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Sample records for novelty locomotor response

  1. Locomotor response to novelty correlates with the number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in rats.

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    Jerzemowska, Grażyna; Plucińska, Karolina; Kulikowski, Michał; Trojniar, Weronika; Wrona, Danuta

    2012-01-04

    The present study investigated whether the higher dopaminergic system activation in rats with high (HRs) rather than low (LRs) locomotor activity in response to novelty depend on the number of cells containing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+)) and/or differences in the morphology of these cells. One week after the novelty test, brains from male Wistar rats (HRs and LRs) were collected and stained for TH expression (immunohistochemistry) and for morphological analysis (immunofluorescent staining). The morphology and total number of TH(+) cells was analyzed for each A9 (substantia nigra) and A10 (ventral tegmental area) group of the midbrain dopaminergic cells. We found that HRs had a higher total number of TH(+) cells in the whole midbrain dopaminergic region (A9-A10) and in the A9 group only than LRs. In particular midbrain dopaminergic groups of neurons, HR/LR differences were regionally specific: HRs had a higher total number of TH(+) cells in the A9, and in the anterior part of the A10. In contrast, the LRs had a higher number of TH(+) cells in the parabrachial pigmented nucleus (A10) and in the posterior part of the A9. There were no significant differences in the morphology of the midbrain dopamine neurons between HRs and LRs. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the total number of TH(+) neurons and the locomotor activity score in response to novelty in the whole A9-A10 region and in the particular A9 group only. The results obtained indicate that the higher behavioral activation in resting conditions correlates with the higher number rather than changes in the morphology of the midbrain dopaminergic TH(+) cells. It supports findings on the higher level of dopaminergic system activation in high responders to novelty that depends on the number of midbrain dopaminergic TH(+) neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Locomotor response to novelty correlates with differences in number and morphology of hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in rats.

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    Jerzemowska, Grażyna; Plucińska, Karolina; Kuśmierczak, Magda; Myślińska, Dorota; Orzeł-Gryglewska, Jolanta

    2014-02-01

    Individual differences in the intensity of locomotor response to a new environment (exploratory reaction) are generally used as a model to study individual vulnerability to stress and drug addiction. In the present work we studied the number, distribution and morphology of the hypothalamic cells expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH+ cells) (immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining) in male Wistar rats divided based on high (HR), midline (MR) or low (LR) locomotor activity in response to novelty. Morphology and total number of TH+ cells were analyzed for A11-A15 dopaminergic groups. We found correlation between the total number of hypothalamic TH+ cells in the whole A11-A15 area and the locomotor activity. The differences were most pronounced in some of the hypothalamic nuclei, i.e. in the rostro-caudal extension of the A11, A12 and A14 structures, where the HR rats had a significantly higher number of TH+ cells in comparison to the MR and LR rats. Morphology analysis of TH+ cells showed HR/MR/LR differences in single cell area and perimeter and, to a lesser extent, in the other morphometric parameters such as length of the major and minor axes, or circularity factor. The results suggest that the behavioral traits which characterize the HR animals and are correlated with increased susceptibility to stress and propensity to develop drug addictions can be determined by the number, distribution, activity and perhaps the morphology of the cells in the dopaminergic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Capacity of novelty-induced locomotor activity and the hole-board test to predict sensitivity to the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine.

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    Arenas, M Carmen; Daza-Losada, Manuel; Vidal-Infer, Antonio; Aguilar, Maria A; Miñarro, José; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2014-06-22

    Novelty-seeking in rodents, defined as enhanced specific exploration of novel situations, is considered to predict the response of animals to drugs of abuse and, thus, allow "drug-vulnerable" individuals to be identified. The main objective of this study was to assess the predictive ability of two well-known paradigms of the novelty-seeking trait - novelty-induced locomotor activity (which distinguishes High- and Low-Responder mice, depending on their motor activity) and the hole-board test (which determines High- and Low-Novelty Seeker mice depending on the number of head dips they perform) - to identify subjects that would subsequently be more sensitive to the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine in a population of young adult (PND 56) and adolescent (PND 35) OF1 mice of both sexes. Conditioned place preference (CPP), a useful tool for evaluating the sensitivity of individuals to the incentive properties of addictive drugs, was induced with a sub-threshold dose of cocaine (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Our results showed that novelty-induced motor activity had a greater predictive capacity to identify "vulnerable-drug" individuals among young-adult mice (PND 56), while the hole-board test was more effective in adolescents (PND 35). High-NR young-adults, which presented higher motor activity in the first ten minutes of the test (novelty-reactivity), were 3.9 times more likely to develop cocaine-induced CPP than Low-NR young-adults. When total activity (1h) was evaluated (novelty-habituation), only High-R (novelty-non-habituating) young-adult male and Low-R (novelty-habituating) female mice produced a high conditioning score. However, only High-Novelty Seeker male and female adolescents and Low-Novelty Seeker female young-adult animals (according to the hole-board test), acquired cocaine-induced CPP. These findings should contribute to the development of screening methods for identifying at-risk human drug users and prevention strategies for those with specific

  4. High locomotor reactivity to novelty is associated with an increased propensity to choose saccharin over cocaine: new insights into the vulnerability to addiction.

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    Vanhille, Nathalie; Belin-Rauscent, Aude; Mar, Adam C; Ducret, Eric; Belin, David

    2015-02-01

    Drug addiction is associated with a relative devaluation of natural or socially-valued reinforcers that are unable to divert addicts from seeking and consuming the drug. Before protracted drug exposure, most rats prefer natural rewards, such as saccharin, over cocaine. However, a subpopulation of animals prefer cocaine over natural rewards and are thought to be vulnerable to addiction. Specific behavioral traits have been associated with different dimensions of drug addiction. For example, anxiety predicts loss of control over drug intake whereas sensation seeking and sign-tracking are markers of a greater sensitivity to the rewarding properties of the drug. However, how these behavioral traits predict the disinterest for natural reinforcers remains unknown. In a population of rats, we identified sensation seekers (HR) on the basis of elevated novelty-induced locomotor reactivity, high anxious rats (HA) based on the propensity to avoid open arms in an elevated-plus maze and sign-trackers (ST) that are prone to approach, and interaction with, reward-associated stimuli. Rats were then tested on their preference for saccharin over cocaine in a discrete-trial choice procedure. We show that HR rats display a greater preference for saccharin over cocaine compared with ST and HA whereas the motivation for the drug was comparable between the three groups. The present data suggest that high locomotor reactivity to novelty, or sensation seeking, by predisposing to an increased choice toward non-drug rewards at early stages of drug use history, may prevent the establishment of chronic cocaine use.

  5. Fluoxetine and aripiprazole treatment following prenatal immune activation exert longstanding effects on rat locomotor response.

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    Richtand, Neil M; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul; Tambyraja, Rabindra; Grainger, Molly; Bronson, Stefanie L; McNamara, Robert K

    2012-05-15

    Studies characterizing treatment interventions in a naturalistic setting suggest that antidepressant and antipsychotic medications may be equally effective in improving clinical outcome in individuals at high risk for first-episode psychosis. Of interest, both beneficial as well as potentially adverse effects have been observed following fluoxetine treatment in a mouse prenatal immune activation model of relevance to psychosis prevention. We sought to extend those findings by examining the effects of fluoxetine, as well as the antipsychotic medication aripiprazole, in a rat prenatal immune activation model. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with poly I:C or saline on gestational day 14. Offspring of poly I:C and saline-treated dams received fluoxetine (10.0 mg/kg/d), aripiprazole (0.66 mg/kg/d), or vehicle from postnatal days 35 to 70. Locomotor responses to novelty, saline injection, and amphetamine (1 and 5 mg/kg) were determined at three months, i.e., 21 days following drug discontinuation. Both fluoxetine and aripiprazole had beneficial effects on behavioral response to amphetamine (1 mg/kg) at 3 months, ameliorating the impact of prenatal immune activation on offspring of poly I:C-treated dams. Significantly, both drugs also exerted effects in offspring of control (saline-treated) dams on locomotor response to injection. Fluoxetine and aripiprazole pretreatment of poly I:C offspring from postnatal days 35 to 70 stabilized response to amphetamine exposure persisting through 3 months of age, similar to earlier findings in mice that fluoxetine treatment following prenatal immune activation prevented altered locomotor response to amphetamine. The current data also confirm earlier findings of potential adverse behavioral effects in offspring of control dams following treatment with fluoxetine and antipsychotic medications, highlighting the potential for both therapeutic as well as safety concerns with exposure to preventive pharmacological treatments over

  6. NGF induces appearance of adult-like response to spatial novelty in 18-day male mice.

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    Calamandrei, Gemma; Valanzano, Angela; Ricceri, Laura

    2002-10-17

    We investigated the effects of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) administration on the maturation of reactivity to spatial and non-spatial novelty in developing mice. CD-1 mice of both sexes received intracerebral administration of NGF on postnatal day (pnd) 15, and their response to object displacement (spatial novelty) and object substitution (object novelty) were assessed in a spatial open-field with four objects on pnd 18 or 28. On pnd 18, NGF induced only in males precocious appearance of spatial novelty discrimination, while increasing choline acetyltransferase activity in neocortex and hippocampus of both sexes. The behavioral and neurochemical effects disappeared by pnd 28. NGF triggers adult-like responding to spatial novelty in developing mice and such effect is gender-specific.

  7. Effects of Risperidone and Paliperidone Pretreatment on Locomotor Response Following Prenatal Immune Activation

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    Richtand, Neil M.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul; Stanford, Kevin; Bronson, Stefanie L.; McNamara, Robert K.

    2011-01-01

    Aim Limited data are available regarding pharmacological characteristics of effective interventions for psychosis prevention. Enrollment challenges in psychosis prevention trials impede screening diverse interventions for efficacy. Relevant animal models could help circumvent this barrier. We previously described prevention with risperidone of abnormal behavior following neonatal hippocampal lesion. We aimed to extend those findings evaluating risperidone and paliperidone following prenatal immune activation, a developmental model of a schizophrenia risk factor. We evaluated a later developmental time point to determine persistent effects of drug treatment. Methods Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with poly I:C or saline on gestational day 14. Offspring of poly I:C and saline treated dams received risperidone (0.45 mg/kg/d), paliperidone (0.05 mg/kg/d), or vehicle from postnatal days 35 to 70. Locomotor responses to novelty, saline injection, and amphetamine (1 and 5 mg/kg) were determined at three months, i.e., 21 days following antipsychotic discontinuation. Results Risperidone and paliperidone had persistent effects on behavioral response to amphetamine (1 mg/kg) at 3 months, ameliorating the impact of prenatal immune activation on offspring of poly I:C-treated dams. Risperidone, but not paliperidone, also exerted persistent effects in offspring of saline-treated dams on locomotor response to saline and amphetamine (5 mg/kg) injection. Conclusions Risperidone and paliperidone pretreatment of poly I:C offspring during peri-pubertal development stabilized response to amphetamine exposure persisting into early adulthood. Prenatal immune activation provides a model for evaluating effects of an environmental risk factor for schizophrenia, and has potential utility for identifying pharmacological approaches to early intervention. PMID:21440257

  8. Happier, faster: Developmental changes in the effects of mood and novelty on responses.

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    Schomaker, Judith; Rangel-Gomez, Mauricio; Meeter, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Positive mood ameliorates several cognitive processes: It can enhance cognitive control, increase flexibility, and promote variety seeking in decision making. These effects of positive mood have been suggested to depend on frontostriatal dopamine, which is also associated with the detection of novelty. This suggests that positive mood could also affect novelty detection. In the present study, children and adults saw either a happy or a neutral movie to induce a positive or neutral mood. After that, they were shown novel and familiar images. On some trials a beep was presented over headphones either at the same time as the image or at a 200-ms stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA), and the task of the participant was to detect these auditory targets. Children were slower in responding than adults. Positive mood, however, speeded responses, especially in children, and induced facilitatory effects of novelty. These effects were consistent with increased arousal. Although effects of novelty were more consistent with an attentional response, in children who had watched a happy movie the novel images evoked a more liberal response criterion, suggestive of increased arousal. This suggests that mood and novelty may affect response behaviour stronger in children than in adults.

  9. Neonatal procedural pain and preterm infant cortisol response to novelty at 8 months.

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    Grunau, Ruth E; Weinberg, Joanne; Whitfield, Michael F

    2004-07-01

    Stress systems may be altered in the long term in preterm infants for multiple reasons, including early exposure to procedural pain in neonatal intensive care. This question has received little attention beyond hospital discharge. Stress responses (cortisol) to visual novelty in preterm infants who were born at extremely low gestational age (ELGA; neonatal exposure to procedural pain and morphine in the neonatal intensive care unit. Seventy-six infants, 54 preterm (neonatal skin-breaking procedures. In contrast, cortisol responses to novelty were predicted equally well by neonatal pain or GA at birth. No relationship between morphine dosing and cortisol response was demonstrated in these infants. ELGA preterm infants show a different pattern of cortisol levels before and after positive stimulation of visual novelty than more maturely born, VLGA preterm and term-born infants. Exposure to high numbers of skin-breaking procedures may contribute to "resetting" basal arousal systems in preterm infants.

  10. The role of oxytocin in familiarization-habituation responses to social novelty

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    Mattie eTops

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress or arousal responses to novel social contexts ease off when individuals get familiar with the social context. In the present study we investigated whether oxytocin is involved in this process of familiarization-habituation, as oxytocin is known to increase trust and decrease anxiety. Fifty-nine healthy female subjects took part in the same experimental procedure in two sessions separated by four weeks. In the first (novelty session state trust scores were significantly positively correlated with salivary oxytocin levels, while in the second (familiarity session state trust scores were significantly negatively correlated with salivary oxytocin levels. In a path model, oxytocin was associated with increased trust in the novelty session and trust was associated with decreased oxytocin levels in the familiarity session. The results are consistent with the idea that oxytocin decreases stress-to-novelty responses by promoting familiarization to novel social contexts.

  11. Making Sense of Infant Familiarity and Novelty Responses to Words at Lexical Onset

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    DePaolis, Rory A.; Keren-Portnoy, Tamar; Vihman, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests that familiarity and novelty preferences in infant experimental tasks can in some instances be interpreted together as a single indicator of language advance. We provide evidence to support this idea based on our use of the auditory headturn preference paradigm to record responses to words likely to be either familiar or unfamiliar to infants. Fifty-nine 10-month-old infants were tested. The task elicited mixed preferences: familiarity (longer average looks to the words likely to be familiar to the infants), novelty (longer average looks to the words likely to be unfamiliar) and no-preference (similar-length of looks to both type of words). The infants who exhibited either a familiarity or a novelty response were more advanced on independent indices of phonetic advance than the infants who showed no preference. In addition, infants exhibiting novelty responses were more lexically advanced than either the infants who exhibited familiarity or those who showed no-preference. The results provide partial support for Hunter and Ames’ (1988) developmental model of attention in infancy and suggest caution when interpreting studies indexed to chronological age. PMID:27242624

  12. Making sense of infant familiarity and novelty responses to words at lexical onset

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    Rory A DePaolis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study suggests that familiarity and novelty preferences in infant experimental tasks can in some instances be interpreted together as a single indicator of language advance. We provide evidence to support this idea based on our use of the auditory headturn preference paradigm to record responses to words likely to be either familiar or unfamiliar to infants. Fifty-nine ten-month-old infants were tested. The task elicited mixed preferences: familiarity (longer average looks to the words likely to be familiar to the infants, novelty (longer average looks to the words likely to be unfamiliar and no-preference (similar-length of looks to both type of words. The infants who exhibited either a familiarity or a novelty response were more advanced on independent indices of phonetic advance than the infants who showed no preference. In addition, infants exhibiting novelty responses were more lexically advanced than either the infants who exhibited familiarity or those who showed no-preference. The results provide partial support for Hunter and Ames’ (1988 developmental model of attention in infancy and suggest caution when interpreting studies indexed to chronological age.

  13. Sex differences in the acute locomotor response to methamphetamine in BALB/c mice.

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    Ohia-Nwoko, Odochi; Haile, Colin N; Kosten, Therese A

    2017-06-01

    Women use methamphetamine more frequently than men and are more vulnerable to its negative psychological effects. Rodent models have been an essential tool for evaluating the sex-dependent effects of psychostimulants; however, evidence of sex differences in the behavioral responses to methamphetamine in mice is lacking. In the present study, we investigated acute methamphetamine-induced (1mg/kg and 4mg/kg) locomotor activation in female and male BALB/c mice. We also evaluated whether basal locomotor activity was associated with the methamphetamine-induced locomotor response. The results indicated that female BALB/c mice displayed enhanced methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity compared to males, while basal locomotor activity was positively correlated with methamphetamine-induced activity in males, but not females. This study is the first to show sex-dependent locomotor effects of methamphetamine in BALB/c mice. Our observations emphasize the importance of considering sex when assessing behavioral responses to methamphetamine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ghrelin influences novelty seeking behavior in rodents and men.

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    Caroline Hansson

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries indicate an important role for ghrelin in drug and alcohol reward and an ability of ghrelin to regulate mesolimbic dopamine activity. The role of dopamine in novelty seeking, and the association between this trait and drug and alcohol abuse, led us to hypothesize that ghrelin may influence novelty seeking behavior. To test this possibility we applied several complementary rodent models of novelty seeking behavior, i.e. inescapable novelty-induced locomotor activity (NILA, novelty-induced place preference and novel object exploration, in rats subjected to acute ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor; GHSR stimulation or blockade. Furthermore we assessed the possible association between polymorphisms in the genes encoding ghrelin and GHSR and novelty seeking behavior in humans. The rodent studies indicate an important role for ghrelin in a wide range of novelty seeking behaviors. Ghrelin-injected rats exhibited a higher preference for a novel environment and increased novel object exploration. Conversely, those with GHSR blockade drastically reduced their preference for a novel environment and displayed decreased NILA. Importantly, the mesolimbic ventral tegmental area selective GHSR blockade was sufficient to reduce the NILA response indicating that the mesolimbic GHSRs might play an important role in the observed novelty responses. Moreover, in untreated animals, a striking positive correlation between NILA and sucrose reward behavior was detected. Two GHSR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs2948694 and rs495225, were significantly associated with the personality trait novelty seeking, as assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI, in human subjects. This study provides the first evidence for a role of ghrelin in novelty seeking behavior in animals and humans, and also points to an association between food reward and novelty seeking in rodents.

  15. Effects of voluntary wheel running on heart rate, body temperature, and locomotor activity in response to acute and repeated stressor exposures in rats.

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    Masini, Cher V; Nyhuis, Tara J; Sasse, Sarah K; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2011-05-01

    Stress often negatively impacts physical and mental health but it has been suggested that voluntary physical activity may benefit health by reducing some of the effects of stress. The present experiments tested whether voluntary exercise can reduce heart rate, core body temperature and locomotor activity responses to acute (novelty or loud noise) or repeated stress (loud noise). After 6 weeks of running-wheel access, rats exposed to a novel environment had reduced heart rate, core body temperature, and locomotor activity responses compared to rats housed under sedentary conditions. In contrast, none of these measures were different between exercised and sedentary rats following acute 30-min noise exposures, at either 85 or 98 dB. Following 10 weeks of running-wheel access, both groups displayed significant habituation of all these responses to 10 consecutive daily 30-min presentations of 98 dB noise stress. However, the extent of habituation of all three responses was significantly enhanced in exercised compared to sedentary animals on the last exposure to noise. These results suggest that in physically active animals, under some conditions, acute responses to stress exposure may be reduced, and response habituation to repeated stress may be enhanced, which ultimately may reduce the negative and cumulative impact of stress.

  16. Constraint, alcoholism, and electrodermal response in aversive classical conditioning and mismatch novelty paradigms.

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    Finn, P R; Justus, A N; Mazas, C; Rorick, L; Steinmetz, J E

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated whether low levels of the personality trait of constraint and early-onset alcoholism would be associated with deficits in aversive conditioning and smaller responses to novelty in a stimulus mismatch protocol. Personality traits (constraint and socialization) and skin conductance responses (SCRs) during conditioning and novelty paradigms were assessed in alcoholics (n=41) and non-alcoholics (n = 32). The conditioning protocol involved measuring SCRs after conditioned stimuli (CS+: tones) paired with shock, CS- tones unpaired with shock, and CS+ probes unpaired with shock. The mismatch protocol involved measuring SCRs to auditory stimuli consisting of a series of 5 pure tones of the same pitch followed a shorter white noise stimulus (the novel stimulus). Contrary to the hypothesis, alcoholics did not differ from non-alcoholics in SCRs to CS+ probes or on the mismatch measure (SCR novel tone-SCR to 5th tone). Higher levels of constraint and self-reports of fear during conditioning were associated with smaller responses to both the CS+ probes and the CS- tones as well as the mismatch measure within non-alcoholics, but not within alcoholics. In alcoholics, low constraint was associated with greater habituation to CS+ probes, and poor differential conditioning on measures of change across trials in SCR to CS+ probes and CS- stimuli. The results suggest that different processes influence levels of constraint in non-alcoholics and alcoholics. The data indicate that low constraint in non-alcoholics is associated with allocating fewer processing resources to potentially significant stimuli, rather than being associated with a specific deficit in aversive conditioning per se.

  17. Locomotor behavioral response of mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) to subacute mercury stress monitored by video tracking system.

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    Jakka, N M; Rao, T Gnaneshwar; Rao, J Venkateswara

    2007-01-01

    Locomotor behavior is commonly affected by contaminants, and the pattern of fish swimming is a highly organized species-specific response. In the current study, we examined the locomotor behavioral response of the mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, which was exposed to a sublethal concentration (LC(5), 20 microg/L) of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) for 28 days and monitored using a computer vision system. The EthoVision video tracking system for automation of behavioral studies at regular intervals revealed abnormal locomotor behavior such as reduction in swimming speed (cm/s) and distance traveled per unit time. The effects of this metal on the gill morphology and bioaccumulation in different body parts were also investigated. High-resolution microscopy studies revealed abnormal gill morphology, with fusion of primary lamellae along with deep lesions and erosions in the secondary lamellae. The bioaccumulation concentrations in head, body, and viscera were determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometric technique at regular intervals. The results indicated that the accumulation of mercury was the highest in viscera followed by head and body, with bioconcentration factors (BCFs) of 3.99, 2.18, and 1.57 and uptake rate constants (k1) of 17.91, 11.02, and 8.13, respectively. These observations indicate that alterations in fish behavior under subacute stress can provide important information useful in predicting the stress.

  18. Persistent amygdala novelty response is associated with less anterior cingulum integrity in trauma-exposed women.

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    Yoon, Seungyeon A; Weierich, Mariann R

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the potential role of cingulum and uncinate fasciculus integrity in trauma-related neural hypervigilance, indexed by less discrimination between amygdala activation to novel and familiar affective images. 22 women (mean age 21.7 ± 3.9 years) with a history of trauma, and 20 no-trauma controls (mean age 21.9 ± 4.8 years). Trauma exposure and trauma-related symptoms were assessed during structured clinical interview. White matter integrity in the anterior cingulum, parahippocampal cingulum, and uncinate fasciculus was measured using diffusion weighted imaging. Amygdala response to novel and familiar affective scenes was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Trauma-exposed women showed less discrimination between novel and familiar negative images in the amygdala compared to no-trauma controls. In trauma-exposed women, less amygdala discrimination between novel and familiar affective images was associated with less structural integrity in the anterior cingulum, but was not associated with structural integrity of the parahippocampal cingulum or the uncinate fasciculus. The anterior cingulum might play an important role in impaired novelty discrimination for affective information in the amygdala. This impairment is potentially driven by inefficient habituation and could contribute to persistent behavioral hypervigilance following trauma exposure.

  19. Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, and Cerebral Responses to Conflict Anticipation: An Exploratory Study

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    Hu, Jianping; Hu, Sien; Maisano, Julianna R.; Chao, Herta H.; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-Shan R.

    2016-01-01

    Proactive control allows us to maneuver a changing environment and individuals are distinct in how they anticipate and approach such changes. Here, we examined how individual differences in personality traits influence cerebral responses to conflict anticipation, a critical process of proactive control. We explored this issue in an fMRI study of the stop signal task, in which the probability of stop signal – p(Stop) – was computed trial by trial with a Bayesian model. Higher p(Stop) is associated with prolonged go trial reaction time, indicating conflict anticipation and proactive control of motor response. Regional brain activations to conflict anticipation were correlated to novelty seeking (NS), harm avoidance (HA), reward dependence, as assessed by the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire, with age and gender as covariates, in a whole-brain linear regression. Results showed that increased anticipation of the stop signal is associated with activations in the bilateral inferior parietal lobules (IPL), right lateral orbitofrontal cortex (lOFC), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), anterior pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA), and bilateral thalamus, with men showing greater activation in the IPL than women. NS correlated negatively to activity in the anterior pre-SMA, right IPL, and MFG/lOFC, and HA correlated negatively to activity in the thalamus during conflict anticipation. In addition, the negative association between NS and MFG/lOFC activity was significant in men but not in women. Thus, NS and HA traits are associated with reduced mobilization of cognitive control circuits when enhanced behavioral control is necessary. The findings from this exploratory study characterize the influence of NS and HA on proactive control and provide preliminary evidence for gender differences in these associations. PMID:27857686

  20. Localization of the event-related potential novelty response as defined by principal components analysis.

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    Dien, Joseph; Spencer, Kevin M; Donchin, Emanuel

    2003-10-01

    Recent research indicates that novel stimuli elicit at least two distinct components, the Novelty P3 and the P300. The P300 is thought to be elicited when a context updating mechanism is activated by a wide class of deviant events. The functional significance of the Novelty P3 is uncertain. Identification of the generator sources of the two components could provide additional information about their functional significance. Previous localization efforts have yielded conflicting results. The present report demonstrates that the use of principal components analysis (PCA) results in better convergence with knowledge about functional neuroanatomy than did previous localization efforts. The results are also more convincing than that obtained by two alternative methods, MUSIC-RAP and the Minimum Norm. Source modeling on 129-channel data with BESA and BrainVoyager suggests the P300 has sources in the temporal-parietal junction whereas the Novelty P3 has sources in the anterior cingulate.

  1. Exploration of a novel object in late adolescence predicts novelty-seeking behavior in adulthood: Associations among behavioral responses in four novelty-seeking tests.

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    Cuenya, Lucas; Sabariego, Marta; Donaire, Rocío; Callejas-Aguilera, José Enrique; Torres, Carmen; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The sensation/novelty seeking behavioral trait refers to the exploration/preference for a novel environment. Novelty seeking increases during late adolescence and it has been associated with several neurobehavioral disorders. In this experiment, we asked whether inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance (RHA-I, RLA-I) rats (1) differ in novelty seeking in late adolescence and (2) whether late adolescent novelty seeking predicts this trait in adulthood. Thirty six male RHA-I and 36 RLA-I rats were exposed to a novel object exploration (NOE) test during late adolescence (pnd: 52-59; contact latency, contact time, contact frequency). Head-dipping (hole-board, HB), time and visits to a novel-arm (Y-maze), and latency-in and emergence latency (emergence test) were registered in adulthood (pnd: 83-105). The results showed strain differences in all these tests (RHA-I>RLA-I). Factor analysis (RHA-I+RLA-I) revealed two clusters. The first one grouped HB and emergence test measures. The second one grouped NOE and Y-maze variables. Time exploring a novel object (NOE) was a significant predictor of novel arm time (RHA-I+RLA, RHA-I); contact latency was a significant predictor of novel arm frequency (RLA-I). Present results show consistent behavioral associations across four novelty-seeking tests and suggest that late adolescent novelty seeking predicts this genetically-influenced temperamental trait in adult Roman rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of stress system disturbance and enhanced novelty response in spatial learning of NCAM-deficient mice.

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    Brandewiede, Joerg; Jakovcevski, Mira; Stork, Oliver; Schachner, Melitta

    2013-11-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a crucial role in stress-related brain function, emotional behavior and memory formation. In this study, we investigated the functions of the glucocorticoid and serotonergic systems in mice constitutively deficient for NCAM (NCAM-/- mice). Our data provide evidence for a hyperfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with enlarged adrenal glands and increased stress-induced corticosterone release, but reduced hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor expression in NCAM-/- mice when compared to NCAM+/+ mice. We also obtained evidence for a hypofunction of 5-HT1A autoreceptors as indicated by increased 8-0H-DPAT-induced hypothermia. These findings suggest a disturbance of both humoral and neural stress systems in NCAM-/- mice. Accordingly, we not only confirmed previously observed hyperarousal of NCAM-/- mice in various anxiety tests, but also observed an increased response to novelty exposure in these animals. Spatial learning deficits of the NCAM-/- mice in a Morris Water maze persisted, even when mice were pretrained to prevent effects of novelty or stress. We suggest that NCAM-mediated processes are involved in both novelty/stress-related emotional behavior and in cognitive function during spatial learning.

  3. A Drosophila systems model of pentylenetetrazole induced locomotor plasticity responsive to antiepileptic drugs

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    Singh Priyanka

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rodent kindling induced by PTZ is a widely used model of epileptogenesis and AED testing. Overlapping pathophysiological mechanisms may underlie epileptogenesis and other neuropsychiatric conditions. Besides epilepsy, AEDs are widely used in treating various neuropsychiatric disorders. Mechanisms of AEDs' long term action in these disorders are poorly understood. We describe here a Drosophila systems model of PTZ induced locomotor plasticity that is responsive to AEDs. Results We empirically determined a regime in which seven days of PTZ treatment and seven days of subsequent PTZ discontinuation respectively cause a decrease and an increase in climbing speed of Drosophila adults. Concomitant treatment with NaVP and LEV, not ETH, GBP and VGB, suppressed the development of locomotor deficit at the end of chronic PTZ phase. Concomitant LEV also ameliorated locomotor alteration that develops after PTZ withdrawal. Time series of microarray expression profiles of heads of flies treated with PTZ for 12 hrs (beginning phase, two days (latent phase and seven days (behaviorally expressive phase showed only down-, not up-, regulation of genes; expression of 23, 2439 and 265 genes were downregulated, in that order. GO biological process enrichment analysis showed downregulation of transcription, neuron morphogenesis during differentiation, synaptic transmission, regulation of neurotransmitter levels, neurogenesis, axonogenesis, protein modification, axon guidance, actin filament organization etc. in the latent phase and of glutamate metabolism, cell communication etc. in the expressive phase. Proteomic interactome based analysis provided further directionality to these events. Pathway overrepresentation analysis showed enrichment of Wnt signaling and other associated pathways in genes downregulated by PTZ. Mining of available transcriptomic and proteomic data pertaining to established rodent models of epilepsy and human epileptic

  4. Cardiovascular responses to locomotor activity and feeding in unrestrained three-toed sloths, Bradypus variegatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P.F. Duarte

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate (HR and systolic (SBP, diastolic (DBP and mean (MBP blood pressure were recorded by biotelemetry in nine conscious unrestrained sloths for 1 min every 15 min over a 24-h period. The animals were allowed to freely move in an acoustically isolated and temperature-controlled (24 ± 1ºC experimental room with light-dark cycle (12/12 h. Behavior was closely monitored through a unidirectional visor and classified as resting (sitting or suspended, feeding (chewing and swallowing embauba leaves, Cecropia adenops, or locomotor activity around the tree trunk or on the room floor. Locomotor activity caused statistically significant increases in SBP (+8%, from 121 ± 22 to 131 ± 18 mmHg, DBP (+7%, from 86 ± 17 to 92 ± 10 mmHg, MBP (+8%, from 97 ± 19 to 105 ± 12 mmHg, and HR (+14%, from 84 ± 15 to 96 ± 15 bpm compared to resting values, indicating a possible major influence of the autonomic nervous system on the modulation of cardiac function during this behavior. During feeding, the increase in blood pressure was even higher (SBP +27%, from 119 ± 21 to 151 ± 21 mmHg; DBP +21%, from 85 ± 16 to 103 ± 15 mmHg; MBP +24%, from 96 ± 17 to 119 ± 17 mmHg, while HR remained at 14% (from 84 ± 15 to 96 ± 10 bpm above resting values. The proportionally greater increase in blood pressure than in HR during feeding suggests an increase in peripheral vascular resistance as part of the overall response to this behavior.

  5. Low and High Locomotor Responsiveness to Cocaine Predicts Intravenous Cocaine Conditioned Place Preference in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard M.; Everett, Carson V.; Nelson, Anna M.; Gulley, Joshua M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2009-01-01

    Outbred, male Sprague-Dawley rats can be classified as either low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs, respectively) based on cocaine-induced locomotor activity in an open-field arena. This difference reflects cocaine’s ability to inhibit the striatal dopamine transporter and predicts development of sensitization. To investigate the relationship between initial cocaine locomotor responsiveness and cocaine reward, here we first classified rats as either LCRs or HCRs in a conditioned place preference (CPP) apparatus. Subsequently, we conducted cocaine conditioning trials, twice daily over four days with vehicle and cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p. or 1 mg/kg, i.v.). When cocaine was administered by the i.p. route, similar to previous findings in the open-field, LCRs and HCRs were readily classified and locomotor sensitization developed in LCRs, but not HCRs. However, cocaine CPP was not observed. In contrast, when cocaine was administered by the i.v. route, the LCR/HCR classification not only predicted sensitization, but also CPP, with only LCR rats exhibiting sensitization and cocaine conditioning. Our findings show that the initial locomotor response to cocaine can predict CPP in male Sprague-Dawley rats under conditions when place conditioning develops, and that LCRs may be more prone to develop conditioning in the context of cocaine reward. PMID:17250883

  6. Conditioned place preference and locomotor activity in response to methylphenidate, amphetamine and cocaine in mice lacking dopamine D4 receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Thanos, P.K.; Bermeo, C.; Rubinstein, M.; Suchland, K.L.; Wang, G.-J.; Grandy, D.K.; Volkow, N.D.

