theoretic approach forms one vertex of a triangle alongside artificial cell research and experimental research on the creation of life. Hopefully this work helps develop an understanding of how information—in a similar sense to the account of functional information described by Hazen et al.—is created by evolution and how this information interacts with or is embedded in its physico-chemical environment.

  12. Rapid centriole assembly in Naegleria reveals conserved roles for both de novo and mentored assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Levy, Yaron Y; Levitan, Edward; Chen, Sean; Cande, W Zacheus; Lai, Elaine Y; Fulton, Chandler

    2016-03-01

    Centrioles are eukaryotic organelles whose number and position are critical for cilia formation and mitosis. Many cell types assemble new centrioles next to existing ones ("templated" or mentored assembly). Under certain conditions, centrioles also form without pre-existing centrioles (de novo). The synchronous differentiation of Naegleria amoebae to flagellates represents a unique opportunity to study centriole assembly, as nearly 100% of the population transitions from having no centrioles to having two within minutes. Here, we find that Naegleria forms its first centriole de novo, immediately followed by mentored assembly of the second. We also find both de novo and mentored assembly distributed among all major eukaryote lineages. We therefore propose that both modes are ancestral and have been conserved because they serve complementary roles, with de novo assembly as the default when no pre-existing centriole is available, and mentored assembly allowing precise regulation of number, timing, and location of centriole assembly. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. De Novo Human Cardiac Myocytes for Medical Research: Promises and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronique Hamel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of cellular reprogramming technology has revolutionized biomedical research. De novo human cardiac myocytes can now be obtained from direct reprogramming of somatic cells (such as fibroblasts, from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which are reprogrammed from somatic cells, and from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Such de novo human cardiac myocytes hold great promise for in vitro disease modeling and drug screening and in vivo cell therapy of heart disease. Here, we review the technique advancements for generating de novo human cardiac myocytes. We also discuss several challenges for the use of such cells in research and regenerative medicine, such as the immature phenotype and heterogeneity of de novo cardiac myocytes obtained with existing protocols. We focus on the recent advancements in addressing such challenges.

  14. Novel de novo BRCA2 mutation in a patient with a family history of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Jønson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    whole blood. The paternity was determined by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis. Parental origin of the de novo mutation was determined by establishing mutation-SNP haplotypes by variant specific PCR, while de novo and mosaic status was investigated by sequencing of DNA from......BACKGROUND: BRCA2 germ-line mutations predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Mutations are widespread and unclassified splice variants are frequently encountered. We describe the parental origin and functional characterization of a novel de novo BRCA2 splice site mutation found in a patient...... and synthesis of a truncated BRCA2 protein. The aberrant splicing was verified by RT-PCR analysis on RNA isolated from whole blood of the affected patient. The mutation was not found in any of the patient's parents or in the mother's carcinoma, showing it is a de novo mutation. Variant specific PCR indicates...

  15. Spontaneous de novo vaginal adenosis resembling Bartholin’s ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adebayo Alade Adewole

    Spontaneous de novo vaginal adenosis resembling Bartholin's cyst: A case report ... 6 by 5 cm. The cervix, uterus, adnexa and Pouch of Douglas (POD) were normal. .... of vaginal cancer.2–4 Although, DES exposed daughters have an.

  16. The NOVO Network: the original scientific basis for its establishment and our R&D vision

    OpenAIRE

    Winkel, Jørgen; Edwards, Kasper; Dellve, L.; Schiller, B.; Westgaard, Rolf H.

    2017-01-01

    The NOVO network is a Nordic non-governmental professional association whose aims are to foster the scientific progress, knowledge and development of the working environment within Healthcare as an integrated part of production system development. The vision is a “Nordic Model for Sustainable Systems” in the healthcare sector. It was founded in 2006 in Copenhagen and was financially supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers from 2007 to 2015. The motivation to establish the NOVO Network ar...

  17. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W M; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which...... is required for maintenance of both activation and silencing of Hox genes. In total, 7 out of 13 subjects with a Bohring-Opitz phenotype had de novo ASXL1 mutations, suggesting that the syndrome is genetically heterogeneous....

  18. Atomistic insight into the catalytic mechanism of glycosyltransferases by combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvaroška, Igor

    2015-02-11

    Glycosyltransferases catalyze the formation of glycosidic bonds by assisting the transfer of a sugar residue from donors to specific acceptor molecules. Although structural and kinetic data have provided insight into mechanistic strategies employed by these enzymes, molecular modeling studies are essential for the understanding of glycosyltransferase catalyzed reactions at the atomistic level. For such modeling, combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have emerged as crucial. These methods allow the modeling of enzymatic reactions by using quantum mechanical methods for the calculation of the electronic structure of the active site models and treating the remaining enzyme environment by faster molecular mechanics methods. Herein, the application of QM/MM methods to glycosyltransferase catalyzed reactions is reviewed, and the insight from modeling of glycosyl transfer into the mechanisms and transition states structures of both inverting and retaining glycosyltransferases are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Atomistic modeling of metal surfaces under electric fields: direct coupling of electric fields to a molecular dynamics algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Djurabekova, Flyura; Pohjonen, Aarne; Nordlund, Kai

    2011-01-01

    The effect of electric fields on metal surfaces is fairly well studied, resulting in numerous analytical models developed to understand the mechanisms of ionization of surface atoms observed at very high electric fields, as well as the general behavior of a metal surface in this condition. However, the derivation of analytical models does not include explicitly the structural properties of metals, missing the link between the instantaneous effects owing to the applied field and the consequent response observed in the metal surface as a result of an extended application of an electric field. In the present work, we have developed a concurrent electrodynamic–molecular dynamic model for the dynamical simulation of an electric-field effect and subsequent modification of a metal surface in the framework of an atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) approach. The partial charge induced on the surface atoms by the electric field is assessed by applying the classical Gauss law. The electric forces acting on the partially...

  20. Atomistic modeling and simulation of the role of Be and Bi in Al diffusion in U-Mo fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, G. L.; Bozzolo, G.; Mosca, H. O.; Yacout, A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Within the RERTR program, previous experimental and modeling studies identified Si as the alloying addition to the Al cladding responsible for inhibiting Al interdiffusion in the UMo fuel. However, difficulties with reprocessing have rendered this choice inappropriate, leading to the need to study alternative elements. In this work, we discuss the results of an atomistic modeling effort which allows for the systematic study of several possible alloying additions. Based on the behavior observed in the phase diagrams, beryllium or bismuth additions suggest themselves as possible options to replace Si. The results of temperature-dependent simulations using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for the energetics for varying concentrations of either element are shown, indicating that Be could have a substantial effect in stopping Al interdiffusion, while Bi does not. Details of the calculations and the dependence of the role of each alloying addition as a function of temperature and concentration (of beryllium or bismuth in Al) are shown.

  1. Atomistic modeling and simulation of the role of Be and Bi in Al diffusion in U-Mo fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bozzolo, G., E-mail: guille_bozzolo@yahoo.com [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigaciones y Aplicaciones, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1499, B165KNA, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Yacout, A.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Within the RERTR program, previous experimental and modeling studies identified Si as the alloying addition to the Al cladding responsible for inhibiting Al interdiffusion in the UMo fuel. However, difficulties with reprocessing have rendered this choice inappropriate, leading to the need to study alternative elements. In this work, we discuss the results of an atomistic modeling effort which allows for the systematic study of several possible alloying additions. Based on the behavior observed in the phase diagrams, beryllium or bismuth additions suggest themselves as possible options to replace Si. The results of temperature-dependent simulations using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for the energetics for varying concentrations of either element are shown, indicating that Be could have a substantial effect in stopping Al interdiffusion, while Bi does not. Details of the calculations and the dependence of the role of each alloying addition as a function of temperature and concentration (of beryllium or bismuth in Al) are shown.

  2. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Alan; Harlen, Oliver G; Harris, Sarah A; Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming; Lonsdale, Richard; Mulholland, Adrian J; Pearson, Arwen R; Read, Daniel J; Richardson, Robin A

    2015-01-01

    Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  3. Two-electron states of a group-V donor in silicon from atomistic full configuration interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankasala, Archana; Salfi, Joseph; Bocquel, Juanita; Voisin, Benoit; Usman, Muhammad; Klimeck, Gerhard; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Rogge, Sven; Rahman, Rajib

    2018-05-01

    Two-electron states bound to donors in silicon are important for both two-qubit gates and spin readout. We present a full configuration interaction technique in the atomistic tight-binding basis to capture multielectron exchange and correlation effects taking into account the full band structure of silicon and the atomic-scale granularity of a nanoscale device. Excited s -like states of A1 symmetry are found to strongly influence the charging energy of a negative donor center. We apply the technique on subsurface dopants subjected to gate electric fields and show that bound triplet states appear in the spectrum as a result of decreased charging energy. The exchange energy, obtained for the two-electron states in various confinement regimes, may enable engineering electrical control of spins in donor-dot hybrid qubits.

  4. Collaborative Simulation Grid: Multiscale Quantum-Mechanical/Classical Atomistic Simulations on Distributed PC Clusters in the US and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideaki; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Ogata, Shuji; Kouno, Takahisa; Shimojo, Fuyuki; Tsuruta, Kanji; Saini, Subhash; hide

    2002-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, collaborative simulation has been performed on a Grid of geographically distributed PC clusters. The multiscale simulation approach seamlessly combines i) atomistic simulation backed on the molecular dynamics (MD) method and ii) quantum mechanical (QM) calculation based on the density functional theory (DFT), so that accurate but less scalable computations are performed only where they are needed. The multiscale MD/QM simulation code has been Grid-enabled using i) a modular, additive hybridization scheme, ii) multiple QM clustering, and iii) computation/communication overlapping. The Gridified MD/QM simulation code has been used to study environmental effects of water molecules on fracture in silicon. A preliminary run of the code has achieved a parallel efficiency of 94% on 25 PCs distributed over 3 PC clusters in the US and Japan, and a larger test involving 154 processors on 5 distributed PC clusters is in progress.

  5. Prediction of point-defect migration energy barriers in alloys using artificial intelligence for atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castin, N. [Structural Materials Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Studiecentrum voor Kerneenergie Centre d' etude de l' energie nucleaire (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Physique des Solides Irradies et Nanostructures (PSIN), CP234 Boulevard du triomphe, Brussels (Belgium); Malerba, L. [Structural Materials Group, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Studiecentrum voor Kerneenergie Centre d' etude de l' energie nucleaire (SCK CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: lmalerba@sckcen.be

    2009-09-15

    We significantly improved a previously proposed method to take into account chemical and also relaxation effects on point-defect migration energy barriers, as predicted by an interatomic potential, in a rigid lattice atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. Examples of energy barriers are rigorously calculated, including chemical and relaxation effects, as functions of the local atomic configuration, using a nudged elastic bands technique. These examples are then used to train an artificial neural network that provides the barriers on-demand during the simulation for each configuration encountered by the migrating defect. Thanks to a newly developed training method, the configuration can include a large number of neighbour shells, thereby properly including also strain effects. Satisfactory results have been obtained when the configuration includes different chemical species only. The problems encountered in the extension of the method to configurations including any number of point-defects are stated and solutions to tackle them are sketched.

  6. Atomistic study of drag, surface and inertial effects on edge dislocations in face-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitzek, Erik; Gumbsch, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of an accelerating edge dislocation were carried out to study the effects of drag and inertia. Using an embedded atom potential for nickel, the Peierls stress, the effective mass and the drag coefficient of an edge dislocation were determined for different temperatures and stresses in a simple slab geometry. The effect of {1 1 1} surfaces on an intersecting edge dislocation were studied by appropriately cutting the slab. A dislocation intersecting a surface step was used as a model system to demonstrate the importance of inertial effects for dynamically overcoming short range obstacles. Significant effects were found even at room temperature. A simple model based on the dislocation-obstacle interaction energies was used to describe the findings

  7. Multiscale modelling of precipitation in concentrated alloys: from atomistic Monte Carlo simulations to cluster dynamics I thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépinoux, J.; Sigli, C.

    2018-01-01

    In a recent paper, the authors showed how the clusters free energies are constrained by the coagulation probability, and explained various anomalies observed during the precipitation kinetics in concentrated alloys. This coagulation probability appeared to be a too complex function to be accurately predicted knowing only the cluster distribution in Cluster Dynamics (CD). Using atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, it is shown that during a transformation at constant temperature, after a short transient regime, the transformation occurs at quasi-equilibrium. It is proposed to use MC simulations until the system quasi-equilibrates then to switch to CD which is mean field but not limited by a box size like MC. In this paper, we explain how to take into account the information available before the quasi-equilibrium state to establish guidelines to safely predict the cluster free energies.

  8. Atomistic simulations indicate cardiolipin to have an integral role in the structure of the cytochrome bc(1) complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poyry, S.; Cramariuc, O.; Postila, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    by both ensuring the structural integrity of the protein complex and also by taking part in the proton uptake. Yet, the atom-scale understanding of these highly charged four-tail lipids in the cyt bc(1) function has remained quite unclear. We consider this issue through atomistic molecular dynamics...... the description of the role of the surrounding lipid environment: in addition to the specific CL-protein interactions, we observe the protein domains on the positive side of the membrane to settle against the lipids. Altogether, the simulations discussed in this article provide novel views into the dynamics...... simulations that are applied to the entire cyt bc(1) dimer of the purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus embedded in a lipid bilayer. We find CLs to spontaneously diffuse to the dimer interface to the immediate vicinity of the higher potential heme b groups of the complex's catalytic Q...

  9. Properties of the Membrane Binding Component of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Revealed by Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, A.; St-Pierre, J. F.; Magarkar, A.

    2011-01-01

    We used atomistic simulations to study the membrane-bound form of catechol-O-methyltransferase (MB-COMT). In particular we investigated the 26-residue transmembrane a-helical segment of MB-COMT together with the 24-residue fragment that links the transmembrane component to the main protein unit...... that was not included in our model. In numerous independent simulations we observed the formation of a salt bridge between ARC 27 and GLU40. The salt bridge closed the flexible loop that formed in the linker and kept it in the vicinity of the membrane-water interface. All simulations supported this conclusion...... that the linker has a clear affinity for the interface and preferentially arranges its residues to reside next to the membrane, without a tendency to relocate into the water phase. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of databases for sequences of membrane proteins that have a single transmembrane helical segment...

  10. Lipid Exchange Mechanism of the Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein Clarified by Atomistic and Coarse-grained Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vuorela, T.; Kovanen, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    molecular dynamics simulations to unravel the mechanisms associated with the CETP-mediated lipid exchange. To this end we used both atomistic and coarse-grained models whose results were consistent with each other. We found CETP to bind to the surface of high density lipoprotein (HDL) -like lipid droplets......Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) transports cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and phospholipids between different lipoprotein fractions in blood plasma. The inhibition of CETP has been shown to be a sound strategy to prevent and treat the development of coronary heart disease. We employed...... evidence that helix X acts as a lid which conducts lipid exchange by alternating the open and closed states. The findings have potential for the design of novel molecular agents to inhibit the activity of CETP....

  11. Can pyrene probes be used to measure lateral pressure profiles of lipid membranes? Perspective through atomistic simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franova, M. D.; Vattulainen, I.; Ollila, O. H. S.

    2014-01-01

    The lateral pressure profile of lipid bilayers has gained a lot of attention, since changes in the pressure profile have been suggested to shift the membrane protein conformational equilibrium. This relation has been mostly studied with theoretical methods, especially with molecular dynamics....../monomer fluorescence ratio has been assumed to represent the lateral pressure in the location of the pyrene moieties. Here, we consider the validity of this assumption through atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in a DOPC (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine) membrane, which hosts di-pyr-PC probes with different acyl...... simulations, since established methods to measure the lateral pressure profile experimentally have not been available. The only experiments that have attempted to gauge the lateral pressure profile have been done by using di-pyrenyl-phosphatidylcholine (di-pyr-PC) probes. In these experiments, the excimer...

