WorldWideScience

Sample records for novo protein structure

  1. De novo protein structure determination using sparse NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, Peter M.; Strauss, Charlie E.M.; Baker, David

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for generating moderate to high-resolution protein structures using limited NMR data combined with the ab initio protein structure prediction method Rosetta. Peptide fragments are selected from proteins of known structure based on sequence similarity and consistency with chemical shift and NOE data. Models are built from these fragments by minimizing an energy function that favors hydrophobic burial, strand pairing, and satisfaction of NOE constraints. Models generated using this procedure with ∼1 NOE constraint per residue are in some cases closer to the corresponding X-ray structures than the published NMR solution structures. The method requires only the sparse constraints available during initial stages of NMR structure determination, and thus holds promise for increasing the speed with which protein solution structures can be determined

  2. Building a better fragment library for de novo protein structure prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulo H P de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Fragment-based approaches are the current standard for de novo protein structure prediction. These approaches rely on accurate and reliable fragment libraries to generate good structural models. In this work, we describe a novel method for structure fragment library generation and its application in fragment-based de novo protein structure prediction. The importance of correct testing procedures in assessing the quality of fragment libraries is demonstrated. In particular, the exclusion of homologs to the target from the libraries to correctly simulate a de novo protein structure prediction scenario, something which surprisingly is not always done. We demonstrate that fragments presenting different predominant predicted secondary structures should be treated differently during the fragment library generation step and that exhaustive and random search strategies should both be used. This information was used to develop a novel method, Flib. On a validation set of 41 structurally diverse proteins, Flib libraries presents both a higher precision and coverage than two of the state-of-the-art methods, NNMake and HHFrag. Flib also achieves better precision and coverage on the set of 275 protein domains used in the two previous experiments of the the Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP9 and CASP10. We compared Flib libraries against NNMake libraries in a structure prediction context. Of the 13 cases in which a correct answer was generated, Flib models were more accurate than NNMake models for 10. "Flib is available for download at: http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/research/proteins/resources".

  3. Structural Insight into the Core of CAD, the Multifunctional Protein Leading De Novo Pyrimidine Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Grande-García, Araceli; Ruiz-Ramos, Alba; Del Caño-Ochoa, Francisco; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago

    2017-06-06

    CAD, the multifunctional protein initiating and controlling de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines in animals, self-assembles into ∼1.5 MDa hexamers. The structures of the dihydroorotase (DHO) and aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC) domains of human CAD have been previously determined, but we lack information on how these domains associate and interact with the rest of CAD forming a multienzymatic unit. Here, we prove that a construct covering human DHO and ATC oligomerizes as a dimer of trimers and that this arrangement is conserved in CAD-like from fungi, which holds an inactive DHO-like domain. The crystal structures of the ATC trimer and DHO-like dimer from the fungus Chaetomium thermophilum confirm the similarity with the human CAD homologs. These results demonstrate that, despite being inactive, the fungal DHO-like domain has a conserved structural function. We propose a model that sets the DHO and ATC complex as the central element in the architecture of CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Get phases from arsenic anomalous scattering: de novo SAD phasing of two protein structures crystallized in cacodylate buffer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Liu

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of two proteins, a putative pyrazinamidase/nicotinamidase from the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans (SmPncA and the human caspase-6 (Casp6, were solved by de novo arsenic single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (As-SAD phasing method. Arsenic (As, an uncommonly used element in SAD phasing, was covalently introduced into proteins by cacodylic acid, the buffering agent in the crystallization reservoirs. In SmPncA, the only cysteine was bound to dimethylarsinoyl, which is a pentavalent arsenic group (As (V. This arsenic atom and a protein-bound zinc atom both generated anomalous signals. The predominant contribution, however, was from the As anomalous signals, which were sufficient to phase the SmPncA structure alone. In Casp6, four cysteines were found to bind cacodyl, a trivalent arsenic group (As (III, in the presence of the reducing agent, dithiothreitol (DTT, and arsenic atoms were the only anomalous scatterers for SAD phasing. Analyses and discussion of these two As-SAD phasing examples and comparison of As with other traditional heavy atoms that generate anomalous signals, together with a few arsenic-based de novo phasing cases reported previously strongly suggest that As is an ideal anomalous scatterer for SAD phasing in protein crystallography.

  5. De novo structural modeling and computational sequence analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-25

    Jul 25, 2011 ... Our study was aimed towards computational proteomic analysis and 3D structural modeling of this novel bacteriocin protein encoded by the earlier aforementioned gene. Different bioinformatics tools and machine learning techniques were used for protein structural classification. De novo protein modeling ...

  6. De novo structural modeling and computational sequence analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different bioinformatics tools and machine learning techniques were used for protein structural classification. De novo protein modeling was performed by using I-TASSER server. The final model obtained was accessed by PROCHECK and DFIRE2, which confirmed that the final model is reliable. Until complete biochemical ...

  7. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. De Novo Chromosome Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman-Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, Jose'n.

    Chromatin consists of DNA and hundreds of proteins that interact with the genetic material. In vivo, chromatin folds into nonrandom structures. The physical mechanism leading to these characteristic conformations, however, remains poorly understood. We recently introduced MiChroM, a model that generates chromosome conformations by using the idea that chromatin can be subdivided into types based on its biochemical interactions. Here we extend and complete our previous finding by showing that structural chromatin types can be inferred from ChIP-Seq data. Chromatin types, which are distinct from DNA sequence, are partially epigenetically controlled and change during cell differentiation, thus constituting a link between epigenetics, chromosomal organization, and cell development. We show that, for GM12878 lymphoblastoid cells we are able to predict accurate chromosome structures with the only input of genomic data. The degree of accuracy achieved by our prediction supports the viability of the proposed physical mechanism of chromatin folding and makes the computational model a powerful tool for future investigations.

  9. De novo origin of human protein-coding genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Dong Wu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA-seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes.

  10. De Novo Origin of Human Protein-Coding Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong-Dong; Irwin, David M.; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The de novo origin of a new protein-coding gene from non-coding DNA is considered to be a very rare occurrence in genomes. Here we identify 60 new protein-coding genes that originated de novo on the human lineage since divergence from the chimpanzee. The functionality of these genes is supported by both transcriptional and proteomic evidence. RNA–seq data indicate that these genes have their highest expression levels in the cerebral cortex and testes, which might suggest that these genes contribute to phenotypic traits that are unique to humans, such as improved cognitive ability. Our results are inconsistent with the traditional view that the de novo origin of new genes is very rare, thus there should be greater appreciation of the importance of the de novo origination of genes. PMID:22102831

  11. Automated de novo phasing and model building of coiled-coil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-03-01

    Models generated by de novo structure prediction can be very useful starting points for molecular replacement for systems where suitable structural homologues cannot be readily identified. Protein-protein complexes and de novo-designed proteins are examples of systems that can be challenging to phase. In this study, the potential of de novo models of protein complexes for use as starting points for molecular replacement is investigated. The approach is demonstrated using homomeric coiled-coil proteins, which are excellent model systems for oligomeric systems. Despite the stereotypical fold of coiled coils, initial phase estimation can be difficult and many structures have to be solved with experimental phasing. A method was developed for automatic structure determination of homomeric coiled coils from X-ray diffraction data. In a benchmark set of 24 coiled coils, ranging from dimers to pentamers with resolutions down to 2.5 Å, 22 systems were automatically solved, 11 of which had previously been solved by experimental phasing. The generated models contained 71-103% of the residues present in the deposited structures, had the correct sequence and had free R values that deviated on average by 0.01 from those of the respective reference structures. The electron-density maps were of sufficient quality that only minor manual editing was necessary to produce final structures. The method, named CCsolve, combines methods for de novo structure prediction, initial phase estimation and automated model building into one pipeline. CCsolve is robust against errors in the initial models and can readily be modified to make use of alternative crystallographic software. The results demonstrate the feasibility of de novo phasing of protein-protein complexes, an approach that could also be employed for other small systems beyond coiled coils.

  12. Hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes originating from long non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tinkering with pre-existing genes has long been known as a major way to create new genes. Recently, however, motherless protein-coding genes have been found to have emerged de novo from ancestral non-coding DNAs. How these genes originated is not well addressed to date. Here we identified 24 hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes with precise origination timing in vertebrate phylogeny. Strand-specific RNA-Seq analyses were performed in five rhesus macaque tissues (liver, prefrontal cortex, skeletal muscle, adipose, and testis, which were then integrated with public transcriptome data from human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque. On the basis of comparing the RNA expression profiles in the three species, we found that most of the hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes encoded polyadenylated non-coding RNAs in rhesus macaque or chimpanzee with a similar transcript structure and correlated tissue expression profile. According to the rule of parsimony, the majority of these hominoid-specific de novo protein-coding genes appear to have acquired a regulated transcript structure and expression profile before acquiring coding potential. Interestingly, although the expression profile was largely correlated, the coding genes in human often showed higher transcriptional abundance than their non-coding counterparts in rhesus macaque. The major findings we report in this manuscript are robust and insensitive to the parameters used in the identification and analysis of de novo genes. Our results suggest that at least a portion of long non-coding RNAs, especially those with active and regulated transcription, may serve as a birth pool for protein-coding genes, which are then further optimized at the transcriptional level.

  13. Characteristics of de novo structural changes in the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Marschall, Tobias; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; Moed, Matthijs H.; Koval, Vyacheslav; Renkens, Ivo; van Roosmalen, Markus J.; Arp, Pascal; Karssen, Lennart C.; Coe, Bradley P.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Suchiman, Eka D.; Cuppen, Edwin; Thung, Djie Tjwan; McVey, Mitch; Wendl, Michael C.; Uitterlinden, Andre; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, GertJan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Schoenhuth, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    Small insertions and deletions (indels) and large structural variations (SVs) are major contributors to human genetic diversity and disease. However, mutation rates and characteristics of de novo indels and SVs in the general population have remained largely unexplored. We report 332 validated de

  14. Massively parallel de novo protein design for targeted therapeutics

    KAUST Repository

    Chevalier, Aaron

    2017-09-26

    De novo protein design holds promise for creating small stable proteins with shapes customized to bind therapeutic targets. We describe a massively parallel approach for designing, manufacturing and screening mini-protein binders, integrating large-scale computational design, oligonucleotide synthesis, yeast display screening and next-generation sequencing. We designed and tested 22,660 mini-proteins of 37-43 residues that target influenza haemagglutinin and botulinum neurotoxin B, along with 6,286 control sequences to probe contributions to folding and binding, and identified 2,618 high-affinity binders. Comparison of the binding and non-binding design sets, which are two orders of magnitude larger than any previously investigated, enabled the evaluation and improvement of the computational model. Biophysical characterization of a subset of the binder designs showed that they are extremely stable and, unlike antibodies, do not lose activity after exposure to high temperatures. The designs elicit little or no immune response and provide potent prophylactic and therapeutic protection against influenza, even after extensive repeated dosing.

  15. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emerge de novo from previously non-coding DNA [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan F Schmitz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo-emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes.

  16. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moye Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5–10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design.

  17. Emergence, Retention and Selection: A Trilogy of Origination for Functional De Novo Proteins from Ancestral LncRNAs in Primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yu Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While some human-specific protein-coding genes have been proposed to originate from ancestral lncRNAs, the transition process remains poorly understood. Here we identified 64 hominoid-specific de novo genes and report a mechanism for the origination of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs with precise splicing structures and specific tissue expression profiles. Whole-genome sequencing of dozens of rhesus macaque animals revealed that these lncRNAs are generally not more selectively constrained than other lncRNA loci. The existence of these newly-originated de novo proteins is also not beyond anticipation under neutral expectation, as they generally have longer theoretical lifespan than their current age, due to their GC-rich sequence property enabling stable ORFs with lower chance of non-sense mutations. Interestingly, although the emergence and retention of these de novo genes are likely driven by neutral forces, population genetics study in 67 human individuals and 82 macaque animals revealed signatures of purifying selection on these genes specifically in human population, indicating a proportion of these newly-originated proteins are already functional in human. We thus propose a mechanism for creation of functional de novo proteins from ancestral lncRNAs during the primate evolution, which may contribute to human-specific genetic novelties by taking advantage of existed genomic contexts.

  18. Simple Approach for De Novo Structural Identification of Mannose Trisaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsu Chen; Liew, Chia Yen; Huang, Shih-Pei; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2017-12-01

    Oligosaccharides have diverse functions in biological systems. However, the structural determination of oligosaccharides remains difficult and has created a bottleneck in carbohydrate research. In this study, a new approach for the de novo structural determination of underivatized oligosaccharides is demonstrated. A low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of sodium ion adducts was used to facilitate the cleavage of desired chemical bonds during the dissociation. The selection of fragments for the subsequent CID was guided using a procedure that we built from the understanding of the saccharide dissociation mechanism. The linkages, anomeric configurations, and branch locations of oligosaccharides were determined by comparing the CID spectra of oligosaccharide with the fragmentation patterns based on the dissociation mechanism and our specially prepared disaccharide CID spectrum database. The usefulness of this method was demonstrated to determine the structures of several mannose trisaccharides. This method can also be applied in the structural determination of oligosaccharides larger than trisaccharides and containing hexose other than mannose if authentic standards are available. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. Simple Approach for De Novo Structural Identification of Mannose Trisaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsu Chen; Liew, Chia Yen; Huang, Shih-Pei; Tsai, Shang-Ting; Ni, Chi-Kung

    2018-03-01

    Oligosaccharides have diverse functions in biological systems. However, the structural determination of oligosaccharides remains difficult and has created a bottleneck in carbohydrate research. In this study, a new approach for the de novo structural determination of underivatized oligosaccharides is demonstrated. A low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) of sodium ion adducts was used to facilitate the cleavage of desired chemical bonds during the dissociation. The selection of fragments for the subsequent CID was guided using a procedure that we built from the understanding of the saccharide dissociation mechanism. The linkages, anomeric configurations, and branch locations of oligosaccharides were determined by comparing the CID spectra of oligosaccharide with the fragmentation patterns based on the dissociation mechanism and our specially prepared disaccharide CID spectrum database. The usefulness of this method was demonstrated to determine the structures of several mannose trisaccharides. This method can also be applied in the structural determination of oligosaccharides larger than trisaccharides and containing hexose other than mannose if authentic standards are available.

  20. Spaced Seed Data Structures for De Novo Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inanç Birol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available De novo assembly of the genome of a species is essential in the absence of a reference genome sequence. Many scalable assembly algorithms use the de Bruijn graph (DBG paradigm to reconstruct genomes, where a table of subsequences of a certain length is derived from the reads, and their overlaps are analyzed to assemble sequences. Despite longer subsequences unlocking longer genomic features for assembly, associated increase in compute resources limits the practicability of DBG over other assembly archetypes already designed for longer reads. Here, we revisit the DBG paradigm to adapt it to the changing sequencing technology landscape and introduce three data structure designs for spaced seeds in the form of paired subsequences. These data structures address memory and run time constraints imposed by longer reads. We observe that when a fixed distance separates seed pairs, it provides increased sequence specificity with increased gap length. Further, we note that Bloom filters would be suitable to implicitly store spaced seeds and be tolerant to sequencing errors. Building on this concept, we describe a data structure for tracking the frequencies of observed spaced seeds. These data structure designs will have applications in genome, transcriptome and metagenome assemblies, and read error correction.

  1. HBV core protein allosteric modulators differentially alter cccDNA biosynthesis from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fang; Zhao, Qiong; Cheng, Junjun; Qi, Yonghe; Su, Qing; Wei, Lai; Li, Wenhui; Chang, Jinhong

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein assembles viral pre-genomic (pg) RNA and DNA polymerase into nucleocapsids for reverse transcriptional DNA replication to take place. Several chemotypes of small molecules, including heteroaryldihydropyrimidines (HAPs) and sulfamoylbenzamides (SBAs), have been discovered to allosterically modulate core protein structure and consequentially alter the kinetics and pathway of core protein assembly, resulting in formation of irregularly-shaped core protein aggregates or “empty” capsids devoid of pre-genomic RNA and viral DNA polymerase. Interestingly, in addition to inhibiting nucleocapsid assembly and subsequent viral genome replication, we have now demonstrated that HAPs and SBAs differentially modulate the biosynthesis of covalently closed circular (ccc) DNA from de novo infection and intracellular amplification pathways by inducing disassembly of nucleocapsids derived from virions as well as double-stranded DNA-containing progeny nucleocapsids in the cytoplasm. Specifically, the mistimed cuing of nucleocapsid uncoating prevents cccDNA formation during de novo infection of hepatocytes, while transiently accelerating cccDNA synthesis from cytoplasmic progeny nucleocapsids. Our studies indicate that elongation of positive-stranded DNA induces structural changes of nucleocapsids, which confers ability of mature nucleocapsids to bind CpAMs and triggers its disassembly. Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the dual effects of the core protein allosteric modulators on nucleocapsid assembly and disassembly will facilitate the discovery of novel core protein-targeting antiviral agents that can more efficiently suppress cccDNA synthesis and cure chronic hepatitis B. PMID:28945802

  2. Cavitation during the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) method – The trigger for de novo prion generation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigh, Cathryn L., E-mail: chaigh@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Drew, Simon C., E-mail: sdrew@unimelb.edu.au [Florey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique has become a widely-adopted method for amplifying minute amounts of the infectious conformer of the prion protein (PrP). PMCA involves repeated cycles of 20 kHz sonication and incubation, during which the infectious conformer seeds the conversion of normally folded protein by a templating interaction. Recently, it has proved possible to create an infectious PrP conformer without the need for an infectious seed, by including RNA and the phospholipid POPG as essential cofactors during PMCA. The mechanism underpinning this de novo prion formation remains unknown. In this study, we first establish by spin trapping methods that cavitation bubbles formed during PMCA provide a radical-rich environment. Using a substrate preparation comparable to that employed in studies of de novo prion formation, we demonstrate by immuno-spin trapping that PrP- and RNA-centered radicals are generated during sonication, in addition to PrP-RNA cross-links. We further show that serial PMCA produces protease-resistant PrP that is oxidatively modified. We suggest a unique confluence of structural (membrane-mimetic hydrophobic/hydrophilic bubble interface) and chemical (ROS) effects underlie the phenomenon of de novo prion formation by PMCA, and that these effects have meaningful biological counterparts of possible relevance to spontaneous prion formation in vivo. - Highlights: • Sonication during PMCA generates free radicals at the surface of cavitation bubbles. • PrP-centered and RNA-centered radicals are formed in addition to PrP-RNA adducts. • De novo prions may result from ROS and structural constraints during cavitation.

  3. Computational Methods for Protein Structure Prediction and Modeling Volume 2: Structure Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Ying; Liang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    Volume 2 of this two-volume sequence focuses on protein structure prediction and includes protein threading, De novo methods, applications to membrane proteins and protein complexes, structure-based drug design, as well as structure prediction as a systems problem. A series of appendices review the biological and chemical basics related to protein structure, computer science for structural informatics, and prerequisite mathematics and statistics.

  4. Degradation and de novo synthesis of D1 protein and psbA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 25; Issue 1. Degradation and de novo synthesis of D1 protein and psbA transcript in reinhardtii during UV-B inactivation of photosynthesis. Ratnesh Haturvedi Adhey Hyam. Articles Volume 25 Issue 1 March 2000 pp 65-71 ...

  5. De Novo Design of Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizicheh, Zahra B; Halloran, Nicholas; Asma, William; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    Iron-sulfur proteins are one of the most abundant and functionally pliable redox proteins found in all living organisms. Because of their crucial role in mediating electron transfer processes, minimalist model systems have been developed as a proxy to study natural Fe-S redox proteins and to dissect rules to enable tuning of their redox and electron transfer activities. This goal has been pursued through computational design, mutagenesis in the first and second coordination sphere, metal substitution, cofactor replacement, and the use of unnatural amino acids to stabilize a given cluster. In this chapter, we discuss the most recent design strategies to introduce various Fe-S clusters into natural and artificial protein scaffolds. Practical approaches for the cluster reconstitution, hydrogen production, and electrochemical characterization are mentioned. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nucleolar development and allocation of key nucleolar proteins require de novo transcription in bovine embryos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarcova, Olga; Laurincik, Jozef; Avery, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate whether key nucleolar proteins involved in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription and processing are transcribed de novo or from maternally inherited messenger RNAs (mRNA) in bovine embryos, and to which extent de novo transcription of these proteins m......RNA is required for the development of functional nucleoli during the major activation of the embryonic genome. Immunofluorescence for localization of key nucleolar proteins, autoradiography for detection of transcriptional activity, and transmission electron microscopy were applied to in vitro produc ed bovine...... embryos cultured from the 2-cell stage with or without (control groups) a-amanitin, which blocks the RNA plymerases II and III transcription and, thus the synthesis of mRNA. In the control groups, weak autoradiographic labelling was initially observed in the periphery of few nuclei at the 4-cell...

  7. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy structure of a gigadalton peptide fiber of de novo design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Thomas H; Bruning, Marc; Mantell, Judith; Sessions, Richard B; Thomson, Andrew R; Zaccai, Nathan R; Brady, R Leo; Verkade, Paul; Woolfson, Derek N

    2012-08-14

    Nature presents various protein fibers that bridge the nanometer to micrometer regimes. These structures provide inspiration for the de novo design of biomimetic assemblies, both to address difficulties in studying and understanding natural systems, and to provide routes to new biomaterials with potential applications in nanotechnology and medicine. We have designed a self-assembling fiber system, the SAFs, in which two small α-helical peptides are programmed to form a dimeric coiled coil and assemble in a controlled manner. The resulting fibers are tens of nm wide and tens of μm long, and, therefore, comprise millions of peptides to give gigadalton supramolecular structures. Here, we describe the structure of the SAFs determined to approximately 8 Å resolution using cryotransmission electron microscopy. Individual micrographs show clear ultrastructure that allowed direct interpretation of the packing of individual α-helices within the fibers, and the construction of a 3D electron density map. Furthermore, a model was derived using the cryotransmission electron microscopy data and side chains taken from a 2.3 Å X-ray crystal structure of a peptide building block incapable of forming fibers. This was validated using single-particle analysis techniques, and was stable in prolonged molecular-dynamics simulation, confirming its structural viability. The level of self-assembly and self-organization in the SAFs is unprecedented for a designed peptide-based material, particularly for a system of considerably reduced complexity compared with natural proteins. This structural insight is a unique high-resolution description of how α-helical fibrils pack into larger protein fibers, and provides a basis for the design and engineering of future biomaterials.

  8. Fast, cheap and out of control--Insights into thermodynamic and informatic constraints on natural protein sequences from de novo protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisendine, Joseph M; Koder, Ronald L

    2016-05-01

    The accumulated results of thirty years of rational and computational de novo protein design have taught us important lessons about the stability, information content, and evolution of natural proteins. First, de novo protein design has complicated the assertion that biological function is equivalent to biological structure - demonstrating the capacity to abstract active sites from natural contexts and paste them into non-native topologies without loss of function. The structure-function relationship has thus been revealed to be either a generality or strictly true only in a local sense. Second, the simplification to "maquette" topologies carried out by rational protein design also has demonstrated that even sophisticated functions such as conformational switching, cooperative ligand binding, and light-activated electron transfer can be achieved with low-information design approaches. This is because for simple topologies the functional footprint in sequence space is enormous and easily exceeds the number of structures which could have possibly existed in the history of life on Earth. Finally, the pervasiveness of extraordinary stability in designed proteins challenges accepted models for the "marginal stability" of natural proteins, suggesting that there must be a selection pressure against highly stable proteins. This can be explained using recent theories which relate non-equilibrium thermodynamics and self-replication. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurosecretory protein GL stimulates food intake, de novo lipogenesis, and onset of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakoshi-Ukena, Eiko; Shikano, Kenshiro; Kondo, Kunihiro; Taniuchi, Shusuke; Furumitsu, Megumi; Ochi, Yuta; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Shiki; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Ukena, Kazuyoshi

    2017-08-11

    Mechanisms underlying the central regulation of food intake and fat accumulation are not fully understood. We found that neurosecretory protein GL (NPGL), a newly-identified neuropeptide, increased food intake and white adipose tissue (WAT) in rats. NPGL-precursor gene overexpression in the hypothalamus caused increases in food intake, WAT, body mass, and circulating insulin when fed a high calorie diet. Intracerebroventricular administration of NPGL induced de novo lipogenesis in WAT, increased insulin, and it selectively induced carbohydrate intake. Neutralizing antibody administration decreased the size of lipid droplets in WAT. Npgl mRNA expression was upregulated by fasting and low insulin levels. Additionally, NPGL-producing cells were responsive to insulin. These results point to NPGL as a novel neuronal regulator that drives food intake and fat deposition through de novo lipogenesis and acts to maintain steady-state fat level in concert with insulin. Dysregulation of NPGL may be a root cause of obesity.

  10. A human-specific de novo protein-coding gene associated with human brain functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Yun Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand whether any human-specific new genes may be associated with human brain functions, we computationally screened the genetic vulnerable factors identified through Genome-Wide Association Studies and linkage analyses of nicotine addiction and found one human-specific de novo protein-coding gene, FLJ33706 (alternative gene symbol C20orf203. Cross-species analysis revealed interesting evolutionary paths of how this gene had originated from noncoding DNA sequences: insertion of repeat elements especially Alu contributed to the formation of the first coding exon and six standard splice junctions on the branch leading to humans and chimpanzees, and two subsequent substitutions in the human lineage escaped two stop codons and created an open reading frame of 194 amino acids. We experimentally verified FLJ33706's mRNA and protein expression in the brain. Real-Time PCR in multiple tissues demonstrated that FLJ33706 was most abundantly expressed in brain. Human polymorphism data suggested that FLJ33706 encodes a protein under purifying selection. A specifically designed antibody detected its protein expression across human cortex, cerebellum and midbrain. Immunohistochemistry study in normal human brain cortex revealed the localization of FLJ33706 protein in neurons. Elevated expressions of FLJ33706 were detected in Alzheimer's brain samples, suggesting the role of this novel gene in human-specific pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. FLJ33706 provided the strongest evidence so far that human-specific de novo genes can have protein-coding potential and differential protein expression, and be involved in human brain functions.

  11. Apoprotein Structure and Metal Binding Characterization of a de Novo Designed Peptide, α3DIV, that Sequesters Toxic Heavy Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plegaria, Jefferson S; Dzul, Stephen P; Zuiderweg, Erik R P; Stemmler, Timothy L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2015-05-12

    De novo protein design is a biologically relevant approach that provides a novel process in elucidating protein folding and modeling the metal centers of metalloproteins in a completely unrelated or simplified fold. An integral step in de novo protein design is the establishment of a well-folded scaffold with one conformation, which is a fundamental characteristic of many native proteins. Here, we report the NMR solution structure of apo α3DIV at pH 7.0, a de novo designed three-helix bundle peptide containing a triscysteine motif (Cys18, Cys28, and Cys67) that binds toxic heavy metals. The structure comprises 1067 NOE restraints derived from multinuclear multidimensional NOESY, as well as 138 dihedral angles (ψ, φ, and χ1). The backbone and heavy atoms of the 20 lowest energy structures have a root mean square deviation from the mean structure of 0.79 (0.16) Å and 1.31 (0.15) Å, respectively. When compared to the parent structure α3D, the substitution of Leu residues to Cys enhanced the α-helical content of α3DIV while maintaining the same overall topology and fold. In addition, solution studies on the metalated species illustrated metal-induced stability. An increase in the melting temperatures was observed for Hg(II), Pb(II), or Cd(II) bound α3DIV by 18-24 °C compared to its apo counterpart. Further, the extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis on Hg(II)-α3DIV produced an average Hg(II)-S bond length at 2.36 Å, indicating a trigonal T-shaped coordination environment. Overall, the structure of apo α3DIV reveals an asymmetric distorted triscysteine metal binding site, which offers a model for native metalloregulatory proteins with thiol-rich ligands that function in regulating toxic heavy metals, such as ArsR, CadC, MerR, and PbrR.

  12. Viral proteins originated de novo by overprinting can be identified by codon usage: application to the "gene nursery" of Deltaretroviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Pavesi

    Full Text Available A well-known mechanism through which new protein-coding genes originate is by modification of pre-existing genes, e.g. by duplication or horizontal transfer. In contrast, many viruses generate protein-coding genes de novo, via the overprinting of a new reading frame onto an existing ("ancestral" frame. This mechanism is thought to play an important role in viral pathogenicity, but has been poorly explored, perhaps because identifying the de novo frames is very challenging. Therefore, a new approach to detect them was needed. We assembled a reference set of overlapping genes for which we could reliably determine the ancestral frames, and found that their codon usage was significantly closer to that of the rest of the viral genome than the codon usage of de novo frames. Based on this observation, we designed a method that allowed the identification of de novo frames based on their codon usage with a very good specificity, but intermediate sensitivity. Using our method, we predicted that the Rex gene of deltaretroviruses has originated de novo by overprinting the Tax gene. Intriguingly, several genes in the same genomic region have also originated de novo and encode proteins that regulate the functions of Tax. Such "gene nurseries" may be common in viral genomes. Finally, our results confirm that the genomic GC content is not the only determinant of codon usage in viruses and suggest that a constraint linked to translation must influence codon usage.

  13. De novo structural modeling and computational sequence analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteriocins produced by different groups of bacteria are ribosomally synthesized peptides or proteins with antimicrobial and specific antagonistic bacterial interaction activity. Rhizobium leguminosarum is a Gram-negative soil bacterium which plays an important role in nitrogen fixation in leguminose plants. Bacteriocins ...

  14. Proteomics of Soil and Sediment: Protein Identification by De Novo Sequencing of Mass Spectra Complements Traditional Database Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.; Rizzo, A. I.; Waldbauer, J.

    2015-12-01

    Proteomics has the potential to elucidate the metabolic pathways and taxa responsible for in situ biogeochemical transformations. However, low rates of protein identification from high resolution mass spectra have been a barrier to the development of proteomics in complex environmental samples. Much of the difficulty lies in the computational challenge of linking mass spectra to their corresponding proteins. Traditional database search methods for matching peptide sequences to mass spectra are often inadequate due to the complexity of environmental proteomes and the large database search space, as we demonstrate with soil and sediment proteomes generated via a range of extraction methods. One alternative to traditional database searching is de novo sequencing, which identifies peptide sequences without the need for a database. BLAST can then be used to match de novo sequences to similar genetic sequences. Assigning confidence to putative identifications has been one hurdle for the implementation of de novo sequencing. We found that accurate de novo sequences can be screened by quality score and length. Screening criteria are verified by comparing the results of de novo sequencing and traditional database searching for well-characterized proteomes from simple biological systems. The BLAST hits of screened sequences are interrogated for taxonomic and functional information. We applied de novo sequencing to organic topsoil and marine sediment proteomes. Peak-rich proteomes, which can result from various extraction techniques, yield thousands of high-confidence protein identifications, an improvement over previous proteomic studies of soil and sediment. User-friendly software tools for de novo metaproteomics analysis have been developed. This "De Novo Analysis" Pipeline is also a faster method of data analysis than constructing a tailored sequence database for traditional database searching.

  15. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which ...

  16. Mass Spectrometry Analysis Coupled with de novo Sequencing Reveals Amino Acid Substitutions in Nucleocapsid Protein from Influenza A Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijian Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid substitutions in influenza A virus are the main reasons for both antigenic shift and virulence change, which result from non-synonymous mutations in the viral genome. Nucleocapsid protein (NP, one of the major structural proteins of influenza virus, is responsible for regulation of viral RNA synthesis and replication. In this report we used LC-MS/MS to analyze tryptic digestion of nucleocapsid protein of influenza virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 H1N1, which was isolated and purified by SDS poly-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Thus, LC-MS/MS analyses, coupled with manual de novo sequencing, allowed the determination of three substituted amino acid residues R452K, T423A and N430T in two tryptic peptides. The obtained results provided experimental evidence that amino acid substitutions resulted from non-synonymous gene mutations could be directly characterized by mass spectrometry in proteins of RNA viruses such as influenza A virus.

  17. Acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of eyelid conditioning responses require de novo protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Mari Carmen; Delgado-García, José María; Carrión, Angel Manuel

    2005-02-23

    Memory, as measured by changes in an animal's behavior some time after learning, is a reflection of many processes. Here, using a trace paradigm, in mice we show that de novo protein synthesis is required for acquisition, consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction of classically conditioned eyelid responses. Two critical periods of protein synthesis have been found: the first, during training, the blocking of which impaired acquisition; and the second, lasting the first 4 h after training, the blocking of which impaired consolidation. The process of reconsolidation was sensitive to protein synthesis inhibition if anisomycin was injected before or just after the reactivation session. Furthermore, extinction was also dependent on protein synthesis, following the same temporal course as that followed during acquisition and consolidation. This last fact reinforces the idea that extinction is an active learning process rather than a passive event of forgetting. Together, these findings demonstrate that all of the different stages of memory formation involved in the classical conditioning of eyelid responses are dependent on protein synthesis.

  18. Rational Structure-Based Rescaffolding Approach to De Novo Design of Interleukin 10 (IL-10 Receptor-1 Mimetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Ruiz-Gómez

    Full Text Available Tackling protein interfaces with small molecules capable of modulating protein-protein interactions remains a challenge in structure-based ligand design. Particularly arduous are cases in which the epitopes involved in molecular recognition have a non-structured and discontinuous nature. Here, the basic strategy of translating continuous binding epitopes into mimetic scaffolds cannot be applied, and other innovative approaches are therefore required. We present a structure-based rational approach involving the use of a regular expression syntax inspired in the well established PROSITE to define minimal descriptors of geometric and functional constraints signifying relevant functionalities for recognition in protein interfaces of non-continuous and unstructured nature. These descriptors feed a search engine that explores the currently available three-dimensional chemical space of the Protein Data Bank (PDB in order to identify in a straightforward manner regular architectures containing the desired functionalities, which could be used as templates to guide the rational design of small natural-like scaffolds mimicking the targeted recognition site. The application of this rescaffolding strategy to the discovery of natural scaffolds incorporating a selection of functionalities of interleukin-10 receptor-1 (IL-10R1, which are relevant for its interaction with interleukin-10 (IL-10 has resulted in the de novo design of a new class of potent IL-10 peptidomimetic ligands.

  19. The induction of the oxidative burst in Elodea densa by sulfhydryl reagent does not depend on de novo protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amicucci, Enrica [Milan, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisiologia e Biochimica delle Piante

    1997-12-31

    In Elodea densa Planchon leaves, N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and other sulfhydryl-binding reagents induce a marked and temporary increase of respiration that is insensitive to cyanide, hydroxamate and propylgallate and completely inhibited by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and by quinacrine. In this paper the author investigates whether the mechanism that causes the oxidative burst depends on the activation of preexisting oxidative systems or on the activation of de novo protein synthesis. The inhibitors used were cycloheximide (CHI) which inhibits protein synthesis in plant cells by depressing the incorporation of aminoacids into proteins and cordycepin, an effective inhibitor of mRNA synthesis. The data support the idea that the mechanism investigated depends on the activation of a long lived protein(s) and not on de novo protein synthesis.

  20. Prediction of Protein Structure Using Surface Accessibility Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlmüller, Christoph; Göbl, Christoph; Madl, Tobias

    2016-09-19

    An approach to the de novo structure prediction of proteins is described that relies on surface accessibility data from NMR paramagnetic relaxation enhancements by a soluble paramagnetic compound (sPRE). This method exploits the distance-to-surface information encoded in the sPRE data in the chemical shift-based CS-Rosetta de novo structure prediction framework to generate reliable structural models. For several proteins, it is demonstrated that surface accessibility data is an excellent measure of the correct protein fold in the early stages of the computational folding algorithm and significantly improves accuracy and convergence of the standard Rosetta structure prediction approach. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Merremoside D: de novo synthesis of the purported structure, NMR analysis, and comparison of spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Ehesan U; Wang, Hua-Yu Leo; Akhmedov, Novruz G; O'Doherty, George A

    2014-01-17

    The first synthesis of the purported structure of Merremoside D has been achieved in 22 longest linear steps. The de novo asymmetric synthesis relied on the use of asymmetric catalysis to selectively install all 21 stereocenters in the final compounds from commercially available achiral starting materials. Adiabatic gradient 2D NMR techniques (gHSQCAD, gHMBCAD, gH2BCAD, gHSQCTOXYAD, ROESYAD) were used to completely assign the structure of synthetic Merremoside D. Comparison of our assignments with the limited NMR data reported for natural Merremoside D allows for the tentative confirmation of its structure.

  2. Exploring alternate states and oligomerization preferences of coiled-coils by de novo structure modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rämisch, Sebastian; Lizatović, Robert; André, Ingemar

    2015-02-01

    Homomeric coiled-coils can self-assemble into a wide range of structural states with different helix topologies and oligomeric states. In this study, we have combined de novo structure modeling with stability calculations to simultaneously predict structure and oligomeric states of homomeric coiled-coils. For dimers an asymmetric modeling protocol was developed. Modeling without symmetry constraints showed that backbone asymmetry is important for the formation of parallel dimeric coiled-coils. Collectively, our results demonstrate that high-resolution structure of coiled-coils, as well as parallel and antiparallel orientations of dimers and tetramers, can be accurately predicted from sequence. De novo modeling was also used to generate models of competing oligomeric states, which were used to compare stabilities and thus predict the native stoichiometry from sequence. In a benchmark set of 33 coiled-coil sequences, forming dimers to pentamers, up to 70% of the oligomeric states could be correctly predicted. The calculations demonstrated that the free energy of helix folding could be an important factor for determining stability and oligomeric state of homomeric coiled-coils. The computational methods developed here should be broadly applicable to studies of sequence-structure relationships in coiled-coils and the design of higher order assemblies with improved oligomerization specificity. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R.; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G.; Onuchic, José N.

    2017-01-01

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. PMID:29087948

  4. De novo prediction of human chromosome structures: Epigenetic marking patterns encode genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Michele; Cheng, Ryan R; Lieberman Aiden, Erez; Wolynes, Peter G; Onuchic, José N

    2017-11-14

    Inside the cell nucleus, genomes fold into organized structures that are characteristic of cell type. Here, we show that this chromatin architecture can be predicted de novo using epigenetic data derived from chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We exploit the idea that chromosomes encode a 1D sequence of chromatin structural types. Interactions between these chromatin types determine the 3D structural ensemble of chromosomes through a process similar to phase separation. First, a neural network is used to infer the relation between the epigenetic marks present at a locus, as assayed by ChIP-Seq, and the genomic compartment in which those loci reside, as measured by DNA-DNA proximity ligation (Hi-C). Next, types inferred from this neural network are used as an input to an energy landscape model for chromatin organization [Minimal Chromatin Model (MiChroM)] to generate an ensemble of 3D chromosome conformations at a resolution of 50 kilobases (kb). After training the model, dubbed Maximum Entropy Genomic Annotation from Biomarkers Associated to Structural Ensembles (MEGABASE), on odd-numbered chromosomes, we predict the sequences of chromatin types and the subsequent 3D conformational ensembles for the even chromosomes. We validate these structural ensembles by using ChIP-Seq tracks alone to predict Hi-C maps, as well as distances measured using 3D fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments. Both sets of experiments support the hypothesis of phase separation being the driving process behind compartmentalization. These findings strongly suggest that epigenetic marking patterns encode sufficient information to determine the global architecture of chromosomes and that de novo structure prediction for whole genomes may be increasingly possible. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  5. Integrative structural annotation of de novo RNA-Seq provides an accurate reference gene set of the enormous genome of the onion (Allium cepa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungill; Kim, Myung-Shin; Kim, Yong-Min; Yeom, Seon-In; Cheong, Kyeongchae; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Kim, Sunggil; Kim, Do-Sun; Sohn, Seong-Han; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Choi, Doil

    2015-02-01

    The onion (Allium cepa L.) is one of the most widely cultivated and consumed vegetable crops in the world. Although a considerable amount of onion transcriptome data has been deposited into public databases, the sequences of the protein-coding genes are not accurate enough to be used, owing to non-coding sequences intermixed with the coding sequences. We generated a high-quality, annotated onion transcriptome from de novo sequence assembly and intensive structural annotation using the integrated structural gene annotation pipeline (ISGAP), which identified 54,165 protein-coding genes among 165,179 assembled transcripts totalling 203.0 Mb by eliminating the intron sequences. ISGAP performed reliable annotation, recognizing accurate gene structures based on reference proteins, and ab initio gene models of the assembled transcripts. Integrative functional annotation and gene-based SNP analysis revealed a whole biological repertoire of genes and transcriptomic variation in the onion. The method developed in this study provides a powerful tool for the construction of reference gene sets for organisms based solely on de novo transcriptome data. Furthermore, the reference genes and their variation described here for the onion represent essential tools for molecular breeding and gene cloning in Allium spp. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  6. Dependency on de novo protein synthesis and proteomic changes during metamorphosis of the marine bryozoan Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yue Him

    2010-05-24

    Background: Metamorphosis in the bryozoan Bugula neritina (Linne) includes an initial phase of rapid morphological rearrangement followed by a gradual phase of morphogenesis. We hypothesized that the first phase may be independent of de novo synthesis of proteins and, instead, involves post-translational modifications of existing proteins, providing a simple mechanism to quickly initiate metamorphosis. To test our hypothesis, we challenged B. neritina larvae with transcription and translation inhibitors. Furthermore, we employed 2D gel electrophoresis to characterize changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome during early metamorphosis. Differentially expressed proteins were identified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and their gene expression patterns were profiled using semi-quantitative real time PCR.Results: When larvae were incubated with transcription and translation inhibitors, metamorphosis initiated through the first phase but did not complete. We found a significant down-regulation of 60 protein spots and the percentage of phosphoprotein spots decreased from 15% in the larval stage to12% during early metamorphosis. Two proteins--the mitochondrial processing peptidase beta subunit and severin--were abundantly expressed and phosphorylated in the larval stage, but down-regulated during metamorphosis. MPPbeta and severin were also down-regulated on the gene expression level.Conclusions: The initial morphogenetic changes that led to attachment of B. neritina did not depend on de novo protein synthesis, but the subsequent gradual morphogenesis did. This is the first time that the mitochondrial processing peptidase beta subunit or severin have been shown to be down-regulated on both gene and protein expression levels during the metamorphosis of B. neritina. Future studies employing immunohistochemistry to reveal the expression locality of these two proteins during metamorphosis should provide further evidence of the involvement of these two

  7. Structural variation in two human genomes mapped at single-nucleotide resolution by whole genome de novo assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng; Luo, Ruibang

    2011-01-01

    Here we use whole-genome de novo assembly of second-generation sequencing reads to map structural variation (SV) in an Asian genome and an African genome. Our approach identifies small- and intermediate-size homozygous variants (1-50 kb) including insertions, deletions, inversions and their precise...

  8. Solving the Secondary Structure Matching Problem in Cryo-EM De Novo Modeling Using a Constrained K-Shortest Path Graph Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nasr, Kamal; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; Chen, Lin; He, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Electron cryomicroscopy is becoming a major experimental technique in solving the structures of large molecular assemblies. More and more three-dimensional images have been obtained at the medium resolutions between 5 and 10 Å. At this resolution range, major α-helices can be detected as cylindrical sticks and β-sheets can be detected as plain-like regions. A critical question in de novo modeling from cryo-EM images is to determine the match between the detected secondary structures from the image and those on the protein sequence. We formulate this matching problem into a constrained graph problem and present an O(Δ(2)N(2)2(N)) algorithm to this NP-Hard problem. The algorithm incorporates the dynamic programming approach into a constrained K-shortest path algorithm. Our method, DP-TOSS, has been tested using α-proteins with maximum 33 helices and α-β proteins up to five helices and 12 β-strands. The correct match was ranked within the top 35 for 19 of the 20 α-proteins and all nine α-β proteins tested. The results demonstrate that DP-TOSS improves accuracy, time and memory space in deriving the topologies of the secondary structure elements for proteins with a large number of secondary structures and a complex skeleton.

  9. De novo designed proteins from a library of artificial sequences function in Escherichia coli and enable cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Fisher

    Full Text Available A central challenge of synthetic biology is to enable the growth of living systems using parts that are not derived from nature, but designed and synthesized in the laboratory. As an initial step toward achieving this goal, we probed the ability of a collection of >10(6 de novo designed proteins to provide biological functions necessary to sustain cell growth. Our collection of proteins was drawn from a combinatorial library of 102-residue sequences, designed by binary patterning of polar and nonpolar residues to fold into stable 4-helix bundles. We probed the capacity of proteins from this library to function in vivo by testing their abilities to rescue 27 different knockout strains of Escherichia coli, each deleted for a conditionally essential gene. Four different strains--ΔserB, ΔgltA, ΔilvA, and Δfes--were rescued by specific sequences from our library. Further experiments demonstrated that a strain simultaneously deleted for all four genes was rescued by co-expression of four novel sequences. Thus, cells deleted for ∼0.1% of the E. coli genome (and ∼1% of the genes required for growth under nutrient-poor conditions can be sustained by sequences designed de novo.

  10. Update on protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbard, T; Tramontano, A; Barton, G

    1996-01-01

    Computational tools for protein structure prediction are of great interest to molecular, structural and theoretical biologists due to a rapidly increasing number of protein sequences with no known structure. In October 1995, a workshop was held at IRBM to predict as much as possible about a number...... of proteins of biological interest using ab initio pre!diction of fold recognition methods. 112 protein sequences were collected via an open invitation for target submissions. 17 were selected for prediction during the workshop and for 11 of these a prediction of some reliability could be made. We believe...

  11. Differential requirement of de novo Arc protein synthesis in the insular cortex and the amygdala for safe and aversive taste long-term memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Venkataraman, Archana; Morin, Jean-Pascal; Osorio-Gómez, Daniel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2018-04-16

    Several immediate early genes products are known to be involved in the facilitation of structural and functional modifications at distinct synapses activated through experience. The IEG-encoded protein Arc (activity regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein) has been widely implicated in long-term memory formation and stabilization. In this study, we sought to evaluate a possible role for de novo Arc protein synthesis in the insular cortex (IC) and in the amygdala (AMY) during long-term taste memory formation. We found that acute inhibition of Arc protein synthesis through the infusion of antisense oligonucleotides administered in the IC before a novel taste presentation, affected consolidation of a safe taste memory trace (ST) but spared consolidation of conditioned taste aversion (CTA). Conversely, blocking Arc synthesis within the AMY impaired CTA consolidation but had no effect on ST long-term memory formation. Our results suggest that Arc-dependent plasticity during taste learning is required within distinct structures of the medial temporal lobe, depending on the emotional valence of the memory trace. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  13. Arsenic trioxide (AT) is a novel human neutrophil pro-apoptotic agent: effects of catalase on AT-induced apoptosis, degradation of cytoskeletal proteins and de novo protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, François; Cavalli, Hélène; Moisan, Eliane; Girard, Denis

    2006-02-01

    The anti-cancer drug arsenic trioxide (AT) induces apoptosis in a variety of transformed or proliferating cells. However, little is known regarding its ability to induce apoptosis in terminally differentiated cells, such as neutrophils. Because neutropenia has been reported in some cancer patients after AT treatment, we hypothesised that AT could induce neutrophil apoptosis, an issue that has never been investigated. Herein, we found that AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis and gelsolin degradation via caspases. AT did not increase neutrophil superoxide production and did not induce mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species. AT-induced apoptosis in PLB-985 and X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) cells (PLB-985 cells deficient in gp91(phox) mimicking CGD) at the same potency. Addition of catalase, an inhibitor of H2O2, reversed AT-induced apoptosis and degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, alpha-tubulin and lamin B1. Unexpectedly, AT-induced de novo protein synthesis, which was reversed by catalase. Cycloheximide partially reversed AT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that AT induces neutrophil apoptosis by a caspase-dependent mechanism and via de novo protein synthesis. H2O2 is of major importance in AT-induced neutrophil apoptosis but its production does not originate from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate dehydrogenase activation and mitochondria. Cytoskeletal structures other than microtubules can now be considered as novel targets of AT.