    2010-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP) and amphetamine (AMPH) are the most frequently prescribed medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Both drugs are believed to derive their therapeutic benefit by virtue of their dopamine (DA)-enhancing effects, yet an explanation for the observation that some patients with ADHD respond well to one medication but not to the other remains elusive. The dopaminergic effects of MP and AMPH are also thought to underlie their reinforcing properties and ultimately their abuse. Polymorphisms in the human gene that codes for the DA D4 receptor (D4R) have been repeatedly associated with ADHD and may correlate with the therapeutic as well as the reinforcing effects of responses to these psychostimulant medications. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for MP, AMPH and cocaine were evaluated in wild-type (WT) mice and their genetically engineered littermates, congenic on the C57Bl/6J background, that completely lack D4Rs (knockout or KO). In addition, the locomotor activity in these mice during the conditioning phase of CPP was tested in the CPP chambers. D4 receptor KO and WT mice showed CPP and increased locomotor activity in response to each of the three psychostimulants tested. D4R differentially modulates the CPP responses to MP, AMPH and cocaine. While the D4R genotype affected CPP responses to MP (high dose only) and AMPH (low dose only) it had no effects on cocaine. Inasmuch as CPP is considered an indicator of sensitivity to reinforcing responses to drugs these data suggest a significant but limited role of D4Rs in modulating conditioning responses to MP and AMPH. In the locomotor test, D4 receptor KO mice displayed attenuated increases in AMPH-induced locomotor activity whereas responses to cocaine and MP did not differ. These results suggest distinct mechanisms for D4 receptor modulation of the reinforcing (perhaps via attenuating dopaminergic signalling) and locomotor properties of these stimulant drugs

  7. Different locomotor sensitization responses to repeated cocaine injections are associated with differential phosphorylation of GluA1 in the dorsomedial striatum of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myonghwan; Kim, Wonju; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Yoon, Bong-June

    2013-11-15

    Behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants reflects neural adaptation, which might share a common mechanism with drug addiction. Outbred male rats show different locomotor sensitization responses to cocaine, and cocaine also produces varied addictive progress in humans. We investigated whether differences in the induction of sensitization would affect the long-term persistence of sensitized locomotor activity, and we sought to determine the molecular basis for the variability in sensitization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats that showed sensitized locomotor responses over 5 consecutive daily cocaine injections (SENS) had significantly lower initial locomotor responses to the 1st cocaine exposure than did rats that did not show locomotor sensitization (NONS). Furthermore, rats that underwent 1 month of cocaine withdrawal after 5 repeated cocaine injections also exhibited sensitized or non-sensitized locomotor responses to a challenge injection of cocaine (SENS-C or NONS-C, respectively). This variability was also related to the initial responsiveness to cocaine. We examined the level of phosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropioniate receptor (AMPAR) in the dorsal striatum and found that there were significant differences between the sensitized rats and the non-sensitized rats. pGluA1-Ser831 was increased in the SENS rats during the induction of locomotor sensitization, and pGluA1-Ser845 was increased in the SENS-C rats during the expression of locomotor sensitization. These phosphorylation changes were observed in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) of adult rats but not in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) of adults. Our findings suggest that differential phosphorylation of AMPAR might be an important mechanism that contributes to the development of locomotor sensitization to cocaine in adult rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Regenerative responses in slow- and fast-twitch muscles following moderate contusion spinal cord injury and locomotor training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arun; Liu, Min; Ye, Fan; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use the rat moderate spinal cord contusion model to investigate the effects of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) on the muscle regeneration process, comparing regeneration of slow-twitch plantarflexor soleus muscle and fast-twitch dorsiflexor tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Additionally, we wanted to examine the effect of a week of locomotor training following incomplete SCI on the muscle regeneration process in these muscles and also determine if a week of similar locomotor training is sufficient to initiate muscle regeneration in control, non-injured rats. Thirty-two, adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the study. Moderate, midthoracic contusion SCIs were produced using a NYU (New York University) impactor in all rats except controls. Animals were randomly assigned to treadmill training or untrained groups. Rats in the treadmill training group were manually treadmill trained starting at 1 week after SCI, for 10 bouts (2 sessions of 20 min of actual stepping) over 5 days and control rats in the training group received similar training. Our results indicate that a muscle regenerative response was initiated only in the slow-twitch soleus muscle in the initial 2 weeks following SCI, the addition of 1 week of locomotor treadmill training led to a significant increase in soleus regenerative process. No significant regenerative process was observed in the fast-twitch TA. Increased muscle regeneration in soleus is suggested by our findings of increased expression of (1) insulin-like growth factor-1, involved in the activation of satellite cells; (2) Pax7, a marker of satellite cell activation; (3) myogenin, a muscle regulatory protein; and (4) embryonic myosin, an indicator of new muscle fiber formation. Locomotor training in control, non-injured animals did not induce similar changes towards the regenerative process.

  9. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de E.N.; Nielsen, B.; Rodenburg, T.B.; Buitenhuis, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understood,

  10. Selection on feather pecking affects response to novelty and foraging behaviour in laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Haas, Elske N; Nielsen, Birte L; Buitenhuis, A J (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    Feather pecking (FP) is a major welfare problem in laying hens, influenced by multiple factors. FP is thought to be redirected foraging behaviour, however fearful birds are also known to be more sensitive to develop FP. The relationship between fear-responses, foraging and FP is not well understo...... preference for eating feathers, this study supports earlier findings that HFP birds have a stronger pecking motivation than LFP birds...

  11. HIV-1 Proteins Influence Novelty-Seeking Behavior and Alter Region-Specific Transcriptional Responses to Chronic Nicotine Treatment in HIV-1Tg Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongli; Nesil, Tanseli; Wingo, Taylor; Chang, Sulie L; Li, Ming D

    2017-09-01

    Clinical studies suggest that HIV-1-infected patients are more likely to use or abuse addictive drugs than is the general population. We hypothesized that HIV-1 proteins impact novelty-seeking behavior and enhance the transcriptional response to nicotine in genes implicated in both novelty-seeking behavior and drug addiction. We assessed the effects of HIV-1 proteins on novelty-seeking behavior by comparing baseline activity differences of HIV-1Tg and F344 control rats in the open-field test. One day after behavioral testing, all rats began daily subcutaneous injections of either nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, base) or saline (the same for each rat) for 27 days. At the end of treatment, the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and ventral tegmental area were collected for RNA expression analysis of genes in the receptor families for dopamine, GABA, glutamate, and serotonin. Significant strain difference was detected in the distance moved in the center, such that HIV-1Tg rats traveled greater distance in the center of the arena than did F344 rats. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that mRNA from Drd3 and Grm2 in the prefrontal cortex and Drd5 and Gabra6 in the ventral tegmental area was significantly upregulated, whereas that of Drd5 in the nucleus accumbens was downregulated in HIV-1Tg rats compared with F344 rats. Further, more addiction-related genes were significantly modulated by nicotine in each brain region in the HIV-1Tg rats than in the control animals. HIV-1 proteins may affect novelty-seeking behavior and modulate the expression of genes related to drug addiction and novelty-seeking behavior. HIV-1 viral proteins and chronic nicotine treatment impact the expression of genes involved in novelty-seeking behavior and addiction in three brain regions of the HIV-1 transgenic rat. These findings implicate that HIV-1 proteins may be involved in novelty-seeking behavior and in modulating the expression of genes related to drug addiction and novelty seeking. © The

  12. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure

    KAUST Repository

    Baud, Maxime O.

    2016-05-03

    © 2016 European Sleep Research Society. Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment.

  13. Sleep fragmentation alters brain energy metabolism without modifying hippocampal electrophysiological response to novelty exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, Maxime O; Parafita, Julia; Nguyen, Audrey; Magistretti, Pierre J; Petit, Jean-Marie

    2016-10-01

    Sleep is viewed as a fundamental restorative function of the brain, but its specific role in neural energy budget remains poorly understood. Sleep deprivation dampens brain energy metabolism and impairs cognitive functions. Intriguingly, sleep fragmentation, despite normal total sleep duration, has a similar cognitive impact, and in this paper we ask the question of whether it may also impair brain energy metabolism. To this end, we used a recently developed mouse model of 2 weeks of sleep fragmentation and measured 2-deoxy-glucose uptake and glycogen, glucose and lactate concentration in different brain regions. In order to homogenize mice behaviour during metabolic measurements, we exposed them to a novel environment for 1 h. Using an intra-hippocampal electrode, we first showed that hippocampal electroencephalograph (EEG) response to exploration was unaltered by 1 or 14 days of sleep fragmentation. However, after 14 days, sleep fragmented mice exhibited a lower uptake of 2-deoxy-glucose in cortex and hippocampus and lower cortical lactate levels than control mice. Our results suggest that long-term sleep fragmentation impaired brain metabolism to a similar extent as total sleep deprivation without affecting the neuronal responsiveness of hippocampus to a novel environment. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical....../technical assessments were performed during CSTw for eleven Norwegian high-level women soccer players. The activity pattern during CSTw and CM was monitored using the ZXY tracking system. No differences were observed between CSTw and CM with regards to total distance covered (10093±94 and 9674±191m), high intensity...

  15. Curious creatures: a multi-taxa investigation of responses to novelty in a zoo environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda A. Hall

    2018-03-01

    influences on their response. Further work to obtain data on multiple captive populations of a single species using a standardised method could uncover factors that nurture the development of curiosity. In doing so, it would be possible to isolate and modify sub-optimal husbandry practices to improve welfare in the zoo environment.

  16. Curious creatures: a multi-taxa investigation of responses to novelty in a zoo environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, Vicky; Burns, Alicia; McGill, David M.; Doyle, Rebecca E.

    2018-01-01

    their response. Further work to obtain data on multiple captive populations of a single species using a standardised method could uncover factors that nurture the development of curiosity. In doing so, it would be possible to isolate and modify sub-optimal husbandry practices to improve welfare in the zoo environment. PMID:29568703

  17. Curious creatures: a multi-taxa investigation of responses to novelty in a zoo environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Belinda A; Melfi, Vicky; Burns, Alicia; McGill, David M; Doyle, Rebecca E

    2018-01-01

    influences on their response. Further work to obtain data on multiple captive populations of a single species using a standardised method could uncover factors that nurture the development of curiosity. In doing so, it would be possible to isolate and modify sub-optimal husbandry practices to improve welfare in the zoo environment.

  18. Novelty enhances visual perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Schomaker

    Full Text Available The effects of novelty on low-level visual perception were investigated in two experiments using a two-alternative forced-choice tilt detection task. A target, consisting of a Gabor patch, was preceded by a cue that was either a novel or a familiar fractal image. Participants had to indicate whether the Gabor stimulus was vertically oriented or slightly tilted. In the first experiment tilt angle was manipulated; in the second contrast of the Gabor patch was varied. In the first, we found that sensitivity was enhanced after a novel compared to a familiar cue, and in the second we found sensitivity to be enhanced for novel cues in later experimental blocks when participants became more and more familiarized with the familiar cue. These effects were not caused by a shift in the response criterion. This shows for the first time that novel stimuli affect low-level characteristics of perception. We suggest that novelty can elicit a transient attentional response, thereby enhancing perception.

  19. Novelty enhances visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Judith; Meeter, Martijn

    2012-01-01

    The effects of novelty on low-level visual perception were investigated in two experiments using a two-alternative forced-choice tilt detection task. A target, consisting of a Gabor patch, was preceded by a cue that was either a novel or a familiar fractal image. Participants had to indicate whether the Gabor stimulus was vertically oriented or slightly tilted. In the first experiment tilt angle was manipulated; in the second contrast of the Gabor patch was varied. In the first, we found that sensitivity was enhanced after a novel compared to a familiar cue, and in the second we found sensitivity to be enhanced for novel cues in later experimental blocks when participants became more and more familiarized with the familiar cue. These effects were not caused by a shift in the response criterion. This shows for the first time that novel stimuli affect low-level characteristics of perception. We suggest that novelty can elicit a transient attentional response, thereby enhancing perception.

  20. Maternal Accuracy and Behavior in Anticipating Children's Responses to Novelty: Relations to Fearful Temperament and Implications for Anxiety Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that mothers' behaviors may serve as a mechanism in the development from toddler fearful temperament to childhood anxiety. The current study examined the maternal characteristic of accuracy in predicting toddlers' distress reactions to novelty in relation to temperament, parenting, and anxiety development.…

  1. Detecting Novelty and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Vera; Bradley, Margaret M.; Codispoti, Maurizio; Lang, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of cognition often use an “oddball” paradigm to study effects of stimulus novelty and significance on information processing. However, an oddball tends to be perceptually more novel than the standard, repeated stimulus as well as more relevant to the ongoing task, making it difficult to disentangle effects due to perceptual novelty and stimulus significance. In the current study, effects of perceptual novelty and significance on ERPs were assessed in a passive viewing context by presenting repeated and novel pictures (natural scenes) that either signaled significant information regarding the current context or not. A fronto-central N2 component was primarily affected by perceptual novelty, whereas a centro-parietal P3 component was modulated by both stimulus significance and novelty. The data support an interpretation that the N2 reflects perceptual fluency and is attenuated when a current stimulus matches an active memory representation and that the amplitude of the P3 reflects stimulus meaning and significance. PMID:19400680

  2. Application of the Copenhagen Soccer Test in high-level women players - locomotor activities, physiological response and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiksen, Mads; Pettersen, Svein Arne; Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Randers, Morten B; Brito, João; Mohr, Magni; Bangsbo, Jens; Krustrup, Peter

    2013-12-01

    We evaluated the physiological response, sprint performance and technical ability in various phases of the Copenhagen Soccer Test for Women (CSTw) and investigated whether the locomotor activities of the CSTw were comparable to competitive match-play (CM). Physiological measurements and physical/technical assessments were performed during CSTw for eleven Norwegian high-level women soccer players. The activity pattern during CSTw and CM was monitored using the ZXY tracking system. No differences were observed between CSTw and CM with regards to total distance covered (10093±94 and 9674±191m), high intensity running (1278±67 and 1193±115m) or sprinting (422±55 and 372±46m) (p>.05). During CSTw, average HR was 85±2%HRmax with 35±2% playing time >90%HRmax. Blood lactate increased (p<.05) from 1.4±0.3mM at rest to an average of 4.7±0.5mM during CSTw, with no changes during the test. Blood glucose was 5.4±0.3mM at rest and remained unaltered during CSTw. Sprint performance (2×20m) decreased (p<.05) by 3% during CSTw (8.19±0.06-8.47±0.10s). In conclusion, the locomotor activities during CSTw were comparable to that of high-level competitive match-play. The physiological demands of the CSTw were high, with no changes in heart rate, blood lactate or technical performance during the test, but a lowered sprint performance towards the end of the test. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Nicotine-Evoked Locomotor Response: A Behavioral Paradigm for Toxicity Screening in Zebrafish (Danio rerio Embryos and Eleutheroembryos Exposed to Methylmercury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco X Mora-Zamorano

    Full Text Available This study is an adaptation of the nicotine-evoked locomotor response (NLR assay, which was originally utilized for phenotype-based neurotoxicity screening in zebrafish embryos. Zebrafish embryos do not exhibit spontaneous swimming until roughly 4 days post-fertilization (dpf, however, a robust swimming response can be induced as early as 36 hours post-fertilization (hpf by means of acute nicotine exposure (30-240μM. Here, the NLR was tested as a tool for early detection of locomotor phenotypes in 36, 48 and 72 hpf mutant zebrafish embryos of the non-touch-responsive maco strain; this assay successfully discriminated mutant embryos from their non-mutant siblings. Then, methylmercury (MeHg was used as a proof-of-concept neurotoxicant to test the effectiveness of the NLR assay as a screening tool in toxicology. The locomotor effects of MeHg were evaluated in 6 dpf wild type eleutheroembryos exposed to waterborne MeHg (0, 0.01, 0.03 and 0.1μM. Afterwards, the NLR assay was tested in 48 hpf embryos subjected to the same MeHg exposure regimes. Embryos exposed to 0.01 and 0.03μM of MeHg exhibited significant increases in locomotion in both scenarios. These findings suggest that similar locomotor phenotypes observed in free swimming fish can be detected as early as 48 hpf, when locomotion is induced with nicotine.

  4. Vasotocin neurons and septal V1a-like receptors potently modulate songbird flocking and responses to novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aubrey M; Kingsbury, Marcy A; Hoffbuhr, Kristin; Schrock, Sara E; Waxman, Brandon; Kabelik, David; Thompson, Richmond R; Goodson, James L

    2011-06-01

    Previous comparisons of territorial and gregarious finches (family Estrildidae) suggest the hypothesis that arginine vasotocin (VT) neurons in the medial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTm) and V(1a)-like receptors in the lateral septum (LS) promote flocking behavior. Consistent with this hypothesis, we now show that intraseptal infusions of a V(1a) antagonist in male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) reduce gregariousness (preference for a group of 10 versus 2 conspecific males), but have no effect on the amount of time that subjects spend in close proximity to other birds ("contact time"). The antagonist also produces a profound increase in anxiety-like behavior, as exhibited by an increased latency to feed in a novelty-suppressed feeding test. Bilateral knockdown of VT production in the BSTm using LNA-modified antisense oligonucleotides likewise produces increases in anxiety-like behavior and a potent reduction in gregariousness, relative to subjects receiving scrambled oligonucleotides. The antisense oligonucleotides also produced a modest increase in contact time, irrespective of group size. Together, these combined experiments provide clear evidence that endogenous VT promotes preferences for larger flock sizes, and does so in a manner that is coupled to general anxiolysis. Given that homologous peptide circuitry of the BSTm-LS is found across all tetrapod vertebrate classes, these findings may be predictive for other highly gregarious species. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Locomotor and Heart Rate Responses of Floaters During Small-Sided Games in Elite Soccer Players: Effect of Pitch Size and Inclusion of Goal Keepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacome, Mathieu; Simpson, Ben M; Cholley, Yannick; Buchheit, Martin

    2017-09-27

    To (1) compare the locomotor and heart rate responses between floaters and regular players during both small and large small sided games (SSGs) and (2) examine whether the type of game (i.e., game simulation vs possession game) affects the magnitude of the difference between floaters and regular players. Data were collected in 41 players belonging to an elite French football team during three consecutive seasons (2014-2017). 5-Hz GPS were used to collect all training data, with the Athletic Data Innovation analyser (v5.4.1.514, Sydney, Australia) used to derive total distance (m), high-speed distance (> 14.4 km.h -1 , m) and external mechanical load (MechL, a.u). All SSGs included exclusively one floater, and were divided into two main categories, according to the participation of goal-keepers (GK) (game simulation, GS) or not (possession games, PO) and then further divided into small and large (>100 m2/player) SSGs based on the area per player ratio. Locomotor activity and mechanical load performed were likely-to-most likely lower (moderate to large magnitude) in floaters compared with regular players, while differences in HR responses were unclear to possibly higher (small) in floaters. The magnitude of the difference in locomotor activity and MechL between floaters and regular players was substantially greater during GS compared with PO. Compared with regular players, floaters present decreased external load (both locomotor and MechL) despite unclear to possibly slightly higher HR responses during SSGs. Moreover, the responses of floaters compared with regular players are not consistent across different sizes of SSGs, with greater differences during GS than PO.

  6. Expecting the unexpected: the effects of deviance on novelty processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Judith; Roos, Rinske; Meeter, Martijn

    2014-04-01

    Novelty is often prioritized and detected automatically. It attracts attention-eliciting the orienting response. However, novelty is not a unitary concept, and the extent to which the orienting response is elicited depends on several factors. In the present study we investigated how stimulus novelty, deviance from the context, and complexity of the stimulus context contribute to the anterior N2 and novelty P3 event-related potential components, using the visual novelty oddball paradigm. In the first experiment the novelty P3 was drastically reduced when the stimulus context was complex compared with simple, and in a second experiment when novels were frequent rather than deviant. No such effect was found for the anterior N2, suggesting it is a function of stimulus characteristics, not deviance. In contrast, the novelty P3 depended on deviance and contextual complexity.

  7. QTL and systems genetics analysis of mouse grooming and behavioral responses to novelty in an open field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delprato, A; Algéo, M-P; Bonheur, B; Bubier, J A; Lu, L; Williams, R W; Chesler, E J; Crusio, W E

    2017-11-01

    The open field is a classic test used to assess exploratory behavior, anxiety and locomotor activity in rodents. Here, we mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying behaviors displayed in an open field, using a panel of 53 BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains with deep replication (10 per strain and sex). The use of these strains permits the integration and comparison of data obtained in different laboratories, and also offers the possibility to study trait covariance by exploiting powerful bioinformatics tools and resources. We quantified behavioral traits during 20-min test sessions including (1) percent time spent and distance traveled near the wall (thigmotaxis), (2) leaning against the wall, (3) rearing, (4) jumping, (5) grooming duration, (6) grooming frequency, (7) locomotion and (8) defecation. All traits exhibit moderate heritability making them amenable to genetic analysis. We identified a significant QTL on chromosome M.m. 4 at approximately 104 Mb that modulates grooming duration in both males and females (likelihood ratio statistic values of approximately 18, explaining 25% and 14% of the variance, respectively) and a suggestive QTL modulating locomotion that maps to the same locus. Bioinformatic analysis indicates Disabled 1 (Dab1, a key protein in the reelin signaling pathway) as a particularly strong candidate gene modulating these behaviors. We also found 2 highly suggestive QTLs for a sex by strain interaction for grooming duration on chromosomes 13 and 17. In addition, we identified a pairwise epistatic interaction between loci on chromosomes 12 at 36-37 Mb and 14 at 34-36 Mb that influences rearing frequency in males. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  8. Maternal Accuracy and Behavior in Anticipating Children’s Responses to Novelty: Relations to Fearful Temperament and Implications for Anxiety Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Buss, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that mothers’ behaviors may serve as a mechanism in the development from toddler fearful temperament to childhood anxiety. The current study examined the maternal characteristic of accuracy in predicting toddlers’ distress reactions to novelty in relation to temperament, parenting, and anxiety development. Ninety-three two-year-old toddlers and their mothers participated in the study. Maternal accuracy moderated the relation between fearful temperament and protective behavior, suggesting this bidirectional link may be more likely to occur when mothers are particularly attuned to their children’s fear responses. An exploratory moderated mediation analysis supported the mechanistic role of protective parenting in the relation between early fearful temperament and later anxiety. Mediation only occurred, however, when mothers displayed high accuracy. Results are discussed within the broader literature of parental influence on fearful children’s development. PMID:20436795

  9. Divergent selection on home pen locomotor activity in a chicken model: Selection program, genetic parameters and direct response on activity and body weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joergen B Kjaer

    Full Text Available General locomotor activity (GLA in poultry has attracted attention, as it negatively influences production costs (energy expenditure and feed consumption and welfare parameters (bone strength, litter quality, feather pecking and cannibalism. Laying hen lines diverging in the average level of spontaneous locomotor activity in the home pen were developed by genetic selection using the founder New Hampshire line. Activity was recorded using RFID technology at around five weeks of age during four to five days in the home pen. After initial phenotyping, the least active birds were selected for the low activity line and the most active for the high activity line, with no gene transfer between lines. In each of six generations, approximately ten sires were mated to twenty dams producing 158 to 334 offspring per line per generation. The response to selection was rapid and of a considerable magnitude. In sixth generation, the level of GLA was approximately halved in the low and doubled in the high line compared to the control (7.2, 14.9 and 28.7 recordings/h. Estimated heritability of locomotor activity in the low and high line was 0.38 and 0.33, respectively. Males, in general, were more active than females. High line birds were significantly heavier than low line birds. In fourth, fifth, and sixth generation, low as well as high line birds were lighter than control line birds. This selection experiment demonstrates variation in heritability for GLA and, as a result, genetically diverged lines have been developed. These lines can be used as models for further studies of underlying physiological, neural and molecular genetic mechanisms of spontaneous locomotor activity.

  10. Heart rate and skin conductance responses to taste, taste novelty, and the (dis)confirmation of expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verastegui-Tena, Luz; Trijp, van Hans; Piqueras-Fiszman, Betina

    2018-01-01

    It is unclear whether the responses of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) can measure how people respond to food. Results focused on emotional responses are contradictory; therefore, the focus has shifted to other components of emotion, such as appraisals. The aim of this study was, therefore, to

  11. Why novelty is overrated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene Tanggaard; Wegener, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    less attention, however, is the fact that many creative activities and everyday innovations in modern-day organisations actually build upon what is already there. Creative products and processes are often the result of some kind of learning from or even re-creation of existing processes and materials....... The paper argues that there is excessive enthusiasm towards the novelty aspects of creativity and innovation, which overshadow the potential of old ideas and past experience as drivers of change....

  12. Cocaine-induced locomotor activity in rats selectively bred for low and high voluntary running behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob D; Green, Caroline L; Arthur, Ian M; Booth, Frank W; Miller, Dennis K

    2015-02-01

    The rewarding effects of physical activity and abused drugs are caused by stimulation of similar brain pathways. Low (LVR) and high (HVR) voluntary running lines were developed by selectively breeding Wistar rats on running distance performance on postnatal days 28-34. We hypothesized that LVR rats would be more sensitive to the locomotor-activating effects of cocaine than HVR rats due to their lower motivation for wheel running. We investigated how selection for LVR or HVR behavior affects inherited activity responses: (a) open field activity levels, (b) habituation to an open field environment, and (c) the locomotor response to cocaine. Open field activity was measured for 80 min on three successive days (days 1-3). Data from the first 20 min were analyzed to determine novelty-induced locomotor activity (day 1) and the habituation to the environment (days 1-3). On day 3, rats were acclimated to the chamber for 20 min and then received saline or cocaine (10, 20, or 30 mg/kg) injection. Dopamine transporter (DAT) protein in the nucleus accumbens was measured via Western blot. Selecting for low and high voluntary running behavior co-selects for differences in inherent (HVR > LVR) and cocaine-induced (LVR > HVR) locomotor activity levels. The differences in the selected behavioral measures do not appear to correlate with DAT protein levels. LVR and HVR rats are an intriguing physical activity model for studying the interactions between genes related to the motivation to run, to use drugs of abuse, and to exhibit locomotor activity.

  13. Studying primate learning in group contexts: Tests of social foraging, response to novelty, and cooperative problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drea, Christine M

    2006-03-01

    Learning commonly refers to the modification of behavior through experience, whereby an animal gains information about stimulus-response contingencies from interacting with its physical environment. Social learning, on the other hand, occurs when the same information originates, not from the animal's personal experience, but from the actions of others. Socially biased learning is the 'collective outcome of interacting physical, social, and individual factors' [D. Fragaszy, E. Visalberghi, Learn. Behav. 32 (2004) 24-35.] (see p. 24). Mounting interest in animal social learning has brought with it certain innovations in animal testing procedures. Variants of the observer-demonstrator and cooperation paradigms, for instance, have been used widely in captive settings to examine the transmission or coordination of behavior, respectively, between two animals. Relatively few studies, however, have examined social learning in more complex group settings and even fewer have manipulated the social environment to empirically test the effect of group dynamics on problem solving. The present paper outlines procedures for group testing captive non-human primates, in spacious arenas, to evaluate the social modulation of learning and performance. These methods are illustrated in the context of (1) naturalistic social foraging problems, modeled after traditional visual discrimination paradigms, (2) response to novel objects and novel extractive foraging tasks, and (3) cooperative problem solving. Each example showcases the benefits of experimentally manipulating social context to compare an animal's performance in intact groups (or even pairs) against its performance under different social circumstances. Broader application of group testing procedures and manipulation of group composition promise to provide meaningful insight into socially biased learning.

  14. P2X7 receptors in body temperature, locomotor activity, and brain mRNA and lncRNA responses to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher J; Taishi, Ping; Honn, Kimberly A; Koberstein, John N; Krueger, James M

    2016-12-01

    The ionotropic purine type 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a nonspecific cation channel implicated in sleep regulation and brain cytokine release. Many endogenous rhythms covary with sleep, including locomotor activity and core body temperature. Furthermore, brain-hypothalamic cytokines and purines play a role in the regulation of these physiological parameters as well as sleep. We hypothesized that these parameters are also affected by the absence of the P2X7 receptor. Herein, we determine spontaneous expression of body temperature and locomotor activity in wild-type (WT) and P2X7R knockout (KO) mice and how they are affected by sleep deprivation (SD). We also compare hypothalamic, hippocampal, and cortical cytokine- and purine-related receptor and enzyme mRNA expressions before and after SD in WT and P2X7RKO mice. Next, in a hypothesis-generating survey of hypothalamic long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, we compare lncRNA expression levels between strains and after SD. During baseline conditions, P2X7RKO mice had attenuated temperature rhythms compared with WT mice, although locomotor activity patterns were similar in both strains. After 6 h of SD, body temperature and locomotion were enhanced to a greater extent in P2X7RKO mice than in WT mice during the initial 2-3 h after SD. Baseline mRNA levels of cortical TNF-α and P2X4R were higher in the KO mice than WT mice. In response to SD, the KO mice failed to increase hypothalamic adenosine deaminase and P2X4R mRNAs. Further, hypothalamic lncRNA expressions varied by strain, and with SD. Current data are consistent with a role for the P2X7R in thermoregulation and lncRNA involvement in purinergic signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Shift work sleep disorder is associated with an attenuated brain response of sensory memory and an increased brain response to novelty: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Jefferson, Catherine; Kick, Ashley; Spear, Laura; Tepley, Norman; Drake, Christopher L

    2010-05-01

    To study the neurophysiological changes in attention and memory functions in shift work sleep disorder (SWSD), using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). 9 healthy night workers (NW) (mean age = 40 y; SD +/- 8.9 y); 8 night workers meeting diagnostic criteria for SWSD (mean age = 37 y +/- 9.4 y) and 9 healthy day workers (DW) (mean age = 35 y +/- 7.3 y). Using standard PSG the sleep related measures (TIB, TST, SOL, SE, and sleep stage distribution) were obtained prior to EEG/ERP study. Measures of habitual sleep were obtained from 2 week sleep logs and sleepiness was assessed with standardized measures. Using 32-EEG leads the ERPs to 3 types of sounds (novel, duration deviant, and simple tone) were obtained. The mismatch negativity (MMN) reflecting memory processing and P3a-reflecting the shift of involuntary attention were obtained. The statistical comparisons of ERPs and sleep related parameters were performed using repeated measured ANOVAs and t-tests where appropriate. Patients with SWSD had reduced TST and increased WASO relative to healthy workers. ERP results demonstrated significant attenuation of MMN amplitude over frontal regions in SWSD patients relative to NW and DW. In the SWSD patients, the P3a was increased to novelty across frontocentral brain regions with respect to the same locations in healthy controls. The ERP evidence of sensory memory reduction and attentional hyper-reaction to novel sound in conjunction with disturbed sleep suggests the need for more neurophysiological studies in SWSD workers.

  16. Neuromotor and Musculoskeletal Responses to Locomotor Training for an Individual With Chronic Motor Complete AIS-B Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Gail F; Sisto, Sue Ann; Barbeau, Hugues; Kirshblum, Steven C; Wilen, Janina; Bond, Quin; Bentson, Scott; Asselin, Pierre; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; Harkema, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Background/objective: To determine the effects of locomotor training (LT) using body weight support (BWS), treadmill, and manual assistance on muscle activation, bone mineral density (BMD), and body composition changes for an individual with motor complete spinal cord injury (AIS B), 1 year after injury. Methods: A man with chronic C6 AIS B (motor complete and sensory incomplete) spinal cord injury (SCI), 1 year after injury, completed 2 blocks of LT over a 9-month training period (35-session block followed by 8.6 weeks of no training and then a 62-session block). Results: Before training, muscle activation was minimal for any muscle examined, whereas after the 2 blocks of LT (97 sessions), hip and knee muscle activation patterns for the bilateral rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and gastrocnemius were in phase with the kinematics. Mean EMG amplitude increased for all bilateral muscles and burst duration increased for rectus femoris and gastrocnemius muscles, whereas burst duration decreased for the biceps femoris after 62 LT sessions. Before LT, left biceps femoris had a pattern that reflected muscle stretch, whereas after training, muscle stretch of the left biceps femoris could not totally account for mean EMG amplitude or burst duration. After the 62 training sessions, total BMD decreased (1.54%), and regional BMD decreased (legs: 6.72%). Total weight increased, lean mass decreased (6.6%), and fat mass increased (7.4%) in the arms, whereas fat mass decreased (3.5%) and lean mass increased (4%) in the legs. Conclusions: LT can induce positive neural and body composition changes in a nonambulatory person with chronic SCI, indicating that neuromuscular plasticity can be induced by repetitive locomotor training after a motor complete SCI. PMID:19086708

  17. Novelty-induced locomotion is positively associated with cocaine ingestion in adolescent rats; anxiety is correlated in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Q David; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L; Caster, Joseph M; Waller, Samuel T; Brooks, Matthew P; Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2009-01-01

    The present studies assessed the roles of sex, age, novelty-seeking and plus-maze behavior on cocaine drinking in rats. Cocaine/saccharin solution was available in three daily, 5-hour sessions then a saccharin-only solution was also available in following sessions. In the one-bottle drinking phase, early and late adolescent males, post-natal day 28 (PN28) and PN42, consumed more cocaine/saccharin solution than young adults (PN65), but females did not exhibit significant age differences. Adolescents of both sexes consumed more cocaine/saccharin than adults during choice drinking. Saccharin availability in the two-bottle trials decreased cocaine/saccharin consumption in PN28 and PN65 rats. After a drug-free period, cocaine-stimulated locomotion was lower in cocaine/saccharin drinking than saccharin-only males, indicating tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that individual differences in pre-screened behavioral traits would correlate with cocaine/saccharin consumption in PN28 and PN65 male rats. High locomotor responses to novelty were associated with greater cocaine/saccharin drinking in adults in one-bottle sessions. In the subsequent choice drinking phase, correlations were age-specific. Adolescents with high novelty-induced locomotion and adults that spent less time on open arms of the elevated plus-maze drank more cocaine/saccharin. Thus, behavioral phenotypes correlated with individual differences in cocaine/saccharin consumption in an age-related manner.

  18. The dynamics of correlated novelties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tria, F.; Loreto, V.; Servedio, V. D. P.; Strogatz, S. H.