  12. Investigation of the removing process of cathode material in micro-EDM using an atomistic-continuum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jianwen; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu; Ming, Wuyi; Liu, Min; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • An atomistic-continuum computational simulation model for single-discharge micro-EDM process of Cu cathode is constructed. • Cathode material is removed mainly in the form of single atoms or small clusters in micro-EDM. • Electric action leads to the formation of peaks on the surface of crater. • Removing process of cathode material under the hybrid action combining the thermal action and the electric action is studied, and the strength of either action needed for material to remove is much reduced. - Abstract: In micro-electrical discharge machining (micro-EDM), the discharge duration is ultra-short, and both the electric action and the thermal action by the discharge channel play important roles in the removing process of cathode material. However, in most researches on the machining mechanism of micro-EDM, only the thermal action is concerned. In this article, a combined atomistic-continuum modeling method in which the two-temperature model and the molecular dynamics simulation model are integrated is used to construct the simulation model for cathode in single-discharge micro-EDM process. With this simulation model, removing processes of Cu cathode material in micro-EDM under pure thermal action, pure electric action and the combination of them are investigated in a simulative way. By analyzing evolutions of temperature, stress and micro-structure of material as well as the dynamical behaviors of material in the removing process, mechanisms of the cathode material removal and crater formation are revealed. In addition, the removing process of cathode material under the combination of pure thermal action and pure electric action is compared with those under the two pure actions respectively to analyze the interactive effect between the thermal action and the electric action

  13. Large-scale atomistic and quantum-mechanical simulations of a Nafion membrane: Morphology, proton solvation and charge transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel V. Komarov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic and first-principles molecular dynamics simulations are employed to investigate the structure formation in a hydrated Nafion membrane and the solvation and transport of protons in the water channel of the membrane. For the water/Nafion systems containing more than 4 million atoms, it is found that the observed microphase-segregated morphology can be classified as bicontinuous: both majority (hydrophobic and minority (hydrophilic subphases are 3D continuous and organized in an irregular ordered pattern, which is largely similar to that known for a bicontinuous double-diamond structure. The characteristic size of the connected hydrophilic channels is about 25–50 Å, depending on the water content. A thermodynamic decomposition of the potential of mean force and the calculated spectral densities of the hindered translational motions of cations reveal that ion association observed with decreasing temperature is largely an entropic effect related to the loss of low-frequency modes. Based on the results from the atomistic simulation of the morphology of Nafion, we developed a realistic model of ion-conducting hydrophilic channel within the Nafion membrane and studied it with quantum molecular dynamics. The extensive 120 ps-long density functional theory (DFT-based simulations of charge migration in the 1200-atom model of the nanochannel consisting of Nafion chains and water molecules allowed us to observe the bimodality of the van Hove autocorrelation function, which provides the direct evidence of the Grotthuss bond-exchange (hopping mechanism as a significant contributor to the proton conductivity.

  14. Atomistic picture for the folding pathway of a hybrid-1 type human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunqiang Bian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we studied the folding process of the hybrid-1 type human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex with solvent and K(+ ions explicitly modeled. Enabled by the powerful bias-exchange metadynamics and large-scale conventional molecular dynamic simulations, the free energy landscape of this G-DNA was obtained for the first time and four folding intermediates were identified, including a triplex and a basically formed quadruplex. The simulations also provided atomistic pictures for the structures and cation binding patterns of the intermediates. The results showed that the structure formation and cation binding are cooperative and mutually supporting each other. The syn/anti reorientation dynamics of the intermediates was also investigated. It was found that the nucleotides usually take correct syn/anti configurations when they form native and stable hydrogen bonds with the others, while fluctuating between two configurations when they do not. Misfolded intermediates with wrong syn/anti configurations were observed in the early intermediates but not in the later ones. Based on the simulations, we also discussed the roles of the non-native interactions. Besides, the formation process of the parallel conformation in the first two G-repeats and the associated reversal loop were studied. Based on the above results, we proposed a folding pathway for the hybrid-1 type G-quadruplex with atomistic details, which is new and more complete compared with previous ones. The knowledge gained for this type of G-DNA may provide a general insight for the folding of the other G-quadruplexes.

  15. Insight into the influence of liquid paraffin for methanol synthesis on Cu(110) surface using continuum and atomistic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Wei-Hong [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Liu, Shi-Zhong [Department of Chemistry, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Zuo, Zhi-Jun, E-mail: zuozhijun@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Ren, Rui-Peng; Gao, Zhi-Hua [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: huangwei@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology of Ministry of Education and Shanxi Province, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • The influence of liquid paraffin is studied using continuum and atomistic models. • Liquid paraffin does not alter the reaction pathways of CO hydrogenation and WGS. • Liquid paraffin alters the reaction pathways of CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. - Abstract: Methanol synthesis from CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu(110) in liquid paraffin and vacuum have been systematically researched with density functional theory calculation (DFT). For methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + H → HCO → H{sub 2}CO → H{sub 3}CO → H{sub 3}COH; in the case of WGS, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + 2H{sub 2}O → CO + 2OH + 2H → CO + H{sub 2}O + O + H{sub 2} → CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + H{sub 2}; the reaction pathways of methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO{sub 2} + H → HCOO → H{sub 2}COO → H{sub 2}CO → H{sub 3}CO → H{sub 3}COH and CO{sub 2} + H → HCOO → HCOOH → H{sub 2}COOH → H{sub 3}CO → H{sub 3}COH, respectively. The result shows that liquid paraffin does not affect the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO and WGS, but it changes the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Hirshfeld charge and the d-band centers indicate that the catalytic activity of Cu(110) in liquid paraffin is smaller than that in vacuum. Our results also show that it is necessary to consider both continuum and atomistic models in the slurry bed.

  16. Selecting Superior De Novo Transcriptome Assemblies: Lessons Learned by Leveraging the Best Plant Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren A Honaas

    Full Text Available Whereas de novo assemblies of RNA-Seq data are being published for a growing number of species across the tree of life, there are currently no broadly accepted methods for evaluating such assemblies. Here we present a detailed comparison of 99 transcriptome assemblies, generated with 6 de novo assemblers including CLC, Trinity, SOAP, Oases, ABySS and NextGENe. Controlled analyses of de novo assemblies for Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa transcriptomes provide new insights into the strengths and limitations of transcriptome assembly strategies. We find that the leading assemblers generate reassuringly accurate assemblies for the majority of transcripts. At the same time, we find a propensity for assemblers to fail to fully assemble highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, the instance of true chimeric assemblies is very low for all assemblers. Normalized libraries are reduced in highly abundant transcripts, but they also lack 1000s of low abundance transcripts. We conclude that the quality of de novo transcriptome assemblies is best assessed through consideration of a combination of metrics: 1 proportion of reads mapping to an assembly 2 recovery of conserved, widely expressed genes, 3 N50 length statistics, and 4 the total number of unigenes. We provide benchmark Illumina transcriptome data and introduce SCERNA, a broadly applicable modular protocol for de novo assembly improvement. Finally, our de novo assembly of the Arabidopsis leaf transcriptome revealed ~20 putative Arabidopsis genes lacking in the current annotation.

  17. De novo FBXO11 mutations are associated with intellectual disability and behavioural anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Daniel; Kuechler, Alma; Grimmel, Mona; Becker, Jessica; Peters, Sophia; Sturm, Marc; Hundertmark, Hela; Schmidt, Axel; Kreiß, Martina; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Haack, Tobias B; Beck-Wödl, Stefanie; Cremer, Kirsten; Engels, Hartmut

    2018-05-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) has an estimated prevalence of 1.5-2%. In most affected individuals, its genetic basis remains unclear. Whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have identified a multitude of novel causative gene defects and have shown that a large proportion of sporadic ID cases results from de novo mutations. Here, we present two unrelated individuals with similar clinical features and deleterious de novo variants in FBXO11 detected by WES. Individual 1, a 14-year-old boy, has mild ID as well as mild microcephaly, corrected cleft lip and alveolus, hyperkinetic disorder, mild brain atrophy and minor facial dysmorphism. WES detected a heterozygous de novo 1 bp insertion in the splice donor site of exon 3. Individual 2, a 3-year-old boy, showed ID and pre- and postnatal growth retardation, postnatal mild microcephaly, hyperkinetic and restless behaviour, as well as mild dysmorphism. WES detected a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation. While ten individuals with ID and de novo variants in FBXO11 have been reported as part of larger studies, only one of the reports has some additional clinical data. Interestingly, the latter individual carries the identical mutation as our individual 2 and also displays ID, intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, behavioural anomalies, and dysmorphisms. Thus, we confirm deleterious de novo mutations in FBXO11 as a cause of ID and start the delineation of the associated clinical picture which may also comprise postnatal microcephaly or borderline small head size and behavioural anomalies.

  18. De novo giant A2 aneurysm following anterior communicating artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Tarik F; Hafez, Ahmad; Andrade-Barazarte, Hugo; Raj, Rahul; Niemela, Mika; Lehto, Hanna; Numminen, Jussi; Jarvelainen, Juha; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2015-01-01

    De novo intracranial aneurysms are reported to occur with varying incidence after intracranial aneurysm treatment. They are purported to be observed, however, with increased incidence after Hunterian ligation; particularly in cases of carotid artery occlusion for giant or complex aneurysms deemed unclippable. We report a case of right-sided de novo giant A2 aneurysm 6 years after an anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm clipping. We believe this de novo aneurysm developed in part due to patient-specific risk factors but also a significant change in cerebral hemodynamics. The ACoA became occluded after surgery that likely altered the cerebral hemodynamics and contributed to the de novo aneurysm. We believe this to be the first reported case of a giant de novo aneurysm in this location. Following parent vessel occlusion (mostly of the carotid artery), there are no reports of any de novo aneurysms in the pericallosal arteries let alone a giant one. The patient had a dominant right A1 and the sudden increase in A2 blood flow likely resulted in increased wall shear stress, particularly in the medial wall of the A2 where the aneurysm occurred 2 mm distal to the A1-2 junction. ACoA preservation is a key element of aneurysm surgery in this location. Suspected occlusion of this vessel may warrant closer radiographic follow-up in patients with other risk factors for aneurysm development.

  19. De novo ORFs in Drosophila are important to organismal fitness and evolved rapidly from previously non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Reinhardt

    Full Text Available How non-coding DNA gives rise to new protein-coding genes (de novo genes is not well understood. Recent work has revealed the origins and functions of a few de novo genes, but common principles governing the evolution or biological roles of these genes are unknown. To better define these principles, we performed a parallel analysis of the evolution and function of six putatively protein-coding de novo genes described in Drosophila melanogaster. Reconstruction of the transcriptional history of de novo genes shows that two de novo genes emerged from novel long non-coding RNAs that arose at least 5 MY prior to evolution of an open reading frame. In contrast, four other de novo genes evolved a translated open reading frame and transcription within the same evolutionary interval suggesting that nascent open reading frames (proto-ORFs, while not required, can contribute to the emergence of a new de novo gene. However, none of the genes arose from proto-ORFs that existed long before expression evolved. Sequence and structural evolution of de novo genes was rapid compared to nearby genes and the structural complexity of de novo genes steadily increases over evolutionary time. Despite the fact that these genes are transcribed at a higher level in males than females, and are most strongly expressed in testes, RNAi experiments show that most of these genes are essential in both sexes during metamorphosis. This lethality suggests that protein coding de novo genes in Drosophila quickly become functionally important.

  20. Radioisotope devices at Novo-Krivorozhskij-ore-enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitskij, V.Ya.; Kucher, V.G.; Ministerstvo Chernoj Metallurgii Ukrainskoj SSR, Dnepropetrovsk, Bazovaya Opytno-Konstruktorskaya Izotopnaya lab.)

    1975-01-01

    Use of the ''Ferrite'' analyzers, AZhR and PAZh-1 and the GR-7 gamma relay in different engineering areas of the Novo-Krivorozh ore-enrichment plant is evaluated. The ''Ferrite'' radioisotopic analyzer was designed for rapid roentgeno-radiometric determination of the total iron and iron group element contents in powdered samples of ores and products of their treatment. From the density of the flux of the characteristic radiation it is possible to determine quantitatively the content of the element of interest in the analyzed material. The radioisotpic analyzer AZhR-1 is distinguished by its high efficiency in the analysis for total iron on products of processing of iron ore raw materials. The use of this apparatus allows complete replacement of the chemical method for rapid analysis of concentrates by the roentgeno-radiometric method, which decreases the total analytical work on determination of total iron and speeds up output of information on concentrate quality. The radioisotopic gamma analyzer PAZh-1 is designed for automatic and either continuous or discrete measurement of the total iron content in iron ore materials ground to 50 mm, carried on a conveyor, without selection or preparation of the samples for analysis. The analyzer operates on the principle of measuring the average frequency of impingement on a detector of gamma quanta back-scattered by the analyzed material. This frequency is determined by the percentage content of total iron in the material. The apparatus operates continuously. The mean square deviation of the apparatus values from chemical data is 0.93% Fesub(total). Use of the apparatus greatly increases the operativeness of the control and decreases the laboriousness of raw material sampling in an engineering stream. The radioisotopic data units GR-7 are designed for control of the level of materials in hoppers for recovery and burning of agglomerates. Use of this apparatus showed its great advantage over data units of other types

  1. Internet e Cultura: um novo olhar, veloz e voraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson de Oliveira Souza

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Em cada piscadela que damos, um novo mundo enxergamos. Com a globalização, o modo de ver o mundo muda radicalmente, principalmente devido ao complexo ritmo ditado pelas relações entre o meio ambiente e seus usuários. De forma sintetizada, podemos explicar que a globalização é resultado da terceira revolução tecnológica (tecnologias ligadas à busca, processamento, difusão e transmissão de informações; inteligência artificial; engenharia genética, da formação de áreas de livre comércio e blocos econômicos interligados (como o Mercosul, a União Européia e o Nafta e da crescente interligação e interdependência dos mercados físicos e financeiros em escala planetária. Essa trinca é responsável pela alteração, principalmente, da nova forma de enxergarmos a cultura, aceitando que a mundialização da cultura é um processo em curso, não concluído ainda, na qual as formas culturais nacionais ou locais entram em contato rapidamente. Com isso, quedam as barreiras territoriais, forçam as mediações e criam, no dizer de Featherstone, a "terceira cultura", entendendo como "um conjunto de práticas, conhecimentos, convenções e estilos de vida que se desenvolvem de modo a se tornar cada vez mais independente dos Estados-Nação".

  2. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B; O'Brien, Thomas J; Stevenson, David M; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using (13)C-labeled sugars and [(15)N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. Copyright © 2015, Pisithkul et al.