  14. Protein structure prediction using bee colony optimization metaheuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Paluszewski, Martin; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    Predicting the native structure of proteins is one of the most challenging problems in molecular biology. The goal is to determine the three-dimensional struc- ture from the one-dimensional amino acid sequence. De novo prediction algorithms seek to do this by developing a representation of the pr......Predicting the native structure of proteins is one of the most challenging problems in molecular biology. The goal is to determine the three-dimensional struc- ture from the one-dimensional amino acid sequence. De novo prediction algorithms seek to do this by developing a representation...... of the proteins structure, an energy potential and some optimization algorithm that ¿nds the structure with minimal energy. Bee Colony Optimization (BCO) is a relatively new approach to solving opti- mization problems based on the foraging behaviour of bees. Several variants of BCO have been suggested...... in the literature. We have devised a new variant that uni¿es the existing and is much more ¿exible with respect to replacing the various elements of the BCO. In particular this applies to the choice of the local search as well as the method for generating scout locations and performing the waggle dance. We apply...

  15. Magic Numbers in Protein Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Bohr, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A homology measure for protein fold classes has been constructed by locally projecting consecutive secondary structures onto a lattice. Taking into account hydrophobic forces we have found a mechanism for formation of domains containing magic numbers of secondary structures and multipla of these ......A homology measure for protein fold classes has been constructed by locally projecting consecutive secondary structures onto a lattice. Taking into account hydrophobic forces we have found a mechanism for formation of domains containing magic numbers of secondary structures and multipla...

  16. Algorithms for Protein Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paluszewski, Martin

    ) and contact number (CN) measures only. We show that the HSE measure is much more information-rich than CN, nevertheless, HSE does not appear to provide enough information to reconstruct the C-traces of real-sized proteins. Our experiments also show that using tabu search (with our novel tabu definition......The problem of predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein given its amino acid sequence is one of the most important open problems in bioinformatics. One of the carbon atoms in amino acids is the C-atom and the overall structure of a protein is often represented by a so-called C...... is competitive in quality and speed with other state-of-the-art decoy generation algorithms. Our third C-trace reconstruction approach is based on bee-colony optimization [24]. We demonstrate why this algorithm has some important properties that makes it suitable for protein structure prediction. Our approach...

  17. Rapid de novo generation of defective interfering RNA by cucumber necrosis virus mutants that do not express the 20-kDa nonstructural protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, D M

    1991-01-01

    It is generally believed that serial passage at high multiplicity of infection (moi) is required for the generation of defective interfering (DI) particles. High levels of DI RNAs are found associated with persistent infections initiated with laboratory cultures of cucumber necrosis virus (CNV). Two synthetic CNV transcripts that were derived through site-directed mutagenesis of a highly infectious CNV cDNA clone and that do not express the CNV 20-kDa nonstructural protein were found to generate high levels of symptom-attenuating DI RNAs de novo without serial high-moi passage in transcript-inoculated plants. Such de novo generation of DI RNAs did not occur in infections initiated with wild-type transcript until at least eight serial high-moi passages. The observation that a CNV nonstructural protein mutant rapidly generates DI RNA de novo may provide insight into mechanisms that underly DI particle formation in RNA viruses in general. Images PMID:1722320

  18. Degradation and de novo synthesis of D1 protein and psbA ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chloroplast membranes are rapidly and essential for the repair of damaged PS II as chloramphenicol accelerated UV-B inactivation of photosynthesis and psb for the D1 protein. Cells showing 72% inhibition of PS II protein. This shows that synthesis of D1 protein is not the only component involved in the recovery process.

  19. Structural principles for computational and de novo design of 4Fe-4S metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Vikas; Senn, Stefan; Pike, Douglas H; Rodriguez-Granillo, Agustina; Hansen, Will A; Khare, Sagar D; Noy, Dror

    2016-05-01

    Iron-sulfur centers in metalloproteins can access multiple oxidation states over a broad range of potentials, allowing them to participate in a variety of electron transfer reactions and serving as catalysts for high-energy redox processes. The nitrogenase FeMoCO cluster converts di-nitrogen to ammonia in an eight-electron transfer step. The 2(Fe4S4) containing bacterial ferredoxin is an evolutionarily ancient metalloprotein fold and is thought to be a primordial progenitor of extant oxidoreductases. Controlling chemical transformations mediated by iron-sulfur centers such as nitrogen fixation, hydrogen production as well as electron transfer reactions involved in photosynthesis are of tremendous importance for sustainable chemistry and energy production initiatives. As such, there is significant interest in the design of iron-sulfur proteins as minimal models to gain fundamental understanding of complex natural systems and as lead-molecules for industrial and energy applications. Herein, we discuss salient structural characteristics of natural iron-sulfur proteins and how they guide principles for design. Model structures of past designs are analyzed in the context of these principles and potential directions for enhanced designs are presented, and new areas of iron-sulfur protein design are proposed. This article is part of a Special issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Post-translational selective intracellular silencing of acetylated proteins with de novo selected intrabodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirichella, Michele; Lisi, Simonetta; Fantini, Marco; Goracci, Martina; Calvello, Mariantonietta; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; D'Onofrio, Mara; Di Primio, Cristina; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-03-01

    The ability to selectively interfere with post-translationally modified proteins would have many biological and therapeutic applications. However, post-translational modifications cannot be selectively targeted by nucleic-acid-based interference approaches. Here we describe post-translational intracellular silencing antibody technology (PISA), a method for selecting intrabodies against post-translationally modified proteins. We demonstrate our method by generating intrabodies against native acetylated proteins and showing functional interference in living cells.

  1. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of rational design principles, template-assisted four-helix-bundle proteins that include two histidines for coordinative binding of a heme were synthesized. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of the proteins in solution reveals the expected bis-histidine coordinated heme...... methods. For all proteins, immobilization causes a decrease in protein stability and a loosening of the helix packing, as reflected by a partial dissociation of a histidine ligand in the ferrous state and very low redox potentials. For the covalently attached MOP-C, the overall interfacial redox process...

  2. Structural entanglements in protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yani; Chwastyk, Mateusz; Cieplak, Marek

    2017-06-01

    We consider multi-chain protein native structures and propose a criterion that determines whether two chains in the system are entangled or not. The criterion is based on the behavior observed by pulling at both termini of each chain simultaneously in the two chains. We have identified about 900 entangled systems in the Protein Data Bank and provided a more detailed analysis for several of them. We argue that entanglement enhances the thermodynamic stability of the system but it may have other functions: burying the hydrophobic residues at the interface and increasing the DNA or RNA binding area. We also study the folding and stretching properties of the knotted dimeric proteins MJ0366, YibK, and bacteriophytochrome. These proteins have been studied theoretically in their monomeric versions so far. The dimers are seen to separate on stretching through the tensile mechanism and the characteristic unraveling force depends on the pulling direction.

  3. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  4. Reconstructing protein structure from solvent exposure using tabu search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winter Pawel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A new, promising solvent exposure measure, called half-sphere-exposure (HSE, has recently been proposed. Here, we study the reconstruction of a protein's Cα trace solely from structure-derived HSE information. This problem is of relevance for de novo structure prediction using predicted HSE measure. For comparison, we also consider the well-established contact number (CN measure. We define energy functions based on the HSE- or CN-vectors and minimize them using two conformational search heuristics: Monte Carlo simulation (MCS and tabu search (TS. While MCS has been the dominant conformational search heuristic in literature, TS has been applied only a few times. To discretize the conformational space, we use lattice models with various complexity. Results The proposed TS heuristic with a novel tabu definition generally performs better than MCS for this problem. Our experiments show that, at least for small proteins (up to 35 amino acids, it is possible to reconstruct the protein backbone solely from the HSE or CN information. In general, the HSE measure leads to better models than the CN measure, as judged by the RMSD and the angle correlation with the native structure. The angle correlation, a measure of structural similarity, evaluates whether equivalent residues in two structures have the same general orientation. Our results indicate that the HSE measure is potentially very useful to represent solvent exposure in protein structure prediction, design and simulation.

  5. Soliton concepts and protein structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokhotin, Andrei; Niemi, Antti J.; Peng, Xubiao

    2012-03-01

    Structural classification shows that the number of different protein folds is surprisingly small. It also appears that proteins are built in a modular fashion from a relatively small number of components. Here we propose that the modular building blocks are made of the dark soliton solution of a generalized discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We find that practically all protein loops can be obtained simply by scaling the size and by joining together a number of copies of the soliton, one after another. The soliton has only two loop-specific parameters, and we compute their statistical distribution in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We explicitly construct a collection of 200 sets of parameters, each determining a soliton profile that describes a different short loop. The ensuing profiles cover practically all those proteins in PDB that have a resolution which is better than 2.0 Å, with a precision such that the average root-mean-square distance between the loop and its soliton is less than the experimental B-factor fluctuation distance. We also present two examples that describe how the loop library can be employed both to model and to analyze folded proteins.

  6. De Novo Design of Supercharged, Unfolded Protein Polymers, and Their Assembly into Supramolecular Aggregates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbe, Anke; Mercato, Loretta L. del; Abbasi, Azhar Z.; Rivera Gil, Pilar; Gorzini, Sekineh J.; Huibers, Willem; Poolman, Bert; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Herrmann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Here we report for the first time the design and expression of highly charged, unfolded protein polymers based on elastin-like peptides (ELPs). Positively and negatively charged variants were achieved by introducing lysine and glutamic acid residues, respectively, within the repetitive pentapeptide

  7. Evolution and structural organization of the C proteins of paramyxovirinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K Lo

    Full Text Available The phosphoprotein (P gene of most Paramyxovirinae encodes several proteins in overlapping frames: P and V, which share a common N-terminus (PNT, and C, which overlaps PNT. Overlapping genes are of particular interest because they encode proteins originated de novo, some of which have unknown structural folds, challenging the notion that nature utilizes only a limited, well-mapped area of fold space. The C proteins cluster in three groups, comprising measles, Nipah, and Sendai virus. We predicted that all C proteins have a similar organization: a variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved, α-helical C-terminus. We confirmed this predicted organization by biophysically characterizing recombinant C proteins from Tupaia paramyxovirus (measles group and human parainfluenza virus 1 (Sendai group. We also found that the C of the measles and Nipah groups have statistically significant sequence similarity, indicating a common origin. Although the C of the Sendai group lack sequence similarity with them, we speculate that they also have a common origin, given their similar genomic location and structural organization. Since C is dispensable for viral replication, unlike PNT, we hypothesize that C may have originated de novo by overprinting PNT in the ancestor of Paramyxovirinae. Intriguingly, in measles virus and Nipah virus, PNT encodes STAT1-binding sites that overlap different regions of the C-terminus of C, indicating they have probably originated independently. This arrangement, in which the same genetic region encodes simultaneously a crucial functional motif (a STAT1-binding site and a highly constrained region (the C-terminus of C, seems paradoxical, since it should severely reduce the ability of the virus to adapt. The fact that it originated twice suggests that it must be balanced by an evolutionary advantage, perhaps from reducing the size of the genetic region vulnerable to mutations.

  8. De novo design and engineering of functional metal and porphyrin-binding protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Bernard H.

    In this work, I describe an approach to the rational, iterative design and characterization of two functional cofactor-binding protein domains. First, a hybrid computational/experimental method was developed with the aim of algorithmically generating a suite of porphyrin-binding protein sequences with minimal mutual sequence information. This method was explored by generating libraries of sequences, which were then expressed and evaluated for function. One successful sequence is shown to bind a variety of porphyrin-like cofactors, and exhibits light- activated electron transfer in mixed hemin:chlorin e6 and hemin:Zn(II)-protoporphyrin IX complexes. These results imply that many sophisticated functions such as cofactor binding and electron transfer require only a very small number of residue positions in a protein sequence to be fixed. Net charge and hydrophobic content are important in determining protein solubility and stability. Accordingly, rational modifications were made to the aforementioned design procedure in order to improve its overall success rate. The effects of these modifications are explored using two `next-generation' sequence libraries, which were separately expressed and evaluated. Particular modifications to these design parameters are demonstrated to effectively double the purification success rate of the procedure. Finally, I describe the redesign of the artificial di-iron protein DF2 into CDM13, a single chain di-Manganese four-helix bundle. CDM13 acts as a functional model of natural manganese catalase, exhibiting a kcat of 0.08s-1 under steady-state conditions. The bound manganese cofactors have a reduction potential of +805 mV vs NHE, which is too high for efficient dismutation of hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that as a high-potential manganese complex, CDM13 may represent a promising first step toward a polypeptide model of the Oxygen Evolving Complex of the photosynthetic enzyme Photosystem II.

  9. In Silico Identification of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Gene Families in the De Novo Assembled Transcriptomes of Four Different Species of the Genus Conus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Figueroa-Montiel

    Full Text Available Small peptides isolated from the venom of the marine snails belonging to the genus Conus have been largely studied because of their therapeutic value. These peptides can be classified in two groups. The largest one is composed by peptides rich in disulfide bonds, and referred to as conotoxins. Despite the importance of conotoxins given their pharmacology value, little is known about the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI enzymes that are required to catalyze their correct folding. To discover the PDIs that may participate in the folding and structural maturation of conotoxins, the transcriptomes of the venom duct of four different species of Conus from the peninsula of Baja California (Mexico were assembled. Complementary DNA (cDNA libraries were constructed for each species and sequenced using a Genome Analyzer Illumina platform. The raw RNA-seq data was converted into transcript sequences using Trinity, a de novo assembler that allows the grouping of reads into contigs without a reference genome. An N50 value of 605 was established as a reference for future assemblies of Conus transcriptomes using this software. Transdecoder was used to extract likely coding sequences from Trinity transcripts, and PDI-specific sequence motif "APWCGHCK" was used to capture potential PDIs. An in silico analysis was performed to characterize the group of PDI protein sequences encoded by the duct-transcriptome of each species. The computational approach entailed a structural homology characterization, based on the presence of functional Thioredoxin-like domains. Four different PDI families were characterized, which are constituted by a total of 41 different gene sequences. The sequences had an average of 65% identity with other PDIs. Using MODELLER 9.14, the homology-based three-dimensional structure prediction of a subset of the sequences reported, showed the expected thioredoxin fold which was confirmed by a "simulated annealing" method.

  10. A Novel De Novo GATA Binding Protein 3 Mutation in a Turkish Boy with Hypoparathyroidism, Deafness, and Renal Dysplasia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Nakamura, Akie; Fukami, Maki; Hatun, Şükrü

    2015-12-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness, and renal dysplasia (HDR; OMIM 146255) syndrome is a rare disease, inherited dominantly and found to be related with GATA3 (GATA binding protein 3) gene mutations. A 13-year and 8-month-old boy who presented with hypocalcemia was diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism. He also had dysmorphic facial features, renal anomaly (pelvic kidney), and mild sensorineural hearing loss. His cranial computed tomography revealed multiple calcifications in bilateral centrum semiovale, corona radiata, and basal ganglions suggesting a persistent hypoparathyroidism. Thus, the presence of triad of HDR syndrome was considered, and genetic analysis using a next-generation sequencer identified a novel de novo missense mutation in exon 4 p.R276Q (c.827G>A) of GATA3 gene. This is the second patient who was reported to have a mutation in GATA3 gene from Turkey. In conclusion, although HDR syndrome is a rare condition, it should be kept in mind in patients with hypoparathyroidism. Classical triad can easily be identified if patients diagnosed with hypoparathyroidism are also evaluated with a urinary tract ultrasound and an audiometer.

  11. Discovery, genotyping and characterization of structural variation and novel sequence at single nucleotide resolution from de novo genome assemblies on a population scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Siyang; Huang, Shujia; Rao, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    present a novel approach implemented in a single software package, AsmVar, to discover, genotype and characterize different forms of structural variation and novel sequence from population-scale de novo genome assemblies up to nucleotide resolution. Application of AsmVar to several human de novo genome......) as well as large deletions. However, these approaches consistently display a substantial bias against the recovery of complex structural variants and novel sequence in individual genomes and do not provide interpretation information such as the annotation of ancestral state and formation mechanism. We...... assemblies captures a wide spectrum of structural variants and novel sequences present in the human population in high sensitivity and specificity. Our method provides a direct solution for investigating structural variants and novel sequences from de novo genome assemblies, facilitating the construction...

  12. Symmetry-Directed Self-Assembly of a Tetrahedral Protein Cage Mediated by de Novo-Designed Coiled Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badieyan, Somayesadat; Sciore, Aaron; Eschweiler, Joseph D; Koldewey, Philipp; Cristie-David, Ajitha S; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Bardwell, James C A; Su, Min; Marsh, E Neil G

    2017-10-05

    The organization of proteins into new hierarchical forms is an important challenge in synthetic biology. However, engineering new interactions between protein subunits is technically challenging and typically requires extensive redesign of protein-protein interfaces. We have developed a conceptually simple approach, based on symmetry principles, that uses short coiled-coil domains to assemble proteins into higher-order structures. Here, we demonstrate the assembly of a trimeric enzyme into a well-defined tetrahedral cage. This was achieved by genetically fusing a trimeric coiled-coil domain to its C terminus through a flexible polyglycine linker sequence. The linker length and coiled-coil strength were the only parameters that needed to be optimized to obtain a high yield of correctly assembled protein cages. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. De novo ORFs in Drosophila are important to organismal fitness and evolved rapidly from previously non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Reinhardt

    Full Text Available How non-coding DNA gives rise to new protein-coding genes (de novo genes is not well understood. Recent work has revealed the origins and functions of a few de novo genes, but common principles governing the evolution or biological roles of these genes are unknown. To better define these principles, we performed a parallel analysis of the evolution and function of six putatively protein-coding de novo genes described in Drosophila melanogaster. Reconstruction of the transcriptional history of de novo genes shows that two de novo genes emerged from novel long non-coding RNAs that arose at least 5 MY prior to evolution of an open reading frame. In contrast, four other de novo genes evolved a translated open reading frame and transcription within the same evolutionary interval suggesting that nascent open reading frames (proto-ORFs, while not required, can contribute to the emergence of a new de novo gene. However, none of the genes arose from proto-ORFs that existed long before expression evolved. Sequence and structural evolution of de novo genes was rapid compared to nearby genes and the structural complexity of de novo genes steadily increases over evolutionary time. Despite the fact that these genes are transcribed at a higher level in males than females, and are most strongly expressed in testes, RNAi experiments show that most of these genes are essential in both sexes during metamorphosis. This lethality suggests that protein coding de novo genes in Drosophila quickly become functionally important.

  14. Complementarity of structure ensembles in protein-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberg, Raik; Leckner, Johan; Nilges, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Protein-protein association is often accompanied by changes in receptor and ligand structure. This interplay between protein flexibility and protein-protein recognition is currently the largest obstacle both to our understanding of and to the reliable prediction of protein complexes. We performed two sets of molecular dynamics simulations for the unbound receptor and ligand structures of 17 protein complexes and applied shape-driven rigid body docking to all combinations of representative snapshots. The crossdocking of structure ensembles increased the likelihood of finding near-native solutions. The free ensembles appeared to contain multiple complementary conformations. These were in general not related to the bound structure. We suggest that protein-protein binding follows a three-step mechanism of diffusion, free conformer selection, and refolding. This model combines previously conflicting ideas and is in better agreement with the current data on interaction forces, time scales, and kinetics.

  15. Protein structure determination using metagenome sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, Sergey; Park, Hahnbeom; Varghese, Neha; Huang, Po-Ssu; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Kim, David E; Kamisetty, Hetunandan; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Baker, David

    2017-01-20

    Despite decades of work by structural biologists, there are still ~5200 protein families with unknown structure outside the range of comparative modeling. We show that Rosetta structure prediction guided by residue-residue contacts inferred from evolutionary information can accurately model proteins that belong to large families and that metagenome sequence data more than triple the number of protein families with sufficient sequences for accurate modeling. We then integrate metagenome data, contact-based structure matching, and Rosetta structure calculations to generate models for 614 protein families with currently unknown structures; 206 are membrane proteins and 137 have folds not represented in the Protein Data Bank. This approach provides the representative models for large protein families originally envisioned as the goal of the Protein Structure Initiative at a fraction of the cost. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Protein 3D structure computed from evolutionary sequence variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora S Marks

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trajectory of a protein through sequence space is constrained by its function. Collections of sequence homologs record the outcomes of millions of evolutionary experiments in which the protein evolves according to these constraints. Deciphering the evolutionary record held in these sequences and exploiting it for predictive and engineering purposes presents a formidable challenge. The potential benefit of solving this challenge is amplified by the advent of inexpensive high-throughput genomic sequencing.In this paper we ask whether we can infer evolutionary constraints from a set of sequence homologs of a protein. The challenge is to distinguish true co-evolution couplings from the noisy set of observed correlations. We address this challenge using a maximum entropy model of the protein sequence, constrained by the statistics of the multiple sequence alignment, to infer residue pair couplings. Surprisingly, we find that the strength of these inferred couplings is an excellent predictor of residue-residue proximity in folded structures. Indeed, the top-scoring residue couplings are sufficiently accurate and well-distributed to define the 3D protein fold with remarkable accuracy.We quantify this observation by computing, from sequence alone, all-atom 3D structures of fifteen test proteins from different fold classes, ranging in size from 50 to 260 residues, including a G-protein coupled receptor. These blinded inferences are de novo, i.e., they do not use homology modeling or sequence-similar fragments from known structures. The co-evolution signals provide sufficient information to determine accurate 3D protein structure to 2.7-4.8 Å C(α-RMSD error relative to the observed structure, over at least two-thirds of the protein (method called EVfold, details at http://EVfold.org. This discovery provides insight into essential interactions constraining protein evolution and will facilitate a comprehensive survey of the universe of

  17. A congenital muscular dystrophy with mitochondrial structural abnormalities caused by defective de novo phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ohkuma, Aya; Talim, Beril; Karahashi, Minako; Koumura, Tomoko; Aoyama, Chieko; Kurihara, Mana; Quinlivan, Ros; Sewry, Caroline; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Goto, Kanako; Koksal, Burcu; Kale, Gulsev; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Noguchi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nonaka, Ikuya; Sher, Roger B; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasuhito; Cox, Gregory A; Topaloglu, Haluk; Nishino, Ichizo

    2011-06-10

    Congenital muscular dystrophy is a heterogeneous group of inherited muscle diseases characterized clinically by muscle weakness and hypotonia in early infancy. A number of genes harboring causative mutations have been identified, but several cases of congenital muscular dystrophy remain molecularly unresolved. We examined 15 individuals with a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by early-onset muscle wasting, mental retardation, and peculiar enlarged mitochondria that are prevalent toward the periphery of the fibers but are sparse in the center on muscle biopsy, and we have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding choline kinase beta (CHKB). This is the first enzymatic step in a biosynthetic pathway for phosphatidylcholine, the most abundant phospholipid in eukaryotes. In muscle of three affected individuals with nonsense mutations, choline kinase activities were undetectable, and phosphatidylcholine levels were decreased. We identified the human disease caused by disruption of a phospholipid de novo biosynthetic pathway, demonstrating the pivotal role of phosphatidylcholine in muscle and brain. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neural Networks for protein Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    This is a review about neural network applications in bioinformatics. Especially the applications to protein structure prediction, e.g. prediction of secondary structures, prediction of surface structure, fold class recognition and prediction of the 3-dimensional structure of protein backbones...

  19. Random protein sequences can form defined secondary structures and are well-tolerated in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tretyachenko, Vyacheslav; Vymětal, Jiří; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Hofbauerová, K.; Jindrová, Helena; Hubálek, Martin; Souček, Radko; Konvalinka, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Hlouchová, Klára

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, Nov 13 (2017), č. článku 15449. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : amino acid sequence * de novo proteins * structure prediction Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016 https://www.nature.com/ articles /s41598-017-15635-8

  20. Fast large-scale clustering of protein structures using Gauss integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    -workers – and subsequently performing K-means clustering. Conclusions: Compared to current methods, Pleiades dramatically improves on the time needed to perform clustering, and can cluster a signicantly larger number of structures, while providing state-ofthe- art results. The number of low energy structures generated...... trajectories. Results: We present Pleiades, a novel approach to clustering protein structures with a rigorous mathematical underpinning. The method approximates clustering based on the root mean square deviation by rst mapping structures to Gauss integral vectors – which were introduced by Røgen and co......Motivation: Clustering protein structures is an important task in structural bioinformatics. De novo structure prediction, for example, often involves a clustering step for nding the best prediction. Other applications include assigning proteins to fold families and analyzing molecular dynamics...

  1. Crystal structures of MBP fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, David S

    2016-03-01

    Although chaperone-assisted protein crystallization remains a comparatively rare undertaking, the number of crystal structures of polypeptides fused to maltose-binding protein (MBP) that have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has grown dramatically during the past decade. Altogether, 102 fusion protein structures were detected by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) analysis. Collectively, these structures comprise a range of sizes, space groups, and resolutions that are typical of the PDB as a whole. While most of these MBP fusion proteins were equipped with short inter-domain linkers to increase their rigidity, fusion proteins with long linkers have also been crystallized. In some cases, surface entropy reduction mutations in MBP appear to have facilitated the formation of crystals. A comparison of the structures of fused and unfused proteins, where both are available, reveals that MBP-mediated structural distortions are very rare. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  2. Computational Protein Design Under a Given Backbone Structure with the ABACUS Statistical Energy Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Peng; Chen, Quan; Liu, Haiyan

    2017-01-01

    An important objective of computational protein design is to identify amino acid sequences that stably fold into a given backbone structure. A general approach to this problem is to minimize an energy function in the sequence space. We have previously reported a method to derive statistical energies for fixed-backbone protein design and showed that it led to de novo proteins that fold as expected. Here, we present the usage of the program that implements this method, which we now name as ABACUS (A Backbone-based Amino aCid Usage Survey).

  3. Is protein structure prediction still an enigma?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... opined that protein fold is coded in the amino acid sequence itself. Protein structure prediction is therefore a problem of much scientific interest and it is still not clear as to how structure is encoded in sequence. Computer methods for protein analysis address this problem since they study the relations within ...

  4. Modeling Protein Structure at Near Atomic Resolutions With Gorgon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Matthew L.; Abeysinghe, Sasakthi S.; Schuh, Stephen; Coleman, Ross A.; Abrams, Austin; Marsh, Michael P.; Hryc, Corey F.; Ruths, Troy; Chiu, Wah; Ju, Tao

    2011-01-01

    Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) has played an increasingly important role in elucidating the structure and function of macromolecular assemblies in near native solution conditions. Typically, however, only non-atomic resolution reconstructions have been obtained for these large complexes, necessitating computational tools for integrating and extracting structural details. With recent advances in cryo-EM, maps at near-atomic resolutions have been achieved for several macromolecular assemblies from which models have been manually constructed. In this work, we describe a new interactive modeling toolkit called Gorgon targeted at intermediate to near-atomic resolution density maps (10-3.5 Å), particularly from cryo-EM. Gorgon's de novo modeling procedure couples sequence-based secondary structure prediction with feature detection and geometric modeling techniques to generate initial protein backbone models. Beyond model building, Gorgon is an extensible interactive visualization platform with a variety of computational tools for annotating a wide variety of 3D volumes. Examples from cryo-EM maps of Rotavirus and Rice Dwarf Virus are used to demonstrate its applicability to modeling protein structure. PMID:21296162

  5. De novo prediction of structured RNAs from genomic sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Þórarinsson, Elfar

    2010-01-01

    currently available, because evolutionary conservation highlights functionally important regions. Conserved secondary structure, rather than primary sequence, is the hallmark of many functionally important RNAs, because compensatory substitutions in base-paired regions preserve structure. Unfortunately...

  6. Sequence protein identification by randomized sequence database and transcriptome mass spectrometry (SPIDER-TMS): from manual to automatic application of a 'de novo sequencing' approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Raffaella; Grossi, Gerarda; Cruciani, Gabriele; Mecca, Giansalvatore; Santoro, Donatello; Sarli Calace, Renzo; Falabella, Patrizia; Bianco, Giuliana

    Sequence protein identification by a randomized sequence database and transcriptome mass spectrometry software package has been developed at the University of Basilicata in Potenza (Italy) and designed to facilitate the determination of the amino acid sequence of a peptide as well as an unequivocal identification of proteins in a high-throughput manner with enormous advantages of time, economical resource and expertise. The software package is a valid tool for the automation of a de novo sequencing approach, overcoming the main limits and a versatile platform useful in the proteomic field for an unequivocal identification of proteins, starting from tandem mass spectrometry data. The strength of this software is that it is a user-friendly and non-statistical approach, so protein identification can be considered unambiguous.

  7. SDSL-ESR-based protein structure characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strancar, J.; Kavalenka, A.A.; Urbancic, I.; Ljubetic, A.; Hemminga, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    As proteins are key molecules in living cells, knowledge about their structure can provide important insights and applications in science, biotechnology, and medicine. However, many protein structures are still a big challenge for existing high-resolution structure-determination methods, as can be

  8. Protein structure prediction using hybrid AI methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, X.; Mural, R.J.; Uberbacher, E.C.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes a new approach for predicting protein structures based on Artificial Intelligence methods and genetic algorithms. We combine nearest neighbor searching algorithms, neural networks, heuristic rules and genetic algorithms to form an integrated system to predict protein structures from their primary amino acid sequences. First we describe our methods and how they are integrated, and then apply our methods to several protein sequences. The results are very close to the real structures obtained by crystallography. Parallel genetic algorithms are also implemented.

  9. Protein Structure Prediction with Visuospatial Analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jim; Glasgow, Janice; Kuo, Tony

    We show that visuospatial representations and reasoning techniques can be used as a similarity metric for analogical protein structure prediction. Our system retrieves pairs of α-helices based on contact map similarity, then transfers and adapts the structure information to an unknown helix pair, showing that similar protein contact maps predict similar 3D protein structure. The success of this method provides support for the notion that changing representations can enable similarity metrics in analogy.

  10. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles

  11. Introducing site-specific cysteines into nanobodies for mercury labelling allows de novo phasing of their crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Simon Boje; Laursen, Nick Stub; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2017-01-01

    of the presence of free cysteines in the target protein could considerably facilitate the process of obtaining unbiased experimental phases. Nanobodies (single-domain antibodies) have recently been shown to promote the crystallization and structure determination of flexible proteins and complexes. To extend......The generation of high-quality protein crystals and the loss of phase information during an X-ray crystallography diffraction experiment represent the major bottlenecks in the determination of novel protein structures. A generic method for introducing Hg atoms into any crystal independent...... the usability of nanobodies for crystallographic work, variants of the Nb36 nanobody with a single free cysteine at one of four framework-residue positions were developed. These cysteines could be labelled with fluorophores or Hg. For one cysteine variant (Nb36-C85) two nanobody structures were experimentally...

  12. PSAIA – Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlahoviček Kristian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PSAIA (Protein Structure and Interaction Analyzer was developed to compute geometric parameters for large sets of protein structures in order to predict and investigate protein-protein interaction sites. Results In addition to most relevant established algorithms, PSAIA offers a new method PIADA (Protein Interaction Atom Distance Algorithm for the determination of residue interaction pairs. We found that PIADA produced more satisfactory results than comparable algorithms implemented in PSAIA. Particular advantages of PSAIA include its capacity to combine different methods to detect the locations and types of interactions between residues and its ability, without any further automation steps, to handle large numbers of protein structures and complexes. Generally, the integration of a variety of methods enables PSAIA to offer easier automation of analysis and greater reliability of results. PSAIA can be used either via a graphical user interface or from the command-line. Results are generated in either tabular or XML format. Conclusion In a straightforward fashion and for large sets of protein structures, PSAIA enables the calculation of protein geometric parameters and the determination of location and type for protein-protein interaction sites. XML formatted output enables easy conversion of results to various formats suitable for statistic analysis. Results from smaller data sets demonstrated the influence of geometry on protein interaction sites. Comprehensive analysis of properties of large data sets lead to new information useful in the prediction of protein-protein interaction sites.

  13. NAPS: Network Analysis of Protein Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Broto; Parekh, Nita

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, protein structures have been analysed by the secondary structure architecture and fold arrangement. An alternative approach that has shown promise is modelling proteins as a network of non-covalent interactions between amino acid residues. The network representation of proteins provide a systems approach to topological analysis of complex three-dimensional structures irrespective of secondary structure and fold type and provide insights into structure-function relationship. We have developed a web server for network based analysis of protein structures, NAPS, that facilitates quantitative and qualitative (visual) analysis of residue–residue interactions in: single chains, protein complex, modelled protein structures and trajectories (e.g. from molecular dynamics simulations). The user can specify atom type for network construction, distance range (in Å) and minimal amino acid separation along the sequence. NAPS provides users selection of node(s) and its neighbourhood based on centrality measures, physicochemical properties of amino acids or cluster of well-connected residues (k-cliques) for further analysis. Visual analysis of interacting domains and protein chains, and shortest path lengths between pair of residues are additional features that aid in functional analysis. NAPS support various analyses and visualization views for identifying functional residues, provide insight into mechanisms of protein folding, domain-domain and protein–protein interactions for understanding communication within and between proteins. URL:http://bioinf.iiit.ac.in/NAPS/. PMID:27151201

  14. De Novo generation of molecular structures using optimization to select graphs on a given lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bywater, R.P.; Poulsen, Thomas Agersten; Røgen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    positions. The linkage process takes place on a lattice whose unit step length and overall geometry is designed to match typical architectures of organic molecules. We use an optimization method to select from the many different graphs possible. The approach is demonstrated in an example where crystal......A recurrent problem in organic chemistry is the generation of new molecular structures that conform to some predetermined set of structural constraints that are imposed in an endeavor to build certain required properties into the newly generated structure. An example of this is the pharmacophore...

  15. Solution NMR structure determination of proteins revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billeter, Martin; Wagner, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    This 'Perspective' bears on the present state of protein structure determination by NMR in solution. The focus is on a comparison of the infrastructure available for NMR structure determination when compared to protein crystal structure determination by X-ray diffraction. The main conclusion emerges that the unique potential of NMR to generate high resolution data also on dynamics, interactions and conformational equilibria has contributed to a lack of standard procedures for structure determination which would be readily amenable to improved efficiency by automation. To spark renewed discussion on the topic of NMR structure determination of proteins, procedural steps with high potential for improvement are identified

  16. Protein Structure Elucidation from NMR Data with the Program Xplor-NIH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Guillermo A; Schwieters, Charles D

    2018-01-01

    Xplor-NIH is a popular software package for biomolecular structure determination from NMR (and other) experimental data. This chapter illustrates its use with the de novo structure determination of the B1 domain of streptococcal protein G (GB1), based on distances from nuclear Overhauser effects, torsion angles from scalar couplings, and bond-vector orientations from residual dipolar couplings. Including Xplor-NIH's latest developments, a complete structure calculation script is discussed in detail, and is intended to serve as a basis for other applications.

  17. Extracting knowledge from protein structure geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Koehl, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    potential from geometric knowledge extracted from native and misfolded conformers of protein structures. This new potential, Metric Protein Potential (MPP), has two main features that are key to its success. Firstly, it is composite in that it includes local and nonlocal geometric information on proteins...

  18. Near-native Protein Structure Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefka Fidanova

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The protein folding problem is a fundamental problem in computational molecular biology and biochemical physics. The high resolution 3D structure of a protein is the key to the understanding and manipulating of its biochemical and cellular functions. All information necessary to fold a protein to its native structure is contained in its amino-acid sequence. Proteins structure could be calculated from knowledge of its sequence and our understanding of the sequence-structure relationships. Various optimization methods have been applied to formulation of the folding problem. There are two main approaches. The one is based on properties of homologous proteins. Other is based on reduced models of proteins structure like hydrophobic-polar (HP protein model. After that, the folding problem is defined like optimization problem. It is a hard optimization problem and most of the authors apply Monte Carlo or metaheuristic methods to solve it. In this paper other approach will be used. By HP model is explained the structures of proteins conformation observed by biologists and is studied the correspondence between the primary and tertiary structures of the proteins.

  19. Validation-driven protein-structure improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, W.G.

    2016-01-01

    High-quality protein structure models are essential for many Life Science applications, such as protein engineering, molecular dynamics, drug design, and homology modelling. The WHAT_CHECK model validation project and the PDB_REDO model optimisation project have shown that many structure models in

  20. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure......In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  1. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  2. Amino acid code of protein secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shestopalov, B V

    2003-01-01

    The calculation of protein three-dimensional structure from the amino acid sequence is a fundamental problem to be solved. This paper presents principles of the code theory of protein secondary structure, and their consequence--the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. The doublet code model of protein secondary structure, developed earlier by the author (Shestopalov, 1990), is part of this theory. The theory basis are: 1) the name secondary structure is assigned to the conformation, stabilized only by the nearest (intraresidual) and middle-range (at a distance no more than that between residues i and i + 5) interactions; 2) the secondary structure consists of regular (alpha-helical and beta-structural) and irregular (coil) segments; 3) the alpha-helices, beta-strands and coil segments are encoded, respectively, by residue pairs (i, i + 4), (i, i + 2), (i, i = 1), according to the numbers of residues per period, 3.6, 2, 1; 4) all such pairs in the amino acid sequence are codons for elementary structural elements, or structurons; 5) the codons are divided into 21 types depending on their strength, i.e. their encoding capability; 6) overlappings of structurons of one and the same structure generate the longer segments of this structure; 7) overlapping of structurons of different structures is forbidden, and therefore selection of codons is required, the codon selection is hierarchic; 8) the code theory of protein secondary structure generates six variants of the amino acid code of protein secondary structure. There are two possible kinds of model construction based on the theory: the physical one using physical properties of amino acid residues, and the statistical one using results of statistical analysis of a great body of structural data. Some evident consequences of the theory are: a) the theory can be used for calculating the secondary structure from the amino acid sequence as a partial solution of the problem of calculation of protein three

  3. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... divided into chirality constraints and distance constraints. Here we report that the problem of mirrored structures, in some cases, can be solved by using a chirality term in the cost function....... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...

  4. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... divided into chirality constraints and distance constraints. Here we report that the problem of mirrored structures, in some cases, can be solved by using a chirality term in the cost function....... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...

  5. Protein structure prediction by all-atom free-energy refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Abhinav; Wenzel, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Background The reliable prediction of protein tertiary structure from the amino acid sequence remains challenging even for small proteins. We have developed an all-atom free-energy protein forcefield (PFF01) that we could use to fold several small proteins from completely extended conformations. Because the computational cost of de-novo folding studies rises steeply with system size, this approach is unsuitable for structure prediction purposes. We therefore investigate here a low-cost free-energy relaxation protocol for protein structure prediction that combines heuristic methods for model generation with all-atom free-energy relaxation in PFF01. Results We use PFF01 to rank and cluster the conformations for 32 proteins generated by ROSETTA. For 22/10 high-quality/low quality decoy sets we select near-native conformations with an average Cα root mean square deviation of 3.03 Å/6.04 Å. The protocol incorporates an inherent reliability indicator that succeeds for 78% of the decoy sets. In over 90% of these cases near-native conformations are selected from the decoy set. This success rate is rationalized by the quality of the decoys and the selectivity of the PFF01 forcefield, which ranks near-native conformations an average 3.06 standard deviations below that of the relaxed decoys (Z-score). Conclusion All-atom free-energy relaxation with PFF01 emerges as a powerful low-cost approach toward generic de-novo protein structure prediction. The approach can be applied to large all-atom decoy sets of any origin and requires no preexisting structural information to identify the native conformation. The study provides evidence that a large class of proteins may be foldable by PFF01. PMID:17371594

  6. Protein NMR structures refined without NOE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyojung; Kim, Tae-Rae; Ahn, SeonJoo; Ji, Sunyoung; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    The refinement of low-quality structures is an important challenge in protein structure prediction. Many studies have been conducted on protein structure refinement; the refinement of structures derived from NMR spectroscopy has been especially intensively studied. In this study, we generated flat-bottom distance potential instead of NOE data because NOE data have ambiguity and uncertainty. The potential was derived from distance information from given structures and prevented structural dislocation during the refinement process. A simulated annealing protocol was used to minimize the potential energy of the structure. The protocol was tested on 134 NMR structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) that also have X-ray structures. Among them, 50 structures were used as a training set to find the optimal "width" parameter in the flat-bottom distance potential functions. In the validation set (the other 84 structures), most of the 12 quality assessment scores of the refined structures were significantly improved (total score increased from 1.215 to 2.044). Moreover, the secondary structure similarity of the refined structure was improved over that of the original structure. Finally, we demonstrate that the combination of two energy potentials, statistical torsion angle potential (STAP) and the flat-bottom distance potential, can drive the refinement of NMR structures.

  7. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  8. Protein Structure and the Sequential Structure of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Engelbrecht, Jacob

    1996-01-01

    entries in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank produced 719 protein chains with matching mRNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and secondary structure assignment, By neural network analysis, we found strong signals in mRNA sequence regions surrounding helices and sheets, These signals do not originate from......A direct comparison of experimentally determined protein structures and their corresponding protein coding mRNA sequences has been performed, We examine whether real world data support the hypothesis that clusters of rare codons correlate with the location of structural units in the resulting...... protein, The degeneracy of the genetic code allows for a biased selection of codons which may control the translational rate of the ribosome, and may thus in vivo have a catalyzing effect on the folding of the polypeptide chain, A complete search for GenBank nucleotide sequences coding for structural...

  9. Modeling protein structures: construction and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, C S; Cohen, F E

    1993-06-01

    Although no general solution to the protein folding problem exists, the three-dimensional structures of proteins are being successfully predicted when experimentally derived constraints are used in conjunction with heuristic methods. In the case of interleukin-4, mutagenesis data and CD spectroscopy were instrumental in the accurate assignment of secondary structure. In addition, the tertiary structure was highly constrained by six cysteines separated by many residues that formed three disulfide bridges. Although the correct structure was a member of a short list of plausible structures, the "best" structure was the topological enantiomer of the experimentally determined conformation. For many proteases, other experimentally derived structures can be used as templates to identify the secondary structure elements. In a procedure called modeling by homology, the structure of a known protein is used as a scaffold to predict the structure of another related protein. This method has been used to model a serine and a cysteine protease that are important in the schistosome and malarial life cycles, respectively. The model structures were then used to identify putative small molecule enzyme inhibitors computationally. Experiments confirm that some of these nonpeptidic compounds are active at concentrations of less than 10 microM.

  10. "De-novo" amino acid sequence elucidation of protein G'e by combined "Top-Down" and "Bottom-Up" mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Koy, Cornelia; Cui, Weidong; Yan, Yuetian; Gross, Michael L.; Glocker, Michael O.

    2015-03-01

    Mass spectrometric de-novo sequencing was applied to review the amino acid sequence of a commercially available recombinant protein Ǵ with great scientific and economic importance. Substantial deviations to the published amino acid sequence (Uniprot Q54181) were found by the presence of 46 additional amino acids at the N-terminus, including a so-called "His-tag" as well as an N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylation and α- N-phosphogluconoylation, respectively. The unexpected amino acid sequence of the commercial protein G' comprised 241 amino acids and resulted in a molecular mass of 25,998.9 ± 0.2 Da for the unmodified protein. Due to the higher mass that is caused by its extended amino acid sequence compared with the original protein G' (185 amino acids), we named this protein "protein G'e." By means of mass spectrometric peptide mapping, the suggested amino acid sequence, as well as the N-terminal partial α- N-gluconoylations, was confirmed with 100% sequence coverage. After the protein G'e sequence was determined, we were able to determine the expression vector pET-28b from Novagen with the Xho I restriction enzyme cleavage site as the best option that was used for cloning and expressing the recombinant protein G'e in E. coli. A dissociation constant ( K d ) value of 9.4 nM for protein G'e was determined thermophoretically, showing that the N-terminal flanking sequence extension did not cause significant changes in the binding affinity to immunoglobulins.

  11. De Novo Synthesis of Basal Bacterial Cell Division Proteins FtsZ, FtsA, and ZipA Inside Giant Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusato, Takumi; Horie, Fumihiro; Matsubayashi, Hideaki T; Amikura, Kazuaki; Kuruma, Yutetsu; Ueda, Takuya

    2018-03-13

    Cell division is the most dynamic event in the cell cycle. Recently, efforts have been made to reconstruct it using the individual component proteins to obtain a better understanding of the process of self-reproduction of cells. However, such reconstruction studies are frequently hampered by difficulties in preparing membrane-associated proteins. Here we demonstrate a de novo synthesis approach based on a cell-free translation system. Genes for fundamental cell division proteins, FtsZ, FtsA, and ZipA, were expressed inside the lipid compartment of giant vesicles (GVs). The synthesized proteins showed polymerization, membrane localization, and eventually membrane deformation. Notably, we found that this morphological change of the vesicle is forced by only FtsZ and ZipA, which form clusters on the membrane at the vesicle interior. Our cell-free approach provides a platform for studying protein dynamics associated with lipid membrane and paves the way to create a synthetic cell that undergoes self-reproduction.

  12. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  13. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+) B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+) Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  14. Trametes versicolor protein YZP activates regulatory B lymphocytes - gene identification through de novo assembly and function analysis in a murine acute colitis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chou Kuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. RESULTS: We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d(+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d(+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models.

  15. Trametes versicolor Protein YZP Activates Regulatory B Lymphocytes – Gene Identification through De Novo Assembly and Function Analysis in a Murine Acute Colitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Yen-Chou; Wu, Ying-Jou; Hung, Chih-Liang; Sheu, Fuu

    2013-01-01

    Background Trametes versicolor (Yun-Zhi) is a medicinal fungus used as a chemotherapy co-treatment to enhance anti-tumor immunity. Although the efficacies of T. versicolor extracts have been documented, the active ingredients and mechanisms underlying the actions of these extracts remain uncharacterized. Results We purified a new protein, YZP, from the fruiting bodies of T. versicolor and identified the gene encoding YZP using RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies. YZP is a 12-kDa non-glycosylated protein comprising 139 amino acids, including an 18-amino acids signal peptide. YZP induced a greater than 60-fold increase in IL-10 secretion in mice B lymphocytes; moreover, YZP specifically triggered the differentiation of CD1d+ B cells into IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs) and enhanced the expression of CD1d. YZP-induced B cells suppressed approximately 40% of the LPS-activated macrophage production of inflammatory cytokines in a mixed leukocyte reaction and significantly alleviated the disease activity and colonic inflammation in a DSS-induced acute colitis murine model. Furthermore, YZP activated Breg function via interaction with TLR2 and TLR4 and up-regulation of the TLR-mediated signaling pathway. Conclusions We purified a novel Breg-stimulating protein, YZP, from T. versicolor and developed an advanced approach combining RNA-seq and de novo assembly technologies.to clone its gene. We demonstrated that YZP activated CD1d+ Breg differentiation through TLR2/4-mediated signaling pathway, and the YZP-stimulated B cells exhibited anti-inflammatory efficacies in vitro and in murine acute colitis models. PMID:24019869

  16. Protein structural similarity search by Ramachandran codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chih-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structural data has increased exponentially, such that fast and accurate tools are necessary to access structure similarity search. To improve the search speed, several methods have been designed to reduce three-dimensional protein structures to one-dimensional text strings that are then analyzed by traditional sequence alignment methods; however, the accuracy is usually sacrificed and the speed is still unable to match sequence similarity search tools. Here, we aimed to improve the linear encoding methodology and develop efficient search tools that can rapidly retrieve structural homologs from large protein databases. Results We propose a new linear encoding method, SARST (Structural similarity search Aided by Ramachandran Sequential Transformation. SARST transforms protein structures into text strings through a Ramachandran map organized by nearest-neighbor clustering and uses a regenerative approach to produce substitution matrices. Then, classical sequence similarity search methods can be applied to the structural similarity search. Its accuracy is similar to Combinatorial Extension (CE and works over 243,000 times faster, searching 34,000 proteins in 0.34 sec with a 3.2-GHz CPU. SARST provides statistically meaningful expectation values to assess the retrieved information. It has been implemented into a web service and a stand-alone Java program that is able to run on many different platforms. Conclusion As a database search method, SARST can rapidly distinguish high from low similarities and efficiently retrieve homologous structures. It demonstrates that the easily accessible linear encoding methodology has the potential to serve as a foundation for efficient protein structural similarity search tools. These search tools are supposed applicable to automated and high-throughput functional annotations or predictions for the ever increasing number of published protein structures in this post-genomic era.