    2014-07-01

    Novelties are a familiar part of daily life. They are also fundamental to the evolution of biological systems, human society, and technology. By opening new possibilities, one novelty can pave the way for others in a process that Kauffman has called ``expanding the adjacent possible''. The dynamics of correlated novelties, however, have yet to be quantified empirically or modeled mathematically. Here we propose a simple mathematical model that mimics the process of exploring a physical, biological, or conceptual space that enlarges whenever a novelty occurs. The model, a generalization of Polya's urn, predicts statistical laws for the rate at which novelties happen (Heaps' law) and for the probability distribution on the space explored (Zipf's law), as well as signatures of the process by which one novelty sets the stage for another. We test these predictions on four data sets of human activity: the edit events of Wikipedia pages, the emergence of tags in annotation systems, the sequence of words in texts, and listening to new songs in online music catalogues. By quantifying the dynamics of correlated novelties, our results provide a starting point for a deeper understanding of the adjacent possible and its role in biological, cultural, and technological evolution.

  19. Unraveling effects of novelty on creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillebaart, M.; Förster, J.; Rotteveel, M.; Jehle, A.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Novelty is inherent to creative processes. A positive effect of novelty on creative task performance was therefore predicted. However, creativity can benefit from divergent, as well as convergent thinking. Subsequently, novelty may benefit creative performance when divergent thinking is required,

  20. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.R. Hudson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training.

  1. Novelty Detection via Answer Updating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiaoyan; Croft, W. B

    2004-01-01

    .... Specifically, we explore the use of question-answering techniques for novelty detection. New information is defined as new/previously unseen answers to questions representing a user's information need...

  2. Energy law novelties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butnaru, Paula

    2004-01-01

    Energy Law no. 318/2003 has been worked out in compliance with the EU Electricity Directive based on the following principles and objectives: - clearly defining the positions and roles of various institutional entities and structures; - introducing the competitions in energy generation and supply; - creation and functioning of electricity competitive markets; - right of certain consumers to buy electricity directly from the producers; - direct, fair and regulated access to electrical network of all the participants in the electricity market; - generators, distributors and consumers; - achieving the activities in the field under reliable conditions and at the quality standards for optimally using the primary energy resources by observing the environmental protection norms in force; - promoting, in a balanced manner, the interests of the National Power System based on the European regulations and requirements on optimal and efficient resources use by observing the environmental criteria and norms; - ensuring the sustainable development of the national economy; - diversifying the primary energy resources basis; - transparency of electricity tariffs, prices and taxes; - creating the security stocks of needed fuels for electricity and heat co-generation; - ensuring the interconnected operation of the NPS with the energy systems in the neighboring countries and with the ones in the UCTE; - promoting the use of renewable energy sources. Among the novelties brought by this Law by the definitions given to the terms used it is worth mentioning: - Access to the public electricity network; - Energy capacity; - Passageway of the electric line; - Natural monopoly in the energy field; - Electricity market operator; - Distribution system operator; - Transmission system operator; -Merit order (i.e the order in which an electricity producer is taken into consideration according to the price offered to cover the NPS electricity demand); - Electricity market; - Rehabilitation

  3. Locomotor inhibition in adults horses faced to stressors: a single postpartum experience may be enough!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eDurier

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the number of postpartum handling that a newborn experiences, few studies focus on their long-term consequences. In rats, regular long separations from the mother, during the early life, led to modifications of the locomotor activity when the animal is confronted to a stressor. In horses, one component of the behavioural response to stressful situation is active locomotion. We wondered if the routine postpartum handling undergone by foals, would affect their level of reactivity or the way they express their stress, when older. One single prolonged bout of handling just after birth clearly affected later adult expression of stress reactivity. In social separation associated with novelty, handled and unhandled horses produced an equal amount of whinnies, showing a similar vocal response to stress. However, both groups differed in their locomotor response to the situations. Early-handled foals expressed less of the active forms of locomotion than the control group. Our findings highlight the need of further reflections on long-term effects of routine handlings procedures close to birth.

  4. Context-dependent responses to novelty in Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), selected for high and low post-stress cortisol responsiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basic, D.; Winberg, S.; Schjolden, J.

    2012-01-01

    in challenging situations than the LR counterpart. The present study addressed whether such variation in behavioral flexibility traits was evident in different experimental settings using these selection lines. The fish were subjected to three sets of challenges (novel object test, resident–intruder test...... and confinement stressor test), all which were repeated a week later. Introducing a novel object evoked a divergent behavioral response in association with feeding: fish from the LR line displayed consistently suppressed feed intake while the HR fish remained unaffected. This observation was found...... to be repeatable along with attack latency and movement activity from the resident–intruder and confinement stressor tests. These results indicate that the behavioral responses in this animal model are context-dependent and shed new light on the expression of behavioral flexibility....

  5. Acute thermal stressor increases glucocorticoid response but minimizes testosterone and locomotor performance in the cane toad (Rhinella marina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J Narayan

    Full Text Available Climatic warming is a global problem and acute thermal stressor in particular could be considered as a major stressor for wildlife. Cane toads (Rhinella marina have expanded their range into warmer regions of Australia and they provide a suitable model species to study the sub-lethal impacts of thermal stressor on the endocrine physiology of amphibians. Presently, there is no information to show that exposure to an acute thermal stressor could initiate a physiological stress (glucocorticoid response and secondly, the possible effects on reproductive hormones and performance. Answering these questions is important for understanding the impacts of extreme temperature on amphibians. In this study, we experimented on cane toads from Queensland, Australia by acclimating them to mildly warm temperature (25°C and then exposing to acute temperature treatments of 30°, 35° or 40°C (hypothetical acute thermal stressors. We measured acute changes in the stress hormone corticosterone and the reproductive hormone testosterone using standard capture and handling protocol and quantified the metabolites of both hormones non-invasively using urinary enzyme-immunoassays. Furthermore, we measured performance trait (i.e. righting response score in the control acclimated and the three treatment groups. Corticosterone stress responses increased in all toads during exposure to an acute thermal stressor. Furthermore, exposure to a thermal stressor also decreased testosterone levels in all toads. The duration of the righting response (seconds was longer for toads that were exposed to 40°C than to 30°, 35° or 25°C. The increased corticosterone stress response with increased intensity of the acute thermal stressor suggests that the toads perceived this treatment as a stressor. Furthermore, the results also highlight a potential trade-off with performance and reproductive hormones. Ultimately, exposure acute thermal stressors due to climatic variability could impact

  6. Overlapping patterns of neural activity for different forms of novelty in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Shaun Hawco

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When stimuli are presented multiple times, the neural response to repeated stimuli is reduced relative to novel stimuli (repetition suppression. Responses to different types of novelty were examined. Stimulus novelty was examined by contrasting first vs. second presentation of triads of objects during memory encoding. Semantic novelty was contrasted by comparing unrelated (semantically novel triads of objects to triads in which all three objects were related (e.g. all objects were tools. In recognition, associative novelty was examined by contrasting rearranged triads (previously seen objects in a new association with intact triads. Activity was observed in posterior regions (occipital and fusiform, with the largest extent of activity for stimulus novelty and smallest for associational novelty. Frontal activity was also observed in stimulus and semantic novelty. Additional analysis indicated that the hemodynamic response in voxels identified in the stimulus and semantic novelty contrasts was modulated by reaction time on a trial-by-trial basis. That is, the duration of the hemodynamic response was driven by reaction time. This was not the case for associative novelty. The high level of overlap across different forms of novelty suggests a similar mechanism for reduced neural activity, which may be related to reduced visual processing time. This is consistent with a facilitation model of repetition suppression, which posits a reduced peak and duration of neuronal firing for repeated stimuli.

  7. Unraveling Effects of Novelty on Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillebaart, Marleen; Förster, Jens; Rotteveel, Mark; Jehle, Astrid C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Novelty is inherent to creative processes. A positive effect of novelty on creative task performance was therefore predicted. However, creativity can benefit from divergent, as well as convergent thinking. Subsequently, novelty may benefit creative performance when divergent thinking is required, but it could inhibit creative performance when…

  8. Panic disorder and locomotor activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Noriyuki; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiroe; Takimoto, Yoshiyuki; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Kumano, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Akabayashi, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Background Panic disorder is one of the anxiety disorders, and anxiety is associated with some locomotor activity changes such as "restlessness". However, there have been few studies on locomotor activity in panic disorder using actigraphy, although many studies on other psychiatric disorders have been reported using actigraphy. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between panic disorder and locomotor activity pattern using a wrist-worn activity monitor. In addition, an ecological momentary assessment technique was used to record panic attacks in natural settings. Methods Sixteen patients with panic disorder were asked to wear a watch-type computer as an electronic diary for recording panic attacks for two weeks. In addition, locomotor activity was measured and recorded continuously in an accelerometer equipped in the watch-type computer. Locomotor activity data were analyzed using double cosinor analysis to calculate mesor and the amplitude and acrophase of each of the circadian rhythm and 12-hour harmonic component. Correlations between panic disorder symptoms and locomotor activity were investigated. Results There were significant positive correlations between the frequency of panic attacks and mesor calculated from double cosinor analysis of locomotor activity (r = 0.55) and between HAM-A scores and mesor calculated from double cosinor analysis of locomotor activity (r = 0.62). Conclusion Panic disorder patients with more panic attacks and more anxiety have greater objectively assessed locomotor activity, which may reflect the "restlessness" of anxiety disorders. PMID:19017383

  9. Physics curiosities, oddities, and novelties

    CERN Document Server

    Kimball, John

    2015-01-01

    An Enlightening Way to Navigate through Mind-Boggling Physics ConceptsPhysics Curiosities, Oddities, and Novelties highlights unusual aspects of physics and gives a new twist to some fundamental concepts. The book covers both classical and modern physics in an engaging, straightforward style.The author presents perplexing questions that often lack satisfying answers. He also delves into the stories of famous and eccentric past scientists. Many examples reveal interesting ideas, including how:Newton had trouble determining the mass of the moonAn electric motor is an electric generator run in re

  10. Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Your Sharepoint Collaboration workspaces will have to migrate to the new Sharepoint 2010 version. As soon as you will create a new site or subsite within your own site or as soon as you will click on “Update my site”, you will be forced to migrate to Sharepoint 2010. In order to anticipate these changes, the technical training invites you to discover all the new features of this interface in a new one day course called “Novelties on Sharepoint Collaboration Workspace 2010”. To sign in, please click on our training catalogue.

  11. Endocrine sensitivity to novelty in squirrel monkeys and titi monkeys: species differences in characteristic modes of responding to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, M B; Mendoza, S P; Mason, W A; Moberg, G P

    1995-02-01

    The present study examined plasma cortisol and behavioral responses to environmental novelty in squirrel monkey and titi monkey male-female pairs. Overall, seemingly trivial increments in novelty evoked sustained plasma cortisol elevations. In individually tested animals, the minimal level of novelty sufficient to evoke a cortisol response was smaller, and the ability of the response to discriminate among levels of novelty was greater, in titis than in squirrel monkeys. When tested with the pairmate, the sensitivity of the response was reduced in titis but not in squirrel monkeys. Behavioral measures were not as sensitive to novelty as was the cortisol response. The results suggest that differential endocrine responsiveness to novelty is an important physiological concomitant to previously described differences between squirrel monkeys and titi monkeys in their characteristic modes of relating to the environment.

  12. Biological novelty in the anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Marcelino

    2018-01-21

    It is well known that humans are creating new variants of organisms, ecosystems and landscapes. Here I argue that the degree of biological novelty generated by humans goes deeper than that. We use property rules to create exclusivity in cooperation among humans, and between humans and other biological entities, thus overcoming social dilemmas and breaking barriers to cooperation. This is leading to novel forms of cooperation. One of them is the human control, modification and replication of whole ecosystems. For the first time, there exist ecosystems with functional design, division of labor and unlimited heredity. We use mental representation and language as new mechanisms of inheritance and modification that apply to an increasing variety of biological and non-biological entities. As a result, the speed, depth and scale of biological innovation are unprecedented in the history of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Hippocampal Networks Habituate as Novelty Accumulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, Vishnu P.; Ballard, Ian C.; Macduffie, Katherine E.; Krebs, Ruth M.; Adcock, R. Alison

    2013-01-01

    Novelty detection, a critical computation within the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system, necessarily depends on prior experience. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to investigate dynamic changes in MTL activation and functional connectivity as experience with novelty accumulates. fMRI data were…

  14. How should novelty be valued in science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barak A

    2017-07-25

    Scientists are under increasing pressure to do "novel" research. Here I explore whether there are risks to overemphasizing novelty when deciding what constitutes good science. I review studies from the philosophy of science to help understand how important an explicit emphasis on novelty might be for scientific progress. I also review studies from the sociology of science to anticipate how emphasizing novelty might impact the structure and function of the scientific community. I conclude that placing too much value on novelty could have counterproductive effects on both the rate of progress in science and the organization of the scientific community. I finish by recommending that our current emphasis on novelty be replaced by a renewed emphasis on predictive power as a characteristic of good science.

  15. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  16. Consequences of the presence of the mother or unfamiliar adult female on cortisol, ACTH, testosterone and behavioral responses of periadolescent guinea pigs during exposure to novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, M B; Maken, D S; Graves, F C

    2000-08-01

    Periadolescent guinea pigs were exposed to a novel environment for 10, 30, 60, or 90 min while either alone or with either their biological mother or an unfamiliar adult female. Both classes of females reduced plasma cortisol, ACTH and vocalization responses to the novel environment, and did so to an equivalent degree. However, behavioral interactions with the mother and unfamiliar female differed considerably. The offspring exhibited more defensive behavior and were the targets of more agonistic acts when with the unfamiliar female, though one agonistic behavior, kicking, was observed more often in tests with the mother. Males displayed more social/courtship behavior and tumescence with the unfamiliar female. Further, males exhibited higher plasma testosterone levels when with the unfamiliar female than when either with the mother or alone. These data in conjunction with earlier findings suggest that the ability of unfamiliar adult females to moderate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity fully emerges during the periadolescent period, is not dependent on nurturant behavior by the adult female, and may facilitate the redirection of social behavior from the mother to unrelated adults. Further, mothers appear to inhibit maternally directed sexual behavior and plasma testosterone elevations in their periadolescent sons, effects which likely serve to inhibit inbreeding.

  17. Novelties that change carrying capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2012-09-01

    Comparative developmental studies have revealed a rich array of details about the patterns and processes of morphological change in animals and increasingly in plants. But, applying these insights to the study of major episodes of evolutionary innovation requires understanding how these novel morphologies become established and sufficiently abundant (either as individuals within a species or as a clade of species) to be preserved in the fossil record, and, in many cases, to influence ecological processes. Evolutionary novelties may: (1) disappear without changing the species; (2) be associated with the generation (through selection or drift) of a new species; and if the latter (3) may or may not become ecologically significant. Only the latter are commonly preserved in the fossil record. These alternatives mirror the distinction among historians of technology between innovation and invention. Here, I argue that specific sorts of evolutionary inventions drive ecological transformation, essentially constructing an environment for themselves and ancillary organisms through ecological spillover effects, increasing the "carrying capacity" of an ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids as evolutionary novelties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Gregory K

    2012-09-01

    Evolutionary novelties represent challenges to biologists, particularly those who would like to understand the developmental and genetic changes responsible for their appearance. Most modern aphids possess two apparent evolutionary novelties: cyclical parthenogenesis (a life cycle with both sexual and asexual phases) and viviparity (internal development and live birth of progeny) in their asexual phase. Here I discuss the evolution of these apparent novelties from a developmental standpoint. Although a full understanding of the evolution of cyclical parthenogenesis and viviparity in aphids can seem a daunting task, these complex transitions can at least be broken down into a handful of steps. I argue that these should include the following: a differentiation of two developmentally distinct oocytes; de novo synthesis of centrosomes and modification of meiosis during asexual oogenesis; a loss or bypass of any cell cycle arrest and changes in key developmental events during viviparous oogenesis; and a change in how mothers specify the sexual vs. asexual fates of their progeny. Grappling with the nature of such steps and the order in which they occurred ought to increase our understanding and reduce the apparent novelty of complex evolutionary transitions. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Definition of Novelty in Recommendation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of information technology and application of the Internet, People gradually entered the time of information overload from information scarcity. User satisfaction with recommender systems is related not only to how accurately the system recommends but also to how much it supports the user’s decision making. Novelty is one of the important metrics of customer satisfaction. There is an increasing realization in the Recommender Systems (RS field that novelty is fundamental qualities of recommendation effectiveness and added-value. This paper combed research results about definition and algorithm of novel recommendation, and starting from the meaning of "novel", defined novelty of item in recommendation system. Experiment proved using the definition of novelty to recommend can effectively recognize the item that the user is familiar with and ensure certain accuracy.

  20. Novelty, coherence, and Mendeleev's periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Predictivism is the view that successful predictions of "novel" evidence carry more confirmational weight than accommodations of already known evidence. Novelty, in this context, has traditionally been conceived of as temporal novelty. However temporal predictivism has been criticized for lacking a rationale: why should the time order of theory and evidence matter? Instead, it has been proposed, novelty should be construed in terms of use-novelty, according to which evidence is novel if it was not used in the construction of a theory. Only if evidence is use-novel can it fully support the theory entailing it. As I point out in this paper, the writings of the most influential proponent of use-novelty contain a weaker and a stronger version of use-novelty. However both versions, I argue, are problematic. With regard to the appraisal of Mendeleev' periodic table, the most contentious historical case in the predictivism debate, I argue that temporal predictivism is indeed supported, although in ways not previously appreciated. On the basis of this case, I argue for a form of so-called symptomatic predictivism according to which temporally novel predictions carry more confirmational weight only insofar as they reveal the theory's presumed coherence of facts as real.

  1. Melatonin reduces locomotor activity and circulating cortisol in goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azpeleta, Clara; Martínez-Alvarez, Rosa María; Delgado, María Jesús; Isorna, Esther; De Pedro, Nuria

    2010-03-01

    The present study focused on the effects of a subchronic melatonin treatment on locomotor activity and cortisol plasma levels in goldfish. We compared two different administration routes: peripheral (10 microg/g body weight) versus central (1 microg/microl) injections of melatonin for 7 or 4 days, respectively. Daily locomotor activity, including both diurnal and nocturnal activities, food anticipatory activity and circulating cortisol at 11:00 (under 24 h of food deprivation and 17 h postinjection) were significantly reduced after repeated intraperitoneal injections with melatonin for 7 days, but not after intracerebroventricular treatment. Taking in mind the anoretic effect of melatonin in this species, we investigated if such feeding reduction is directly responsible for the reduction in motor activity induced by melatonin treatment. Food restriction (50%) for 10 days did not significantly modify either daily locomotor activity or plasma cortisol levels in goldfish, indicating that the peripheral action of melatonin diminishing locomotor activity in goldfish is not a direct consequence of its anoretic action. In summary, our results indicate that, as previously described in other vertebrate species, melatonin can regulate locomotor activity and cortisol levels in goldfish, suggesting a sedative effect of this hormone in this teleost. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Novelty helmet use and motorcycle rider fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Thomas M; Troszak, Lara; Erhardt, Taryn; Trent, Roger B; Zhu, Motao

    2017-06-01

    To compare the risk of fatal injury across helmet types among collision-involved motorcyclists. We used data from a cohort of motorcyclists involved in police-reported traffic collisions. Eighty-four law enforcement agencies in California collected detailed information on helmet and rider characteristics during collision investigations in June 2012 through July 2013. Multiply-adjusted risk ratios were estimated with log-binomial regression. The adjusted fatal injury risk ratio for novelty helmets was 1.95 (95% CI 1.11-3.40, p 0.019), comparing novelty helmets with full-face helmets. The risk ratios for modular, open-face, and half-helmets, compared with full-face helmets, were not significant. A more complete understanding of the inadequacy of novelty helmets can be used in educational and law enforcement countermeasures to improve helmet use among motorcycling populations in California and other US states. Law enforcement approaches to mitigating novelty helmet use would seem attractive given that novelty helmets can be visually identified by law enforcement officers with sufficient training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Quaternary naltrexone reverses radiogenic and morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.; Galbraith, J.A.; White, G.A.; Gibbs, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    The present study attempted to determine the relative role of the peripheral and central nervous system in the production of morphine-induced or radiation-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the mouse. Toward this end, we used a quaternary derivative of an opiate antagonist (naltrexone methobromide), which presumably does not cross the blood-brain barrier. Quaternary naltrexone was used to challenge the stereotypic locomotor response observed in these mice after either an i.p. injection of morphine or exposure to 1500 rads /sup 60/Co. The quaternary derivative of naltrexone reversed the locomotor hyperactivity normally observed in the C57BL/6J mouse after an injection of morphine. It also significantly attenuated radiation-induced locomotion. The data reported here support the hypothesis of endorphin involvement in radiation-induced and radiogenic behaviors. However, these conclusions are contingent upon further research which more fully evaluates naltrexone methobromide's capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Participation in novelty-seeking leisure activities and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Thomas; Smyth, Kathleen A; Debanne, Sara M; Petot, Grace J; Friedland, Robert P

    2005-09-01

    The objective was to study the associations between participation in different types of mentally stimulating leisure activities and status as Alzheimer's disease (AD) case or normal control. Research suggests that participation in leisure activities, especially mentally stimulating activities, is associated with a lower risk for AD. However, no study has yet evaluated associations between AD and different types of mental leisure activities, especially those involving "novelty seeking." The authors used a case-control design to compare participation in activities across the life span in persons with AD and normal controls. Cases (n = 264) were recruited from clinical settings and from the community. Controls were drawn from 2 populations. Control group A members (n = 364) were the friends or neighbors of the cases or members of the same organizations to which the cases belonged. Control group B members (n = 181) were randomly drawn from the community. The 2 control groups did not differ in their responses to most activity questions, so they were combined. Factor analysis of activity questions identified 3 activity factors: (1) novelty seeking; (2) exchange of ideas; and (3) social. Logistic regression analysis indicated that, adjusting for control variables, greater participation in novelty-seeking and exchange-of-ideas activities was significantly associated with decreased odds of AD. The odds of AD were lower among those who more often participated in activities involving exchange of ideas and were lower yet for those who more frequently participated in novelty-seeking activities. We conclude that participation in a variety of mental activities across the life span may lower one's chances of developing AD.

  5. How will climate novelty influence ecological forecasts? Using the Quaternary to assess future reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Blois, Jessica L; Williams, John W; Nieto-Lugilde, Diego; Maguire, Kaitlin C; Lorenz, David J

    2018-03-23

    Future climates are projected to be highly novel relative to recent climates. Climate novelty challenges models that correlate ecological patterns to climate variables and then use these relationships to forecast ecological responses to future climate change. Here, we quantify the magnitude and ecological significance of future climate novelty by comparing it to novel climates over the past 21,000 years in North America. We then use relationships between model performance and climate novelty derived from the fossil pollen record from eastern North America to estimate the expected decrease in predictive skill of ecological forecasting models as future climate novelty increases. We show that, in the high emissions scenario (RCP8.5) and by late 21 st century, future climate novelty is similar to or higher than peak levels of climate novelty over the last 21,000 years. The accuracy of ecological forecasting models is projected to decline steadily over the coming decades in response to increasing climate novelty, though models that incorporate co-occurrences among species may retain somewhat higher predictive skill. In addition to quantifying future climate novelty in the context of late Quaternary climate change, this work underscores the challenges of making reliable forecasts to an increasingly novel future, while highlighting the need to assess potential avenues for improvement, such as increased reliance on geological analogues for future novel climates and improving existing models by pooling data through time and incorporating assemblage-level information. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Creativity and Cognition: Producing Effective Novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropley, Arthur J.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews cognitive processes, control mechanisms, and structures in creative thinking, and examines the way these aspects of cognition develop from childhood to adulthood. The cognitive definition of creativity, cognitive approaches to novelty production, creativity and cognitive development, and mechanisms guiding cognitive processes are explored.…

  7. Adaptive locomotor network activation during randomized walking speeds using functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Yeon; Kim, Eun Joo; You, Joshua Sung H

    2017-07-20

    An improved understanding of the mechanisms underlying locomotor networks has the potential to benefit the neurorehabilitation of patients with neurological locomotor deficits. However, the specific locomotor networks that mediate adaptive locomotor performance and changes in gait speed remain unknown. The aim of the present study was to examine patterns of cortical activation associated with the walking speeds of 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 km/h on a treadmill. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was performed on a 30-year-old right-handed healthy female subject, and cerebral hemodynamic changes were observed in cortical locomotor network areas including the primary sensorimotor cortex (SMC), premotor cortex (PMC), supplementary motor area (SMA), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and sensory association cortex (SAC). The software package NIRS-statistical parametric mapping (NIRS-SPM) was utilized to analyze fNIRS data in the MATLAB environment. SPM t-statistic maps were computed at an uncorrected threshold of pglobalized locomotor network activation of the SMC, PMC, SMA, and PMC; additionally, the site with the highest cortical activation ratio shifted from the SMC to the SMA. Global locomotor network recruitment, in particular PFC activation indicated by OxyHb in our study, may indicate a response to increased cognitive-locomotor demand due to simultaneous postural maintenance and leg movement coordination.

  8. A note on fashion cycles, novelty and conformity

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Alberti

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model in which novelty and conformity motivate fashion behavior. Fashion cycles occur if conformity is not too high. The duration of fashion cycles depends on individual-specific conformity, novelty, and the number of available styles. The use of individual-specific novelty and conformity allows us to also identify fashion leaders.

  9. Decoupling Novelty from R&D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Chatterjee, Rabikar; Bhargava, Mukesh

    and services. We argue that marketing innovation may significantly increase a firm’s innovation performance. Further, we posit that investments in marketing and technological innovation are substitutes because of resource constraints and a compounding of risks. We propose that the substitutive relationship......Conventional wisdom ties successful innovation primarily to technological R&D. In this paper, we introduce the concept of marketing innovation in which novelty originates separately from the innovative design, packaging, pricing, promotion, and/or distribution of technologically unchanged products...... is especially pronounced in small firms and high-tech industries. Based on the analysis of a dataset of 866 firms from a diverse set of industries in Germany, we find empirical support for our hypotheses, suggesting that novelty can in fact be decoupled from R&D...

  10. Novelty-driven Particle Swarm Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galvao, Diana; Lehman, Joel Anthony; Urbano, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is a well-known population-based optimization algorithm. Most often it is applied to optimize objective-based fitness functions that reward progress towards a desired objective or behavior. As a result, search increasingly focuses on higher-fitness areas. However......, in problems with many local optima, such focus often leads to premature convergence that precludes reaching the intended objective. To remedy this problem in certain types of domains, this paper introduces Novelty-driven Particle Swarm Optimization (NdPSO), which is motivated by the novelty search algorithm...... in genetic programming, this paper implements NdPSO as an extension of the grammatical swarm method, which combines PSO with genetic programming. The resulting NdPSO implementation is tested in three different domains representative of those in which it might provide advantage over objective-driven PSO...

  11. Manufacturing Of Novelty Leather From Cattle Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Habiba Bodrun Naher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of turning cattle stomach into novelty leather and then leather product which would add value to end of cattle. Four pieces of green buffalo stomachs were taken through soaking liming deliming pickling tanning neutralization retanning dyeing and fat liquoring operation. Then mechanical operations like drying and staking operations were also done. Some physical tensile strength stitch tear strength and colour rub fastness and chemical chromic oxide content fat content and pH tests were accomplished .The results of physical tests were poor compared to the grain leather as the composition of raw outer coverings of animals and their stomachs are different. The stomach leathers could be used for making coin purse key case bracelet wrist watch belt ear-ring necklace hair band iPod case etc. as novelty leather product item.

  12. Developing the content of a locomotor disability scale for adults in Bangladesh: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Ilias; Clarke, Lynda; Ploubidis, George B

    2017-01-01

    Bangladesh has an estimated 17 million adults with disabilities. A significant proportion of them are believed to have locomotor disabilities. There are over 300 non-governmental organizations providing different types of rehabilitation services to them. However, there is no locally developed and validated locomotor disability measurement scale in Bangladesh. The purpose of this study was to develop a locomotor disability scale with disability indicators suitable for adults in Bangladesh. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 25 purposively selected adults with locomotor disabilities to generate scale items. At the second stage, cognitive interviews were conducted with 12 purposively selected adults with locomotor disabilities in order to refine the measurement questions and response categories. Data were analysed using the framework technique- identifying, abstracting, charting and matching themes across the interviews. For a locomotor disability scale, 70 activities (disability indicators) were identified: 37 mobility activities, 9 activities of daily living, 17 work/productivity activities and 7 leisure activities. Cognitive interviews revealed that when asking the respondents to rate their difficulty in performing the activities, instead of just mentioning the activity name, such as taking a bath or shower, a detailed description of the activity and response options were necessary to ensure consistent interpretation of the disability indicators and response options across all respondents. Identifying suitable disability indicators was the first step in developing a locomotor disability scale for adults in Bangladesh. Interviewing adults with locomotor disabilities in Bangladesh ensured that the locomotor disability scale is of relevance to them and consequently it has excellent content validity. Further research is needed to evaluate the psychometric properties of this scale.

  13. Novelty Detection in and Between Different Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veflingstad, Henning; Yildirim, Sule

    2008-01-01

    Our general aim is to reflect the advances in artificial intelligence and cognitive science fields to space exploration studies such that next generation space rovers can benefit from these advances. We believe next generation space rovers can benefit from the studies related to employing conceptual representations in generating structured thought. This way, rovers need not be equipped with all necessary steps of an action plan to execute in space exploration but they can autonomously form representations of their world and reason on them to make intelligent decision. As part of this approach, autonomous novelty detection is an important feature of next generation space rovers. This feature allows a rover to make further decisions about exploring a rock sample more closely or not and on its own. This way, a rover will use less of its time for communication between the earth and itself and more of its time for achieving its assigned tasks in space. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based novelty detection mechanism that next generation space rovers can employ as part of their intelligence. We also present an implementation of such a mechanism and present its reliability in detecting novelty.

  14. Novelty detection for breast cancer image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Pawel; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Using classification learning algorithms for medical applications may require not only refined model creation techniques and careful unbiased model evaluation, but also detecting the risk of misclassification at the time of model application. This is addressed by novelty detection, which identifies instances for which the training set is not sufficiently representative and for which it may be safer to restrain from classification and request a human expert diagnosis. The paper investigates two techniques for isolated instance identification, based on clustering and one-class support vector machines, which represent two different approaches to multidimensional outlier detection. The prediction quality for isolated instances in breast cancer image data is evaluated using the random forest algorithm and found to be substantially inferior to the prediction quality for non-isolated instances. Each of the two techniques is then used to create a novelty detection model which can be combined with a classification model and used at the time of prediction to detect instances for which the latter cannot be reliably applied. Novelty detection is demonstrated to improve random forest prediction quality and argued to deserve further investigation in medical applications.

  15. Novelty Detection in and Between Different Modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veflingstad, Henning; Yildirim, Sule

    2008-01-01

    Our general aim is to reflect the advances in artificial intelligence and cognitive science fields to space exploration studies such that next generation space rovers can benefit from these advances. We believe next generation space rovers can benefit from the studies related to employing conceptual representations in generating structured thought. This way, rovers need not be equipped with all necessary steps of an action plan to execute in space exploration but they can autonomously form representations of their world and reason on them to make intelligent decision. As part of this approach, autonomous novelty detection is an important feature of next generation space rovers. This feature allows a rover to make further decisions about exploring a rock sample more closely or not and on its own. This way, a rover will use less of its time for communication between the earth and itself and more of its time for achieving its assigned tasks in space. In this paper, we propose an artificial neural network based novelty detection mechanism that next generation space rovers can employ as part of their intelligence. We also present an implementation of such a mechanism and present its reliability in detecting novelty

  16. Sex difference in sensitization to the locomotor effects of mazindol in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, M; Takahashi, R N

    1994-01-01

    Male and female rats were treated daily for 7 days with mazindol (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg), an anorectic drug, and tested in the open field. Mazindol developed sensitization to its locomotor stimulatory effect in both sexes on day 7 with a nondose-dependent pattern of response. However, the locomotor activity appeared to be sex dependent, female rats being more sensitive. Following a challenge dose of mazindol (10 and 20 mg/kg) on day 10, a marked enhancement of locomotion was seen in female rats. These findings indicate that repeated administration of mazindol produces sex-dependent sensitization to its effect on locomotor behavior.

  17. Locomotor adaptation to a soleus EMG-controlled antagonistic exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaird, Catherine R.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Locomotor adaptation in humans is not well understood. To provide insight into the neural reorganization that occurs following a significant disruption to one's learned neuromuscular map relating a given motor command to its resulting muscular action, we tied the mechanical action of a robotic exoskeleton to the electromyography (EMG) profile of the soleus muscle during walking. The powered exoskeleton produced an ankle dorsiflexion torque proportional to soleus muscle recruitment thus limiting the soleus' plantar flexion torque capability. We hypothesized that neurologically intact subjects would alter muscle activation patterns in response to the antagonistic exoskeleton by decreasing soleus recruitment. Subjects practiced walking with the exoskeleton for two 30-min sessions. The initial response to the perturbation was to “fight” the resistive exoskeleton by increasing soleus activation. By the end of training, subjects had significantly reduced soleus recruitment resulting in a gait pattern with almost no ankle push-off. In addition, there was a trend for subjects to reduce gastrocnemius recruitment in proportion to the soleus even though only the soleus EMG was used to control the exoskeleton. The results from this study demonstrate the ability of the nervous system to recalibrate locomotor output in response to substantial changes in the mechanical output of the soleus muscle and associated sensory feedback. This study provides further evidence that the human locomotor system of intact individuals is highly flexible and able to adapt to achieve effective locomotion in response to a broad range of neuromuscular perturbations. PMID:23307949

  18. Evidence of adaptations of locomotor neural drive in response to enhanced intermuscular connectivity between the triceps surae muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, Michel; van Dieën, Jaap H; Maas, Huub

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate changes 1 ) in the coordination of activation of the triceps surae muscle group, and 2 ) in muscle belly length of soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) during locomotion (trotting) in response to increased stiffness of intermuscular connective tissues in the rat. We measured muscle activation and muscle belly lengths, as well as hindlimb kinematics, before and after an artificial enhancement of the connectivity between SO and LG muscles obtained by implanting a tissue-integrating surgical mesh at the muscles' interface. We found that SO muscle activation decreased to 62%, while activation of LG and medial gastrocnemius muscles increased to 134 and 125%, respectively, compared with the levels measured preintervention. Although secondary additional or amplified activation bursts were observed with enhanced connectivity, the primary pattern of activation over the stride and the burst duration were not affected by the intervention. Similar muscle length changes after manipulation were observed, suggesting that length feedback from spindle receptors within SO and LG was not affected by the connectivity enhancement. We conclude that peripheral mechanical constraints given by morphological (re)organization of connective tissues linking synergists are taken into account by the central nervous system. The observed shift in activity toward the gastrocnemius muscles after the intervention suggests that these larger muscles are preferentially recruited when the soleus has a similar mechanical disadvantage in that it produces an unwanted flexion moment around the knee. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Connective tissue linkages between muscle-tendon units may act as an additional mechanical constraint on the musculoskeletal system, thereby reducing the spectrum of solutions for performing a motor task. We found that intermuscular coordination changes following intermuscular connectivity enhancement. Besides showing that the extent of such

  19. Decoupling Novelty from R&D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Chatterjee, Rabikar; Bhargava, Mukesh

    Conventional wisdom ties successful innovation primarily to technological R&D. In this paper, we introduce the concept of marketing innovation in which novelty originates separately from the innovative design, packaging, pricing, promotion, and/or distribution of technologically unchanged products...... and services. We argue that marketing innovation may significantly increase a firm’s innovation performance. Further, we posit that investments in marketing and technological innovation are substitutes because of resource constraints and a compounding of risks. We propose that the substitutive relationship...