  3. Potencial forrageiro de novos clones de capim-elefante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botrel Milton de Andrade

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o comportamento de novos clones selecionados de capim-elefante. O experimento foi realizado na Embrapa Gado de Leite, em Coronel Pacheco -- MG, por um período de dois anos. Foi avaliado o potencial forrageiro de 20 clones de capim-elefante, obtidos pelo programa de melhoramento, e mais duas cultivares tradicionais (Cameroon e Taiwan A-146 usadas como testemunhas. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. As adubações para estabelecimento e manutenção foram realizadas de acordo com a análise do solo, visando suprir as exigências nutricionais do capim-elefante. Observaram-se diferenças significativas entre os clones, quanto ao potencial para produção de forragem, à relação folha/colmo e ao perfilhamento aéreo e basal. A maioria dos clones avaliados apresentou maior produção de matéria seca que as cultivares tradicionais, Cameroon e Taiwan A-146, durante o período seco e chuvoso. Não houve diferença significativa no teor de proteína bruta da matéria seca das cultivares controles (Cameroon e Taiwan A-146 e dos clones avaliados, em ambas as estações (águas e seca. O clone F 27-01, lançado pela Embrapa Gado de Leite com o nome de cultivar Pioneiro, destacou-se para quase todas as características agronômicas estudadas.

  4. Phenolic Amides Are Potent Inhibitors of De Novo Nucleotide Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisithkul, Tippapha; Jacobson, Tyler B.; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Stevenson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    An outstanding challenge toward efficient production of biofuels and value-added chemicals from plant biomass is the impact that lignocellulose-derived inhibitors have on microbial fermentations. Elucidating the mechanisms that underlie their toxicity is critical for developing strategies to overcome them. Here, using Escherichia coli as a model system, we investigated the metabolic effects and toxicity mechanisms of feruloyl amide and coumaroyl amide, the predominant phenolic compounds in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates. Using metabolomics, isotope tracers, and biochemical assays, we showed that these two phenolic amides act as potent and fast-acting inhibitors of purine and pyrimidine biosynthetic pathways. Feruloyl or coumaroyl amide exposure leads to (i) a rapid buildup of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), a key precursor in nucleotide biosynthesis, (ii) a rapid decrease in the levels of pyrimidine biosynthetic intermediates, and (iii) a long-term generalized decrease in nucleotide and deoxynucleotide levels. Tracer experiments using 13C-labeled sugars and [15N]ammonia demonstrated that carbon and nitrogen fluxes into nucleotides and deoxynucleotides are inhibited by these phenolic amides. We found that these effects are mediated via direct inhibition of glutamine amidotransferases that participate in nucleotide biosynthetic pathways. In particular, feruloyl amide is a competitive inhibitor of glutamine PRPP amidotransferase (PurF), which catalyzes the first committed step in de novo purine biosynthesis. Finally, external nucleoside supplementation prevents phenolic amide-mediated growth inhibition by allowing nucleotide biosynthesis via salvage pathways. The results presented here will help in the development of strategies to overcome toxicity of phenolic compounds and facilitate engineering of more efficient microbial producers of biofuels and chemicals. PMID:26070680

  5. Atomistic materials modeling of complex systems: Carbynes, carbon nanotube devices and bulk metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiqi

    The key to understanding and predicting the behavior of materials is the knowledge of their structures. Many properties of materials samples are not solely determined by their average chemical compositions which one may easily control. Instead, they are profoundly influenced by structural features of different characteristic length scales. Starting in the last century, metallurgical engineering has mostly been microstructure engineering. With the further evolution of materials science, structural features of smaller length scales down to the atomic structure, have become of interest for the purpose of properties engineering and functionalizing materials and are, therefore, subjected to study. As computer modeling is becoming more powerful due to the dramatic increase of computational resources and software over the recent decades, there is an increasing demand for atomistic simulations with the goal of better understanding materials behavior on the atomic scale. Density functional theory (DFT) is a quantum mechanics based approach to calculate electron distribution, total energy and interatomic forces with high accuracy. From these, atomic structures and thermal effects can be predicted. However, DFT is mostly applied to relatively simple systems because it is computationally very demanding. In this thesis, the current limits of DFT applications are explored by studying relatively complex systems, namely, carbynes, carbon nanotube (CNT) devices and bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Special care is taken to overcome the limitations set by small system sizes and time scales that often prohibit DFT from being applied to realistic systems under realistic external conditions. In the first study, we examine the possible existence of a third solid phase of carbon with linear bonding called carbyne, which has been suggested in the literature and whose formation has been suggested to be detrimental to high-temperature carbon materials. We have suggested potential structures for

  6. ''de novo'' aneurysms following endovascular procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briganti, F.; Cirillo, S.; Caranci, F. [Department of Neurological Sciences, Services of Neuroradiology, ' ' Federico II' ' University, Naples (Italy); Esposito, F.; Maiuri, F. [Department of Neurological Sciences, Services of Neurosurgery, ' ' Federico II' ' University, Naples (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    Two personal cases of ''de novo'' aneurysms of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA) occurring 9 and 4 years, respectively, after endovascular carotid occlusion are described. A review of the 30 reported cases (including our own two) of ''de novo'' aneurysms after occlusion of the major cerebral vessels has shown some features, including a rather long time interval after the endovascular procedure of up to 20-25 years (average 9.6 years), a preferential ACoA (36.3%) and internal carotid artery-posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) (33.3%) location of the ''de novo'' aneurysms, and a 10% rate of multiple aneurysms. These data are compared with those of the group of reported spontaneous ''de novo'' aneurysms after SAH or previous aneurysm clipping. We agree that the frequency of ''de novo'' aneurysms after major-vessel occlusion (two among ten procedures in our series, or 20%) is higher than commonly reported (0 to 11%). For this reason, we suggest that patients who have been submitted to endovascular major-vessel occlusion be followed up for up to 20-25 years after the procedure, using non-invasive imaging studies such as MR angiography and high-resolution CT angiography. On the other hand, periodic digital angiography has a questionable risk-benefit ratio; it may be used when a ''de novo'' aneurysm is detected or suspected on non-invasive studies. The progressive enlargement of the ACoA after carotid occlusion, as described in our case 1, must be considered a radiological finding of risk for ''de novo'' aneurysm formation. (orig.)

  7. Coccidioidomicose: novo caso brasileiro Coccidiodomycosis: a new Brazilian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário A.P. Moraes

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available É descrito um caso de coccidioidomicose pulmonar oriundo da zona rural de Bertolínia, PI. A manifestação clínica principal consistiu em dor torácica e o diagnóstico teve por base o achado do agente3/4Coccidioides immitis3/4em cortes histológicos. Formas teciduais do microrganismo3/4esférulas imaturas e maduras3/4estavam presentes nas lesões observadas em fragmento pulmonar removido do paciente por biópsia a céu aberto. Este novo caso autóctone da doença, como os outros anteriormente descritos no Brasil, procedia do interior semi-árido da Região Nordeste. O ambiente quente e seco do sertão nordestino oferece, sem dúvida, condições propícias ao desenvolvimento de C. immitis, um habitante do solo. As pessoas e animais do local devem adquirir a infecção ao revolver a terra, ato que os expõe à poeira contendo os propágulos do fungo.A case of pulmonary coccidioidomycosis from the rural zone of Bertolinia, PI, is reported. The patient, a farm worker, attributed his illness to the dust inhaled while digging a water well during the dry season of the year, some weeks before the onset of the clinical manifestations. The main symptoms of the disease were severe chest pain and moderate fever. The diagnosis was made histopathologically: tissue phase fungal organisms3/4immature spherules and spherules with endospores3/4were observed in histological sections of a lung fragment obtained by open chest biopsy. This is the twelfth autochthonous case of coccidioidomycosis found so far in Brazil. All of them involved native inhabitants of the semi-arid part of Northeastern Brazil. The hot and dry environment of the region seems to favor the development of C. immitis in the soil. Humans and animals probably acquire the infection by digging the soil, when they become exposed to the conidium-bearing dust raised by this activity.

  8. High frequencies of de novo CNVs in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Malhotra, Dheeraj

    2011-12-22

    While it is known that rare copy-number variants (CNVs) contribute to risk for some neuropsychiatric disorders, the role of CNVs in bipolar disorder is unclear. Here, we reasoned that a contribution of CNVs to mood disorders might be most evident for de novo mutations. We performed a genome-wide analysis of de novo CNVs in a cohort of 788 trios. Diagnoses of offspring included bipolar disorder (n = 185), schizophrenia (n = 177), and healthy controls (n = 426). Frequencies of de novo CNVs were significantly higher in bipolar disorder as compared with controls (OR = 4.8 [1.4,16.0], p = 0.009). De novo CNVs were particularly enriched among cases with an age at onset younger than 18 (OR = 6.3 [1.7,22.6], p = 0.006). We also confirmed a significant enrichment of de novo CNVs in schizophrenia (OR = 5.0 [1.5,16.8], p = 0.007). Our results suggest that rare spontaneous mutations are an important contributor to risk for bipolar disorder and other major neuropsychiatric diseases.

  9. Prediction of irradiation induced microstructures in the AgCu model alloy using a multiscale method coupling atomistic and phase field modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Demange, Gilles; Pontikis, Vassilis; Lunéville, Laurence; Simeone, David

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a multiscale approach based on phase field was developed to simulate the microstructure's evolution under irradiation in binary systems, from atomic to microstructural scale. For that purpose, an efficient numerical scheme was developed. In the case of AgCu alloy under Krypton ions irradiation, phenomenological parameters were computed using atomistic methods, as a function of the temperature and the irradiation flux. As a result, we predicted the influence of the irradiation fl...

  10. A method of integration of atomistic simulations and continuum mechanics by collecting of dynamical systems with dimensional reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Elementary processes responsible for phenomena in material are frequently related to scale close to atomic one. Therefore atomistic simulations are important for material sciences. On the other hand continuum mechanics is widely applied in mechanics of materials. It seems inevitable that both methods will gradually integrate. A multiscale method of integration of these approaches called collection of dynamical systems with dimensional reduction is introduced in this work. The dimensional reduction procedure realizes transition between various scale models from an elementary dynamical system (EDS) to a reduced dynamical system (RDS). Mappings which transform variables and forces, skeletal dynamical system (SDS) and a set of approximation and identification methods are main components of this procedure. The skeletal dynamical system is a set of dynamical systems parameterized by some constants and has variables related to the dimensionally reduced model. These constants are identified with the aid of solutions of the elementary dynamical system. As a result we obtain a dimensionally reduced dynamical system which describes phenomena in an averaged way in comparison with the EDS. Concept of integration of atomistic simulations with continuum mechanics consists in using a dynamical system describing evolution of atoms as an elementary dynamical system. Then, we introduce a continuum skeletal dynamical system within the dimensional reduction procedure. In order to construct such a system we have to modify a continuum mechanics formulation to some degree. Namely, we formalize scale of averaging for continuum theory and as a result we consider continuum with finite-dimensional fields only. Then, realization of dimensional reduction is possible. A numerical example of realization of the dimensional reduction procedure is shown. We consider a one dimensional chain of atoms interacting by Lennard-Jones potential. Evolution of this system is described by an elementary

  11. De Novo Discovery of Structured ncRNA Motifs in Genomic Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzo, Walter L; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphas...... on an approach based on the CMfinder CMfinder program as a case study. Applications to genomic screens for novel de novo structured ncRNA ncRNA s, including structured RNA elements in untranslated portions of protein-coding genes, are presented.......De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphasis...

  12. Defining the maize transcriptome de novo using deep RNA-Seq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Gross, Stephen; Choi, Cindy; Zhang, Tao; Lindquist, Erika; Wei, Chia-Lin; Wang, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    De novo assembly of the transcriptome is crucial for functional genomics studies in bioenergy research, since many of the organisms lack high quality reference genomes. In a previous study we successfully de novo assembled simple eukaryote transcriptomes exclusively from short Illumina RNA-Seq reads [1]. However, extensive alternative splicing, present in most of the higher eukaryotes, poses a significant challenge for current short read assembly processes. Furthermore, the size of next-generation datasets, often large for plant genomes, presents an informatics challenge. To tackle these challenges we present a combined experimental and informatics strategy for de novo assembly in higher eukaryotes. Using maize as a test case, preliminary results suggest our approach can resolve transcript variants and improve gene annotations.

  13. Defining the maize transcriptome de novo using deep RNA-Seq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Gross, Stephen; Choi, Cindy; Zhang, Tao; Lindquist, Erika; Wei, Chia-Lin; Wang, Zhong

    2011-06-02

    De novo assembly of the transcriptome is crucial for functional genomics studies in bioenergy research, since many of the organisms lack high quality reference genomes. In a previous study we successfully de novo assembled simple eukaryote transcriptomes exclusively from short Illumina RNA-Seq reads [1]. However, extensive alternative splicing, present in most of the higher eukaryotes, poses a significant challenge for current short read assembly processes. Furthermore, the size of next-generation datasets, often large for plant genomes, presents an informatics challenge. To tackle these challenges we present a combined experimental and informatics strategy for de novo assembly in higher eukaryotes. Using maize as a test case, preliminary results suggest our approach can resolve transcript variants and improve gene annotations.

  14. Sequencing and de novo assembly of 150 genomes from Denmark as a population reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maretty, Lasse; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Petersen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of human genomes are now being sequenced to characterize genetic variation and use this information to augment association mapping studies of complex disorders and other phenotypic traits. Genetic variation is identified mainly by mapping short reads to the reference genome......-coverage sequencing with mate-pair libraries extending up to 20 kilobases. We report de novo assemblies of 150 individuals (50 trios) from the GenomeDenmark project. The quality of these assemblies is similar to those obtained using the more expensive long-read technology. We use the assemblies to identify a rich set...... or by performing local assembly. However, these approaches are biased against discovery of structural variants and variation in the more complex parts of the genome. Hence, large-scale de novo assembly is needed. Here we show that it is possible to construct excellent de novo assemblies from high...

  15. Sequencing and de novo assembly of 150 genomes from Denmark as a population reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maretty, Lasse; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Petersen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of human genomes are now being sequenced to characterize genetic variation and use this information to augment association mapping studies of complex disorders and other phenotypic traits. Genetic variation is identified mainly by mapping short reads to the reference genome...... or by performing local assembly. However, these approaches are biased against discovery of structural variants and variation in the more complex parts of the genome. Hence, large-scale de novo assembly is needed. Here we show that it is possible to construct excellent de novo assemblies from high......-coverage sequencing with mate-pair libraries extending up to 20 kilobases. We report de novo assemblies of 150 individuals (50 trios) from the GenomeDenmark project. The quality of these assemblies is similar to those obtained using the more expensive long-read technology. We use the assemblies to identify a rich set...