  17. Structural principles governing domain motions in proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of a recently developed method, twenty-four proteins for which two or more X-ray conformers are known have been analyzed to reveal structural principles that govern domain motions in proteins. In all 24 cases, the domain motion is a rotation about a physical axis created through local

  18. Overcoming barriers to membrane protein structure determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bill, Roslyn M.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Iwata, So; Kunji, Edmund R. S.; Michel, Hartmut; Neutze, Richard; Newstead, Simon; Poolman, Bert; Tate, Christopher G.; Vogel, Horst

    After decades of slow progress, the pace of research on membrane protein structures is beginning to quicken thanks to various improvements in technology, including protein engineering and microfocus X-ray diffraction. Here we review these developments and, where possible, highlight generic new

  19. PEGylated nanoparticles: protein corona and secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runa, Sabiha; Hill, Alexandra; Cochran, Victoria L.; Payne, Christine K.

    2014-09-01

    Nanoparticles have important biological and biomedical applications ranging from drug and gene delivery to biosensing. In the presence of extracellular proteins, a "corona" of proteins adsorbs on the surface of the nanoparticles, altering their interaction with cells, including immune cells. Nanoparticles are often functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to reduce this non-specific adsorption of proteins. To understand the change in protein corona that occurs following PEGylation, we first quantified the adsorption of blood serum proteins on bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles using gel electrophoresis. We find a threefold decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed on PEGylated gold nanoparticles compared to the bare gold nanoparticles, showing that PEG reduces, but does not prevent, corona formation. To determine if the secondary structure of corona proteins was altered upon adsorption onto the bare and PEGylated gold nanoparticles, we use CD spectroscopy to characterize the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin following incubation with the nanoparticles. Our results show no significant change in protein secondary structure following incubation with bare or PEGylated nanoparticles. Further examination of the secondary structure of bovine serum albumin, α2-macroglobulin, and transferrin in the presence of free PEG showed similar results. These findings provide important insights for the use of PEGylated gold nanoparticles under physiological conditions.

  20. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  1. Human cancer protein-protein interaction network: a structural perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Kar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interaction networks provide a global picture of cellular function and biological processes. Some proteins act as hub proteins, highly connected to others, whereas some others have few interactions. The dysfunction of some interactions causes many diseases, including cancer. Proteins interact through their interfaces. Therefore, studying the interface properties of cancer-related proteins will help explain their role in the interaction networks. Similar or overlapping binding sites should be used repeatedly in single interface hub proteins, making them promiscuous. Alternatively, multi-interface hub proteins make use of several distinct binding sites to bind to different partners. We propose a methodology to integrate protein interfaces into cancer interaction networks (ciSPIN, cancer structural protein interface network. The interactions in the human protein interaction network are replaced by interfaces, coming from either known or predicted complexes. We provide a detailed analysis of cancer related human protein-protein interfaces and the topological properties of the cancer network. The results reveal that cancer-related proteins have smaller, more planar, more charged and less hydrophobic binding sites than non-cancer proteins, which may indicate low affinity and high specificity of the cancer-related interactions. We also classified the genes in ciSPIN according to phenotypes. Within phenotypes, for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and leukemia, interface properties were found to be discriminating from non-cancer interfaces with an accuracy of 71%, 67%, 61%, respectively. In addition, cancer-related proteins tend to interact with their partners through distinct interfaces, corresponding mostly to multi-interface hubs, which comprise 56% of cancer-related proteins, and constituting the nodes with higher essentiality in the network (76%. We illustrate the interface related affinity properties of two cancer-related hub

  2. A 'periodic table' for protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, William R

    2002-04-11

    Current structural genomics programs aim systematically to determine the structures of all proteins coded in both human and other genomes, providing a complete picture of the number and variety of protein structures that exist. In the past, estimates have been made on the basis of the incomplete sample of structures currently known. These estimates have varied greatly (between 1,000 and 10,000; see for example refs 1 and 2), partly because of limited sample size but also owing to the difficulties of distinguishing one structure from another. This distinction is usually topological, based on the fold of the protein; however, in strict topological terms (neglecting to consider intra-chain cross-links), protein chains are open strings and hence are all identical. To avoid this trivial result, topologies are determined by considering secondary links in the form of intra-chain hydrogen bonds (secondary structure) and tertiary links formed by the packing of secondary structures. However, small additions to or loss of structure can make large changes to these perceived topologies and such subjective solutions are neither robust nor amenable to automation. Here I formalize both secondary and tertiary links to allow the rigorous and automatic definition of protein topology.

  3. Neutron Protein Crystallography: Beyond the Folding Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimura, N.

    2008-01-01

    Neutron diffraction provides an experimental method of directly locating hydrogen atoms in proteins, a technique complementary to ultra-high-resolution X-ray diffraction. A neutron diffractometers for biological macromolecules has been constructed in Japan, and it has been used to determine the crystal structures of proteins up to resolution limits of 1.5-2.5 A. Results relating to hydrogen positions and hydration patterns in proteins have been obtained from these studies. Examples include the geometrical details of hydrogen bonds, the role of hydrogen atoms in enzymatic activity, CH 3 configuration, H/D exchange in proteins and oligonucleotides, and the dynamical behavior of hydration structures, all of which have been extracted from these structural results and reviewed

  4. Structural analysis of recombinant human protein QM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualberto, D.C.H.; Fernandes, J.L.; Silva, F.S.; Saraiva, K.W.; Affonso, R.; Pereira, L.M.; Silva, I.D.C.G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The ribosomal protein QM belongs to a family of ribosomal proteins, which is highly conserved from yeast to humans. The presence of the QM protein is necessary for joining the 60S and 40S subunits in a late step of the initiation of mRNA translation. Although the exact extra-ribosomal functions of QM are not yet fully understood, it has been identified as a putative tumor suppressor. This protein was reported to interact with the transcription factor c-Jun and thereby prevent c-Jun actives genes of the cellular growth. In this study, the human QM protein was expressed in bacterial system, in the soluble form and this structure was analyzed by Circular Dichroism and Fluorescence. The results of Circular Dichroism showed that this protein has less alpha helix than beta sheet, as described in the literature. QM protein does not contain a leucine zipper region; however the ion zinc is necessary for binding of QM to c-Jun. Then we analyzed the relationship between the removal of zinc ions and folding of protein. Preliminary results obtained by the technique Fluorescence showed a gradual increase in fluorescence with the addition of increasing concentration of EDTA. This suggests that the zinc is important in the tertiary structure of the protein. More studies are being made for better understand these results. (author)

  5. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibo Cao

    2003-01-01

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches

  6. Protein Structure Recognition: From Eigenvector Analysis to Structural Threading Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Haibo [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In this work, they try to understand the protein folding problem using pair-wise hydrophobic interaction as the dominant interaction for the protein folding process. They found a strong correlation between amino acid sequences and the corresponding native structure of the protein. Some applications of this correlation were discussed in this dissertation include the domain partition and a new structural threading method as well as the performance of this method in the CASP5 competition. In the first part, they give a brief introduction to the protein folding problem. Some essential knowledge and progress from other research groups was discussed. This part includes discussions of interactions among amino acids residues, lattice HP model, and the design ability principle. In the second part, they try to establish the correlation between amino acid sequence and the corresponding native structure of the protein. This correlation was observed in the eigenvector study of protein contact matrix. They believe the correlation is universal, thus it can be used in automatic partition of protein structures into folding domains. In the third part, they discuss a threading method based on the correlation between amino acid sequences and ominant eigenvector of the structure contact-matrix. A mathematically straightforward iteration scheme provides a self-consistent optimum global sequence-structure alignment. The computational efficiency of this method makes it possible to search whole protein structure databases for structural homology without relying on sequence similarity. The sensitivity and specificity of this method is discussed, along with a case of blind test prediction. In the appendix, they list the overall performance of this threading method in CASP5 blind test in comparison with other existing approaches.

  7. Recurrent Structural Motifs in Non-Homologous Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Guex

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have extracted an extensive collection of recurrent structural motifs (RSMs, which consist of sequentially non-contiguous structural motifs (4–6 residues, each of which appears with very similar conformation in three or more mutually unrelated protein structures. We find that the proteins in our set are covered to a substantial extent by the recurrent non-contiguous structural motifs, especially the helix and strand regions. Computational alanine scanning calculations indicate that the average folding free energy changes upon alanine mutation for most types of non-alanine residues are higher for amino acids that are present in recurrent structural motifs than for amino acids that are not. The non-alanine amino acids that are most common in the recurrent structural motifs, i.e., phenylalanine, isoleucine, leucine, valine and tyrosine and the less abundant methionine and tryptophan, have the largest folding free energy changes. This indicates that the recurrent structural motifs, as we define them, describe recurrent structural patterns that are important for protein stability. In view of their properties, such structural motifs are potentially useful for inter-residue contact prediction and protein structure refinement.

  8. Structure and non-structure of centrosomal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena G Dos Santos

    Full Text Available Here we perform a large-scale study of the structural properties and the expression of proteins that constitute the human Centrosome. Centrosomal proteins tend to be larger than generic human proteins (control set, since their genes contain in average more exons (20.3 versus 14.6. They are rich in predicted disordered regions, which cover 57% of their length, compared to 39% in the general human proteome. They also contain several regions that are dually predicted to be disordered and coiled-coil at the same time: 55 proteins (15% contain disordered and coiled-coil fragments that cover more than 20% of their length. Helices prevail over strands in regions homologous to known structures (47% predicted helical residues against 17% predicted as strands, and even more in the whole centrosomal proteome (52% against 7%, while for control human proteins 34.5% of the residues are predicted as helical and 12.8% are predicted as strands. This difference is mainly due to residues predicted as disordered and helical (30% in centrosomal and 9.4% in control proteins, which may correspond to alpha-helix forming molecular recognition features (α-MoRFs. We performed expression assays for 120 full-length centrosomal proteins and 72 domain constructs that we have predicted to be globular. These full-length proteins are often insoluble: Only 39 out of 120 expressed proteins (32% and 19 out of 72 domains (26% were soluble. We built or retrieved structural models for 277 out of 361 human proteins whose centrosomal localization has been experimentally verified. We could not find any suitable structural template with more than 20% sequence identity for 84 centrosomal proteins (23%, for which around 74% of the residues are predicted to be disordered or coiled-coils. The three-dimensional models that we built are available at http://ub.cbm.uam.es/centrosome/models/index.php.

  9. Understanding Protein-Protein Interactions Using Local Structural Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Bonet, Jaume; García-García, Javier

    2013-01-01

    of this classification suggests that the balance between favoring and disfavoring structural features determines if a pair of proteins interacts or not. Our results are in agreement with previous works and support the funnel-like intermolecular energy landscape theory that explains PPIs. We have used these features...

  10. Structure-guided deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Choi, Yoonjoo; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins continue to yield revolutionary new treatments for a growing spectrum of human disease, but the development of these powerful drugs requires solving a unique set of challenges. For instance, it is increasingly apparent that mitigating potential anti-therapeutic immune responses, driven by molecular recognition of a therapeutic protein's peptide fragments, may be best accomplished early in the drug development process. One may eliminate immunogenic peptide fragments by mutating the cognate amino acid sequences, but deimmunizing mutations are constrained by the need for a folded, stable, and functional protein structure. These two concerns may be competing, as the mutations that are best at reducing immunogenicity often involve amino acids that are substantially different physicochemically. We develop a novel approach, called EpiSweep, that simultaneously optimizes both concerns. Our algorithm identifies sets of mutations making such Pareto optimal trade-offs between structure and immunogenicity, embodied by a molecular mechanics energy function and a T-cell epitope predictor, respectively. EpiSweep integrates structure-based protein design, sequence-based protein deimmunization, and algorithms for finding the Pareto frontier of a design space. While structure-based protein design is NP-hard, we employ integer programming techniques that are efficient in practice. Furthermore, EpiSweep only invokes the optimizer once per identified Pareto optimal design. We show that EpiSweep designs of regions of the therapeutics erythropoietin and staphylokinase are predicted to outperform previous experimental efforts. We also demonstrate EpiSweep's capacity for deimmunization of the entire proteins, case analyses involving dozens of predicted epitopes, and tens of thousands of unique side-chain interactions. Ultimately, Epi-Sweep is a powerful protein design tool that guides the protein engineer toward the most promising immunotolerant biotherapeutic

  11. A framework for direct locating and conformational sampling of protein structural motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianyong; Xiang, Leijun; Zhang, Weidong

    2011-05-01

    A specific treatment of recurrent structural motifs that represent the local bias information has been proven to be an important ingredient in de novo protein structure predication. Significant majority of methods for local structure are based on building blocks, which still suffer from its inherent discrete nature. Instead of using building blocks, this work presents a new protocol framework for local structural motifs prediction based on the direct locating along protein sequence and probabilistic sampling in a continuous (φ, ψ) space. The protein sequence was first scanned by an algorithm of sliding window with variable length of 7 to 19 residues, to match local segments to one of 82 motifs patterns in the fragment library. Identified segments were then labeled and modeled as the correlations of backbone torsion angles with mixture of bivariate cosine distributions in continuous (φ, ψ) space. 3D conformations of corresponding segments were finally sampled by using a backtrack algorithm to the hidden Markov model with single output of (φ, ψ). For local motifs in 50 proteins of testing set, about 62% of eight-residue segments located with high confidence value were predicted within 1.5 Å of their native structures by the method. Majority of local structural motifs were identified and sampled, which indicates the proposed protocol may at least serve as the foundation to obtain better protein tertiary structure prediction.

  12. Fibrous Protein Structures: Hierarchy, History and Heroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M; Parry, David A D

    2017-01-01

    During the 1930s and 1940s the technique of X-ray diffraction was applied widely by William Astbury and his colleagues to a number of naturally-occurring fibrous materials. On the basis of the diffraction patterns obtained, he observed that the structure of each of the fibres was dominated by one of a small number of different types of molecular conformation. One group of fibres, known as the k-m-e-f group of proteins (keratin - myosin - epidermin - fibrinogen), gave rise to diffraction characteristics that became known as the α-pattern. Others, such as those from a number of silks, gave rise to a different pattern - the β-pattern, while connective tissues yielded a third unique set of diffraction characteristics. At the time of Astbury's work, the structures of these materials were unknown, though the spacings of the main X-ray reflections gave an idea of the axial repeats and the lateral packing distances. In a breakthrough in the early 1950s, the basic structures of all of these fibrous proteins were determined. It was found that the long protein chains, composed of strings of amino acids, could be folded up in a systematic manner to generate a limited number of structures that were consistent with the X-ray data. The most important of these were known as the α-helix, the β-sheet, and the collagen triple helix. These studies provided information about the basic building blocks of all proteins, both fibrous and globular. They did not, however, provide detailed information about how these molecules packed together in three-dimensions to generate the fibres found in vivo. A number of possible packing arrangements were subsequently deduced from the X-ray diffraction and other data, but it is only in the last few years, through the continued improvements of electron microscopy, that the packing details within some fibrous proteins can now be seen directly. Here we outline briefly some of the milestones in fibrous protein structure determination, the role of the

  13. Tryptophan tags and de novo designed complementary affinity ligands for the expression and purification of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Ana Sofia; Carvalho, Sara; Dias, Ana Margarida G C; Guilherme, Márcia; Pereira, Alice S; Caraça, Luciana T; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Lowe, Christopher R; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-11-11

    A common strategy for the production and purification of recombinant proteins is to fuse a tag to the protein terminal residues and employ a "tag-specific" ligand for fusion protein capture and purification. In this work, we explored the effect of two tryptophan-based tags, NWNWNW and WFWFWF, on the expression and purification of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) used as a model fusion protein. The titers obtained with the expression of these fusion proteins in soluble form were 0.11mgml -1 and 0.48mgml -1 for WFWFWF and NWNWNW, respectively. A combinatorial library comprising 64 ligands based on the Ugi reaction was prepared and screened for binding GFP-tagged and non-tagged proteins. Complementary ligands A2C2 and A3C1 were selected for the effective capture of NWNWNW and WFWFWF tagged proteins, respectively, in soluble forms. These affinity pairs displayed 10 6 M -1 affinity constants and Qmax values of 19.11±2.60ugg -1 and 79.39ugg -1 for the systems WFWFWF AND NWNWNW, respectively. GFP fused to the WFWFWF affinity tag was also produced as inclusion bodies, and a refolding-on column strategy was explored using the ligand A4C8, selected from the combinatorial library of ligands but in presence of denaturant agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. De Novo Mutations in Protein Kinase Genes CAMK2A and CAMK2B Cause Intellectual Disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kury, S.; Woerden, G.M. van; Besnard, T.; Onori, M.P.; Latypova, X.; Towne, M.C.; Cho, M.T.; Prescott, T.E.; Ploeg, M.A.; Sanders, S.; Stessman, H.A.F.; Pujol, A.; Distel, B.; Robak, L.A.; Bernstein, J.A.; Denomme-Pichon, A.S.; Lesca, G.; Sellars, E.A.; Berg, J .; Carre, W.; Busk, O.L.; Bon, B.W.M. van; Waugh, J.L.; Deardorff, M.; Hoganson, G.E.; Bosanko, K.B.; Johnson, D.S.; Dabir, T.; Holla, O.L.; Sarkar, A.; Tveten, K.; Bellescize, J. de; Braathen, G.J.; Terhal, P.A.; Grange, D.K.; Haeringen, A. van; Lam, C.; Mirzaa, G.; Burton, J.; Bhoj, E.J.; Douglas, J.; Santani, A.B.; Nesbitt, A.I.; Helbig, K.L.; Andrews, M.V.; Begtrup, A.; Tang, S.; Gassen, K.L.I. van; Juusola, J.; Foss, K.; Enns, G.M.; Moog, U.; Hinderhofer, K.; Paramasivam, N.; Lincoln, S.; Kusako, B.H.; Lindenbaum, P.; Charpentier, E.; Nowak, C.B.; Cherot, E.; Simonet, T.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.L.; Hahn, S.; Brownstein, C.A.; Xia, F.; Schmitt, S.; Deb, W.; Bonneau, D.; Nizon, M.; Quinquis, D.; Chelly, J.; Rudolf, G.; Sanlaville, D.; Parent, P.; Gilbert-Dussardier, B.; Toutain, A.; Sutton, V.R.; Thies, J.; Peart-Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Boisseau, P.; Vincent, M.; Grabrucker, A.M.; Dubourg, C.; Tan, W.H.; Verbeek, N.E.; Granzow, M.; Santen, G.W.E.; Shendure, J.; Isidor, B.; Pasquier, L.; Redon, R.; Yang, Y; State, M.W.; Kleefstra, T.; Cogne, B.; Petrovski, S.; Retterer, K.; Eichler, E.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Agrawal, P.B.; Elgersma, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMK2) is one of the first proteins shown to be essential for normal learning and synaptic plasticity in mice, but its requirement for human brain development has not yet been established. Through a multi-center collaborative study based on a

  15. De novo synthesis of fatty acids is regulated by FapR protein in Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7, a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraúna, Rafael A; das Graças, Diego A; Nunes, Catarina I P; Schneider, Maria P C; Silva, Artur; Carepo, Marta S P

    2016-09-20

    FapR protein from the psychrotrophic species Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 was expressed and purified, and subsequently evaluated for its capacity to bind to the promoter regions of the fabH1-fabF and fapR-plsX-fabD-fabG operons, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The genes that compose these operons encode for enzymes involved in the de novo synthesis of fatty acids molecules. In Bacillus subtilis, FapR regulates the expression of these operons, and consequently has influence in the synthesis of long or short-chain fatty acids. To analyze the bacterial cold adaptation, this is an important metabolic pathway because psychrotrophic microrganisms tend to synthesize short and branched-chain unsaturated fatty acids at cold to maintain cell membrane fluidity. In this work, it was observed that recombinant protein was able to bind to the promoter of the fully amplified fabH1-fabF and fapR-plsX-fabD-fabG operons. However, FapR was unable to bind to the promoter of fapR-plsX-fabD-fabG operon when synthesized only up to the protein-binding palindrome 5'-TTAGTACCAGATACTAA-3', thus showing the importance of the entire promoter sequence for the correct protein-DNA interaction. Through this observation, we demonstrate that the FapR protein possibly regulates the same operons as described for other species, which emphasizes its importance to cold adaptation process of E. antarcticum B7, a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated at Antarctica.

  16. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  17. Data-assisted protein structure modeling by global optimization in CASP12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Keehyoung; Heo, Seungryong; Joung, InSuk; Hong, Seung Hwan; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2018-03-01

    In CASP12, 2 types of data-assisted protein structure modeling were experimented. Either SAXS experimental data or cross-linking experimental data was provided for a selected number of CASP12 targets that the CASP12 predictor could utilize for better protein structure modeling. We devised 2 separate energy terms for SAXS data and cross-linking data to drive the model structures into more native-like structures that satisfied the given experimental data as much as possible. In CASP11, we successfully performed protein structure modeling using simulated sparse and ambiguously assigned NOE data and/or correct residue-residue contact information, where the only energy term that folded the protein into its native structure was the term which was originated from the given experimental data. However, the 2 types of experimental data provided in CASP12 were far from being sufficient enough to fold the target protein into its native structure because SAXS data provides only the overall shape of the molecule and the cross-linking contact information provides only very low-resolution distance information. For this reason, we combined the SAXS or cross-linking energy term with our regular modeling energy function that includes both the template energy term and the de novo energy terms. By optimizing the newly formulated energy function, we obtained protein models that fit better with provided SAXS data than the X-ray structure of the target. However, the improvement of the model relative to the 1 modeled without the SAXS data, was not significant. Consistent structural improvement was achieved by incorporating cross-linking data into the protein structure modeling. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Kernel for Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Guermeur , Yann; Lifchitz , Alain; Vert , Régis

    2004-01-01

    http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=10338&mode=toc; International audience; Multi-class support vector machines have already proved efficient in protein secondary structure prediction as ensemble methods, to combine the outputs of sets of classifiers based on different principles. In this chapter, their implementation as basic prediction methods, processing the primary structure or the profile of multiple alignments, is investigated. A kernel devoted to the task is in...

  19. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  20. Alpha complexes in protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Fonseca, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    -complexes from scratch for every configuration encountered during the search for the native structure would make this approach hopelessly slow. However, it is argued that kinetic a-complexes can be used to reduce the computational effort of determining the potential energy when "moving" from one configuration...... to a neighboring one. As a consequence, relatively expensive (initial) construction of an a-complex is expected to be compensated by subsequent fast kinetic updates during the search process. Computational results presented in this paper are limited. However, they suggest that the applicability of a......-complexes and kinetic a-complexes in protein related problems (e.g., protein structure prediction and protein-ligand docking) deserves furhter investigation.)...

  1. Enterovirus A71 Proteins: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 infection has grown to become a serious threat to global public health. It is one of the major causes of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD in infants and young children. EV-A71 can also infect the central nervous system (CNS and induce diverse neurological complications, such as brainstem encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis, or even death. Viral proteins play a crucial role in EV-A71 infection. Many recent studies have discussed the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins, and the findings reported will definitely aid the development of vaccines and therapeutic approaches. This article reviews the progress in the research on the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins. Available literature can provide a basis for studying the pathogenesis of EV-A71 infection in detail.

  2. Dengue Virus Non-Structural Protein 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sahili, Abbas; Lescar, Julien

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that the yearly number of dengue cases averages 390 million. This mosquito-borne virus disease is endemic in over 100 countries and will probably continue spreading, given the observed trend in global warming. So far, there is no antiviral drug available against dengue, but a vaccine has been recently marketed. Dengue virus also serves as a prototype for the study of other pathogenic flaviviruses that are emerging, like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Upon viral entry into the host cell and fusion of the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane, the viral RNA is released and expressed as a polyprotein, that is then matured into three structural and seven non-structural (NS) proteins. The envelope, membrane and capsid proteins form the viral particle while NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B and NS5 assemble inside a cellular replication complex, which is embedded in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles. In addition to their roles in RNA replication within the infected cell, NS proteins help the virus escape the host innate immunity and reshape the host-cell inner structure. This review focuses on recent progress in characterizing the structure and functions of NS5, a protein responsible for the replication and capping of viral RNA that represents a promising drug target. PMID:28441781

  3. FAS activation induces dephosphorylation of SR proteins - Dependence on the de novo generation of ceramide and activation of protein phosphatase 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalfant, CE; Ogretmen, B; Galadari, S; Kroesen, BJ; Pettus, BJ; Hannun, YA

    2001-01-01

    The search for potential targets for ceramide action led to the identification of ceramide-activated protein phosphatases (CAPP). To date, two serine/threonine protein phosphatases, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), have been demonstrated to function as

  4. PSIbase: a database of Protein Structural Interactome map (PSIMAP)

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, S.; Yoon, G.; Jang, I.; Bolser, D.; Panos, D.; Schroeder, M.; Choi, H.; Cho, Y.; Han, K.; Lee, S.; Choi, H.; Lappe, M.; Holm, L.; Kim, S.; Oh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Protein Structural Interactome map (PSIMAP) is a global interaction map that describes domain–domain and protein–protein interaction information for known Protein Data Bank structures. It calculates the Euclidean distance to determine interactions between possible pairs of structural domains in proteins. PSIbase is a database and file server for protein structural interaction information calculated by the PSIMAP algorithm. PSIbase also provides an easy-to-use protein domain assignmen...

  5. De novo design of RNA-binding proteins with a prion-like domain related to ALS/FTD proteinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuhashi, Kana; Ito, Daisuke; Mashima, Kyoko; Oyama, Munenori; Takahashi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2017-12-04

    Aberrant RNA-binding proteins form the core of the neurodegeneration cascade in spectrums of disease, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Six ALS-related molecules, TDP-43, FUS, TAF15, EWSR1, heterogeneous nuclear (hn)RNPA1 and hnRNPA2 are RNA-binding proteins containing candidate mutations identified in ALS patients and those share several common features, including harboring an aggregation-prone prion-like domain (PrLD) containing a glycine/serine-tyrosine-glycine/serine (G/S-Y-G/S)-motif-enriched low-complexity sequence and rich in glutamine and/or asparagine. Additinally, these six molecules are components of RNA granules involved in RNA quality control and become mislocated from the nucleus to form cytoplasmic inclusion bodies (IBs) in the ALS/FTD-affected brain. To reveal the essential mechanisms involved in ALS/FTD-related cytotoxicity associated with RNA-binding proteins containing PrLDs, we designed artificial RNA-binding proteins harboring G/S-Y-G/S-motif repeats with and without enriched glutamine residues and nuclear-import/export-signal sequences and examined their cytotoxicity in vitro. These proteins recapitulated features of ALS-linked molecules, including insoluble aggregation, formation of cytoplasmic IBs and components of RNA granules, and cytotoxicity instigation. These findings indicated that these artificial RNA-binding proteins mimicked features of ALS-linked molecules and allowed the study of mechanisms associated with gain of toxic functions related to ALS/FTD pathogenesis.

  6. Pb(II) and Hg(II) binding to $\\textit{de novo}$ designed proteins studied by $^{204m}$Pb- and $^{199m}$Hg-Perturbed Angular Correlation of $\\gamma$-rays (PAC) spectroscopy : Clues to heavy metal toxicity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    $\\textit{De novo}$ design of proteins combined with PAC spectroscopy offers a unique and powerful approach to the study of fundamental chemistry of heavy metal-protein interactions, and thus of the mechanisms underlying heavy metal toxicity. In this project we focus on Pb(II) and Hg(II) binding to designed three stranded coiled coil proteins with one or two binding sites, mimicking a variety of naturally occurring thiolate-rich metal ion binding sites in proteins. The $^{204m}$Pb- and $^{199m}$Hg-PAC experiments will complement data already recorded with EXAFS, NMR, UV-Vis and CD spectroscopies.

  7. Predicting protein structure classes from function predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, I.; Rahnenfuhrer, J.; de Lichtenberg, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    membership. Even for structural families of small size, family members receive significantly higher scores. For some examples, we show that the relevant functional features identified by this method are biologically meaningful. The proposed approach can be used to improve existing sequence......We introduce a new approach to using the information contained in sequence-to-function prediction data in order to recognize protein template classes, a critical step in predicting protein structure. The data on which our method is based comprise probabilities of functional categories; for given...... query sequences these probabilities are obtained by a neural net that has previously been trained on a variety of functionally important features. On a training set of sequences we assess the relevance of individual functional categories for identifying a given structural family. Using a combination...

  8. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. Results We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. Conclusions We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific

  9. Automated Antibody De Novo Sequencing and Its Utility in Biopharmaceutical Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, K. Ilker; Tang, Wilfred H.; Nayak, Shruti; Kil, Yong J.; Bern, Marshall; Ozoglu, Berk; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Davis, Darryl; Becker, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Applications of antibody de novo sequencing in the biopharmaceutical industry range from the discovery of new antibody drug candidates to identifying reagents for research and determining the primary structure of innovator products for biosimilar development. When murine, phage display, or patient-derived monoclonal antibodies against a target of interest are available, but the cDNA or the original cell line is not, de novo protein sequencing is required to humanize and recombinantly express these antibodies, followed by in vitro and in vivo testing for functional validation. Availability of fully automated software tools for monoclonal antibody de novo sequencing enables efficient and routine analysis. Here, we present a novel method to automatically de novo sequence antibodies using mass spectrometry and the Supernovo software. The robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated through a series of stress tests.

  10. The structure and function of endophilin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Brodin, Lennart; Jung, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Members of the BAR domain protein superfamily are essential elements of cellular traffic. Endophilins are among the best studied BAR domain proteins. They have a prominent function in synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE), receptor trafficking and apoptosis, and in other processes that require remod...... remodeling of the membrane structure. Here, we discuss the role of endophilins in these processes and summarize novel insights into the molecular aspects of endophilin function. Also, we discuss phosphorylation of endophilins and how this and other mechanisms may contribute to disease....

  11. Automated Protein Structure Modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Comparative protein structure modeling is a computational approach to build three-dimensional structural models for proteins using experimental structures of related protein family members as templates. Regular blind assessments of modeling accuracy have demonstrated that comparative protein structure modeling is currently the most reliable technique to model protein structures. Homology models are often sufficiently accurate to substitute for experimental structures in a wide variety of appl...

  12. Shaking alone induces de novo conversion of recombinant prion proteins to β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol L Ladner-Keay

    Full Text Available The formation of β-sheet rich prion oligomers and fibrils from native prion protein (PrP is thought to be a key step in the development of prion diseases. Many methods are available to convert recombinant prion protein into β-sheet rich fibrils using various chemical denaturants (urea, SDS, GdnHCl, high temperature, phospholipids, or mildly acidic conditions (pH 4. Many of these methods also require shaking or another form of agitation to complete the conversion process. We have identified that shaking alone causes the conversion of recombinant PrP to β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils at near physiological pH (pH 5.5 to pH 6.2 and temperature. This conversion does not require any denaturant, detergent, or any other chemical cofactor. Interestingly, this conversion does not occur when the water-air interface is eliminated in the shaken sample. We have analyzed shaking-induced conversion using circular dichroism, resolution enhanced native acidic gel electrophoresis (RENAGE, electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thioflavin T fluorescence and proteinase K resistance. Our results show that shaking causes the formation of β-sheet rich oligomers with a population distribution ranging from octamers to dodecamers and that further shaking causes a transition to β-sheet fibrils. In addition, we show that shaking-induced conversion occurs for a wide range of full-length and truncated constructs of mouse, hamster and cervid prion proteins. We propose that this method of conversion provides a robust, reproducible and easily accessible model for scrapie-like amyloid formation, allowing the generation of milligram quantities of physiologically stable β-sheet rich oligomers and fibrils. These results may also have interesting implications regarding our understanding of prion conversion and propagation both within the brain and via techniques such as protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA and quaking induced conversion (QuIC.

  13. Building protein-protein interaction networks for Leishmania species through protein structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Vasconcelos, Crhisllane Rafaele; de Lima Campos, Túlio; Rezende, Antonio Mauro

    2018-03-06

    Systematic analysis of a parasite interactome is a key approach to understand different biological processes. It makes possible to elucidate disease mechanisms, to predict protein functions and to select promising targets for drug development. Currently, several approaches for protein interaction prediction for non-model species incorporate only small fractions of the entire proteomes and their interactions. Based on this perspective, this study presents an integration of computational methodologies, protein network predictions and comparative analysis of the protozoan species Leishmania braziliensis and Leishmania infantum. These parasites cause Leishmaniasis, a worldwide distributed and neglected disease, with limited treatment options using currently available drugs. The predicted interactions were obtained from a meta-approach, applying rigid body docking tests and template-based docking on protein structures predicted by different comparative modeling techniques. In addition, we trained a machine-learning algorithm (Gradient Boosting) using docking information performed on a curated set of positive and negative protein interaction data. Our final model obtained an AUC = 0.88, with recall = 0.69, specificity = 0.88 and precision = 0.83. Using this approach, it was possible to confidently predict 681 protein structures and 6198 protein interactions for L. braziliensis, and 708 protein structures and 7391 protein interactions for L. infantum. The predicted networks were integrated to protein interaction data already available, analyzed using several topological features and used to classify proteins as essential for network stability. The present study allowed to demonstrate the importance of integrating different methodologies of interaction prediction to increase the coverage of the protein interaction of the studied protocols, besides it made available protein structures and interactions not previously reported.

  14. MUFOLD-DB: a processed protein structure database for protein structure prediction and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiquan; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Yang; Zeng, Shuai; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Protein structure data in Protein Data Bank (PDB) are widely used in studies of protein function and evolution and in protein structure prediction. However, there are two main barriers in large-scale usage of PDB data: 1) PDB data are highly redundant in terms of sequence and structure similarity; and 2) many PDB files have issues due to inconsistency of data and standards as well as missing residues, so that automated retrieval and analysis are often difficult. To address these issues, we have created MUFOLD-DB http://mufold.org/mufolddb.php, a web-based database, to collect and process the weekly PDB files thereby providing users with non-redundant, cleaned and partially-predicted structure data. For each of the non-redundant sequences, we annotate the SCOP domain classification and predict structures of missing regions by loop modelling. In addition, evolutional information, secondary structure, disorder region, and processed three-dimensional structure are computed and visualized to help users better understand the protein. MUFOLD-DB integrates processed PDB sequence and structure data and multiple computational results, provides a friendly interface for users to retrieve, browse and download these data, and offers several useful functionalities to facilitate users' data operation.

  15. PCNA Structure and Interactions with Partner Proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse

    2018-01-29

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) consists of three identical monomers that topologically encircle double-stranded DNA. PCNA stimulates the processivity of DNA polymerase δ and, to a less extent, the intrinsically highly processive DNA polymerase ε. It also functions as a platform that recruits and coordinates the activities of a large number of DNA processing proteins. Emerging structural and biochemical studies suggest that the nature of PCNA-partner proteins interactions is complex. A hydrophobic groove at the front side of PCNA serves as a primary docking site for the consensus PIP box motifs present in many PCNA-binding partners. Sequences that immediately flank the PIP box motif or regions that are distant from it could also interact with the hydrophobic groove and other regions of PCNA. Posttranslational modifications on the backside of PCNA could add another dimension to its interaction with partner proteins. An encounter of PCNA with different DNA structures might also be involved in coordinating its interactions. Finally, the ability of PCNA to bind up to three proteins while topologically linked to DNA suggests that it would be a versatile toolbox in many different DNA processing reactions.

  16. Are specialized servers better at predicting protein structures than ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study answers the question that technology is the best for predicting protein structures. Stand-alone software only depend on protein structure prediction algorithms, while web servers consult a number of other sources such as meta servers and protein data banks to produce a protein structure achieved ...

  17. Protein Structure Prediction with Evolutionary Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, W.E.; Krasnogor, N.; Pelta, D.A.; Smith, J.

    1999-02-08

    Evolutionary algorithms have been successfully applied to a variety of molecular structure prediction problems. In this paper we reconsider the design of genetic algorithms that have been applied to a simple protein structure prediction problem. Our analysis considers the impact of several algorithmic factors for this problem: the confirmational representation, the energy formulation and the way in which infeasible conformations are penalized, Further we empirically evaluated the impact of these factors on a small set of polymer sequences. Our analysis leads to specific recommendations for both GAs as well as other heuristic methods for solving PSP on the HP model.

  18. Protein secondary structure: category assignment and predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus A.; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, the prediction of protein secondary structure has been optimized using essentially one and the same assignment scheme known as DSSP. We present here a different scheme, which is more predictable. This scheme predicts directly the hydrogen bonds, which stabilize the secondary......-forward neural network with one hidden layer on a data set identical to the one used in earlier work....

  19. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  20. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system.

  1. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase with autologous inhibitory protein–protein interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Shiva; Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Mudeppa, Devaraja G.; Rathod, Pradipsinh K., E-mail: rathod@chem.washington.edu [University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    P. falciparum orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, a potential target for antimalarial drugs and a conduit for prodrugs, crystallized as a structure with eight molecules per asymmetric unit that included some unique parasite-specific auto-inhibitory interactions between catalytic dimers. The most severe form of malaria is caused by the obligate parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (OPRTase) is the fifth enzyme in the de novo pyrimidine-synthesis pathway in the parasite, which lacks salvage pathways. Among all of the malaria de novo pyrimidine-biosynthesis enzymes, the structure of P. falciparum OPRTase (PfOPRTase) was the only one unavailable until now. PfOPRTase that could be crystallized was obtained after some low-complexity sequences were removed. Four catalytic dimers were seen in the asymmetic unit (a total of eight polypeptides). In addition to revealing unique amino acids in the PfOPRTase active sites, asymmetric dimers in the larger structure pointed to novel parasite-specific protein–protein interactions that occlude the catalytic active sites. The latter could potentially modulate PfOPRTase activity in parasites and possibly provide new insights for blocking PfOPRTase functions.

  2. Towards the role of metal ions in the structural variability of proteins: CdII speciation of a metal ion binding loop motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jancsó, Attila; Szunyogh, Dániel; Gyurcsik, Béla

    2011-01-01

    A de novo designed dodecapeptide (HS), inspired by the metal binding loops of metal-responsive transcriptional activators, was synthesized. The aim was to create a model system for structurally promiscuous and intrinsically unstructured proteins, and explore the effect of metal ions on their stru...... the peptide is exchanging between a number of structures also in its metal ion bound state(s), as indicated by NMR and PAC data. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  3. Protein mechanics: a route from structure to function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Why do proteins have such varied and complicated structures and how are these structures related to the functions that each protein must perform? Almost 50 years after the first protein structures were solved (Kendrew et al 1958; Perutz 1960), these questions are still very much part of molecular biology. While structures ...

  4. De novo DESIGN AND SYNTHESIS OF AN ICE-BINDING, DENDRIMERIC, POLYPEPTIDE BASED ON INSECT ANTIFREEZE PROTEINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vera Bravo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy is presented for the designand synthesis of peptides that exhibitice-binding and antifreeze activity. Apennant-type dendrimer polypeptidescaffold combining an α-helical backbonewith four short β-strand branches wassynthesized in solid phase using Fmocchemistry in a divergent approach. The51-residue dendrimer was characterizedby reverse phase high performance liquidchromatography, mass spectrometry andcircular dichroism. Each β-strand branchcontained three overlapping TXT aminoacid repeats, an ice-binding motif foundin the ice-binding face of the sprucebudworm (Choristoneura fumiferanaand beetle (Tenebrio molitor antifreezeproteins. Ice crystals in the presence ofthe polypeptide monomer displayed flat,hexagonal plate morphology, similar tothat produced by weakly active antifreezeproteins. An oxidized dimeric form of thedendrimer polypeptide also produced flathexagonal ice crystals and was capableof inhibiting ice crystal growth upontemperature reduction, a phenomenontermed thermal hysteresis, a definingproperty of antifreeze proteins. Linkageof the pennant-type dendrimer to a trifunctionalcascade-type polypeptideproduced a trimeric macromolecule thatgave flat hexagonal ice crystals withhigher thermal hysteresis activity thanthe dimer or monomer and an ice crystal burst pattern similar to that producedby samples containing insect antifreezeproteins. This macromolecule was alsocapable of inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  5. PROCARB: A Database of Known and Modelled Carbohydrate-Binding Protein Structures with Sequence-Based Prediction Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that interact with carbohydrates covalently (glycoproteins as well as noncovalently (protein-carbohydrate complexes is essential to many biological processes and plays a significant role in normal and disease-associated functions. It is important to have a central repository of knowledge available about these protein-carbohydrate complexes as well as preprocessed data of predicted structures. This can be significantly enhanced by tools de novo which can predict carbohydrate-binding sites for proteins in the absence of structure of experimentally known binding site. PROCARB is an open-access database comprising three independently working components, namely, (i Core PROCARB module, consisting of three-dimensional structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes taken from Protein Data Bank (PDB, (ii Homology Models module, consisting of manually developed three-dimensional models of N-linked and O-linked glycoproteins of unknown three-dimensional structure, and (iii CBS-Pred prediction module, consisting of web servers to predict carbohydrate-binding sites using single sequence or server-generated PSSM. Several precomputed structural and functional properties of complexes are also included in the database for quick analysis. In particular, information about function, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, hydrogen bonds and literature reference, and so forth, is included. In addition, each protein in the database is mapped to Uniprot, Pfam, PDB, and so forth.

  6. Annotating the protein-RNA interaction sites in proteins using evolutionary information and protein backbone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Qian-Zhong

    2012-11-07

    RNA-protein interactions play important roles in various biological processes. The precise detection of RNA-protein interaction sites is very important for understanding essential biological processes and annotating the function of the proteins. In this study, based on various features from amino acid sequence and structure, including evolutionary information, solvent accessible surface area and torsion angles (φ, ψ) in the backbone structure of the polypeptide chain, a computational method for predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins is proposed. When the method is applied to predict RNA-binding sites in three datasets: RBP86 containing 86 protein chains, RBP107 containing 107 proteins chains and RBP109 containing 109 proteins chains, better sensitivities and specificities are obtained compared to previously published methods in five-fold cross-validation tests. In order to make further examination for the efficiency of our method, the RBP107 dataset is used as training set, RBP86 and RBP109 datasets are used as the independent test sets. In addition, as examples of our prediction, RNA-binding sites in a few proteins are presented. The annotated results are consistent with the PDB annotation. These results show that our method is useful for annotating RNA binding sites of novel proteins.

  7. Requirements on paramagnetic relaxation enhancement data for membrane protein structure determination by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Daniel; Reckel, Sina; Dötsch, Volker; Güntert, Peter

    2012-06-06

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure calculations of the α-helical integral membrane proteins DsbB, GlpG, and halorhodopsin show that distance restraints from paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) can provide sufficient structural information to determine their structure with an accuracy of about 1.5 Å in the absence of other long-range conformational restraints. Our systematic study with simulated NMR data shows that about one spin label per transmembrane helix is necessary for obtaining enough PRE distance restraints to exclude wrong topologies, such as pseudo mirror images, if only limited other NMR restraints are available. Consequently, an experimentally realistic amount of PRE data enables α-helical membrane protein structure determinations that would not be feasible with the very limited amount of conventional NOESY data normally available for these systems. These findings are in line with our recent first de novo NMR structure determination of a heptahelical integral membrane protein, proteorhodopsin, that relied extensively on PRE data. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biophysical characterization of a de novo elastin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenland, Kelly Nicole

    Natural human elastin is found in tissue such as the lungs, arteries, and skin. This protein is formed at birth with no mechanism present to repair or supplement the initial quantity formed. As a result, the functionality and durability of elastin's elasticity is critically important. To date, the mechanics of this ability to stretch and recoil is not fully understood. This study utilizes de novo protein design to create a small library of simplistic versions of elastin-like proteins, demonstrate the elastin-like proteins, maintain elastin's functionality, and inquire into its structure using solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Elastin is formed from cross-linked tropoelastin. Therefore, the first generation of designed proteins consisted of one protein that utilized homogony of interspecies tropoelastin by using three common domains, two hydrophobic and one cross-linking domains. Basic modifications were made to open the hydrophobic region and also to make the protein easier to purify and characterize. The designed protein maintained its functionality, self-aggregating as the temperature increased. Uniquely, the protein remained self-aggregated as the temperature returned below the critical transition temperature. Self-aggregation was additionally induced by increasing salt concentrations and by modifying the pH. The protein appeared to have little secondary structure when studied with solution NMR. These results fueled a second generation of designed elastin-like proteins. This generation contained variations designed to study the cross-linking domain, one specific hydrophobic domain, and the effect of the length of the elastin-like protein. The cross-linking domain in one variation has been significantly modified while the flanking hydrophobic domains have remained unchanged. This characterization of this protein will answer questions regarding the specificity of the homologous nature of the cross-linking domain of tropoelastin across species. A second

  9. Atomic-level Analysis of Membrane Protein Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are substantially more challenging than natively soluble proteins as subjects for structural analysis. Thus, membrane proteins are greatly under-represented in structural databases. Recently, as a consequence of focused attention by consortium efforts and advances in methodology, the pace has accelerated for atomic-level structure determination of membrane proteins. Enabling advances have come in methods for protein production, for crystallographic analysis, and for cryo-EM ...

  10. Protein Production for Structural Genomics Using E. coli Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Maltseva, Natalia; Li, Hui; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The goal of structural biology is to reveal details of the molecular structure of proteins in order to understand their function and mechanism. X-ray crystallography and NMR are the two best methods for atomic level structure determination. However, these methods require milligram quantities of proteins. In this chapter a reproducible methodology for large-scale protein production applicable to a diverse set of proteins is described. The approach is based on protein expression in E. coli as a...

  11. Protein crystal structure analysis using synchrotron radiation at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Takamasa

    1999-01-01

    We can now obtain a detailed picture of protein, allowing the identification of individual atoms, by interpreting the diffraction of X-rays from a protein crystal at atomic resolution, 1.2 A or better. As of this writing, about 45 unique protein structures beyond 1.2 A resolution have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This review provides a simplified overview of how protein crystallographers use such diffraction data to solve, refine, and validate protein structures. (author)

  12. A suite of de novo c-type cytochromes for functional oxidoreductase engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Daniel W; Armstrong, Craig T; Beesley, Joseph L; Marsh, Jane E; Jenkins, Jonathan M X; Sessions, Richard B; Mann, Stephen; Ross Anderson, J L

    2016-05-01

    Central to the design of an efficient de novo enzyme is a robust yet mutable protein scaffold. The maquette approach to protein design offers precisely this, employing simple four-α-helix bundle scaffolds devoid of evolutionary complexity and with proven tolerance towards iterative protein engineering. We recently described the design of C2, a de novo designed c-type cytochrome maquette that undergoes post-translational modification in E. coli to covalently graft heme onto the protein backbone in vivo. This de novo cytochrome is capable of reversible oxygen binding, an obligate step in the catalytic cycle of many oxygen-activating oxidoreductases. Here we demonstrate the flexibility of both the maquette platform and the post-translational machinery of E. coli by creating a suite of functional de novo designed c-type cytochromes. We explore the engineering tolerances of the maquette by selecting alternative binding sites for heme C attachment and creating di-heme maquettes either by appending an additional heme C binding motif to the maquette scaffold or by binding heme B through simple bis-histidine ligation to a second binding site. The new designs retain the essential properties of the parent design but with significant improvements in structural stability. Molecular dynamics simulations aid the rationalization of these functional improvements while providing insight into the rules for engineering heme C binding sites in future iterations. This versatile, functional suite of de novo c-type cytochromes shows significant promise in providing robust platforms for the future engineering of de novo oxygen-activating oxidoreductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electron transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure with Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Larsen, Simon; Thomsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    we are considering here, is to predict the secondary structure from the primary one. To this end we train a Markov model on training data and then use it to classify parts of unknown protein sequences as sheets, helices or coils. We show how to exploit the directional information contained...... in the Markov model for this task. Classifications that are purely based on statistical models might not always be biologically meaningful. We present combinatorial methods to incorporate biological background knowledge to enhance the prediction performance....