  20. mGluR5 ablation in cortical glutamatergic neurons increases novelty-induced locomotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P Jew

    Full Text Available The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5 has been implicated in the pathology of various neurological disorders including schizophrenia, ADHD, and autism. mGluR5-dependent synaptic plasticity has been described at a variety of neural connections and its signaling has been implicated in several behaviors. These behaviors include locomotor reactivity to novel environment, sensorimotor gating, anxiety, and cognition. mGluR5 is expressed in glutamatergic neurons, inhibitory neurons, and glia in various brain regions. In this study, we show that deleting mGluR5 expression only in principal cortical neurons leads to defective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R dependent synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex. These cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice exhibit increased novelty-induced locomotion, and their locomotion can be further enhanced by treatment with the psychostimulant methylphenidate. Despite a modest reduction in repetitive behaviors, cortical glutamatergic mGluR5 knockout mice are normal in sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor balance/learning and fear conditioning behaviors. These results show that mGluR5 signaling in cortical glutamatergic neurons is required for precisely modulating locomotor reactivity to a novel environment but not for sensorimotor gating, anxiety, motor coordination, several forms of learning or social interactions.

  1. Stimulus Novelty Energizes Actions in the Absence of Explicit Reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Koster

    Full Text Available Novelty seeking has been tied to impulsive choice and biased value based choice. It has been postulated that novel stimuli should trigger more vigorous approach and exploration. However, it is unclear whether stimulus novelty can enhance simple motor actions in the absence of explicit reward, a necessary condition for energizing approach and exploration in an entirely unfamiliar situation. In this study human subjects were cued to omit or perform actions in form of button presses by novel or familiar images. We found that subjects' motor actions were faster when cued by a novel compared to a familiar image. This facilitation by novelty was strongest when the delay between cue and action was short, consistent with a link between novelty and impulsive choices. The facilitation of reaction times by novelty was correlated across subjects with trait novelty seeking as measured in the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire. However, this li between high novelty-seeking and action facilitation was driven by trials with a long delay between cue and action. This prolonged time window of energization following novelty could hint at a mechanistic underpinning of enhanced vigour for approach and exploration frequently postulated for novelty seeking humans. In conclusion, we show that stimulus novelty enhances the speed of a cued motor action. We suggest this is likely to reflect an adaptation to changing environments but may also provide a source of maladaptive choice and impulsive behaviour.

  2. Short- and long-lasting consequences of novelty, deviance and surprise on brain and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, J; Meeter, M

    2015-08-01

    When one encounters a novel stimulus this sets off a cascade of brain responses, activating several neuromodulatory systems. As a consequence novelty has a wide range of effects on cognition; improving perception and action, increasing motivation, eliciting exploratory behavior, and promoting learning. Here, we review these benefits and how they may arise in the brain. We propose a framework that organizes novelty's effects on brain and cognition into three groups. First, novelty can transiently enhance perception. This effect is proposed to be mediated by novel stimuli activating the amygdala and enhancing early sensory processing. Second, novel stimuli can increase arousal, leading to short-lived effects on action in the first hundreds of milliseconds after presentation. We argue that these effects are related to deviance, rather than to novelty per se, and link them to activation of the locus-coeruleus norepinephrine system. Third, spatial novelty may trigger the dopaminergic mesolimbic system, promoting dopamine release in the hippocampus, having longer-lasting effects, up to tens of minutes, on motivation, reward processing, and learning and memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Popularity and Novelty Dynamics in Evolving Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Khushnood; Shang, Mingsheng; Abbasi, Alireza; Luo, Xin; Xu, Jian Jun; Zhang, Yu-Xia

    2018-04-20

    Network science plays a big role in the representation of real-world phenomena such as user-item bipartite networks presented in e-commerce or social media platforms. It provides researchers with tools and techniques to solve complex real-world problems. Identifying and predicting future popularity and importance of items in e-commerce or social media platform is a challenging task. Some items gain popularity repeatedly over time while some become popular and novel only once. This work aims to identify the key-factors: popularity and novelty. To do so, we consider two types of novelty predictions: items appearing in the popular ranking list for the first time; and items which were not in the popular list in the past time window, but might have been popular before the recent past time window. In order to identify the popular items, a careful consideration of macro-level analysis is needed. In this work we propose a model, which exploits item level information over a span of time to rank the importance of the item. We considered ageing or decay effect along with the recent link-gain of the items. We test our proposed model on four various real-world datasets using four information retrieval based metrics.

  4. Locomotor rehabilitation in a complex virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, J; Malouin, F; McFadyen, B J; Comeau, F; Lamontagne, A; Chapdelaine, S; Beaudoin, C; Laurendeau, D; Hughey, L; Richards, C L

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology offers a new and safe way to increase practice time and provide the varied environments and constraints needed to optimize locomotor training. Our specific objectives are (1) to create a virtual environment (VE) coupled with a self-paced treadmill for locomotor training; (2) to compare temporal and distance measurements of gait during treadmill walking while looking at different scenarios of VE; and (3) to develop a protocol optimized for the training of locomotor disorders after stroke. A motorized treadmill was mounted on a six-degree-of-freedom motion platform. VEs were created using commercial software (SoftImage) and projected on a large screen, while system control was administered through the CAREN software (Motek BV). The instantaneous treadmill speed and scene progression were servo-controlled. Preliminary results show that healthy subjects are able to have full control of their own walking speed both on the treadmill and within the virtual scene, while experiencing a strong sense of presence. A street crossing training protocol has been developed for locomotor training. It is expected that locomotor training with increasingly complex VEs will allow persons with stroke to increase progressively their locomotor capacity, as required and entrained by the VE.

  5. Cocaine locomotor activation, sensitization and place preference in six inbred strains of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabowski-Boase Laura

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expanding set of genomics tools available for inbred mouse strains has renewed interest in phenotyping larger sets of strains. The present study aims to explore phenotypic variability among six commonly-used inbred mouse strains to both the rewarding and locomotor stimulating effects of cocaine in a place conditioning task, including several strains or substrains that have not yet been characterized for some or all of these behaviors. Methods C57BL/6J (B6, BALB/cJ (BALB, C3H/HeJ (C3H, DBA/2J (D2, FVB/NJ (FVB and 129S1/SvImJ (129 mice were tested for conditioned place preference to 20 mg/kg cocaine. Results Place preference was observed in most strains with the exception of D2 and 129. All strains showed a marked increase in locomotor activity in response to cocaine. In BALB mice, however, locomotor activation was context-dependent. Locomotor sensitization to repeated exposure to cocaine was most significant in 129 and D2 mice but was absent in FVB mice. Conclusions Genetic correlations suggest that no significant correlation between conditioned place preference, acute locomotor activation, and locomotor sensitization exists among these strains indicating that separate mechanisms underlie the psychomotor and rewarding effects of cocaine.

  6. Effect of repeated stress on novelty-induced antinociception in rats

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    Torres I.L.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available There is extensive evidence that acute stress induces an analgesic response in rats. On the other hand, repeatedly stressed animals may present the opposite effect, i.e., hyperalgesia. Furthermore, exposure to novelty is known to induce antinociception. The effects of repeated restraint stress on nociception after exposure to novelty, as measured by the tail-flick latency (TFL, were studied in adult male rats. The animals were stressed by restraint 1 h daily, 5 days a week for 40 days. The control group was not submitted to restraint. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. After being familiarized with the TFL apparatus, each group was subdivided into two other groups, i.e., with or without novelty. Animals were subjected to the TFL measurement twice. For the animals exposed to novelty, the first TFL measurement was made immediately before, and the second 2 min after a 2-min exposure to a new environment. While the control group presented an increased TFL after exposure to a novel environment, chronically stressed animals did not show this effect. These results suggest that repeated restraint stress induces an alteration in the nociceptive response, perhaps as a result of an alteration in endogenous opioids in these animals.

  7. The Novelty Exploration Bonus and Its Attentional Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Ruth M.; Schott, Bjorn H.; Schutze, Hartmut; Duzel, Emrah

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that novel stimuli represent salient learning signals that can motivate "exploration" in search for potential rewards. In computational theories of reinforcement learning, this is referred to as the novelty "exploration bonus" for rewards. If true, stimulus novelty should enhance the reward anticipation signals in brain areas that…

  8. Effects of a selectively bred novelty-seeking phenotype on the motivation to take cocaine in male and female rats

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    Cummings Jennifer A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender and enhanced novelty reactivity can predispose certain individuals to drug abuse. Previous research in male and female rats selectively bred for high or low locomotor reactivity to novelty found that bred High Responders (bHRs acquire cocaine self-administration more rapidly than bred Low Responders (bLRs and that bHR females in particular self-administered more cocaine than the other groups. The experiments presented here aimed to determine whether an individual's sex and behavioral phenotype interact to affect motivation to take cocaine. Methods We examined motivation for taking cocaine in two experiments using a range of doses on a progressive ratio (PR schedule of responding in bHR or bLR males and females. Additionally, we included a measure of continuing to respond in the absence of reinforcement, a feature of addiction that has been recently incorporated into tests of animal models on the basis of the criteria for substance use disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Statistical analyses were performed using PASW Statistics 18.0 software. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by a Bonferroni correction post hoc test when applicable. Results We found sex differences as well as effects of novelty reactivity on the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Specifically, females demonstrated higher breaking points on the PR schedule compared with males, regardless of phenotype, and bHR males and females exhibited higher motivation than bLR animals at a number of the doses studied. Conclusions An individual's sex continues to be a predisposing factor with respect to drug abuse liability and can be compounded by additional individual differences such as reactivity to novelty.

  9. Tree shrews (tupaia belangeri exhibit novelty preference in the novel location memory task with 24-hour retention periods.

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    Jayakrishnan H R Nair

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Novelty preference is pervasive in mammalian species, and describes an inherent tendency to preferentially explore novelty. The novel location memory task studied here assesses the ability of animals to form accurate memories of a spatial configuration, consisting of several identical objects placed within an arena. Tree shrews were first familiarized with a particular object configuration during several sessions, and then an object was displaced during a test session. Tree shrews exhibited enhanced exploration when confronted with this novel configuration. The most reliable indicator associated with novelty preference was an enhancement in directed exploration towards the novel object, although we also observed a non-specific overall increase in exploration in one experiment. During the test session, we also observed an exploration of the location, which had previously been occupied by the displaced object, an effect termed empty quadrant. Our behavioral findings suggest multiple stages of spatial memory formation in tree shrews that are associated with various forms of behavioral responses to novelty. Reduced novelty preference has been linked to major depressive disorder in human patients. Given the established social conflict depression model in tree shrews, we anticipate that the study of the neural circuits of novelty preference and their malfunction during depression may have implications for understanding or treating depression in humans.

  10. Footwear and locomotor skill performance in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Leah E; Rudisill, Mary E; Weimar, Wendi H; Breslin, Casey M; Shroyer, Justin F; Morera, Maria

    2011-10-01

    The effect of footwear on locomotor skill performance was examined. 12 children (4 boys, 8 girls; M age = 56.3 mo., SD = 3.3) served as participants. Participants were randomly assigned to perform the locomotor subscale of Ulrich's Test of Gross Motor Development in two shoe conditions (Condition 1: Stride Rite athletic shoes, and Condition 2: flip flop sandals). Children scored significantly higher when wearing athletic shoes than flip-flop sandals. This finding is relevant for motor performance and safety in physical education and movement programs.

  11. Novelties on amoebiasis: A neglected tropical disease

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    Cecilia Ximénez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the 1997 documents of the World Health Organization (WHO, amoebiasis is defined as the infection by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica with or without clinical manifestations. The only known natural host of E. histolytica is the human with the large intestine as major target organ. This parasite has a very simple life cycle in which the infective form is the cyst, considered a resistant form of parasite: The asymptomatic cyst passers and the intestinal amoebiasis patients are the transmitters; they excrete cysts in their feces, which can contaminate food and water sources. E. histolytica sensu stricto is the potentially pathogenic species and E. dispar is a commensal non-pathogenic Entamoeba. Both species are biochemical, immunological and genetically distinct. The knowledge of both species with different pathogenic phenotypes comes from a large scientific debate during the second half of the 20 th century, which gave place to the rapid development of diagnostics technology based on molecular and immunological strategies. During the last ten years, knowledge of the new epidemiology of amoebiasis in different geographic endemic and non-endemic areas has been obtained by applying mostly molecular techniques. In the present work we highlight novelties on human infection and the disease that can help the general physician from both endemic and non-endemic countries in their medical practice, particularly, now that emigration is undoubtedly a global phenomenon that is modifying the previous geography of infectious diseases worldwide.

  12. Wolbachia: Evolutionary novelty in a rickettsial bacteria

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    Anderson Cort L

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although closely related, the alpha-proteobacteria Wolbachia and the Rickettsiacae (Rickettsia and Ehrlichia, employ different evolutionary life history strategies. Wolbachia are obligate endocellular symbionts that infect an extraordinary host range and, in contrast to the infectious and pathogenic Rickettsia and Ehrlichia, profoundly influence host reproductive biology. Results Phylogenies of the Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, and Wolbachia were independently inferred from 16S rDNA sequences and GroEL amino acid sequences. Topologies inferred from both sets of sequence data were consistent with one another, and both indicate the genus Wolbachia shared a common ancestor most recently with Ehrlichia. These two genera are a sister group to the genus Rickettsia. Mapping biological properties onto this phylogeny reveals that manipulation of host reproduction, characteristic of Wolbachia strains, is a derived characteristic. This evolutionary novelty is accompanied by the loss of the ability to infect vertebrate hosts. Conclusions Because of the contrasting transmission strategies employed by each, Wolbachia is expected to maximize efficiency of vertical transmission, while Ehrlichia and Rickettsia will optimize horizontal transfer of infection. Wolbachia manipulation of host reproduction could thus be viewed as strategy employed by this bacterium to foster its own propagation via vertical transmission.

  13. D4 receptor deficiency in mice has limited effects on impulsivity and novelty seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, C M; Gubner, N R; Wilhelm, C J; Mitchell, S H; Grandy, D K

    2008-09-01

    Alleles of the human dopamine D(4) receptor (D(4)R) gene (DRD4.7) have repeatedly been found to correlate with novelty seeking, substance abuse, pathological gambling, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). If these various psychopathologies are a result of attenuated D(4)R-mediated signaling, mice lacking D(4)Rs (D(4)KO) should be more impulsive than wild-type (WT) mice and exhibit more novelty seeking. However, in our study, D(4)KO and WT mice showed similar levels of impulsivity as measured by delay discounting performance and response inhibition on a Go/No-go test, suggesting that D(4)R-mediated signaling may not affect impulsivity. D(4)KO mice were more active than WT mice in the first 5 min of a novel open field test, suggesting greater novelty seeking. For both genotypes, more impulsive mice habituated less in the novel open field. These data suggest that the absence of D(4)Rs is not sufficient to cause psychopathologies associated with heightened impulsivity and novelty seeking.

  14. Attentive novelty detection in humans is governed by pre-attentive sensory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiitinen, H; May, P; Reinikainen, K; Näätänen, R

    1994-11-03

    Being able to detect unusual, possibly dangerous events in the environment is a fundamental ability that helps ensure the survival of biological organisms. Novelty detection requires a memory system that models (builds neural representations of) events in the environment, so that changes are detected because they violate the predictions of the model. The earliest physiologically measurable brain response to novel auditory stimuli is the mismatch negativity, MMN, a component of the event-related potential. It is elicited when a predictable series of unvarying stimuli is unexpectedly followed by a deviating stimulus. As the occurrence of MMN is not usually affected by the direction of attention, MMN reflects the operation of automatic sensory (echoic) memory, the earliest memory system that builds traces of the acoustic environment against which new stimuli can be compared. The dependence of attentive novelty detection on earlier, pre-attentive processes, however, has remained elusive. Previous, related studies seem to suggest a relationship between MMN and attentive processes, although no conclusive evidence has so far been shown. Here we address novelty detection in humans both on a physiological and behavioural level, and show how attentive novelty detection is governed by a pre-attentive sensory memory mechanism.

  15. The availability of novelty sweets within high school localities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljawad, A; Morgan, M Z; Rees, J S; Fairchild, R

    2016-06-10

    Background Reducing sugar consumption is a primary focus of current global public health policy. Achieving 5% of total energy from free sugars will be difficult acknowledging the concentration of free sugars in sugar sweetened beverages, confectionery and as hidden sugars in many savoury items. The expansion of the novelty sweet market in the UK has significant implications for children and young adults as they contribute to dental caries, dental erosion and obesity.Objective To identify the most available types of novelty sweets within the high school fringe in Cardiff, UK and to assess their price range and where and how they were displayed in shops.Subjects and methods Shops within a ten minute walking distance around five purposively selected high schools in the Cardiff aea representing different levels of deprivation were visited. Shops in Cardiff city centre and three supermarkets were also visited to identify the most commonly available novelty sweets.Results The ten most popular novelty sweets identified in these scoping visits were (in descending order): Brain Licker, Push Pop, Juicy Drop, Lickedy Lips, Big Baby Pop, Vimto candy spray, Toxic Waste, Tango candy spray, Brain Blasterz Bitz and Mega Mouth candy spray. Novelty sweets were located on low shelves which were accessible to all age-groups in 73% (14 out of 19) of the shops. Novelty sweets were displayed in the checkout area in 37% (seven out of 19) shops. The price of the top ten novelty sweets ranged from 39p to £1.Conclusion A wide range of acidic and sugary novelty sweets were easily accessible and priced within pocket money range. Those personnel involved in delivering dental and wider health education or health promotion need to be aware of recent developments in children's confectionery. The potential effects of these novelty sweets on both general and dental health require further investigation.

  16. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and altered locomotor behavior in the carabid beetle pterostichus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte S.; Krause-Jensen, Lone; Baatrup, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of cause–effect relationships is fundamental for the interpretation and the predictive value of biomarker responses measured at all levels of biological complexity. In the present study, the biochemical exposure biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was related...... to locomotor behavior, representing a general effect biomarker at the organismal level. Both sexes of the carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus were intoxicated with three doses of the organophosphorous insecticide dimethoate. Five elements of their locomotor behavior were measured for 4 h employing computer......-dependent difference in behavioral sensitivity to minor AChE depressions. The results demonstrate that automated measurements of locomotor behavior is at least as sensitive an endpoint to organophosphate poisoning as the AChE assay. Further, the correlation between the molecular and behavioral responses in individual...

  17. Locomotor Experience Affects Self and Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ichiro; Anderson, David I.; Campos, Joseph J.; Witherington, David; Frankel, Carl B.; Lejeune, Laure; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Two studies investigated the role of locomotor experience on visual proprioception in 8-month-old infants. "Visual proprioception" refers to the sense of self-motion induced in a static person by patterns of optic flow. A moving room apparatus permitted displacement of an entire enclosure (except for the floor) or the side walls and…

  18. Clozapine-Induced Locomotor Suppression is Mediated by 5-HT2A Receptors in the Forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    McOmish, Caitlin E; Lira, Alena; Hanks, James B; Gingrich, Jay A

    2012-01-01

    The need for safer, more effective therapeutics for the treatment of schizophrenia is widely acknowledged. To optimally target novel pharmacotherapies, in addition to establishing the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effects of antipsychotics, the pathways underlying the most severe side effects must also be elucidated. Here we investigate the role of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A), serotonin 2C (5-HT2C), and dopamine 2 receptors (D2) in mediating adverse effects associated with canonical first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs in mice. Wild-type (WT) and 5-HT2A knockout (KO) mice treated with haloperidol, clozapine, and risperidone were assessed for locomotor activity and catalepsy. WT mice showed a marked reduction in locomotor activity following acute administration of haloperidol and high-dose risperidone, which was most likely secondary to the severe catalepsy caused by these compounds. Clozapine also dramatically reduced locomotor activity, but in the absence of catalepsy. Interestingly, 5-HT2A KO mice were cataleptic following haloperidol and risperidone, but did not respond to clozapine's locomotor-suppressing effects. Restoration of 5-HT2A expression to cortical glutamatergic neurons re-instated the locomotor-suppressing effects of clozapine in the open field. In sum, we confirm that haloperidol and risperidone caused catalepsy in rodents, driven by strong antagonism of D2. We also demonstrate that clozapine decreases locomotor activity in a 5-HT2A-dependent manner, in the absence of catalepsy. Moreover, we show that it is the cortical population of 5-HT2A that mediate the locomotor-suppressing effects of clozapine. PMID:22871913

  19. Novelty, Stress, and Biological Roots in Human Market Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Sarapultsev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although studies examining the biological roots of human behavior have been conducted since the seminal work Kahneman and Tversky, crises and panics have not disappeared. The frequent occurrence of various types of crises has led some economists to the conviction that financial markets occasionally praise irrational judgments and that market crashes cannot be avoided a priori (Sornette 2009; Smith 2004. From a biological point of view, human behaviors are essentially the same during crises accompanied by stock market crashes and during bubble growth when share prices exceed historic highs. During those periods, most market participants see something new for themselves, and this inevitably induces a stress response in them with accompanying changes in their endocrine profiles and motivations. The result is quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior (Zhukov 2007. An underestimation of the role of novelty as a stressor is the primary shortcoming of current approaches for market research. When developing a mathematical market model, it is necessary to account for the biologically determined diphasisms of human behavior in everyday low-stress conditions and in response to stressors. This is the only type of approach that will enable forecasts of market dynamics and investor behaviors under normal conditions as well as during bubbles and panics.

  20. Novelty, stress, and biological roots in human market behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultsev, Alexey; Sarapultsev, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Although studies examining the biological roots of human behavior have been conducted since the seminal work Kahneman and Tversky, crises and panics have not disappeared. The frequent occurrence of various types of crises has led some economists to the conviction that financial markets occasionally praise irrational judgments and that market crashes cannot be avoided a priori (Sornette 2009; Smith 2004). From a biological point of view, human behaviors are essentially the same during crises accompanied by stock market crashes and during bubble growth when share prices exceed historic highs. During those periods, most market participants see something new for themselves, and this inevitably induces a stress response in them with accompanying changes in their endocrine profiles and motivations. The result is quantitative and qualitative changes in behavior (Zhukov 2007). An underestimation of the role of novelty as a stressor is the primary shortcoming of current approaches for market research. When developing a mathematical market model, it is necessary to account for the biologically determined diphasisms of human behavior in everyday low-stress conditions and in response to stressors. This is the only type of approach that will enable forecasts of market dynamics and investor behaviors under normal conditions as well as during bubbles and panics.

  1. Novelty, conditioning and attentional bias to sexual rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banca, Paula; Morris, Laurel S; Mitchell, Simon; Harrison, Neil A; Potenza, Marc N; Voon, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The Internet provides a large source of novel and rewarding stimuli, particularly with respect to sexually explicit materials. Novelty-seeking and cue-conditioning are fundamental processes underlying preference and approach behaviors implicated in disorders of addiction. Here we examine these processes in individuals with compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB), hypothesizing a greater preference for sexual novelty and stimuli conditioned to sexual rewards relative to healthy volunteers. Twenty-two CSB males and forty age-matched male volunteers were tested in two separate behavioral tasks focusing on preferences for novelty and conditioned stimuli. Twenty subjects from each group were also assessed in a third conditioning and extinction task using functional magnetic resonance imaging. CSB was associated with enhanced novelty preference for sexual, as compared to control images, and a generalized preference for cues conditioned to sexual and monetary versus neutral outcomes compared to healthy volunteers. CSB individuals also had greater dorsal cingulate habituation to repeated sexual versus monetary images with the degree of habituation correlating with enhanced preference for sexual novelty. Approach behaviors to sexually conditioned cues dissociable from novelty preference were associated with an early attentional bias to sexual images. This study shows that CSB individuals have a dysfunctional enhanced preference for sexual novelty possibly mediated by greater cingulate habituation along with a generalized enhancement of conditioning to rewards. We further emphasize a dissociable role for cue-conditioning and novelty preference on the early attentional bias for sexual cues. These findings have wider relevance as the Internet provides a broad range of novel and potentially rewarding stimuli. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Locomotor muscle fatigue does not alter oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise

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    James Hopker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The slow component (VO2sc that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre fatigue condition or rest for 33 minutes (control condition according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-second maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min-1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and VO2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03, the VO2sc was not significantly different between the pre fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min-1 and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min-1 condition (P = 0.50. Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48 but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01 suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the VO2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the VO2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  3. Short-Term Genetic Selection for Adolescent Locomotor Sensitivity to Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Chelsea R; Zhang, Yanping; Mackie, Ken; Boehm, Stephen L

    2018-03-17

    Cannabis use is linked to positive and negative outcomes. Identifying genetic targets of susceptibility to the negative effects of cannabinoid use is of growing importance. The current study sought to complete short-term selective breeding for adolescent sensitivity and resistance to the locomotor effects of a single 10 mg/kg THC dose in the open field. Selection for THC-locomotor sensitivity was moderately heritable, with the greatest estimates of heritability seen in females from the F2 to S3 generations. Selection for locomotor sensitivity also resulted in increased anxiety-like activity in the open field. These results are the first to indicate that adolescent THC-locomotor sensitivity can be influenced via selective breeding. Development of lines with a genetic predisposition for THC-sensitivity or resistance to locomotor effects allow for investigation of risk factors, differences in consequences of THC use, identification of correlated behavioral responses, and detection of genetic targets that may contribute to heightened cannabinoid sensitivity.

  4. Multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory novelty: a magnetoencephalography study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles eNaeije

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using magnetoencephalography (MEG, this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of sixteen healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 +/-3 y were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local versus global levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31,6 +/-2 y also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped.Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55-130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ and supplementary motor area (SMA. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing.

  5. Multilevel Cortical Processing of Somatosensory Novelty: A Magnetoencephalography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeije, Gilles; Vaulet, Thibaut; Wens, Vincent; Marty, Brice; Goldman, Serge; De Tiège, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), this study investigates the spatio-temporal dynamics of the multilevel cortical processing of somatosensory change detection. Neuromagnetic signals of 16 healthy adult subjects (7 females and 9 males, mean age 29 ± 3 years) were recorded using whole-scalp-covering MEG while they underwent an oddball paradigm based on simple standard (right index fingertip tactile stimulation) and deviant (simultaneous right index fingertip and middle phalanx tactile stimulation) stimuli gathered into sequences to create and then deviate from stimulus patterns at multiple (local vs. global) levels of complexity. Five healthy adult subjects (3 females and 2 males, mean age 31, 6 ± 2 years) also underwent a similar oddball paradigm in which standard and deviant stimuli were flipped. Local deviations led to a somatosensory mismatch response peaking at 55-130 ms post-stimulus onset with a cortical generator located at the contralateral secondary somatosensory (cSII) cortex. The mismatch response was independent of the deviant stimuli physical characteristics. Global deviants led to a P300 response with cortical sources located bilaterally at temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and supplementary motor area (SMA). The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and the SMA were found to generate a contingent magnetic variation (CMV) attributed to top-down expectations. Amplitude of mismatch responses were modulated by top-down expectations and correlated with both the magnitude of the CMV and the P300 amplitude at the right TPJ. These results provide novel empirical evidence for a unified sensory novelty detection system in the human brain by linking detection of salient sensory stimuli in personal and extra-personal spaces to a common framework of multilevel cortical processing.

  6. Plasticity of locomotor sensorimotor interactions after peripheral and/or spinal lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossignol, Serge; Barrière, Grégory; Frigon, Alain

    2008-01-01

    ) to highlight the spinal neuroplasticity necessary for adapting to sensory loss. Recent work on plastic interactions between reflex pathways that could be responsible for such plasticity, in particular changes in proprioceptive and cutaneous pathways that occur during locomotor training of spinal cats...

  7. Functional organization of V2a-related locomotor circuits in the rodent spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.; Kiehn, Ole

    2010-01-01

    organization responsible for walking in mammals. Here, we review these experiments with a focus on the functional role of excitatory V2a interneurons in the mammalian locomotor network. With regard to these neurons and other network structures we also discuss similarities and differences between the mammalian...

  8. Both novelty and expertise increase action observation network activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Lei eLiew

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Our experiences with others affect how we perceive their actions. In particular, activity in bilateral premotor and parietal cortices during action observation, collectively known as the action observation network (AON, is modulated by one’s expertise with the observed actions or individuals. However, conflicting reports suggest that AON activity is greatest both for familiar and unfamiliar actions. The current study examines the effects of different types and amounts of experience (e.g., visual, interpersonal, personal on AON activation. fMRI was used to scan 16 healthy participants without prior experience with individuals with amputations (novices, 11 experienced occupational therapists (OTs who had varying amounts of experience with individuals with amputations, and one individual born with below-elbow residual limbs (participant CJ, as they viewed video clips of goal-matched actions performed by an individual with residual limbs and by an individual with hands. Participants were given increased visual exposure to actions performed by both effectors midway through the scanning procedure. Novices demonstrated a large AON response to the initial viewing of an individual with residual limbs compared to one with hands, but this signal was attenuated after they received visual exposure to both effectors. In contrast, OTs, who had moderate familiarity with residual limbs, demonstrated a lower AON response upon initial viewing—similar to novices after they received visual exposure. At the other extreme, CJ, who has extreme familiarity with residual limbs both visually and motorically, shows a largely increased left-lateralized AON response, exceeding that of novices and experienced OTs, when viewing the residual limb compared to hand actions. These results suggest that a nuanced model of AON engagement is needed to explain how cases of both extreme experience (CJ and extreme novelty (novices can result in the greatest AON activity.