  16. De novo synthesis of purine nucleotides in different fiber types of rat skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The contribution of de novo purine nucleotide synthesis to nucleotide metabolism in skeletal muscles is not known. The authors have determined rates of de novo synthesis in soleus (slow-twitch red), red gastrocnemius (fast-twitch red), and white gastrocnemius (fast-twitch white) using the perfused rat hindquarter. 14 C glycine incorporation into ATP was linear after 1 and 2 hours of perfusion with 0.2 mM added glycine. The intracellular (I) and extracellular (E) specific activity of 14 C glycine was determined by HPLC of phenylisothiocyanate derivatives of neutralized PCA extracts. The rates of de novo synthesis when expressed relative to muscle ATP content show slow and fast-twitch red muscles to be similar and about twice as great as fast-twitch white muscles. This could represent a greater turnover of the adenine nucleotide pool in more oxidative red muscle types

  17. A Pareto Algorithm for Efficient De Novo Design of Multi-functional Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeyaert, Frits; Deem, Micheal W

    2017-01-01

    We have introduced a Pareto sorting algorithm into Synopsis, a de novo design program that generates synthesizable molecules with desirable properties. We give a detailed description of the algorithm and illustrate its working in 2 different de novo design settings: the design of putative dual and selective FGFR and VEGFR inhibitors, and the successful design of organic structure determining agents (OSDAs) for the synthesis of zeolites. We show that the introduction of Pareto sorting not only enables the simultaneous optimization of multiple properties but also greatly improves the performance of the algorithm to generate molecules with hard-to-meet constraints. This in turn allows us to suggest approaches to address the problem of false positive hits in de novo structure based drug design by introducing structural and physicochemical constraints in the designed molecules, and by forcing essential interactions between these molecules and their target receptor. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A Terra em Transe: o cosmopolitismo às avessas do cinema novo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Prysthon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Usando como referencial teórico os estudos culturais, este artigo analisa o cinema novo brasileiro como parte de uma estratégia terceiro mundista de conceber a cultura. A partir da emergência do conceito de terceiro mundo e das lutas de descolonização nos anos 1950 e 1960, a ideologia cosmopolita foi sendo vista pelos intelectuais de esquerda como a versão cultural da aliança com as forças hegemônicas da Europa e dos Estados Unidos. O projeto do cinema novo chama a atenção por suas afinidades ideológicas com o terceiro mundismo, mas, paradoxalmente, trazendo à tona uma polí­tica cosmopolita da periferia. Palavras-chave cinema novo, identidade, cultura brasileira, terceiro mundismo, estudos culturais. Abstract Using the cultural studies theoretical framework, this paper analyzes the cinema novo movement in Brazil as a part of the Third World conception of culture. Following the creation of the term "Third World" and the international politics of colonial independence of the 1950s and 1960s, a cosmopolitan attitude was seen by the intellectuals of the left as a cultural version of the alliance with the hegemonic forces of Europe and North America. Even though the cinema novo project can be associated with the ideology of an united Third World ,it brings about, paradoxically, a very cosmopolitan politics of the periphery. Key words cinema novo, identity, Brazilian culture, third world, cultural studies.

  19. Precise detection of de novo single nucleotide variants in human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Romero, Laura; Palacios-Flores, Kim; Reyes, José; García, Delfino; Boege, Margareta; Dávila, Guillermo; Flores, Margarita; Schatz, Michael C; Palacios, Rafael

    2018-05-07

    The precise determination of de novo genetic variants has enormous implications across different fields of biology and medicine, particularly personalized medicine. Currently, de novo variations are identified by mapping sample reads from a parent-offspring trio to a reference genome, allowing for a certain degree of differences. While widely used, this approach often introduces false-positive (FP) results due to misaligned reads and mischaracterized sequencing errors. In a previous study, we developed an alternative approach to accurately identify single nucleotide variants (SNVs) using only perfect matches. However, this approach could be applied only to haploid regions of the genome and was computationally intensive. In this study, we present a unique approach, coverage-based single nucleotide variant identification (COBASI), which allows the exploration of the entire genome using second-generation short sequence reads without extensive computing requirements. COBASI identifies SNVs using changes in coverage of exactly matching unique substrings, and is particularly suited for pinpointing de novo SNVs. Unlike other approaches that require population frequencies across hundreds of samples to filter out any methodological biases, COBASI can be applied to detect de novo SNVs within isolated families. We demonstrate this capability through extensive simulation studies and by studying a parent-offspring trio we sequenced using short reads. Experimental validation of all 58 candidate de novo SNVs and a selection of non-de novo SNVs found in the trio confirmed zero FP calls. COBASI is available as open source at https://github.com/Laura-Gomez/COBASI for any researcher to use. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  20. De novo mutations in ATP1A3 cause alternating hemiplegia of childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinzen, Erin L; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Hitomi, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    and their unaffected parents to identify de novo nonsynonymous mutations in ATP1A3 in all seven individuals. In a subsequent sequence analysis of ATP1A3 in 98 other patients with AHC, we found that ATP1A3 mutations were likely to be responsible for at least 74% of the cases; we also identified one inherited mutation...... affecting the level of protein expression. This work identifies de novo ATP1A3 mutations as the primary cause of AHC and offers insight into disease pathophysiology by expanding the spectrum of phenotypes associated with mutations in ATP1A3....

  1. NovoTTF™-100A System (Tumor Treating Fields) transducer array layout planning for glioblastoma: a NovoTAL™ system user study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Benson, Laura; Varshaver, Michael; Farber, Ori; Weinberg, Uri; Kirson, Eilon; Palti, Yoram

    2015-11-11

    Optune™, previously known as the NovoTTF-100A System™, generates Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), an effective anti-mitotic therapy for glioblastoma. The system delivers intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields to the supratentorial brain. Patient therapy is personalized by configuring transducer array layout placement on the scalp to the tumor site using MRI measurements and the NovoTAL System. Transducer array layout mapping optimizes therapy by maximizing electric field intensity to the tumor site. This study evaluated physician performance in conducting transducer array layout mapping using the NovoTAL System compared with mapping performed by the Novocure in-house clinical team. Fourteen physicians (7 neuro-oncologists, 4 medical oncologists, and 3 neurosurgeons) evaluated five blinded cases of recurrent glioblastoma and performed head size and tumor location measurements using a standard Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine reader. Concordance with Novocure measurement and intra- and inter-rater reliability were assessed using relevant correlation coefficients. The study criterion for success was a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) >0.80. CCC for each physician versus Novocure on 20 MRI measurements was 0.96 (standard deviation, SD ± 0.03, range 0.90-1.00), indicating very high agreement between the two groups. Intra- and inter-rater reliability correlation coefficients were similarly high: 0.83 (SD ±0.15, range 0.54-1.00) and 0.80 (SD ±0.18, range 0.48-1.00), respectively. This user study demonstrated an excellent level of concordance between prescribing physicians and Novocure in-house clinical teams in performing transducer array layout planning. Intra-rater reliability was very high, indicating reproducible performance. Physicians prescribing TTFields, when trained on the NovoTAL System, can independently perform transducer array layout mapping required for the initiation and maintenance of patients on TTFields

  2. Atomistic structural ensemble refinement reveals non-native structure stabilizes a sub-millisecond folding intermediate of CheY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jade; Schwantes, Christian; Bilsel, Osman

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of globular proteins can be described in terms of transitions between a folded native state and less-populated intermediates, or excited states, which can play critical roles in both protein folding and function. Excited states are by definition transient species, and therefore are difficult to characterize using current experimental techniques. We report an atomistic model of the excited state ensemble of a stabilized mutant of an extensively studied flavodoxin fold protein CheY. We employed a hybrid simulation and experimental approach in which an aggregate 42 milliseconds of all-atom molecular dynamics were used as an informative prior for the structure of the excited state ensemble. The resulting prior was then refined against small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data employing an established method (EROS). The most striking feature of the resulting excited state ensemble was an unstructured N-terminus stabilized by non-native contacts in a conformation that is topologically simpler than the native state. We then predict incisive single molecule FRET experiments, using these results, as a means of model validation. Our study demonstrates the paradigm of uniting simulation and experiment in a statistical model to study the structure of protein excited states and rationally design validating experiments.

  3. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian [Eduard-Zintl-Institut für Anorganische und Physikalische Chemie and Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich Weiss Straße 4, D-64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Sugii, Taisuke, E-mail: taisuke.sugii.zs@hitachi.com [Center for Technology Innovation – Mechanical Engineering, Research & Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-0034 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T{sub g} in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T{sub g} increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T{sub g} in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T{sub g} is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment.

  4. Deformation behaviors of three-dimensional graphene honeycombs under out-of-plane compression: Atomistic simulations and predictive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanchao; Chen, Cheng; Hu, Dianyin; Song, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Combining atomistic simulations and continuum modeling, a comprehensive study of the out-of-plane compressive deformation behaviors of equilateral three-dimensional (3D) graphene honeycombs was performed. It was demonstrated that under out-of-plane compression, the honeycomb exhibits two critical deformation events, i.e., elastic mechanical instability (including elastic buckling and structural transformation) and inelastic structural collapse. The above events were shown to be strongly dependent on the honeycomb cell size and affected by the local atomic bonding at the cell junction. By treating the 3D graphene honeycomb as a continuum cellular solid, and accounting for the structural heterogeneity and constraint at the junction, a set of analytical models were developed to accurately predict the threshold stresses corresponding to the onset of those deformation events. The present study elucidates key structure-property relationships of 3D graphene honeycombs under out-of-plane compression, and provides a comprehensive theoretical framework to predictively analyze their deformation responses, and more generally, offers critical new knowledge for the rational bottom-up design of 3D networks of two-dimensional nanomaterials.

  5. The glass transition in cured epoxy thermosets: A comparative molecular dynamics study in coarse-grained and atomistic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langeloth, Michael; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Sugii, Taisuke

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the volumetric glass transition temperature T g in epoxy thermosets by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The epoxy thermosets consist of the resin bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and the hardener diethylenetriamine. A structure based coarse-grained (CG) force field has been derived using iterative Boltzmann inversion in order to facilitate simulations of larger length scales. We observe that T g increases clearly with the degree of cross-linking for all-atomistic (AA) and CG simulations. The transition T g in CG simulations of uncured mixtures is much lower than in AA-simulations due to the soft nature of the CG potentials, but increases all the more with the formation of rigid cross-links. Additional simulations of the CG mixtures in contact with a surface show the existence of an interphase region of about 3 nm thickness in which the network properties deviate significantly from the bulk. In accordance to experimental studies, we observe that T g is reduced in this interphase region and gradually increases to its bulk value with distance from the surface. The present study shows that the glass transition is a local phenomenon that depends on the network structure in the immediate environment

  6. Role of hydrogen on the incipient crack tip deformation behavior in α-Fe: An atomistic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, I.; Solanki, K. N.

    2018-01-01

    A crack tip in α-Fe presents a preferential trap site for hydrogen, and sufficient concentration of hydrogen can change the incipient crack tip deformation response, causing a transition from a ductile to a brittle failure mechanism for inherently ductile alloys. In this work, the effect of hydrogen segregation around the crack tip on deformation in α-Fe was examined using atomistic simulations and the continuum based Rice-Thompson criterion for various modes of fracture (I, II, and III). The presence of a hydrogen rich region ahead of the crack tip was found to cause a decrease in the critical stress intensity factor required for incipient deformation for various crack orientations and modes of fracture examined here. Furthermore, the triaxial stress state ahead of the crack tip was found to play a crucial role in determining the effect of hydrogen on the deformation behavior. Overall, the segregation of hydrogen atoms around the crack tip enhanced both dislocation emission and cleavage behavior suggesting that hydrogen has a dual role during the deformation in α-Fe.

  7. A Long-Range Electric Field Solver for Molecular Dynamics Based on Atomistic-to-Continuum Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jeremy A; Jones, Reese E; Lee, Jonathan W; Zimmerman, Jonathan A; Wong, Bryan M

    2011-06-14

    Understanding charge transport processes at a molecular level is currently hindered by a lack of appropriate models for incorporating nonperiodic, anisotropic electric fields in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, we develop a model for including electric fields in MD using an atomistic-to-continuum framework. This framework provides the mathematical and the algorithmic infrastructure to couple finite element (FE) representations of continuous data with atomic data. Our model represents the electric potential on a FE mesh satisfying a Poisson equation with source terms determined by the distribution of the atomic charges. Boundary conditions can be imposed naturally using the FE description of the potential, which then propagate to each atom through modified forces. The method is verified using simulations where analytical solutions are known or comparisons can be made to existing techniques. In addition, a calculation of a salt water solution in a silicon nanochannel is performed to demonstrate the method in a target scientific application in which ions are attracted to charged surfaces in the presence of electric fields and interfering media.

  8. Giant electrocaloric response in the prototypical Pb(Mg,Nb)O3 relaxor ferroelectric from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhijun; Nahas, Y.; Prokhorenko, S.; Prosandeev, S.; Wang, D.; Íñiguez, Jorge; Bellaiche, L.

    2018-03-01

    An atomistic effective Hamiltonian is used to investigate electrocaloric (EC) effects of Pb (Mg1 /3Nb2 /3) O3 relaxor ferroelectrics in its ergodic regime, and subject to electric fields applied along the pseudocubic [111] direction. Such a Hamiltonian qualitatively reproduces (i) the electric field-versus-temperature phase diagram, including the existence of a critical point where first-order and second-order transitions meet each other; and (ii) a giant EC response near such a critical point. It also reveals that such giant response around this critical point is microscopically induced by field-induced percolation of polar nanoregions. Moreover, it is also found that, for any temperature above the critical point, the EC coefficient-versus-electric-field curve adopts a maximum (and thus larger electrocaloric response too), that can be well described by the general Landau-like model proposed by Jiang et al., [Phys. Rev. B 96, 014114 (2017)], 10.1103/PhysRevB.96.014114, and that is further correlated with specific microscopic features related to dipoles lying along different rhombohedral directions. Furthermore, for temperatures being at least 40 K higher than the critical temperature, the (electric field, temperature) line associated with this maximal EC coefficient is below both the Widom line and the line representing percolation of polar nanoregions.

  9. Atomistic Origins of High Capacity and High Structural Stability of Polymer-Derived SiOC Anode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Zhao, Kejie

    2017-10-11

    Capacity and structural stability are often mutually exclusive properties of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs): a gain in capacity is usually accompanied by the undesired large volumetric change of the host material upon lithiation. Polymer-derived ceramics, such as silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) of hybrid Si-O-C bonds, show an exceptional combination of high capacity and superior structural stability. We investigate the atomistic origins of the unique chemomechanical performance of carbon-rich SiOC using the first-principles theoretical approach. The atomic model of SiOC is composed of continuous Si-O-C units caged by a graphene-like cellular network and percolated nanovoids. The segregated sp 2 carbon network serves as the backbone to maintain the structural stability of the lattice. Li insertion is first absorbed at the nanovoid sites, and then it is accommodated by the SiOC tetrahedral units, excess C atoms, and topological defects at the edge of or within the segregated carbon network. SiOC expands up to 22% in volumetric strain at the fully lithiated capacity of 1230 mA h/g. We examine in great detail the evolution of the microscopic features of the SiOC molecule in the course of Li reactions. The first-principles modeling provides a fundamental understanding of the physicochemical properties of Si-based glass ceramics for their application in LIBs.

  10. Atomistic simulation on charge mobility of amorphous tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3): origin of Poole-Frenkel-type behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yuki; Lennartz, Christian

    2008-07-21

    The atomistic simulation of charge transfer process for an amorphous Alq(3) system is reported. By employing electrostatic potential charges, we calculate site energies and find that the standard deviation of site energy distribution is about twice as large as predicted in previous research. The charge mobility is calculated via the Miller-Abrahams formalism and the master equation approach. We find that the wide site energy distribution governs Poole-Frenkel-type behavior of charge mobility against electric field, while the spatially correlated site energy is not a dominant mechanism of Poole-Frenkel behavior in the range from 2x10(5) to 1.4x10(6) V/cm. Also we reveal that randomly meshed connectivities are, in principle, required to account for the Poole-Frenkel mechanism. Charge carriers find a zigzag pathway at low electric field, while they find a straight pathway along electric field when a high electric field is applied. In the space-charge-limited current scheme, the charge-carrier density increases with electric field strength so that the nonlinear behavior of charge mobility is enhanced through the strong charge-carrier density dependence of charge mobility.

  11. Evaluating variability with atomistic simulations: the effect of potential and calculation methodology on the modeling of lattice and elastic constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Trautt, Zachary T.; Becker, Chandler A.