  14. Protein structure--based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, P J; Blundell, T L

    1994-01-01

    Design cycles will undoubtedly play an increasingly important role in drug discovery in the coming years, as the amount of structural information on protein targets continues to rise. However, the traditional method of drug discovery, based upon random screening and systematic modification of leads by medicinal chemistry techniques, will probably not be abandoned completely because it has a potentially important advantage over more structure-based methods--namely, leads identified in this way are unlikely to show a close resemblance to the natural ligand or substrate. They may, therefore, have advantages in terms of patent novelty, selectivity, or pharmacokinetic profile. However, such leads could then serve as the basis for structure-based, rational modification programs, in which their interactions with target receptors are defined (as we have described) and improved molecules are designed. A final important point to be made about structure-based design in drug discovery is that, while it can be of great use in the initial process of identifying ligands with improved affinity and selectivity in vitro, it can usually say very little about other essential aspects of the drug discovery process, e.g. the need to achieve an adequate pharmacokinetic profile and low toxicity in vivo. This observation reminds us that drug design is a multidisciplinary process, involving molecular biologists, biochemists, pharmacologists, organic chemists, crystallographers, and others. In order to be effective, therefore, structure-based design must be properly integrated into the overall discovery effort.

  15. GIS: a comprehensive source for protein structure similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerler, Aysam; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2010-07-01

    A web service for analysis of protein structures that are sequentially or non-sequentially similar was generated. Recently, the non-sequential structure alignment algorithm GANGSTA+ was introduced. GANGSTA+ can detect non-sequential structural analogs for proteins stated to possess novel folds. Since GANGSTA+ ignores the polypeptide chain connectivity of secondary structure elements (i.e. alpha-helices and beta-strands), it is able to detect structural similarities also between proteins whose sequences were reshuffled during evolution. GANGSTA+ was applied in an all-against-all comparison on the ASTRAL40 database (SCOP version 1.75), which consists of >10,000 protein domains yielding about 55 x 10(6) possible protein structure alignments. Here, we provide the resulting protein structure alignments as a public web-based service, named GANGSTA+ Internet Services (GIS). We also allow to browse the ASTRAL40 database of protein structures with GANGSTA+ relative to an externally given protein structure using different constraints to select specific results. GIS allows us to analyze protein structure families according to the SCOP classification scheme. Additionally, users can upload their own protein structures for pairwise protein structure comparison, alignment against all protein structures of the ASTRAL40 database (SCOP version 1.75) or symmetry analysis. GIS is publicly available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/gplus.

  16. Towards optimal alignment of protein structure distance matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Wohlers (Inken); F.S. Domingues; G.W. Klau (Gunnar)

    2010-01-01

    htmlabstractMOTIVATION: Structural alignments of proteins are important for identification of structural similarities, homology detection and functional annotation. The structural alignment problem is well studied and computationally difficult. Many different scoring schemes for structural

  17. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The advent of Transverse Relaxation Optimized SpectroscopY (TROSY) and perdeuteration allowed biomolecularNMR spectroscopists to overcome the size limitation barrier (~20 kDa) in de novo structure determination of proteins.The utility of these techniques was immediately demonstrated on large proteins and protein ...

  18. Structure based alignment and clustering of proteins (STRALCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam T.; Zhou, Carol E.; Smith, Jason R.; Lam, Marisa W.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed are computational methods of clustering a set of protein structures based on local and pair-wise global similarity values. Pair-wise local and global similarity values are generated based on pair-wise structural alignments for each protein in the set of protein structures. Initially, the protein structures are clustered based on pair-wise local similarity values. The protein structures are then clustered based on pair-wise global similarity values. For each given cluster both a representative structure and spans of conserved residues are identified. The representative protein structure is used to assign newly-solved protein structures to a group. The spans are used to characterize conservation and assign a "structural footprint" to the cluster.

  19. Automated protein structure modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Comparative protein structure modeling is a computational approach to build three-dimensional structural models for proteins using experimental structures of related protein family members as templates. Regular blind assessments of modeling accuracy have demonstrated that comparative protein structure modeling is currently the most reliable technique to model protein structures. Homology models are often sufficiently accurate to substitute for experimental structures in a wide variety of applications. Since the usefulness of a model for specific application is determined by its accuracy, model quality estimation is an essential component of protein structure prediction. Comparative protein modeling has become a routine approach in many areas of life science research since fully automated modeling systems allow also nonexperts to build reliable models. In this chapter, we describe practical approaches for automated protein structure modeling with SWISS-MODEL Workspace and the Protein Model Portal.

  20. Structure-based druggability assessment of the mammalian structural proteome with inclusion of light protein flexibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn A Loving

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Advances reported over the last few years and the increasing availability of protein crystal structure data have greatly improved structure-based druggability approaches. However, in practice, nearly all druggability estimation methods are applied to protein crystal structures as rigid proteins, with protein flexibility often not directly addressed. The inclusion of protein flexibility is important in correctly identifying the druggability of pockets that would be missed by methods based solely on the rigid crystal structure. These include cryptic pockets and flexible pockets often found at protein-protein interaction interfaces. Here, we apply an approach that uses protein modeling in concert with druggability estimation to account for light protein backbone movement and protein side-chain flexibility in protein binding sites. We assess the advantages and limitations of this approach on widely-used protein druggability sets. Applying the approach to all mammalian protein crystal structures in the PDB results in identification of 69 proteins with potential druggable cryptic pockets.

  1. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Gary [San Francisco, CA; Schoeniger, Joseph S [Oakland, CA; Young, Malin M [Livermore, CA

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  2. Using an alignment of fragment strings for comparing protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Iddo; Harder, Tim; Kolodny, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    be a powerful tool for protein structure comparison and classification, given the arsenal of sequence comparison tools developed by computational biology. However, in order to do so, there is a need to first understand how much information is contained in various possible 1D representations of protein structure......MOTIVATION: Most methods that are used to compare protein structures use three-dimensional (3D) structural information. At the same time, it has been shown that a 1D string representation of local protein structure retains a degree of structural information. This type of representation can....... RESULTS: Here we describe the use of a particular structure fragment library, denoted here as KL-strings, for the 1D representation of protein structure. Using KL-strings, we develop an infrastructure for comparing protein structures with a 1D representation. This study focuses on the added value gained...

  3. Protein structure prediction using basin-hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentiss, Michael C.; Wales, David J.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2008-06-01

    Associative memory Hamiltonian structure prediction potentials are not overly rugged, thereby suggesting their landscapes are like those of actual proteins. In the present contribution we show how basin-hopping global optimization can identify low-lying minima for the corresponding mildly frustrated energy landscapes. For small systems the basin-hopping algorithm succeeds in locating both lower minima and conformations closer to the experimental structure than does molecular dynamics with simulated annealing. For large systems the efficiency of basin-hopping decreases for our initial implementation, where the steps consist of random perturbations to the Cartesian coordinates. We implemented umbrella sampling using basin-hopping to further confirm when the global minima are reached. We have also improved the energy surface by employing bioinformatic techniques for reducing the roughness or variance of the energy surface. Finally, the basin-hopping calculations have guided improvements in the excluded volume of the Hamiltonian, producing better structures. These results suggest a novel and transferable optimization scheme for future energy function development.

  4. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  5. Protein structure similarity from principle component correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou James

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to rapid expansion of protein structure databases in recent years, methods of structure comparison are becoming increasingly effective and important in revealing novel information on functional properties of proteins and their roles in the grand scheme of evolutionary biology. Currently, the structural similarity between two proteins is measured by the root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD in their best-superimposed atomic coordinates. RMSD is the golden rule of measuring structural similarity when the structures are nearly identical; it, however, fails to detect the higher order topological similarities in proteins evolved into different shapes. We propose new algorithms for extracting geometrical invariants of proteins that can be effectively used to identify homologous protein structures or topologies in order to quantify both close and remote structural similarities. Results We measure structural similarity between proteins by correlating the principle components of their secondary structure interaction matrix. In our approach, the Principle Component Correlation (PCC analysis, a symmetric interaction matrix for a protein structure is constructed with relationship parameters between secondary elements that can take the form of distance, orientation, or other relevant structural invariants. When using a distance-based construction in the presence or absence of encoded N to C terminal sense, there are strong correlations between the principle components of interaction matrices of structurally or topologically similar proteins. Conclusion The PCC method is extensively tested for protein structures that belong to the same topological class but are significantly different by RMSD measure. The PCC analysis can also differentiate proteins having similar shapes but different topological arrangements. Additionally, we demonstrate that when using two independently defined interaction matrices, comparison of their maximum

  6. Prediction of the protein components of a putative Calanus finmarchicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian signaling system using a de novo assembled transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Nesbit, Katherine T; Lenz, Petra H

    2013-09-01

    Diel vertical migration and seasonal diapause are critical life history events for the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. While much is known about these behaviors phenomenologically, little is known about their molecular underpinnings. Recent studies in insects suggest that some circadian genes/proteins also contribute to the establishment of seasonal diapause. Thus, it is possible that in Calanus these distinct timing regimes share some genetic components. To begin to address this possibility, we used the well-established Drosophila melanogaster circadian system as a reference for mining clock transcripts from a 200,000+ sequence Calanus transcriptome; the proteins encoded by the identified transcripts were also deduced and characterized. Sequences encoding homologs of the Drosophila core clock proteins CLOCK, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS were identified, as was one encoding CRYPTOCHROME 2, a core clock protein in ancestral insect systems, but absent in Drosophila. Calanus transcripts encoding proteins known to modulate the Drosophila core clock were also identified and characterized, e.g. CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, SHAGGY and VRILLE. Alignment and structural analyses of the deduced Calanus proteins with their Drosophila counterparts revealed extensive sequence conservation, particularly in functional domains. Interestingly, reverse BLAST analyses of these sequences against all arthropod proteins typically revealed non-Drosophila isoforms to be most similar to the Calanus queries. This, in combination with the presence of both CRYPTOCHROME 1 (a clock input pathway protein) and CRYPTOCHROME 2 in Calanus, suggests that the organization of the copepod circadian system is an ancestral one, more similar to that of insects like Danaus plexippus than to that of Drosophila. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Power Law Behavior of Structural Properties of Protein Gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheul, Marleen; Roefs, Sebastianus P.F.M.; Mellema, J.; Kruif, Kees G.

    1998-01-01

    Whey proteins are globular, heat-sensitive proteins. The gel structure, the formation of this structure, and the rheological properties of particulate whey protein isolate (WPI) gels have been investigated. On increasing the NaCl concentration, the permeability of the WPI gels increased, indicating

  8. Nonlinear deterministic structures and the randomness of protein sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Huang Yan Zhao

    2003-01-01

    To clarify the randomness of protein sequences, we make a detailed analysis of a set of typical protein sequences representing each structural classes by using nonlinear prediction method. No deterministic structures are found in these protein sequences and this implies that they behave as random sequences. We also give an explanation to the controversial results obtained in previous investigations.

  9. Analysis on sliding helices and strands in protein structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-16

    Jun 16, 2007 ... The quality of the structural alignments plays an important role in such studies. Several structural comparison algorithms have been developed over the last few decades and some ... for superposition of distantly related multiple protein ... protein kinase [1O6L, (Yang et al 2002)], protein kinase C θ. [1XJD ...

  10. Protein loop modeling using a new hybrid energy function and its application to modeling in inaccurate structural environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahnbeom Park

    Full Text Available Protein loop modeling is a tool for predicting protein local structures of particular interest, providing opportunities for applications involving protein structure prediction and de novo protein design. Until recently, the majority of loop modeling methods have been developed and tested by reconstructing loops in frameworks of experimentally resolved structures. In many practical applications, however, the protein loops to be modeled are located in inaccurate structural environments. These include loops in model structures, low-resolution experimental structures, or experimental structures of different functional forms. Accordingly, discrepancies in the accuracy of the structural environment assumed in development of the method and that in practical applications present additional challenges to modern loop modeling methods. This study demonstrates a new strategy for employing a hybrid energy function combining physics-based and knowledge-based components to help tackle this challenge. The hybrid energy function is designed to combine the strengths of each energy component, simultaneously maintaining accurate loop structure prediction in a high-resolution framework structure and tolerating minor environmental errors in low-resolution structures. A loop modeling method based on global optimization of this new energy function is tested on loop targets situated in different levels of environmental errors, ranging from experimental structures to structures perturbed in backbone as well as side chains and template-based model structures. The new method performs comparably to force field-based approaches in loop reconstruction in crystal structures and better in loop prediction in inaccurate framework structures. This result suggests that higher-accuracy predictions would be possible for a broader range of applications. The web server for this method is available at http://galaxy.seoklab.org/loop with the PS2 option for the scoring function.

  11. Structural Characterization of de Novo Designed L5K5W Model Peptide Isomers with Potent Antimicrobial and Varied Hemolytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Jean Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop short antimicrobial peptides with simple amino acid compositions, we generated a series of undecapeptide isomers having the L5K5W formula. Amino acid sequences were designed to be perfectly amphipathic when folded into a helical conformation by converging leucines onto one side and lysines onto the other side of the helical axis. The single tryptophans, whose positions were varied in the primary structures, were located commonly at the critical amphipathic interface in the helical wheel projection. Helical conformations and the tryptophanyl environments of the 11 L5K5W peptides were confirmed and characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All of the isomers exhibited a potent, broad-spectrum of antibacterial activity with just a slight variance in individual potency, whereas their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes were significantly diversified. Interestingly, helical dispositions and fluorescence blue shifts of the peptides in aqueous trifluoroethanol solutions, rather than in detergent micelles, showed a marked linear correlation with their hemolytic potency. These results demonstrate that our de novo design strategy for amphipathic helical model peptides is effective for developing novel antimicrobial peptides and their hemolytic activities can be estimated in correlation with structural parameters.

  12. Structural characterization of de novo designed L5K5W model peptide isomers with potent antimicrobial and varied hemolytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo-Jin; Kim, Jae-Seok; Lee, Yoo-Sup; Sim, Dae-Won; Lee, Sung-Hee; Bahk, Young-Yil; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Hee; Park, Sung-Jean; Lee, Bong-Jin; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2013-01-11

    In an effort to develop short antimicrobial peptides with simple amino acid compositions, we generated a series of undecapeptide isomers having the L(5)K(5)W formula. Amino acid sequences were designed to be perfectly amphipathic when folded into a helical conformation by converging leucines onto one side and lysines onto the other side of the helical axis. The single tryptophans, whose positions were varied in the primary structures, were located commonly at the critical amphipathic interface in the helical wheel projection. Helical conformations and the tryptophanyl environments of the 11 L(5)K(5)W peptides were confirmed and characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. All of the isomers exhibited a potent, broad-spectrum of antibacterial activity with just a slight variance in individual potency, whereas their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes were significantly diversified. Interestingly, helical dispositions and fluorescence blue shifts of the peptides in aqueous trifluoroethanol solutions, rather than in detergent micelles, showed a marked linear correlation with their hemolytic potency. These results demonstrate that our de novo design strategy for amphipathic helical model peptides is effective for developing novel antimicrobial peptides and their hemolytic activities can be estimated in correlation with structural parameters.

  13. Gaia: automated quality assessment of protein structure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Pradeep; Ding, Feng; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2011-08-15

    Increasing use of structural modeling for understanding structure-function relationships in proteins has led to the need to ensure that the protein models being used are of acceptable quality. Quality of a given protein structure can be assessed by comparing various intrinsic structural properties of the protein to those observed in high-resolution protein structures. In this study, we present tools to compare a given structure to high-resolution crystal structures. We assess packing by calculating the total void volume, the percentage of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds, the number of steric clashes and the scaling of the accessible surface area. We assess covalent geometry by determining bond lengths, angles, dihedrals and rotamers. The statistical parameters for the above measures, obtained from high-resolution crystal structures enable us to provide a quality-score that points to specific areas where a given protein structural model needs improvement. We provide these tools that appraise protein structures in the form of a web server Gaia (http://chiron.dokhlab.org). Gaia evaluates the packing and covalent geometry of a given protein structure and provides quantitative comparison of the given structure to high-resolution crystal structures. dokh@unc.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. SCPC: a method to structurally compare protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Ryotaro; Ota, Motonori

    2012-02-01

    Protein-protein interactions play vital functional roles in various biological phenomena. Physical contacts between proteins have been revealed using experimental approaches that have solved the structures of protein complexes at atomic resolution. To examine the huge number of protein complexes available in the Protein Data Bank, an efficient automated method that compares protein complexes is required. We have developed Structural Comparison of Protein Complexes (SCPC), a novel method to structurally compare protein complexes. SCPC compares the spatial arrangements of subunits in a complex with those in another complex using secondary structure elements. Similar substructures are detected in two protein complexes and the similarity is scored. SCPC was applied to dimers, homo-oligomers and haemoglobins. SCPC properly estimated structural similarities between the dimers examined as well as an existing method, MM-align. Conserved substructures were detected in a homo-tetramer and a homo-hexamer composed of homologous proteins. Classification of quaternary structures of haemoglobins using SCPC was consistent with the conventional classification. The results demonstrate that SCPC is a valuable tool to investigate the structures of protein complexes. SCPC is available at http://idp1.force.cs.is.nagoya-u.ac.jp/scpc/. rkoike@is.nagoya-u.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. K-nearest uphill clustering in the protein structure space

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2016-08-26

    The protein structure classification problem, which is to assign a protein structure to a cluster of similar proteins, is one of the most fundamental problems in the construction and application of the protein structure space. Early manually curated protein structure classifications (e.g., SCOP and CATH) are very successful, but recently suffer the slow updating problem because of the increased throughput of newly solved protein structures. Thus, fully automatic methods to cluster proteins in the protein structure space have been designed and developed. In this study, we observed that the SCOP superfamilies are highly consistent with clustering trees representing hierarchical clustering procedures, but the tree cutting is very challenging and becomes the bottleneck of clustering accuracy. To overcome this challenge, we proposed a novel density-based K-nearest uphill clustering method that effectively eliminates noisy pairwise protein structure similarities and identifies density peaks as cluster centers. Specifically, the density peaks are identified based on K-nearest uphills (i.e., proteins with higher densities) and K-nearest neighbors. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to apply and develop density-based clustering methods in the protein structure space. Our results show that our density-based clustering method outperforms the state-of-the-art clustering methods previously applied to the problem. Moreover, we observed that computational methods and human experts could produce highly similar clusters at high precision values, while computational methods also suggest to split some large superfamilies into smaller clusters. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  16. Rift Valley fever virus structural and non-structural proteins: Recombinant protein expression and immunoreactivity against antisera from sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) encodes structural proteins, nucleoprotein (N), N-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), C-terminus glycoprotein (Gc) and L protein, 78-kDa and non-structural proteins NSm and NSs. Using the baculovirus system we expressed the full-length coding sequence of N, NSs, NSm, Gc an...

  17. Structural Basis of Protein Oxidation Resistance: A Lysozyme Study

    OpenAIRE

    Girod, Marion; Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lukac, Iva; Radman, Miroslav; Krisko, Anita; Dugourd, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistan...

  18. Pushing the frontiers of atomic models for protein tertiary structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Protein folding, considered to be the holy grail of molecular biology, remains intractable even after six decades since the report of the first crystal structure. Over 70,000 X-ray and NMR structures are now available in protein structural repositories and no physico-chemical solution is in sight. Molecular simulation.

  19. Monolayers of a De Novo Designed 4-Alpha-Helix Bundle Carboprotein and Partial Structures on Au(111)-Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Jesper; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    on a galactopyranoside derivative with a thiol anchor aglycon suitable for surface immobilization on gold. The galactopyranoside with thiol anchor and the thiol anchor alone were prepared for comparison. Voltammetry of the three molecules on Au(111) showed reductive desorption peaks caused by monolayer adsorption via...... thiolate-Au bonding. In situ STM of the thiol anchor disclosed an ordered adlayer with clear domains and molecular features. This holds promise, broadly for single-molecule voltammetry and the SPM and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) of natural and synthetic proteins....

  20. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown

  1. Implementation of a Parallel Protein Structure Alignment Service on Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform.

  2. Inferring and Using Protein Quaternary Structure Information from Crystallographic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sucharita; Levy, Emmanuel D

    2018-01-01

    A precise knowledge of the quaternary structure of proteins is essential to illuminate both their function and their evolution. The major part of our knowledge on quaternary structure is inferred from X-ray crystallography data, but this inference process is hard and error-prone. The difficulty lies in discriminating fortuitous protein contacts, which make up the lattice of protein crystals, from biological protein contacts that exist in the native cellular environment. Here, we review methods devised to discriminate between both types of contacts and describe resources for downloading protein quaternary structure information and identifying high-confidence quaternary structures. The use of high-confidence datasets of quaternary structures will be critical for the analysis of structural, functional, and evolutionary properties of proteins.

  3. Structural analysis of heme proteins: implications for design and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonkovsky Herbert L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme is an essential molecule and plays vital roles in many biological processes. The structural determination of a large number of heme proteins has made it possible to study the detailed chemical and structural properties of heme binding environment. Knowledge of these characteristics can provide valuable guidelines in the design of novel heme proteins and help us predict unknown heme binding proteins. Results In this paper, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 125 heme-binding protein chains and found that these heme proteins encompass at least 31 different structural folds with all-α class as the dominating scaffold. Heme binding pockets are enriched in aromatic and non-polar amino acids with fewer charged residues. The differences between apo and holo forms of heme proteins in terms of the structure and the binding pockets have been investigated. In most cases the proteins undergo small conformational changes upon heme binding. We also examined the CP (cysteine-proline heme regulatory motifs and demonstrated that the conserved dipeptide has structural implications in protein-heme interactions. Conclusions Our analysis revealed that heme binding pockets show special features and that most of the heme proteins undergo small conformational changes after heme binding, suggesting the apo structures can be used for structure-based heme protein prediction and as scaffolds for future heme protein design.

  4. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  5. Relation between native ensembles and experimental structures of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Best, R. B.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; DePristo, M. A.

    2006-01-01

    Different experimental structures of the same protein or of proteins with high sequence similarity contain many small variations. Here we construct ensembles of "high-sequence similarity Protein Data Bank" (HSP) structures and consider the extent to which such ensembles represent the structural...... Data Bank ensembles; moreover, we show that the effects of uncertainties in structure determination are insufficient to explain the results. These results highlight the importance of accounting for native-state protein dynamics in making comparisons with ensemble-averaged experimental data and suggest...... heterogeneity of the native state in solution. We find that different NMR measurements probing structure and dynamics of given proteins in solution, including order parameters, scalar couplings, and residual dipolar couplings, are remarkably well reproduced by their respective high-sequence similarity Protein...

  6. Predicting protein-protein interface residues using local surface structural similarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Rafael A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of the residues in protein-protein interaction sites has a significant impact in problems such as drug discovery. Motivated by the observation that the set of interface residues of a protein tend to be conserved even among remote structural homologs, we introduce PrISE, a family of local structural similarity-based computational methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Results We present a novel representation of the surface residues of a protein in the form of structural elements. Each structural element consists of a central residue and its surface neighbors. The PrISE family of interface prediction methods uses a representation of structural elements that captures the atomic composition and accessible surface area of the residues that make up each structural element. Each of the members of the PrISE methods identifies for each structural element in the query protein, a collection of similar structural elements in its repository of structural elements and weights them according to their similarity with the structural element of the query protein. PrISEL relies on the similarity between structural elements (i.e. local structural similarity. PrISEG relies on the similarity between protein surfaces (i.e. general structural similarity. PrISEC, combines local structural similarity and general structural similarity to predict interface residues. These predictors label the central residue of a structural element in a query protein as an interface residue if a weighted majority of the structural elements that are similar to it are interface residues, and as a non-interface residue otherwise. The results of our experiments using three representative benchmark datasets show that the PrISEC outperforms PrISEL and PrISEG; and that PrISEC is highly competitive with state-of-the-art structure-based methods for predicting protein-protein interface residues. Our comparison of PrISEC with PredUs, a recently

  7. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Structural Studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dandan; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and the most physiologically important membrane protein family that recognizes a variety of environmental stimuli, and are drug targets in the treatment of numerous diseases. Recent progress on GPCR structural studies shed light on molecular mechanisms of GPCR ligand recognition, activation and allosteric modulation, as well as structural basis of GPCR dimerization. In this review, we will discuss the structural features of GPCRs and structural insights of different aspects of GPCR biological functions.

  9. Current strategies for protein production and purification enabling membrane protein structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Aditya; Shin, Kyungsoo; Patterson, Robin E; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2016-12-01

    Membrane proteins are still heavily under-represented in the protein data bank (PDB), owing to multiple bottlenecks. The typical low abundance of membrane proteins in their natural hosts makes it necessary to overexpress these proteins either in heterologous systems or through in vitro translation/cell-free expression. Heterologous expression of proteins, in turn, leads to multiple obstacles, owing to the unpredictability of compatibility of the target protein for expression in a given host. The highly hydrophobic and (or) amphipathic nature of membrane proteins also leads to challenges in producing a homogeneous, stable, and pure sample for structural studies. Circumventing these hurdles has become possible through the introduction of novel protein production protocols; efficient protein isolation and sample preparation methods; and, improvement in hardware and software for structural characterization. Combined, these advances have made the past 10-15 years very exciting and eventful for the field of membrane protein structural biology, with an exponential growth in the number of solved membrane protein structures. In this review, we focus on both the advances and diversity of protein production and purification methods that have allowed this growth in structural knowledge of membrane proteins through X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

  10. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  11. Structure determination of archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a reveals a novel protein fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yingang, E-mail: fengyg@qibebt.ac.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Song, Xiaxia [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lin, Jinzhong [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xuan, Jinsong [Department of Biological Science and Engineering, School of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Cui, Qiu [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao, Shandong 266101 (China); Wang, Jinfeng [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • The archaea-specific ribosomal protein L46a has no homology to known proteins. • Three dimensional structure and backbone dynamics of L46a were determined by NMR. • The structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. • A potential rRNA-binding surface on L46a was identified. • The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed. - Abstract: Three archaea-specific ribosomal proteins recently identified show no sequence homology with other known proteins. Here we determined the structure of L46a, the most conserved one among the three proteins, from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 using NMR spectroscopy. The structure presents a twisted β-sheet formed by the N-terminal part and two helices at the C-terminus. The L46a structure has a positively charged surface which is conserved in the L46a protein family and is the potential rRNA-binding site. Searching homologous structures in Protein Data Bank revealed that the structure of L46a represents a novel protein fold. The backbone dynamics identified by NMR relaxation experiments reveal significant flexibility at the rRNA binding surface. The potential position of L46a on the ribosome was proposed by fitting the structure into a previous electron microscopy map of the ribosomal 50S subunit, which indicated that L46a contacts to domain I of 23S rRNA near a multifunctional ribosomal protein L7ae.

  12. BLAST-based structural annotation of protein residues using Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-25

    In the era of next-generation sequencing where thousands of genomes have been already sequenced; size of protein databases is growing with exponential rate. Structural annotation of these proteins is one of the biggest challenges for the computational biologist. Although, it is easy to perform BLAST search against Protein Data Bank (PDB) but it is difficult for a biologist to annotate protein residues from BLAST search. A web-server StarPDB has been developed for structural annotation of a protein based on its similarity with known protein structures. It uses standard BLAST software for performing similarity search of a query protein against protein structures in PDB. This server integrates wide range modules for assigning different types of annotation that includes, Secondary-structure, Accessible surface area, Tight-turns, DNA-RNA and Ligand modules. Secondary structure module allows users to predict regular secondary structure states to each residue in a protein. Accessible surface area predict the exposed or buried residues in a protein. Tight-turns module is designed to predict tight turns like beta-turns in a protein. DNA-RNA module developed for predicting DNA and RNA interacting residues in a protein. Similarly, Ligand module of server allows one to predicted ligands, metal and nucleotides ligand interacting residues in a protein. In summary, this manuscript presents a web server for comprehensive annotation of a protein based on similarity search. It integrates number of visualization tools that facilitate users to understand structure and function of protein residues. This web server is available freely for scientific community from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/starpdb .

  13. Dimensionality reduction in computational demarcation of protein tertiary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rajani R; Panigrahi, Priyabrata R; Patil, Reshma N

    2012-06-01

    Predictive classification of major structural families and fold types of proteins is investigated deploying logistic regression. Only five to seven dimensional quantitative feature vector representations of tertiary structures are found adequate. Results for benchmark sample of non-homologous proteins from SCOP database are presented. Importance of this work as compared to homology modeling and best-known quantitative approaches is highlighted.

  14. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  15. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2016-06-15

    Motivation: Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. Method: We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence–structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. Results: We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM–HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods.

  16. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being...... taken over all directions in space. Hereby, we introduce a new family of global geometric measures of protein structures, which we compare with the so-called generalized Gauss integrals....

  17. Constraining cyclic peptides to mimic protein structure motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Timothy A.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Diness, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins exert their biological activities through small exposed surface regions called epitopes that are folded peptides of well-defined three-dimensional structures. Short synthetic peptide sequences corresponding to these bioactive protein surfaces do not form thermodynamically stable...... and proteins, and identifies some additional restraints incorporated into natural product cyclic peptides and synthetic macrocyclic pepti-domimetics that refine peptide structure and confer biological properties....

  18. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2018-01-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  19. Structure of synaptophysin: a hexameric MARVEL-domain channel protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Christopher P; Stowell, Michael H B

    2007-06-01

    Synaptophysin I (SypI) is an archetypal member of the MARVEL-domain family of integral membrane proteins and one of the first synaptic vesicle proteins to be identified and cloned. Most all MARVEL-domain proteins are involved in membrane apposition and vesicle-trafficking events, but their precise role in these processes is unclear. We have purified mammalian SypI and determined its three-dimensional (3D) structure by using electron microscopy and single-particle 3D reconstruction. The hexameric structure resembles an open basket with a large pore and tenuous interactions within the cytosolic domain. The structure suggests a model for Synaptophysin's role in fusion and recycling that is regulated by known interactions with the SNARE machinery. This 3D structure of a MARVEL-domain protein provides a structural foundation for understanding the role of these important proteins in a variety of biological processes.

  20. Automating the determination of 3D protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayl, K.D.

    1993-12-31

    The creation of an automated method for determining 3D protein structure would be invaluable to the field of biology and presents an interesting challenge to computer science. Unfortunately, given the current level of protein knowledge, a completely automated solution method is not yet feasible, therefore, our group has decided to integrate existing databases and theories to create a software system that assists X-ray crystallographers in specifying a particular protein structure. By breaking the problem of determining overall protein structure into small subproblems, we hope to come closer to solving a novel structure by solving each component. By generating necessary information for structure determination, this method provides the first step toward designing a program to determine protein conformation automatically.

  1. Structural footprinting in protein structure comparison: the impact of structural fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur W John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One approach for speeding-up protein structure comparison is the projection approach, where a protein structure is mapped to a high-dimensional vector and structural similarity is approximated by distance between the corresponding vectors. Structural footprinting methods are projection methods that employ the same general technique to produce the mapping: first select a representative set of structural fragments as models and then map a protein structure to a vector in which each dimension corresponds to a particular model and "counts" the number of times the model appears in the structure. The main difference between any two structural footprinting methods is in the set of models they use; in fact a large number of methods can be generated by varying the type of structural fragments used and the amount of detail in their representation. How do these choices affect the ability of the method to detect various types of structural similarity? Results To answer this question we benchmarked three structural footprinting methods that vary significantly in their selection of models against the CATH database. In the first set of experiments we compared the methods' ability to detect structural similarity characteristic of evolutionarily related structures, i.e., structures within the same CATH superfamily. In the second set of experiments we tested the methods' agreement with the boundaries imposed by classification groups at the Class, Architecture, and Fold levels of the CATH hierarchy. Conclusion In both experiments we found that the method which uses secondary structure information has the best performance on average, but no one method performs consistently the best across all groups at a given classification level. We also found that combining the methods' outputs significantly improves the performance. Moreover, our new techniques to measure and visualize the methods' agreement with the CATH hierarchy, including the

  2. Prediction of protein–protein interactions: unifying evolution and structure at protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Keskin, Ozlem

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of the chores in the living cell involve protein–protein interactions. Providing details of protein interactions at the residue level and incorporating them into protein interaction networks are crucial toward the elucidation of a dynamic picture of cells. Despite the rapid increase in the number of structurally known protein complexes, we are still far away from a complete network. Given experimental limitations, computational modeling of protein interactions is a prerequisite to proceed on the way to complete structural networks. In this work, we focus on the question 'how do proteins interact?' rather than 'which proteins interact?' and we review structure-based protein–protein interaction prediction approaches. As a sample approach for modeling protein interactions, PRISM is detailed which combines structural similarity and evolutionary conservation in protein interfaces to infer structures of complexes in the protein interaction network. This will ultimately help us to understand the role of protein interfaces in predicting bound conformations

  3. Continuum secondary structure captures protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C.A.F.; Palmer, A.G.; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    with different hydrogen bond thresholds. The final continuous assignment for a single NMR model successfully reflected the structural variations observed between all NMR models in the ensemble. The structural variations between NMR models were verified to correlate with thermal motion; these variations were...... captured by the continuous assignments. Because the continuous assignment reproduces the structural variation between many NMR models from one single model, functionally important variation can be extracted from a single X-ray structure. Thus, continuous assignments of secondary structure may affect future...

  4. Host Proteins Determine MRSA Biofilm Structure and Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Cindy; Nielsen, Astrid; Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen

    Human extracellular matrix (hECM) proteins aids the initial attachment and initiation of an infection, by specific binding to bacterial cell surface proteins. However, the importance of hECM proteins in structure, integrity and antibiotic resilience of a biofilm is unknown. This study aims......, indicating that they are important for biofilm initiation. Their enzymatic degradation, in an established biofilm, caused dispersal, showing that these proteins are critical for structural integrity. A combination of antibiotics with hECM degrading enzymes did not improve the treatment outcome. We conclude...... to determine how specific hECM proteins affect S. aureus USA300 JE2 biofilms. Biofilms were grown in the presence of synovial fluid from rheumatoid arteritis patients to mimic in vivo conditions, where bacteria incorporate hECM proteins into the biofilm matrix. Difference in biofilm structure, with and without...

  5. Tuning structure of oppositely charged nanoparticle and protein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Callow, P.

    2014-04-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the structures of anionic silica nanoparticles (LS30) and cationic lyszyme protein (M.W. 14.7kD, I.P. ˜ 11.4) by tuning their interaction through the pH variation. The protein adsorption on nanoparticles is found to be increasing with pH and determined by the electrostatic attraction between two components as well as repulsion between protein molecules. We show the strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticles and protein molecules leads to protein-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles which are characterized by fractal structures. At pH 5, the protein adsorption gives rise to nanoparticle aggregation having surface fractal morphology with close packing of nanoparticles. The surface fractals transform to open structures of mass fractal morphology at higher pH (7 and 9) on approaching isoelectric point (I.P.).

  6. Tuning structure of oppositely charged nanoparticle and protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sugam, E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Callow, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, DS/LSS, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-04-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the structures of anionic silica nanoparticles (LS30) and cationic lyszyme protein (M.W. 14.7kD, I.P. ∼ 11.4) by tuning their interaction through the pH variation. The protein adsorption on nanoparticles is found to be increasing with pH and determined by the electrostatic attraction between two components as well as repulsion between protein molecules. We show the strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticles and protein molecules leads to protein-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles which are characterized by fractal structures. At pH 5, the protein adsorption gives rise to nanoparticle aggregation having surface fractal morphology with close packing of nanoparticles. The surface fractals transform to open structures of mass fractal morphology at higher pH (7 and 9) on approaching isoelectric point (I.P.)

  7. Tuning structure of oppositely charged nanoparticle and protein complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Callow, P.

    2014-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to probe the structures of anionic silica nanoparticles (LS30) and cationic lyszyme protein (M.W. 14.7kD, I.P. ∼ 11.4) by tuning their interaction through the pH variation. The protein adsorption on nanoparticles is found to be increasing with pH and determined by the electrostatic attraction between two components as well as repulsion between protein molecules. We show the strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticles and protein molecules leads to protein-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles which are characterized by fractal structures. At pH 5, the protein adsorption gives rise to nanoparticle aggregation having surface fractal morphology with close packing of nanoparticles. The surface fractals transform to open structures of mass fractal morphology at higher pH (7 and 9) on approaching isoelectric point (I.P.)

  8. Small world network strategies for studying protein structures and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Neil R

    2013-01-01

    Small world network concepts provide many new opportunities to investigate the complex three dimensional structures of protein molecules. This mini-review explores the published literature on using small-world network approaches to study protein structure, with emphasis on the different combinations of descriptors that have been tested, on studies involving ligand binding in protein-ligand complexes, and on protein-protein complexes. The benefits and success of small world network approaches, which change the focus from specific interactions to the local environment, even to non-local phenomenon, are described. The purpose is to show the different ways that small world network concepts have been used for building new computational models for studying protein structure and function, and for extending and improving existing modelling approaches.

  9. Studying Membrane Protein Structure and Function Using Nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie

    The structure and dynamic of membrane proteins can provide valuable information about general functions, diseases and effects of various drugs. Studying membrane proteins are a challenge as an amphiphilic environment is necessary to stabilise the protein in a functionally and structurally relevant...... form. This is most typically achieved through the use of detergent based reconstitution systems. However, time and again such systems fail to provide a suitable environment causing aggregation and inactivation. Nanodiscs are self-assembled lipoproteins containing two membrane scaffold proteins...... and a lipid bilayer in defined nanometer size, which can act as a stabiliser for membrane proteins. This enables both functional and structural investigation of membrane proteins in a detergent free environment which is closer to the native situation. Understanding the self-assembly of nanodiscs is important...

  10. Structural Aspects of GPCR-G Protein Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ka Young

    2013-09-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane receptors; approximately 40% of drugs on the market target GPCRs. A precise understanding of the activation mechanism of GPCRs would facilitate the development of more effective and less toxic drugs. Heterotrimeric G proteins are important molecular switches in GPCR-mediated signal transduction. An agonist-activated receptor interacts with specific sites on G proteins and promotes the release of GDP from the Gα subunit. Because of the important biological role of the GPCR-G protein coupling, conformational changes in the G protein upon receptor coupling have been of great interest. One of the most important questions was the interface between the GPCR and G proteins and the structural mechanism of GPCR-induced G protein activation. A number of biochemical and biophysical studies have been performed since the late 80s to address these questions; there was a significant breakthrough in 2011 when the crystal structure of a GPCR-G protein complex was solved. This review discusses the structural aspects of GPCR-G protein coupling by comparing the results of previous biochemical and biophysical studies to the GPCR-G protein crystal structure.

  11. Confinement Effect on Structure and Elasticity of Proteins Interfacing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu; Akcora, Pinar

    E-beam patterned nanoporous PMMA thin films are used as templates for protein functionalization to study the confinement effect on structural and mechanical properties of the globular lysozyme and the rod-shaped fibrinogen. We characterize the structure and elasticity of these proteins tethered inside the pores, and discuss the relations between the concentration of attached proteins, protein orientation and conformation in different pore sizes. Adhesion force mapping measured in atomic force microscopy reveals that the end-on attached fibrinogens induce higher concentration than the side-on attached proteins. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopic analysis of protein secondary structures and nanoindentation results show that fibrinogen undergoes less structural changes and behaves less stiff when pore size is close to the protein size, which is due to less protein-surface interactions and higher concentration of end-on attached fibrinogen in 50nm pores than other pore sizes. Lysozyme, on the other hand, retains its native-like structure and exhibits the highest modulus in 15nm pores due to the lower macromolecular crowding effect the protein faces compared to lysozyme within larger pores. This research was carried out in part at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), Brookhaven National Laboratory, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-SC0012704.

  12. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  13. Function and structure of GFP-like proteins in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wayne J-H; Alvarez, Samuel; Leroux, Ivan E; Shahid, Ramza S; Samma, Alex A; Peshkepija, Paola; Morgan, Alicia L; Mulcahy, Shawn; Zimmer, Marc

    2011-04-01

    The RCSB protein databank contains 266 crystal structures of green fluorescent proteins (GFP) and GFP-like proteins. This is the first systematic analysis of all the GFP-like structures in the pdb. We have used the pdb to examine the function of fluorescent proteins (FP) in nature, aspects of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in FPs, deformation from planarity of the chromophore and chromophore maturation. The conclusions reached in this review are that (1) The lid residues are highly conserved, particularly those on the "top" of the β-barrel. They are important to the function of GFP-like proteins, perhaps in protecting the chromophore or in β-barrel formation. (2) The primary/ancestral function of GFP-like proteins may well be to aid in light induced electron transfer. (3) The structural prerequisites for light activated proton pumps exist in many structures and it's possible that like bioluminescence, proton pumps are secondary functions of GFP-like proteins. (4) In most GFP-like proteins the protein matrix exerts a significant strain on planar chromophores forcing most GFP-like proteins to adopt non-planar chromophores. These chromophoric deviations from planarity play an important role in determining the fluorescence quantum yield. (5) The chemospatial characteristics of the chromophore cavity determine the isomerization state of the chromophore. The cavities of highlighter proteins that can undergo cis/trans isomerization have chemospatial properties that are common to both cis and trans GFP-like proteins.

  14. Using linear algebra for protein structural comparison and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomide, Janaína; Melo-Minardi, Raquel; Dos Santos, Marcos Augusto; Neshich, Goran; Meira, Wagner; Lopes, Júlio César; Santoro, Marcelo

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we describe a novel methodology to extract semantic characteristics from protein structures using linear algebra in order to compose structural signature vectors which may be used efficiently to compare and classify protein structures into fold families. These signatures are built from the pattern of hydrophobic intrachain interactions using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and Latent Semantic Indexing (LSI) techniques. Considering proteins as documents and contacts as terms, we have built a retrieval system which is able to find conserved contacts in samples of myoglobin fold family and to retrieve these proteins among proteins of varied folds with precision of up to 80%. The classifier is a web tool available at our laboratory website. Users can search for similar chains from a specific PDB, view and compare their contact maps and browse their structures using a JMol plug-in.

  15. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crick, Duncan J.; Wang, Jue X. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Mott, Helen R.; Nietlispach, Daniel, E-mail: dn206@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  16. A 9-state hidden Markov model using protein secondary structure information for protein fold recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Jong Yun; Jung, Kwang Su; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2009-06-01

    In protein fold recognition, the main disadvantage of hidden Markov models (HMMs) is the employment of large-scale model architectures which require large data sets and high computational resources for training. Also, HMMs must consider sequential information about secondary structures of proteins, to improve prediction performance and reduce model parameters. Therefore, we propose a novel method for protein fold recognition based on a hidden Markov model, called a 9-state HMM. The method can (i) reduce the number of states using secondary structure information about proteins for each fold and (ii) recognize protein folds more accurately than other HMMs.

  17. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratholm, Lars A; Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations of three small proteins (ENHD, Protein G and the SMN Tudor Domain) using the PROFASI force field and the chemical shift predictor CamShift. Using a clustering-criterion for identifying the best structure, together with the addition of a solvent exposure scoring term, the simulations suggests that sampling both the structure and the uncertainties in chemical shift prediction leads more accurate structures compared to conventional methods using empirical determined weights. The Cauchy distribution, using either sampled uncertainties or predetermined weights, did, however, result in overall better convergence to the native fold, suggesting that both types of distribution might be useful in different aspects of the protein structure prediction.

  18. PSPP: a protein structure prediction pipeline for computing clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Lee

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein structures are critical for understanding the mechanisms of biological systems and, subsequently, for drug and vaccine design. Unfortunately, protein sequence data exceed structural data by a factor of more than 200 to 1. This gap can be partially filled by using computational protein structure prediction. While structure prediction Web servers are a notable option, they often restrict the number of sequence queries and/or provide a limited set of prediction methodologies. Therefore, we present a standalone protein structure prediction software package suitable for high-throughput structural genomic applications that performs all three classes of prediction methodologies: comparative modeling, fold recognition, and ab initio. This software can be deployed on a user's own high-performance computing cluster.The pipeline consists of a Perl core that integrates more than 20 individual software packages and databases, most of which are freely available from other research laboratories. The query protein sequences are first divided into domains either by domain boundary recognition or Bayesian statistics. The structures of the individual domains are then predicted using template-based modeling or ab initio modeling. The predicted models are scored with a statistical potential and an all-atom force field. The top-scoring ab initio models are annotated by structural comparison against the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP fold database. Furthermore, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, transmembrane helices, and structural disorder are predicted. The results are generated in text, tab-delimited, and hypertext markup language (HTML formats. So far, the pipeline has been used to study viral and bacterial proteomes.The standalone pipeline that we introduce here, unlike protein structure prediction Web servers, allows users to devote their own computing assets to process a potentially unlimited number of queries as well as perform

  19. Structural basis for target protein recognition by the protein disulfide reductase thioredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin is ubiquitous and regulates various target proteins through disulfide bond reduction. We report the structure of thioredoxin (HvTrxh2 from barley) in a reaction intermediate complex with a protein substrate, barley alpha-amylase/subtilisin inhibitor (BASI). The crystal structure...

  20. Fusion proteins as alternate crystallization paths to difficult structure problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Rueker, Florian; Ho, Joseph X.; Lim, Kap; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary; Ji, Xinhua

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a peptide fusion product with glutathione transferase from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGST) has been solved by crystallographic methods to 2.5 A resolution. Peptides or proteins can be fused to SjGST and expressed in a plasmid for rapid synthesis in Escherichia coli. Fusion proteins created by this commercial method can be purified rapidly by chromatography on immobilized glutathione. The potential utility of using SjGST fusion proteins as alternate paths to the crystallization and structure determination of proteins is demonstrated.

  1. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein In vitro Digestibility and Solubility

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Mingmei; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Long, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transfor...

  2. Combining neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1995-01-01

    In this paper structured neural networks are applied to the problem of predicting the secondary structure of proteins. A hierarchical approach is used where specialized neural networks are designed for each structural class and then combined using another neural network. The submodels are designed...... by using a priori knowledge of the mapping between protein building blocks and the secondary structure and by using weight sharing. Since none of the individual networks have more than 600 adjustable weights over-fitting is avoided. When ensembles of specialized experts are combined the performance...... is better than most secondary structure prediction methods based on single sequences even though this model contains much fewer parameters...

  3. Mandibular defect reconstruction using three-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold in combination with platelet-rich plasma and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2: de novo synthesis of bone in a single case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuckert, Karl-Heinz; Jopp, Stefan; Teoh, Swee-Hin

    2009-03-01

    This publication describes the clinical case of a 71-year-old female patient. Using polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2), a critical-sized defect in the anterior mandible was regenerated using de novo-grown bone. A bacterial infection had caused a periimplantitis in two dental implants leading to a large destruction in the anterior mandible. Both implants were removed under antibiotic prophylaxis. A PCL scaffold was prepared especially for this clinical case. In a second procedure with antibiotic prophylaxis, the bony defect was reopened. The PCL scaffold was fitted and charged with PRP and rhBMP-2 (1.2 mg). After complication-free wound healing, the radiological control demonstrated de novo-grown bone in the anterior mandible 6 months postoperatively. Dental implants were inserted in a third operation. A bone biopsy of the newly grown bone, as well as of the bordering local bone, was taken and histologically examined. The bone samples were identical and presented vital laminar bone.