  9. Effect of Environmental Conditions and Toxic Compounds on the Locomotor Activity of Pediculus humanus capitis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Insaurralde, I; Toloza, A C; Gonzalez-Audino, P; Mougabure-Cueto, G A; Alvarez-Costa, A; Roca-Acevedo, G; Picollo, M I

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we evaluated the effect of environmental variables such as temperature, humidity, and light on the locomotor activity of Pediculus humanus capitis. In addition, we used selected conditions of temperature, humidity, and light to study the effects of cypermethrin and N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) on the locomotor activity of head lice. Head lice increased their locomotor activity in an arena at 30°C compared with activity at 20°C. When we tested the influence of the humidity level, the locomotor activity of head lice showed no significant differences related to humidity level, both at 30°C and 20°C. Concerning light influence, we observed that the higher the intensity of light, the slower the movement of head lice. We also demonstrated that sublethal doses of toxics may alter locomotor activity in adults of head lice. Sublethal doses of cypermethrin induced hyperactivated responses in adult head lice. Sublethal doses of DEET evocated hypoactivated responses in head lice. The observation of stereotyped behavior in head lice elicited by toxic compounds proved that measuring locomotor activity in an experimental set-up where environmental conditions are controlled would be appropriate to evaluate compounds of biological importance, such as molecules involved in the host-parasite interaction and intraspecific relationships. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Dopamine and the Brainstem Locomotor Networks: From Lamprey to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Ryczko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, dopamine neurons are classically known to modulate locomotion via their ascending projections to the basal ganglia that project to brainstem locomotor networks. An increased dopaminergic tone is associated with increase in locomotor activity. In pathological conditions where dopamine cells are lost, such as in Parkinson's disease, locomotor deficits are traditionally associated with the reduced ascending dopaminergic input to the basal ganglia. However, a descending dopaminergic pathway originating from the substantia nigra pars compacta was recently discovered. It innervates the mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR from basal vertebrates to mammals. This pathway was shown to increase locomotor output in lampreys, and could very well play an important role in mammals. Here, we provide a detailed account on the newly found dopaminergic pathway in lamprey, salamander, rat, monkey, and human. In lampreys and salamanders, dopamine release in the MLR is associated with the activation of reticulospinal neurons that carry the locomotor command to the spinal cord. Dopamine release in the MLR potentiates locomotor movements through a D1-receptor mechanism in lampreys. In rats, stimulation of the substantia nigra pars compacta elicited dopamine release in the pedunculopontine nucleus, a known part of the MLR. In a monkey model of Parkinson's disease, a reduced dopaminergic innervation of the brainstem locomotor networks was reported. Dopaminergic fibers are also present in human pedunculopontine nucleus. We discuss the conserved locomotor role of this pathway from lamprey to mammals, and the hypothesis that this pathway could play a role in the locomotor deficits reported in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Elimination of Left-Right Reciprocal Coupling in the Adult Lamprey Spinal Cord Abolishes the Generation of Locomotor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Messina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of left-right reciprocal coupling between spinal locomotor networks to the generation of locomotor activity was tested in adult lampreys. Muscle recordings were made from normal animals as well as from experimental animals with rostral midline (ML spinal lesions (~13%→35% body length, BL, before and after spinal transections (T at 35% BL. Importantly, in the present study actual locomotor movements and muscle burst activity, as well as other motor activity, were initiated in whole animals by descending brain-spinal pathways in response to sensory stimulation of the anterior head. For experimental animals with ML spinal lesions, sensory stimulation could elicit well-coordinated locomotor muscle burst activity, but with some significant differences in the parameters of locomotor activity compared to those for normal animals. Computer models representing normal animals or experimental animals with ML spinal lesions could mimic many of the differences in locomotor activity. For experimental animals with ML and T spinal lesions, right and left rostral hemi-spinal cords, disconnected from intact caudal cord, usually produced tonic or unpatterned muscle activity. Hemi-spinal cords sometimes generated spontaneous or sensory-evoked relatively high frequency “burstlet” activity that probably is analogous to the previously described in vitro “fast rhythm”, which is thought to represent lamprey locomotor activity. However, “burstlet” activity in the present study had parameters and features that were very different than those for lamprey locomotor activity: average frequencies were ~25 Hz, but individual frequencies could be >50 Hz; burst proportions (BPs often varied with cycled time; “burstlet” activity usually was not accompanied by a rostrocaudal phase lag; and following ML spinal lesions alone, “burstlet” activity could occur in the presence or absence of swimming burst activity, suggesting the two were generated

  12. Levels of biological organization and the origin of novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Brian K; Kerney, Ryan

    2012-09-01

    The concept of novelty in evolutionary biology pertains to multiple tiers of biological organization from behavioral and morphological changes to changes at the molecular level. Identifying novel features requires assessments of similarity (homology and homoplasy) of relationships (phylogenetic history) and of shared developmental and genetic pathways or networks. After a brief discussion of how novelty is used in recent literature, we discuss whether the evolutionary approach to homology and homoplasy initially formulated by Lankester in the 19th century informs our understanding of novelty today. We then discuss six examples of morphological features described in the recent literature as novelties, and assess the basis upon which they are regarded as novel. The six are: origin of the turtle shell, transition from fish fins to tetrapod limbs, origination of the neural crest and neural crest cells, cement glands in frogs and casquettes in fish, whale bone-eating tubeworms, and the digestion of plant proteins by nematodes. The article concludes with a discussion of means of acquiring novel genetic information that can account for novelty recognized at higher levels. These are co-options of existing genetic circuitry, gene duplication followed by neofunctionalization, gene rearrangements through mobile genetic elements, and lateral gene transfer. We conclude that on the molecular level only the latter category provides novel genetic information, in that there is no homologous precursor. However, novel phenotypes can be generated through both neofunctionalization and gene rearrangements. Therefore, assigning phenotypic or genotypic "novelty" is contingent on the level of biological organization addressed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Some novelties and recommendations by swithing antipsychotics

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    Nika Aleksandra Kravos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Clinical outcome of patients with severe mental disorders treated with antipsychotics depends on individual response to therapy, adverse events, physical health, maintaining of physical health and of the patient’s, interpersonal (patient - therapist, health and environmental features. Replacement of antipsychotics is a common therapeutic measure. The response depends on mostly unknown genetic factors, physiological particularities of the patient and its variations. This article summarizes the most important and the most recent pharmacological properties and consequences of cross-action of antipsychotics. It specifies the basic rules and ways of replacing antipsychotic drugs in different clinical situations, and summarizes alerts, recommendations and suggestions when changing antipsychotics.

  14. Secondary contact seeds phenotypic novelty in cichlid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Paul; Genner, Martin J; van Oosterhout, Cock; Smith, Alan; Parsons, Paul; Sungani, Harold; Swanstrom, Jennifer; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-07

    Theory proposes that genomic admixture between formerly reproductively isolated populations can generate phenotypic novelty for selection to act upon. Secondary contact may therefore be a significant promoter of phenotypic novelty that allows species to overcome environmental challenges and adapt to novel environments, including during adaptive radiation. To date, this has largely been considered from the perspective of interspecific hybridization at contact zones. However, it is also possible that this process occurs more commonly between natural populations of a single species, and thus its importance in adaptive evolution may have been underestimated. In this study, we tested the consequences of genomic introgression during apparent secondary contact between phenotypically similar lineages of the riverine cichlid fish Astatotilapia calliptera. We provide population genetic evidence of a secondary contact zone in the wild, and then demonstrate using mate-choice experiments that both lineages can reproduce together successfully in laboratory conditions. Finally, we show that genomically admixed individuals display extreme phenotypes not observed in the parental lineages. Collectively, the evidence shows that secondary contact can drive the evolution of phenotypic novelty, suggesting that pulses of secondary contact may repeatedly seed genetic novelty, which when coupled with ecological opportunity could promote rapid adaptive evolution in natural circumstances.

  15. Cultural Novelty and Adjustment: Western Business Expatriates in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Although seldom formally tested, the traditional assumption in the literature on expatriate management is that the greater the cultural novelty of the host country, the more difficult it would be for the expatriate to adjust. To be able to test this proposition, a mail survey was directed towards...

  16. Effect of Age and Food Novelty on Food Memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sulmont-Rosse, C.; Moller, P.; Issanchou, S.; Köster, E.P.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of age of the consumer and food novelty on incidentally learned food memory was investigated by providing a meal containing novel and familiar target items under the pretense of a study on hunger feelings to 34 young and 36 older participants in France and to 24 young and 20 older

  17. Prenatal Cocaine Exposure and Infants' Preference for Novelty and Distractibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaultney, Jane F.; Gingras, Jeannine L.; Martin, Mindy; DeBrule, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The authors used the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence (J. F. Fagan, L. T. Singer, J. E. Montie, & P. A. Shepherd, 1986) to examine preferences for novelty and to evaluate several indicators of attention (off- and on-task indexes and durations) in 6- and 9-month-old infants who had been prenatally exposed to cigarette smoke only or to cocaine plus…

  18. Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine G Akers

    Full Text Available Early experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care.

  19. Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendocrine function in old age: influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akers, Katherine G; Yang, Zhen; DelVecchio, Dominic P; Reeb, Bethany C; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S; Tang, Akaysha C

    2008-06-30

    Early experience is known to have a profound impact on brain and behavioral function later in life. Relatively few studies, however, have examined whether the effects of early experience remain detectable in the aging animal. Here, we examined the effects of neonatal novelty exposure, an early stimulation procedure, on late senescent rats' ability to win in social competition. During the first 3 weeks of life, half of each litter received daily 3-min exposures to a novel environment while the other half stayed in the home cage. At 24 months of age, pairs of rats competed against each other for exclusive access to chocolate rewards. We found that novelty-exposed rats won more rewards than home-staying rats, indicating that early experience exerts a life-long effect on this aspect of social dominance. Furthermore, novelty-exposed but not home-staying rats exhibited habituation of corticosterone release across repeated days of social competition testing, suggesting that early experience permanently enhances plasticity of the stress response system. Finally, we report a surprising finding that across individual rat families, greater effects of neonatal novelty exposure on stress response plasticity were found among families whose dams provided more reliable, instead of a greater total quantity of, maternal care.

  20. A neurocomputational account of reward and novelty processing and effects of psychostimulants in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Arjun; Voon, Valerie; Critchley, Hugo D; Cercignani, Mara; Harrison, Neil A

    2018-03-13

    Computational models of reinforcement learning have helped dissect discrete components of reward-related function and characterize neurocognitive deficits in psychiatric illnesses. Stimulus novelty biases decision-making, even when unrelated to choice outcome, acting as if possessing intrinsic reward value to guide decisions toward uncertain options. Heightened novelty seeking is characteristic of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, yet how this influences reward-related decision-making is computationally encoded, or is altered by stimulant medication, is currently uncertain. Here we used an established reinforcement-learning task to model effects of novelty on reward-related behaviour during functional MRI in 30 adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and 30 age-, sex- and IQ-matched control subjects. Each participant was tested on two separate occasions, once ON and once OFF stimulant medication. OFF medication, patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder showed significantly impaired task performance (P = 0.027), and greater selection of novel options (P = 0.004). Moreover, persistence in selecting novel options predicted impaired task performance (P = 0.025). These behavioural deficits were accompanied by a significantly lower learning rate (P = 0.011) and heightened novelty signalling within the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (family-wise error corrected P attention deficit hyperactivity disorder participants' overall task performance (P = 0.011), increased reward-learning rates (P = 0.046) and enhanced their ability to differentiate optimal from non-optimal novel choices (P = 0.032). It also reduced substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area responses to novelty. Preliminary cross-sectional evidence additionally suggested an association between long-term stimulant treatment and a reduction in the rewarding value of novelty. These data suggest that aberrant substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area novelty processing plays an

  1. Initial locomotor sensitivity to cocaine varies widely among inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltshire, T; Ervin, R B; Duan, H; Bogue, M A; Zamboni, W C; Cook, S; Chung, W; Zou, F; Tarantino, L M

    2015-03-01

    Initial sensitivity to psychostimulants can predict subsequent use and abuse in humans. Acute locomotor activation in response to psychostimulants is commonly used as an animal model of initial drug sensitivity and has been shown to have a substantial genetic component. Identifying the specific genetic differences that lead to phenotypic differences in initial drug sensitivity can advance our understanding of the processes that lead to addiction. Phenotyping inbred mouse strain panels are frequently used as a first step for studying the genetic architecture of complex traits. We assessed locomotor activation following a single, acute 20 mg/kg dose of cocaine (COC) in males from 45 inbred mouse strains and observed significant phenotypic variation across strains indicating a substantial genetic component. We also measured levels of COC, the active metabolite, norcocaine and the major inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, in plasma and brain in the same set of inbred strains. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and behavioral data were significantly correlated, but at a level that indicates that PK alone does not account for the behavioral differences observed across strains. Phenotypic data from this reference population of inbred strains can be utilized in studies aimed at examining the role of psychostimulant-induced locomotor activation on drug reward and reinforcement and to test theories about addiction processes. Moreover, these data serve as a starting point for identifying genes that alter sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of COC. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  2. Functional relations between locomotor performance traits in spiders and implications for evolutionary hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Phillip W

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Locomotor performance in ecologically relevant activities is often linked to individual fitness. Recent controversy over evolution of extreme sexual size dimorphism (SSD in spiders centres on the relationship between size and locomotor capacity in males. Advantages for large males running over horizontal surfaces and small males climbing vertically have been proposed. Models have implicitly treated running and climbing as functionally distinct activities and failed to consider the possibility that they reflect common underlying capacities. Findings We examine the relationship between maximum climbing and running performance in males of three spider species. Maximum running and climbing speeds were positively related in two orb-web spiders with high SSD (Argiope keyserlingi and Nephila plumipes, indicating that for these species assays of running and climbing largely reveal the same underlying capacities. Running and climbing speeds were not related in a jumping spider with low SSD (Jacksonoides queenslandica. We found no evidence of a performance trade-off between these activities. Conclusions In the web-spiders A. keyserlingi and N. plumipes good runners were also good climbers. This indicates that climbing and running largely represent a single locomotor performance characteristic in these spiders, but this was not the case for the jumping spider J. queenslandica. There was no evidence of a trade-off between maximum running and climbing speeds in these spiders. We highlight the need to establish the relationship between apparently disparate locomotor activities when testing alternative hypotheses that yield predictions about different locomotor activities. Analysis of slopes suggests greater potential for an evolutionary response on performance in the horizontal compared to vertical context in these spiders.

  3. Functional reorganization of the locomotor network in Parkinson patients with freezing of gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett W Fling

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait (FoG is a transient inability to initiate or maintain stepping that often accompanies advanced Parkinson's disease (PD and significantly impairs mobility. The current study uses a multimodal neuroimaging approach to assess differences in the functional and structural locomotor neural network in PD patients with and without FoG and relates these findings to measures of FoG severity. Twenty-six PD patients and fifteen age-matched controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging along with self-reported and clinical assessments of FoG. After stringent movement correction, fifteen PD patients and fourteen control participants were available for analysis. We assessed functional connectivity strength between the supplementary motor area (SMA and the following locomotor hubs: 1 subthalamic nucleus (STN, 2 mesencephalic and 3 cerebellar locomotor region (MLR and CLR, respectively within each hemisphere. Additionally, we quantified structural connectivity strength between locomotor hubs and assessed relationships with metrics of FoG. FoG+ patients showed greater functional connectivity between the SMA and bilateral MLR and between the SMA and left CLR compared to both FoG- and controls. Importantly, greater functional connectivity between the SMA and MLR was positively correlated with i clinical, ii self-reported and iii objective ratings of freezing severity in FoG+, potentially reflecting a maladaptive neural compensation. The current findings demonstrate a re-organization of functional communication within the locomotor network in FoG+ patients whereby the higher-order motor cortex (SMA responsible for gait initiation communicates with the MLR and CLR to a greater extent than in FoG- patients and controls. The observed pattern of altered connectivity in FoG+ may indicate a failed attempt by the CNS to compensate for the loss of connectivity between the STN and SMA and may reflect a

  4. Aesthetic Emotions and Aesthetic People: Openness Predicts Sensitivity to Novelty in the Experiences of Interest and Pleasure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eFayn

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a stable relationship between the Openness/Intellect domain of personality and aesthetic engagement. However, neither of these are simple constructs and while the relationship exists process based evidence explaining the relationship is still lacking. The current research looked to clarify the relationship by evaluating the influence of the Openness and Intellect aspects on several different aesthetic emotions. Two studies looked at the between- and within-person differences in the emotions of interest, pleasure and confusion in response to visual art. The results suggest that Openness, as opposed to Intellect, was predictive of greater interest and pleasure, while both aspects explained less confusion. Differences in Openness were associated with within-person emotion appraisal contingencies, particularly greater novelty-interest and novelty-pleasure relationships. Those higher in Openness were particularly influenced by novelty in artworks. For pleasure this relationship suggested a different qualitative structure of appraisals. The appraisal of novelty is part of the experience of pleasure for those high in Openness, but not those low in Openness. This research supports the utility of studying Openness and Intellect as separate aspects of the broad domain and clarifies the relationship between Openness and aesthetic states in terms of within-person appraisal processes.

  5. Naps improve new walkers' locomotor problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah E; Scher, Anat

    2017-10-01

    In this first study of the impact of sleep on infants' problem solving of a locomotor task, 28 newly walking infants who were within a week of having given up crawling trained to navigate a shoulder-height tunnel to reach a caregiver waiting at the end. During the transitional window between crawling and walking, infants are reluctant to return to crawling, making this task uniquely challenging. Infants were randomly assigned to either nap or stay awake during a delay between training and a later test session. For the Nap group, efficiency of problem solving improved from training to test, but there was no change for the No Nap group. These findings suggest that for newly walking infants, sleep facilitates learning to solve a novel motor problem. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. PROBLEMAS LOCOMOTORES EM FRANGOS DE CORTE - REVISÃO. / LOCOMOTOR PROBLEMS IN BROILER CHICKENS - A REVIEW.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IBIARA CORREIA DE LIMA ALMEIDA PAZ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O bem estar animal é, sem dúvida, um dos pontos em que os produtores de aves devem se atentar para conseguir melhor rentabilidade e colocação no mercado externo. No entanto, é necessário ter uma ampla idéia de que alguns pontos impostos por mercados importadores, muitas vezes não tem fundamento científico e tratam-se mais de barreiras não tarifárias que de problemas de produção propriamente ditos. Dentre os vários fatores que afetam o bem estar animal pode-se destacar a incidência de problemas locomotores, principalmente em animais confinados. Estes distúrbios podem acarretar em perdas de até 6% em lotes comercias de frangos de corte, além de outras perdas não mensuráveis em linhas de abate, por fraturas e hematomas. Existem diversas metodologias para diagnosticar problemas locomotores, entretanto, a mais difundida na indústria avícola é o Gait Score, por sua facilidade de aplicação e por englobar os diferentes tipos de problemas locomotores. Sabe-se, contudo que esta metodologia é bastante subjetiva e pode inferir  em  diferentes  níveis  de  avaliação  dependendo  do método  utilizado. Os  problemas locomotores devem ser prevenidos já que depois de estabelecidos as perdas são inevitáveis.

  7. Nucleus accumbens cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript mediates food intake during novelty conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, PR; Krolewski, DM; Dykhuis, KE; Ching, J; Pinawin, AM; Britton, SL; Koch, LG; Watson, SJ; Akil, H.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a persistent and pervasive problem, particularly in industrialized nations. It has come to be appreciated that the metabolic health of an individual can influence brain function and subsequent behavioral patterns. To examine the relationship between metabolic phenotype and central systems that regulate behavior, we tested rats with divergent metabolic phenotypes (Low Capacity Runner: LCR vs. High Capacity Runner: HCR) for behavioral responses to the conflict between hunger and environmental novelty using the novelty suppressed feeding (NSF) paradigm. Additionally, we measured expression of mRNA, for peptides involved in energy management, in response to fasting. Following a 24-h fast, LCR rats showed lower latencies to begin eating in a novel environment compared to HCR rats. A 48-h fast equilibrated the latency to begin eating in the novel environment. A 24-h fast differentially affected expression of cocaine-amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) mRNA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), where 24-h of fasting reduced CART mRNA in LCR rats. Bilateral microinjections of CART 55–102 peptide into the NAc increased the latency to begin eating in the NSF paradigm following a 24-h fast in LCR rats. These results indicate that metabolic phenotype influences how animals cope with the conflict between hunger and novelty, and that these differences are at least partially mediated by CART signaling in the NAc. For individuals with poor metabolic health who have to navigate food-rich and stressful environments, changes in central systems that mediate conflicting drives may feed into the rates of obesity and exacerbate the difficulty individuals have in maintaining weight loss. PMID:26926827

  8. New is always better: Novelty modulates oculomotor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meermeier, Annegret; Gremmler, Svenja; Lappe, Markus

    2017-09-01

    Saccadic adaptation aims at keeping saccades accurate to enable precise foveation of objects. It has been believed to be a rather low-level adjustment, responding chiefly to direction and magnitude of postsaccadic position error. However, recent studies have shown that image content can modify saccadic adaptation. Adaptation is more complete for saccades toward socially relevant human figures in comparison to noise when time constraints exist. In the present experiment, we show that saccadic adaptation is also susceptible to the novelty of a stimulus. In a scanning adaptation paradigm, 20 subjects participated in two sessions of forward adaptation to one position at which the same human picture was always displayed versus a position at which a new human figure was presented in every trial. Saccadic adaptation was more complete to the novel-target position. This suggests that novelty can increase oculomotor learning and corroborates the claim that saccadic adaptation includes influences that reflect the target's visual properties.

  9. The availability of novelty sweets within the high school fringe

    OpenAIRE

    Aljawad, Ayman; Morgan, Maria; Fairchild, Ruth; Rees, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Reducing sugar consumption is a primary focus of current global public health policy. Achieving 5% of total energy from free sugars will be difficult acknowledging the concentration of free sugars in sugar sweetened beverages, confectionery and as hidden sugars in many savoury items. The expansion of the novelty sweet market in the UK has significant implications for children and young adults as they contribute to dental caries, dental erosion and obesity.\\ud \\ud Objective To ident...

  10. Detecting falls as novelties in acceleration patterns acquired with smartphones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medrano

    Full Text Available Despite being a major public health problem, falls in the elderly cannot be detected efficiently yet. Many studies have used acceleration as the main input to discriminate between falls and activities of daily living (ADL. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in using smartphones for fall detection. The most promising results have been obtained by supervised Machine Learning algorithms. However, a drawback of these approaches is that they rely on falls simulated by young or mature people, which might not represent every possible fall situation and might be different from older people's falls. Thus, we propose to tackle the problem of fall detection by applying a kind of novelty detection methods which rely only on true ADL. In this way, a fall is any abnormal movement with respect to ADL. A system based on these methods could easily adapt itself to new situations since new ADL could be recorded continuously and the system could be re-trained on the fly. The goal of this work is to explore the use of such novelty detectors by selecting one of them and by comparing it with a state-of-the-art traditional supervised method under different conditions. The data sets we have collected were recorded with smartphones. Ten volunteers simulated eight type of falls, whereas ADL were recorded while they carried the phone in their real life. Even though we have not collected data from the elderly, the data sets were suitable to check the adaptability of novelty detectors. They have been made publicly available to improve the reproducibility of our results. We have studied several novelty detection methods, selecting the nearest neighbour-based technique (NN as the most suitable. Then, we have compared NN with the Support Vector Machine (SVM. In most situations a generic SVM outperformed an adapted NN.

  11. Apathy and the Processing of Novelty in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Robert M.; Koven, Nancy S.; Pendergrass, Jo Cara; Flashman, Laura A.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Apathy is a common negative symptom in schizophrenia that has been associated with poor medication compliance and treatment outcome. Recent studies in neurological patients have observed an association between apathy and reduced attention to novel stimuli. We evaluated whether patients with schizophrenia demonstrate a similar relationship. Participants included 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy comparison subjects matched for age, sex, handedness, and parental education. A self-paced visual novelty task was presented which assessed the duration that participants looked at frequent standard stimuli, infrequent target stimuli, and novel stimuli. Attention to novelty was defined as the duration of viewing novel relative to standard stimuli. Apathy was assessed with the Marin Apathy Evaluation Scale. Results revealed significantly greater self- and informant- reported apathy, slower reaction time to target stimuli, and longer viewing times the stimuli, but not reduced attention to the novel stimuli, in the patient group. Although greater self-report of apathy was associated with longer viewing times for all stimuli in the patient group, this was accounted for by depressed mood. The present findings indicate that schizophrenia is associated with slowed information processing, but do not support the hypothesis that apathy in schizophrenia is associated with abnormal processing of novelty. PMID:17884352

  12. Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA regulation via systematic neonatal novelty exposure: the influence of maternal HPA function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Dinces

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the rat, repeated brief exposures to novelty early in life can induce long-lasting enhancements in adult cognitive, social, emotional, and neuroendocrine function. Family-to-family variations in these intervention effects on adult offspring are predicted by the mother’s ability to mount a rapid corticosterone (CORT response to the onset of an acute stressor. Here, in Long-Evans rats, we investigated whether neonatal and adulthood novelty exposure, each individually and in combination, can enhance offspring HPA regulation. Using a 2x2 within-litter design, one half of each litter were exposed to a relatively novel non-home environment for 3-min (Neo_Novel daily during infancy (PND1-21 and the other half of the litter remained in the home cage (Neo_Home; we further exposed half of these two groups to early adulthood (PND54-63 novelty exposure in an open field and the remaining siblings stayed in their home cages. Two aspects of HPA regulation were assessed: the ability to maintain a low level of resting CORT (CORTB and the ability to mount a large rapid CORT response (CORTE to the onset of an acute stressor. Assessment of adult offspring’s ability to regulate HPA regulation began at 370 days of age. We further investigated whether the novelty exposure effects on offspring HPA regulation are sensitive to the context of maternal HPA regulation by assessing maternal HPA regulation similarly beginning 7 days after her pups were weaned. We found that at the population level, rats receiving neonatal, but not early adulthood exposure or both, showed a greater rapid CORTE than their home-staying siblings. At the individual family level, these novelty effects are positively associated with maternal CORTE. These results suggest that early experience of novelty can enhance the offspring’s ability to mount a rapid response to environmental challenge and the success of such early life intervention is critically dependent upon the context of maternal

  13. Evidence for a Role of Orexin/Hypocretin System in Vestibular Lesion-Induced Locomotor Abnormalities in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Leilei; Qi, Ruirui; Wang, Junqin; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Jiluo; Cai, Yiling

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN)-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL) on the orexin-A (OXA) labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.). The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v.) on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48, and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  14. Evidence for a role of orexin/hypocretin system in vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3, 3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL on the orexin-A (OXA labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.. The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v. on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48 and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  15. Estradiol facilitation of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization in female rats requires activation of mGluR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis A; Peterson, Brittni M; Meisel, Robert L; Mermelstein, Paul G

    2014-09-01

    In comparison to men, women exhibit enhanced responsiveness to the stimulating and addictive properties of cocaine. A growing body of evidence implicates the steroid hormone estradiol in mediating this sex difference, yet the mechanisms underlying estradiol enhancement of behavioral responses to cocaine in females are not known. Recently, we have found that estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) functionally couples with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) to mediate the effects of estradiol on both cellular activation as well as dendritic spine plasticity in brain regions involved in cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Thus, we sought to determine whether mGluR5 activation is required for the facilitative effects of estradiol on locomotor responses to cocaine. To test this hypothesis, ovariectomized (OVX) female rats were tested for locomotor activity on the first and fifth days of daily systemic injections of cocaine. For the 2 days prior to each locomotor test, animals were injected with the mGluR5 antagonist MPEP (or vehicle) and estradiol (or oil). MPEP treatment blocked the facilitative effects of estradiol on cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, without affecting acute responses to cocaine or the inhibitory actions of estradiol on weight gain. Considered together, these data indicate that mGluR5 activation is critical for the actions of estradiol on cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic locomotor capabilities revealed by early dinosaur trackmakers from southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new investigation of the sedimentology and ichnology of the Early Jurassic Moyeni tracksite in Lesotho, southern Africa has yielded new insights into the behavior and locomotor dynamics of early dinosaurs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The tracksite is an ancient point bar preserving a heterogeneous substrate of varied consistency and inclination that includes a ripple-marked riverbed, a bar slope, and a stable algal-matted bar top surface. Several basal ornithischian dinosaurs and a single theropod dinosaur crossed its surface within days or perhaps weeks of one another, but responded to substrate heterogeneity differently. Whereas the theropod trackmaker accommodated sloping and slippery surfaces by gripping the substrate with its pedal claws, the basal ornithischian trackmakers adjusted to the terrain by changing between quadrupedal and bipedal stance, wide and narrow gauge limb support (abduction range = 31 degrees , and plantigrade and digitigrade foot posture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The locomotor adjustments coincide with changes in substrate consistency along the trackway and appear to reflect 'real time' responses to a complex terrain. It is proposed that these responses foreshadow important locomotor transformations characterizing the later evolution of the two main dinosaur lineages. Ornithischians, which shifted from bipedal to quadrupedal posture at least three times in their evolutionary history, are shown to have been capable of adopting both postures early in their evolutionary history. The substrate-gripping behavior demonstrated by the early theropod, in turn, is consistent with the hypothesized function of pedal claws in bird ancestors.

  17. Influence of temperature on daily locomotor activity in the crab Uca pugilator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey M Mat

    Full Text Available Animals living in the intertidal zone are exposed to prominent temperature changes. To cope with the energetic demands of environmental thermal challenges, ectotherms rely mainly on behavioral responses, which may change depending on the time of the day and seasonally. Here, we analyze how temperature shapes crabs' behavior at 2 different times of the year and show that a transition from constant cold (13.5°C to constant warm (17.5°C water temperature leads to increased locomotor activity levels throughout the day in fiddler crabs (Uca pugilator collected during the summer. In contrast, the same transition in environmental temperature leads to a decrease in the amplitude of the daily locomotor activity rhythm in crabs collected during the winter. In other words, colder temperatures during the cold season favor a more prominent diurnal behavior. We interpret this winter-summer difference in the response of daily locomotor activity to temperature changes within the framework of the circadian thermoenergetics hypothesis, which predicts that a less favorable energetic balance would promote a more diurnal activity pattern. During the winter, when the energetic balance is likely less favorable, crabs would save energy by being more active during the expected high-temperature phase of the day-light phase-and less during the expected low-temperature phase of the day-dark phase. Our results suggest that endogenous rhythms in intertidal ectotherms generate adaptive behavioral programs to cope with thermoregulatory demands of the intertidal habitat.

  18. Reliability review of the remote tool delivery system locomotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chesser, J.B.

    1999-04-01

    The locomotor being built by RedZone Robotics is designed to serve as a remote tool delivery (RID) system for waste retrieval, tank cleaning, viewing, and inspection inside the high-level waste tanks 8D-1 and 8D-2 at West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS). The RTD systm is to be deployed through a tank riser. The locomotor portion of the RTD system is designed to be inserted into the tank and is to be capable of moving around the tank by supporting itself and moving on the tank internal structural columns. The locomotor will serve as a mounting platform for a dexterous manipulator arm. The complete RTD system consists of the locomotor, dexterous manipulator arm, cameras, lights, cables, hoses, cable/hose management system, power supply, and operator control station.

  19. Relationship between ethanol preference and sensation/novelty seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Lidia; Gómez, Ma José; Callejas-Aguilera, José E; Donaire, Rocío; Sabariego, Marta; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto; Cañete, Antoni; Blázquez, Gloria; Papini, Mauricio R; Torres, Carmen

    2014-06-22

    High- and low-avoidance Roman inbred rat strains (RHA-I, RLA-I) were selected for extreme differences in two-way active avoidance. RHA-I rats also express less anxiety than RLA-I rats. This study compared male Roman rats in ethanol preference and sensation/novelty seeking. Rats were first exposed in counterbalanced order to the hole-board test (forced exposure to novelty) and the Y-maze and emergence tests (free choice between novel and familiar locations). Then, rats were tested in 24-h, two-bottle preference tests with water in one bottle and ethanol (2, 4, 6, 8, or 10% in successive days). Compared to RLA-I rats, RHA-I rats showed (1) higher frequency and time in head dipping, (2) higher activity, and (3) lower frequency of rearing and grooming in the hole-board test, and (4) remained in the novel arm longer in the Y-maze test. No strain differences were observed in the emergence test. RHA-I rats exhibited higher preference for and consumed more ethanol than RLA-I rats at all concentrations. However, both strains preferred ethanol over water for 2-4% concentrations, but water over ethanol for 6-10% concentrations. Factorial analysis with all the rats pooled identified a two-factor solution, one grouping preferred ethanol concentrations (2-4%) with head dipping and grooming in the hole board, and another factor grouping the nonpreferred ethanol concentrations (6-10%) with activity in the hole board and novel-arm time in the Y-maze test. These results show that preference for ethanol is associated with different aspects of behavior measured in sensation/novelty-seeking tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Furcation and fusion: The phylogenetics of evolutionary novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Todd H

    2017-11-01

    Novelty and innovation are fundamental yet relatively understudied concepts in evolution. We may study the history and provenance of novelty using phylogenetics, where key questions include when evolution occurs by tree-like branching and when it occurs by movement of distantly related parts in processes akin to horizontal transfer. Perfectly vertical inheritance, often an assumption of evolutionary trees, requires simultaneous co-duplication of the parts of a duplicating or speciating (processes I collectively call 'furcating') biological feature. However, simultaneous co-duplication of many parts usually requires variational processes that are rare. Therefore, instead of always being perfectly tree-like, evolution often involves events that incorporate or fuse more distantly related parts into new units during evolution, which herein I call 'fusion'. Exon shuffling, horizontal gene transfer, introgression, and co-option are such fusion processes at different levels of organization. The ubiquity of processes that fuse distantly related parts has wide ranging implications for the study of macroevolution. For one, the central metaphor of a tree of life will often be incomplete, to the point where we may consider a different metaphor, such as economic public goods, or a 'web of life'. Secondly, we often may need to expand commonly used phylogenetic models and methods, highlighting a need for an expansive toolkit for studying evolutionary history. Even though furcation - the splitting and individuation of biological features - does happen, fusion of distant parts may often be just as critical for the evolution of novelties, and must formally be incorporated into the metaphors, models, and visualization of evolutionary history. This will allow us to understand the timing, order of appearance, and diversification rates of developmental systems, including cell types, organs, behavior, and language, which very commonly evolve through co-option. Copyright © 2017

  1. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Bui, Tuan V.; Brownstone, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks...

  2. Novelty-seeking and avoidant coping strategies are associated with academic stress in Korean medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hoyoung; Chung, Seockhoon; Park, Jangho; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Kim, Kyung Mo; Kim, Ki-Soo

    2012-12-30

    High levels of stress and depression in medical students is raising concern. In this study, we sought to identify coping strategies and other factors influencing academic stress in medical students. We enrolled 157 students from the University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Korea, in November, 2010. We used the Medical Stress Scale, Temperament and Character Inventory, Hamilton Depression Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, and Coping Response Inventory to assess psychological parameters. We used Pearson's correlation and linear regression analyses to analyze the data. Novelty-seeking, self-directedness, cooperativeness, coping strategy, and depression scale scores all correlated significantly with stress level. Linear regression analysis indicated that students who are novelty-seeking, likely to use avoidant coping strategies, and unlikely to use active-cognitive and active-behavioral strategies tend to have higher stress levels. Reduction of stress in medical students may be achieved through evaluation of coping strategies and personality features and use of interventions to promote active coping strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The role of novelty detection in food memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Audebrand, Léri; Mojet, Jos; Chabanet, Claire; Issanchou, Sylvie; Møller, Per; Köster, Ep; Sulmont-Rossé, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Memory plays a central role in food choice. Recent studies focusing on food memory in everyday eating and drinking behaviour used a paradigm based on incidental learning of target foods and unexpected memory testing, demanding recognition of the target among distractors, which deviate slightly from the target. Results question the traditional view of memory as reactivation of previous experiences. Comparison of data from several experiments shows that in incidentally learned memory, distractors are rejected, while original targets are not recognised better than by chance guessing. Food memory is tuned at detecting novelty and change, rather than at recognising a previously encountered food. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Adaptive locomotor behavior in larval zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugues, Ruben; Engert, Florian

    2011-01-01

    In this study we report that larval zebrafish display adaptive locomotor output that can be driven by unexpected visual feedback. We develop a new assay that addresses visuomotor integration in restrained larval zebrafish. The assay involves a closed-loop environment in which the visual feedback a larva receives depends on its own motor output in a way that resembles freely swimming conditions. The experimenter can control the gain of this closed feedback loop, so that following a given motor output the larva experiences more or less visual feedback depending on whether the gain is high or low. We show that increases and decreases in this gain setting result in adaptive changes in behavior that lead to a generalized decrease or increase of motor output, respectively. Our behavioral analysis shows that both the duration and tail beat frequency of individual swim bouts can be modified, as well as the frequency with which bouts are elicited. These changes can be implemented rapidly, following an exposure to a new gain of just 175 ms. In addition, modifications in some behavioral parameters accumulate over tens of seconds and effects last for at least 30 s from trial to trial. These results suggest that larvae establish an internal representation of the visual feedback expected from a given motor output and that the behavioral modifications are driven by an error signal that arises from the discrepancy between this expectation and the actual visual feedback. The assay we develop presents a unique possibility for studying visuomotor integration using imaging techniques available in the larval zebrafish.