    2018-07-01

    Atomistic simulations using classical interatomic potentials are powerful investigative tools linking atomic structures to dynamic properties and behaviors. It is well known that different interatomic potentials produce different results, thus making it necessary to characterize potentials based on how they predict basic properties. Doing so makes it possible to compare existing interatomic models in order to select those best suited for specific use cases, and to identify any limitations of the models that may lead to unrealistic responses. While the methods for obtaining many of these properties are often thought of as simple calculations, there are many underlying aspects that can lead to variability in the reported property values. For instance, multiple methods may exist for computing the same property and values may be sensitive to certain simulation parameters. Here, we introduce a new high-throughput computational framework that encodes various simulation methodologies as Python calculation scripts. Three distinct methods for evaluating the lattice and elastic constants of bulk crystal structures are implemented and used to evaluate the properties across 120 interatomic potentials, 18 crystal prototypes, and all possible combinations of unique lattice site and elemental model pairings. Analysis of the results reveals which potentials and crystal prototypes are sensitive to the calculation methods and parameters, and it assists with the verification of potentials, methods, and molecular dynamics software. The results, calculation scripts, and computational infrastructure are self-contained and openly available to support researchers in performing meaningful simulations.

  12. Atomistic Modeling of Ion Conduction through the Voltage-Sensing Domain of the Shaker K+ Ion Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mona L; Freites, J Alfredo; Tombola, Francesco; Tobias, Douglas J

    2017-04-20

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) sense changes in the membrane electrostatic potential and, through conformational changes, regulate a specific function. The VSDs of wild-type voltage-dependent K + , Na + , and Ca 2+ channels do not conduct ions, but they can become ion-permeable through pathological mutations in the VSD. Relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of conduction through VSDs. The most detailed studies have been performed on Shaker K + channel variants in which ion conduction through the VSD is manifested in electrophysiology experiments as a voltage-dependent inward current, the so-called omega current, which appears when the VSDs are in their resting state conformation. Only monovalent cations appear to permeate the Shaker VSD via a pathway that is believed to be, at least in part, the same as that followed by the S4 basic side chains during voltage-dependent activation. We performed μs-time scale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of a cation-conducting variant of the Shaker VSD under applied electric fields in an experimentally validated resting-state conformation, embedded in a lipid bilayer surrounded by solutions containing guanidinium chloride or potassium chloride. Our simulations provide insights into the Shaker VSD permeation pathway, the protein-ion interactions that control permeation kinetics, and the mechanism of voltage-dependent activation of voltage-gated ion channels.

  13. Atomistic simulation of solid solution hardening in Mg/Al alloys: Examination of composition scaling and thermo-mechanical relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Peng; Cammarata, Robert C.; Falk, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Dislocation mobility in a solid solution was studied using atomistic simulations of an Mg/Al system. The critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) for the dislocations on the basal plane was calculated at temperatures from 0 K to 500 K with solute concentrations from 0 to 7 at%, and with four different strain rates. Solute hardening of the CRSS is decomposed into two contributions: one scales with c 2/3 , where c is the solute concentration, and the other scales with c 1 . The former was consistent with the Labusch model for local solute obstacles, and the latter was related to the athermal plateau stress due to the long range solute effect. A thermo-mechanical model was then used to analyze the temperature and strain rate dependences of the CRSS, and it yielded self-consistent and realistic results. The scaling laws were confirmed and the thermo-mechanical model was successfully parameterized using experimental measurements of the CRSS for Mg/Al alloys under quasi-static conditions. The predicted strain rate sensitivity from the experimental measurements of the CRSS is in reasonable agreement with separate mechanical tests. The concentration scaling and the thermo-mechanical relationships provide a potential tool to analytically relate the structural and thermodynamic parameters on the microscopic level with the macroscopic mechanical properties arising from dislocation mediated deformation.

  14. Thermally activated magnetization reversal in monatomic magnetic chains on surfaces studied by classical atomistic spin-dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, David S G; Mavropoulos, Phivos; Bluegel, Stefan; Lounis, Samir

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the spontaneous magnetization reversal of supported monatomic chains of finite length due to thermal fluctuations via atomistic spin-dynamics simulations. Our approach is based on the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion of a classical spin Hamiltonian in the presence of stochastic forces. The associated magnetization lifetime is found to obey an Arrhenius law with an activation barrier equal to the domain wall energy in the chain. For chains longer than one domain wall width, the reversal is initiated by nucleation of a reversed magnetization domain primarily at the chain edge followed by a subsequent propagation of the domain wall to the other edge in a random-walk fashion. This results in a linear dependence of the lifetime on the chain length, if the magnetization correlation length is not exceeded. We studied chains of uniaxial and triaxial anisotropy and found that a triaxial anisotropy leads to a reduction of the magnetization lifetime due to a higher reversal attempt rate, even though the activation barrier is not changed.

  15. On the use of atomistic simulations to aid bulk metallic glasses structural elucidation with solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ary R; Rino, José P

    2017-08-24

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experimental 27 Al metallic shifts reported in the literature for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) were revisited in the light of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. In a consistent way, the Gauge-Including Projector Augmented-Wave (GIPAW) method was applied in conjunction with classical molecular dynamics (CMD). A series of Zr-Cu-Al alloys with low Al concentrations were selected as case study systems, for which realistic CMD derived structural models were used for a short- and medium-range order mining. That initial procedure allowed the detection of trends describing changes on the microstructure of the material upon Al alloying, which in turn were used to guide GIPAW calculations with a set of abstract systems in the context of ssNMR. With essential precision and accuracy, the ab initio simulations also yielded valuable trends from the electronic structure point of view, which enabled an overview of the bonding nature of Al-centered clusters as well as its influence on the experimental ssNMR outcomes. The approach described in this work might promote the use of ssNMR spectroscopy in research on glassy metals. Moreover, the results presented demonstrate the possibility to expand the applications of this technique, with deeper insight into nuclear interactions and less speculative assignments.

  16. Atomistic simulations of thermal transport in Si and SiGe based materials: From bulk to nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Donadio, Davide; Galli, Giulia

    2010-03-01

    It has been recently proposed that Si and SiGe based nanostructured materials may exhibit low thermal conductivity and overall promising properties for thermoelectric applications. Hence there is a considerable interest in developing accurate theoretical and computational methods which can help interpret recent measurements, identify the physical origin of the reduced thermal conductivity, as well as shed light on the interplay between disorder and nanostructuring in determining a high figure of merit. In this work, we investigate the capability of an atomistic Green's function method [1] to describe phonon transport in several types of Si and SiGe based systems: amorphous Si, SiGe alloys, planar and nanodot Si/SiGe multilayers. We compare our results with experimental data [2,3], and with the findings of molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on the Boltzmann transport equation. [1] I. Savic, N. Mingo, and D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 165502 (2008). [2] S.-M. Lee, D. G. Cahill, and R. Venkatasubramanian, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70, 2957 (1997). [3] G. Pernot et al., submitted.

  17. Incorporation of local structure into kriging models for the prediction of atomistic properties in the water decamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Stuart J; Di Pasquale, Nicodemo; Popelier, Paul L A

    2016-10-15

    Machine learning algorithms have been demonstrated to predict atomistic properties approaching the accuracy of quantum chemical calculations at significantly less computational cost. Difficulties arise, however, when attempting to apply these techniques to large systems, or systems possessing excessive conformational freedom. In this article, the machine learning method kriging is applied to predict both the intra-atomic and interatomic energies, as well as the electrostatic multipole moments, of the atoms of a water molecule at the center of a 10 water molecule (decamer) cluster. Unlike previous work, where the properties of small water clusters were predicted using a molecular local frame, and where training set inputs (features) were based on atomic index, a variety of feature definitions and coordinate frames are considered here to increase prediction accuracy. It is shown that, for a water molecule at the center of a decamer, no single method of defining features or coordinate schemes is optimal for every property. However, explicitly accounting for the structure of the first solvation shell in the definition of the features of the kriging training set, and centring the coordinate frame on the atom-of-interest will, in general, return better predictions than models that apply the standard methods of feature definition, or a molecular coordinate frame. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In pursuit of an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomolecules at the atomistic level: a perspective on computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Alan [The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Harlen, Oliver G. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Harris, Sarah A., E-mail: s.a.harris@leeds.ac.uk [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Khalid, Syma; Leung, Yuk Ming [University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Lonsdale, Richard [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein Strasse, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Mulholland, Adrian J. [University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TS (United Kingdom); Pearson, Arwen R. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); University of Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Read, Daniel J.; Richardson, Robin A. [University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    The current computational techniques available for biomolecular simulation are described, and the successes and limitations of each with reference to the experimental biophysical methods that they complement are presented. Despite huge advances in the computational techniques available for simulating biomolecules at the quantum-mechanical, atomistic and coarse-grained levels, there is still a widespread perception amongst the experimental community that these calculations are highly specialist and are not generally applicable by researchers outside the theoretical community. In this article, the successes and limitations of biomolecular simulation and the further developments that are likely in the near future are discussed. A brief overview is also provided of the experimental biophysical methods that are commonly used to probe biomolecular structure and dynamics, and the accuracy of the information that can be obtained from each is compared with that from modelling. It is concluded that progress towards an accurate spatial and temporal model of biomacromolecules requires a combination of all of these biophysical techniques, both experimental and computational.

  19. Mobility and stability of large vacancy and vacancy-copper clusters in iron: An atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castin, N., E-mail: ncastin@sckcen.be [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etudes de l' energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Unit Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure-Boeretang 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium); Pascuet, M.I., E-mail: pascuet@cnea.gov.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Malerba, L. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etudes de l' energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Unit Structural Materials Modelling and Microstructure-Boeretang 200, B2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2012-10-15

    The formation of Cu-rich precipitates under irradiation is a major cause for changes in the mechanical response to load of reactor pressure vessel steels. In previous works, it has been shown that the mechanism under which precipitation occurs is governed by diffusion of vacancy-copper (VCu) complexes, also in the absence of irradiation. Coarse-grained computer models (such as object kinetic Monte Carlo) aimed at simulating irradiation processes in model alloys or steels should therefore explicitly include the mobility of Cu precipitates, as a consequence of vacancy hops at their surface. For this purpose, in this work we calculate diffusion coefficients and lifetimes for a large variety of VCu complexes. We use an innovative atomistic model, where vacancy migration energies are calculated with little approximations, taking into account all effects of static relaxation and long-range chemical interaction as predicted by an interatomic potential. Our results show that, contrary to what intuition might suggest, saturation in vacancies tend to slow down the transport of Cu atoms.

  20. Analysis of 60 706 Exomes Questions the Role of De Novo Variants Previously Implicated in Cardiac Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christian; Ahlberg, Gustav; Ghouse, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: De novo variants in the exome occur at a rate of 1 per individual per generation, and because of the low reproductive fitness for de novo variants causing severe disease, the likelihood of finding these as standing variations in the general population is low. Therefore, this study...... sought to evaluate the pathogenicity of de novo variants previously associated with cardiac disease based on a large population-representative exome database. METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a literature search for previous publications on de novo variants associated with severe arrhythmias...... trio studies (>1000 subjects). Of the monogenic variants, 11% (23/211) were present in ExAC, whereas 26% (802/3050) variants believed to increase susceptibility of disease were identified in ExAC. Monogenic de novo variants in ExAC had a total allele count of 109 and with ≈844 expected cases in Ex...

  1. Long-read sequencing and de novo assembly of a Chinese genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-read sequencing has enabled the de novo assembly of several individual human genomes, but with inherent limitations in characterizing repeat elements. Here we sequence a Chinese individual HX1 by single-molecule real-time (SMRT) long-read sequencing, construct a physical map by NanoChannel arr...

  2. A De novo Mutation in Dystrophin Causing Muscular Dystrophy in a Female Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We identified two novel de novo mutations of DMD gene in two Chinese pedigrees, one of which caused a female patient with muscular dystrophy. The mutational analysis is important for DMD patients and carriers in the absence of a family history. The NGS can help detect the mutations in MLPA-negative patients.

  3. Effect of haemodilution, acidosis, and hypothermia on the activity of recombinant factor VIIa (NovoSeven)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, D.; Lauritzen, B.; Pusateri, A.E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A range of plasma volume expanders is used clinically, often in settings where haemostasis may already be impaired. The haemostatic agent, recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa, NovoSeven), may be used to improve haemostasis but potential interactions with different volume expanders...

  4. Optimization of treatment protocols to prevent de novo development of antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    The ever-increasing rate of drug resistant bacteria has been one of the most challenging problem worldwide. This thesis studied the following subjects with mostly the clinically leading pathogen, P. aeruginosa, as the model strain: de novo development of antibiotic resistance in patient during the

  5. Norgal: Extraction and de novo assembly of mitochondrial DNA from whole-genome sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nakeeb, Kosai Ali Ahmed; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    and performing a de novo assembly on a subset of reads that contains these k-mers. The method was applied to WGS data from a panda, brown algae seaweed, butterfly and filamentous fungus. We were able to extract full circular mitochondrial genomes and obtained sequence identities to the reference sequences...

  6. 76 FR 61103 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0689] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug...

  7. De novo post-pollen mitosis II tobacco pollen tube transcriptome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hafidh, Said; Breznenová, Katarína; Honys, David

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2012), s. 918-921 ISSN 1559-2316 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP501/11/P321; GA ČR GA522/09/0858 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : de novo pollen tube transcriptome * male gametophyte development * pollen tube growth Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. De novo mutations of KIAA2022 in females cause intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, Iris M; Helbig, Katherine L; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Møller, Rikke S; Velinov, Milen; Dolzhanskaya, Natalia; Marsh, Eric; Helbig, Ingo; Devinsky, Orrin; Tang, Sha; Mefford, Heather C; Myers, Candace T; van Paesschen, Wim; Striano, Pasquale; van Gassen, Koen; van Kempen, Marjan; de Kovel, Carolien G F; Piard, Juliette; Minassian, Berge A; Nezarati, Marjan M; Pessoa, André; Jacquette, Aurelia; Maher, Bridget; Balestrini, Simona; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Warde, Marie Therese Abi; De St Martin, Anne; Chelly, Jamel; van 't Slot, Ruben; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Brilstra, Eva H; Koeleman, Bobby P C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the KIAA2022 gene have been reported in male patients with X-linked intellectual disability, and related female carriers were unaffected. Here, we report 14 female patients who carry a heterozygous de novo KIAA2022 mutation and share a phenotype characterised by intellectual

  9. Inflammatory bowel disease after liver transplantation : Risk factors for recurrence and De novo disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonka, RC; Dijkstra, G; Haagsma, EB; Shostrom, VK; Van den Berg, AP; Kleibeuker, JH

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and can recur or develop de novo after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and severity of IBD after liver

  10. Drug-Eluting Balloons in the Treatment of Coronary De Novo Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richelsen, Rasmus Kapalu Broge; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Jensen, Svend Eggert

    2016-01-01

    Drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) have emerged as a new application in percutaneous coronary intervention. DEBs have proven successful in the treatment of in-stent restenosis, but their role in de novo lesions is less clear. This paper provides a review of the current studies where DEBs have been used...

  11. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, Jacob J.; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We...

  12. The Key Drivers behind Novo Nordisk’s Growth in the Diabetes Market in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Louiza CHITOUR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To enter the Chinese Pharmaceutical market, “Big Pharma” has adopted different strategies to tackle the challenges specific to the country in terms of size, demographics, specific sales channels and logistics adjustments. While the majority of Global Pharmaceutical players have opted for an aggressive M&A approach to penetrate the Chinese market and gain local insight; the Danish Novo Nordisk has instead chosen a strategy focusing on innovation and developing its R&D structure to capitalize on the local talent pool. To illustrate Novo Nordisk’s growth strategy in the Mainland, we analyzed its competitiveness in the diabetes market by demonstrating the key drivers behind this success. We applied a various set of tools for this research: Novo Nordisk, Dong Bao Pharmaceutical executives’ interviews and personal observations accounting for the primary data, we also reviewed secondary data to perform a PEST analysis in addition to Porter’s competitive advantage model in order to extract the reasons behind Novo Nordisk’s marching success in the Mainland.