  4. Tridimensional model structure and patterns of molecular evolution of Pepino mosaic virus TGBp3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Czerwoniec, Anna; Pospieszny, Henryk; Elena, Santiago F

    2011-06-24

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is considered one of the most dangerous pathogens infecting tomatoes worldwide. The virus is highly diverse and four distinct genotypes, as well as inter-strain recombinants, have already been described. The isolates display a wide range on symptoms on infected plant species, ranging from mild mosaic to severe necrosis. However, little is known about the mechanisms and pattern of PepMV molecular evolution and about the role of individual proteins in host-pathogen interactions. The nucleotide sequences of the triple gene block 3 (TGB3) from PepMV isolates varying in symptomatology and geographic origin have been analyzed. The modes and patterns of molecular evolution of the TGBp3 protein were investigated by evaluating the selective constraints to which particular amino acid residues have been subjected during the course of diversification. The tridimensional structure of TGBp3 protein has been modeled de novo using the Rosetta algorithm. The correlation between symptoms development and location of specific amino acids residues was analyzed. The results have shown that TGBp3 has been evolving mainly under the action of purifying selection operating on several amino acid sites, thus highlighting its functional role during PepMV infection. Interestingly, amino acid 67, which has been previously shown to be a necrosis determinant, was found to be under positive selection. Identification of diverse selection events in TGB3p3 will help unraveling its biological functions and is essential to an understanding of the evolutionary constraints exerted on the Potexvirus genome. The estimated tridimensional structure of TGBp3 will serve as a platform for further sequence, structural and function analysis and will stimulate new experimental advances.

  5. Automated functional classification of experimental and predicted protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samudrala Ram

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that are similar in sequence or structure may perform different functions in nature. In such cases, function cannot be inferred from sequence or structural similarity. Results We analyzed experimental structures belonging to the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP database and showed that about half of them belong to multi-functional fold families for which protein similarity alone is not adequate to assign function. We also analyzed predicted structures from the LiveBench and the PDB-CAFASP experiments and showed that accurate homology-based functional assignments cannot be achieved approximately one third of the time, when the protein is a member of a multi-functional fold family. We then conducted extended performance evaluation and comparisons on both experimental and predicted structures using our Functional Signatures from Structural Alignments (FSSA algorithm that we previously developed to handle the problem of classifying proteins belonging to multi-functional fold families. Conclusion The results indicate that the FSSA algorithm has better accuracy when compared to homology-based approaches for functional classification of both experimental and predicted protein structures, in part due to its use of local, as opposed to global, information for classifying function. The FSSA algorithm has also been implemented as a webserver and is available at http://protinfo.compbio.washington.edu/fssa.

  6. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  7. Structural and Functional Annotation of Hypothetical Proteins of O139

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries threat of cholera is a significant health concern whenever water purification and sewage disposal systems are inadequate. Vibrio cholerae is one of the responsible bacteria involved in cholera disease. The complete genome sequence of V. cholerae deciphers the presence of various genes and hypothetical proteins whose function are not yet understood. Hence analyzing and annotating the structure and function of hypothetical proteins is important for understanding the V. cholerae. V. cholerae O139 is the most common and pathogenic bacterial strain among various V. cholerae strains. In this study sequence of six hypothetical proteins of V. cholerae O139 has been annotated from NCBI. Various computational tools and databases have been used to determine domain family, protein-protein interaction, solubility of protein, ligand binding sites etc. The three dimensional structure of two proteins were modeled and their ligand binding sites were identified. We have found domains and families of only one protein. The analysis revealed that these proteins might have antibiotic resistance activity, DNA breaking-rejoining activity, integrase enzyme activity, restriction endonuclease, etc. Structural prediction of these proteins and detection of binding sites from this study would indicate a potential target aiding docking studies for therapeutic designing against cholera.

  8. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  9. Protein Structure Classification and Loop Modeling Using Multiple Ramachandran Distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Najibi, Seyed Morteza

    2017-02-08

    Recently, the study of protein structures using angular representations has attracted much attention among structural biologists. The main challenge is how to efficiently model the continuous conformational space of the protein structures based on the differences and similarities between different Ramachandran plots. Despite the presence of statistical methods for modeling angular data of proteins, there is still a substantial need for more sophisticated and faster statistical tools to model the large-scale circular datasets. To address this need, we have developed a nonparametric method for collective estimation of multiple bivariate density functions for a collection of populations of protein backbone angles. The proposed method takes into account the circular nature of the angular data using trigonometric spline which is more efficient compared to existing methods. This collective density estimation approach is widely applicable when there is a need to estimate multiple density functions from different populations with common features. Moreover, the coefficients of adaptive basis expansion for the fitted densities provide a low-dimensional representation that is useful for visualization, clustering, and classification of the densities. The proposed method provides a novel and unique perspective to two important and challenging problems in protein structure research: structure-based protein classification and angular-sampling-based protein loop structure prediction.

  10. 3D complex: a structural classification of protein complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel D Levy

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Most of the proteins in a cell assemble into complexes to carry out their function. It is therefore crucial to understand the physicochemical properties as well as the evolution of interactions between proteins. The Protein Data Bank represents an important source of information for such studies, because more than half of the structures are homo- or heteromeric protein complexes. Here we propose the first hierarchical classification of whole protein complexes of known 3-D structure, based on representing their fundamental structural features as a graph. This classification provides the first overview of all the complexes in the Protein Data Bank and allows nonredundant sets to be derived at different levels of detail. This reveals that between one-half and two-thirds of known structures are multimeric, depending on the level of redundancy accepted. We also analyse the structures in terms of the topological arrangement of their subunits and find that they form a small number of arrangements compared with all theoretically possible ones. This is because most complexes contain four subunits or less, and the large majority are homomeric. In addition, there is a strong tendency for symmetry in complexes, even for heteromeric complexes. Finally, through comparison of Biological Units in the Protein Data Bank with the Protein Quaternary Structure database, we identified many possible errors in quaternary structure assignments. Our classification, available as a database and Web server at http://www.3Dcomplex.org, will be a starting point for future work aimed at understanding the structure and evolution of protein complexes.

  11. Protein structure determination by exhaustive search of Protein Data Bank derived databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes-Rees, Ian; Sliz, Piotr

    2010-12-14

    Parallel sequence and structure alignment tools have become ubiquitous and invaluable at all levels in the study of biological systems. We demonstrate the application and utility of this same parallel search paradigm to the process of protein structure determination, benefitting from the large and growing corpus of known structures. Such searches were previously computationally intractable. Through the method of Wide Search Molecular Replacement, developed here, they can be completed in a few hours with the aide of national-scale federated cyberinfrastructure. By dramatically expanding the range of models considered for structure determination, we show that small (less than 12% structural coverage) and low sequence identity (less than 20% identity) template structures can be identified through multidimensional template scoring metrics and used for structure determination. Many new macromolecular complexes can benefit significantly from such a technique due to the lack of known homologous protein folds or sequences. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method by determining the structure of a full-length p97 homologue from Trichoplusia ni. Example cases with the MHC/T-cell receptor complex and the EmoB protein provide systematic estimates of minimum sequence identity, structure coverage, and structural similarity required for this method to succeed. We describe how this structure-search approach and other novel computationally intensive workflows are made tractable through integration with the US national computational cyberinfrastructure, allowing, for example, rapid processing of the entire Structural Classification of Proteins protein fragment database.

  12. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  13. Topological properties of complex networks in protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsik; Jung, Jae-Won; Min, Seungsik

    2014-03-01

    We study topological properties of networks in structural classification of proteins. We model the native-state protein structure as a network made of its constituent amino-acids and their interactions. We treat four structural classes of proteins composed predominantly of α helices and β sheets and consider several proteins from each of these classes whose sizes range from amino acids of the Protein Data Bank. Particularly, we simulate and analyze the network metrics such as the mean degree, the probability distribution of degree, the clustering coefficient, the characteristic path length, the local efficiency, and the cost. This work was supported by the KMAR and DP under Grant WISE project (153-3100-3133-302-350).

  14. Effects of NMR spectral resolution on protein structure calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhas Tikole

    Full Text Available Adequate digital resolution and signal sensitivity are two critical factors for protein structure determinations by solution NMR spectroscopy. The prime objective for obtaining high digital resolution is to resolve peak overlap, especially in NOESY spectra with thousands of signals where the signal analysis needs to be performed on a large scale. Achieving maximum digital resolution is usually limited by the practically available measurement time. We developed a method utilizing non-uniform sampling for balancing digital resolution and signal sensitivity, and performed a large-scale analysis of the effect of the digital resolution on the accuracy of the resulting protein structures. Structure calculations were performed as a function of digital resolution for about 400 proteins with molecular sizes ranging between 5 and 33 kDa. The structural accuracy was assessed by atomic coordinate RMSD values from the reference structures of the proteins. In addition, we monitored also the number of assigned NOESY cross peaks, the average signal sensitivity, and the chemical shift spectral overlap. We show that high resolution is equally important for proteins of every molecular size. The chemical shift spectral overlap depends strongly on the corresponding spectral digital resolution. Thus, knowing the extent of overlap can be a predictor of the resulting structural accuracy. Our results show that for every molecular size a minimal digital resolution, corresponding to the natural linewidth, needs to be achieved for obtaining the highest accuracy possible for the given protein size using state-of-the-art automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation methods.

  15. A novel structural tree for wrap-proteins, a subclass of (α+β)-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshkova, Eugenia A; Gordeev, Alexey B; Efimov, Alexander V

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel structural subclass of (α+β)-proteins is presented. A characteristic feature of these proteins and domains is that they consist of strongly twisted and coiled β-sheets wrapped around one or two α-helices, so they are referred to here as wrap-proteins. It is shown that overall folds of the wrap-proteins can be obtained by stepwise addition of α-helices and/or β-strands to the strongly twisted and coiled β-hairpin taken as the starting structure in modeling. As a result of modeling, a structural tree for the wrap-proteins was constructed that includes 201 folds of which 49 occur in known nonhomologous proteins.

  16. Structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malomo, Sunday A; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of pH and protein concentration on some structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein isolate (HPI, 84.15% protein content) and defatted hemp seed protein meal (HPM, 44.32% protein content) were determined. The HPI had minimum protein solubility (PS) at pH 4.0, which increased as pH was decreased or increased. In contrast, the HPM had minimum PS at pH 3.0, which increased at higher pH values. Gel electrophoresis showed that some of the high molecular weight proteins (>45 kDa) present in HPM were not well extracted by the alkali and were absent or present in low ratio in the HPI polypeptide profile. The amino acid composition showed that the isolation process increased the Arg/Lys ratio of HPI (5.52%) when compared to HPM (3.35%). Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism data indicate that the HPI proteins had a well-defined structure at pH 3.0, which was lost as pH value increased. The differences in structural conformation of HPI at different pH values were reflected as better foaming capacity at pH 3.0 when compared to pH 5.0, 7.0, and 9.0. At 10 and 25 mg/mL protein concentrations, emulsions formed by the HPM had smaller oil droplet sizes (higher quality), when compared to the HPI-formed emulsions. In contrast at 50 mg/mL protein concentration, the HPI-formed emulsions had smaller oil droplet sizes (except at pH 3.0). We conclude that the functional properties of hemp seed protein products are dependent on structural conformations as well as protein concentration and pH. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Structural and Function Prediction of Musa acuminata subsp. Malaccensis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Munir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical proteins (HPs are the proteins whose presence has been anticipated, yet in vivo function has not been built up. Illustrating the structural and functional privileged insights of these HPs might likewise prompt a superior comprehension of the protein-protein associations or networks in diverse types of life. Bananas (Musa acuminata spp., including sweet and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister grouped to the all-around considered Poales, which incorporate oats. Bananas are crucial for nourishment security in numerous tropical and subtropical nations and the most prominent organic product in industrialized nations. In the present study, the hypothetical protein of M. acuminata (Banana was chosen for analysis and modeling by distinctive bioinformatics apparatuses and databases. As indicated by primary and secondary structure analysis, XP_009393594.1 is a stable hydrophobic protein containing a noteworthy extent of α-helices; Homology modeling was done utilizing SWISS-MODEL server where the templates identity with XP_009393594.1 protein was less which demonstrated novelty of our protein. Ab initio strategy was conducted to produce its 3D structure. A few evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters determined the generated protein model as stable with genuinely great quality. Functional analysis was completed by ProtFun 2.2, and KEGG (KAAS, recommended that the hypothetical protein is a transcription factor with cytoplasmic domain as zinc finger. The protein was observed to be vital for translation process, involved in metabolism, signaling and cellular processes, genetic information processing and Zinc ion binding. It is suggested that further test approval would help to anticipate the structures and functions of other uncharacterized proteins of different plants and living being.

  18. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein In vitro Digestibility and Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mingmei; Qin, Guixin; Sun, Zewei; Long, Guohui

    2016-08-01

    The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller's dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine the protein molecular spectral band characteristics for amides I and II as well as α-helices and β-sheets and their ratios. Protein solubility and in vitro digestibility were measured with the Kjeldahl method using 0.2% KOH solution and the pepsin-pancreatin two-step enzymatic method, respectively. We found that all measured spectral band intensities (height and area) of feed proteins were correlated with their the in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.003); moreover, the relatively quantitative amounts of α-helices, random coils, and α-helix to β-sheet ratio in protein secondary structures were positively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.004). On the other hand, the percentage of β-sheet structures was negatively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility (pproteins are closely related to their in vitro digestibility at 28 h and solubility. Furthermore, the α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio can be used to predict the nutritional value of feed proteins.

  19. Computational protein structure modeling and analysis of UV-B stress protein in Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Akhlaqur; Chaturvedi, Navaneet; Sinha, Sukrat; Pandey, Paras Nath; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar; Sundaram, Shanthy; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on Ultra Violet stress (UVS) gene product which is a UV stress induced protein from cyanobacteria, Synechocystis PCC 6803. Three dimensional structural modeling of target UVS protein was carried out by homology modeling method. 3F2I pdb from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 was selected as a suitable template protein structure. Ultimately, the detection of active binding regions was carried out for characterization of functional sites in modeled UV-B stress protein. The top five probable ligand binding sites were predicted and the common binding residues between target and template protein was analyzed. It has been validated for the first time that modeled UVS protein structure from Synechocystis PCC 6803 was structurally and functionally similar to well characterized UVS protein of another cyanobacterial species, Nostoc sp PCC 7120 because of having same structural motif and fold with similar protein topology and function. Investigations revealed that UVS protein from Synechocystis sp. might play significant role during ultraviolet resistance. Thus, it could be a potential biological source for remediation for UV induced stress.

  20. A physical approach to protein structure prediction: CASP4 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivelli, Silvia; Eskow, Elizabeth; Bader, Brett; Lamberti, Vincent; Byrd, Richard; Schnabel, Robert; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2001-02-27

    We describe our global optimization method called Stochastic Perturbation with Soft Constraints (SPSC), which uses information from known proteins to predict secondary structure, but not in the tertiary structure predictions or in generating the terms of the physics-based energy function. Our approach is also characterized by the use of an all atom energy function that includes a novel hydrophobic solvation function derived from experiments that shows promising ability for energy discrimination against misfolded structures. We present the results obtained using our SPSC method and energy function for blind prediction in the 4th Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP4) competition, and show that our approach is more effective on targets for which less information from known proteins is available. In fact our SPSC method produced the best prediction for one of the most difficult targets of the competition, a new fold protein of 240 amino acids.

  1. Structural studies of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A., E-mail: oasojo@unmc.edu [College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States); Koski, Raymond A.; Bonafé, Nathalie [L2 Diagnostics LLC, 300 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); College of Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-6495 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Structural analysis of a truncated soluble domain of human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1, a membrane protein implicated in the proliferation of aggressive brain cancer, is presented. Human glioma pathogenesis-related protein 1 (GLIPR1) is a membrane protein that is highly upregulated in brain cancers but is barely detectable in normal brain tissue. GLIPR1 is composed of a signal peptide that directs its secretion, a conserved cysteine-rich CAP (cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 proteins) domain and a transmembrane domain. GLIPR1 is currently being investigated as a candidate for prostate cancer gene therapy and for glioblastoma targeted therapy. Crystal structures of a truncated soluble domain of the human GLIPR1 protein (sGLIPR1) solved by molecular replacement using a truncated polyalanine search model of the CAP domain of stecrisp, a snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP), are presented. The correct molecular-replacement solution could only be obtained by removing all loops from the search model. The native structure was refined to 1.85 Å resolution and that of a Zn{sup 2+} complex was refined to 2.2 Å resolution. The latter structure revealed that the putative binding cavity coordinates Zn{sup 2+} similarly to snake-venom CRISPs, which are involved in Zn{sup 2+}-dependent mechanisms of inflammatory modulation. Both sGLIPR1 structures have extensive flexible loop/turn regions and unique charge distributions that were not observed in any of the previously reported CAP protein structures. A model is also proposed for the structure of full-length membrane-bound GLIPR1.

  2. Structure and function of nanoparticle-protein conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubin-Tam, M-E; Hamad-Schifferli, K

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation of proteins to nanoparticles has numerous applications in sensing, imaging, delivery, catalysis, therapy and control of protein structure and activity. Therefore, characterizing the nanoparticle-protein interface is of great importance. A variety of covalent and non-covalent linking chemistries have been reported for nanoparticle attachment. Site-specific labeling is desirable in order to control the protein orientation on the nanoparticle, which is crucial in many applications such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer. We evaluate methods for successful site-specific attachment. Typically, a specific protein residue is linked directly to the nanoparticle core or to the ligand. As conjugation often affects the protein structure and function, techniques to probe structure and activity are assessed. We also examine how molecular dynamics simulations of conjugates would complete those experimental techniques in order to provide atomistic details on the effect of nanoparticle attachment. Characterization studies of nanoparticle-protein complexes show that the structure and function are influenced by the chemistry of the nanoparticle ligand, the nanoparticle size, the nanoparticle material, the stoichiometry of the conjugates, the labeling site on the protein and the nature of the linkage (covalent versus non-covalent)

  3. Computing a new family of shape descriptors for protein structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Sinclair, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The large-scale 3D structure of a protein can be represented by the polygonal curve through the carbon a atoms of the protein backbone. We introduce an algorithm for computing the average number of times that a given configuration of crossings on such polygonal curves is seen, the average being...

  4. Ranking beta sheet topologies with applications to protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    One reason why ab initio protein structure predictors do not perform very well is their inability to reliably identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To achieve reliable long-range interactions, all potential pairings of ß-strands (ß-topologies) of a given protein are enumerated, in...

  5. Ion pairs in non-redundant protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Ion pairs in non-reduntant protein structures. 693. J. Biosci. 32(4), June 2007. 1. Introduction. In proteins, ion pairs are electrostatic interactions between the nitrogen atoms of basic residues and the carboxylate oxygen atoms of acidic residues. The basic residues include histidine, arginine and lysine, and the acidic residues ...

  6. Automatic classification of protein structure by using Gauss integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Fain, B.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a method of looking at, analyzing, and comparing protein structures. The topology of a protein is captured by 30 numbers inspired by Vassiliev knot invariants. To illustrate the simplicity and power of this topological approach, we construct a measure (scaled Gauss metric, SGM...

  7. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girod, Marion; Enjalbert, Quentin; Brunet, Claire; Antoine, Rodolphe; Lemoine, Jérôme; Lukac, Iva; Radman, Miroslav; Krisko, Anita; Dugourd, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  8. The CTCF insulator protein forms an unusual DNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadowski Paul D

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CTCF insulator protein is a highly conserved zinc finger protein that has been implicated in many aspects of gene regulation and nuclear organization. The protein has been hypothesized to organize the human genome by forming DNA loops. Results In this paper, we report biochemical evidence to support the role for CTCF in forming DNA loops. We have measured DNA bending by CTCF at the chicken HS4 β-globin FII insulator element in vitro and have observed a unique DNA structure with aberrant electrophoretic mobility which we believe to be a DNA loop. CTCF is able to form this unusual DNA structure at two other binding sites: the c-myc P2 promoter and the chicken F1 lysozyme gene silencer. We also demonstrate that the length though not the sequence of the DNA downstream of the binding site is important for the ability of CTCF to form this unusual DNA structure. We hypothesize that a single CTCF protein molecule is able to act as a "looper" possibly through the use of several of its zinc fingers. Conclusions CTCF is able to form an unusual DNA structure through the zinc finger domain of the protein. This unusual DNA structure is formed in a directional manner by the CTCF protein. The findings described in this paper suggest mechanisms by which CTCF is able to form DNA loops, organize the mammalian genome and function as an insulator protein.

  9. Antigenic and structural conservation of herpesvirus DNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littler, E; Yeo, J; Killington, R A; Purifoy, D J; Powell, K L

    1981-10-01

    Previously, we have shown a common antigen of several herpesviruses (pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus) to be antigenically related to the major DNA-binding proteins of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2. In this study we have purified the cross-reacting polypeptide from cells infected with pseudorabies virus, equine abortion virus and bovine mammillitis virus and shown the cross-reacting protein to be a major DNA-binding protein for each virus. Tryptic peptide analysis of the cross-reacting DNA-binding proteins of all five viruses has shown structural similarities. The proteins thus were shown to share common antigenic sites, to have similar biological properties and to have a highly conserved amino acid sequence. This unexpected similarity between proteins from diverse herpes viruses suggests an essential and fundamental role of the major DNA-binding protein in herpes virus replication.

  10. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emergede novofrom previously non-coding DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo -emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes.

  11. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  12. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-01

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  13. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Rich, Virginia I; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter.

  14. Structural predictions of neurobiologically relevant G-protein coupled receptors and intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Giulia; Dibenedetto, Domenica; Calandrini, Vania; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-09-15

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and intrinsic disordered proteins (IDPs) are key players for neuronal function and dysfunction. Unfortunately, their structural characterization is lacking in most cases. From one hand, no experimental structure has been determined for the two largest GPCRs subfamilies, both key proteins in neuronal pathways. These are the odorant (450 members out of 900 human GPCRs) and the bitter taste receptors (25 members) subfamilies. On the other hand, also IDPs structural characterization is highly non-trivial. They exist as dynamic, highly flexible structural ensembles that undergo conformational conversions on a wide range of timescales, spanning from picoseconds to milliseconds. Computational methods may be of great help to characterize these neuronal proteins. Here we review recent progress from our lab and other groups to develop and apply in silico methods for structural predictions of these highly relevant, fascinating and challenging systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structuring oil by protein building blocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Auke

    2017-01-01

    Over the recent years, structuring of oil into ‘organogels’ or ‘oleogels’ has gained much attention amongst colloid-, material,- and food scientists. Potentially, these oleogels could be used as an alternative for saturated- and trans fats in food products. To develop

  16. The accuracy of protein structure alignment servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naeem Aslam

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Overall none of the structural alignment servers showed 100% success rate. Studies of overall performance, effect of mainly alpha and effect of mainly beta showed consistent performance. CE, DALI, FatCat and PhyreStorm showed more than 90% success rate.

  17. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  18. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  19. Bayesian inference of protein structure from chemical shift data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bratholm, Lars Andersen; Christensen, Anders Steen; Hamelryck, Thomas Wim

    2015-01-01

    content of the data. Here, we present the formulation of such a probability distribution where the error in chemical shift prediction is described by either a Gaussian or Cauchy distribution. The methodology is demonstrated and compared to a set of empirically weighted potentials through Markov chain......Protein chemical shifts are routinely used to augment molecular mechanics force fields in protein structure simulations, with weights of the chemical shift restraints determined empirically. These weights, however, might not be an optimal descriptor of a given protein structure and predictive model......, and a bias is introduced which might result in incorrect structures. In the inferential structure determination framework, both the unknown structure and the disagreement between experimental and back-calculated data are formulated as a joint probability distribution, thus utilizing the full information...

  20. Sequential Release of Proteins from Structured Multishell Microcapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimanovich, Ulyana; Michaels, Thomas C T; De Genst, Erwin; Matak-Vinkovic, Dijana; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2017-10-09

    In nature, a wide range of functional materials is based on proteins. Increasing attention is also turning to the use of proteins as artificial biomaterials in the form of films, gels, particles, and fibrils that offer great potential for applications in areas ranging from molecular medicine to materials science. To date, however, most such applications have been limited to single component materials despite the fact that their natural analogues are composed of multiple types of proteins with a variety of functionalities that are coassembled in a highly organized manner on the micrometer scale, a process that is currently challenging to achieve in the laboratory. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of multicomponent protein microcapsules where the different components are positioned in a controlled manner. We use molecular self-assembly to generate multicomponent structures on the nanometer scale and droplet microfluidics to bring together the different components on the micrometer scale. Using this approach, we synthesize a wide range of multiprotein microcapsules containing three well-characterized proteins: glucagon, insulin, and lysozyme. The localization of each protein component in multishell microcapsules has been detected by labeling protein molecules with different fluorophores, and the final three-dimensional microcapsule structure has been resolved by using confocal microscopy together with image analysis techniques. In addition, we show that these structures can be used to tailor the release of such functional proteins in a sequential manner. Moreover, our observations demonstrate that the protein release mechanism from multishell capsules is driven by the kinetic control of mass transport of the cargo and by the dissolution of the shells. The ability to generate artificial materials that incorporate a variety of different proteins with distinct functionalities increases the breadth of the potential applications of artificial protein-based materials

  1. Mining protein loops using a structural alphabet and statistical exceptionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Juliette

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein loops encompass 50% of protein residues in available three-dimensional structures. These regions are often involved in protein functions, e.g. binding site, catalytic pocket... However, the description of protein loops with conventional tools is an uneasy task. Regular secondary structures, helices and strands, have been widely studied whereas loops, because they are highly variable in terms of sequence and structure, are difficult to analyze. Due to data sparsity, long loops have rarely been systematically studied. Results We developed a simple and accurate method that allows the description and analysis of the structures of short and long loops using structural motifs without restriction on loop length. This method is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA. HMM-SA allows the simplification of a three-dimensional protein structure into a one-dimensional string of states, where each state is a four-residue prototype fragment, called structural letter. The difficult task of the structural grouping of huge data sets is thus easily accomplished by handling structural letter strings as in conventional protein sequence analysis. We systematically extracted all seven-residue fragments in a bank of 93000 protein loops and grouped them according to the structural-letter sequence, named structural word. This approach permits a systematic analysis of loops of all sizes since we consider the structural motifs of seven residues rather than complete loops. We focused the analysis on highly recurrent words of loops (observed more than 30 times. Our study reveals that 73% of loop-lengths are covered by only 3310 highly recurrent structural words out of 28274 observed words. These structural words have low structural variability (mean RMSd of 0.85 Å. As expected, half of these motifs display a flanking-region preference but interestingly, two thirds are shared by short (less than 12 residues and long loops. Moreover, half of

  2. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  3. An Algebro-topological description of protein domain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object--a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we investigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH.

  4. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Motoyasu, E-mail: adachi.motoyasu@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Rumi; Kuroki, Ryota [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    An artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats was created and the structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure showed threefold symmetry even though there is an amino- and carboxy-terminal. The artificial protein with threefold symmetry may be useful as a scaffold to capture small materials with C3 symmetry. Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical β-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine–glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine–glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine–glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of

  5. CMsearch: simultaneous exploration of protein sequence space and structure space improves not only protein homology detection but also protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xuefeng; Lu, Zhiwu; Wang, Sheng; Jing-Yan Wang, Jim; Gao, Xin

    2016-06-15

    Protein homology detection, a fundamental problem in computational biology, is an indispensable step toward predicting protein structures and understanding protein functions. Despite the advances in recent decades on sequence alignment, threading and alignment-free methods, protein homology detection remains a challenging open problem. Recently, network methods that try to find transitive paths in the protein structure space demonstrate the importance of incorporating network information of the structure space. Yet, current methods merge the sequence space and the structure space into a single space, and thus introduce inconsistency in combining different sources of information. We present a novel network-based protein homology detection method, CMsearch, based on cross-modal learning. Instead of exploring a single network built from the mixture of sequence and structure space information, CMsearch builds two separate networks to represent the sequence space and the structure space. It then learns sequence-structure correlation by simultaneously taking sequence information, structure information, sequence space information and structure space information into consideration. We tested CMsearch on two challenging tasks, protein homology detection and protein structure prediction, by querying all 8332 PDB40 proteins. Our results demonstrate that CMsearch is insensitive to the similarity metrics used to define the sequence and the structure spaces. By using HMM-HMM alignment as the sequence similarity metric, CMsearch clearly outperforms state-of-the-art homology detection methods and the CASP-winning template-based protein structure prediction methods. Our program is freely available for download from http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx : xin.gao@kaust.edu.sa Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. Automatic classification of protein structure by using Gauss integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røgen, Peter; Fain, B.

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a method of looking at, analyzing, and comparing protein structures. The topology of a protein is captured by 30 numbers inspired by Vassiliev knot invariants. To illustrate the simplicity and power of this topological approach, we construct a measure (scaled Gauss metric, SGM......) of similarity of protein shapes. Under this metric, protein chains naturally separate into fold clusters. We use SGM to construct an automatic classification procedure for the CATH2.4 database. The method is very fast because it requires neither alignment of the chains nor any chain-chain comparison. It also...

  7. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. A computer graphics program system for protein structure representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, A M; Golub, E E

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a computer graphics program system for the schematic representation of several protein secondary structure analysis algorithms. The programs calculate the probability of occurrence of alpha-helix, beta-sheet and beta-turns by the method of Chou and Fasman and assign unique predicted structure to each residue using a novel conflict resolution algorithm based on maximum likelihood. A detailed structure map containing secondary structure, hydrophobicity, sequence identity, sequence numbering and the location of putative N-linked glycosylation sites is then produced. In addition, helical wheel diagrams and hydrophobic moment calculations can be performed to further analyze the properties of selected regions of the sequence. As they require only structure specification as input, the graphics programs can easily be adapted for use with other secondary structure prediction schemes. The use of these programs to analyze protein structure-function relationships is described and evaluated. PMID:2832829

  9. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure study for the complex of HU protein and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo; Tanaka, Isao; Kataoka, Mikio; Mihara, Ken-ichi; Tokunaga, Fumio; Mita, Kazuei.

    1993-01-01

    The small angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments have revealed the structure of the complex of DNA-binding protein HU and DNA with 20 base pair long in solution. By comparing observed Rg(Radius of gyration) of the complex with calculated Rg of the model, we have concluded that HU protein binds DNA in such a manner that the protein bends the rod-like DNA, and that the binding is rather cooperative. This is the first evidence on the structure of HU-DNA complex obtained by the diffractive method in vitro. These findings give us the view that HU protein might facilitate the DNA's dynamical reactions in a cell by winding DNA like an enzyme, and that there might been a possibility that cells turn on and off the enzymatic actions by changing the concentration of HU protein. (author)

  11. Structural protein relationships among eastern equine encephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizki, J M; Repik, P M

    1994-11-01

    We have re-evaluated the relationships among the polypeptides of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viruses using SDS-PAGE and peptide mapping of individual virion proteins. Four to five distinct polypeptide bands were detected upon SDS-PAGE analysis of viruses: the E1, E2 and C proteins normally associated with alphavirus virions, as well as an additional more rapidly-migrating E2-associated protein and a high M(r) (HMW) protein. In contrast with previous findings by others, the electrophoretic profiles of the virion proteins of EEE viruses displayed a marked correlation with serotype. The protein profiles of the 33 North American (NA)-serotype viruses examined were remarkably homogeneous, with variation detected only in the E1 protein of two isolates. In contrast, considerable heterogeneity was observed in the migration profiles of both the E1 and E2 glycoproteins of the 13 South American (SA)-type viruses examined. Peptide mapping of individual virion proteins using limited proteolysis with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease confirmed that, in addition to the homogeneity evident among NA-type viruses and relative heterogeneity among SA-type viruses, the E1 and E2 proteins of NA- and SA-serotype viruses exhibited serotype-specific structural variation. The C protein was highly conserved among isolates of both virus serotypes. Endoglycosidase analyses of intact virions did not reveal substantial glycosylation differences between the glycoproteins of NA- and SA-serotype viruses. Both the HMW protein and the E2 protein (doublet) of EEE virus appeared to contain, at least in part, high-mannose type N-linked oligosaccharides. No evidence of O-linked glycans was found on either the E1 or the E2 glycoprotein. Despite the observed structural differences between proteins of NA- and SA-type viruses, Western blot analyses utilizing polyclonal antibodies indicated that immunoreactive epitopes appeared to be conserved.

  12. Local Crystalline Structure in an Amorphous Protein Dense Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Daniel G.; Modla, Shannon; Wagner, Norman J.; Sandler, Stanley I.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins exhibit a variety of dense phases ranging from gels, aggregates, and precipitates to crystalline phases and dense liquids. Although the structure of the crystalline phase is known in atomistic detail, little attention has been paid to noncrystalline protein dense phases, and in many cases the structures of these phases are assumed to be fully amorphous. In this work, we used small-angle neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and electron tomography to measure the structure of ovalbumin precipitate particles salted out with ammonium sulfate. We found that the ovalbumin phase-separates into core-shell particles with a core radius of ∼2 μm and shell thickness of ∼0.5 μm. Within this shell region, nanostructures comprised of crystallites of ovalbumin self-assemble into a well-defined bicontinuous network with branches ∼12 nm thick. These results demonstrate that the protein gel is comprised in part of nanocrystalline protein. PMID:26488663

  13. Deprotonated imidodiphosphate in AMPPNP-containing protein structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    In certain AMPPNP-containing protein structures, the nitrogen bridging the two terminal phosphate groups can be deprotonated. Many different proteins utilize the chemical energy provided by the cofactor adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for their proper function. A number of structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contain adenosine 5′-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate (AMPPNP), a nonhydrolysable analog of ATP in which the bridging O atom between the two terminal phosphate groups is substituted by the imido function. Under mild conditions imides do not have acidic properties and thus the imide nitrogen should be protonated. However, an analysis of protein structures containing AMPPNP reveals that the imide group is deprotonated in certain complexes if the negative charges of the phosphate moieties in AMPPNP are in part neutralized by coordinating divalent metals or a guanidinium group of an arginine

  14. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  15. Blind Test of Physics-Based Prediction of Protein Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, M. Scott; Ozkan, S. Banu; Voelz, Vincent; Wu, Guohong Albert; Dill, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    We report here a multiprotein blind test of a computer method to predict native protein structures based solely on an all-atom physics-based force field. We use the AMBER 96 potential function with an implicit (GB/SA) model of solvation, combined with replica-exchange molecular-dynamics simulations. Coarse conformational sampling is performed using the zipping and assembly method (ZAM), an approach that is designed to mimic the putative physical routes of protein folding. ZAM was applied to the folding of six proteins, from 76 to 112 monomers in length, in CASP7, a community-wide blind test of protein structure prediction. Because these predictions have about the same level of accuracy as typical bioinformatics methods, and do not utilize information from databases of known native structures, this work opens up the possibility of predicting the structures of membrane proteins, synthetic peptides, or other foldable polymers, for which there is little prior knowledge of native structures. This approach may also be useful for predicting physical protein folding routes, non-native conformations, and other physical properties from amino acid sequences. PMID:19186130

  16. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  17. Relationship between Molecular Structure Characteristics of Feed Proteins and Protein Digestibility and Solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingmei Bai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional value of feed proteins and their utilization by livestock are related not only to the chemical composition but also to the structure of feed proteins, but few studies thus far have investigated the relationship between the structure of feed proteins and their solubility as well as digestibility in monogastric animals. To address this question we analyzed soybean meal, fish meal, corn distiller’s dried grains with solubles, corn gluten meal, and feather meal by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy to determine the protein molecular spectral band characteristics for amides I and II as well as α-helices and β-sheets and their ratios. Protein solubility and in vitro digestibility were measured with the Kjeldahl method using 0.2% KOH solution and the pepsin-pancreatin two-step enzymatic method, respectively. We found that all measured spectral band intensities (height and area of feed proteins were correlated with their the in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.003; moreover, the relatively quantitative amounts of α-helices, random coils, and α-helix to β-sheet ratio in protein secondary structures were positively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility and solubility (p≤0.004. On the other hand, the percentage of β-sheet structures was negatively correlated with protein in vitro digestibility (p<0.001 and solubility (p = 0.002. These results demonstrate that the molecular structure characteristics of feed proteins are closely related to their in vitro digestibility at 28 h and solubility. Furthermore, the α-helix-to-β-sheet ratio can be used to predict the nutritional value of feed proteins.

  18. Identification of structural domains in proteins by a graph heuristic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wernisch, Lorenz; Hunting, M.M.G.; Wodak, Shoshana J.

    1999-01-01

    A novel automatic procedure for identifying domains from protein atomic coordinates is presented. The procedure, termed STRUDL (STRUctural Domain Limits), does not take into account information on secondary structures and handles any number of domains made up of contiguous or non-contiguous chain

  19. Packing of protein structures in clusters with magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Bohr, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    of clusters containing magic numbers of secondary structures and multipla of these cluster. A scheme for the relation between the sequence information and the native fold is given. We have performed a statistical analysis of available protein structures and found agreement with the predicted preferred...

  20. A generative, probabilistic model of local protein structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Mardia, Kanti V.; Taylor, Charles C.

    2008-01-01

    conformational stabilities. Here, we present a fully probabilistic, continuous model of local protein structure in atomic detail. The generative model makes efficient conformational sampling possible and provides a framework for the rigorous analysis of local sequence-structure correlations in the native state...

  1. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    -protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive...

  2. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is well known that water molecules play an indispensable role in the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The water-mediated ionic interactions between the charged residues provide stability and plasticity and in turn address the function of the protein structures. Thus, this study specifically addresses the ...

  3. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  4. The Protein Structure Factory X-ray Diffraction Beamlines at BESSY - Results from structural studies of human proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.

    2004-01-01

    The Protein Structure Factory is one of the large scale structural genomics projects in Europe. The PSF follows the integrated approach to gain insight into the three dimensional structure of human proteins by X-ray diffraction methods. Therefore, synchrotron based X-ray data collection facilities, including two tunable energy beamlines and one fixed energy beamline are set into operation at the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY. Attached to these beamlines and experimental end-stations, a dedicated infrastructure was established in order to provide optimal conditions for carrying out experiments. Within the first year operation, this new facility did increase the availability of high brilliance PX-beamtime considerably for the structure biology community within Europe. The experimental usage of anomalous dispersion techniques enabled us to analyze the three dimensional structure for a number of human proteins. (author)

  5. Develop Infrared Structural Biology for Probing Structural Dynamics of Protein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Aihua; Kang, Zhouyang; Causey, Oliver; Liu, Charle

    2015-03-01

    Protein functions are carried out through a series of structural transitions. Lack of knowledge on functionally important structural motions of proteins impedes our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology is an emerging technology with powerful applications for protein structural dynamics. One key element of infrared structural biology is the development of vibrational structural marker (VSM) database library that translates infrared spectroscopic signals into specific structural information. We report the development of VSM for probing the type, geometry and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of buried COO- side chains of Asp and Glu in proteins. Quantum theory based first principle computational studies combined with bioinformatic hydrogen bond analysis are employed in this study. We will discuss the applications of VSM in mechanistic studies of protein functions. Infrared structural biology is expected to emerge as a powerful technique for elucidating the functional mechanism of a broad range of proteins, including water soluble and membrane proteins. This work is supported by OCAST HR10-078 and NSF DBI1338097.

  6. NMR structure of hypothetical protein MG354 from Mycoplasmagenitalium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Shi, Jianxia; Yokotoa, Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Wemmer, David E.

    2005-04-12

    Mycoplasma genitalium (Mg) and M. pneumoniae (Mp) are human pathogens with two of the smallest genomes sequenced to date ({approx} 480 and 680 genes, respectively). The Berkeley Structural Genomics Center is determining representative structures for gene products in these organisms, helping to understand the set of protein folds needed to sustain this minimal organism. The protein coded by gene MG354 (gi3844938) from M. genitalium has a relatively unique sequence, related only to MPN530 from M. pneumoniae (68% identity, coverage 99%) and MGA{_}0870 from the avian pathogen M. gallisepticum (23% identity, coverage 94%), has no homologue with a determined structure, and no functional annotations.

  7. Protein micro-structuring as a tool to texturize protein foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purwanti, N.; Peters, J.P.C.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Structuring protein foods to control the textural properties receives growing attention nowadays. It requires decoupling of the product properties such as water holding capacity and the mechanical properties from the actual protein concentration in the product. From an application point of view,

  8. Structural dynamics of green fluorescent protein alone and fused with a single chain Fv protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Griep, R.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Structural information on intracellular fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria with endogenous proteins is required as they are increasingly used in cell biology and biochemistry. We have investigated the dynamic properties of GFP alone and fused to a

  9. Perspective: Structural fluctuation of protein and Anfinsen's thermodynamic hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Fumio; Sugita, Masatake; Yoshida, Masasuke; Akasaka, Kazuyuki

    2018-01-01

    The thermodynamics hypothesis, casually referred to as "Anfinsen's dogma," is described theoretically in terms of a concept of the structural fluctuation of protein or the first moment (average structure) and the second moment (variance and covariance) of the structural distribution. The new theoretical concept views the unfolding and refolding processes of protein as a shift of the structural distribution induced by a thermodynamic perturbation, with the variance-covariance matrix varying. Based on the theoretical concept, a method to characterize the mechanism of folding (or unfolding) is proposed. The transition state, if any, between two stable states is interpreted as a gap in the distribution, which is created due to an extensive reorganization of hydrogen bonds among back-bone atoms of protein and with water molecules in the course of conformational change. Further perspective to applying the theory to the computer-aided drug design, and to the material science, is briefly discussed.

  10. De novo molecular design

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2013-01-01

    Systematically examining current methods and strategies, this ready reference covers a wide range of molecular structures, from organic-chemical drugs to peptides, Proteins and nucleic acids, in line with emerging new drug classes derived from biomacromolecules. A leader in the field and one of the pioneers of this young discipline has assembled here the most prominent experts from across the world to provide first-hand knowledge. While most of their methods and examples come from the area of pharmaceutical discovery and development, the approaches are equally applicable for chemical probes an

  11. The Protein Model Portal--a comprehensive resource for protein structure and model information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Juergen; Roth, Steven; Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Schmidt, Tobias; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Model Portal (PMP) has been developed to foster effective use of 3D molecular models in biomedical research by providing convenient and comprehensive access to structural information for proteins. Both experimental structures and theoretical models for a given protein can be searched simultaneously and analyzed for structural variability. By providing a comprehensive view on structural information, PMP offers the opportunity to apply consistent assessment and validation criteria to the complete set of structural models available for proteins. PMP is an open project so that new methods developed by the community can contribute to PMP, for example, new modeling servers for creating homology models and model quality estimation servers for model validation. The accuracy of participating modeling servers is continuously evaluated by the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) project. The PMP offers a unique interface to visualize structural coverage of a protein combining both theoretical models and experimental structures, allowing straightforward assessment of the model quality and hence their utility. The portal is updated regularly and actively developed to include latest methods in the field of computational structural biology. Database URL: http://www.proteinmodelportal.org.

  12. The Protein Model Portal—a comprehensive resource for protein structure and model information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Juergen; Roth, Steven; Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Schmidt, Tobias; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The Protein Model Portal (PMP) has been developed to foster effective use of 3D molecular models in biomedical research by providing convenient and comprehensive access to structural information for proteins. Both experimental structures and theoretical models for a given protein can be searched simultaneously and analyzed for structural variability. By providing a comprehensive view on structural information, PMP offers the opportunity to apply consistent assessment and validation criteria to the complete set of structural models available for proteins. PMP is an open project so that new methods developed by the community can contribute to PMP, for example, new modeling servers for creating homology models and model quality estimation servers for model validation. The accuracy of participating modeling servers is continuously evaluated by the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) project. The PMP offers a unique interface to visualize structural coverage of a protein combining both theoretical models and experimental structures, allowing straightforward assessment of the model quality and hence their utility. The portal is updated regularly and actively developed to include latest methods in the field of computational structural biology. Database URL: http://www.proteinmodelportal.org PMID:23624946

  13. Tertiary alphabet for the observable protein structural universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Craig O; Zhou, Jianfu; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-11-22

    Here, we systematically decompose the known protein structural universe into its basic elements, which we dub tertiary structural motifs (TERMs). A TERM is a compact backbone fragment that captures the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary environments around a given residue, comprising one or more disjoint segments (three on average). We seek the set of universal TERMs that capture all structure in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), finding remarkable degeneracy. Only ∼600 TERMs are sufficient to describe 50% of the PDB at sub-Angstrom resolution. However, more rare geometries also exist, and the overall structural coverage grows logarithmically with the number of TERMs. We go on to show that universal TERMs provide an effective mapping between sequence and structure. We demonstrate that TERM-based statistics alone are sufficient to recapitulate close-to-native sequences given either NMR or X-ray backbones. Furthermore, sequence variability predicted from TERM data agrees closely with evolutionary variation. Finally, locations of TERMs in protein chains can be predicted from sequence alone based on sequence signatures emergent from TERM instances in the PDB. For multisegment motifs, this method identifies spatially adjacent fragments that are not contiguous in sequence-a major bottleneck in structure prediction. Although all TERMs recur in diverse proteins, some appear specialized for certain functions, such as interface formation, metal coordination, or even water binding. Structural biology has benefited greatly from previously observed degeneracies in structure. The decomposition of the known structural universe into a finite set of compact TERMs offers exciting opportunities toward better understanding, design, and prediction of protein structure.

  14. Structural Elements Regulating AAA+ Protein Quality Control Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Wen Chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Members of the ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities (AAA+ superfamily participate in essential and diverse cellular pathways in all kingdoms of life by harnessing the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to drive their biological functions. Although most AAA+ proteins share a ring-shaped architecture, AAA+ proteins have evolved distinct structural elements that are fine-tuned to their specific functions. A central question in the field is how ATP binding and hydrolysis are coupled to substrate translocation through the central channel of ring-forming AAA+ proteins. In this mini-review, we will discuss structural elements present in AAA+ proteins involved in protein quality control, drawing similarities to their known role in substrate interaction by AAA+ proteins involved in DNA translocation. Elements to be discussed include the pore loop-1, the Inter-Subunit Signaling (ISS motif, and the Pre-Sensor I insert (PS-I motif. Lastly, we will summarize our current understanding on the inter-relationship of those structural elements and propose a model how ATP binding and hydrolysis might be coupled to polypeptide translocation in protein quality control machines.

  15. Models of protein-ligand crystal structures: trust, but verify

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Marc C.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    X-ray crystallography provides the most accurate models of protein-ligand structures. These models serve as the foundation of many computational methods including structure prediction, molecular modelling, and structure-based drug design. The success of these computational methods ultimately depends on the quality of the underlying protein-ligand models. X-ray crystallography offers the unparalleled advantage of a clear mathematical formalism relating the experimental data to the protein-ligand model. In the case of X-ray crystallography, the primary experimental evidence is the electron density of the molecules forming the crystal. The first step in the generation of an accurate and precise crystallographic model is the interpretation of the electron density of the crystal, typically carried out by construction of an atomic model. The atomic model must then be validated for fit to the experimental electron density and also for agreement with prior expectations of stereochemistry. Stringent validation of protein-ligand models has become possible as a result of the mandatory deposition of primary diffraction data, and many computational tools are now available to aid in the validation process. Validation of protein-ligand complexes has revealed some instances of overenthusiastic interpretation of ligand density. Fundamental concepts and metrics of protein-ligand quality validation are discussed and we highlight software tools to assist in this process. It is essential that end users select high quality protein-ligand models for their computational and biological studies, and we provide an overview of how this can be achieved.