  5. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-04-01

    Voluntary limb modifications must be integrated with basic walking patterns during visually guided walking. In this study we tested whether voluntary gait modifications can become more automatic with practice. We challenged walking control by presenting visual stepping targets that instructed subjects to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence-nonspecific learning during walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 yr,n= 20) could learn a specific sequence of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 yr,n= 8) had lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning were the same compared with those of older children (11-16 yr,n= 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited at faster walking speeds. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that spatial sequence learning can be integrated with a highly automatic task such as walking. These findings suggest that adults and children use implicit knowledge about the sequence to plan and execute leg movement during visually guided walking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β haploinsufficiency lengthens the circadian locomotor activity period in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Joëlle; Hébert, Marc; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2013-09-15

    The mood stabiliser drug lithium has been reported to impact circadian rhythms in vertebrates. Among several putative therapeutic molecular targets, direct inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) by lithium has been proposed to underlie its effects on circadian physiology. Here we study the effect of GSK3β haploinsufficiency on the circadian locomotor activity in mice during a free-running period in comparison to wildtype littermates (WT). Mice were housed individually to record their circadian wheel running activity and were entrained to a 12h light/12h dark cycle for 14 days and then placed under constant darkness for 14 days to allow free-running. During the free-running phase, the circadian locomotor activity period of GSK3β(+/-) was significantly lengthened (23.83±0.05h) when compared to the WT mice (23.54±0.10h; p=0.0374). No significant difference in locomotor activity was observed. Knowing that GSK3β interacts with most of the core clock components, these data suggest that GSK3β acts as a critical intrinsic regulator of the circadian clock and plays an important role in regulating its period in response to lithium treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of cocaine on norepinephrine stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and locomotor activity in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosaddeghi, M.

    1989-01-01

    The function of α 1 -adrenoceptors was determined by stimulating cortical tissue slices, which were pre-labeled with [ 3 H]inositol, with norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of 8 mM LiCl. Results of in vitro studies showed that cocaine 10 μM potentiated maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by 30%. In addition, the EC 50 was decreased from 3.93 ± 0.42 to 1.91 ± 0.31 μM NE. Concentrations of 0.1-100 μM and 0.1-10 μM cocaine enhanced PI hydrolysis stimulated by 0.3 and 3 μM NE, respectively. The concentration-effect curves for NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis were shifted to the right 100-fold in the presence of 0.1 μM prazosin. Cocaine (10 μM) did not potentiate NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis in the presence of 0.1 μM prazosin. [ 3 H]Prazosin saturation and NE [ 3 H]prazosin competition binding studies using crude membrane preparations showed that 10 μM cocaine did not alter binding parameters B max , K d , Hill slope, and IC 50 . Together, these results implied that cocaine in vitro potentiated NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis by blocking NE reuptake. For in vivo studies, the locomotor activity was determined after an acute or chronic injections of either cocaine or saline. Cocaine or saline-treated rats were killed after measurement of the locomotor activity, and NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis was measured. Acute administration of cocaine 3.2-42 mg/kg (i.p.) produced an inverted U shaped dose-response curve on locomotor activity. The peak increase in locomotor activity was at 32 mg/kg cocaine. A dose of 42 mg/kg cocaine produced a significant depression of maximal NE-stimulated PI hydrolysis

  8. Dentate gyrus neurogenesis ablation via cranial irradiation enhances morphine self-administration and locomotor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulin, Sarah E; Mendoza, Matthew L; Richardson, Devon R; Song, Kwang H; Solberg, Timothy D; Yun, Sanghee; Eisch, Amelia J

    2018-03-01

    Adult dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis is important for hippocampal-dependent learning and memory, but the role of new neurons in addiction-relevant learning and memory is unclear. To test the hypothesis that neurogenesis is involved in the vulnerability to morphine addiction, we ablated adult DG neurogenesis and examined morphine self-administration (MSA) and locomotor sensitization. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent hippocampal-focused, image-guided X-ray irradiation (IRR) to eliminate new DG neurons or sham treatment (Sham). Six weeks later, rats underwent either MSA (Sham = 16, IRR = 15) or locomotor sensitization (Sham = 12, IRR = 12). Over 21 days of MSA, IRR rats self-administered ~70 percent more morphine than Sham rats. After 28 days of withdrawal, IRR rats pressed the active lever 40 percent more than Sham during extinction. This was not a general enhancement of learning or locomotion, as IRR and Sham groups had similar operant learning and inactive lever presses. For locomotor sensitization, both IRR and Sham rats sensitized, but IRR rats sensitized faster and to a greater extent. Furthermore, dose-response revealed that IRR rats were more sensitive at a lower dose. Importantly, these increases in locomotor activity were not apparent after acute morphine administration and were not a byproduct of irradiation or post-irradiation recovery time. Therefore, these data, along with other previously published data, indicate that reduced hippocampal neurogenesis confers vulnerability for multiple classes of drugs. Thus, therapeutics to specifically increase or stabilize hippocampal neurogenesis could aid in preventing initial addiction as well as future relapse. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. The topology of evolutionary novelty and innovation in macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Douglas H

    2017-12-05

    Sewall Wright's fitness landscape introduced the concept of evolutionary spaces in 1932. George Gaylord Simpson modified this to an adaptive, phenotypic landscape in 1944 and since then evolutionary spaces have played an important role in evolutionary theory through fitness and adaptive landscapes, phenotypic and functional trait spaces, morphospaces and related concepts. Although the topology of such spaces is highly variable, from locally Euclidean to pre-topological, evolutionary change has often been interpreted as a search through a pre-existing space of possibilities, with novelty arising by accessing previously inaccessible or difficult to reach regions of a space. Here I discuss the nature of evolutionary novelty and innovation within the context of evolutionary spaces, and argue that the primacy of search as a conceptual metaphor ignores the generation of new spaces as well as other changes that have played important evolutionary roles.This article is part of the themed issue 'Process and pattern in innovations from cells to societies'. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Divergent effect of the selective D3 receptor agonist pd-128,907 on locomotor activity in Roman high- and low-avoidance rats: relationship to NGFI-A gene expression in the Calleja islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart-Masip, Marc; Johansson, Björn; Fernández-Teruel, Albert; Tobeña, Adolf; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    The inbred Roman high- (RHA-I) and low-avoidance (RLA-I) rats, differing in dopaminergic activity and novelty/substance-seeking profiles, may be a suitable model to study the implication of the dopaminergic system in vulnerability to drug abuse. Differences in D3 receptor binding recently described between the two strains (Guitart-Masip M, Johansson B, Fernández-Teruel A, Cañete T, Tobeña A, Terenius L, Giménez-Llort L, Neuroscience 142:1231-1243, 2006b) may be important in shaping the aforementioned differences in novelty seeking. The aim of the present work was to study the effect of D3 receptor activation on novelty-induced locomotor activity in these two strains of rats. We administered saline and PD-128,907 (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg), a putative D3 receptor agonist, to the Roman rats and studied the locomotor activity when animals were placed in a novel environment. Thereafter, by means of in situ hybridization, nerve growth factor inducible clone A (NGFI-A) mRNA was measured in the striatum and the Calleja islands of these animals. We found that RLA-I rats showed stronger locomotor inhibition than RHA-I rats after PD-128,907 administration. Moreover, RLA-I rats showed stronger reduction of NGFI-A mRNA in the Calleja islands than RHA-I rats. These results, together with previous findings, suggest that differences in D3 receptor expression in the Calleja islands may contribute to the divergent behavioral effect of PD-128,907 administration in the two strains of Roman rats.

  11. Syngeneic B16F10 Melanoma Causes Cachexia and Impaired Skeletal Muscle Strength and Locomotor Activity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício A. Voltarelli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle wasting has been emerging as one of the principal components of cancer cachexia, leading to progressive impairment of work capacity. Despite early stages melanomas rarely promotes weight loss, the appearance of metastatic and/or solid tumor melanoma can leads to cachexia development. Here, we investigated the B16F10 tumor-induced cachexia and its contribution to muscle strength and locomotor-like activity impairment. C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with 5 × 104 B16F10 melanoma cells or PBS as a Sham negative control. Tumor growth was monitored during a period of 28 days. Compared to Sham mice, tumor group depicts a loss of skeletal muscle, as well as significantly reduced muscle grip strength and epididymal fat mass. This data are in agreement with mild to severe catabolic host response promoted by elevated serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Tumor implantation has also compromised general locomotor activity and decreased exploratory behavior. Likewise, muscle loss, and elevated inflammatory interleukin were associated to muscle strength loss and locomotor activity impairment. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumor-driven catabolic state in response to a pro-inflammatory environment that is associated with impaired skeletal muscle strength and decreased locomotor activity in tumor-bearing mice.

  12. The possible interaction of dopamine system in nucleus accumbens shell and glutamate system of prelimbic region on locomotor activity in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatam Ahmadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nucleus accumbens (NAc and prefrontal cortex (PFC dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems are involved in regulating of locomotor activity behaviors. This study has investigated the interaction of NAc shell dopaminergic system and prelimbic glutamatergic systems in regulating locomotor activity and related parameters. Methods: The aim of this study was the effect the drugs injection interaction in the brain of male Wistar rats on locomotor activity and related parameters, in the order of this purpose, open field apparatus that automatically recorded locomotor activity was employed. Unilateral intra-cerebral injection of drugs was done. Results: Unilateral intra-prelimbic injection of D-AP7 (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid= NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl did not alter locomotor activity behaviors. However, infusion of NMDA (0.9μg/μl in this region increased locomotor activity (P<0.01, whereas decreased rearing (P<0.01 and grooming (P<0.01 which was blocked by D-AP7 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Moreover, unilateral infusion of SCH23390 (dopamine D1 receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl into the left NAc shell did not alter locomotor activity. However, injection of SKF38393 (dopamine D1 receptor agonist; 4μg/μl into the left NAc shell increased locomotor activity (P<0.05 which was blocked by SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Furthermore, the subthreshold dose infusion of SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl into the left NAc shell reduced the effect of intra- prelimbic NMDA on locomotor activity (P<0.01. In addition, intra-NAc shell administration of the subthreshold dose of SKF38393 (1μg/μl potentiated the middle dose (P<0.05, whereas decreased the higher dose of intra-left prelimbic NMDA response (P<0.05 on locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results suggested a modulatory effect of the NAc shell dopaminergic system on increased locomotor activity by activating glutamate system in prelimbic.

  13. Female novelty and the courtship behavior of male guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn D.W.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In several rodent species, an increase or recovery of sexual behavior can be observed when sexually satiated males are placed in contact with a novel mate. In order to assess the influence of female novelty on the courtship behavior of guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus, four adult males were observed during four daily 15-min sessions while interacting with the same pregnant female (same-female sessions. A new female was presented during the fifth session (switched-female session. The duration of behavioral categories was obtained from videotape records using an observational software. From the first to the second session, all males decreased the time allocated to investigating (sniffing and licking, following, and mounting the female, and that response did not recover by the end of the same-female sessions. No similar decreasing tendencies were detected in the circling or rumba categories. A marked increase of investigating occurred in all males from the last same-female session (8.1, 11.9, 15.1 and 17.3 percent session time to the switched-female one (16.4, 18.4, 37.1 and 28.9 percent session time, respectively. Increases in following and circling were recorded in three of four males, and full-blown recovery of mounting in one male. No consistent changes in the females' responses to males (following or attacking were observed throughout testing. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that guinea pig males recognize individual females and that courtship responses may suffer a habituation/recovery process controlled by mate novelty.

  14. Is it new? Personal and contextual influences on perceptions of novelty and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Wang, Xiaoye May; Song, Lynda Jiwen; Wu, Junfeng

    2017-02-01

    Novelty recognition is the crucial starting point for extracting value from the ideas generated by others. In this paper we develop an associative evaluation account for how personal and contextual factors motivate individuals to perceive novelty and creativity. We report 4 studies that systematically tested hypotheses developed from this perspective. Study 1 (a laboratory experiment) showed that perceivers' regulatory focus, as an experimentally induced state, affected novelty perception. Study 2 (a field study) found that perceivers' promotion focus and prevention focus, measured as chronic traits, each interacted with normative level of novelty and creativity: perceivers who scored higher on promotion focus perceived more novelty (or creativity) in novel (or creative) targets than those who scored lower, whereas perceivers who scored higher on prevention focus perceived less novelty (or creativity) in novel (or creative) targets than those who scored lower. Study 3 (a field study) showed that organizational culture affected the perception of novelty and creativity. Study 4 (a laboratory experiment) found perceiver-by-idea-by-context 3-way interaction effects: for perceivers with prevention focus, the positive relation between normative level of novelty and novelty ratings was weakened in the loss-framing condition versus the gain-framing condition. We discuss implications of the findings for future research and management practice. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. β-endorphin modulates the effect of stress on novelty-suppressed feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth T. Barfield

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although stress is implicated in the pathophysiology of mood and anxiety disorders, not all individuals who suffer stressful life events develop psychopathology. Differential susceptibility to stress may be influenced by genetically-mediated differences in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis activity and moderation of the stress response by the opioid peptide β-endorphin (β-E. The present study investigated genetic contributions to coping behavior by examining anxious behavior of transgenic mice with varying capacities to synthesize β-E (B6.129S2-Pomctm1Low/J; regulated by insertion of a premature stop codon into one or both copies of the proopiomelanocortin gene, both under normal conditions and following 3 minutes of forced swim. Ten minutes after this stress exposure or a control manipulation, acutely food-deprived female and male transgenic mice were subjected to a novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF test, during which their interaction with an almond slice located in the center of an open field box was measured. There was an interaction between genotype and stress for latency to approach the almond and whether or not the almond was approached, such that mice with low or absent β-E displayed a stronger aversion to novelty-feeding after stress exposure than did mice with normal levels. These data provide evidence for a moderating effect of β-E on the behavioral response to stress. Genotypic differences in anxious behavior emerged when mice were stressed prior to behavioral assessment, suggesting that β-E plays a role in coping behavior. These findings indicate that genetic variability in sensitivity of the β-E system to stress may contribute, at least in part, to heritable differences in stress reactivity as well as vulnerability to stress-related psychopathology.

  16. Novelty processing and memory formation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, J; Berendse, H W; Foncke, E M J; van der Werf, Y D; van den Heuvel, O A; Theeuwes, J; Meeter, M

    2014-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic cells, resulting in dopamine depletion. This depletion is counteracted through dopamine replacement therapy (DRT). Dopamine has been suggested to affect novelty processing and memory, which suggests that these processes are also implicated in PD and that DRT could affect them. To investigate word learning and novelty processing in patients with PD as indexed by the P2 and P3 event-related potential components, and the role of DRT in these processes. 21 patients with PD and 21 matched healthy controls were included. Patients with PD were tested on and off DRT in two sessions in a counterbalanced design, and healthy controls were tested twice without intervention. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was measured while participants performed a word learning Von Restorff task. Healthy controls showed the typical Von Restorff effect, with better memory for words that were presented in novel fonts, than for words presented in standard font. Surprisingly, this effect was reversed in the patients with PD. In line with the behavioral findings, the P3 was larger for novel than for standard font words in healthy controls, but not in patients with PD. For both groups the P2 and P3 event-related components were larger for recalled versus forgotten words. DRT did not affect these processes. Learning of novel information is compromised in patients with PD. Likewise, the P2 and P3 components that predict successful memory encoding are reduced in PD patients. This was true both on and off DRT, suggesting that these findings reflect abnormalities in learning and memory in PD that are not resolved by dopaminergic medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive and Reactive Locomotor Adaptability in Healthy Elderly: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Sebastian; Mademli, Lida; Mersmann, Falk; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2015-12-01

    Locomotor adaptability is based on the implementation of error-feedback information from previous perturbations to predictively adapt to expected perturbations (feedforward) and to facilitate reactive responses in recurring unexpected perturbations ('savings'). The effect of aging on predictive and reactive adaptability is yet unclear. However, such understanding is fundamental for the design and application of effective interventions targeting fall prevention. We systematically searched the Web of Science, MEDLINE, Embase and Science Direct databases as well as the reference lists of the eligible articles. A study was included if it addressed an investigation of the locomotor adaptability in response to repeated mechanical movement perturbations of healthy older adults (≥60 years). The weighted average effect size (WAES) of the general adaptability (adaptive motor responses to repeated perturbations) as well as predictive (after-effects) and reactive adaptation (feedback responses to a recurring unexpected perturbation) was calculated and tested for an overall effect. A subgroup analysis was performed regarding the factor age group [i.e., young (≤35 years) vs. older adults]. Furthermore, the methodological study quality was assessed. The review process yielded 18 studies [1009 participants, 613 older adults (70 ± 4 years)], which used various kinds of locomotor tasks and perturbations. The WAES for the general locomotor adaptability was 1.21 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-1.74, n = 11] for the older and 1.39 (95% CI 0.90-1.89, n = 10) for the young adults with a significant (p reactive (older: WAES 1.09, 95% CI 0.22-1.96, n = 5; young: WAES 1.35, 95% CI 0.60-2.09, n = 5) adaptation featuring significant (p reactive adaptation in particular remain highly effective in the elderly, showing only minor, not statistically significant age-related deficits. Consequently, interventions which use adaptation and learning paradigms including the application of the

  18. Anatomía del Aparato Locomotor, 2010-11

    OpenAIRE

    Juanes Méndez, Juan Antonio

    2010-01-01

    I. Materiales de clase: 1.Sistema Oseo. Las Articulaciones: definición, clasificaciones; 2.Esqueleto Axial; 3.Esqueleto Apendicular; 4. Organización del sistema nervioso periférico. Inervación del Aparato Locomotor; 5. Sistema muscular. II. Bibliografía y atlas Establecer la correlación morfofuncional del aparato locomotor necesaria para la deducción deficitaria derivada de las alteraciones de la dinámica osteoarticular. Esta asignatura se imparte en el primer curso del Grado en Terapia Oc...

  19. Triple dissociation in the medial temporal lobes: Recollection, familiarity, and novelty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daselaar, S.M.; Fleck, M.S.; Cabeza, R.

    2006-01-01

    Memory for past events may be based on retrieval accompanied by specific contextual details (recollection) or on the feeling that an item is old (familiarity) or new (novelty) in the absence of contextual details. There are indications that recollection, familiarity, and novelty involve different

  20. Triple dissociation in the medial temporal lobes: recollection, familiarity, and novelty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daselaar, S.M.; Fleck, M.S.; Cabeza, R.

    2006-01-01

    Memory for past events may be based on retrieval accompanied by specific contextual details (recollection) or on the feeling that an item is old (familiarity) or new (novelty) in the absence of contextual details. There are indications that recollection, familiarity, and novelty involve different

  1. Metaphor and metamorphosis : Paul Ricoeur and Gilles Deleuze on the emergence of novelty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boven, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation develops a new reading of the works of two French philosophers, Paul Ricoeur (1913-2005) and Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995). through a focus on their understanding of the emergence of novelty. Ricoeur’s conception of novelty is understood in terms of a living metaphor. The living

  2. Stress during adolescence increases novelty seeking and risk taking behavior in male and female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eToledo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period of major physical, hormonal and psychological change. It is also characterized by a significant increase in the incidence of psychopathologies and this increase is gender-specific. Likewise, stress during adolescence is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. Previously, using a rat model of psychogenic stress (exposure to predator odor followed by placement on an elevated platform during the pre-pubertal period (postnatal days 28-30, we reported sex-specific effects on auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Here, we study the short-term impact of psychogenic stress before and during puberty (postnatal days 28-42 on behavior (novelty seeking, risk taking, anxiety and depression and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis activation during late adolescence (postnatal days 45-51. Peri-pubertal stress decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased risk taking and novelty seeking behaviors during late adolescence (measured with the elevated plus maze, open field and exposure to novel object tests and intake of chocopop pellets before or immediate after stress. Finally neither depressive-like behavior (measured at the forced swim test nor HPA response to stress (blood corticosterone and glucose were affected by peri-pubertal stress. Nevertheless, when controlling for the basal anxiety of the mothers, animals exposed to peri-pubertal stress showed a significant decrease in corticosterone levels immediate after an acute stressor. The results from this study suggest that exposure to mild stressors during the peri-pubertal period induces a broad spectrum of behavioral changes in late adolescence, which may exacerbate the independence-building behaviors naturally happening during this transitional period (increase in curiosity, sensation-seeking and risk taking behaviors.

  3. Benchmarking bio-inspired designs with brainstorming in terms of novelty of design outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshwani, Sonal; Lenau, Torben Anker; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2013-01-01

    With the increasing demand of innovative products in the market, there is a need for effective creativity approaches that will support development of creative design outcomes. Most researchers agree that novelty of design concepts is a major element of creativity; design outcomes are more creative...... when they are more novel. Biomimetics has emerged as a creativity approach that can lead to generation of novel design concepts. However, not many researchers explored how the degree of novelty of the concepts generated using biomimetic approaches compare with the degree of novelty of concepts...... generated using existing traditional creative problem solving approaches. In this research we have compared the novelty of design concepts produced by using biological analogies with the novelty of design concepts produced by using traditional brainstorming. Results show that there is an increase...

  4. Role of spared pathways in locomotor recovery after body-weight-supported treadmill training in contused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anita; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Murray, Marion; Lemay, Michel; Houle, John

    2011-12-01

    Body-weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT)-related locomotor recovery has been shown in spinalized animals. Only a few animal studies have demonstrated locomotor recovery after BWSTT in an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) model, such as contusion injury. The contribution of spared descending pathways after BWSTT to behavioral recovery is unclear. Our goal was to evaluate locomotor recovery in contused rats after BWSTT, and to study the role of spared pathways in spinal plasticity after BWSTT. Forty-eight rats received a contusion, a transection, or a contusion followed at 9 weeks by a second transection injury. Half of the animals in the three injury groups were given BWSTT for up to 8 weeks. Kinematics and the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) test assessed behavioral improvements. Changes in Hoffmann-reflex (H-reflex) rate depression property, soleus muscle mass, and sprouting of primary afferent fibers were also evaluated. BWSTT-contused animals showed accelerated locomotor recovery, improved H-reflex properties, reduced muscle atrophy, and decreased sprouting of small caliber afferent fibers. BBB scores were not improved by BWSTT. Untrained contused rats that received a transection exhibited a decrease in kinematic parameters immediately after the transection; in contrast, trained contused rats did not show an immediate decrease in kinematic parameters after transection. This suggests that BWSTT with spared descending pathways leads to neuroplasticity at the lumbar spinal level that is capable of maintaining locomotor activity. Discontinuing training after the transection in the trained contused rats abolished the improved kinematics within 2 weeks and led to a reversal of the improved H-reflex response, increased muscle atrophy, and an increase in primary afferent fiber sprouting. Thus continued training may be required for maintenance of the recovery. Transected animals had no effect of BWSTT, indicating that in the absence of spared pathways this

  5. Ontogenetic differences in adolescent and adult C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice: Anxiety-like, locomotor, and consummatory behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Eileen M.; Linsenbardt, David N.; Melón, Laverne C.; Boehm, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a highly conserved period during which mammals undergo a number of hormonal, biological and behavioral changes (Spear, 2000). Ethical constraints limit the research that can be done in human adolescents. Rodents provide a useful model of at least some of the features of adolescence, including increases in body growth, differences in sleep/wake and eating patterns, as well as differences in risk-taking, novelty seeking and exploratory behaviors. Much of the available developmental research has utilized rats; however the use of inbred mouse strains provides a unique means to assess the genetic factors involved in behavioral differences during adolescence. We assessed differences between adults and adolescents in anxiety-like, locomotor, and consummatory behaviors using two commonly used inbred strains of mice, the DBA/2J and C57BL/6J strains. Age and genotype dependent differences were found in all three behaviors measured, suggesting both factors are important determinants of behavior in mice. PMID:20886536

  6. Locomotor sensitization to ethanol: Contribution of b-Endorphin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephani eDempsey

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders, like all drug addictions, involve a constellation of adaptive changes throughout the brain. Neural activity underlying changes in the rewarding properties of alcohol reflect changes in dopamine transmission in mesolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways and these effects are modulated by endogenous opioids such as b-Endorphin. In order to study the role of b-Endorphin in the development of locomotor sensitization to repeated EtOH exposure, we tested transgenic mice that vary in their capacity to synthesize this peptide as a result of constitutive modification of the Pomc gene. Our results indicate that mice deficient in b-Endorphin show attenuated locomotor activation following an acute injection of EtOH (2 g/kg and, in contrast to wildtype mice, fail to demonstrate locomotor sensitization after 12 days of repeated EtOH injections. These data support the idea that b-Endorphin modulates the locomotor effects of EtOH and contributes to the neuroadaptive changes associated with chronic use.

  7. Olanzapine affects locomotor activity and meal size in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Evers, Simon S.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine is an antipsychotic drug that frequently induces weight gain accompanied by increased fat deposition as a side effect To investigate how olanzapine affects different aspects of energy balance we used male rats to determine effects on meal patterns food preference locomotor activity and

  8. Olanzapine affects locomotor activity and meal size in male rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaal, Esther M.; Luijendijk, Mieneke C. M.; Evers, Simon S.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Adan, Roger A. H.

    2010-01-01

    Olanzapine is an antipsychotic drug that frequently induces weight gain accompanied by increased fat deposition as a side effect. To investigate how olanzapine affects different aspects of energy balance, we used male rats to determine effects on meal patterns, food preference, locomotor activity

  9. LFP Oscillations in the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region during Voluntary Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R. Noga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Oscillatory rhythms in local field potentials (LFPs are thought to coherently bind cooperating neuronal ensembles to produce behaviors, including locomotion. LFPs recorded from sites that trigger locomotion have been used as a basis for identification of appropriate targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS to enhance locomotor recovery in patients with gait disorders. Theta band activity (6–12 Hz is associated with locomotor activity in locomotion-inducing sites in the hypothalamus and in the hippocampus, but the LFPs that occur in the functionally defined mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR during locomotion have not been determined. Here we record the oscillatory activity during treadmill locomotion in MLR sites effective for inducing locomotion with electrical stimulation in rats. The results show the presence of oscillatory theta rhythms in the LFPs recorded from the most effective MLR stimulus sites (at threshold ≤60 μA. Theta activity increased at the onset of locomotion, and its power was correlated with the speed of locomotion. In animals with higher thresholds (>60 μA, the correlation between locomotor speed and theta LFP oscillations was less robust. Changes in the gamma band (previously recorded in vitro in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN, thought to be a part of the MLR were relatively small. Controlled locomotion was best achieved at 10–20 Hz frequencies of MLR stimulation. Our results indicate that theta and not delta or gamma band oscillation is a suitable biomarker for identifying the functional MLR sites.

  10. Nature and Causes of Locomotor Disabilities in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Santoshi; Talukdar, Arindam

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of disability around the world is preventable. Levels of disability in many poor countries can be reduced by achieving the international development targets for economic, social and human development. In this paper, the author studied the different contributory and causative factors of locomotor disability, disease states and…

  11. Locomotor Sub-functions for Control of Assistive Wearable Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharbafi, Maziar A; Seyfarth, Andre; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-01

    A primary goal of comparative biomechanics is to understand the fundamental physics of locomotion within an evolutionary context. Such an understanding of legged locomotion results in a transition from copying nature to borrowing strategies for interacting with the physical world regarding design and control of bio-inspired legged robots or robotic assistive devices. Inspired from nature, legged locomotion can be composed of three locomotor sub-functions, which are intrinsically interrelated: Stance : redirecting the center of mass by exerting forces on the ground. Swing : cycling the legs between ground contacts. Balance : maintaining body posture. With these three sub-functions, one can understand, design and control legged locomotory systems with formulating them in simpler separated tasks. Coordination between locomotor sub-functions in a harmonized manner appears then as an additional problem when considering legged locomotion. However, biological locomotion shows that appropriate design and control of each sub-function simplifies coordination. It means that only limited exchange of sensory information between the different locomotor sub-function controllers is required enabling the envisioned modular architecture of the locomotion control system. In this paper, we present different studies on implementing different locomotor sub-function controllers on models, robots, and an exoskeleton in addition to demonstrating their abilities in explaining humans' control strategies.

  12. MRT of the locomotor system. 4. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahlensieck, Martin; Reiser, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    The book on MRT of the locomotor system covers the following topics: relevant NMT imaging techniques, spinal cord, shoulder, elbows, wrist and fingers, hip region, knee, lower leg - ankle - foot, temporomandibular joint, skeletal muscles, bone marrow, bone and soft tissue tumors, osteoporosis, sacroiliac joint, jaw and periodontium.

  13. Effects of nutmeg consumption on the open field locomotor activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... was a steady significant difference (p < 0.05) in the behaviours of line crossing and walling. There was no much significant changes (P<0.05) in the behaviours of hinding, grooming and defeacation between the Treatments and Control groups of animals. Keywords: Nutmeg, Wistar rats, Open field, Locomotor activities ...

  14. Hesperidin effects on behavior and locomotor activity of diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... after treatment of Ruta graveolens and rutin with nicotinamide/streptozotocin diabetic rats (Gispen and. Biessels, 2000). After treating with hesperidin, there was an increase in the anxiety level which improved locomotor activity and recovery time during testing in open field. The same remark was made for ...

  15. Inbreeding affects locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster at different ages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manenti, Tommaso; Pertoldi, Cino; Nasiri Moghadam, Neda

    2015-01-01

    The ability to move is essential for many behavioural traits closely related to fitness. Here we studied the effect of inbreeding on locomotor activity (LA) of Drosophila melanogaster at different ages under both dark and light regimes. We expected to find a decreased LA in inbred lines compared...

  16. Development and functional organization of spinal locomotor circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole

    2011-01-01

    that have revealed the developmental and functional organization of these fundamental spinal motor networks in limbed and non-limbed animals. The comparison will highlight common principles and divergence in the organization of the spinal locomotor network structure in these different species as well...

  17. LFP Oscillations in the Mesencephalic Locomotor Region during Voluntary Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Brian R; Sanchez, Francisco J; Villamil, Luz M; O'Toole, Christopher; Kasicki, Stefan; Olszewski, Maciej; Cabaj, Anna M; Majczyński, Henryk; Sławińska, Urszula; Jordan, Larry M

    2017-01-01

    Oscillatory rhythms in local field potentials (LFPs) are thought to coherently bind cooperating neuronal ensembles to produce behaviors, including locomotion. LFPs recorded from sites that trigger locomotion have been used as a basis for identification of appropriate targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS) to enhance locomotor recovery in patients with gait disorders. Theta band activity (6-12 Hz) is associated with locomotor activity in locomotion-inducing sites in the hypothalamus and in the hippocampus, but the LFPs that occur in the functionally defined mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) during locomotion have not been determined. Here we record the oscillatory activity during treadmill locomotion in MLR sites effective for inducing locomotion with electrical stimulation in rats. The results show the presence of oscillatory theta rhythms in the LFPs recorded from the most effective MLR stimulus sites (at threshold ≤60 μA). Theta activity increased at the onset of locomotion, and its power was correlated with the speed of locomotion. In animals with higher thresholds (>60 μA), the correlation between locomotor speed and theta LFP oscillations was less robust. Changes in the gamma band (previously recorded in vitro in the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), thought to be a part of the MLR) were relatively small. Controlled locomotion was best achieved at 10-20 Hz frequencies of MLR stimulation. Our results indicate that theta and not delta or gamma band oscillation is a suitable biomarker for identifying the functional MLR sites.

  18. A Model of Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling in Quadrupeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori,, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Briggs, Whitney S.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion and respiration are not independent phenomena in running mammals because locomotion and respiration both rely on cyclic movements of the ribs, sternum, and associated musculature. Thus, constraints are imposed on locomotor and respiratory function by virtue of their linkage. Specifically, locomotion imposes mechanical constraints on…

  19. Locomotor training as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locomotor training as part of a rehabilitation programme for patients with spinal cord injury - a case study. BM Parr, R Gamieldien, SEH Davies. Abstract. No Abstract South African Journal of Sports Medicine Vol. 20 (3) 2008: pp. 91-92. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  20. Linking the evolution of body shape and locomotor biomechanics in bird-line archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Vivian; Bates, Karl T; Li, Zhiheng; Hutchinson, John R

    2013-05-02

    Locomotion in living birds (Neornithes) has two remarkable features: feather-assisted flight, and the use of unusually crouched hindlimbs for bipedal support and movement. When and how these defining functional traits evolved remains controversial. However, the advent of computer modelling approaches and the discoveries of exceptionally preserved key specimens now make it possible to use quantitative data on whole-body morphology to address the biomechanics underlying this issue. Here we use digital body reconstructions to quantify evolutionary trends in locomotor biomechanics (whole-body proportions and centre-of-mass position) across the clade Archosauria. We use three-dimensional digital reconstruction to estimate body shape from skeletal dimensions for 17 archosaurs along the ancestral bird line, including the exceptionally preserved, feathered taxa Microraptor, Archaeopteryx, Pengornis and Yixianornis, which represent key stages in the evolution of the avian body plan. Rather than a discrete transition from more-upright postures in the basal-most birds (Avialae) and their immediate outgroup deinonychosauria, our results support hypotheses of a gradual, stepwise acquisition of more-crouched limb postures across much of theropod evolution, although we find evidence of an accelerated change within the clade Maniraptora (birds and their closest relatives, such as deinonychosaurs). In addition, whereas reduction of the tail is widely accepted to be the primary morphological factor correlated with centre-of-mass position and, hence, evolution of hindlimb posture, we instead find that enlargement of the pectoral limb and several associated trends have a much stronger influence. Intriguingly, our support for the onset of accelerated morpho-functional trends within Maniraptora is closely correlated with the evolution of flight. Because we find that the evolution of enlarged forelimbs is strongly linked, via whole-body centre of mass, to hindlimb function during

  1. The ventromedial hypothalamus oxytocin induces locomotor behavior regulated by estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Kazumi; Murata, Takuya; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that excitation of neurons in the rat ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) induced locomotor activity. An oxytocin receptor (Oxtr) exists in the VMH and plays a role in regulating sexual behavior. However, the role of Oxtr in the VMH in locomotor activity is not clear. In this study we examined the roles of oxytocin in the VMH in running behavior, and also investigated the involvement of estrogen in this behavioral change. Microinjection of oxytocin into the VMH induced a dose-dependent increase in the running behavior in male rats. The oxytocin-induced running activity was inhibited by simultaneous injection of Oxtr-antagonist, (d(CH2)5(1), Try(Me)(2), Orn(8))-oxytocin. Oxytocin injection also induced running behavior in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats. Pretreatment of the OVX rats with estrogen augmented the oxytocin-induced running activity twofold, and increased the Oxtr mRNA in the VMH threefold. During the estrus cycle locomotor activity spontaneously increased in the dark period of proestrus. The Oxtr mRNA was up-regulated in the proestrus afternoon. Blockade of oxytocin neurotransmission by its antagonist before the onset of the dark period of proestrus decreased the following nocturnal locomotor activity. These findings demonstrate that Oxtr in the VMH is involved in the induction of running behavior and that estrogen facilitates this effect by means of Oxtr up-regulation, suggesting the involvement of oxytocin in the locomotor activity of proestrus female rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stability of auditory discrimination and novelty processing in physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Alberto; Tasca, Domenica; Rundo, Francesco; Ferri, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Complex higher-order cognitive functions and their possible changes with aging are mandatory objectives of cognitive neuroscience. Event-related potentials (ERPs) allow investigators to probe the earliest stages of information processing. N100, Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are auditory ERP components that reflect automatic sensory discrimination. The aim of the present study was to determine if N100, MMN and P3a parameters are stable in healthy aged subjects, compared to those of normal young adults. Normal young adults and older participants were assessed using standardized cognitive functional instruments and their ERPs were obtained with an auditory stimulation at two different interstimulus intervals, during a passive paradigm. All individuals were within the normal range on cognitive tests. No significant differences were found for any ERP parameters obtained from the two age groups. This study shows that aging is characterized by a stability of the auditory discrimination and novelty processing. This is important for the arrangement of normative for the detection of subtle preclinical changes due to abnormal brain aging.