  13. A glance at quality score: implication for de novo transcriptome reconstruction of Illumina reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Kimbung Mbandi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Downstream analyses of short-reads from next-generation sequencing platforms are often preceded by a pre-processing step that removes uncalled and wrongly called bases. Standard approaches rely on their associated base quality scores to retain the read or a portion of it when the score is above a predefined threshold. It is difficult to differentiate sequencing error from biological variation without a reference using quality scores. The effects of quality score based trimming have not been systematically studied in de novo transcriptome assembly. Using RNA-Seq data produced from Illumina, we teased out the effects of quality score base filtering or trimming on de novo transcriptome reconstruction. We showed that assemblies produced from reads subjected to different quality score thresholds contain truncated and missing transfrags when compared to those from untrimmed reads. Our data supports the fact that de novo assembling of untrimmed data is challenging for de Bruijn graph assemblers. However, our results indicates that comparing the assemblies from untrimmed and trimmed read subsets can suggest appropriate filtering parameters and enable selection of the optimum de novo transcriptome assembly in non-model organisms.

  14. Evaluation of effect of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi on four major wood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effect of Ophiostoma novo-ulmi on four major wood species of the elm family in Rasht (North West of Iran) ... the diameter size of vessels and the number of xylary rays in four species: Ulmus carpinifolia, Ulmus glabra, Zelkova carpinifolia and Celtis australis as important factors in host resistance to elm disease.

  15. De novo formation of centrosomes in vertebrate cells arrested during S phase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodjakov, A; Rieder, CL; Sluder, G; Cassels, G; Sibon, O; Wang, CL

    2002-01-01

    The centrosome usually replicates in a semiconservative fashion, i.e., new centrioles form in association with preexisting "maternal" centrioles. De novo formation of centrioles has been reported for a few highly specialized cell types but it has not been seen in vertebrate somatic cells. We find

  16. Robust de novo pathway enrichment with KeyPathwayMiner 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alcaraz, Nicolas; List, Markus; Dissing-Hansen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functional modules or novel active pathways, recently termed de novo pathway enrichment, is a computational systems biology challenge that has gained much attention during the last decade. Given a large biological interaction network, KeyPathwayMiner extracts connected subnetworks tha...

  17. De novo insertions and deletions of predominantly paternal origin are associated with autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shan; Walker, Michael F.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; DiCola, Michael; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Ye, Adam Y.; Waqar, Zainulabedin; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Overton, John D.; Frahm, Stephanie; Keaney, John F.; Teran, Nicole A.; Dea, Jeanselle; Mandell, Jeffrey D.; Bal, Vanessa Hus; Sullivan, Catherine A.; DiLullo, Nicholas M.; Khalil, Rehab O.; Gockley, Jake; Yuksel, Zafer; Sertel, Sinem M.; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Gupta, Abha R.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Sheldon, Michael; Brooks, Andrew I.; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie; State, Matthew W.; Wei, Liping; Sanders, Stephan J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies have demonstrated the contribution of de novo loss-of-function single nucleotide variants to autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, challenges in the reliable detection of de novo insertions and deletions (indels) have limited inclusion of these variants in prior analyses. Through the application of a robust indel detection method to WES data from 787 ASD families (2,963 individuals), we demonstrate that de novo frameshift indels contribute to ASD risk (OR=1.6; 95%CI=1.0-2.7; p=0.03), are more common in female probands (p=0.02), are enriched among genes encoding FMRP targets (p=6×10−9), and arise predominantly on the paternal chromosome (p<0.001). Based on mutation rates in probands versus unaffected siblings, de novo frameshift indels contribute to risk in approximately 3.0% of individuals with ASD. Finally, through observing clustering of mutations in unrelated probands, we report two novel ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5), a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release. PMID:25284784

  18. Novo Jornalismo: fronteiras litero-factuais em A sangue Frio e em Radical Chique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Aquinei Timóteo Queirós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa busca analisar de que forma fato e ficção se entrecruzam no “movimento” do Novo Jornalismo, a partir das obras A sangue Frio e Radical Chique e o Novo Jornalismo, de Truman Capote e Tom Wolfe, respectivamente. Pretende-se, a partir da investigação do corpus em estudo, revelar os aspectos que aproximam o fato jornalístico, a notícia e a reportagem às técnicas literárias do romance, do conto e da crônica. O estudo investiga o Novo Jornalismo sob o viés de textos centrais das áreas de teoria literária e estudos jornalísticos utilizando autores como Mikhail Bakhtin, Hayden White, Paul Ricoeur, Muniz Sodré; além de referenciar outros escritores que, como Tom Wolfe e Truman Capote, fizeram parte de um grande movimento renovador do jornalismo literário nos anos 1950, 1960 e 1970 chamado, genericamente, de Novo Jornalismo.

  19. CycloBranch: De Novo Sequencing of Nonribosomal Peptides from Accurate Product Ion Mass Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Jiří; Lemr, Karel; Schug, K. A.; Havlíček, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 10 (2015), s. 1780-1786 ISSN 1044-0305 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : De novo sequencing * Nonribosomal peptides * Linear Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2015

  20. Novo Jornalismo: fronteiras litero-factuais em A sangue Frio e em Radical Chique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Aquinei Timóteo Queirós

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1984-784X.2012v12n18p130 A pesquisa busca analisar de que forma fato e ficção se entrecruzam no “movimento” do Novo Jornalismo, a partir das obras A sangue Frio e Radical Chique e o Novo Jornalismo, de Truman Capote e Tom Wolfe, respectivamente. Pretende-se, a partir da investigação do corpus em estudo, revelar os aspectos que aproximam o fato jornalístico, a notícia e a reportagem às técnicas literárias do romance, do conto e da crônica. O estudo investiga o Novo Jornalismo sob o viés de textos centrais das áreas de teoria literária e estudos jornalísticos utilizando autores como Mikhail Bakhtin, Hayden White, Paul Ricoeur, Muniz Sodré; além de referenciar outros escritores que, como Tom Wolfe e Truman Capote, fizeram parte de um grande movimento renovador do jornalismo literário nos anos 1950, 1960 e 1970 chamado, genericamente, de Novo Jornalismo.

  1. Predicting survival of de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asian women: systematic review and validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hui; Hartman, Mikael; Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala; Lee, Soo-Chin; Taib, Nur Aishah; Tan, Ern-Yu; Chan, Patrick; Moons, Karel G M; Wong, Hoong-Seam; Goh, Jeremy; Rahim, Siti Mastura; Yip, Cheng-Har; Verkooijen, Helena M

    2014-01-01

    In Asia, up to 25% of breast cancer patients present with distant metastases at diagnosis. Given the heterogeneous survival probabilities of de novo metastatic breast cancer, individual outcome prediction is challenging. The aim of the study is to identify existing prognostic models for patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer and validate them in Asia. We performed a systematic review to identify prediction models for metastatic breast cancer. Models were validated in 642 women with de novo metastatic breast cancer registered between 2000 and 2010 in the Singapore Malaysia Hospital Based Breast Cancer Registry. Survival curves for low, intermediate and high-risk groups according to each prognostic score were compared by log-rank test and discrimination of the models was assessed by concordance statistic (C-statistic). We identified 16 prediction models, seven of which were for patients with brain metastases only. Performance status, estrogen receptor status, metastatic site(s) and disease-free interval were the most common predictors. We were able to validate nine prediction models. The capacity of the models to discriminate between poor and good survivors varied from poor to fair with C-statistics ranging from 0.50 (95% CI, 0.48-0.53) to 0.63 (95% CI, 0.60-0.66). The discriminatory performance of existing prediction models for de novo metastatic breast cancer in Asia is modest. Development of an Asian-specific prediction model is needed to improve prognostication and guide decision making.

  2. De novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1 cause Bohring-Opitz syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoischen, Alexander; van Bon, Bregje W. M.; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Gilissen, Christian; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; de Vries, Petra; Janssen, Irene; van Lier, Bart; Hastings, Rob; Smithson, Sarah F.; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Kjaergaard, Susanne; Goodship, Judith; McGowan, Ruth; Bartholdi, Deborah; Rauch, Anita; Peippo, Maarit; Cobben, Jan M.; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Veltman, Joris A.; Brunner, Han G.; de Vries, Bert B. B. A.

    2011-01-01

    Bohring-Opitz syndrome is characterized by severe intellectual disability, distinctive facial features and multiple congenital malformations. We sequenced the exomes of three individuals with Bohring-Opitz syndrome and in each identified heterozygous de novo nonsense mutations in ASXL1, which is

  3. De novo mutations of KIAA2022 in females cause intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lange, Iris M; Helbig, Katherine L; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the KIAA2022 gene have been reported in male patients with X-linked intellectual disability, and related female carriers were unaffected. Here, we report 14 female patients who carry a heterozygous de novo KIAA2022 mutation and share a phenotype characterised by intellect...

  4. Wound complications and surgical events in de novo heart transplant patients treated with everolimus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rashidi, Mitra; Esmaily, Sorosh; Fiane, Arnt E

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The use of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have been limited by adverse events (AE), including delayed wound healing. We retrospectively reviewed all AE and serious AE (SAE) in The Scandinavian heart transplant (HTx) everolimus (EVE) de novo trial with early calcineurin...

  5. Associations between Familial Rates of Psychiatric Disorders and De Novo Genetic Mutations in Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyleen Luhrs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the confluence of genetic and familial risk factors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD with distinct de novo genetic events. We hypothesized that gene-disrupting mutations would be associated with reduced rates of familial psychiatric disorders relative to structural mutations. Participants included families of children with ASD in four groups: de novo duplication copy number variations (DUP, n=62, de novo deletion copy number variations (DEL, n=74, de novo likely gene-disrupting mutations (LGDM, n=267, and children without a known genetic etiology (NON, n=2111. Familial rates of psychiatric disorders were calculated from semistructured interviews. Results indicated overall increased rates of psychiatric disorders in DUP families compared to DEL and LGDM families, specific to paternal psychiatric histories, and particularly evident for depressive disorders. Higher rates of depressive disorders in maternal psychiatric histories were observed overall compared to paternal histories and higher rates of anxiety disorders were observed in paternal histories for LGDM families compared to DUP families. These findings support the notion of an additive contribution of genetic etiology and familial factors are associated with ASD risk and highlight critical need for continued work targeting these relationships.

  6. A recurrent de novo mutation in KCNC1 causes progressive myoclonus epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muona, M.; Berkovic, S. F.; Dibbens, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of rare, inherited disorders manifesting with action myoclonus, tonicclonic seizures and ataxia. We sequenced the exomes of 84 unrelated individuals with PME of unknown cause and molecularly solved 26 cases (31%). Remarkably, a recurrent de novo...

  7. The impact of employee satisfaction on productivity in Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Cimperman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Does employee satisfaction, impact on productivity? How are these two variables associated? What is the job satisfaction in Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd. What needs to be done to make employees more satisfied at work and, consequently, more productive? Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine what are the factors that influence employee satisfaction Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd. and check the connection between work satisfaction and employee productivity. The aim of the research is to examine what is the level of job satisfaction of employees in Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd. And find our reasons and factors that prevent employees were satisfied in the workplace. Method: In this study we used a descriptive method and the method of combining the study of domestic and foreign literature. Pending the results we have come to interview employees in the Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd. Results: We conducted a survey among employees in Tiskarna Novo mesto, Ltd and we came to the conclusion that the employees are medium satisfied – the average grade point job satisfaction of employees was 3.1 (evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. The worst assessed was factor in job satisfaction opportunity for advancement and educational opportunities. We have found out that factors like receiving praise and awards as well as good interpersonal relations are those that affect good on job satisfaction, on the other hand conflict is the one that reduces job satisfaction. The existence of links between work satisfaction and productivity were not found (r = -0.061. Organization: The organization and managers, it is important to know which are the factors by which employees are satisfied or dissatisfied. Results of the research will give managers a clear picture of the factors of satisfaction / dissatisfaction and opinion on productivity. Society: The employees it means a lot to have your job satisfaction and consequently they are more productive. Originality: The

  8. TRANSPORT OF PATIENTS FOR PRIMARY PTCA FROM GENERAL HOSPITAL NOVO MESTO TO LJUBLJANA IN 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Okrajšek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS with ST-segment elevation with primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA is the best way to treat these patients. Primary PTCA is also practicable with patients who are admitted into institution without catheter laboratory. The transport of patients into the tertiary institution is safe, but it is important to keep the time of ischemia as short as possible and to reach the time interval of door-balloon as recommended by the guidelines. The ACS patients with ST-segment elevation that were directed into General Hospital Novo mesto after examination at the internistic emergency department have been redirected to KC Ljubljana for realization of PTCA since October 2001.Methods. A prospective analysis of patients with ACS with STsegment elevation, who had been transferred from General Hospital Novo mesto to KC Ljubljana in the period from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002 to have a primary PTCA, was performed. The analysis comprised the following: the time interval of handling the patients at Internistic department of General Hospital Novo mesto, the time of transport of patients to Ljubljana and total time interval from the arrival of patients to General Hospital Novo mesto to the first inflation of balloon in Ljubljana. We monitored the complications that occurred during the treatment of the patients.Results. In the above mentioned period 29 patients (24 males and 5 females were transported from the General Hospital Novo mesto to the KC Ljubljana to have a primary PTCA performed. The total time interval measured between the patients’ arrival to General Hospital Novo mesto to the first inflation of balloon in Ljubljana in the year 2002 was 145 minutes, which is 17 minutes better than in the previous period. The time interval recommended by the guidelines was achieved with four patients.Conclusions. By recognizing the problems that had encountered with directing the

  9. A prognostic scoring model for survival after locoregional therapy in de novo stage IV breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommalapati, Anuhya; Tella, Sri Harsha; Goyal, Gaurav; Ganti, Apar Kishor; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Tandra, Pavan Kumar

    2018-05-02

    The role of locoregional treatment (LRT) remains controversial in de novo stage IV breast cancer (BC). We sought to analyze the role of LRT and prognostic factors of overall survival (OS) in de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT utilizing the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). The objective of the current study is to create and internally validate a prognostic scoring model to predict the long-term OS for de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT. We included de novo stage IV BC patients reported to NCDB between 2004 and 2015. Patients were divided into LRT and no-LRT subsets. We randomized LRT subset to training and validation cohorts. In the training cohort, a seventeen-point prognostic scoring system was developed based on the hazard ratios calculated using Cox-proportional method. We stratified both training and validation cohorts into two "groups" [group 1 (0-7 points) and group 2 (7-17 points)]. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to compare OS between the two groups. Our prognostic score was validated internally by comparing the OS between the respective groups in both the training and validation cohorts. Among 67,978 patients, LRT subset (21,200) had better median OS as compared to that of no-LRT (45 vs. 24 months; p < 0.0001). The group 1 and group 2 in the training cohort showed a significant difference in the 3-year OS (p < 0.0001) (68 vs. 26%). On internal validation, comparable OS was seen between the respective groups in each cohort (p = 0.77). Our prognostic scoring system will help oncologists to predict the prognosis in de novo stage IV BC patients treated with LRT. Although firm treatment-related conclusions cannot be made due to the retrospective nature of the study, LRT appears to be associated with a better OS in specific subgroups.