  16. Data mining of metal ion environments present in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Lasota, Piotr; Lebioda, Lukasz; Minor, Wladek

    2008-09-01

    Analysis of metal-protein interaction distances, coordination numbers, B-factors (displacement parameters), and occupancies of metal-binding sites in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography and deposited in the PDB shows many unusual values and unexpected correlations. By measuring the frequency of each amino acid in metal ion-binding sites, the positive or negative preferences of each residue for each type of cation were identified. Our approach may be used for fast identification of metal-binding structural motifs that cannot be identified on the basis of sequence similarity alone. The analysis compares data derived separately from high and medium-resolution structures from the PDB with those from very high-resolution small-molecule structures in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). For high-resolution protein structures, the distribution of metal-protein or metal-water interaction distances agrees quite well with data from CSD, but the distribution is unrealistically wide for medium (2.0-2.5A) resolution data. Our analysis of cation B-factors versus average B-factors of atoms in the cation environment reveals substantial numbers of structures contain either an incorrect metal ion assignment or an unusual coordination pattern. Correlation between data resolution and completeness of the metal coordination spheres is also found.

  17. Accurate de novo design of hyperstable constrained peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Mulligan, Vikram Khipple; Bahl, Christopher D.; Gilmore, Jason M.; Harvey, Peta J.; Cheneval, Olivier; Buchko, Garry W.; Pulavarti, Surya V. S. R. K.; Kaas, Quentin; Eletsky, Alexander; Huang, Po-Ssu; Johnsen, William A.; Greisen, Per Jr; Rocklin, Gabriel J.; Song, Yifan; Linsky, Thomas W.; Watkins, Andrew; Rettie, Stephen A.; Xu, Xianzhong; Carter, Lauren P.; Bonneau, Richard; Olson, James M.; Coutsias, Evangelos; Correnti, Colin E.; Szyperski, Thomas; Craik, David J.; Baker, David

    2016-09-14

    Covalently-crosslinked peptides present attractive opportunities for developing new therapeutics. Lying between small molecule and protein therapeutics in size, natural crosslinked peptides play critical roles in signaling, virulence and immunity. Engineering novel peptides with precise control over their three-dimensional structures is a significant challenge. Here we describe the development of computational methods for de novo design of conformationally-restricted peptides, and the use of these methods to design hyperstable disulfide-stabilized miniproteins, heterochiral peptides, and N-C cyclic peptides. Experimentally-determined X-ray and NMR structures for 12 of the designs are nearly identical to the computational models. The computational design methods and stable scaffolds provide the basis for a new generation of peptide-based drugs.

  18. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from Streptococcus pyogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkart Lour

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. Results We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy_2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB:2fu2, and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Conclusions Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  19. The structure of pyogenecin immunity protein, a novel bacteriocin-like immunity protein from streptococcus pyogenes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.; Coggill, P.; Bateman, A.; Finn, R.; Cymborowski, M.; Otwinowski, Z.; Minor, W.; Volkart, L.; Joachimiak, A.; Wellcome Trust Sanger Inst.; Univ. of Virginia; UT Southwestern Medical Center

    2009-12-17

    Many Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce anti-bacterial peptides and small proteins called bacteriocins, which enable them to compete against other bacteria in the environment. These peptides fall structurally into three different classes, I, II, III, with class IIa being pediocin-like single entities and class IIb being two-peptide bacteriocins. Self-protective cognate immunity proteins are usually co-transcribed with these toxins. Several examples of cognates for IIa have already been solved structurally. Streptococcus pyogenes, closely related to LAB, is one of the most common human pathogens, so knowledge of how it competes against other LAB species is likely to prove invaluable. We have solved the crystal structure of the gene-product of locus Spy-2152 from S. pyogenes, (PDB: 2fu2), and found it to comprise an anti-parallel four-helix bundle that is structurally similar to other bacteriocin immunity proteins. Sequence analyses indicate this protein to be a possible immunity protein protective against class IIa or IIb bacteriocins. However, given that S. pyogenes appears to lack any IIa pediocin-like proteins but does possess class IIb bacteriocins, we suggest this protein confers immunity to IIb-like peptides. Combined structural, genomic and proteomic analyses have allowed the identification and in silico characterization of a new putative immunity protein from S. pyogenes, possibly the first structure of an immunity protein protective against potential class IIb two-peptide bacteriocins. We have named the two pairs of putative bacteriocins found in S. pyogenes pyogenecin 1, 2, 3 and 4.

  20. Constraint Logic Programming approach to protein structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogolari Federico

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein structure prediction problem is one of the most challenging problems in biological sciences. Many approaches have been proposed using database information and/or simplified protein models. The protein structure prediction problem can be cast in the form of an optimization problem. Notwithstanding its importance, the problem has very seldom been tackled by Constraint Logic Programming, a declarative programming paradigm suitable for solving combinatorial optimization problems. Results Constraint Logic Programming techniques have been applied to the protein structure prediction problem on the face-centered cube lattice model. Molecular dynamics techniques, endowed with the notion of constraint, have been also exploited. Even using a very simplified model, Constraint Logic Programming on the face-centered cube lattice model allowed us to obtain acceptable results for a few small proteins. As a test implementation their (known secondary structure and the presence of disulfide bridges are used as constraints. Simplified structures obtained in this way have been converted to all atom models with plausible structure. Results have been compared with a similar approach using a well-established technique as molecular dynamics. Conclusions The results obtained on small proteins show that Constraint Logic Programming techniques can be employed for studying protein simplified models, which can be converted into realistic all atom models. The advantage of Constraint Logic Programming over other, much more explored, methodologies, resides in the rapid software prototyping, in the easy way of encoding heuristics, and in exploiting all the advances made in this research area, e.g. in constraint propagation and its use for pruning the huge search space.

  1. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  2. A characterization of structural proteins expressed by Bombyx mori bidensovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Peng; Xing, Yali; Hu, Zhaoyang; Yang, Yanhua; Pan, Ye; Chen, Kangmin; Zhu, Feifei; Zhou, Yajing; Chen, Keping; Yao, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Bombyx mori bidensiovirus (BmBDV) is a species of Bidensovirus that has been was placed into a new genus within the new family Bidnaviridae by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. BmBDV causes fatal flacherie disease in silkworms, which causes large losses to the sericulture industry. BmBDV contains two sets of complementary linear single-stranded DNAs of approximately 6.5kb (viral DNA 1, VD1) and 6.0kb (viral DNA 2, VD2). VD1 and VD2 are encapsidated in separate icosahedral non-enveloped capsids, which are similar in size and shape. However, the strategies used to express BmBDV structural proteins remains unclear. In this work, a total of six structural proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and shown to be encoded by the BmBDV VP gene via mass spectrometry. The transmission electron microscopy results showed that co-expression of the BmBDV VP and SP structural proteins in Spodoptera frugiperda sf9 cells resulted in the formation of 22-24nm virus-like particles. Furthermore, a mutation of the major structural protein-encoding VP gene, in which the second in-frame ATG codon was mutated to GCG, abrogated the production of several structural proteins, indicating that this strategy of expressing BmBDV VP is dependent on a leaky scanning translation mechanism. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Delineation of protein structure classes from multivariate analysis of protein Raman optical activity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fujiang; Tranter, George E; Isaacs, Neil W; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D

    2006-10-13

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA), measured as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right and left-circularly polarized incident light, or as the intensity of a small circularly polarized component in the scattered light, is a powerful probe of the aqueous solution structure of proteins. On account of the large number of structure-sensitive bands in protein ROA spectra, multivariate analysis techniques such as non-linear mapping (NLM) are especially favourable for determining structural relationships between different proteins. Here NLM is used to map a dataset of 80 polypeptide, protein and virus ROA spectra, considered as points in a multidimensional space with axes representing the digitized wavenumbers, into readily visualizable two and three-dimensional spaces in which points close to or distant from each other, respectively, represent similar or dissimilar structures. Discrete clusters are observed which correspond to the seven structure classes all alpha, mainly alpha, alphabeta, mainly beta, all beta, mainly disordered/irregular and all disordered/irregular. The average standardised ROA spectra of the proteins falling within each structure class have distinct features characteristic of each class. A distinct cluster containing the wheat protein A-gliadin and the plant viruses potato virus X, narcissus mosaic virus, papaya mosaic virus and tobacco rattle virus, all of which appear in the mainly alpha cluster in the two-dimensional representation, becomes clearly separated in the direction of increasing disorder in the three-dimensional representation. This suggests that the corresponding five proteins, none of which to date has yielded high-resolution X-ray structures, consist mainly of alpha-helix and disordered structure with little or no beta-sheet. This combination of structural elements may have functional significance, such as facilitating disorder-to-order transitions (and vice versa) and suppressing

  4. Synergistic effect of temperature, protein and salt concentration on structures and interactions among lysozyme proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2016-07-01

    Synergistic effect of temperature, protein and salt concentration on structures and interactions among lysozyme proteins in solution has been studied using small angle neutron scattering technique. Scattering study shows that for a particular protein concentration, with increasing temperature, short-range attraction decreases but long-range repulsion becomes system specific. In absence of salt, lower value of attractive interaction is obtained, however, in presence of salt it becomes higher and decreases with increasing temperature. For specific condition, weak long range attraction and intermediate range repulsion exists. At higher temperature (90 °C), fractal structure develops and the corresponding fractal dimension depends upon the experimental conditions.

  5. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  6. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Daniel; Tramontano, Anna

    2012-08-02

    Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by non-academics: No.

  7. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models.

    KAUST Repository

    Carbajo, Daniel

    2012-08-02

    BACKGROUND: Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. RESULTS: This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. CONCLUSIONS: The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. IMPLEMENTATION, AVAILABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS: Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php.Operating system(s): Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program); mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database); php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server). Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet) and PSAIA. License: Free. Any restrictions to use by

  8. Lipid nanotechnologies for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoilova-McPhie, Svetla; Grushin, Kirill; Dalm, Daniela; Miller, Jaimy

    2014-11-01

    We present a methodology of lipid nanotubes (LNT) and nanodisks technologies optimized in our laboratory for structural studies of membrane-associated proteins at close to physiological conditions. The application of these lipid nanotechnologies for structure determination by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is fundamental for understanding and modulating their function. The LNTs in our studies are single bilayer galactosylceramide based nanotubes of ∼20 nm inner diameter and a few microns in length, that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. The lipid nanodisks (NDs) are self-assembled discoid lipid bilayers of ∼10 nm diameter, which are stabilized in aqueous solutions by a belt of amphipathic helical scaffold proteins. By combining LNT and ND technologies, we can examine structurally how the membrane curvature and lipid composition modulates the function of the membrane-associated proteins. As proof of principle, we have engineered these lipid nanotechnologies to mimic the activated platelet's phosphtaidylserine rich membrane and have successfully assembled functional membrane-bound coagulation factor VIII in vitro for structure determination by cryo-EM. The macromolecular organization of the proteins bound to ND and LNT are further defined by fitting the known atomic structures within the calculated three-dimensional maps. The combination of LNT and ND technologies offers a means to control the design and assembly of a wide range of functional membrane-associated proteins and complexes for structural studies by cryo-EM. The presented results confirm the suitability of the developed methodology for studying the functional structure of membrane-associated proteins, such as the coagulation factors, at a close to physiological environment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Elliptical structure of phospholipid bilayer nanodiscs encapsulated by scaffold proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar-Gislinge, Nicholas; Simonsen, Jens Bæk; Mortensen, Kell

    2010-01-01

    neutron scattering in combination with variable-temperature studies of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering on nanodiscs in solution, we show that the fundamental nanodisc unit, consisting of a lipid bilayer surrounded by amphiphilic scaffold proteins, possesses intrinsically an elliptical shape......Phospholipid bilayers host and support the function of membrane proteins and may be stabilized in disc-like nanostructures, allowing for unprecedented solution studies of the assembly, structure, and function of membrane proteins (Bayburt et al. Nano Lett. 2002, 2, 853-856). Based on small-angle...... the experimental scattering profile from nanodiscs. The model paves the way for future detailed structural studies of functional membrane proteins encapsulated in nanodiscs....

  10. Structural History of Human SRGAP2 Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporny, Michael; Guez-Haddad, Julia; Kreusch, Annett; Shakartzi, Sivan; Neznansky, Avi; Cross, Alice; Isupov, Michail N; Qualmann, Britta; Kessels, Michael M; Opatowsky, Yarden

    2017-06-01

    In the development of the human brain, human-specific genes are considered to play key roles, conferring its unique advantages and vulnerabilities. At the time of Homo lineage divergence from Australopithecus, SRGAP2C gradually emerged through a process of serial duplications and mutagenesis from ancestral SRGAP2A (3.4-2.4 Ma). Remarkably, ectopic expression of SRGAP2C endows cultured mouse brain cells, with human-like characteristics, specifically, increased dendritic spine length and density. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this change in neuronal morphology, we determined the structure of SRGAP2A and studied the interplay between SRGAP2A and SRGAP2C. We found that: 1) SRGAP2A homo-dimerizes through a large interface that includes an F-BAR domain, a newly identified F-BAR extension (Fx), and RhoGAP-SH3 domains. 2) SRGAP2A has an unusual inverse geometry, enabling associations with lamellipodia and dendritic spine heads in vivo, and scaffolding of membrane protrusions in cell culture. 3) As a result of the initial partial duplication event (∼3.4 Ma), SRGAP2C carries a defective Fx-domain that severely compromises its solubility and membrane-scaffolding ability. Consistently, SRGAP2A:SRAGP2C hetero-dimers form, but are insoluble, inhibiting SRGAP2A activity. 4) Inactivation of SRGAP2A is sensitive to the level of hetero-dimerization with SRGAP2C. 5) The primal form of SRGAP2C (P-SRGAP2C, existing between ∼3.4 and 2.4 Ma) is less effective in hetero-dimerizing with SRGAP2A than the modern SRGAP2C, which carries several substitutions (from ∼2.4 Ma). Thus, the genetic mutagenesis phase contributed to modulation of SRGAP2A's inhibition of neuronal expansion, by introducing and improving the formation of inactive SRGAP2A:SRGAP2C hetero-dimers, indicating a stepwise involvement of SRGAP2C in human evolutionary history. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of centromeric DNA and kinetochore proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Meraldi, Patrick; McAinsh, Andrew D; Rheinbay, Esther; Sorger, Peter K

    2006-01-01

    Background: Kinetochores are large multi-protein structures that assemble on centromeric DNA (CEN DNA) and mediate the binding of chromosomes to microtubules. Comprising 125 base-pairs of CEN DNA and 70 or more protein components, Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinetochores are among the best understood. In contrast, most fungal, plant and animal cells assemble kinetochores on CENs that are longer and more complex, raising the question of whether kinetochore architecture has been conserved through ...

  12. Predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Seth; Khatib, Firas; Treuille, Adrien; Barbero, Janos; Lee, Jeehyung; Beenen, Michael; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Baker, David; Popović, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    People exert significant amounts of problem solving effort playing computer games. Simple image- and text-recognition tasks have been successfully crowd-sourced through gamesi, ii, iii, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be similarly solved with human-directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search sp...

  13. (PS)2: protein structure prediction server version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tsun-Tsao; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Chen, Chu-Huang; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Chi-Wen; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2015-07-01

    Protein complexes are involved in many biological processes. Examining coupling between subunits of a complex would be useful to understand the molecular basis of protein function. Here, our updated (PS)(2) web server predicts the three-dimensional structures of protein complexes based on comparative modeling; furthermore, this server examines the coupling between subunits of the predicted complex by combining structural and evolutionary considerations. The predicted complex structure could be indicated and visualized by Java-based 3D graphics viewers and the structural and evolutionary profiles are shown and compared chain-by-chain. For each subunit, considerations with or without the packing contribution of other subunits cause the differences in similarities between structural and evolutionary profiles, and these differences imply which form, complex or monomeric, is preferred in the biological condition for the subunit. We believe that the (PS)(2) server would be a useful tool for biologists who are interested not only in the structures of protein complexes but also in the coupling between subunits of the complexes. The (PS)(2) is freely available at http://ps2v3.life.nctu.edu.tw/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G. (SOIBC); (Purdue); (Columbia)

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  15. Crystal Structure of the Capsid Protein from Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zifang; Song, Hao; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2018-03-30

    Recently, Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged as a global public health concern and is distinct from other flaviviruses in many aspects, for example, causing transplacental infection, fetal abnormalities and vector-independent transmission through body fluids in humans. The capsid (C) protein is a multifunctional protein, since it binds to viral RNA in the process of nucleocapsid assembly and plays important roles in virus infection processes by interacting with cellular proteins, modulating cellular metabolism, apoptosis and immune response. Here we solved the crystal structure of ZIKV C protein at a resolution of 1.9Å. The ZIKV C protein structure contains four α helices with a long pre-α1 loop and forms dimers. The unique long pre-α1 loop in ZIKV C contributes to the tighter association of dimeric assembly and renders a divergent hydrophobic feature at the lipid bilayer interface in comparison with the known C structures of West Nile and dengue viruses. We reported the interaction between the ZIKV C protein and lipid droplets through confocal microscopy analysis. Substitutions of key amino acids in the pre-α1 loop of ZIKV C disrupted the interaction with lipid droplets, indicating that the loop is critical for membrane association. We also recognized that ZIKV C protein possesses broad binding capability to different nucleotide types, including single-stranded and double-stranded RNAs or DNAs. Furthermore, the highly positively charged interface, mainly formed by α4 helix, is proposed to be responsible for nucleotide binding. These findings will greatly enhance our understanding of ZIKV C protein, providing information for anti-ZIKV drug design targeting the C protein. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Prediction of protein-destabilizing polymorphisms by manual curation with protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Alan Gough

    Full Text Available The relationship between sequence polymorphisms and human disease has been studied mostly in terms of effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs leading to single amino acid substitutions that change protein structure and function. However, less attention has been paid to more drastic sequence polymorphisms which cause premature termination of a protein's sequence or large changes, insertions, or deletions in the sequence. We have analyzed a large set (n = 512 of insertions and deletions (indels and single nucleotide polymorphisms causing premature termination of translation in disease-related genes. Prediction of protein-destabilization effects was performed by graphical presentation of the locations of polymorphisms in the protein structure, using the Genomes TO Protein (GTOP database, and manual annotation with a set of specific criteria. Protein-destabilization was predicted for 44.4% of the nonsense SNPs, 32.4% of the frameshifting indels, and 9.1% of the non-frameshifting indels. A prediction of nonsense-mediated decay allowed to infer which truncated proteins would actually be translated as defective proteins. These cases included the proteins linked to diseases inherited dominantly, suggesting a relation between these diseases and toxic aggregation. Our approach would be useful in identifying potentially aggregation-inducing polymorphisms that may have pathological effects.

  17. Structural basis of protein oxidation resistance: a lysozyme study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Girod

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative damage in proteins correlates with aging since it can cause irreversible and progressive degeneration of almost all cellular functions. Apparently, native protein structures have evolved intrinsic resistance to oxidation since perfectly folded proteins are, by large most robust. Here we explore the structural basis of protein resistance to radiation-induced oxidation using chicken egg white lysozyme in the native and misfolded form. We study the differential resistance to oxidative damage of six different parts of native and misfolded lysozyme by a targeted tandem/mass spectrometry approach of its tryptic fragments. The decay of the amount of each lysozyme fragment with increasing radiation dose is found to be a two steps process, characterized by a double exponential evolution of their amounts: the first one can be largely attributed to oxidation of specific amino acids, while the second one corresponds to further degradation of the protein. By correlating these results to the structural parameters computed from molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we find the protein parts with increased root-mean-square deviation (RMSD to be more susceptible to modifications. In addition, involvement of amino acid side-chains in hydrogen bonds has a protective effect against oxidation Increased exposure to solvent of individual amino acid side chains correlates with high susceptibility to oxidative and other modifications like side chain fragmentation. Generally, while none of the structural parameters alone can account for the fate of peptides during radiation, together they provide an insight into the relationship between protein structure and susceptibility to oxidation.

  18. PROGRAM SYSTEM AND INFORMATION METADATA BANK OF TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Nikitin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the architecture of metadata storage model for check results of three-dimensional protein structures. Concept database model was built. The service and procedure of database update as well as data transformation algorithms for protein structures and their quality were presented. Most important information about entries and their submission forms to store, access, and delivery to users were highlighted. Software suite was developed for the implementation of functional tasks using Java programming language in the NetBeans v.7.0 environment and JQL to query and interact with the database JavaDB. The service was tested and results have shown system effectiveness while protein structures filtration.

  19. Three-dimensional protein structure prediction: Methods and computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Márcio; E Silva, Mariel Barbachan; Buriol, Luciana S; Lamb, Luis C

    2014-10-12

    A long standing problem in structural bioinformatics is to determine the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of a protein when only a sequence of amino acid residues is given. Many computational methodologies and algorithms have been proposed as a solution to the 3-D Protein Structure Prediction (3-D-PSP) problem. These methods can be divided in four main classes: (a) first principle methods without database information; (b) first principle methods with database information; (c) fold recognition and threading methods; and (d) comparative modeling methods and sequence alignment strategies. Deterministic computational techniques, optimization techniques, data mining and machine learning approaches are typically used in the construction of computational solutions for the PSP problem. Our main goal with this work is to review the methods and computational strategies that are currently used in 3-D protein prediction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational structural analysis: multiple proteins bound to DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Tomovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With increasing numbers of crystal structures of proteinratioDNA and proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes publically available, it is now possible to extract sufficient structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters to make general observations and predictions about their interactions. In particular, the properties of macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA have not previously been investigated in detail. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have performed computational structural analyses on macromolecular assemblies of multiple proteins bound to DNA using a variety of different computational tools: PISA; PROMOTIF; X3DNA; ReadOut; DDNA and DCOMPLEX. Additionally, we have developed and employed an algorithm for approximate collision detection and overlapping volume estimation of two macromolecules. An implementation of this algorithm is available at http://promoterplot.fmi.ch/Collision1/. The results obtained are compared with structural, physical-chemical and thermodynamic parameters from proteinratioprotein and single proteinratioDNA complexes. Many of interface properties of multiple proteinratioDNA complexes were found to be very similar to those observed in binary proteinratioDNA and proteinratioprotein complexes. However, the conformational change of the DNA upon protein binding is significantly higher when multiple proteins bind to it than is observed when single proteins bind. The water mediated contacts are less important (found in less quantity between the interfaces of components in ternary (proteinratioproteinratioDNA complexes than in those of binary complexes (proteinratioprotein and proteinratioDNA.The thermodynamic stability of ternary complexes is also higher than in the binary interactions. Greater specificity and affinity of multiple proteins binding to DNA in comparison with binary protein-DNA interactions were observed. However, protein-protein binding affinities are stronger in

  1. Protein structure prediction provides comparable performance to crystallographic structures in docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Hongying; Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Structure based virtual screening has largely been limited to protein targets for which either an experimental structure is available or a strongly homologous template exists so that a high-resolution model can be constructed. The performance of state of the art protein structure predictions in virtual screening in systems where only weakly homologous templates are available is largely untested. Using the challenging DUD database of structural decoys, we show here that even using templates with only weak sequence homology (identity) structural models can be constructed by I-TASSER which achieve comparable enrichment rates to using the experimental bound crystal structure in the majority of the cases studied. For 65% of the targets, the I-TASSER models, which are constructed essentially in the apo conformations, reached 70% of the virtual screening performance of using the holo-crystal structures. A correlation was observed between the success of I-TASSER in modeling the global fold and local structures in the binding pockets of the proteins versus the relative success in virtual screening. The virtual screening performance can be further improved by the recognition of chemical features of the ligand compounds. These results suggest that the combination of structure-based docking and advanced protein structure modeling methods should be a valuable approach to the large-scale drug screening and discovery studies, especially for the proteins lacking crystallographic structures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  3. RACK1, A Multifaceted Scaffolding Protein: Structure and Function

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, David R

    2011-10-06

    Abstract The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a member of the tryptophan-aspartate repeat (WD-repeat) family of proteins and shares significant homology to the β subunit of G-proteins (Gβ). RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller structure which facilitates protein binding. RACK1 has a significant role to play in shuttling proteins around the cell, anchoring proteins at particular locations and in stabilising protein activity. It interacts with the ribosomal machinery, with several cell surface receptors and with proteins in the nucleus. As a result, RACK1 is a key mediator of various pathways and contributes to numerous aspects of cellular function. Here, we discuss RACK1 gene and structure and its role in specific signaling pathways, and address how posttranslational modifications facilitate subcellular location and translocation of RACK1. This review condenses several recent studies suggesting a role for RACK1 in physiological processes such as development, cell migration, central nervous system (CN) function and circadian rhythm as well as reviewing the role of RACK1 in disease.

  4. MUSTANG-MR structural sieving server: applications in protein structural analysis and crystallography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun S Konagurthu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A central tenet of structural biology is that related proteins of common function share structural similarity. This has key practical consequences for the derivation and analysis of protein structures, and is exploited by the process of "molecular sieving" whereby a common core is progressively distilled from a comparison of two or more protein structures. This paper reports a novel web server for "sieving" of protein structures, based on the multiple structural alignment program MUSTANG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: "Sieved" models are generated from MUSTANG-generated multiple alignment and superpositions by iteratively filtering out noisy residue-residue correspondences, until the resultant correspondences in the models are optimally "superposable" under a threshold of RMSD. This residue-level sieving is also accompanied by iterative elimination of the poorly fitting structures from the input ensemble. Therefore, by varying the thresholds of RMSD and the cardinality of the ensemble, multiple sieved models are generated for a given multiple alignment and superposition from MUSTANG. To aid the identification of structurally conserved regions of functional importance in an ensemble of protein structures, Lesk-Hubbard graphs are generated, plotting the number of residue correspondences in a superposition as a function of its corresponding RMSD. The conserved "core" (or typically active site shows a linear trend, which becomes exponential as divergent parts of the structure are included into the superposition. CONCLUSIONS: The application addresses two fundamental problems in structural biology: first, the identification of common substructures among structurally related proteins--an important problem in characterization and prediction of function; second, generation of sieved models with demonstrated uses in protein crystallographic structure determination using the technique of Molecular Replacement.

  5. MUSTANG-MR structural sieving server: applications in protein structural analysis and crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konagurthu, Arun S; Reboul, Cyril F; Schmidberger, Jason W; Irving, James A; Lesk, Arthur M; Stuckey, Peter J; Whisstock, James C; Buckle, Ashley M

    2010-04-06

    A central tenet of structural biology is that related proteins of common function share structural similarity. This has key practical consequences for the derivation and analysis of protein structures, and is exploited by the process of "molecular sieving" whereby a common core is progressively distilled from a comparison of two or more protein structures. This paper reports a novel web server for "sieving" of protein structures, based on the multiple structural alignment program MUSTANG. "Sieved" models are generated from MUSTANG-generated multiple alignment and superpositions by iteratively filtering out noisy residue-residue correspondences, until the resultant correspondences in the models are optimally "superposable" under a threshold of RMSD. This residue-level sieving is also accompanied by iterative elimination of the poorly fitting structures from the input ensemble. Therefore, by varying the thresholds of RMSD and the cardinality of the ensemble, multiple sieved models are generated for a given multiple alignment and superposition from MUSTANG. To aid the identification of structurally conserved regions of functional importance in an ensemble of protein structures, Lesk-Hubbard graphs are generated, plotting the number of residue correspondences in a superposition as a function of its corresponding RMSD. The conserved "core" (or typically active site) shows a linear trend, which becomes exponential as divergent parts of the structure are included into the superposition. The application addresses two fundamental problems in structural biology: first, the identification of common substructures among structurally related proteins--an important problem in characterization and prediction of function; second, generation of sieved models with demonstrated uses in protein crystallographic structure determination using the technique of Molecular Replacement.

  6. Protein Structural Analysis via Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigues, Antonio; Nadeau, Owen W.; Rimmer, Mary Ashley; Villar, Maria T.; Du, Xiuxia; Fenton, Aron W.; Carlson, Gerald M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern mass spectrometry (MS) technologies have provided a versatile platform that can be combined with a large number of techniques to analyze protein structure and dynamics. These techniques include the three detailed in this chapter: 1) hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX), 2) limited proteolysis, and 3) chemical crosslinking (CX). HDX relies on the change in mass of a protein upon its dilution into deuterated buffer, which results in varied deuterium content within its backbone amides. Structural information on surface exposed, flexible or disordered linker regions of proteins can be achieved through limited proteolysis, using a variety of proteases and only small extents of digestion. CX refers to the covalent coupling of distinct chemical species and has been used to analyze the structure, function and interactions of proteins by identifying crosslinking sites that are formed by small multi-functional reagents, termed crosslinkers. Each of these MS applications is capable of revealing structural information for proteins when used either with or without other typical high resolution techniques, including NMR and X-ray crystallography. PMID:27975228

  7. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Karina Baptista

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction. PMID:28085928

  8. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Trevizani

    Full Text Available The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  9. Critical Features of Fragment Libraries for Protein Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevizani, Raphael; Custódio, Fábio Lima; Dos Santos, Karina Baptista; Dardenne, Laurent Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The use of fragment libraries is a popular approach among protein structure prediction methods and has proven to substantially improve the quality of predicted structures. However, some vital aspects of a fragment library that influence the accuracy of modeling a native structure remain to be determined. This study investigates some of these features. Particularly, we analyze the effect of using secondary structure prediction guiding fragments selection, different fragments sizes and the effect of structural clustering of fragments within libraries. To have a clearer view of how these factors affect protein structure prediction, we isolated the process of model building by fragment assembly from some common limitations associated with prediction methods, e.g., imprecise energy functions and optimization algorithms, by employing an exact structure-based objective function under a greedy algorithm. Our results indicate that shorter fragments reproduce the native structure more accurately than the longer. Libraries composed of multiple fragment lengths generate even better structures, where longer fragments show to be more useful at the beginning of the simulations. The use of many different fragment sizes shows little improvement when compared to predictions carried out with libraries that comprise only three different fragment sizes. Models obtained from libraries built using only sequence similarity are, on average, better than those built with a secondary structure prediction bias. However, we found that the use of secondary structure prediction allows greater reduction of the search space, which is invaluable for prediction methods. The results of this study can be critical guidelines for the use of fragment libraries in protein structure prediction.

  10. Fragment-HMM: A new approach to protein structure prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai Cheng; Bu, Dongbo; Xu, Jinbo; Li, Ming

    2008-01-01

    We designed a simple position-specific hidden Markov model to predict protein structure. Our new framework naturally repeats itself to converge to a final target, conglomerating fragment assembly, clustering, target selection, refinement, and consensus, all in one process. Our initial implementation of this theory converges to within 6 Å of the native structures for 100% of decoys on all six standard benchmark proteins used in ROSETTA (discussed by Simons and colleagues in a recent paper), which achieved only 14%–94% for the same data. The qualities of the best decoys and the final decoys our theory converges to are also notably better. PMID:18723665

  11. Automatic protein structure solution from weak X-ray data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubák, Pavol; Pannu, Navraj S.

    2013-11-01

    Determining new protein structures from X-ray diffraction data at low resolution or with a weak anomalous signal is a difficult and often an impossible task. Here we propose a multivariate algorithm that simultaneously combines the structure determination steps. In tests on over 140 real data sets from the protein data bank, we show that this combined approach can automatically build models where current algorithms fail, including an anisotropically diffracting 3.88 Å RNA polymerase II data set. The method seamlessly automates the process, is ideal for non-specialists and provides a mathematical framework for successfully combining various sources of information in image processing.

  12. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline

    2014-01-01

    to individual structures that bind to phosphate groups; here, we investigate a total of 8307 structures obtained from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB). An analysis of the binding site amino acid propensities reveals very characteristic first shell residue distributions, which are found to be influenced...... by the characteristics of the phosphorus compound and by the presence of cobound cations. The second shell, which supports the coordinating residues in the first shell, is found to consist mainly of protein backbone groups. Our results show how the second shell residue distribution is dictated mainly by the first shell...

  13. Taking MAD to the extreme: ultrafast protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M.A.; Dementieva, I.; Evans, G.; Sanishvili, R.; Joachimiak, A.

    1999-01-01

    Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction data were measured in 23 min from a 16 kDa selenomethionyl-substituted protein, producing experimental phases to 2.25 (angstrom) resolution. The data were collected on a mosaic 3 x 3 charge-coupled device using undulator radiation from the Structural Biology Center 19ID beamline at the Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced Photon Source. The phases were independently obtained semiautomatically by two crystallographic program suites, CCP4 and CNS. The quality and speed of this data acquisition exemplify the opportunities at third-generation synchrotron sources for high-throughput protein crystal structure determination

  14. Structure and Protein-Protein Interaction Studies on Chlamydia trachomatis Protein CT670 (YscO Homolog)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzini, Emily; Singer, Alexander; Singh, Bhag; Lam, Robert; Skarina, Tatiana; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Savchenko, Alexei; Gupta, Radhey S. (Toronto); (McMaster U.); (OCI)

    2010-07-28

    Comparative genomic studies have identified many proteins that are found only in various Chlamydiae species and exhibit no significant sequence similarity to any protein in organisms that do not belong to this group. The CT670 protein of Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the proteins whose genes are in one of the type III secretion gene clusters but whose cellular functions are not known. CT670 shares several characteristics with the YscO protein of Yersinia pestis, including the neighboring genes, size, charge, and secondary structure, but the structures and/or functions of these proteins remain to be determined. Although a BLAST search with CT670 did not identify YscO as a related protein, our analysis indicated that these two proteins exhibit significant sequence similarity. In this paper, we report that the CT670 crystal, solved at a resolution of 2 {angstrom}, consists of a single coiled coil containing just two long helices. Gel filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that in solution CT670 exists in both monomeric and dimeric forms and that the monomer predominates at lower protein concentrations. We examined the interaction of CT670 with many type III secretion system-related proteins (viz., CT091, CT665, CT666, CT667, CT668, CT669, CT671, CT672, and CT673) by performing bacterial two-hybrid assays. In these experiments, CT670 was found to interact only with the CT671 protein (YscP homolog), whose gene is immediately downstream of ct670. A specific interaction between CT670 and CT671 was also observed when affinity chromatography pull-down experiments were performed. These results suggest that CT670 and CT671 are putative homologs of the YcoO and YscP proteins, respectively, and that they likely form a chaperone-effector pair.

  15. Prediction of protein continuum secondary structure with probabilistic models based on NMR solved structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of proteins may change as a result of the inherent flexibility of some protein regions. We develop and explore probabilistic machine learning methods for predicting a continuum secondary structure, i.e. assigning probabilities to the conformational states of a residue. We train our methods using data derived from high-quality NMR models. Results Several probabilistic models not only successfully estimate the continuum secondary structure, but also provide a categorical output on par with models directly trained on categorical data. Importantly, models trained on the continuum secondary structure are also better than their categorical counterparts at identifying the conformational state for structurally ambivalent residues. Conclusion Cascaded probabilistic neural networks trained on the continuum secondary structure exhibit better accuracy in structurally ambivalent regions of proteins, while sustaining an overall classification accuracy on par with standard, categorical prediction methods.

  16. Efficient Multicriteria Protein Structure Comparison on Modern Processor Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakos, Elias S.

    2015-01-01

    Fast increasing computational demand for all-to-all protein structures comparison (PSC) is a result of three confounding factors: rapidly expanding structural proteomics databases, high computational complexity of pairwise protein comparison algorithms, and the trend in the domain towards using multiple criteria for protein structures comparison (MCPSC) and combining results. We have developed a software framework that exploits many-core and multicore CPUs to implement efficient parallel MCPSC in modern processors based on three popular PSC methods, namely, TMalign, CE, and USM. We evaluate and compare the performance and efficiency of the two parallel MCPSC implementations using Intel's experimental many-core Single-Chip Cloud Computer (SCC) as well as Intel's Core i7 multicore processor. We show that the 48-core SCC is more efficient than the latest generation Core i7, achieving a speedup factor of 42 (efficiency of 0.9), making many-core processors an exciting emerging technology for large-scale structural proteomics. We compare and contrast the performance of the two processors on several datasets and also show that MCPSC outperforms its component methods in grouping related domains, achieving a high F-measure of 0.91 on the benchmark CK34 dataset. The software implementation for protein structure comparison using the three methods and combined MCPSC, along with the developed underlying rckskel algorithmic skeletons library, is available via GitHub. PMID:26605332

  17. The Semantics of the Modular Architecture of Protein Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hleap, Jose Sergio; Blouin, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Protein structures can be conceptualized as context-aware self-organizing systems. One of its emerging properties is a modular architecture. Such modular architecture has been identified as domains and defined as its units of evolution and function. However, this modular architecture is not exclusively defined by domains. Also, the definition of a domain is an ongoing debate. Here we propose differentiating structural, evolutionary and functional domains as distinct concepts. Defining domains or modules is confounded by diverse definitions of the concept, and also by other elements inherent to protein structures. An apparent hierarchy in protein structure architecture is one of these elements, where lower level interactions may create noise for the definition of higher levels. Diverse modularity-molding factors such as folding, function, and selection, can have a misleading effect when trying to define a given type of module. It is thus important to keep in mind this complexity when defining modularity in protein structures and interpreting the outcome modularity inference approaches.

  18. How round is a protein? Exploring protein structures for globularity using conformal mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel eHass

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new algorithm that automatically computes a measure of the geometric difference between the surface of a protein and a round sphere. The algorithm takes as input two triangulated genus zero surfaces representing the protein and the round sphere, respectively, and constructs a discrete conformal map between these surfaces. The conformal map is chosen to minimize a symmetric elastic energy that measures the distance of the constructed conformal map from an isometry. We illustrate our approach on a set of basic sample problems and then on a dataset of diverse protein structures. We show first that the symmetric elastic energy is able to quantify the roundness of the Platonic solids and that for these surfaces it replicates well traditional measures of roundness such as the sphericity. We then demonstrate that the symmetric elastic energy captures both global and local differences between two surfaces, showing that our method identifies the presence of protruding regions in protein structures and quantifies how these regions make the shape of a protein deviate from globularity. Based on these results, we show that the symmetric elastic energy serves as a probe of the limits of the application of conformal mappings to parametrize protein shapes. We identify limitations of the method and discuss its extension to achieving automatic registration of protein structures based on their surface geometry.

  19. Predicting and validating protein interactions using network structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Yang Chen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions play a vital part in the function of a cell. As experimental techniques for detection and validation of protein interactions are time consuming, there is a need for computational methods for this task. Protein interactions appear to form a network with a relatively high degree of local clustering. In this paper we exploit this clustering by suggesting a score based on triplets of observed protein interactions. The score utilises both protein characteristics and network properties. Our score based on triplets is shown to complement existing techniques for predicting protein interactions, outperforming them on data sets which display a high degree of clustering. The predicted interactions score highly against test measures for accuracy. Compared to a similar score derived from pairwise interactions only, the triplet score displays higher sensitivity and specificity. By looking at specific examples, we show how an experimental set of interactions can be enriched and validated. As part of this work we also examine the effect of different prior databases upon the accuracy of prediction and find that the interactions from the same kingdom give better results than from across kingdoms, suggesting that there may be fundamental differences between the networks. These results all emphasize that network structure is important and helps in the accurate prediction of protein interactions. The protein interaction data set and the program used in our analysis, and a list of predictions and validations, are available at http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/bioinfo/resources/PredictingInteractions.

  20. Improving the accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction using structural alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallin Warren J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has steadily improved over the past 30 years. Now many secondary structure prediction methods routinely achieve an accuracy (Q3 of about 75%. We believe this accuracy could be further improved by including structure (as opposed to sequence database comparisons as part of the prediction process. Indeed, given the large size of the Protein Data Bank (>35,000 sequences, the probability of a newly identified sequence having a structural homologue is actually quite high. Results We have developed a method that performs structure-based sequence alignments as part of the secondary structure prediction process. By mapping the structure of a known homologue (sequence ID >25% onto the query protein's sequence, it is possible to predict at least a portion of that query protein's secondary structure. By integrating this structural alignment approach with conventional (sequence-based secondary structure methods and then combining it with a "jury-of-experts" system to generate a consensus result, it is possible to attain very high prediction accuracy. Using a sequence-unique test set of 1644 proteins from EVA, this new method achieves an average Q3 score of 81.3%. Extensive testing indicates this is approximately 4–5% better than any other method currently available. Assessments using non sequence-unique test sets (typical of those used in proteome annotation or structural genomics indicate that this new method can achieve a Q3 score approaching 88%. Conclusion By using both sequence and structure databases and by exploiting the latest techniques in machine learning it is possible to routinely predict protein secondary structure with an accuracy well above 80%. A program and web server, called PROTEUS, that performs these secondary structure predictions is accessible at http://wishart.biology.ualberta.ca/proteus. For high throughput or batch sequence analyses, the PROTEUS programs

  1. Quality assessment of protein model-structures based on structural and functional similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Bogumil M; Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Kotulska, Malgorzata

    2012-09-21

    Experimental determination of protein 3D structures is expensive, time consuming and sometimes impossible. A gap between number of protein structures deposited in the World Wide Protein Data Bank and the number of sequenced proteins constantly broadens. Computational modeling is deemed to be one of the ways to deal with the problem. Although protein 3D structure prediction is a difficult task, many tools are available. These tools can model it from a sequence or partial structural information, e.g. contact maps. Consequently, biologists have the ability to generate automatically a putative 3D structure model of any protein. However, the main issue becomes evaluation of the model quality, which is one of the most important challenges of structural biology. GOBA--Gene Ontology-Based Assessment is a novel Protein Model Quality Assessment Program. It estimates the compatibility between a model-structure and its expected function. GOBA is based on the assumption that a high quality model is expected to be structurally similar to proteins functionally similar to the prediction target. Whereas DALI is used to measure structure similarity, protein functional similarity is quantified using standardized and hierarchical description of proteins provided by Gene Ontology combined with Wang's algorithm for calculating semantic similarity. Two approaches are proposed to express the quality of protein model-structures. One is a single model quality assessment method, the other is its modification, which provides a relative measure of model quality. Exhaustive evaluation is performed on data sets of model-structures submitted to the CASP8 and CASP9 contests. The validation shows that the method is able to discriminate between good and bad model-structures. The best of tested GOBA scores achieved 0.74 and 0.8 as a mean Pearson correlation to the observed quality of models in our CASP8 and CASP9-based validation sets. GOBA also obtained the best result for two targets of CASP8, and

  2. Prediction of protein-protein interactions in dengue virus coat proteins guided by low resolution cryoEM structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narayanaswamy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus along with the other members of the flaviviridae family has reemerged as deadly human pathogens. Understanding the mechanistic details of these infections can be highly rewarding in developing effective antivirals. During maturation of the virus inside the host cell, the coat proteins E and M undergo conformational changes, altering the morphology of the viral coat. However, due to low resolution nature of the available 3-D structures of viral assemblies, the atomic details of these changes are still elusive. Results In the present analysis, starting from Cα positions of low resolution cryo electron microscopic structures the residue level details of protein-protein interaction interfaces of dengue virus coat proteins have been predicted. By comparing the preexisting structures of virus in different phases of life cycle, the changes taking place in these predicted protein-protein interaction interfaces were followed as a function of maturation process of the virus. Besides changing the current notion about the presence of only homodimers in the mature viral coat, the present analysis indicated presence of a proline-rich motif at the protein-protein interaction interface of the coat protein. Investigating the conservation status of these seemingly functionally crucial residues across other members of flaviviridae family enabled dissecting common mechanisms used for infections by these viruses. Conclusions Thus, using computational approach the present analysis has provided better insights into the preexisting low resolution structures of virus assemblies, the findings of which can be made use of in designing effective antivirals against these deadly human pathogens.

  3. Exploring the universe of protein structures beyond the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio, Pilar; Trovato, Antonio; Pietrucci, Fabio; Seno, Flavio; Maritan, Amos; Laio, Alessandro

    2010-11-04

    It is currently believed that the atlas of existing protein structures is faithfully represented in the Protein Data Bank. However, whether this atlas covers the full universe of all possible protein structures is still a highly debated issue. By using a sophisticated numerical approach, we performed an exhaustive exploration of the conformational space of a 60 amino acid polypeptide chain described with an accurate all-atom interaction potential. We generated a database of around 30,000 compact folds with at least of secondary structure corresponding to local minima of the potential energy. This ensemble plausibly represents the universe of protein folds of similar length; indeed, all the known folds are represented in the set with good accuracy. However, we discover that the known folds form a rather small subset, which cannot be reproduced by choosing random structures in the database. Rather, natural and possible folds differ by the contact order, on average significantly smaller in the former. This suggests the presence of an evolutionary bias, possibly related to kinetic accessibility, towards structures with shorter loops between contacting residues. Beside their conceptual relevance, the new structures open a range of practical applications such as the development of accurate structure prediction strategies, the optimization of force fields, and the identification and design of novel folds.

  4. Exploring the universe of protein structures beyond the Protein Data Bank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Cossio

    Full Text Available It is currently believed that the atlas of existing protein structures is faithfully represented in the Protein Data Bank. However, whether this atlas covers the full universe of all possible protein structures is still a highly debated issue. By using a sophisticated numerical approach, we performed an exhaustive exploration of the conformational space of a 60 amino acid polypeptide chain described with an accurate all-atom interaction potential. We generated a database of around 30,000 compact folds with at least of secondary structure corresponding to local minima of the potential energy. This ensemble plausibly represents the universe of protein folds of similar length; indeed, all the known folds are represented in the set with good accuracy. However, we discover that the known folds form a rather small subset, which cannot be reproduced by choosing random structures in the database. Rather, natural and possible folds differ by the contact order, on average significantly smaller in the former. This suggests the presence of an evolutionary bias, possibly related to kinetic accessibility, towards structures with shorter loops between contacting residues. Beside their conceptual relevance, the new structures open a range of practical applications such as the development of accurate structure prediction strategies, the optimization of force fields, and the identification and design of novel folds.

  5. Structure of Pfu Pop5, an archaeal RNase P protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ross C; Bohlen, Christopher J; Foster, Mark P; Bell, Charles E

    2006-01-24

    We have used NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of PF1378 (Pfu Pop5), one of four protein subunits of archaeal RNase P that shares a homolog in the eukaryotic enzyme. RNase P is an essential and ubiquitous ribonucleoprotein enzyme required for maturation of tRNA. In bacteria, the enzyme's RNA subunit is responsible for cleaving the single-stranded 5' leader sequence of precursor tRNA molecules (pre-tRNA), whereas the protein subunit assists in substrate binding. Although in bacteria the RNase P holoenzyme consists of one large catalytic RNA and one small protein subunit, in archaea and eukarya the enzyme contains several (> or =4) protein subunits, each of which lacks sequence similarity to the bacterial protein. The functional role of the proteins is poorly understood, as is the increased complexity in comparison to the bacterial enzyme. Pfu Pop5 has been directly implicated in catalysis by the observation that it pairs with PF1914 (Pfu Rpp30) to functionally reconstitute the catalytic domain of the RNA subunit. The protein adopts an alpha-beta sandwich fold highly homologous to the single-stranded RNA binding RRM domain. Furthermore, the three-dimensional arrangement of Pfu Pop5's structural elements is remarkably similar to that of the bacterial protein subunit. NMR spectra have been used to map the interaction of Pop5 with Pfu Rpp30. The data presented permit tantalizing hypotheses regarding the role of this protein subunit shared by archaeal and eukaryotic RNase P.