  3. Probing the lifetimes of auditory novelty detection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegado, Felipe; Bekinschtein, Tristan; Chausson, Nicolas; Dehaene, Stanislas; Cohen, Laurent; Naccache, Lionel

    2010-08-01

    Auditory novelty detection can be fractionated into multiple cognitive processes associated with their respective neurophysiological signatures. In the present study we used high-density scalp event-related potentials (ERPs) during an active version of the auditory oddball paradigm to explore the lifetimes of these processes by varying the stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA). We observed that early MMN (90-160 ms) decreased when the SOA increased, confirming the evanescence of this echoic memory system. Subsequent neural events including late MMN (160-220 ms) and P3a/P3b components of the P3 complex (240-500 ms) did not decay with SOA, but showed a systematic delay effect supporting a two-stage model of accumulation of evidence. On the basis of these observations, we propose a distinction within the MMN complex of two distinct events: (1) an early, pre-attentive and fast-decaying MMN associated with generators located within superior temporal gyri (STG) and frontal cortex, and (2) a late MMN more resistant to SOA, corresponding to the activation of a distributed cortical network including fronto-parietal regions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Stability of Auditory Discrimination and Novelty Processing in Physiological Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Raggi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex higher-order cognitive functions and their possible changes with aging are mandatory objectives of cognitive neuroscience. Event-related potentials (ERPs allow investigators to probe the earliest stages of information processing. N100, Mismatch negativity (MMN and P3a are auditory ERP components that reflect automatic sensory discrimination. The aim of the present study was to determine if N100, MMN and P3a parameters are stable in healthy aged subjects, compared to those of normal young adults. Normal young adults and older participants were assessed using standardized cognitive functional instruments and their ERPs were obtained with an auditory stimulation at two different interstimulus intervals, during a passive paradigm. All individuals were within the normal range on cognitive tests. No significant differences were found for any ERP parameters obtained from the two age groups. This study shows that aging is characterized by a stability of the auditory discrimination and novelty processing. This is important for the arrangement of normative for the detection of subtle preclinical changes due to abnormal brain aging.

  5. Is there still room for novelty, in histochemical papers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Pellicciari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Histochemistry continues to be widely applied in biomedical research, being nowadays mostly addressed to detect and locate single molecules or molecular complexes inside cells and tissues, and to relate structural organization and function at the high resolution of the more advanced microscopical techniques. In the attempt to see whether histochemical novelties may be found in the recent literature, the articles published in the European Journal of Histochemistry in the period 2014-2016 have been reviewed. In the majority of the published papers, standardized methods have been preferred by scientists to make their results reliably comparable with the data in the literature, but  many papers (approximately one fourth of the published articles described novel histochemical methods and procedures.  It is worth noting that there is a growing interest for minimally-invasive in vivo techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, autofluorescence spectroscopy which may parallel conventional  histochemical analyses to obtain information not only on the morphological features of living organs and tissues, but also on their functional, biophysical and molecular characteristics. Thanks to this unceasing methodological refinement, histochemistry will continue to provide innovative applications in the biomedical field.

  6. Neurocognitive determinants of novelty and sensation-seeking in individuals with alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Xavier; Brevers, Damien; Bechara, Antoine; Hanak, Catherine; Kornreich, Charles; Verbanck, Paul; Le Bon, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Sober alcoholic abusers exhibit personality traits such as novelty-seeking (NS) and sensation-seeking, which overlap to a limited extent. In parallel, they also show impaired executive and decision-making processes. However, little is known about the specific and common cognitive processes associated with NS and sensation-seeking personality traits in detoxified sober alcoholic abusers. In these present studies, we have investigated the relationships between executive functioning/central executive of working memory (pre-potent response inhibition, manipulation stored in working memory), and decision-making under uncertainty and NS/sensation-seeking traits in such alcoholics. Compared with healthy controls (n = 30, mean age = 40.2), and in agreement with previous studies, alcoholics (n = 30, mean age = 40.4) showed higher levels of both NS and sensation-seeking traits. Alcoholics were also disadvantaged with respect to (a) gambling tasks, as reported previously, and (b) a poor ability to manipulate information stored in working memory and inhibit pre-potent responses. Most importantly, regression analyses and mediation analyses measures showed that poor response inhibition and decision-making were associated with high NS behaviour. In addition, impaired decision-making and manipulation of stored information in working memory were associated with a high sensation-seeking trait. Overall, these results support the existence of specific links between cognitive executive functioning, decision-making under uncertainty and NS/sensation-seeking personality traits in individuals with alcoholism.

  7. Analysis of Indonesian Spice Essential Oil Compounds That Inhibit Locomotor Activity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Subarnas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Some fragrance components of spices used for cooking are known to have an effect on human behavior. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of the essential oils of basil (Ocimum formacitratum L. leaves, lemongrass (Cymbopogon citrates L. herbs, ki lemo (Litsea cubeba L. bark, and laja gowah (Alpinia malaccencis Roxb. rhizomes on locomotor activity in mice and identify the active component(s that might be responsible for the activity. The effect of the essential oils was studied by a wheel cage method and the active compounds of the essential oils were identified by GC/MS analysis. The essential oils were administered by inhalation at doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.5 mL/cage. The results showed that the four essential oils had inhibitory effects on locomotor activity in mice. Inhalation of the essential oils of basil leaves, lemongrass herbs, ki lemo bark, and laja gowah rhizomes showed the highest inhibitory activity at doses of 0.5 (57.64%, 0.1 (55.72%, 0.5 (60.75%, and 0.1 mL/cage (47.09%, respectively. The major volatile compounds 1,8-cineole, α-terpineol, 4-terpineol, citronelol, citronelal, and methyl cinnamate were identified in blood plasma of mice after inhalation of the four oils. These compounds had a significant inhibitory effect on locomotion after inhalation. The volatile compounds of essential oils identified in the blood plasma may correlate with the locomotor-inhibiting properties of the oil when administered by inhalation.

  8. 40 CFR 405.80 - Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy desserts...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Ice Cream, Frozen Desserts, Novelties and Other Dairy Desserts Subcategory § 405.80 Applicability; description of the ice cream, frozen desserts, novelties and other dairy... manufacture of ice cream, ice milk, sherbert, water ices, stick confections, frozen novelties products, frozen...

  9. Predictability and novelty in literal language comprehension: an ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Tristan; Coulson, Seana

    2011-10-18

    Linguists have suggested that one mechanism for the creative extension of meaning in language involves mapping, or constructing correspondences between conceptual domains. For example, the sentence, "The clever boys used a cardboard box as a boat," sets up a novel mapping between the concepts cardboard box and boat, while "His main method of transportation is a boat," relies on a more conventional mapping between method of transportation and boat. To examine the electrophysiological signature of this mapping process, electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from the scalp as healthy adults read three sorts of sentences: low-cloze (unpredictable) conventional ("His main method of transportation is a boat,"), low-cloze novel mapp'ing ("The clever boys used a cardboard box as a boat,"), and high-cloze (predictable) conventional ("The only way to get around Venice is to navigate the canals in a boat,"). Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were time-locked to sentence final words. The novel and conventional conditions were matched for cloze probability (a measure of predictability based on the sentence context), lexical association between the sentence frame and the final word (using latent semantic analysis), and other factors known to influence ERPs to language stimuli. The high-cloze conventional control condition was included to compare the effects of mapping conventionality to those of predictability. The N400 component of the ERPs was affected by predictability but not by conventionality. By contrast, a late positivity was affected both by the predictability of sentence final words, being larger for words in low-cloze contexts that made target words difficult to predict, and by novelty, as words in the novel condition elicited a larger positivity 700-900ms than the same words in the (cloze-matched) conventional condition. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M; Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Constant drive provided to the human lumbar spinal cord by epidural electrical stimulation can cause local neural circuits to generate rhythmic motor outputs to lower limb muscles in people paralysed by spinal cord injury. Epidural spinal cord stimulation thus allows the study of spinal rhythm and pattern generating circuits without their configuration by volitional motor tasks or task-specific peripheral feedback. To reveal spinal locomotor control principles, we studied the repertoire of rhythmic patterns that can be generated by the functionally isolated human lumbar spinal cord, detected as electromyographic activity from the legs, and investigated basic temporal components shared across these patterns. Ten subjects with chronic, motor-complete spinal cord injury were studied. Surface electromyographic responses to lumbar spinal cord stimulation were collected from quadriceps, hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and triceps surae in the supine position. From these data, 10-s segments of rhythmic activity present in the four muscle groups of one limb were extracted. Such samples were found in seven subjects. Physiologically adequate cycle durations and relative extension- and flexion-phase durations similar to those needed for locomotion were generated. The multi-muscle activation patterns exhibited a variety of coactivation, mixed-synergy and locomotor-like configurations. Statistical decomposition of the electromyographic data across subjects, muscles and samples of rhythmic patterns identified three common temporal components, i.e. basic or shared activation patterns. Two of these basic patterns controlled muscles to contract either synchronously or alternatingly during extension- and flexion-like phases. The third basic pattern contributed to the observed muscle activities independently from these extensor- and flexor-related basic patterns. Each bifunctional muscle group was able to express both extensor- and flexor-patterns, with variable ratios across the

  11. Social dominance in rats: effects on cocaine self-administration, novelty reactivity and dopamine receptor binding and content in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupp, Bianca; Murray, Jennifer E; Jordan, Emily R; Xia, Jing; Fluharty, Meg; Shrestha, Saurav; Robbins, Trevor W; Dalley, Jeffrey W

    2016-02-01

    Studies in human and non-human primates demonstrate that social status is an important determinant of cocaine reinforcement. However, it is unclear whether social rank is associated with other traits that also predispose to addiction and whether social status similarly predicts cocaine self-administration in rats. The objective of this study is to investigate whether social ranking assessed using a resource competition task affects (i) the acquisition, maintenance and reinstatement of cocaine self-administration; (ii) the dopaminergic markers in the striatum; and (iii) the expression of ancillary traits for addiction. Social ranking was determined in group-housed rats based upon drinking times during competition for a highly palatable liquid. Rats were then evaluated for cocaine self-administration and cue-induced drug reinstatement or individual levels of impulsivity, anxiety and novelty-induced locomotor activity. Finally, dopamine content, dopamine transporter (DAT) and dopamine D2/D3 (D2/3) receptor binding were measured postmortem in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Rats deemed socially dominant showed enhanced novelty reactivity but were neither more impulsive nor anxious compared with subordinate rats. Dominant rats additionally maintained higher rates of cocaine self-administration but showed no differences in the acquisition, extinction and reinstatement of this behaviour. D2/3 binding was elevated in the nucleus accumbens shell and dorsal striatum of dominant rats when compared to subordinate rats, and was accompanied by elevated DAT and reduced dopamine content in the nucleus accumbens shell. These findings show that social hierarchy influences the rate of self-administered cocaine but not anxiety or impulsivity in rats. Similar to non-human primates, these effects may be mediated by striatal dopaminergic systems.

  12. Usability evaluation of a locomotor therapy device considering different strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langthaler Sonja

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Usability of medical devices is one of the main determining factors in preventing use errors in treatment and strongly correlates to patient safety and quality of treatment. This thesis demonstrates the usability testing and evaluation of a prototype for locomotor therapy of infants. Therefore, based on the normative requirements of the EN 62366, a concept combined of evaluation procedures and assessing methods was created to enable extensive testing and analysis of the different aspects of usability. On the basis of gathered information weak points were identified and appropriate measures were presented to increase the usability and operating safety of the locomotor prototype. The overall outcome showed an usability value of 77.4% and an evaluation score of 6.99, which can be interpreted as “satisfactory”.

  13. Trastornos psicosomáticos en el aparato locomotor

    OpenAIRE

    Carabias Huete, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Se abordan los trastornos psicosomáticos que atañen al aparato locomotor. Se analizan los factores psicológicos que pueden hacer más vulnerables a algunos sujetos frente a otros. Se exponen también algunos estudios a este respecto, describiendo los trastornos concretos para pasar después a cómo explican los diferentes modelos teóricos estos trastornos, proponiendo algunas intervenciones que parecen eficaces

  14. Locomotor therapy with extended-release crystalline glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasilyevich Badokin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical glucocorticoid (GC therapy for locomotor diseases is an extremely important component of a comprehensive program to treat inflammatory and, to a lesser extent, degenerative diseases. It reduces the time of hospitalization by 5—10 days in this category of patients, has a prompt and potent anti-inflammatory effect, and shows predictable efficiency. This therapy shows good tolerability and high safety and prevents serious adverse reactions to GC treatment.

  15. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance

    OpenAIRE

    Askew, Graham N.; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E.

    2011-01-01

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined...

  16. Comparing novelty of designs from biological-inspiration with those from brainstorming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keshwani, Sonal; Lenau, Torben Anker; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to understand the significance of biological-analogies in fostering novelty by comparing biological-analogies with other design methods for idea generation. Among other design methods, brainstorming was chosen here as benchmark. Four studies were conducted to compare: (i) the l...... reasons behind the results. The results demonstrate that the design methods substantially influence the novelty of concepts generated, while indicating the need for better training in effective use of biological-analogies.......This research aims to understand the significance of biological-analogies in fostering novelty by comparing biological-analogies with other design methods for idea generation. Among other design methods, brainstorming was chosen here as benchmark. Four studies were conducted to compare: (i......) the levels of abstraction at which concepts were ideated using biological inspiration (represented using biocards) with that using traditional brainstorming; and (ii) the novelty of concepts produced by using these two design methods. Concepts produced in these studies were evaluated for levels...

  17. Novelty Detection Classifiers in Weed Mapping: Silybum marianum Detection on UAV Multispectral Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, Thomas K; Tamouridou, Afroditi Alexandra; Pantazi, Xanthoula Eirini; Lagopodi, Anastasia L; Kashefi, Javid; Ovakoglou, Georgios; Polychronos, Vassilios; Moshou, Dimitrios

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, the detection and mapping of Silybum marianum (L.) Gaertn. weed using novelty detection classifiers is reported. A multispectral camera (green-red-NIR) on board a fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) was employed for obtaining high-resolution images. Four novelty detection classifiers were used to identify S. marianum between other vegetation in a field. The classifiers were One Class Support Vector Machine (OC-SVM), One Class Self-Organizing Maps (OC-SOM), Autoencoders and One Class Principal Component Analysis (OC-PCA). As input features to the novelty detection classifiers, the three spectral bands and texture were used. The S. marianum identification accuracy using OC-SVM reached an overall accuracy of 96%. The results show the feasibility of effective S. marianum mapping by means of novelty detection classifiers acting on multispectral UAV imagery.

  18. Fluctuation-Driven Neural Dynamics Reproduce Drosophila Locomotor Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maesani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The neural mechanisms determining the timing of even simple actions, such as when to walk or rest, are largely mysterious. One intriguing, but untested, hypothesis posits a role for ongoing activity fluctuations in neurons of central action selection circuits that drive animal behavior from moment to moment. To examine how fluctuating activity can contribute to action timing, we paired high-resolution measurements of freely walking Drosophila melanogaster with data-driven neural network modeling and dynamical systems analysis. We generated fluctuation-driven network models whose outputs-locomotor bouts-matched those measured from sensory-deprived Drosophila. From these models, we identified those that could also reproduce a second, unrelated dataset: the complex time-course of odor-evoked walking for genetically diverse Drosophila strains. Dynamical models that best reproduced both Drosophila basal and odor-evoked locomotor patterns exhibited specific characteristics. First, ongoing fluctuations were required. In a stochastic resonance-like manner, these fluctuations allowed neural activity to escape stable equilibria and to exceed a threshold for locomotion. Second, odor-induced shifts of equilibria in these models caused a depression in locomotor frequency following olfactory stimulation. Our models predict that activity fluctuations in action selection circuits cause behavioral output to more closely match sensory drive and may therefore enhance navigation in complex sensory environments. Together these data reveal how simple neural dynamics, when coupled with activity fluctuations, can give rise to complex patterns of animal behavior.

  19. The influence of age on learning a locomotor task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hedel, H J A; Dietz, V

    2004-09-01

    Knowledge about locomotor task performance and learning in the elderly is important in optimizing rehabilitation strategies. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between young and elderly subjects in the acquisition and performance of a precision locomotor task, with full and restricted vision. The subjects walked on a treadmill and had to step as low as possible over an obstacle, without touching it. They received acoustic warning and feedback signals, indicating obstacle appearance and foot clearance, respectively. Full vision was provided during the first two runs and became restricted during the third run. The number of obstacle hits and adaptations in foot clearance, leg muscle activity, range of motion of leg joints and swing phase duration were assessed. With vision, the performance improved in both groups. Restricted vision reduced the task accuracy in both the young and the elderly. However, only the young subjects regained optimal foot clearance with practice. Elderly subjects rely more on visual control when acquiring and performing a precision locomotor task. We suggest that this is due to an impaired function of proprioceptive feedback mechanisms, which can replace visual information in young subjects. In the elderly, therapeutical attention should be directed towards optimizing the use of the remaining proprioceptive inputs.

  20. Morphological correlates of locomotor performance in hatchling Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Donald B; Fitzgerald, Lee A; Snell, Howard L

    1995-08-01

    Previous studies of locomotor performance from a variety of perspectives often assumed that speed and limb length were strongly correlated. Despite support of this assumption from biomechanical models, few empirical studies have demonstrated a significant relationship between measures of locomotor capacity, such as maximum velocity, and length of the hindlimb at either the inter- or intra-specific level. We examined whether one measure of locomotor performance, maximum velocity, correlates with body size and elements of the hindlimb in hatchling marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Larger hatchlings ran faster. Removing the effects of body size revealed that relative lengths of the tibia and hindfoot correlated with size-adjusted maximum velocity. Individuals with relatively long tibia and short pes were relatively faster than individuals with short tibia and long pes. Functional morphological analyses predict that femur length should correlate with maximum velocity. However, our analyses failed to support this prediction. Because hatchling marine iguanas exploit relatively open habitats, the relationship between maximum velocity and limb morphology may be interpreted as an adaptation enhancing escape from predators.

  1. Neural plasticity and locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, Keith E

    2010-12-01

    The discussion of neural plasticity and locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) focuses on 2 main themes, the issues associated with detecting neural plasticity in human beings and the issue of how to translate information from animal models, in which neural plasticity can be more readily studied, to human clinical research and application. This article discusses the importance of studying neural plasticity to better understand the effects of current rehabilitation interventions and to devise the next generation of therapies. It reviews the current spectrum of clinical, functional, anatomical, and neurophysiological assessments of patients that can be made in neurorehabilitation and the relationship between those measures and the study of neural plasticity. Then the similarities and differences between animal models and human SCI are discussed in relation to the severity of injury, the effect of locomotor training on gait recovery, the localization of neural plasticity associated with that gait recovery, and the implications for interpreting the "translatability" of animal model data to human study and clinical practice. In summary, it is concluded that the study of neural plasticity and locomotor recovery after SCI is really in its infancy but that it is critical for the advancement of the science of neurorehabilitation and "restorative neurology." Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of electrolytic lesion of the dorsomedial striatum on sexual behaviour and locomotor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Pulido, R; Hernández-Briones, Z S; Tamariz-Rodríguez, A; Hernández, M E; Aranda-Abreu, G E; Coria-Avila, G A; Manzo, J; García, L I

    2017-06-01

    Cortical motor areas are influenced not only by peripheral sensory afferents and prefrontal association areas, but also by the basal ganglia, specifically the striatum. The dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and dorsolateral striatum are involved in both spatial and stimulus-response learning; however, each of these areas may mediate different components of learning. The aim of the study is to determine the effect of electrolytic lesion to the DMS on the learning and performance of sexual behaviour and locomotor activity in male rats. Once the subjects had learned to perform motor tests of balance, maze navigation, ramp ascent, and sexual behaviour, they underwent electrolytic lesion to the DMS. Five days later, the tests were repeated on 2 occasions and researchers compared performance latencies for each test. Average latency values for performance on the maze and balance tests were higher after the lesion. However, the average values for the ramp test and for sexual behaviour did not differ between groups. Electrolytic lesion of the DMS modifies the performance of locomotor activity (maze test and balance), but not of sexual behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Radioprotection, locomotor activity and consummatory behavior of mice administered synthetic trehalose dimycolate (S-TDM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McChesney, D.G.; Landauer, M.R.; Davis, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    The biological response modifier, S-TDM, administered in doses of 100, 200, 400 and 800 ug/mouse 24 hours before a LD80/30 dose (5.6 Gy at 0.4 Gy-MLT/minute) of radiation (neutron:gamma double-bond 1) resulted in survival of 100%, 60%, 89% and 20% respectively. Because of the radioprotective efficacy of this immunomodulator, the behavioral effects of S-TDM were investigated. Locomotor activity, food intake, water consumption, and body weight were examined using female B6D2F1 mice. At doses of 100-400 ug/mouse locomotor activity decreased within 4 hours of administration and returned to control values by 2.5 days postinjection. Food and water intake were significantly depressed at doses of 100, 200, and 400 ug/mouse on the day following drug administration and recovered in 1 day. Body weight was significantly decreased in the 100 and 200 ug/mouse groups for 2 days and in the 400 ug/mouse for 3 days following injection of S-TDM. These results indicate that there is short-term reversible toxicity in mice administered S-TDM at doses of 100, 200, and 400 ug/mouse

  4. Rhythmic arm swing enhances patterned locomotor-like muscle activity in passively moved lower extremities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tetsuya; Sato, Takahiko; Ogata, Toru; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    The use of driven gait orthosis (DGO) has drawn attention in gait rehabilitation for patients after central nervous system (CNS) lesions. By imposing a passive locomotor-like kinematic pattern, the neural mechanisms responsible for locomotion can be activated as in a normal gait. To further enhance this activity, discussions on possible intervention are necessary. Given the possible functional linkages between the upper and lower limbs, we investigated in healthy subjects the degree of modification in the lower limb muscles during DGO-induced passive gait by the addition of swing movement in the upper extremity. The results clearly showed that muscle activity in the ankle dorsiflexor TA muscle was significantly enhanced when the passive locomotor-like movement was accompanied by arm swing movement. The modifications in the TA activity were not a general increase through the stride cycles, but were observed under particular phases as in normal gaits. Voluntary effort to swing the arms may have certain effects on the modification of the muscle activity. The results provide clinical implications regarding the usefulness of voluntary arm swing movement as a possible intervention in passive gait training using DGO, since ordinary gait training using DGO does not induce spontaneous arm swing movement despite its known influence on the lower limb movement. PMID:25742956

  5. S-adenosylmethionine modifies cocaine-induced DNA methylation and increases locomotor sensitization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anier, Kaili; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Kalda, Anti

    2013-10-01

    Several studies suggest that individual variability is a critical component underlying drug addiction as not all members of a population who use addictive substance become addicted. There is evidence that the overall epigenetic status of a cell (epigenome) can be modulated by a variety of environmental factors, such as nutrients and chemicals. Based on these data, our aim was to investigate whether environmental factors like S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) via affecting epigenome could alter cocaine-induced gene expression and locomotor sensitization in mice. Our results demonstrate that repeated SAM (10 mm/kg) pretreatment significantly potentiated cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Using mouse nucleus accumbens (NAc) tissue, whole-genome gene expression profiling revealed that repeated SAM treatment affected a limited number of genes, but significantly modified cocaine-induced gene expression by blunting non-specifically the cocaine response. At the gene level, we discovered that SAM modulated cocaine-induced DNA methylation by inhibiting both promoter-associated CpG-island hyper- and hypomethylation in the NAc but not in the reference tissue cerebellum. Finally, our in vitro and in vivo data show that the modulating effect of SAM is in part due to decreased methyltransferase activity via down-regulation of Dnmt3a mRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that environmental factors that affect the NAc-cell epigenome may alter the development of psychostimulant-induced addiction and this may explain, at least partly, why some individuals are more vulnerable to drug addiction.

  6. Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Modulates the Locomotor and Sensitization Effects of Nicotine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Sukhanov

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 has emerged as a promising target for addiction treatments because it affects dopamine transmission in the mesolimbic pathway. TAAR1 is involved in the effects of addictive drugs, such as amphetamines, cocaine and ethanol, but the impact of TAAR1 on the effects of nicotine, the psychoactive drug responsible for the development and maintenance of tobacco smoking, has not yet been studied. This study was performed to investigate the possible modulatory action of TAAR1 on the effects of nicotine on locomotor behaviors in rats and mice. Pretreatment with the TAAR1 agonist RO5263397 dose-dependently decreased nicotine-induced hyperlocomotion in rats habituated to locomotor boxes, prevented the development of nicotine sensitization and blocked hypermotility in nicotine-sensitized rats at the highest tested dose (10 mg/kg. The lack of TAAR1 failed to affect the effects of nicotine on the locomotion of mutant mice. Based on the results of the present study, TAAR1 activation attenuates the locomotion-stimulating effects of nicotine on rats. These results further support the previously proposed hypothesis that TAAR1 is a promising target for the prevention and treatment of drug addiction. Further studies aimed at analyzing the effects of TAAR1 agonists on animal models of nicotine addiction are warranted.

  7. Mice Lacking EGR1 Have Impaired Clock Gene (BMAL1) Oscillation, Locomotor Activity, and Body Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Casper Schwartz; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Hannibal, Jens; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Early growth response transcription factor 1 (EGR1) is expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) after light stimulation. We used EGR1-deficient mice to address the role of EGR1 in the clock function and light-induced resetting of the clock. The diurnal rhythms of expression of the clock genes BMAL1 and PER1 in the SCN were evaluated by semi-quantitative in situ hybridization. We found no difference in the expression of PER1 mRNA between wildtype and EGR1-deficient mice; however, the daily rhythm of BMAL1 mRNA was completely abolished in the EGR1-deficient mice. In addition, we evaluated the circadian running wheel activity, telemetric locomotor activity, and core body temperature of the mice. Loss of EGR1 neither altered light-induced phase shifts at subjective night nor affected negative masking. Overall, circadian light entrainment was found in EGR1-deficient mice but they displayed a reduced locomotor activity and an altered temperature regulation compared to wild type mice. When placed in running wheels, a subpopulation of EGR1-deficient mice displayed a more disrupted activity rhythm with no measurable endogenous period length (tau). In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence that the circadian clock in the SCN is disturbed in mice deficient of EGR1.

  8. Polycose Taste Pre-Exposure Fails to Influence Behavioral and Neural Indices of Taste Novelty

    OpenAIRE

    Barot, Sabiha K.; Bernstein, Ilene L.

    2005-01-01

    Taste novelty can strongly modulate the speed and efficacy of taste aversion learning. Novel sweet tastes enhance c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in the central amygdala and insular cortex. The present studies examined whether this neural correlate of novelty extends to different taste types by measuring FLI signals after exposure to novel and familiar polysaccharide (Polycose®) and salt (NaCl) tastes. Novel Polycose not only failed to elevate FLI expression in central amygdala and insular ...

  9. Association of novelty-related behaviors and intravenous cocaine self-administration in Diversity Outbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Price E; Ndukum, Juliet; Wilcox, Troy; Clark, James; Roy, Brittany; Zhang, Lifeng; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting; Chesler, Elissa J

    2015-03-01

    The preference for and reaction to novelty are strongly associated with addiction to cocaine and other drugs. However, the genetic variants and molecular mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain largely unknown. Although the relationship between novelty- and addiction-related traits has been observed in rats, studies in mice have failed to demonstrate this association. New, genetically diverse, high-precision mouse populations including Diversity Outbred (DO) mice provide an opportunity to assess an expanded range of behavioral variation enabling detection of associations of novelty- and addiction-related traits in mice. To examine the relationship between novelty- and addiction-related traits, male (n = 51) and female (n = 47) DO mice were tested on open field exploration, hole board exploration, and novelty preference followed by intravenous cocaine self-administration (IVSA; ten 2-h sessions of fixed ratio 1 and one 6-h session of progressive ratio). We observed high variation of cocaine IVSA in DO mice with 43 % reaching and 57 % not reaching conventional acquisition criteria. As a group, mice that did not reach these criteria still demonstrated significant lever discrimination. Mice experiencing catheter occlusion or other technical issues (n = 17) were excluded from the analysis. Novelty-related behaviors were positively associated with cocaine IVSA. Multivariate analysis of associations among novelty- and addiction-related traits revealed a large degree of shared variance (45 %). Covariation among cocaine IVSA and novelty-related phenotypes in DO mice indicates that this relationship is amenable to genetic dissection. The high genetic precision and phenotypic diversity in the DO may facilitate discovery of previously undetectable mechanisms underlying predisposition to develop addiction disorders.

  10. Sensory-evoked perturbations of locomotor activity by sparse sensory input: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tuan V; Brownstone, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    Sensory inputs from muscle, cutaneous, and joint afferents project to the spinal cord, where they are able to affect ongoing locomotor activity. Activation of sensory input can initiate or prolong bouts of locomotor activity depending on the identity of the sensory afferent activated and the timing of the activation within the locomotor cycle. However, the mechanisms by which afferent activity modifies locomotor rhythm and the distribution of sensory afferents to the spinal locomotor networks have not been determined. Considering the many sources of sensory inputs to the spinal cord, determining this distribution would provide insights into how sensory inputs are integrated to adjust ongoing locomotor activity. We asked whether a sparsely distributed set of sensory inputs could modify ongoing locomotor activity. To address this question, several computational models of locomotor central pattern generators (CPGs) that were mechanistically diverse and generated locomotor-like rhythmic activity were developed. We show that sensory inputs restricted to a small subset of the network neurons can perturb locomotor activity in the same manner as seen experimentally. Furthermore, we show that an architecture with sparse sensory input improves the capacity to gate sensory information by selectively modulating sensory channels. These data demonstrate that sensory input to rhythm-generating networks need not be extensively distributed. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Locomotor Behavior of Chickens Anticipating Incline Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal LeBlanc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Keel bone damage (KBD is prevalent in hens raised for egg production, and ramps between different tiers in aviaries have potential to reduce the frequency of falls resulting in KBD. Effective use of ramps requires modulation of locomotion in anticipation of the incline. Inadequate adaptive locomotion may be one explanation why domestic layer hens (Gallus gallus domesticus exhibit high rates of KBD. To improve understanding of the capacity of hens to modulate their locomotion in anticipation of climbing, we measured the effects of incline angle upon the mechanics of the preparatory step before ascending a ramp. Because the energetic challenge of climbing increases with slope, we predicted that as angle of incline increased, birds during foot contact with the ground before starting to climb would increase their peak force and duration of contact and reduce variation in center of pressure (COP under their foot. We tested 20 female domestic chickens on ramp inclines at slopes of +0°, +40°, and +70° when birds were 17, 21, 26, 31, and 36 weeks of age. There were significantly higher vertical peak ground reaction forces in preparation at the steepest slope, and ground contact time increased significantly with each increase in ramp angle. Effects upon variation in COP were not apparent; likewise, effects of limb length, age, body mass were not significant. Our results reveal that domestic chickens are capable of modulating their locomotion in response to incline angle.

  12. Behaviour, heart rate, and heart rate variability in pigs exposed to novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manja Zupan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present study, we investigated behavioural responses and determined parameters of heart rate variability (HRV to elucidate a relative activation of autonomic nervous system (ANS during baseline (10 min and in response to potentially stressful situations (10 min in two pig breeds and sexes. Gilts (n = 21 and barrows (n = 9 of the Landrace × Yorkshire (LY; n = 15 and Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc (LYLD; n = 15 breeds were subjected to a novel object test (NOT and a novel arena test (NAT. Basal ANS state differed in pigs across breeds but not sexes. Landrace × Yorkshire pigs had a significantly lower basal heart rate (HR and low-frequency band (LF with a higher root mean square of successive interbeat intervals (RMSSD and high-frequency band (HF than LYLD pigs. In the NOT, despite having similar cardiac responses, gilts had a longer duration of contact with a novel object, higher lying and standing duration, and a lower duration of walking compared with barrows. In the NAT, we found similar behaviour across sexes but a different degree of ANS state, with barrows having a significantly higher increase in LF/HF (power of the low frequency component divided by the power of the high-frequency band compared with gilts. Landrace/Yorkshire × Landrace/Duroc pigs showed longer duration of contact with a novel object in the NOT accompanied by less lying and standing than LY pigs in both tests. No difference in ANS activation between breeds was found in the NOT. In the NAT, HR increased more from baseline to testing in LY pigs than in LYLD pigs. There is a complex and often contradictory nature of relationships between behaviour and cardiac responses to novelty in pigs of different breeds and sexes.