  10. De Novo Heart Failure After Kidney Transplantation: Trends in Incidence and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenihan, Colin R; Liu, Sai; Deswal, Anita; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2018-03-29

    Heart failure is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following kidney transplantation. Some studies in the general population have shown that the incidence of heart failure has decreased during the past 20 years. However, it is not currently known whether such a trend exists in the kidney transplantation population. Retrospective observational cohort study. Adult patients included in the US Renal Data System who underwent their first kidney transplantation in the United States between 1998 and 2010 with at least 6 months of continuous Medicare parts A and B coverage before transplantation and no prior evidence for a diagnosis of heart failure before kidney transplantation. Calendar year of transplantation and calendar year of posttransplantation heart failure diagnosis. De novo posttransplantation heart failure defined using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes and mortality following de novo posttransplantation heart failure diagnosis. Secular trends in de novo post-kidney transplantation heart failure were examined using Cox proportional hazards analysis. Within a study cohort of 48,771 patients, 7,269 developed de novo heart failure within 3 years of kidney transplantation, with a median time to heart failure of 0.76 years. The adjusted HR for heart failure with death as competing risk comparing patients who underwent transplantation in 2010 with those who underwent transplantation in 1998 was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.60-0.79). No temporal trend in mortality following a diagnosis of post-kidney transplantation heart failure was observed. Potential residual confounding from either incorrectly ascertained or unavailable confounders. The cohort was limited to Medicare beneficiaries. Adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics, the risk for developing de novo post-kidney transplantation heart failure has declined significantly between 1998 and 2010, with no apparent change in subsequent mortality. Copyright © 2018

  11. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  12. De Novo Insertions and Deletions of Predominantly Paternal Origin Are Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Dong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Whole-exome sequencing (WES studies have demonstrated the contribution of de novo loss-of-function single-nucleotide variants (SNVs to autism spectrum disorder (ASD. However, challenges in the reliable detection of de novo insertions and deletions (indels have limited inclusion of these variants in prior analyses. By applying a robust indel detection method to WES data from 787 ASD families (2,963 individuals, we demonstrate that de novo frameshift indels contribute to ASD risk (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.0–2.7; p = 0.03, are more common in female probands (p = 0.02, are enriched among genes encoding FMRP targets (p = 6 × 10−9, and arise predominantly on the paternal chromosome (p < 0.001. On the basis of mutation rates in probands versus unaffected siblings, we conclude that de novo frameshift indels contribute to risk in approximately 3% of individuals with ASD. Finally, by observing clustering of mutations in unrelated probands, we uncover two ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5, a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release. : Insertions and deletions (indels have proven especially difficult to detect in exome sequencing data. Dong et al. now identify indels in exome data for 787 autism spectrum disorder (ASD families. They demonstrate association between de novo indels that alter the reading frame and ASD. Furthermore, by observing clustering of indels in unrelated probands, they uncover two additional ASD-associated genes: KMT2E (MLL5, a chromatin regulator, and RIMS1, a regulator of synaptic vesicle release.

  13. De novo synthesis of adenine nucleotides in different skeletal muscle fiber types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullson, P.C.; John-Alder, H.B.; Hood, D.A.; Terjung, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Management of adenine nucleotide catabolism differs among skeletal muscle fiber types. This study evaluated whether there are corresponding differences in the rates of de novo synthesis of adenine nucleotide among fiber type sections of skeletal muscle using an isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Label incorporation into adenine nucleotides from the [1-14C]glycine precursor was determined and used to calculate synthesis rates based on the intracellular glycine specific radioactivity. Results show that intracellular glycine is closely related to the direct precursor pool. Rates of de novo synthesis were highest in fast-twitch red muscle (57.0 +/- 4.0, 58.2 +/- 4.4 nmol.h-1.g-1; deep red gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis), relatively high in slow-twitch red muscle (47.0 +/- 3.1; soleus), and low in fast-twitch white muscle (26.1 +/- 2.0 and 21.6 +/- 2.3; superficial white gastrocnemius and vastus lateralis). Rates for four mixed muscles were intermediate, ranging between 32.3 and 37.3. Specific de novo synthesis rates exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.986) with muscle section citrate synthase activity. Turnover rates (de novo synthesis rate/adenine nucleotide pool size) were highest in high oxidative muscle (0.82-1.06%/h), lowest in low oxidative muscle (0.30-0.35%/h), and intermediate in mixed muscle (0.44-0.55%/h). Our results demonstrate that differences in adenine nucleotide management among fiber types extends to the process of de novo adenine nucleotide synthesis

  14. Efficient assembly of de novo human artificial chromosomes from large genomic loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Gregory

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Artificial Chromosomes (HACs are potentially useful vectors for gene transfer studies and for functional annotation of the genome because of their suitability for cloning, manipulating and transferring large segments of the genome. However, development of HACs for the transfer of large genomic loci into mammalian cells has been limited by difficulties in manipulating high-molecular weight DNA, as well as by the low overall frequencies of de novo HAC formation. Indeed, to date, only a small number of large (>100 kb genomic loci have been reported to be successfully packaged into de novo HACs. Results We have developed novel methodologies to enable efficient assembly of HAC vectors containing any genomic locus of interest. We report here the creation of a novel, bimolecular system based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs for the construction of HACs incorporating any defined genomic region. We have utilized this vector system to rapidly design, construct and validate multiple de novo HACs containing large (100–200 kb genomic loci including therapeutically significant genes for human growth hormone (HGH, polycystic kidney disease (PKD1 and ß-globin. We report significant differences in the ability of different genomic loci to support de novo HAC formation, suggesting possible effects of cis-acting genomic elements. Finally, as a proof of principle, we have observed sustained ß-globin gene expression from HACs incorporating the entire 200 kb ß-globin genomic locus for over 90 days in the absence of selection. Conclusion Taken together, these results are significant for the development of HAC vector technology, as they enable high-throughput assembly and functional validation of HACs containing any large genomic locus. We have evaluated the impact of different genomic loci on the frequency of HAC formation and identified segments of genomic DNA that appear to facilitate de novo HAC formation. These genomic loci

  15. De novo triiodothyronine formation from thyrocytes activated by thyroid-stimulating hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, Cintia E; Veluswamy, Balaji; Morgan, Sarah J; Galton, Valerie A; Banga, J Paul; Atkins, Stephen; Morishita, Yoshiaki; Neumann, Susanne; Latif, Rauf; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Smith, Terry J; Arvan, Peter

    2017-09-15

    The thyroid gland secretes primarily tetraiodothyronine (T 4 ), and some triiodothyronine (T 3 ). Under normal physiological circumstances, only one-fifth of circulating T 3 is directly released by the thyroid, but in states of hyperactivation of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptors (TSHRs), patients develop a syndrome of relative T 3 toxicosis. Thyroidal T 4 production results from iodination of thyroglobulin (TG) at residues Tyr 5 and Tyr 130 , whereas thyroidal T 3 production may originate in several different ways. In this study, the data demonstrate that within the carboxyl-terminal portion of mouse TG, T 3 is formed de novo independently of deiodination from T 4 We found that upon iodination in vitro , de novo T 3 formation in TG was decreased in mice lacking TSHRs. Conversely, de novo T 3 that can be formed upon iodination of TG secreted from PCCL3 (rat thyrocyte) cells was augmented from cells previously exposed to increased TSH, a TSHR agonist, a cAMP analog, or a TSHR-stimulating antibody. We present data suggesting that TSH-stimulated TG phosphorylation contributes to enhanced de novo T 3 formation. These effects were reversed within a few days after removal of the hyperstimulating conditions. Indeed, direct exposure of PCCL3 cells to human serum from two patients with Graves' disease, but not control sera, led to secretion of TG with an increased intrinsic ability to form T 3 upon in vitro iodination. Furthermore, TG secreted from human thyrocyte cultures hyperstimulated with TSH also showed an increased intrinsic ability to form T 3 Our data support the hypothesis that TG processing in the secretory pathway of TSHR-hyperstimulated thyrocytes alters the structure of the iodination substrate in a way that enhances de novo T 3 formation, contributing to the relative T 3 toxicosis of Graves' disease.

  16. Automated de novo phasing and model building of coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Models generated by de novo structure prediction can be very useful starting points for molecular replacement for systems where suitable structural homologues cannot be readily identified. Protein-protein complexes and de novo-designed proteins are examples of systems that can be challenging to phase. In this study, the potential of de novo models of protein complexes for use as starting points for molecular replacement is investigated. The approach is demonstrated using homomeric coiled-coil proteins, which are excellent model systems for oligomeric systems. Despite the stereotypical fold of coiled coils, initial phase estimation can be difficult and many structures have to be solved with experimental phasing. A method was developed for automatic structure determination of homomeric coiled coils from X-ray diffraction data. In a benchmark set of 24 coiled coils, ranging from dimers to pentamers with resolutions down to 2.5 Å, 22 systems were automatically solved, 11 of which had previously been solved by experimental phasing. The generated models contained 71-103% of the residues present in the deposited structures, had the correct sequence and had free R values that deviated on average by 0.01 from those of the respective reference structures. The electron-density maps were of sufficient quality that only minor manual editing was necessary to produce final structures. The method, named CCsolve, combines methods for de novo structure prediction, initial phase estimation and automated model building into one pipeline. CCsolve is robust against errors in the initial models and can readily be modified to make use of alternative crystallographic software. The results demonstrate the feasibility of de novo phasing of protein-protein complexes, an approach that could also be employed for other small systems beyond coiled coils.

  17. Genome sequencing of bacteria: sequencing, de novo assembly and rapid analysis using open source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Lettieri, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    De novo genome sequencing of previously uncharacterized microorganisms has the potential to open up new frontiers in microbial genomics by providing insight into both functional capabilities and biodiversity. Until recently, Roche 454 pyrosequencing was the NGS method of choice for de novo assembly because it generates hundreds of thousands of long reads (tools for processing NGS data are increasingly free and open source and are often adopted for both their high quality and role in promoting academic freedom. The error rate of pyrosequencing the Alcanivorax borkumensis genome was such that thousands of insertions and deletions were artificially introduced into the finished genome. Despite a high coverage (~30 fold), it did not allow the reference genome to be fully mapped. Reads from regions with errors had low quality, low coverage, or were missing. The main defect of the reference mapping was the introduction of artificial indels into contigs through lower than 100% consensus and distracting gene calling due to artificial stop codons. No assembler was able to perform de novo assembly comparable to reference mapping. Automated annotation tools performed similarly on reference mapped and de novo draft genomes, and annotated most CDSs in the de novo assembled draft genomes. Free and open source software (FOSS) tools for assembly and annotation of NGS data are being developed rapidly to provide accurate results with less computational effort. Usability is not high priority and these tools currently do not allow the data to be processed without manual intervention. Despite this, genome assemblers now readily assemble medium short reads into long contigs (>97-98% genome coverage). A notable gap in pyrosequencing technology is the quality of base pair calling and conflicting base pairs between single reads at the same nucleotide position. Regardless, using draft whole genomes that are not finished and remain fragmented into tens of contigs allows one to characterize

  18. Atomistic computer simulations on multi-loaded PAMAM dendrimers: a comparison of amine- and hydroxyl-terminated dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalkhani-Khamseh, Farideh; Ebrahim-Habibi, Azadeh; Hadipour, Nasser L.

    2017-12-01

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have been extensively studied as delivery vectors in biomedical applications. A limited number of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies have investigated the effect of surface chemistry on therapeutic molecules loading, with the aim of providing insights for biocompatibility improvement and increase in drug loading capacity of PAMAM dendrimers. In this work, fully atomistic MD simulations were employed to study the association of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) with amine (NH2)- and hydroxyl (OH)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers of generations 3 and 4 (G3 and G4). MD results show a 1:12, 1:1, 1:27, and 1:4 stoichiometry, respectively, for G3NH2-FU, G3OH-FU, G4NH2-FU, and G4OH-FU complexes, which is in good agreement with the isothermal titration calorimetry results. The results obtained showed that NH2-terminated dendrimers assume segmented open structures with large cavities and more drug molecules can encapsulate inside the dendritic cavities of amine terminated dendrimers. However, OH-terminated have a densely packed structure and therefore, 5-FU drug molecules are more stable to locate close to the surface of the dendrimers. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis showed that 5-FU drug molecules have more tendency to form hydrogen bonds with terminal monomers of OH-terminated dendrimers, while in NH2-terminated these occur both in the inner region and the surface. Furthermore, MM-PBSA analysis revealed that van der Waals and electrostatic energies are both important to stabilize the complexes. We found that drug molecules are distributed uniformly inside the amine and hydroxyl terminated dendrimers and therefore, both dendrimers are promising candidates as drug delivery systems for 5-FU drug molecules.

  19. Correlation between self-diffusion in Si and the migration mechanisms of vacancies and self-interstitials: An atomistic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posselt, M.; Gao, F.; Bracht, H.

    2008-01-01

    The migration of point defects in silicon and the corresponding atomic mobility are investigated by comprehensive classical molecular-dynamics simulations using the Stillinger-Weber potential and the Tersoff potential. In contrast to most of the previous studies both the point defect diffusivity and the self-diffusion coefficient per defect are calculated separately so that the diffusion-correlation factor can be determined. Simulations with both the Stillinger-Weber and the Tersoff potential show that vacancy migration is characterized by the transformation of the tetrahedral vacancy to the split vacancy and vice versa and the diffusion-correlation factor f V is about 0.5. This value was also derived by the statistical diffusion theory under the assumption of the same migration mechanism. The mechanisms of self-interstitial migration are more complex. The detailed study, including a visual analysis and investigations with the nudged elastic band method, reveals a variety of transformations between different self-interstitial configurations. Molecular-dynamics simulations using the Stillinger-Weber potential show that the self-interstitial migration is dominated by a dumbbell mechanism, whereas in the case of the Tersoff potential the interstitialcy mechanism prevails. The corresponding values of the correlation factor f I are different, namely, 0.59 and 0.69 for the dumbbell and the interstitialcy mechanisms, respectively. The latter value is nearly equal to that obtained by the statistical theory which assumes the interstitialcy mechanism. Recent analysis of experimental results demonstrated that in the framework of state-of-the-art diffusion and reaction models the best interpretation of point defect data can be given by assuming f I ≅0.6. The comparison with the present atomistic study leads to the conclusion that the self-interstitial migration in Si should be governed by a dumbbell mechanism

  20. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-06-01

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011), 10.1063/1.3643333 and preprint arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  1. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light

  2. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmer, David T.; Chandler, David, E-mail: chandler@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys.135, 134503 (2011) and preprint http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  3. The putative liquid-liquid transition is a liquid-solid transition in atomistic models of water. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2013-06-07

    This paper extends our earlier studies of free energy functions of density and crystalline order parameters for models of supercooled water, which allows us to examine the possibility of two distinct metastable liquid phases [D. T. Limmer and D. Chandler, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134503 (2011) and preprint arXiv:1107.0337 (2011)]. Low-temperature reversible free energy surfaces of several different atomistic models are computed: mW water, TIP4P/2005 water, Stillinger-Weber silicon, and ST2 water, the last of these comparing three different treatments of long-ranged forces. In each case, we show that there is one stable or metastable liquid phase, and there is an ice-like crystal phase. The time scales for crystallization in these systems far exceed those of structural relaxation in the supercooled metastable liquid. We show how this wide separation in time scales produces an illusion of a low-temperature liquid-liquid transition. The phenomenon suggesting metastability of two distinct liquid phases is actually coarsening of the ordered ice-like phase, which we elucidate using both analytical theory and computer simulation. For the latter, we describe robust methods for computing reversible free energy surfaces, and we consider effects of electrostatic boundary conditions. We show that sensible alterations of models and boundary conditions produce no qualitative changes in low-temperature phase behaviors of these systems, only marginal changes in equations of state. On the other hand, we show that altering sampling time scales can produce large and qualitative non-equilibrium effects. Recent reports of evidence of a liquid-liquid critical point in computer simulations of supercooled water are considered in this light.