  6. Structural model of dodecameric heat-shock protein Hsp21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutsdottir, Gudrun; Härmark, Johan; Weide, Yoran

    2017-01-01

    Small heat-shock proteins (sHsps) prevent aggregation of thermosensitive client proteins in a first line of defense against cellular stress. The mechanisms by which they perform this function have been hard to define due to limited structural information; currently, there is only one high......-resolution structure of a plant sHsp published, that of the cytosolic Hsp16.9. We took interest in Hsp21, a chloroplast-localized sHsp crucial for plant stress resistance, which has even longer N-terminal arms than Hsp16.9, with a functionally important and conserved methionine-rich motif. To provide a framework...... for investigating structure-function relationships of Hsp21 and understanding these sequence variations, we developed a structural model of Hsp21 based on homology modeling, cryo-EM, cross-linking mass spectrometry, NMR, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Our data suggest a dodecameric arrangement of two trimer...

  7. Systematic comparison of crystal and NMR protein structures deposited in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikic, Kresimir; Tomic, Sanja; Carugo, Oliviero

    2010-09-03

    Nearly all the macromolecular three-dimensional structures deposited in Protein Data Bank were determined by either crystallographic (X-ray) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopic methods. This paper reports a systematic comparison of the crystallographic and NMR results deposited in the files of the Protein Data Bank, in order to find out to which extent these information can be aggregated in bioinformatics. A non-redundant data set containing 109 NMR - X-ray structure pairs of nearly identical proteins was derived from the Protein Data Bank. A series of comparisons were performed by focusing the attention towards both global features and local details. It was observed that: (1) the RMDS values between NMR and crystal structures range from about 1.5 Å to about 2.5 Å; (2) the correlation between conformational deviations and residue type reveals that hydrophobic amino acids are more similar in crystal and NMR structures than hydrophilic amino acids; (3) the correlation between solvent accessibility of the residues and their conformational variability in solid state and in solution is relatively modest (correlation coefficient = 0.462); (4) beta strands on average match better between NMR and crystal structures than helices and loops; (5) conformational differences between loops are independent of crystal packing interactions in the solid state; (6) very seldom, side chains buried in the protein interior are observed to adopt different orientations in the solid state and in solution.

  8. Covalent bond symmetry breaking and protein secondary structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, Martin; Niemi, Antti J.

    2011-01-01

    Both symmetry and organized breaking of symmetry have a pivotal r\\^ole in our understanding of structure and pattern formation in physical systems, including the origin of mass in the Universe and the chiral structure of biological macromolecules. Here we report on a new symmetry breaking phenomenon that takes place in all biologically active proteins, thus this symmetry breaking relates to the inception of life. The unbroken symmetry determines the covalent bond geometry of a sp3 hybridized ...

  9. StructureMapper: a high-throughput algorithm for analyzing protein sequence locations in structural data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurminen, Anssi; Hytönen, Vesa P; Valencia, Alfonso

    2018-02-14

    StructureMapper is a high-throughput algorithm for automated mapping of protein primary amino sequence locations to existing three-dimensional protein structures. The algorithm is intended for facilitating easy and efficient utilization of structural information in protein characterization and proteomics. StructureMapper provides an analysis of the identified structural locations that includes surface accessibility, flexibility, protein-protein interfacing, intrinsic disorder prediction, secondary structure assignment, biological assembly information, and sequence identity percentages, among other metrics. We have showcased the use of the algorithm by estimating the coverage of structural information of the human proteome, identifying critical interface residues in DNA polymerase γ, profiling structurally protease cleavage sites and post-translational modification sites, and by identifying putative, novel phosphoswitches. The StructureMapper algorithm is available as an online service and standalone implementation at http://structuremapper.uta.fi. vesa.hytonen@uta.fi. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Protein flexibility: coordinate uncertainties and interpretation of structural differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashin, Alexander A., E-mail: alexander-rashin@hotmail.com [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); LH Baker Center for Bioinformatics and Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 112 Office and Lab Building, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); Rashin, Abraham H. L. [BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States); Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 22371 BPO WAY, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8123 (United States); Jernigan, Robert L. [LH Baker Center for Bioinformatics and Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Molecular Biology, 112 Office and Lab Building, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-3020 (United States); BioChemComp Inc., 543 Sagamore Avenue, Teaneck, NJ 07666 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Criteria for the interpretability of coordinate differences and a new method for identifying rigid-body motions and nonrigid deformations in protein conformational changes are developed and applied to functionally induced and crystallization-induced conformational changes. Valid interpretations of conformational movements in protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography require that the movement magnitudes exceed their uncertainty threshold. Here, it is shown that such thresholds can be obtained from the distance difference matrices (DDMs) of 1014 pairs of independently determined structures of bovine ribonuclease A and sperm whale myoglobin, with no explanations provided for reportedly minor coordinate differences. The smallest magnitudes of reportedly functional motions are just above these thresholds. Uncertainty thresholds can provide objective criteria that distinguish between true conformational changes and apparent ‘noise’, showing that some previous interpretations of protein coordinate changes attributed to external conditions or mutations may be doubtful or erroneous. The use of uncertainty thresholds, DDMs, the newly introduced CDDMs (contact distance difference matrices) and a novel simple rotation algorithm allows a more meaningful classification and description of protein motions, distinguishing between various rigid-fragment motions and nonrigid conformational deformations. It is also shown that half of 75 pairs of identical molecules, each from the same asymmetric crystallographic cell, exhibit coordinate differences that range from just outside the coordinate uncertainty threshold to the full magnitude of large functional movements. Thus, crystallization might often induce protein conformational changes that are comparable to those related to or induced by the protein function.

  11. Structure of haze forming proteins in white wines: Vitis vinifera thaumatin-like proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Marangon

    Full Text Available Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1, and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C, with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions.

  12. Structure of Haze Forming Proteins in White Wines: Vitis vinifera Thaumatin-Like Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Matteo; Van Sluyter, Steven C.; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Menz, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Grape thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) play roles in plant-pathogen interactions and can cause protein haze in white wine unless removed prior to bottling. Different isoforms of TLPs have different hazing potential and aggregation behavior. Here we present the elucidation of the molecular structures of three grape TLPs that display different hazing potential. The three TLPs have very similar structures despite belonging to two different classes (F2/4JRU is a thaumatin-like protein while I/4L5H and H2/4MBT are VVTL1), and having different unfolding temperatures (56 vs. 62°C), with protein F2/4JRU being heat unstable and forming haze, while I/4L5H does not. These differences in properties are attributable to the conformation of a single loop and the amino acid composition of its flanking regions. PMID:25463627

  13. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboul-Magd Mohammed O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing α-helices, β-strands, and non-regular structures from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI, a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Results Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input

  14. What determines the structures of native folds of proteins?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trovato, Antonio; Hoang, Trinh X; Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Seno, Flavio

    2005-01-01

    We review a simple physical model (Hoang et al 2004 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101 7960, Banavar et al 2004 Phys. Rev. E at press) which captures the essential physico-chemical ingredients that determine protein structure, such as the inherent anisotropy of a chain molecule, the geometrical and energetic constraints placed by hydrogen bonds, sterics, and hydrophobicity. Within this framework, marginally compact conformations resembling the native state folds of proteins emerge as competing minima in the free energy landscape. Here we demonstrate that a hydrophobic-polar (HP) sequence composed of regularly repeated patterns has as its ground state a β-helical structure remarkably similar to a known architecture in the Protein Data Bank

  15. Neutron structure of the hydrophobic plant protein crambin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teeter, M.M.; Kossiakoff, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Crystals of the small hydrophobic protein crambin have been shown to diffract to a resolution of at least 0.88 A. This means that crambin presents a rare opportunity to study a protein structure at virtually atomic resolution. The high resolution of the diffraction pattern coupled with the assets of neutron diffraction present the distinct possibility that crambin's analysis may surpass that of any other protein system in degree and accuracy of detail. The neutron crambin structure is currently being refined at 1.50 A (44.9% of the data to 1.2 A has also been included). It is expected that a nominal resolution of 1.0 A can be achieved. 15 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  16. De Novo Mutations in EBF3 Cause a Neurodevelopmental Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleven, Hannah; Welsh, Seth J; Yu, Jing; Churchill, Mair E A; Wright, Caroline F; Henderson, Alex; Horvath, Rita; Rankin, Julia; Vogt, Julie; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Green, Andrew; King, Mary D; Cox, Helen; Armstrong, Linlea; Lehman, Anna; Nelson, Tanya N; Williams, Jonathan; Clouston, Penny; Hagman, James; Németh, Andrea H

    2017-01-05

    Early B cell factor 3 (EBF3) is an atypical transcription factor that is thought to influence the laminar formation of the cerebral cortex. Here, we report that de novo mutations in EBF3 cause a complex neurodevelopmental syndrome. The mutations were identified in two large-scale sequencing projects: the UK Deciphering Developmental Disorders (DDD) study and the Canadian Clinical Assessment of the Utility of Sequencing and Evaluation as a Service (CAUSES) study. The core phenotype includes moderate to severe intellectual disability, and many individuals exhibit cerebellar ataxia, subtle facial dysmorphism, strabismus, and vesicoureteric reflux, suggesting that EBF3 has a widespread developmental role. Pathogenic de novo variants identified in EBF3 include multiple loss-of-function and missense mutations. Structural modeling suggested that the missense mutations affect DNA binding. Functional analysis of mutant proteins with missense substitutions revealed reduced transcriptional activities and abilities to form heterodimers with wild-type EBF3. We conclude that EBF3, a transcription factor previously unknown to be associated with human disease, is important for brain and other organ development and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of similar regions of protein structures using integrated sequence and structure analysis tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiland Randy

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding protein function from its structure is a challenging problem. Sequence based approaches for finding homology have broad use for annotation of both structure and function. 3D structural information of protein domains and their interactions provide a complementary view to structure function relationships to sequence information. We have developed a web site http://www.sblest.org/ and an API of web services that enables users to submit protein structures and identify statistically significant neighbors and the underlying structural environments that make that match using a suite of sequence and structure analysis tools. To do this, we have integrated S-BLEST, PSI-BLAST and HMMer based superfamily predictions to give a unique integrated view to prediction of SCOP superfamilies, EC number, and GO term, as well as identification of the protein structural environments that are associated with that prediction. Additionally, we have extended UCSF Chimera and PyMOL to support our web services, so that users can characterize their own proteins of interest. Results Users are able to submit their own queries or use a structure already in the PDB. Currently the databases that a user can query include the popular structural datasets ASTRAL 40 v1.69, ASTRAL 95 v1.69, CLUSTER50, CLUSTER70 and CLUSTER90 and PDBSELECT25. The results can be downloaded directly from the site and include function prediction, analysis of the most conserved environments and automated annotation of query proteins. These results reflect both the hits found with PSI-BLAST, HMMer and with S-BLEST. We have evaluated how well annotation transfer can be performed on SCOP ID's, Gene Ontology (GO ID's and EC Numbers. The method is very efficient and totally automated, generally taking around fifteen minutes for a 400 residue protein. Conclusion With structural genomics initiatives determining structures with little, if any, functional characterization

  18. Protein quaternary structure and aggregation in relation to allergenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxtel, van E.L.

    2007-01-01

    In order to induce systemic food allergic reactions in humans, proteins after digestion in the human gastro-intestinal tract should still be able to bind IgE. The aim of the work presented in this thesis was to determine the effects of heating on the structure and digestibility of cupin and prolamin

  19. Iron Sulfur Proteins and their Synthetic Analogues: Structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The understanding of structures and functions of iron sulfur proteins is an area ofbio-inorganic chemistry which has developed into a subject of great significance over the last two decades. This group of non-heme iron-sulfur (Fe-S) compounds are involved in electron transfer reactions in biological systems and are thus.

  20. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J R; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-01-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo

  1. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U

    2000-01-01

    fundamental structure/function relationships in the binding and catalytic mechanisms. In parallel, issues of relevance for application have been pursued using protein engineering to improve the industrial properties. The present review focuses on recent findings on the catalytic site, mechanism of action......, substrate recognition, the linker region, the multidomain architecture, the engineering of specificity and stability, and roles of individual substrate binding subsites....

  2. Characterization of chicken riboflavin carrier protein gene structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    chicken RCP gene regulation, the structure and the 5′ flanking region of the gene have been characterized. 2. Methods. 2.1 Isolation of RCP genomic clones ..... The work was supported by the Department of Science and Tech- nology, New Delhi by a grant to PK. References. Adiga P R 1994 Riboflavin Carrier Protein in ...

  3. Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Like similar repeats, Proline and Histidine had a low propensity. This may be because Histidine is involved in the active site and is highly conserved, while Proline has a specific function in the three-dimensional structure of the protein. Figure 4. The propensity of different amino acids to form different types of repeats is ...

  4. Correlated mutations in protein sequences: Phylogenetic and structural effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Giraud, B.G. [C.E.N. Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France). Service Physique Theorique; Liu, L.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Stormo, G.D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

    1998-12-01

    Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for RNA molecules is relatively successful in elucidating RNA secondary structure, as well as some aspects of tertiary structure. Covariation analysis of sets of aligned sequences for protein molecules is successful in certain instances in elucidating certain structural and functional links, but in general, pairs of sites displaying highly covarying mutations in protein sequences do not necessarily correspond to sites that are spatially close in the protein structure. In this paper the authors identify two reasons why naive use of covariation analysis for protein sequences fails to reliably indicate sequence positions that are spatially proximate. The first reason involves the bias introduced in calculation of covariation measures due to the fact that biological sequences are generally related by a non-trivial phylogenetic tree. The authors present a null-model approach to solve this problem. The second reason involves linked chains of covariation which can result in pairs of sites displaying significant covariation even though they are not spatially proximate. They present a maximum entropy solution to this classic problem of causation versus correlation. The methodologies are validated in simulation.

  5. Iron Sulfur Proteins and their Synthetic Analogues: Structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    group of non-heme iron-sulfur (Fe-S) compounds are involved in ... The sulfur ligands are arranged tetrahedrally about the iron atoms. The presence of inorganic sulfur is indicated through the release of. H. 2. S gas when these proteins are treated with a ... analysis of this structure and the tri-iron cluster was corrected as.

  6. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-21

    Jun 21, 2007 ... However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 ... each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codon- ... class by SCOP database are removed from our analysis.

  7. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    2007-06-21

    Jun 21, 2007 ... usage of Lactobacillus species; Nucleic Acids Res. 22. 929–936. Siemion I Z and Siemion P J 1994 The informational context of the third base in amino acid codons; Biosystems 33. 139–148. Tao X and Dafu D 1998 The relationship between synonymous codon usage and protein Structure; FEBS Lett.

  8. A new scoring function for protein-protein docking that identifies native structures with unprecedented accuracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, Irina S.; da Silva Martins, João Miguel; Coimbra, João T.S.

    2015-01-01

    the most correct one, in particular when a single answer is asked for. With such a low success rate it is difficult to point out one docked structure as being native-like. Here we present a new, high accuracy, scoring method to identify the 3D structure of P-P complexes among a set of trial poses...... the trial structures and identifies the native-like structures with unprecedented accuracy (∼94%), providing the correct P-P 3D structures that biochemists and molecular biologists need to pursue their studies. With such a success rate, the bottleneck of protein-protein docking moves from the scoring....... It incorporates alanine scanning mutagenesis experimental data that need to be obtained a priori. The scoring scheme works by matching the computational and the experimental alanine scanning mutagenesis results. The size of the trial P-P interface area is also taken into account. We show that the method ranks...

  9. Structural Characterization of Clusterin-Chaperone Client Protein Complexes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Amy R.; Yerbury, Justin J.; Wilson, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    Clusterin (CLU) is a potent extracellular chaperone that inhibits protein aggregation and precipitation otherwise caused by physical or chemical stresses (e.g. heat, reduction). This action involves CLU forming soluble high molecular weight (HMW) complexes with the client protein. Other than their unquantified large size, the physical characteristics of these complexes were previously unknown. In this study, HMW CLU-citrate synthase (CS), HMW CLU-fibrinogen (FGN), and HMW CLU-glutathione S-transferase (GST) complexes were generated in vitro, and their structures studied using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), ELISA, SDS-PAGE, dynamic light scattering (DLS), bisANS fluorescence, and circular dichroism spectrophotometry (CD). Densitometry of Coomassie Blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels indicated that all three HMW CLU-client protein complexes had an approximate mass ratio of 1:2 (CLU:client protein). SEC indicated that all three clients formed complexes with CLU ≥ 4 × 107 Da; however, DLS estimated HMW CLU-FGN to have a diameter of 108.57 ± 18.09 nm, while HMW CLU-CS and HMW CLU-GST were smaller with estimated diameters of 51.06 ± 6.87 nm and 52.61 ± 7.71 nm, respectively. Measurements of bisANS fluorescence suggest that the chaperone action of CLU involves preventing the exposure to aqueous solvent of hydrophobic regions that are normally exposed by the client protein during heat-induced unfolding. CD analysis indicated that, depending on the individual client protein, CLU may interact with a variety of intermediates on protein unfolding pathways with different amounts of native secondary structure. In vivo, soluble complexes like those studied here are likely to serve as vehicles to dispose of otherwise dangerous aggregation-prone misfolded extracellular proteins. PMID:19535339

  10. Structural Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Complexes Involved in Intracellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Klára; Sok, Péter; Reményi, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Signaling complexes within the cell convert extracellular cues into physiological outcomes. Their assembly involves signaling enzymes, allosteric regulators and scaffold proteins that often contain long stretches of disordered protein regions, display multi-domain architectures, and binding affinity between individual components is low. These features are indispensable for their central roles as dynamic information processing hubs, on the other hand they also make reconstruction of structurally homogeneous complex samples highly challenging. In this present chapter we discuss protein machinery which influences extracellular signal reception, intracellular pathway activity, and cytoskeletal or transcriptional activity.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  12. Compare local pocket and global protein structure models by small structure patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-09-09

    Researchers proposed several criteria to assess the quality of predicted protein structures because it is one of the essential tasks in the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) competitions. Popular criteria include root mean squared deviation (RMSD), MaxSub score, TM-score, GDT-TS and GDT-HA scores. All these criteria require calculation of rigid transformations to superimpose the the predicted protein structure to the native protein structure. Yet, how to obtain the rigid transformations is unknown or with high time complexity, and, hence, heuristic algorithms were proposed. In this work, we carefully design various small structure patterns, including the ones specifically tuned for local pockets. Such structure patterns are biologically meaningful, and address the issue of relying on a sufficient number of backbone residue fragments for existing methods. We sample the rigid transformations from these small structure patterns; and the optimal superpositions yield by these small structures are refined and reported. As a result, among 11; 669 pairs of predicted and native local protein pocket models from the CASP10 dataset, the GDT-TS scores calculated by our method are significantly higher than those calculated by LGA. Moreover, our program is computationally much more efficient. Source codes and executables are publicly available at http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/prosta/

  13. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. 3D protein structure prediction with genetic tabu search algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Ting; Luo, Huiping; Yang, Jack Y; Deng, Youping; Tang, Jinshan; Yang, Mary Qu

    2010-05-28

    Protein structure prediction (PSP) has important applications in different fields, such as drug design, disease prediction, and so on. In protein structure prediction, there are two important issues. The first one is the design of the structure model and the second one is the design of the optimization technology. Because of the complexity of the realistic protein structure, the structure model adopted in this paper is a simplified model, which is called off-lattice AB model. After the structure model is assumed, optimization technology is needed for searching the best conformation of a protein sequence based on the assumed structure model. However, PSP is an NP-hard problem even if the simplest model is assumed. Thus, many algorithms have been developed to solve the global optimization problem. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm, which combines genetic algorithm (GA) and tabu search (TS) algorithm, is developed to complete this task. In order to develop an efficient optimization algorithm, several improved strategies are developed for the proposed genetic tabu search algorithm. The combined use of these strategies can improve the efficiency of the algorithm. In these strategies, tabu search introduced into the crossover and mutation operators can improve the local search capability, the adoption of variable population size strategy can maintain the diversity of the population, and the ranking selection strategy can improve the possibility of an individual with low energy value entering into next generation. Experiments are performed with Fibonacci sequences and real protein sequences. Experimental results show that the lowest energy obtained by the proposed GATS algorithm is lower than that obtained by previous methods. The hybrid algorithm has the advantages from both genetic algorithm and tabu search algorithm. It makes use of the advantage of multiple search points in genetic algorithm, and can overcome poor hill-climbing capability in the conventional genetic

  15. Integrated visual analysis of protein structures, sequences, and feature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Heinrich, Julian; Hammang, Christopher J; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that give rise to a protein's function, biologists often need to (i) find and access all related atomic-resolution 3D structures, and (ii) map sequence-based features (e.g., domains, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, post-translational modifications) onto these structures. To streamline these processes we recently developed Aquaria, a resource offering unprecedented access to protein structure information based on an all-against-all comparison of SwissProt and PDB sequences. In this work, we provide a requirements analysis for several frequently occuring tasks in molecular biology and describe how design choices in Aquaria meet these requirements. Finally, we show how the interface can be used to explore features of a protein and gain biologically meaningful insights in two case studies conducted by domain experts. The user interface design of Aquaria enables biologists to gain unprecedented access to molecular structures and simplifies the generation of insight. The tasks involved in mapping sequence features onto structures can be conducted easier and faster using Aquaria.

  16. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Claudia C.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Westler, William M.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Markley, John L.

    2015-01-01

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR—from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website ( http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm )

  17. NMRFAM-SDF: a protein structure determination framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dashti, Hesam; Lee, Woonghee; Tonelli, Marco; Cornilescu, Claudia C.; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Westler, William M.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The computationally demanding nature of automated NMR structure determination necessitates a delicate balancing of factors that include the time complexity of data collection, the computational complexity of chemical shift assignments, and selection of proper optimization steps. During the past two decades the computational and algorithmic aspects of several discrete steps of the process have been addressed. Although no single comprehensive solution has emerged, the incorporation of a validation protocol has gained recognition as a necessary step for a robust automated approach. The need for validation becomes even more pronounced in cases of proteins with higher structural complexity, where potentially larger errors generated at each step can propagate and accumulate in the process of structure calculation, thereby significantly degrading the efficacy of any software framework. This paper introduces a complete framework for protein structure determination with NMR—from data acquisition to the structure determination. The aim is twofold: to simplify the structure determination process for non-NMR experts whenever feasible, while maintaining flexibility by providing a set of modules that validate each step, and to enable the assessment of error propagations. This framework, called NMRFAM-SDF (NMRFAM-Structure Determination Framework), and its various components are available for download from the NMRFAM website ( http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm http://nmrfam.wisc.edu/software.htm )

  18. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  19. De Novo Glutamine Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiao; Shi, Xinchong; Zhang, Linqi; Yi, Chang; Zhang, Xuezhen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of de novo glutamine (Gln) synthesis in the proliferation of C6 glioma cells and its detection with 13N-ammonia. Methods: Chronic Gln-deprived C6 glioma (0.06C6) cells were established. The proliferation rates of C6 and 0.06C6 cells were measured under the conditions of Gln deprivation along with or without the addition of ammonia or glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor. 13N-ammonia uptake was assessed in C6 cells by gamma counting and in rats with C6 and 0.06C6 xenografts by micro–positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. The expression of GS in C6 cells and xenografts was assessed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: The Gln-deprived C6 cells showed decreased proliferation ability but had a significant increase in GS expression. Furthermore, we found that low concentration of ammonia was sufficient to maintain the proliferation of Gln-deprived C6 cells, and 13N-ammonia uptake in C6 cells showed Gln-dependent decrease, whereas inhibition of GS markedly reduced the proliferation of C6 cells as well as the uptake of 13N-ammoina. Additionally, microPET/computed tomography exhibited that subcutaneous 0.06C6 xenografts had higher 13N-ammonia uptake and GS expression in contrast to C6 xenografts. Conclusion: De novo Gln synthesis through ammonia–glutamate reaction plays an important role in the proliferation of C6 cells. 13N-ammonia can be a potential metabolic PET tracer for Gln-dependent tumors. PMID:27118759

  20. The E. coli Single Protein Production (cSPP) System for Production and Structural Analysis of Membrane Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Lili; Vaiphei, S. Thangminlal; Shimazu, Tsutomu; Schneider, William M.; Tang, Yuefeng; Mani, Rajeswari; Roth, Monica J.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Inouye, Masayori

    2009-01-01

    At present, only 0.9% of PDB-deposited structures are of membrane proteins in spite of the fact that membrane proteins constitute approximately 30% of total proteins in most genomes from bacteria to humans. Here we address some of the major bottlenecks in the structural studies of membrane proteins and discuss the ability of the new technology, the Single-Protein Production (SPP) system, to help solve these bottlenecks.

  1. A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbajo Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasingly, biologists and biochemists use computational tools to design experiments to probe the function of proteins and/or to engineer them for a variety of different purposes. The most effective strategies rely on the knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. However it is often the case that an experimental structure is not available and that models of different quality are used instead. On the other hand, the relationship between the quality of a model and its appropriate use is not easy to derive in general, and so far it has been analyzed in detail only for specific application. Results This paper describes a database and related software tools that allow testing of a given structure based method on models of a protein representing different levels of accuracy. The comparison of the results of a computational experiment on the experimental structure and on a set of its decoy models will allow developers and users to assess which is the specific threshold of accuracy required to perform the task effectively. Conclusions The ModelDB server automatically builds decoy models of different accuracy for a given protein of known structure and provides a set of useful tools for their analysis. Pre-computed data for a non-redundant set of deposited protein structures are available for analysis and download in the ModelDB database. Implementation, availability and requirements Project name: A resource for benchmarking the usefulness of protein structure models. Project home page: http://bl210.caspur.it/MODEL-DB/MODEL-DB_web/MODindex.php. Operating system(s: Platform independent. Programming language: Perl-BioPerl (program; mySQL, Perl DBI and DBD modules (database; php, JavaScript, Jmol scripting (web server. Other requirements: Java Runtime Environment v1.4 or later, Perl, BioPerl, CPAN modules, HHsearch, Modeller, LGA, NCBI Blast package, DSSP, Speedfill (Surfnet and PSAIA. License: Free. Any

  2. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  3. Electronic structure of proteins and DNA: solid-state aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladik, J J

    1978-01-01

    The generalization of the Hartree-Fock method to periodic systems (polymers or crystals) using a linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) makes it possible to calculate ab initio self-consistent-field LCAO band structures of periodic protein and DNA models. The results obtained for polyglycine, polyalanine, and for the mixed poly(Gly-Ala) periodic chain, as well as for the four homopolynucleotides, are presented. The correction of these band structures for excitonic effects (in the excited state) and for long-range correlation effects is shown also. Furthermore, it is outlined how the short-range correlation in insulator biopolymers and correlation effects in proteins with a partially filled valence band (for instance, due to charge transfer) can be calculated. The Coherent Potential Approximation is outlined and its possible application to aperiodic proteins and DNA is pointed out. Finally the effect of an electron acceptor on proteins or of a chemical carcinogen bound to DNA is discussed as a local perturbation of the band structures of these systems on the basis of the self-consistent resolvent method.

  4. Structural interface parameters are discriminatory in recognising near-native poses of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sony Malhotra

    Full Text Available Interactions at the molecular level in the cellular environment play a very crucial role in maintaining the physiological functioning of the cell. These molecular interactions exist at varied levels viz. protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions or protein-small molecules interactions. Presently in the field, these interactions and their mechanisms mark intensively studied areas. Molecular interactions can also be studied computationally using the approach named as Molecular Docking. Molecular docking employs search algorithms to predict the possible conformations for interacting partners and then calculates interaction energies. However, docking proposes number of solutions as different docked poses and hence offers a serious challenge to identify the native (or near native structures from the pool of these docked poses. Here, we propose a rigorous scoring scheme called DockScore which can be used to rank the docked poses and identify the best docked pose out of many as proposed by docking algorithm employed. The scoring identifies the optimal interactions between the two protein partners utilising various features of the putative interface like area, short contacts, conservation, spatial clustering and the presence of positively charged and hydrophobic residues. DockScore was first trained on a set of 30 protein-protein complexes to determine the weights for different parameters. Subsequently, we tested the scoring scheme on 30 different protein-protein complexes and native or near-native structure were assigned the top rank from a pool of docked poses in 26 of the tested cases. We tested the ability of DockScore to discriminate likely dimer interactions that differ substantially within a homologous family and also demonstrate that DOCKSCORE can distinguish correct pose for all 10 recent CAPRI targets.

  5. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has recently received much attention as a potential drug target in type 2 diabetes. This has in particular been spurred by the finding that PTP1B knockout mice show increased insulin sensitivity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Surprisingly, the highly...... homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...

  6. DNABII proteins play a central role in UPEC biofilm structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Justice, Sheryl S; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Goodman, Steven D

    2015-06-01

    Most chronic and recurrent bacterial infections involve a biofilm component, the foundation of which is the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a conserved and key component of the EPS of pathogenic biofilms. The DNABII protein family includes integration host factor (IHF) and histone-like protein (HU); both are present in the extracellular milieu. We have shown previously that the DNABII proteins are often found in association with eDNA and are critical for the structural integrity of bacterial communities that utilize eDNA as a matrix component. Here, we demonstrate that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain UTI89 incorporates eDNA within its biofilm matrix and that the DNABII proteins are not only important for biofilm growth, but are limiting; exogenous addition of these proteins promotes biofilm formation that is dependent on eDNA. In addition, we show that both subunits of IHF, yet only one subunit of HU (HupB), are critical for UPEC biofilm development. We discuss the roles of these proteins in context of the UPEC EPS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Prediction of protein-protein interaction sites in sequences and 3D structures by random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mile Sikić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying interaction sites in proteins provides important clues to the function of a protein and is becoming increasingly relevant in topics such as systems biology and drug discovery. Although there are numerous papers on the prediction of interaction sites using information derived from structure, there are only a few case reports on the prediction of interaction residues based solely on protein sequence. Here, a sliding window approach is combined with the Random Forests method to predict protein interaction sites using (i a combination of sequence- and structure-derived parameters and (ii sequence information alone. For sequence-based prediction we achieved a precision of 84% with a 26% recall and an F-measure of 40%. When combined with structural information, the prediction performance increases to a precision of 76% and a recall of 38% with an F-measure of 51%. We also present an attempt to rationalize the sliding window size and demonstrate that a nine-residue window is the most suitable for predictor construction. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our prediction methods by modeling the Ras-Raf complex using predicted interaction sites as target binding interfaces. Our results suggest that it is possible to predict protein interaction sites with quite a high accuracy using only sequence information.

  8. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Laddomada

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome” and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”, in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies.

  9. Structural organization of G-protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic-resolution structures of the transmembrane 7-α-helical domains of 26 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (including opsins, cationic amine, melatonin, purine, chemokine, opioid, and glycoprotein hormone receptors and two related proteins, retinochrome and Duffy erythrocyte antigen) were calculated by distance geometry using interhelical hydrogen bonds formed by various proteins from the family and collectively applied as distance constraints, as described previously [Pogozheva et al., Biophys. J., 70 (1997) 1963]. The main structural features of the calculated GPCR models are described and illustrated by examples. Some of the features reflect physical interactions that are responsible for the structural stability of the transmembrane α-bundle: the formation of extensive networks of interhelical H-bonds and sulfur-aromatic clusters that are spatially organized as 'polarity gradients' the close packing of side-chains throughout the transmembrane domain; and the formation of interhelical disulfide bonds in some receptors and a plausible Zn2+ binding center in retinochrome. Other features of the models are related to biological function and evolution of GPCRs: the formation of a common 'minicore' of 43 evolutionarily conserved residues; a multitude of correlated replacements throughout the transmembrane domain; an Na+-binding site in some receptors, and excellent complementarity of receptor binding pockets to many structurally dissimilar, conformationally constrained ligands, such as retinal, cyclic opioid peptides, and cationic amine ligands. The calculated models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data.

  10. Structure determination of drug target proteins by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamada, Taro; Adachi, Motoyasu

    2010-01-01

    High resolution X-ray crystallography provides information for most of the atoms comprising the proteins, with the exception of hydrogen atoms. Whereas, neutron crystallography, which is a powerful technique for locating hydrogen atoms, enables us to obtain accurate atomic positions within proteins. Neutron diffraction data can provide information of the location of hydrogen atoms to the structural information determined by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show the recent results of the structural determination of drug-target proteins, porcine pancreatic elastase and human immuno-deficiency virus type-1 protease by both X-ray and neutron diffraction. The structure of porcine pancreatic elastase with its potent inhibitor was determined to 0.094 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.165 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The structure of HIV-PR with its potent inhibitor was also determined to 0.093 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.19 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The ionization state and the location of hydrogen atoms of the catalytic residue in these enzymes were determined by neutron diffraction. Furthermore, collaborative use of both X-ray and neutron crystallography to identify the location of ambiguous hydrogen atoms will be shown. (author)

  11. Automatic classification of protein structures using low-dimensional structure space mappings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Daniel; Singh, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Protein function is closely intertwined with protein structure. Discovery of meaningful structure-function relationships is of utmost importance in protein biochemistry and has led to creation of high-quality, manually curated classification databases, such as the gold-standard SCOP (Structural Classification of Proteins) database. The SCOP database and its counterparts such as CATH provide a detailed and comprehensive description of the structural and evolutionary relationships of the proteins of known structure and are widely employed in structural and computational biology. Since manual classification is both subjective and highly laborious, automated classification of novel structures is increasingly an active area of research. The design of methods for automated structure classification has been rendered even more important since the recent past, due to the explosion in number of solved structures arising out of various structural biology initiatives. In this paper we propose an approach to the problem of structure classification based on creating and tessellating low dimensional maps of the protein structure space (MPSS). Given a set of protein structures, an MPSS is a low dimensional embedding of structural similarity-based distances between the molecules. In an MPSS, a group of proteins (such as all the proteins in the PDB or sub-samplings thereof) under consideration are represented as point clouds and structural relatedness maps to spatial adjacency of the points. In this paper we present methods and results that show that MPSS can be used to create tessellations of the protein space comparable to the clade systems within SCOP. Though we have used SCOP as the gold standard, the proposed approach is equally applicable for other structural classifications. In the proposed approach, we first construct MPSS using pairwise alignment distances obtained from four established structure alignment algorithms (CE, Dali, FATCAT and MATT). The low dimensional

  12. Cleavage of the HPV16 Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Virion Morphogenesis Ablates the Requirement for Cellular Furin during De Novo Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Cruz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Infections by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV are the causative agents for the development of cervical cancer. As with other non-enveloped viruses, HPVs are taken up by the cell through endocytosis following primary attachment to the host cell. Through studies using recombinant pseudovirus particles (PsV, many host cellular proteins have been implicated in the process. The proprotein convertase furin has been demonstrated to cleave the minor capsid protein, L2, post-attachment to host cells and is required for infectious entry by HPV16 PsV. In contrast, using biochemical inhibition by a furin inhibitor and furin-negative cells, we show that tissue-derived HPV16 native virus (NV initiates infection independent of cellular furin. We show that HPV16 L2 is cleaved during virion morphogenesis in differentiated tissue. In addition, HPV45 is also not dependent on cellular furin, but two other alpha papillomaviruses, HPV18 and HPV31, are dependent on the activity of cellular furin for infection.

  13. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedermannová, Lada, E-mail: lada.biedermannova@ibt.cas.cz; Schneider, Bohdan [Institute of Biotechnology CAS, Videnska 1083, 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-10-27

    The hydration of protein crystal structures was studied at the level of individual amino acids. The dependence of the number of water molecules and their preferred spatial localization on various parameters, such as solvent accessibility, secondary structure and side-chain conformation, was determined. Crystallography provides unique information about the arrangement of water molecules near protein surfaces. Using a nonredundant set of 2818 protein crystal structures with a resolution of better than 1.8 Å, the extent and structure of the hydration shell of all 20 standard amino-acid residues were analyzed as function of the residue conformation, secondary structure and solvent accessibility. The results show how hydration depends on the amino-acid conformation and the environment in which it occurs. After conformational clustering of individual residues, the density distribution of water molecules was compiled and the preferred hydration sites were determined as maxima in the pseudo-electron-density representation of water distributions. Many hydration sites interact with both main-chain and side-chain amino-acid atoms, and several occurrences of hydration sites with less canonical contacts, such as carbon–donor hydrogen bonds, OH–π interactions and off-plane interactions with aromatic heteroatoms, are also reported. Information about the location and relative importance of the empirically determined preferred hydration sites in proteins has applications in improving the current methods of hydration-site prediction in molecular replacement, ab initio protein structure prediction and the set-up of molecular-dynamics simulations.

  14. Dengue Virus Non-structural Protein 1 Modulates Infectious Particle Production via Interaction with the Structural Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Scaturro

    Full Text Available Non-structural protein 1 (NS1 is one of the most enigmatic proteins of the Dengue virus (DENV, playing distinct functions in immune evasion, pathogenesis and viral replication. The recently reported crystal structure of DENV NS1 revealed its peculiar three-dimensional fold; however, detailed information on NS1 function at different steps of the viral replication cycle is still missing. By using the recently reported crystal structure, as well as amino acid sequence conservation, as a guide for a comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis study, we discovered that in addition to being essential for RNA replication, DENV NS1 is also critically required for the production of infectious virus particles. Taking advantage of a trans-complementation approach based on fully functional epitope-tagged NS1 variants, we identified previously unreported interactions between NS1 and the structural proteins Envelope (E and precursor Membrane (prM. Interestingly, coimmunoprecipitation revealed an additional association with capsid, arguing that NS1 interacts via the structural glycoproteins with DENV particles. Results obtained with mutations residing either in the NS1 Wing domain or in the β-ladder domain suggest that NS1 might have two distinct functions in the assembly of DENV particles. By using a trans-complementation approach with a C-terminally KDEL-tagged ER-resident NS1, we demonstrate that the secretion of NS1 is dispensable for both RNA replication and infectious particle production. In conclusion, our results provide an extensive genetic map of NS1 determinants essential for viral RNA replication and identify a novel role of NS1 in virion production that is mediated via interaction with the structural proteins. These studies extend the list of NS1 functions and argue for a central role in coordinating replication and assembly/release of infectious DENV particles.

  15. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  16. Structural Basis for Target Protein Regcognition by Thiredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an ubiquitous protein disulfide reductase that possesses two redox active cysteines in the conserved active site sequence motif, Trp-CysN-Gly/Pro-Pro-CysC situated in the so called Trx-fold. The lack of insight into the protein substrate recognition mechanism of Trx has to date...... on HvTrxh2 surface, associated through several van der Waals contacts and three backbone-backbone hydrogen bonds resembling beta-sheet formation. Moreover, a pattern of interactions essentially identical to that in HvTrxh2-S-S-BASI was observed in the structure of HvTrxh1 crystallized in the oxidized...... form. In the crystal lattice, HvTrxh1 formed a dimer, in which a loop segment from one molecule was situated along the hydrophobic groove at the active site of another molecule. The observed manner of protein recognition by Trx was similar in the central part to the glutathione recognition mechanisms...

  17. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng; Rao Zihe; Tien, Po

    2006-01-01

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins

  18. Structural Isosteres of Phosphate Groups in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuezhou; Borrel, Alexandre; Ghemtio, Leo; Regad, Leslie; Boije Af Gennäs, Gustav; Camproux, Anne-Claude; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Xhaard, Henri

    2017-03-27

    We developed a computational workflow to mine the Protein Data Bank for isosteric replacements that exist in different binding site environments but have not necessarily been identified and exploited in compound design. Taking phosphate groups as examples, the workflow was used to construct 157 data sets, each composed of a reference protein complexed with AMP, ADP, ATP, or pyrophosphate as well other ligands. Phosphate binding sites appear to have a high hydration content and large size, resulting in U-shaped bioactive conformations recurrently found across unrelated protein families. A total of 16 413 replacements were extracted, filtered for a significant structural overlap on phosphate groups, and sorted according to their SMILES codes. In addition to the classical isosteres of phosphate, such as carboxylate, sulfone, or sulfonamide, unexpected replacements that do not conserve charge or polarity, such as aryl, aliphatic, or positively charged groups, were found.

  19. Innate Immune Evasion Mediated by Flaviviridae Non-Structural Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Mingshu; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-10-07

    Flaviviridae-caused diseases are a critical, emerging public health problem worldwide. Flaviviridae infections usually cause severe, acute or chronic diseases, such as liver damage and liver cancer resulting from a hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and high fever and shock caused by yellow fever. Many researchers worldwide are investigating the mechanisms by which Flaviviridae cause severe diseases. Flaviviridae can interfere with the host's innate immunity to achieve their purpose of proliferation. For instance, dengue virus (DENV) NS2A, NS2B3, NS4A, NS4B and NS5; HCV NS2, NS3, NS3/4A, NS4B and NS5A; and West Nile virus (WNV) NS1 and NS4B proteins are involved in immune evasion. This review discusses the interplay between viral non-structural Flaviviridae proteins and relevant host proteins, which leads to the suppression of the host's innate antiviral immunity.

  20. [Research progress in the structure and function of dengue virus non-structural 1 protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Ren, Rui-wen; Liu, Jian-wei

    2014-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a re-emerging disease transmitted by the Aedes mosquitoes and has become a major public health problem in southern China. Currently, no antiviral drug or effective vaccine exist to control this disease. The chimeric DENV structural protein vaccine cannot elicit balanced levels of protective immunity to each of the four viral serotypes; therefore, non-structural protein components may be required to construct an effective DENV vaccine. The Dengue virus non-structural 1 (DENV NS1) protein plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis and protective immunity. Therefore, immunity to Dengue 1-4 NS1 subtypes may be crucial for the prevention of severe disease. This review attempts to provide an overview about the structure and function of DENV NS1.

  1. Protein Data Bank (PDB): The Single Global Macromolecular Structure Archive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Stephen K; Berman, Helen M; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Markley, John L; Nakamura, Haruki; Velankar, Sameer

    2017-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB)--the single global repository of experimentally determined 3D structures of biological macromolecules and their complexes--was established in 1971, becoming the first open-access digital resource in the biological sciences. The PDB archive currently houses ~130,000 entries (May 2017). It is managed by the Worldwide Protein Data Bank organization (wwPDB; wwpdb.org), which includes the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB; rcsb.org), the Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj; pdbj.org), the Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe; pdbe.org), and BioMagResBank (BMRB; www.bmrb.wisc.edu). The four wwPDB partners operate a unified global software system that enforces community-agreed data standards and supports data Deposition, Biocuration, and Validation of ~11,000 new PDB entries annually (deposit.wwpdb.org). The RCSB PDB currently acts as the archive keeper, ensuring disaster recovery of PDB data and coordinating weekly updates. wwPDB partners disseminate the same archival data from multiple FTP sites, while operating complementary websites that provide their own views of PDB data with selected value-added information and links to related data resources. At present, the PDB archives experimental data, associated metadata, and 3D-atomic level structural models derived from three well-established methods: crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), and electron microscopy (3DEM). wwPDB partners are working closely with experts in related experimental areas (small-angle scattering, chemical cross-linking/mass spectrometry, Forster energy resonance transfer or FRET, etc.) to establish a federation of data resources that will support sustainable archiving and validation of 3D structural models and experimental data derived from integrative or hybrid methods.

  2. EDM-DEDM and protein crystal structure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliandro, Rocco; Carrozzini, Benedetta; Cascarano, Giovanni Luca; Giacovazzo, Carmelo; Mazzone, Anna Maria; Siliqi, Dritan

    2009-05-01

    Electron-density modification (EDM) procedures are the classical tool for driving model phases closer to those of the target structure. They are often combined with automated model-building programs to provide a correct protein model. The task is not always performed, mostly because of the large initial phase error. A recently proposed procedure combined EDM with DEDM (difference electron-density modification); the method was applied to the refinement of phases obtained by molecular replacement, ab initio or SAD phasing [Caliandro, Carrozzini, Cascarano, Giacovazzo, Mazzone & Siliqi (2009), Acta Cryst. D65, 249-256] and was more effective in improving phases than EDM alone. In this paper, a novel fully automated protocol for protein structure refinement based on the iterative application of automated model-building programs combined with the additional power derived from the EDM-DEDM algorithm is presented. The cyclic procedure was successfully tested on challenging cases for which all other approaches had failed.

  3. Solvation structure of ice-binding antifreeze proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen-Goos, Hendrik; Wettlaufer, John

    2009-03-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) can be found in organisms which survive at subzero temperatures. They were first discovered in polar fishes since the 1950's [1] and have been isolated meanwhile also from insects, plants, and bacteria. While AFPs shift the freezing point of water below the bulk melting point and hence can prevent recrystallization; the effect is non-colligative and there is a pronounced hysteresis between freezing and melting. For many AFPs it is generally accepted that they function through an irreversible binding to the ice-water interface which leads to a piecewise convex growth front with a lower nonequilibrium freezing point due to the Kelvin effect. Recent molecular dynamics simulations of the AFP from Choristoneura fumiferana reveal that the solvation structures of water at ice-binding and non-ice-binding faces of the protein are crucial for understanding how the AFP binds to the ice surface and how it is protected from being overgrown [2]. We use density functional theory of classical fluids in order to assess the microscopic solvent structure in the vicinity of protein faces with different surface properties. With our method, binding energies of different protein faces to the water-ice-interface can be computed efficiently in a simplified model. [1] Y. Yeh and R.E. Feeney, Chem. Rev. 96, 601 (1996). [2] D.R. Nutt and J.C. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130, 13066 (2008).

  4. Structure of the Janus protein human CLIC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromer, Brett A; Gorman, Michael A; Hansen, Guido; Adams, Julian J; Coggan, Marjorie; Littler, Dene R; Brown, Louise J; Mazzanti, Michele; Breit, Samuel N; Curmi, Paul M G; Dulhunty, Angela F; Board, Philip G; Parker, Michael W

    2007-11-30

    Chloride intracellular channel (CLIC) proteins possess the remarkable property of being able to convert from a water-soluble state to a membrane channel state. We determined the three-dimensional structure of human CLIC2 in its water-soluble form by X-ray crystallography at 1.8-A resolution from two crystal forms. In contrast to the previously characterized CLIC1 protein, which forms a possibly functionally important disulfide-induced dimer under oxidizing conditions, we show that CLIC2 possesses an intramolecular disulfide and that the protein remains monomeric irrespective of redox conditions. Site-directed mutagenesis studies show that removal of the intramolecular disulfide or introduction of cysteine residues in CLIC2, equivalent to those that form the intramolecular disulfide in CLIC1, does not cause dimer formation under oxidizing conditions. We also show that CLIC2 forms pH-dependent chloride channels in vitro with higher channel activity at low pH levels and that the channels are subject to redox regulation. In both crystal forms, we observed an extended loop region from the C-terminal domain, called the foot loop, inserting itself into an interdomain crevice of a neighboring molecule. The equivalent region in the structurally related glutathione transferase superfamily corresponds to the active site. This so-called foot-in-mouth interaction suggests that CLIC2 might recognize other proteins such as the ryanodine receptor through a similar interaction.

  5. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola A. Brown

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2 is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S. These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  6. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  7. Validation of Structures in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Swanand; Sanz García, Eduardo; Hendrickx, Pieter M S; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Westbrook, John D; Yang, Huanwang; Feng, Zukang; Baskaran, Kumaran; Berrisford, John M; Hudson, Brian P; Ikegawa, Yasuyo; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Lawson, Catherine L; Mading, Steve; Mak, Lora; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Oldfield, Thomas J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Peisach, Ezra; Sahni, Gaurav; Sekharan, Monica R; Sen, Sanchayita; Shao, Chenghua; Smart, Oliver S; Ulrich, Eldon L; Yamashita, Reiko; Quesada, Martha; Young, Jasmine Y; Nakamura, Haruki; Markley, John L; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K; Velankar, Sameer; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2017-12-05

    The Worldwide PDB recently launched a deposition, biocuration, and validation tool: OneDep. At various stages of OneDep data processing, validation reports for three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules are produced. These reports are based on recommendations of expert task forces representing crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and cryoelectron microscopy communities. The reports provide useful metrics with which depositors can evaluate the quality of the experimental data, the structural model, and the fit between them. The validation module is also available as a stand-alone web server and as a programmatically accessible web service. A growing number of journals require the official wwPDB validation reports (produced at biocuration) to accompany manuscripts describing macromolecular structures. Upon public release of the structure, the validation report becomes part of the public PDB archive. Geometric quality scores for proteins in the PDB archive have improved over the past decade. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary structural documentation of the major urinary protein of the Indian commensal rat (Rattus rattus) using a proteomic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ramalingam; Prakash, Subramaniya; Archunan, Govindaraju; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2010-04-01

    A number of proteome studies have been performed recently to identify pheromone-related protein expression and their molecular function using genetically modified rodents' urine. However, no such studies have used Indian commensal rodents; interestingly, in a previous investigation, we confirmed the presence of volatile molecules in commensal rodents urine and these molecules seem to be actively involved in pheromonal communication. Therefore, the present study aims to identify the major urinary protein [MUP] present in commensal rat urine, which will help us to understand the protein's expression pattern and intrinsic properties among the rodents globally. Initially, the total urinary proteins were separated by 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis and then subsequently analyzed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight and Mass Spectrometer (MALDI-TOF/MS). Furthermore, they were then fragmented with the aid of a Tandem Mass Spectrometer (TOF/TOF) and the identified sequences aligned and confirmed using similarity with the deduced primary structures of members of the lipocalin superfamily. The SDS-PAGE protein profiles showed distinct proteins with molecular masses of 15, 22.4, 25, 28, 42, 50, 55, 68, and 91 kDa. Of these proteins, the 22.4 kDa protein was considered to be target candidate. When 2D elctrophoresis was carried out, about approximately 50 spots were detected with different masses and various pI ranges. The 22.4 kDa protein was found to have a pI of about 4.9.This 22.4 kDa protein spot was digested and subjected to mass spectrometry; it was identified as rat MUP. The fragmented peptides from the rat MUP at 935, 1026, 1192, and 1303 m/z were further fragmented with the aid of MS/MS and generated de novo sequence and this confirmed this protein to be the MUP present in the urine of commensal rats. The present investigation confirms the presence of MUP with a molecular mass of 22.4 kDa in the urine of commensal rats. This protein may be

  9. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  10. Crystal structure of human protein kinase CK2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Ermakowa, I

    2001-01-01

    The crystal structure of a fully active form of human protein kinase CK2 (casein kinase 2) consisting of two C-terminally truncated catalytic and two regulatory subunits has been determined at 3.1 A resolution. In the CK2 complex the regulatory subunits form a stable dimer linking the two catalytic...... subunits, which make no direct contact with one another. Each catalytic subunit interacts with both regulatory chains, predominantly via an extended C-terminal tail of the regulatory subunit. The CK2 structure is consistent with its constitutive activity and with a flexible role of the regulatory subunit...

  11. Extreme-Scale De Novo Genome Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georganas, Evangelos [Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Hofmeyr, Steven [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Buluc, Aydin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Oliker, Leonid [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.; Rokhsar, Daniel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Division; Yelick, Katherine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Joint Genome Inst.

    2017-09-26

    De novo whole genome assembly reconstructs genomic sequence from short, overlapping, and potentially erroneous DNA segments and is one of the most important computations in modern genomics. This work presents HipMER, a high-quality end-to-end de novo assembler designed for extreme scale analysis, via efficient parallelization of the Meraculous code. Genome assembly software has many components, each of which stresses different components of a computer system. This chapter explains the computational challenges involved in each step of the HipMer pipeline, the key distributed data structures, and communication costs in detail. We present performance results of assembling the human genome and the large hexaploid wheat genome on large supercomputers up to tens of thousands of cores.

  12. Automatic structure classification of small proteins using random forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirst Jonathan D

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random forest, an ensemble based supervised machine learning algorithm, is used to predict the SCOP structural classification for a target structure, based on the similarity of its structural descriptors to those of a template structure with an equal number of secondary structure elements (SSEs. An initial assessment of random forest is carried out for domains consisting of three SSEs. The usability of random forest in classifying larger domains is demonstrated by applying it to domains consisting of four, five and six SSEs. Results Random forest, trained on SCOP version 1.69, achieves a predictive accuracy of up to 94% on an independent and non-overlapping test set derived from SCOP version 1.73. For classification to the SCOP Class, Fold, Super-family or Family levels, the predictive quality of the model in terms of Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC ranged from 0.61 to 0.83. As the number of constituent SSEs increases the MCC for classification to different structural levels decreases. Conclusions The utility of random forest in classifying domains from the place-holder classes of SCOP to the true Class, Fold, Super-family or Family levels is demonstrated. Issues such as introduction of a new structural level in SCOP and the merger of singleton levels can also be addressed using random forest. A real-world scenario is mimicked by predicting the classification for those protein structures from the PDB, which are yet to be assigned to the SCOP classification hierarchy.

  13. Minor snake venom proteins: Structure, function and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Pucca, Manuela Berto; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Anjolette, Fernando Antonio Pino; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Wiezel, Gisele Adriano; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Shibao, Priscila Yumi Tanaka; Ferreira, Isabela Gobbo; de Oliveira, Isadora Sousa; Cardoso, Iara Aimê; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2017-04-01

    Snake venoms present a great diversity of pharmacologically active compounds that may be applied as research and biotechnological tools, as well as in drug development and diagnostic tests for certain diseases. The most abundant toxins have been extensively studied in the last decades and some of them have already been used for different purposes. Nevertheless, most of the minor snake venom protein classes remain poorly explored, even presenting potential application in diverse areas. The main difficulty in studying these proteins lies on the impossibility of obtaining sufficient amounts of them for a comprehensive investigation. The advent of more sensitive techniques in the last few years allowed the discovery of new venom components and the in-depth study of some already known minor proteins. This review summarizes information regarding some structural and functional aspects of low abundant snake venom proteins classes, such as growth factors, hyaluronidases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, nucleases and nucleotidases, cobra venom factors, vespryns, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, among others. Some potential applications of these molecules are discussed herein in order to encourage researchers to explore the full venom repertoire and to discover new molecules or applications for the already known venom components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. New protein structures provide an updated understanding of phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Eileen K

    2017-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) and less severe hyperphenylalaninemia (HPA) constitute the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism, and is most often caused by defects in phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) function resulting in accumulation of Phe to neurotoxic levels. Despite the success of dietary intervention in preventing permanent neurological damage, individuals living with PKU clamor for additional non-dietary therapies. The bulk of disease-associated mutations are PAH missense variants, which occur throughout the entire 452 amino acid human PAH protein. While some disease-associated mutations affect protein structure (e.g. truncations) and others encode catalytically dead variants, most have been viewed as defective in protein folding/stability. Here we refine this view to address how PKU-associated missense variants can perturb the equilibrium among alternate native PAH structures (resting-state PAH and activated PAH), thus shifting the tipping point of this equilibrium to a neurotoxic Phe concentration. This refined view of PKU introduces opportunities for the design or discovery of therapeutic pharmacological chaperones that can help restore the tipping point to healthy Phe levels and how such a therapeutic might work with or without the inhibitory pharmacological chaperone BH 4 . Dysregulation of an equilibrium of architecturally distinct native PAH structures departs from the concept of "misfolding", provides an updated understanding of PKU, and presents an enhanced foundation for understanding genotype/phenotype relationships. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prebiotic Alternatives to Proteins: Structure and Function of Hyperbranched Polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamajanov, Irena; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Cody, George D.

    2015-06-01

    Proteins are responsible multiple biological functions, such as ligand binding, catalysis, and ion channeling. This functionality is enabled by proteins' three-dimensional structures that require long polypeptides. Since plausibly prebiotic synthesis of functional polypeptides has proven challenging in the laboratory, we propose that these functions may have been initially performed by alternative macromolecular constructs, namely hyperbranched polymers (HBPs), during early stages of chemical evolution. HBPs can be straightforwardly synthesized in one-pot processes, possess globular structures determined by their architecture as opposed to folding in proteins, and have documented ligand binding and catalytic properties. Our initial study focuses on glycerol-citric acid HBPs synthesized via moderate heating in the dry state. The polymerization products consisted of a mixture of isomeric structures of varying molar mass as evidenced by NMR, mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Addition of divalent cations during polymerization resulted in increased incorporation of citric acid into the HBPs and the possible formation of cation-oligomer complexes. The chelating properties of citric acid govern the makeup of the resulting polymer, turning the polymerization system into a rudimentary smart material.

  16. A simple and fast heuristic for protein structure comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelta, David A; González, Juan R; Moreno Vega, Marcos

    2008-03-25

    Protein structure comparison is a key problem in bioinformatics. There exist several methods for doing protein comparison, being the solution of the Maximum Contact Map Overlap problem (MAX-CMO) one of the alternatives available. Although this problem may be solved using exact algorithms, researchers require approximate algorithms that obtain good quality solutions using less computational resources than the formers. We propose a variable neighborhood search metaheuristic for solving MAX-CMO. We analyze this strategy in two aspects: 1) from an optimization point of view the strategy is tested on two different datasets, obtaining an error of 3.5%(over 2702 pairs) and 1.7% (over 161 pairs) with respect to optimal values; thus leading to high accurate solutions in a simpler and less expensive way than exact algorithms; 2) in terms of protein structure classification, we conduct experiments on three datasets and show that is feasible to detect structural similarities at SCOP's family and CATH's architecture levels using normalized overlap values. Some limitations and the role of normalization are outlined for doing classification at SCOP's fold level. We designed, implemented and tested.a new tool for solving MAX-CMO, based on a well-known metaheuristic technique. The good balance between solution's quality and computational effort makes it a valuable tool. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the MAX-CMO measure is tested at SCOP's fold and CATH's architecture levels with encouraging results.

  17. Structure and application of antifreeze proteins from Antarctic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Patricio A; Márquez, Sebastián L; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Márquez-Miranda, Valeria; Blamey, Jenny M

    2017-08-07

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) production is a survival strategy of psychrophiles in ice. These proteins have potential in frozen food industry avoiding the damage in the structure of animal or vegetal foods. Moreover, there is not much information regarding the interaction of Antarctic bacterial AFPs with ice, and new determinations are needed to understand the behaviour of these proteins at the water/ice interface. Different Antarctic places were screened for antifreeze activity and microorganisms were selected for the presence of thermal hysteresis in their crude extracts. Isolates GU1.7.1, GU3.1.1, and AFP5.1 showed higher thermal hysteresis and were characterized using a polyphasic approach. Studies using cucumber and zucchini samples showed cellular protection when samples were treated with partially purified AFPs or a commercial AFP as was determined using toluidine blue O and neutral red staining. Additionally, genome analysis of these isolates revealed the presence of genes that encode for putative AFPs. Deduced amino acids sequences from GU3.1.1 (gu3A and gu3B) and AFP5.1 (afp5A) showed high similarity to reported AFPs which crystal structures are solved, allowing then generating homology models. Modelled proteins showed a triangular prism form similar to β-helix AFPs with a linear distribution of threonine residues at one side of the prism that could correspond to the putative ice binding side. The statistically best models were used to build a protein-water system. Molecular dynamics simulations were then performed to compare the antifreezing behaviour of these AFPs at the ice/water interface. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations revealed that gu3B could have the most efficient antifreezing behavior, but gu3A could have a higher affinity for ice. AFPs from Antarctic microorganisms GU1.7.1, GU3.1.1 and AFP5.1 protect cellular structures of frozen food showing a potential for frozen food industry. Modeled proteins possess a β-helix structure, and

  18. Structure and Function Study of HIV and Influenza Fusion Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuang

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza virus are membrane-enveloped viruses causing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and flu. The initial step of HIV and influenza virus infection is fusion between viral and host cell membrane catalyzed by the viral fusion protein gp41 and hemagglutinin (HA) respectively. However, the structure of gp41 and HA as well as the infection mechanism are still not fully understood. This work addresses (1) full length gp41 ectodomain and TM domain structure and function and (2) IFP membrane location and IFP-membrane interaction. My studies of gp41 protein and IFP can provide better understanding of the membrane fusion mechanism and may aid development of anti-viral therapeutics and vaccine. The full length ectodomain and transmembrane domain of gp41 and shorter constructs were expressed, purified and solubilized at physiology conditions. The constructs adopt overall alpha helical structure in SDS and DPC detergents, and showed hyperthermostability with Tm > 90 °C. The oligomeric states of these proteins vary in different detergent buffer: predominant trimer for all constructs and some hexamer fraction for HM and HM_TM protein in SDS at pH 7.4; and mixtures of monomer, trimer, and higher-order oligomer protein in DPC at pH 4.0 and 7.4. Substantial protein-induced vesicle fusion was observed, including fusion of neutral vesicles at neutral pH, which are the conditions similar HIV/cell fusion. Vesicle fusion by a gp41 ectodomain construct has rarely been observed under these conditions, and is aided by inclusion of both the FP and TM, and by protein which is predominantly trimer rather than monomer. Current data was integrated with existing data, and a structural model was proposed. Secondary structure and conformation of IFP is a helix-turn-helix structure in membrane. However, there has been arguments about the IFP membrane location. 13C-2H REDOR solid-state NMR is used to solve this problem. The IFP adopts major alpha

  19. Searching protein 3-D structures in linear time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Tetsuo

    2010-03-01

    One of the most important issues in the post-genomic molecular biology is the analysis of protein three-dimensional (3-D) structures, and searching over the 3-D structure databases of them is becoming more and more important. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) is the most popular similarity measure for comparing two molecular structures. In this article, we propose new theoretically and practically fast algorithms for the basic problem of finding all the substructures of structures in a structure database of chain molecules (such as proteins), whose RMSDs to the query are within a given constant threshold. The best-known worst-case time complexity for the problem is O(N log m), where N is the database size and m is the query size. The previous best-known expected time complexity for the problem is also O(N log m). We also propose a new breakthrough linear-expected-time algorithm. It is not only a theoretically significant improvement over previous algorithms, but also a practically faster algorithm, according to computational experiments. Our experiments over the whole Protein Data Bank (PDB) database show that our algorithm is 3.6-28 times faster than previously known algorithms, to search for similar substructures whose RMSDs are within 1A to queries of ordinary lengths. We also propose a series of preprocessing algorithms that enable faster queries, though there have been no known indexing algorithm whose query time complexity is better than the above O(N log m) bound. One is an O(N log(2)N)-time and O(N log N)-space preprocessing algorithm with expected query time complexity of O(m + N given complex square root of m). Another is an O(N log N)-time and O(N)-space preprocessing algorithm with expected query time complexity of O(N given complex square root of m + m log (N given m)).(1)

  20. Quantification of Protein Hydration, Glass Transitions, and Structural Relaxations of Aqueous Protein and Carbohydrate-Protein Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Yrjö H; Potes, Naritchaya

    2015-06-11

    Water distribution and miscibility of carbohydrate and protein components in biological materials and their structural contributions in concentrated solids are poorly understood. In the present study, structural relaxations and a glass transition of protein hydration water and antiplasticization of the hydration water at low temperatures were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for bovine whey protein (BWP), aqueous glucose-fructose (GF), and their mixture. Thermal transitions of α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin components of BWP included water-content-dependent endothermic but reversible dehydration and denaturation, and exothermic and irreversible aggregation. An α-relaxation assigned to hydration water in BWP appeared at water-content-dependent temperatures and increased to over the range of 150-200 K at decreasing water content and in the presence of GF. Two separate glass transitions and individual fractions of unfrozen water of ternary GF-BWP-water systems contributed to uncoupled α-relaxations, suggesting different roles of protein hydration water and carbohydrate vitrification in concentrated solids during freezing and dehydration. Hydration water in the BWP fraction of GF-BWP systems was derived from equilibrium water sorption and glass transition data of the GF fraction, which gave a significant universal method to quantify (i) protein hydration water and (ii) the unfrozen water in protein-carbohydrate systems for such applications as cryopreservation, freezing, lyophilization, and dehydration of biological materials. A ternary supplemented phase diagram (state diagram) established for the GF-BWP-water system can be used for the analysis of the water distribution across carbohydrate and protein components in such applications.

  1. Protein NMR Structure Refinement based on Bayesian Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Teppei; Ikeda, Shiro; Kigawa, Takanori; Ito, Yutaka; Güntert, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a tool to investigate threedimensional (3D) structures and dynamics of biomacromolecules at atomic resolution in solution or more natural environments such as living cells. Since NMR data are principally only spectra with peak signals, it is required to properly deduce structural information from the sparse experimental data with their imperfections and uncertainty, and to visualize 3D conformations by NMR structure calculation. In order to efficiently analyse the data, Rieping et al. proposed a new structure calculation method based on Bayes’ theorem. We implemented a similar approach into the program CYANA with some modifications. It allows us to handle automatic NOE cross peak assignments in unambiguous and ambiguous usages, and to create a prior distribution based on a physical force field with the generalized Born implicit water model. The sampling scheme for obtaining the posterior is performed by a hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm combined with Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) by the Gibbs sampler, and molecular dynamics simulation (MD) for obtaining a canonical ensemble of conformations. Since it is not trivial to search the entire function space particularly for exploring the conformational prior due to the extraordinarily large conformation space of proteins, the replica exchange method is performed, in which several MCMC calculations with different temperatures run in parallel as replicas. It is shown with simulated data or randomly deleted experimental peaks that the new structure calculation method can provide accurate structures even with less peaks, especially compared with the conventional method. In particular, it dramatically improves in-cell structures of the proteins GB1 and TTHA1718 using exclusively information obtained in living Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells.

  2. Crystal structure of the Japanese encephalitis virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Vincent C; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H

    2012-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-Å resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  3. A use of Ramachandran potentials in protein solution structure determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertini, Ivano; Cavallaro, Gabriele; Luchinat, Claudio; Poli, Irene

    2003-01-01

    A strategy is developed to use database-derived φ-ψ constraints during simulated annealing procedures for protein solution structure determination in order to improve the Ramachandran plot statistics, while maintaining the agreement with the experimental constraints as the sole criterion for the selection of the family. The procedure, fully automated, consists of two consecutive simulated annealing runs. In the first run, the database-derived φ-ψ constraints are enforced for all aminoacids (but prolines and glycines). A family of structures is then selected on the ground of the lowest violations of the experimental constraints only, and the φ-ψ values for each residue are examined. In the second and final run, the database-derived φ-ψ constraints are enforced only for those residues which in the first run have ended in one and the same favored φ-ψ region. For residues which are either spread over different favored regions or concentrated in disallowed regions, the constraints are not enforced. The final family is then selected, after the second run, again only based on the agreement with the experimental constraints. This automated approach was implemented in DYANA and was tested on as many as 12 proteins, including some containing paramagnetic metals, whose structures had been previously solved in our laboratory. The quality of the structures, and of Ramachandran plot statistics in particular, was notably improved while preserving the agreement with the experimental constraints

  4. From Extraction of Local Structures of Protein Energy Landscapes to Improved Decoy Selection in Template-Free Protein Structure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Akhter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the essential role that the three-dimensional conformation of a protein plays in regulating interactions with molecular partners, wet and dry laboratories seek biologically-active conformations of a protein to decode its function. Computational approaches are gaining prominence due to the labor and cost demands of wet laboratory investigations. Template-free methods can now compute thousands of conformations known as decoys, but selecting native conformations from the generated decoys remains challenging. Repeatedly, research has shown that the protein energy functions whose minima are sought in the generation of decoys are unreliable indicators of nativeness. The prevalent approach ignores energy altogether and clusters decoys by conformational similarity. Complementary recent efforts design protein-specific scoring functions or train machine learning models on labeled decoys. In this paper, we show that an informative consideration of energy can be carried out under the energy landscape view. Specifically, we leverage local structures known as basins in the energy landscape probed by a template-free method. We propose and compare various strategies of basin-based decoy selection that we demonstrate are superior to clustering-based strategies. The presented results point to further directions of research for improving decoy selection, including the ability to properly consider the multiplicity of native conformations of proteins.

  5. From Extraction of Local Structures of Protein Energy Landscapes to Improved Decoy Selection in Template-Free Protein Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Nasrin; Shehu, Amarda

    2018-01-19

    Due to the essential role that the three-dimensional conformation of a protein plays in regulating interactions with molecular partners, wet and dry laboratories seek biologically-active conformations of a protein to decode its function. Computational approaches are gaining prominence due to the labor and cost demands of wet laboratory investigations. Template-free methods can now compute thousands of conformations known as decoys, but selecting native conformations from the generated decoys remains challenging. Repeatedly, research has shown that the protein energy functions whose minima are sought in the generation of decoys are unreliable indicators of nativeness. The prevalent approach ignores energy altogether and clusters decoys by conformational similarity. Complementary recent efforts design protein-specific scoring functions or train machine learning models on labeled decoys. In this paper, we show that an informative consideration of energy can be carried out under the energy landscape view. Specifically, we leverage local structures known as basins in the energy landscape probed by a template-free method. We propose and compare various strategies of basin-based decoy selection that we demonstrate are superior to clustering-based strategies. The presented results point to further directions of research for improving decoy selection, including the ability to properly consider the multiplicity of native conformations of proteins.

  6. COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR RATIONAL DESIGN OF PROTEINS WITH NOVEL FUNCTIONALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Tiwari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes.

  7. A structural annotation resource for the selection of putative target proteins in the malaria parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joubert Fourie

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure plays a pivotal role in elucidating mechanisms of parasite functioning and drug resistance. Moreover, protein structure aids the determination of protein function, which can together with the structure be used to identify novel drug targets in the parasite. However, various structural features in Plasmodium falciparum proteins complicate the experimental determination of protein structures. Limited similarity to proteins in the Protein Data Bank and the shortage of solved protein structures in the malaria parasite necessitate genome-scale structural annotation of P. falciparum proteins. Additionally, the annotation of a range of structural features facilitates the identification of suitable targets for experimental and computational studies. Methods An integrated structural annotation system was developed and applied to P. falciparum, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium yoelii. The annotation included searches for sequence similarity, patterns and domains in addition to the following predictions: secondary structure, transmembrane helices, protein disorder, low complexity, coiled-coils and small molecule interactions. Subsequently, candidate proteins for further structural studies were identified based on the annotated structural features. Results The annotation results are accessible through a web interface, enabling users to select groups of proteins which fulfil multiple criteria pertaining to structural and functional features 1. Analysis of features in the P. falciparum proteome showed that protein-interacting proteins contained a higher percentage of predicted disordered residues than non-interacting proteins. Proteins interacting with 10 or more proteins have a disordered content concentrated in the range of 60–100%, while the disorder distribution for proteins having only one interacting partner, was more evenly spread. Conclusion A series of P. falciparum protein targets for experimental structure

  8. An approach to membrane protein structure without crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgen, Paul L.; Hu, Yonglin; Guan, Lan; Kaback, H. Ronald; Girvin, Mark E.

    2002-01-01

    The lactose permease of Escherichia coli catalyzes coupled translocation of galactosides and H+ across the cell membrane. It is the best-characterized member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily, a related group of membrane proteins with 12 transmembrane domains that mediate transport of various substrates across cell membranes. Despite decades of effort and their functional importance in all kingdoms of life, no high-resolution structures have been solved for any member of this family. However, extensive biochemical, genetic, and biophysical studies on lactose permease have established its transmembrane topology, secondary structure, and numerous interhelical contacts. Here we demonstrate that this information is sufficient to calculate a structural model at the level of helix packing or better. PMID:12391320

  9. A periodic table of coiled-coil protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutevelis, Efrosini; Woolfson, Derek N

    2009-01-23

    Coiled coils are protein structure domains with two or more alpha-helices packed together via interlacing of side chains known as knob-into-hole packing. We analysed and classified a large set of coiled-coil structures using a combination of automated and manual methods. This led to a systematic classification that we termed a "periodic table of coiled coils," which we have made available at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/ccplus/search/periodic_table. In this table, coiled-coil assemblies are arranged in columns with increasing numbers of alpha-helices and in rows of increased complexity. The table provides a framework for understanding possibilities in and limits on coiled-coil structures and a basis for future prediction, engineering and design studies.

  10. Systematic Identification of Machine-Learning Models Aimed to Classify Critical Residues for Protein Function from Protein Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Corral, Ricardo; Beltrán, Jesús A; Brizuela, Carlos A; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2017-10-09

    Protein structure and protein function should be related, yet the nature of this relationship remains unsolved. Mapping the critical residues for protein function with protein structure features represents an opportunity to explore this relationship, yet two important limitations have precluded a proper analysis of the structure-function relationship of proteins: (i) the lack of a formal definition of what critical residues are and (ii) the lack of a systematic evaluation of methods and protein structure features. To address this problem, here we introduce an index to quantify the protein-function criticality of a residue based on experimental data and a strategy aimed to optimize both, descriptors of protein structure (physicochemical and centrality descriptors) and machine learning algorithms, to minimize the error in the classification of critical residues. We observed that both physicochemical and centrality descriptors of residues effectively relate protein structure and protein function, and that physicochemical descriptors better describe critical residues. We also show that critical residues are better classified when residue criticality is considered as a binary attribute (i.e., residues are considered critical or not critical). Using this binary annotation for critical residues 8 models rendered accurate and non-overlapping classification of critical residues, confirming the multi-factorial character of the structure-function relationship of proteins.

  11. Water-mediated energy transport and structure across a protein-protein interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, David

    2010-03-01

    Water molecules embedded within proteins or at the interface between globules play a central role in folding and function. We discuss the influence of interfacial water molecules on energy transport and structure, specifically the role of water at the interface between the two globules of the homodimeric hemoglobin from Scapharca inaequivalvis, which binds oxygen cooperatively. We have studied the water-mediated energy transport in this protein with communication maps and nonequilibrium molecular simulations of energy flow, which reveal the disproportionate amount of energy carried by the water molecules, particularly across the interface, i.e., a larger thermal conductivity of the interfacial waters compared with other parts of the protein, promoting hydrogen bond rearrangements at the interface.

  12. [Structure analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hirotsugu

    2014-01-01

    Analyses of the structure and properties of identified pathogenic proteins are important for elucidating the molecular basis of diseases and in drug discovery research. Vibrational spectroscopy has advantages over other techniques in terms of sensitivity of detection of structural changes. Spectral analysis, however, is complicated because the spectrum involves a substantial amount of information. This article includes examples of structural analysis of disease-related proteins using vibrational spectroscopy in combination with additional techniques that facilitate data acquisition and analysis. Residue-specific conformation analysis of an amyloid fibril was conducted using IR absorption spectroscopy in combination with (13)C-isotope labeling, linear dichroism measurement, and analysis of amide I band features. We reveal a pH-dependent property of the interacting segment of an amyloidogenic protein, β2-microglobulin, which causes dialysis-related amyloidosis. We also reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying pH-dependent sugar-binding activity of human galectin-1, which is involved in cell adhesion, using spectroscopic techniques including UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. The decreased activity at acidic pH was attributed to a conformational change in the sugar-binding pocket caused by protonation of His52 (pKa 6.3) and the cation-π interaction between Trp68 and the protonated His44 (pKa 5.7). In addition, we show that the peak positions of the Raman bands of the C4=C5 stretching mode at approximately 1600 cm(-1) and the Nπ-C2-Nτ bending mode at approximately 1405 cm(-1) serve as markers of the His side-chain structure. The Raman signal was enhanced 12 fold using a vertical flow apparatus.

  13. A Survey of Protein Structures from Archaeal Viruses

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    Nikki Dellas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that infect the third domain of life, Archaea, are a newly emerging field of interest. To date, all characterized archaeal viruses infect archaea that thrive in extreme conditions, such as halophilic, hyperthermophilic, and methanogenic environments. Viruses in general, especially those replicating in extreme environments, contain highly mosaic genomes with open reading frames (ORFs whose sequences are often dissimilar to all other known ORFs. It has been estimated that approximately 85% of virally encoded ORFs do not match known sequences in the nucleic acid databases, and this percentage is even higher for archaeal viruses (typically 90%–100%. This statistic suggests that either virus genomes represent a larger segment of sequence space and/or that viruses encode genes of novel fold and/or function. Because the overall three-dimensional fold of a protein evolves more slowly than its sequence, efforts have been geared toward structural characterization of proteins encoded by archaeal viruses in order to gain insight into their potential functions. In this short review, we provide multiple examples where structural characterization of archaeal viral proteins has indeed provided significant functional and evolutionary insight.

  14. WildSpan: mining structured motifs from protein sequences

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    Chen Chien-Yu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automatic extraction of motifs from biological sequences is an important research problem in study of molecular biology. For proteins, it is desired to discover sequence motifs containing a large number of wildcard symbols, as the residues associated with functional sites are usually largely separated in sequences. Discovering such patterns is time-consuming because abundant combinations exist when long gaps (a gap consists of one or more successive wildcards are considered. Mining algorithms often employ constraints to narrow down the search space in order to increase efficiency. However, improper constraint models might degrade the sensitivity and specificity of the motifs discovered by computational methods. We previously proposed a new constraint model to handle large wildcard regions for discovering functional motifs of proteins. The patterns that satisfy the proposed constraint model are called W-patterns. A W-pattern is a structured motif that groups motif symbols into pattern blocks interleaved with large irregular gaps. Considering large gaps reflects the fact that functional residues are not always from a single region of protein sequences, and restricting motif symbols into clusters corresponds to the observation that short motifs are frequently present within protein families. To efficiently discover W-patterns for large-scale sequence annotation and function prediction, this paper first formally introduces the problem to solve and proposes an algorithm named WildSpan (sequential pattern mining across large wildcard regions that incorporates several pruning strategies to largely reduce the mining cost. Results WildSpan is shown to efficiently find W-patterns containing conserved residues that are far separated in sequences. We conducted experiments with two mining strategies, protein-based and family-based mining, to evaluate the usefulness of W-patterns and performance of WildSpan. The protein-based mining mode

  15. Determination of structural fluctuations of proteins from structure-based calculations of residual dipolar couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalvao, Rinaldo W.; De Simone, Alfonso; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have the potential of providing detailed information about the conformational fluctuations of proteins. It is very challenging, however, to extract such information because of the complex relationship between RDCs and protein structures. A promising approach to decode this relationship involves structure-based calculations of the alignment tensors of protein conformations. By implementing this strategy to generate structural restraints in molecular dynamics simulations we show that it is possible to extract effectively the information provided by RDCs about the conformational fluctuations in the native states of proteins. The approach that we present can be used in a wide range of alignment media, including Pf1, charged bicelles and gels. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated by the analysis of the Q factors for RDCs not used as restraints in the calculations, which are significantly lower than those corresponding to existing high-resolution structures and structural ensembles, hence showing that we capture effectively the contributions to RDCs from conformational fluctuations.

  16. Structural Interface Forms and Their Involvement in Stabilization of Multidomain Proteins or Protein Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dygut

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The presented analysis concerns the inter-domain and inter-protein interface in protein complexes. We propose extending the traditional understanding of the protein domain as a function of local compactness with an additional criterion which refers to the presence of a well-defined hydrophobic core. Interface areas in selected homodimers vary with respect to their contribution to share as well as individual (domain-specific hydrophobic cores. The basic definition of a protein domain, i.e., a structural unit characterized by tighter packing than its immediate environment, is extended in order to acknowledge the role of a structured hydrophobic core, which includes the interface area. The hydrophobic properties of interfaces vary depending on the status of interacting domains—In this context we can distinguish: (1 Shared hydrophobic cores (spanning the whole dimer; (2 Individual hydrophobic cores present in each monomer irrespective of whether the dimer contains a shared core. Analysis of interfaces in dystrophin and utrophin indicates the presence of an additional quasi-domain with a prominent hydrophobic core, consisting of fragments contributed by both monomers. In addition, we have also attempted to determine the relationship between the type of interface (as categorized above and the biological function of each complex. This analysis is entirely based on the fuzzy oil drop model.

  17. Domain decomposition-based structural condensation of large protein structures for understanding their conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae In; Na, Sungsoo; Eom, Kilho

    2011-01-15

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) with coarse-grained model, such as elastic network model (ENM), has allowed the quantitative understanding of protein dynamics. As the protein size is increased, there emerges the expensive computational process to find the dynamically important low-frequency normal modes due to diagonalization of massive Hessian matrix. In this study, we have provided the domain decomposition-based structural condensation method that enables the efficient computations on low-frequency motions. Specifically, our coarse-graining method is established by coupling between model condensation (MC; Eom et al., J Comput Chem 2007, 28, 1400) and component mode synthesis (Kim et al., J Chem Theor Comput 2009, 5, 1931). A protein structure is first decomposed into substructural units, and then each substructural unit is coarse-grained by MC. Once the NMA is implemented to coarse-grained substructural units, normal modes and natural frequencies for each coarse-grained substructural unit are assembled by using geometric constraints to provide the normal modes and natural frequencies for whole protein structure. It is shown that our coarse-graining method enhances the computational efficiency for analysis of large protein complexes. It is clearly suggested that our coarse-graining method provides the B-factors of 100 large proteins, quantitatively comparable with those obtained from original NMA, with computational efficiency. Moreover, the collective behaviors and/or the correlated motions for model proteins are well delineated by our suggested coarse-grained models, quantitatively comparable with those computed from original NMA. It is implied that our coarse-grained method enables the computationally efficient studies on conformational dynamics of large protein complex.

  18. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R; Christie, Cole H; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K

    2017-01-04

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a 'Structural View of Biology.' Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Knowledge-based computational intelligence development for predicting protein secondary structures from sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hong-Bin; Yi, Dong-Liang; Yao, Li-Xiu; Yang, Jie; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2008-10-01

    In the postgenomic age, with the avalanche of protein sequences generated and relatively slow progress in determining their structures by experiments, it is important to develop automated methods to predict the structure of a protein from its sequence. The membrane proteins are a special group in the protein family that accounts for approximately 30% of all proteins; however, solved membrane protein structures only represent less than 1% of known protein structures to date. Although a great success has been achieved for developing computational intelligence techniques to predict secondary structures in both globular and membrane proteins, there is still much challenging work in this regard. In this review article, we firstly summarize the recent progress of automation methodology development in predicting protein secondary structures, especially in membrane proteins; we will then give some future directions in this research field.

  20. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ice cream structure modification by ice-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleda, Aleksei; Tsanev, Robert; Klesment, Tiina; Vilu, Raivo; Laos, Katrin

    2018-04-25

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs), also known as antifreeze proteins, were added to ice cream to investigate their effect on structure and texture. Ice recrystallization inhibition was assessed in the ice cream mixes using a novel accelerated microscope assay and the ice cream microstructure was studied using an ice crystal dispersion method. It was found that adding recombinantly produced fish type III IBPs at a concentration 3 mg·L -1 made ice cream hard and crystalline with improved shape preservation during melting. Ice creams made with IBPs (both from winter rye, and type III IBP) had aggregates of ice crystals that entrapped pockets of the ice cream mixture in a rigid network. Larger individual ice crystals and no entrapment in control ice creams was observed. Based on these results a model of ice crystals aggregates formation in the presence of IBPs was proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Biophysical and structural considerations for protein sequence evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahnen Johan A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein sequence evolution is constrained by the biophysics of folding and function, causing interdependence between interacting sites in the sequence. However, current site-independent models of sequence evolutions do not take this into account. Recent attempts to integrate the influence of structure and biophysics into phylogenetic models via statistical/informational approaches have not resulted in expected improvements in model performance. This suggests that further innovations are needed for progress in this field. Results Here we develop a coarse-grained physics-based model of protein folding and binding function, and compare it to a popular informational model. We find that both models violate the assumption of the native sequence being close to a thermodynamic optimum, causing directional selection away from the native state. Sampling and simulation show that the physics-based model is more specific for fold-defining interactions that vary less among residue type. The informational model diffuses further in sequence space with fewer barriers and tends to provide less support for an invariant sites model, although amino acid substitutions are generally conservative. Both approaches produce sequences with natural features like dN/dS Conclusions Simple coarse-grained models of protein folding can describe some natural features of evolving proteins but are currently not accurate enough to use in evolutionary inference. This is partly due to improper packing of the hydrophobic core. We suggest possible improvements on the representation of structure, folding energy, and binding function, as regards both native and non-native conformations, and describe a large number of possible applications for such a model.

  3. ProtNN: fast and accurate protein 3D-structure classification in structural and topological space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhifli, Wajdi; Diallo, Abdoulaye Baniré

    2016-01-01

    Studying the functions and structures of proteins is important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of life. The number of publicly available protein structures has increasingly become extremely large. Still, the classification of a protein structure remains a difficult, costly, and time consuming task. The difficulties are often due to the essential role of spatial and topological structures in the classification of protein structures. We propose ProtNN, a novel classification approach for protein 3D-structures. Given an unannotated query protein structure and a set of annotated proteins, ProtNN assigns to the query protein the class with the highest number of votes across the k nearest neighbor reference proteins, where k is a user-defined parameter. The search of the nearest neighbor annotated structures is based on a protein-graph representation model and pairwise similarities between vector embedding of the query and the reference protein structures in structural and topological spaces. We demonstrate through an extensive experimental evaluation that ProtNN is able to accurately classify several datasets in an extremely fast runtime compared to state-of-the-art approaches. We further show that ProtNN is able to scale up to a whole PDB dataset in a single-process mode with no parallelization, with a gain of thousands order of magnitude in runtime compared to state-of-the-art approaches.

  4. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans: structure, protein interactions and cell signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Dreyfuss

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans are ubiquitously found at the cell surface and extracellular matrix in all the animal species. This review will focus on the structural characteristics of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans related to protein interactions leading to cell signaling. The heparan sulfate chains due to their vast structural diversity are able to bind and interact with a wide variety of proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, morphogens, extracellular matrix components, enzymes, among others. There is a specificity directing the interactions of heparan sulfates and target proteins, regarding both the fine structure of the polysaccharide chain as well precise protein motifs. Heparan sulfates play a role in cellular signaling either as receptor or co-receptor for different ligands, and the activation of downstream pathways is related to phosphorylation of different cytosolic proteins either directly or involving cytoskeleton interactions leading to gene regulation. The role of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans in cellular signaling and endocytic uptake pathways is also discussed.Proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato são encontrados tanto superfície celular quanto na matriz extracelular em todas as espécies animais. Esta revisão tem enfoque nas características estruturais dos proteoglicanos de heparam sulfato e nas interações destes proteoglicanos com proteínas que levam à sinalização celular. As cadeias de heparam sulfato, devido a sua variedade estrutural, são capazes de se ligar e interagir com ampla gama de proteínas, como fatores de crescimento, quimiocinas, morfógenos, componentes da matriz extracelular, enzimas, entreoutros. Existe uma especificidade estrutural que direciona as interações dos heparam sulfatos e proteínas alvo. Esta especificidade está relacionada com a estrutura da cadeia do polissacarídeo e os motivos conservados da cadeia polipeptídica das proteínas envolvidas nesta interação. Os heparam

  5. Some Recent Developments in Structure and Glassy Behavior of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-02-01

    We have used ARVO developed by us to find that the ratio of volume and surface area of proteins in Protein Data Bank distributed in a very narrow region [1]. Such result is useful for the determination of protein 3D structures. It has been widely known that a spin glass model can be used to understand the slow relaxation behavior of a glass at low temperatures [2]. We have used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that polymer chains with neighboring monomers connected by rigid bonds can relax very slowly and show glassy behavior [3]. We have also found that native collagen fibrils show glassy behavior at room temperatures [4]. The results of [3] and [4] about the glassy behavior of polymers or proteins are useful for understanding the mechanism for a biological system to maintain in a non-equilibrium state, including the ancient seed [5], which can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time. (1) M.-C. Wu, M. S. Li, W.-J. Ma, M. Kouza, and C.-K. Hu, EPL, in press (2011); (2) C. Dasgupta, S.-K. Ma, and C.-K. Hu. Phys. Rev. B 20, 3837-3849 (1979); (3) W.-J. Ma and C.-K. Hu, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 79, 024005, 024006, 054001, and 104002 (2010), C.-K. Hu and W.-J. Ma, Prog. Theor. Phys. Supp. 184, 369 (2010); S. G. Gevorkian, A. E. Allahverdyan, D. S. Gevorgyan and C.-K. Hu, EPL 95, 23001 (2011); S. Sallon, et al. Science 320, 1464 (2008).

  6. A simple and fast heuristic for protein structure comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Vega Marcos

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structure comparison is a key problem in bioinformatics. There exist several methods for doing protein comparison, being the solution of the Maximum Contact Map Overlap problem (MAX-CMO one of the alternatives available. Although this problem may be solved using exact algorithms, researchers require approximate algorithms that obtain good quality solutions using less computational resources than the formers. Results We propose a variable neighborhood search metaheuristic for solving MAX-CMO. We analyze this strategy in two aspects: 1 from an optimization point of view the strategy is tested on two different datasets, obtaining an error of 3.5%(over 2702 pairs and 1.7% (over 161 pairs with respect to optimal values; thus leading to high accurate solutions in a simpler and less expensive way than exact algorithms; 2 in terms of protein structure classification, we conduct experiments on three datasets and show that is feasible to detect structural similarities at SCOP's family and CATH's architecture levels using normalized overlap values. Some limitations and the role of normalization are outlined for doing classification at SCOP's fold level. Conclusion We designed, implemented and tested.a new tool for solving MAX-CMO, based on a well-known metaheuristic technique. The good balance between solution's quality and computational effort makes it a valuable tool. Moreover, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the MAX-CMO measure is tested at SCOP's fold and CATH's architecture levels with encouraging results. Software is available for download at http://modo.ugr.es/jrgonzalez/msvns4maxcmo.

  7. The construction of an amino acid network for understanding protein structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Zhou, Jianhong; Sun, Maomin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2014-06-01

    Amino acid networks (AANs) are undirected networks consisting of amino acid residues and their interactions in three-dimensional protein structures. The analysis of AANs provides novel insight into protein science, and several common amino acid network properties have revealed diverse classes of proteins. In this review, we first summarize methods for the construction and characterization of AANs. We then compare software tools for the construction and analysis of AANs. Finally, we review the application of AANs for understanding protein structure and function, including the identification of functional residues, the prediction of protein folding, analyzing protein stability and protein-protein interactions, and for understanding communication within and between proteins.

  8. Protein structure-sensitive electrocatalysis at dithiothreitol-modified electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostatná, Veronika; Černocká, Hana; Paleček, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 27 (2010), s. 9408-9413 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB100040901; GA ČR(CZ) GP202/07/P497; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN400310651 Program:KA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : constant current chronopotentiometry * mercury and solid amalgam electrodes * structure-sensitive protein analysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.019, year: 2010

  9. Structural studies on proton/protonation of the protein molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Yukio; Kida, Akiko; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Keiichi; Murakami, Takuto; Umino, Masaaki; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hisatome, Ichiro; Yanagisawa, Yasutake; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Hidaka, Yuji; Shimamoto, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Mitsutoshi; Nakanishi, Takeyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports three studies involved in the analysis of protons and protonation at physiologically active sites in protein molecules. (1) 'Elucidation of the higher-order structure formation and activity performing mechanism of yeast proteasome.' With an aim to apply to anti-cancer drugs, this study performed the shape analysis of the total structure of 26S proteasome using small-angle X-ray scattering to clarify the complex form where controlling elements bonded to the both ends of 20S catalyst body, and analyzed the complex structure between the active sites of 20S and inhibitor (drug). (2) 'Basic study on the neutron experiment of biomolecules such as physiologically active substances derived from Natto-bacteria.' This study conducted the purification, crystallization, and X-ray analysis experiment of nattokinase; high-grade purification and solution experiment of vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7); and Z-DNA crystal structure study related to the neutron crystal analysis of DNA as another biomolecule structure study. (3) 'Functional evaluation on digestive enzymes derived from Nephila clavata.' As an Alzheimer's disease-related amyloid fibril formation model, this study carried out elucidation on the fibrosis and fiber-forming mechanism of the traction fiber of Nephila clavata, and the functional analysis of its degrading enzyme. (A.O.)

  10. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  11. Structure of the ordered hydration of amino acids in proteins: analysis of crystal structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biedermannová, Lada; Schneider, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 11 (2015), s. 2178-2202 ISSN 1399-0047 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : protein hydration * structural biology * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.674, year: 2014

  12. Water entrapment and structure ordering as protection mechanisms for protein structural preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsiccio, A.; Pisano, R.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, molecular dynamics is used to further gain insight into the mechanisms by which typical pharmaceutical excipients preserve the protein structure. More specifically, the water entrapment scenario will be analyzed, which states that excipients form a cage around the protein, entrapping and slowing water molecules. Human growth hormone will be used as a model protein, but the results obtained are generally applicable. We will show that water entrapment, as well as the other mechanisms of protein stabilization in the dried state proposed so far, may be related to the formation of a dense hydrogen bonding network between excipient molecules. We will also present a simple phenomenological model capable of explaining the behavior and stabilizing effect provided by typical cryo- and lyo-protectants. This model uses, as input data, molecular properties which can be easily evaluated. We will finally show that the model predictions compare fairly well with experimental data.

  13. Engineering and introduction of de novo disulphide bridges in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The engineeringof de novo disulphide bridges has been explored as a means to increase the thermal stability of enzymes in the rationalmethod of protein engineering. In this study, Disulphide by Design software, homology modelling and moleculardynamics simulations were used to select appropriate amino acid pairs for ...

  14. Effects of dietary energy density and digestible protein:energy ratio on de novo lipid synthesis from dietary protein in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) quantified with stable isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekmann, Kim Schøn; Dalsgaard, Anne Johanne Tang; Holm, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    to trace the metabolic fate of dietary protein, 1·8% fishmeal was replaced with isotope-labelled whole protein (.98% 13C). The experiment was divided into a growth period lasting 89 d, growing fish from approximately 140 to 350 g, followed by a 3 d period feeding isotope-enriched diets. Isotope ratio MS...

  15. Hantaviral proteins: structure, functions and role in hantavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musalwa eMuyangwa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hantaviruses are the members of the family Bunyaviridae that are naturally maintained in the populations of small mammals, mostly rodents. Most of these viruses can easily infect humans through contact with aerosols or dust generated by contaminated animal waste products. Depending on the particular hantavirus involved, human infection could result in either Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS or in Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS. In the past few years, clinical cases of the hantavirus caused diseases have been on the rise. Understanding structure of the hantavirus genome and the functions of the key viral proteins is critical for the therapeutic agents’ research. This paper gives a brief overview of the current knowledge on the structure and properties of the hantavirus nucleoprotein and the glycoproteins.

  16. Criteria for folding in structure-based models of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wołek, Karol; Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: mc@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-05-14

    In structure-based models of proteins, one often assumes that folding is accomplished when all contacts are established. This assumption may frequently lead to a conceptual problem that folding takes place in a temperature region of very low thermodynamic stability, especially when the contact map used is too sparse. We consider six different structure-based models and show that allowing for a small, but model-dependent, percentage of the native contacts not being established boosts the folding temperature substantially while affecting the time scales of folding only in a minor way. We also compare other properties of the six models. We show that the choice of the description of the backbone stiffness has a substantial effect on the values of characteristic temperatures that relate both to equilibrium and kinetic properties. Models without any backbone stiffness (like the self-organized polymer) are found to perform similar to those with the stiffness, including in the studies of stretching.

  17. An automated approach to network features of protein structure ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Moitrayee; Bhat, Chanda R; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2013-01-01

    Network theory applied to protein structures provides insights into numerous problems of biological relevance. The explosion in structural data available from PDB and simulations establishes a need to introduce a standalone-efficient program that assembles network concepts/parameters under one hood in an automated manner. Herein, we discuss the developme