  4. THE PARADOX OF MIGRATION AND THE INTERESTS OF THE ATOMISTIC NATION-STATES: THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phazha Jimmy Ngandwe

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The "paradox of migration and the interests of the atomistic nation-states" interrogates the phenomenon of migration in general and in the Southern African Development Community in particular. The point of departure of the paper is the African Union and the Southern African Development Community’s legal framework on migration, as read with the national legal instruments of the different member states. Its focal point is the raison d’être of this phenomenon of migration and the corresponding approaches and attitudes of the nation-states within which migration takes place inter se. This includes the psycho-social impact of migration. Internationally as well as regionally, States are concerned with issues of sovereignty, the preservation of the welfare of the citizenry, ensuring social cohesion social, cultural and economic development including job creation, and fighting against transnational organised crime, including terrorism. The theme of the paper is that whereas migration should form the bedrock of regionalism and globalisation, the negative attitudes of the nation-states to migration are more often than not at variance with the objectives of regionalism and globalisation. The central question of the research is how states can discharge their duties and obligations vis-à-vis their nationals without perpetuating the bottlenecks to and the stigma that attaches to migration and thereby upsetting the international as well as regional integration objectives of the free movement of people. This is the issue that the paper is intended to explore. The main areas of concern are that the negative attitudes of the nation-states are manifested in the hostile treatment of migrants at all ports of entry, including illegal or ungazetted points of entry, within the nation-states in general, and in their labour markets in particular. This research therefore explores the paradoxical nature of the duties and responsibilities of states within the

  5. Impact of amphiphilic molecules on the structure and stability of homogeneous sphingomyelin bilayer: Insights from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Pratibha; Kaur, Supreet; Sharma, Shobha; Kashyap, Hemant K.

    2018-04-01

    Modulation of lipid membrane properties due to the permeation of amphiphiles is an important biological process pertaining to many applications in the field of pharmaceutics, toxicology, and biotechnology. Sphingolipids are both structural and functional lipids that constitute an important component of mechanically stable and chemically resistant outer leaflets of plasma membranes. Here, we present an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation study to appreciate the concentration-dependent effects of small amphiphilic molecules, such as ethanol, acetone, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), on the structure and stability of a fully hydrated homogeneous N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (PSM) bilayer. The study reveals an increase in the lateral expansion of the bilayer along with disordering of the hydrophobic lipid tails on increasing the concentration of ethanol. At higher concentrations of ethanol, rupturing of the bilayer is quite evident through the analysis of partial electron density profiles and lipid tail order parameters. For ethanol containing systems, permeation of water molecules in the hydrophobic part of the bilayer is allowed through local defects made due to the entry of ethanol molecules via ethanol-ethanol and ethanol-PSM hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the extent of PSM-PSM hydrogen bonding decreases with increasing ethanol concentration. On the other hand, acetone and DMSO exhibit minimal effects on the stability of the PSM bilayer at their lower concentrations, but at higher concentrations they tend to enhance the stability of the bilayer. The simulated potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for the translocation of the three solutes studied reveal that the free-energy of transfer of an ethanol molecule across the PSM lipid head region is lower than that for acetone and DMSO molecules. However, highest free-energy rise in the core hydrophobic part of the bilayer is observed for the DMSO molecule, whereas the ethanol and acetone PMF profiles show a lower barrier in

  6. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-28

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H 2 + I 2  ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H 2 and I 2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H 2 ] eq and equilibrium constants K eq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H 2 ] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  7. Transferência do fator caturra para o cultivar Mundo Novo de Coffea arabica Transfer of the CT gene to Mundo Novo cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carvalho

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho são relatados os estudos realizados visando à introdução do gene Ct (caturra que contribui para reduzir a altura da planta, no cultivar Mundo" Novo de Coffea arabica.Estudaram-se, em ensaios de produtividade, as populações Fv F.,, F3 e F4. Nessas populações e principalmente entre os descendentes dos "caféeiros H 2077-2-5 e H 2077-2-12, foram selecionadas plantas homozigotas para os alelos Ct e também para os alelos responsáveis pela cor do fruto xc ou Xc. Essas combinações foram denominadas 'Catuaí Amarelo' e 'Catuaí Vermelho', respectivamente, e suas características são apresentadas. Os novos cultivares vêm-se mostrando de interesse econômico para as regiões cafeeiras não somente pelo porte pequeno, mas também pela produtividade, pelo vigor vegetativo e pela precocidade.The successful transfer of the Ct gene for short internode to the tall cultivar of Coffea arábica'Mundo Novo' is reported. Individual selections were carried out in the F1, F2, F3 and F4 generations. It was found that early selection in the F2 generation was quite effective. A remarkably good correlation was found between productitivity of F2 plants and the yield of the F3 and F4 generations. Plants of the F4 generation have shown reasonable uniformity and high yield in several trials. The new selections showed to be early producers. Two new cultivars were released namely 'Catuaí Amarelo' and 'Catuaí Vermelho'. The former has yellow fruits whereas the latter has red fruits. The plants are much shorter that the ones of Mundo Novo. The new cultivars have a very strong secondary and tertiary branching. Because of these characteristics Catuaí Amarelo and Catuaí Vermelho are being planted in large scale replacing the tall cultivars.

  8. Atomistic tight-binding theory of excitonic splitting energies in CdX(X = Se, S and Te)/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukkabot, Worasak; Pinsook, Udomsilp

    2017-01-01

    Using the atomistic tight-binding theory (TB) and a configuration interaction description (CI), we numerically compute the excitonic splitting of CdX(X = Se, S and Te)/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals with the objective to explain how types of the core materials and growth shell thickness can provide the detailed manipulation of the dark-dark (DD), dark-bright (DB) and bright-bright (BB) excitonic splitting, beneficial for the active application of quantum information. To analyze the splitting of the excitonic states, the optical band gaps, ground-state wave function overlaps and atomistic electron-hole interactions tend to be numerically demonstrated. Based on the atomistic computations, the single-particle and excitonic gaps are mainly reduced with the increasing ZnS shell thickness owing to the quantum confinement. In the range of the higher to lower energies, the order of the single-particle gaps is CdSe/ZnS, CdS/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals, while one of the excitonic gaps is CdS/ZnS, CdSe/ZnS and CdTe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals because of the atomistic electron-hole interaction. The strongest electron-hole interactions are mainly observed in CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals. In addition, the computational results underline that the energies of the dark-dark (DD), dark-bright (DB) and bright-bright (BB) excitonic splitting are generally reduced with the increasing ZnS growth shell thickness as described by the trend of the electron-hole exchange interaction. The high-to-low splitting of the excitonic states is demonstrated in CdSe/ZnS, CdTe/ZnS and CdS/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals because of the fashion in the electron-hole exchange interaction and overlaps of the electron-hole wave functions. As the resulting calculations, it is expected that CdS/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals are the best candidates to be the source of entangled photons. Finally, the comprehensive information on the excitonic splitting can enable the use of suitable core

  9. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement...

  10. Key role of water in proton transfer at the Q(o)-site of the cytochrome bc(1) complex predicted by atomistic molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postila, P. A.; Kaszuba, K.; Sarewicz, M.

    2013-01-01

    of the cyt bc(1) function have remained unclear especially regarding the substrate binding at the Q(o)-site. In this work we address this issue by performing extensive atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with the cyt bc(1) complex of Rhodobacter capsulatus embedded in a lipid bilayer. Based...... on the simulations we are able to show the atom-level binding modes of two substrate forms: quinol (QH(2)) and quinone (Q). The QH(2) binding at the Q(o)-site involves a coordinated water arrangement that produces an exceptionally close and stable interaction between the cyt b and iron sulfur protein subunits...

  11. De novo mutations in the genome organizer CTCF cause intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregor, Anne; Oti, Martin; Kouwenhoven, Evelyn N

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of genes involved in chromatin structure and epigenetic regulation has been implicated in a variety of developmental disorders, often including intellectual disability. By trio exome sequencing and subsequent mutational screening we now identified two de novo frameshift...... mutations and one de novo missense mutation in CTCF in individuals with intellectual disability, microcephaly, and growth retardation. Furthermore, an individual with a larger deletion including CTCF was identified. CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) is one of the most important chromatin organizers in vertebrates...... and is involved in various chromatin regulation processes such as higher order of chromatin organization, enhancer function, and maintenance of three-dimensional chromatin structure. Transcriptome analyses in all three individuals with point mutations revealed deregulation of genes involved in signal transduction...

  12. Whole-Genome de novo Sequencing Of Quail And Grey Partridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars-Erik; Panitz, Frank; Burt, Dave

    2011-01-01

    The development in sequencing methods has made it possible to perform whole genome de novo sequencing of species without large commercial interests. Within the EU-financed QUANTOMICS project (KBBE-2A-222664), we have performed de novo sequencing of quail (Coturnix coturnix) and grey partridge...... (Perdix perdix) on a Genome Analyzer GAII (Illumina) using paired-end sequencing. The amount of generated sequences amounts to 8 to 9 Gb for each species. The analysis and assembly of the generated sequences is ongoing. Access to the whole genome sequence from these two species will enable enhanced...... comparative studies towards the chicken genome and will aid in identifying evolutionarily conserved sequences within the Galliformes. The obtained sequences from quail and partridge represent a beginning of generating the whole genome sequence for these species. The continuation of establishing the genome...

  13. NxRepair: error correction in de novo sequence assembly using Nextera mate pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca R. Murphy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Scaffolding errors and incorrect repeat disambiguation during de novo assembly can result in large scale misassemblies in draft genomes. Nextera mate pair sequencing data provide additional information to resolve assembly ambiguities during scaffolding. Here, we introduce NxRepair, an open source toolkit for error correction in de novo assemblies that uses Nextera mate pair libraries to identify and correct large-scale errors. We show that NxRepair can identify and correct large scaffolding errors, without use of a reference sequence, resulting in quantitative improvements in the assembly quality. NxRepair can be downloaded from GitHub or PyPI, the Python Package Index; a tutorial and user documentation are also available.

  14. Trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid decreases de novo lipid synthesis in human adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obsen, Thomas; Faergeman, Nils J; Chung, Soonkyu

    2012-01-01

    7-12 h, respectively. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor (LXR)α and sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c, transcription factors that regulate SCD-1, were decreased by 10,12 CLA within 5 h. These data suggest that the isomer-specific decrease in de novo lipid synthesis by 10,12 CLA......]-oleic or [(14)C]-linoleic acids. When using [(14)C]-acetic acid and [(14)C]-pyruvic acid as substrates, 30 μM 10,12 CLA, but not 9,11 CLA, decreased de novo synthesis of triglyceride, free FA, diacylglycerol, cholesterol esters, cardiolipin, phospholipids and ceramides within 3-24 h. Treatment with 30 μM 10...... is due, in part, to the rapid repression of lipogenic transcription factors that regulate MUFA synthesis, suggesting an anti-obesity mechanism unique to this trans FA....

  15. Integrative Analyses of De Novo Mutations Provide Deeper Biological Insights into Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takata

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have established important roles of de novo mutations (DNMs in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Here, we analyze DNMs in 262 ASD probands of Japanese origin and confirm the “de novo paradigm” of ASDs across ethnicities. Based on this consistency, we combine the lists of damaging DNMs in our and published ASD cohorts (total number of trios, 4,244 and perform integrative bioinformatics analyses. Besides replicating the findings of previous studies, our analyses highlight ATP-binding genes and fetal cerebellar/striatal circuits. Analysis of individual genes identified 61 genes enriched for damaging DNMs, including ten genes for which our dataset now contributes to statistical significance. Screening of compounds altering the expression of genes hit by damaging DNMs reveals a global downregulating effect of valproic acid, a known risk factor for ASDs, whereas cardiac glycosides upregulate these genes. Collectively, our integrative approach provides deeper biological and potential medical insights into ASDs.

  16. Alternative normalization methods demonstrate widespread cortical hypometabolism in untreated de novo Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berti, Valentina; Polito, C; Borghammer, Per

    2012-01-01

    , recent studies suggested that conventional data normalization procedures may not always be valid, and demonstrated that alternative normalization strategies better allow detection of low magnitude changes. We hypothesized that these alternative normalization procedures would disclose more widespread...... metabolic alterations in de novo PD. METHODS: [18F]FDG PET scans of 26 untreated de novo PD patients (Hoehn & Yahr stage I-II) and 21 age-matched controls were compared using voxel-based analysis. Normalization was performed using gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) reference regions and Yakushev...... normalization. RESULTS: Compared to GM normalization, WM and Yakushev normalization procedures disclosed much larger cortical regions of relative hypometabolism in the PD group with extensive involvement of frontal and parieto-temporal-occipital cortices, and several subcortical structures. Furthermore...

  17. A de novo missense mutation of FGFR2 causes facial dysplasia syndrome in Holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; McEvoy, Fintan; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    was suspected as all recorded cases were progeny of the same sire. Detailed investigations were performed to characterize the syndrome and to reveal its cause. Results Seven malformed calves were submitted examination. All cases shared a common morphology with the most striking lesions being severe facial...... chromosome 26 where whole genome sequencing of a case-parent trio revealed two de novo variants perfectly associated with the disease: an intronic SNP in the DMBT1 gene and a single non-synonymous variant in the FGFR2 gene. This FGFR2 missense variant (c.927G>T) affects a gene encoding a member...... of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, where amino acid sequence is highly conserved between members and across species. It is predicted to change an evolutionary conserved tryptophan into a cysteine residue (p.Trp309Cys). Both variant alleles were proven to result from de novo mutation events...

  18. A rare case of de novo gigantic ovarian abscess within an endometrioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Aisha; Mehta, Vaishali; Sinha, Prabha

    2010-06-01

    We are reporting a rare case of de novo ovarian abscess in an endometrioma. Ovarian abscess within an endometrioma is a rare gynecological problem, but de novo abscess in the endometrioma is even rarer. Most of the ovarian abscesses develop in the endometriomas following interventions, e.g., aspiration, pelvic surgery, and oocyte retrieval. We are presenting a case of a spontaneous giant abscess in a large ovarian cyst in a nulliparous woman who presented with acute abdomen. Patient was treated in a district general hospital with multidisciplinary approach. Thirteen liters of the pus were drained. She has had a sub total (supra cervical) hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) performed. Histology of the abscess wall confirmed endometriotic nature of the cyst. Patient made an uneventful recovery and was discharged home on the 14th postoperative day. This case highlights that endometrioma and its complication can present as a surgical emergency and should be dealt as one.

  19. The significance of trilineage myelodysplasia in de novo acute myeloblastic leukemia: Clinical and laboratory features

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, CSP; Vassalo, J; LorandMetze, I; Bechelli, APP; Souza, CA

    1997-01-01

    A prospective study was undertaken to elucidate the clinical and laboratory differences between tie novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and AML with trilineage myelodysplasia (AML-TMDS). One hundred and seven patients with AML were diagnosed at the University Hospital between January 1987 and July 1992, and were followed until July 1995. TMDS was identified in 17 of them (16%). With regard to age and sex distribution no difference was found between AML patients with and without TMDS (p = 0.43, ...

  20. Perinatal Autopsy Findings in a Case of De Novo Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Nagaraju, Smitha; Kangle, Rajit; Gosavi, Mansi

    2015-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia are group of inherited disorders involving the developmental defects of ectodermal structures like hair, teeth, nails, sweat glands, and others. X-linked recessive inheritance is most common. Here we describe perinatal autopsy findings in a case of de novo ectodermal dysplasia in a female fetus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first fetal autopsy description in a case of ectodermal dysplasia.