  13. Loss of Sphingosine Kinase Alters Life History Traits and Locomotor Function inCaenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jason P; Brown, Jaylene; Hark, Brandon; Nolan, Abby; Servello, Dustin; Hrobuchak, Hannah; Staab, Trisha A

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism is important to balance the abundance of bioactive lipid molecules involved in cell signaling, neuronal function, and survival. Specifically, the sphingolipid sphingosine mediates cell death signaling, whereas its phosphorylated form, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), mediates cell survival signaling. The enzyme sphingosine kinase produces S1P, and the activity of sphingosine kinase impacts the ability of cells to survive under stress and challenges. To examine the influence of sphingolipid metabolism, particularly enzymes regulating sphingosine and S1P, in mediating aging, neuronal function and stress response, we examined life history traits, locomotor capacities and heat stress responses of young and old animals using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans . We found that C. elegans sphk-1 mutants, which lack sphingosine kinase, had shorter lifespans, reduced brood sizes, and smaller body sizes compared to wild type animals. By analyzing a panel of young and old animals with genetic mutations in the sphingolipid signaling pathway, we showed that aged sphk-1 mutants exhibited a greater decline in neuromuscular function and locomotor behavior. In addition, aged animals lacking sphk-1 were more susceptible to death induced by acute and prolonged heat exposure. On the other hand, older animals with loss of function mutations in ceramide synthase ( hyl-1 ), which converts sphingosine to ceramide, showed improved neuromuscular function and stress response with age. This phenotype was dependent on sphk-1 . Together, our data show that loss of sphingosine kinase contributes to poor animal health span, suggesting that sphingolipid signaling may be important for healthy neuronal function and animal stress response during aging.

  14. Loss of Sphingosine Kinase Alters Life History Traits and Locomotor Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Chan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sphingolipid metabolism is important to balance the abundance of bioactive lipid molecules involved in cell signaling, neuronal function, and survival. Specifically, the sphingolipid sphingosine mediates cell death signaling, whereas its phosphorylated form, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P, mediates cell survival signaling. The enzyme sphingosine kinase produces S1P, and the activity of sphingosine kinase impacts the ability of cells to survive under stress and challenges. To examine the influence of sphingolipid metabolism, particularly enzymes regulating sphingosine and S1P, in mediating aging, neuronal function and stress response, we examined life history traits, locomotor capacities and heat stress responses of young and old animals using the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that C. elegans sphk-1 mutants, which lack sphingosine kinase, had shorter lifespans, reduced brood sizes, and smaller body sizes compared to wild type animals. By analyzing a panel of young and old animals with genetic mutations in the sphingolipid signaling pathway, we showed that aged sphk-1 mutants exhibited a greater decline in neuromuscular function and locomotor behavior. In addition, aged animals lacking sphk-1 were more susceptible to death induced by acute and prolonged heat exposure. On the other hand, older animals with loss of function mutations in ceramide synthase (hyl-1, which converts sphingosine to ceramide, showed improved neuromuscular function and stress response with age. This phenotype was dependent on sphk-1. Together, our data show that loss of sphingosine kinase contributes to poor animal health span, suggesting that sphingolipid signaling may be important for healthy neuronal function and animal stress response during aging.

  15. Modality-specific, multitask locomotor deficits persist despite good recovery after a traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadyen, Bradford J; Cantin, Jean-François; Swaine, Bonnie; Duchesneau, Guylaine; Doyon, Julien; Dumas, Denyse; Fait, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    To study the effects of sensory modality of simultaneous tasks during walking with and without obstacles after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Group comparison study. Gait analysis laboratory within a postacute rehabilitation facility. Volunteer sample (N=18). Persons with moderate to severe TBI (n=11) (9 men, 3 women; age, 37.56+/-13.79 y) and a comparison group (n=7) of subjects without neurologic problems matched on average for body mass index and age (4 men, 3 women; age, 39.19+/-17.35 y). Not applicable. Magnitudes and variability for walking speeds, foot clearance margins (ratio of foot clearance distance to obstacle height), and response reaction times (both direct and as a relative cost because of obstacle avoidance). The TBI group had well-recovered walking speeds and a general ability to avoid obstacles. However, these subjects did show lower trail limb toe clearances (P=.003) across all conditions. Response reaction times to the Stroop tasks were longer in general for the TBI group (P=.017), and this group showed significant increases in response reaction times for the visual modality within the more challenging obstacle avoidance task that was not observed for control subjects. A measure of multitask costs related to differences in response reaction times between obstructed and unobstructed trials also only showed increased attention costs for the visual over the auditory stimuli for the TBI group (P=.002). Mobility is a complex construct, and the present results provide preliminary findings that, even after good locomotor recovery, subjects with moderate to severe TBI show residual locomotor deficits in multitasking. Furthermore, our results suggest that sensory modality is important, and greater multitask costs occur during sensory competition (ie, visual interference).

  16. Suppression of Locomotor Activity in Female C57Bl/6J Mice Treated with Interleukin-1β: Investigating a Method for the Study of Fatigue in Laboratory Animals.

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    David R Bonsall

    Full Text Available Fatigue is a disabling symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's Disease, and is also common in patients with traumatic brain injury, cancer, and inflammatory disorders. Little is known about the neurobiology of fatigue, in part due to the lack of an approach to induce fatigue in laboratory animals. Fatigue is a common response to systemic challenge by pathogens, a response in part mediated through action of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β. We investigated the behavioral responses of mice to IL-1β. Female C57Bl/6J mice of 3 ages were administered IL-1β at various doses i.p. Interleukin-1β reduced locomotor activity, and sensitivity increased with age. Further experiments were conducted with middle-aged females. Centrally administered IL-1β dose-dependently reduced locomotor activity. Using doses of IL-1β that caused suppression of locomotor activity, we measured minimal signs of sickness, such as hyperthermia, pain or anhedonia (as measured with abdominal temperature probes, pre-treatment with the analgesic buprenorphine and through sucrose preference, respectively, all of which are responses commonly reported with higher doses. We found that middle-aged orexin-/- mice showed equivalent effects of IL-1β on locomotor activity as seen in wild-type controls, suggesting that orexins are not necessary for IL-1β -induced reductions in wheel-running. Given that the availability and success of therapeutic treatments for fatigue is currently limited, we examined the effectiveness of two potential clinical treatments, modafinil and methylphenidate. We found that these treatments were variably successful in restoring locomotor activity after IL-1β administration. This provides one step toward development of a satisfactory animal model of the multidimensional experience of fatigue, a model that could allow us to determine possible pathways through which inflammation induces fatigue, and could lead to novel

  17. Early life seizures in female rats lead to anxiety-related behavior and abnormal social behavior characterized by reduced motivation to novelty and deficit in social discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelhano, Adelisandra Silva Santos; Ramos, Fabiane Ochai; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cysneiros, Roberta Monterazzo

    2015-03-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that male Wistar rats submitted to neonatal status epilepticus showed abnormal social behavior characterized by deficit in social discrimination and enhanced emotionality. Taking into account that early insult can produce different biological manifestations in a gender-dependent manner, we aimed to investigate the social behavior and anxiety-like behavior in female Wistar rats following early life seizures. Neonate female Wistar rats at 9 days postnatal were subject to pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and the control received saline. Behavioral tests started from 60 days postnatal and were carried out only during the diestrus phase of the reproductive cycle. In sociability test experimental animals exhibited reduced motivation for social encounter and deficit in social discrimination. In open field and the elevated plus maze, experimental animals showed enhanced emotionality with no changes in basal locomotor activity. The results showed that female rats submitted to neonatal status epipepticus showed impaired social behavior, characterized by reduced motivation to novelty and deficit in social discrimination in addition to enhanced emotionality.

  18. Daily rhythms of locomotor and demand-feeding activities in Schizothorax pelzami (Kessler, 1870).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ehsan; Kamrani, Ehsan; Heydarnejad, Mohammad Saeed; Safari, Omid

    2017-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate the daily rhythms of locomotor and feeding activity of Khajoo, Schizothorax pelzami, a candidate species for freshwater aquaculture. Using self-feeder juvenile Khajoo were exposed to a 12/12 LD cycle to determine the rhythms of locomotor and feeding activity. The effects of feeding on locomotor and feeding activity of fish were also examined. Finally, the endogenous rhythmicity under different lighting condition tested. Fish displayed a strictly diurnal feeding and locomotor activities with 98% and 84% of the total activity occurred in the photophase, respectively. In scheduled feeding, both the L-group (fed in light) and the D-group (fed in the dark) showed a diurnal locomotor activity pattern. However, the L-group had a peak of locomotor activity near the feeding time, but the D-group had a scarce locomotor activity in the scatophase with no significant change at the mealtime. Most of the individuals display free-running rhythms when exposed to different lighting condition including, constant darkness, ultradian 45:45 min LD cycle and reversed DL photo cycle. Taken together the results of this study showed that both locomotor and feeding activity have diurnal rhythms in Khajoo S. pelzami, even fish feeding had taken place at night. Additionally, the free-running locomotor activity of the fish in the absence of external light stimuli, suggests the existence of an endogenous timing mechanism in this fish species.

  19. Separating acoustic deviance from novelty during the first year of life: A review of event related potential evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Kushnerenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Orienting to salient events in the environment is a first step in the development of attention in young infants. Electrophysiological studies have indicated that in newborns and young infants, sounds with widely distributed spectral energy, such as noise and various environmental sounds, as well as sounds widely deviating from their context elicit an event related potential (ERP similar to the adult P3a response. We discuss how the maturation of event-related potentials parallels the process of the development of passive auditory attention during the first year of life. Behavioural studies have indicated that the neonatal orientation to high energy stimuli gradually changes to attending to genuine novelty and other significant events by approximately 9 months of age. In accordance with these changes, in newborns, the ERP response to large acoustic deviance is dramatically larger than that to small and moderate deviations. This ERP difference, however, rapidly decreases within first months of life and the differentiation of the ERP response to genuine novelty from that to spectrally rich but repeatedly presented sounds commences during the same period. The relative decrease of the response amplitudes elicited by high energy stimuli may reflect development of an inhibitory brain network suppressing the processing of uninformative stimuli. Based on data obtained from healthy full term and pre term infants as well as from infants at risk for various developmental problems, we suggest that the electrophysiological indices of the processing of acoustic and contextual deviance may be indicative of the functioning of auditory attention, a crucial prerequisite of learning and language development.

  20. Separating acoustic deviance from novelty during the first year of life: a review of event-related potential evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnerenko, Elena V.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.; Winkler, István

    2013-01-01

    Orienting to salient events in the environment is a first step in the development of attention in young infants. Electrophysiological studies have indicated that in newborns and young infants, sounds with widely distributed spectral energy, such as noise and various environmental sounds, as well as sounds widely deviating from their context elicit an event-related potential (ERP) similar to the adult P3a response. We discuss how the maturation of event-related potentials parallels the process of the development of passive auditory attention during the first year of life. Behavioral studies have indicated that the neonatal orientation to high-energy stimuli gradually changes to attending to genuine novelty and other significant events by approximately 9 months of age. In accordance with these changes, in newborns, the ERP response to large acoustic deviance is dramatically larger than that to small and moderate deviations. This ERP difference, however, rapidly decreases within first months of life and the differentiation of the ERP response to genuine novelty from that to spectrally rich but repeatedly presented sounds commences during the same period. The relative decrease of the response amplitudes elicited by high-energy stimuli may reflect development of an inhibitory brain network suppressing the processing of uninformative stimuli. Based on data obtained from healthy full-term and pre-term infants as well as from infants at risk for various developmental problems, we suggest that the electrophysiological indices of the processing of acoustic and contextual deviance may be indicative of the functioning of auditory attention, a crucial prerequisite of learning and language development. PMID:24046757

  1. Sound stabilizes locomotor-respiratory coupling and reduces energy cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles P Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A natural synchronization between locomotor and respiratory systems is known to exist for various species and various forms of locomotion. This Locomotor-Respiratory Coupling (LRC is fundamental for the energy transfer between the two subsystems during long duration exercise and originates from mechanical and neurological interactions. Different methodologies have been used to compute LRC, giving rise to various and often diverging results in terms of synchronization, (de-stabilization via information, and associated energy cost. In this article, the theory of nonlinear-coupled oscillators was adopted to characterize LRC, through the model of the sine circle map, and tested it in the context of cycling. Our specific focus was the sound-induced stabilization of LRC and its associated change in energy consumption. In our experimental study, participants were instructed during a cycling exercise to synchronize either their respiration or their pedaling rate with an external auditory stimulus whose rhythm corresponded to their individual preferential breathing or cycling frequencies. Results showed a significant reduction in energy expenditure with auditory stimulation, accompanied by a stabilization of LRC. The sound-induced effect was asymmetrical, with a better stabilizing influence of the metronome on the locomotor system than on the respiratory system. A modification of the respiratory frequency was indeed observed when participants cycled in synchrony with the tone, leading to a transition toward more stable frequency ratios as predicted by the sine circle map. In addition to the classical mechanical and neurological origins of LRC, here we demonstrated using the sine circle map model that information plays an important modulatory role of the synchronization, and has global energetic consequences.

  2. Locomotor-Like Leg Movements Evoked by Rhythmic Arm Movements in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylos-Labini, Francesca; Ivanenko, Yuri P.; MacLellan, Michael J.; Cappellini, Germana; Poppele, Richard E.; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG) activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs. PMID:24608249

  3. Locomotor-like leg movements evoked by rhythmic arm movements in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Sylos-Labini

    Full Text Available Motion of the upper limbs is often coupled to that of the lower limbs in human bipedal locomotion. It is unclear, however, whether the functional coupling between upper and lower limbs is bi-directional, i.e. whether arm movements can affect the lumbosacral locomotor circuitry. Here we tested the effects of voluntary rhythmic arm movements on the lower limbs. Participants lay horizontally on their side with each leg suspended in an unloading exoskeleton. They moved their arms on an overhead treadmill as if they walked on their hands. Hand-walking in the antero-posterior direction resulted in significant locomotor-like movements of the legs in 58% of the participants. We further investigated quantitatively the responses in a subset of the responsive subjects. We found that the electromyographic (EMG activity of proximal leg muscles was modulated over each cycle with a timing similar to that of normal locomotion. The frequency of kinematic and EMG oscillations in the legs typically differed from that of arm oscillations. The effect of hand-walking was direction specific since medio-lateral arm movements did not evoke appreciably leg air-stepping. Using externally imposed trunk movements and biomechanical modelling, we ruled out that the leg movements associated with hand-walking were mainly due to the mechanical transmission of trunk oscillations. EMG activity in hamstring muscles associated with hand-walking often continued when the leg movements were transiently blocked by the experimenter or following the termination of arm movements. The present results reinforce the idea that there exists a functional neural coupling between arm and legs.

  4. Persistence of locomotor-related interlimb reflex networks during walking after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, E Paul; Loadman, Pamela M

    2012-04-01

    Cutaneous nerve stimulation evokes coordinated and phase-modulated reflex output widely distributed to muscles of all four limbs during walking. Accessibility to this distributed network after stroke offers insight into the pathological changes and suggests utility for therapeutic applications. Here we examined muscles in both the more (MA) and less affected (LA) legs evoked by stimulation at the ankle and wrist during walking in chronic (>6 months post CVA) stroke. Stroke and control participants walked on a treadmill with a harness support system. Reflexes were evoked with trains of electrical stimuli delivered separately to the cutaneous superficial peroneal (SP; at the ankle) and superficial radial (SR; at the wrist) nerves. Background locomotor and reflex EMG were phase-averaged across the gait cycle and analyzed off line. Locomotor background muscle activation patterns were altered bilaterally in stroke, as compared with control. Phase-dependent modulation of interlimb cutaneous reflexes was found in both stroke and control subjects with stimulation of each nerve, but responses were blunted in stroke. Reflex reversal in tibialis anterior (TA) at heel strike with SP nerve stimulation was present in both groups. Notably, SR nerve stimulation produced facilitation during the swing-to-stance transition in the TA and suppression of MG in the MA leg during stance. Interlimb cutaneous inputs may access coordinated reflex pathways in the MA limb during walking after stroke. Importantly activation in these pathways could provoke responses to counter foot drop during swing phase of walking. Additionally, our data support the perspective that there is no "unaffected" side after stroke and that caution should be used when interpreting the LA side as "control" after stroke. The presence of functionally-relevant interlimb cutaneous reflexes in the MA leg presents a substrate that may be strengthened by rehabilitation. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical

  5. Optimizing learning of a locomotor task: amplifying errors as needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; López-Olóriz, Jorge; Jaeger, Lukas; Riener, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Research on motor learning has emphasized that errors drive motor adaptation. Thereby, several researchers have proposed robotic training strategies that amplify movement errors rather than decrease them. In this study, the effect of different robotic training strategies that amplify errors on learning a complex locomotor task was investigated. The experiment was conducted with a one degree-of freedom robotic stepper (MARCOS). Subjects were requested to actively coordinate their legs in a desired gait-like pattern in order to track a Lissajous figure presented on a visual display. Learning with three different training strategies was evaluated: (i) No perturbation: the robot follows the subjects' movement without applying any perturbation, (ii) Error amplification: existing errors were amplified with repulsive forces proportional to errors, (iii) Noise disturbance: errors were evoked with a randomly-varying force disturbance. Results showed that training without perturbations was especially suitable for a subset of initially less-skilled subjects, while error amplification seemed to benefit more skilled subjects. Training with error amplification, however, limited transfer of learning. Random disturbing forces benefited learning and promoted transfer in all subjects, probably because it increased attention. These results suggest that learning a locomotor task can be optimized when errors are randomly evoked or amplified based on subjects' initial skill level.

  6. Running behavior and its energy cost in mice selectively bred for high voluntary locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Enrico L; Gomes, Fernando R; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Locomotion is central to behavior and intrinsic to many fitness-critical activities (e.g., migration, foraging), and it competes with other life-history components for energy. However, detailed analyses of how changes in locomotor activity and running behavior affect energy budgets are scarce. We quantified these effects in four replicate lines of house mice that have been selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running (S lines) and in their four nonselected control lines (C lines). We monitored wheel speeds and oxygen consumption for 24-48 h to determine daily energy expenditure (DEE), resting metabolic rate (RMR), locomotor costs, and running behavior (bout characteristics). Daily running distances increased roughly 50%-90% in S lines in response to selection. After we controlled for body mass effects, selection resulted in a 23% increase in DEE in males and a 6% increase in females. Total activity costs (DEE - RMR) accounted for 50%-60% of DEE in both S and C lines and were 29% higher in S males and 5% higher in S females compared with their C counterparts. Energetic costs of increased daily running distances differed between sexes because S females evolved higher running distances by running faster with little change in time spent running, while S males also spent 40% more time running than C males. This increase in time spent running impinged on high energy costs because the majority of running costs stemmed from "postural costs" (the difference between RMR and the zero-speed intercept of the speed vs. metabolic rate relationship). No statistical differences in these traits were detected between S and C females, suggesting that large changes in locomotor behavior do not necessarily effect overall energy budgets. Running behavior also differed between sexes: within S lines, males ran with more but shorter bouts than females. Our results indicate that selection effects on energy budgets can differ dramatically between sexes and that energetic constraints in S

  7. Effects of noradrenaline on locomotor rhythm-generating networks in the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, O; Sillar, K T; Kjaerulff, O

    1999-01-01

    , the addition of NA to the NMDA/5-HT saline could reinstate a well-coordinated locomotor rhythm. We conclude that exogenously applied NA can elicit tonic activity or can trigger a slow, irregular and often synchronous motor pattern. When NA is applied during ongoing locomotor activity, the amine has a distinct...

  8. Locomotor problems among rural elderly population in a District of Aligarh, North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroof, Mohd; Ahmad, Anees; Khalique, Najam; Ansari, M Athar

    2017-01-01

    Locomotor functions decline with the age along with other physiological changes. This results in deterioration of the quality of life with decreased social and economic role in the society, as well as increased dependency, for the health care and other basic services. The demographic transition resulting in increased proportion of elderly may pose a burden to the health system. To find the prevalence of locomotor problems among the elderly population, and related sociodemographic factors. The study was a community-based cross-sectional study done at field practice area of Rural Health Training Centre, JN Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India. A sample of 225 was drawn from 1018 elderly population aged 60 years and above using systematic random sampling with probability proportionate to size. Sociodemographic characteristics were obtained using pretested and predesigned questionnaire. Locomotor problems were assessed using the criteria used by National Sample Survey Organization. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Chi-square test was used to test relationship of locomotor problems with sociodemographic factors. P <0.05 was considered statistically significant. The prevalence of locomotor problems among the elderly population was 25.8%. Locomotor problems were significantly associated with age, gender, and working status whereas no significant association with literacy status and marital status was observed. The study concluded that approximately one-fourth of the elderly population suffered from locomotor problems. The sociodemographic factors related to locomotor problems needs to be addressed properly to help them lead an independent and economically productive life.

  9. Adenosine kinase inhibitors: polar 7-substitutent of pyridopyrimidine derivatives improving their locomotor selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guo Zhu; Mao, Yue; Lee, Chih-Hung; Pratt, John K; Koenig, John R; Perner, Richard J; Cowart, Marlon D; Gfesser, Gregory A; McGaraughty, Steve; Chu, Katharine L; Zhu, Chang; Yu, Haixia; Kohlhaas, Kathy; Alexander, Karen M; Wismer, Carol T; Mikusa, Joseph; Jarvis, Michael F; Kowaluk, Elizabeth A; Stewart, Andrew O

    2003-09-15

    We have discovered that polar 7-substituents of pyridopyrimidine derivatives affect not only whole cell AK inhibitory potency, but also selectivity in causing locomotor side effects in vivo animal models. We have identified compound, 1o, which has potent whole cell AK inhibitory potency, analgesic activity and minimal reduction of locomotor activity.

  10. Stress affects theta activity in limbic networks and impairs novelty-induced exploration and familiarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis eJacinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to a novel environment triggers the response of several brain areas that regulate emotional behaviors. Here, we studied theta oscillations within the hippocampus (HPC-amygdala (AMY-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC network in exploration of a novel environment and subsequent familiarization through repeated exposures to that same environment; in addition, we assessed how concomitant stress exposure could disrupt this activity and impair both behavioral processes. Local field potentials were simultaneously recorded from dorsal and ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC respectively, basolateral amygdala (BLA and mPFC in freely behaving rats while they were exposed to a novel environment, then repeatedly re-exposed over the course of 3 weeks to that same environment and, finally, on re-exposure to a novel unfamiliar environment. A longitudinal analysis of theta activity within this circuit revealed a reduction of vHPC and BLA theta power and vHPC-BLA theta coherence through familiarization which was correlated with a return to normal exploratory behavior in control rats. In contrast, a persistent over-activation of the same brain regions was observed in stressed rats that displayed impairments in novel exploration and familiarization processes. Importantly, we show that stress also affected intra-hippocampal synchrony and heightened the coherence between vHPC and BLA. In summary, we demonstrate that modulatory theta activity in the aforementioned circuit, namely in the vHPC and BLA, is correlated with the expression of anxiety in novelty-induced exploration and familiarization in both normal and pathological conditions.

  11. Scientists versus Regulators: Precaution, Novelty & Regulatory Oversight as Predictors of Perceived Risks of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudrie, Christian E. H.; Satterfield, Terre; Kandlikar, Milind; Harthorn, Barbara H.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanoscale materials (ENMs) present a difficult challenge for risk assessors and regulators. Continuing uncertainty about the potential risks of ENMs means that expert opinion will play an important role in the design of policies to minimize harmful implications while supporting innovation. This research aims to shed light on the views of ‘nano experts’ to understand which nanomaterials or applications are regarded as more risky than others, to characterize the differences in risk perceptions between expert groups, and to evaluate the factors that drive these perceptions. Our analysis draws from a web-survey (N = 404) of three groups of US and Canadian experts: nano-scientists and engineers, nano-environmental health and safety scientists, and regulatory scientists and decision-makers. Significant differences in risk perceptions were found across expert groups; differences found to be driven by underlying attitudes and perceptions characteristic of each group. Nano-scientists and engineers at the upstream end of the nanomaterial life cycle perceived the lowest levels of risk, while those who are responsible for assessing and regulating risks at the downstream end perceived the greatest risk. Perceived novelty of nanomaterial risks, differing preferences for regulation (i.e. the use of precaution versus voluntary or market-based approaches), and perceptions of the risk of technologies in general predicted variation in experts' judgments of nanotechnology risks. Our findings underscore the importance of involving a diverse selection of experts, particularly those with expertise at different stages along the nanomaterial lifecycle, during policy development. PMID:25222742

  12. Locomotor circumvention strategies are altered by stroke: I. Obstacle clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darekar, Anuja; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2017-06-15

    Functional locomotion requires the ability to adapt to environmental challenges such as the presence of stationary or moving obstacles. Difficulties in obstacle circumvention often lead to restricted community ambulation in individuals with stroke. The objective of this study was to contrast obstacle circumvention strategies between post-stroke (n = 12) and healthy individuals (n = 12) performing locomotor and perceptuomotor (joystick navigation) tasks with different obstacle approaches. Participants walked and navigated with a joystick towards a central target, in a virtual environment simulating a large room, while avoiding an obstacle that either remained stationary at the pre-determined point of intersection or moved from head-on or diagonally 30° left/right. The outcome measures included dynamic clearance (DC), instantaneous distance from obstacle at crossing (IDC), number of collisions and preferred side of circumvention. These measures were compared between groups (stroke vs. healthy), obstacle parameter (stationary vs. moving head-on) and direction of approach (left/paretic vs. right/non-paretic). DC was significantly larger when circumventing a moving obstacle that approached head-on as compared to a stationary obstacle for both groups during both tasks, while not significantly different in either diagonal approach in either group. IDC was smaller in the stroke group while walking and larger in both groups during joystick navigation when avoiding moving as compared to stationary obstacle. IDC was significantly larger in the stroke group compared to controls for diagonal approaches during walking, wherein two different strategies emerged amongst individuals with stroke: circumventing to the same (V same n = 6) or opposite (V opp n = 4) side of obstacle approach. This behavior was not seen in the perceptuomotor task, wherein post-stroke participants circumvented to opposite side of the obstacle approach as seen in healthy participants. In the

  13. A Multiposture Locomotor Training Device with Force-Field Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Sui

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a multiposture locomotor training device (MPLTD with a closed-loop control scheme based on joint angle feedback, which is able to overcome various difficulties resulting from mechanical vibration and the weight of trainer to achieve higher accuracy trajectory. By introducing the force-field control scheme used in the closed-loop control, the device can obtain the active-constrained mode including the passive one. The MPLTD is mainly composed of three systems: posture adjusting and weight support system, lower limb exoskeleton system, and control system, of which the lower limb exoskeleton system mainly includes the indifferent equilibrium mechanism with two degrees of freedom (DOF and the driving torque is calculated by the Lagrangian function. In addition, a series of experiments, the weight support and the trajectory accuracy experiment, demonstrate a good performance of mechanical structure and the closed-loop control.

  14. Future Land-Use Changes and the Potential for Novelty in Ecosystems of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian Martinuzzi; Gregorio I. Gavier-Pizarro; Ariel E. Lugo; Volker C. Radeloff

    2015-01-01

    Rapid global changes due to changing land use, climate, and non-native species are altering environmental conditions, resulting in more novel communities with unprecedented species combinations. Understanding how future anthropogenic changes may affect novelty in ecosystems is important to advance environmental management and ecological research in the Anthropocene....

  15. Appearance of the Moss-Harlow Effect with Stimuli Equated for Novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, David P.; Cross, Henry A.

    1976-01-01

    An experiment tested for the Moss Harlow Effect in 3- and 5-year-olds with stimulus novelty equated. Experimental groups familiarized themselves with each pair of test objects by sorting them, then received a P or N information trial and test trials. (JH)

  16. Novelties in the genus Persicaria (Polygonaceae) in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funez, Luís A.; Hassemer, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    This work presents novelties in the genus Persicaria in Brazil. More specifically, we describe P. sylvestris, a new species from the Atlantic rainforest in subtropical Brazil, propose the new combination P. diospyrifolium and designate a lectotype for its basionym, Polygonum diospyrifolium. The new...

  17. Novelty detection-based internal fingerprint segmentation in optical coherence tomography images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khutlang, Rethabile

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available and rejection classes. Using a mixture of Gaussian's novelty detection routine on images pre-processed with a regularized anisotropic diffusion filter, the papillary contours—internal fingerprints—are consistent with those segmented manually, with the modified...

  18. Autonomous visual exploration creates developmental change in familiarity and novelty seeking behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy ePerone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available What motivates children to radically transform themselves during early development? We addressed this question in the domain of infant visual exploration. Over the first year, infants’ exploration shifts from familiarity to novelty seeking. This shift is delayed in preterm relative to term infants and is stable within individuals over the course of the first year. Laboratory tasks have shed light on the nature of this familiarity-to-novelty shift, but it is not clear what motivates the infant to change her exploratory style. We probed this by letting a Dynamic Neural Field (DNF model of visual exploration develop itself via accumulating experience in a virtual world. We then situated it in a canonical laboratory task. Much like infants, the model exhibited a familiarity-to-novelty shift. When we manipulated the initial conditions of the model, the model’s performance was developmentally delayed much like preterm infants. This delay was overcome by enhancing the model’s experience during development. We also found that the model’s performance was stable at the level of the individual. Our simulations indicate that novelty seeking emerges with no explicit motivational source via the accumulation of visual experience within a complex, dynamical exploratory system.

  19. Wood staining fungi revealed taxonomic novelties in Pezizomycotina : New order Superstratomycetales and new species Cyanodermella oleoligni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, E. J.; Miadlikowska, J M; Houbraken, J. A. M. P.; Adan, Olaf C G; Lutzoni, F M; Samson, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    A culture-based survey of staining fungi on oil-treated timber after outdoor exposure in Australia and the Netherlands uncovered new taxa in Pezizomycotina. Their taxonomic novelty was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses of multi-locus sequences (ITS, nrSSU, nrLSU, mitSSU, RPB1, RPB2, and EF-1α)

  20. Neural synchrony indexes impaired motor slowing after errors and novelty following white matter damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessel, J.R.; Ullsperger, M.; Obrig, H.; Villringer, A.; Quinque, E.M.; Schroeter, M.L.; Bretschneider, K.J.; Arelin, K.; Roggenhofer, E.; Frisch, S.; Klein, T.A.

    2016-01-01

    In humans, action errors and perceptual novelty elicit activity in a shared frontostriatal brain network, allowing them to adapt their ongoing behavior to such unexpected action outcomes. Healthy and pathologic aging reduces the integrity of white matter pathways that connect individual hubs of such

  1. Vibration-Based Adaptive Novelty Detection Method for Monitoring Faults in a Kinematic Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Adolfo Cariño-Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an adaptive novelty detection methodology applied to a kinematic chain for the monitoring of faults. The proposed approach has the premise that only information of the healthy operation of the machine is initially available and fault scenarios will eventually develop. This approach aims to cover some of the challenges presented when condition monitoring is applied under a continuous learning framework. The structure of the method is divided into two recursive stages: first, an offline stage for initialization and retraining of the feature reduction and novelty detection modules and, second, an online monitoring stage to continuously assess the condition of the machine. Contrary to classical static feature reduction approaches, the proposed method reformulates the features by employing first a Laplacian Score ranking and then the Fisher Score ranking for retraining. The proposed methodology is validated experimentally by monitoring the vibration measurements of a kinematic chain driven by an induction motor. Two faults are induced in the motor to validate the method performance to detect anomalies and adapt the feature reduction and novelty detection modules to the new information. The obtained results show the advantages of employing an adaptive approach for novelty detection and feature reduction making the proposed method suitable for industrial machinery diagnosis applications.

  2. Immature spinal locomotor output in children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Cappellini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Detailed descriptions of gait impairments have been reported in cerebral palsy (CP, but it is still unclear how maturation of the spinal motoneuron output is affected. Spatiotemporal alpha-motoneuron activation during walking can be assessed by mapping the electromyographic activity profiles from several, simultaneously recorded muscles onto the anatomical rostrocaudal location of the motoneuron pools in the spinal cord, and by means of factor analysis of the muscle activity profiles. Here, we analysed gait kinematics and EMG activity of 11 pairs of bilateral muscles with lumbosacral innervation in 35 children with CP (19 diplegic, 16 hemiplegic, 2-12 years and 33 typically developing (TD children (1-12 years. TD children showed a progressive reduction of EMG burst durations and a gradual reorganization of the spatiotemporal motoneuron output with increasing age. By contrast, children with CP showed very limited age-related changes of EMG durations and motoneuron output, as well as of limb intersegmental coordination and foot trajectory control (on both sides for diplegic children and the affected side for hemiplegic children. Factorization of the EMG signals revealed a comparable structure of the motor output in children with CP and TD children, but significantly wider temporal activation patterns in children with CP, resembling the patterns of much younger TD infants. A similar picture emerged when considering the spatiotemporal maps of alpha-motoneuron activation. Overall, the results are consistent with the idea that early injuries to developing motor regions of the brain substantially affect the maturation of the spinal locomotor output and consequently the future locomotor behaviour.

  3. Novel locomotor muscle design in extreme deep-diving whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, B P; Dillaman, R M; Kinsey, S T; McLellan, W A; Pabst, D A

    2013-05-15

    Most marine mammals are hypothesized to routinely dive within their aerobic dive limit (ADL). Mammals that regularly perform deep, long-duration dives have locomotor muscles with elevated myoglobin concentrations that are composed of predominantly large, slow-twitch (Type I) fibers with low mitochondrial volume densities (V(mt)). These features contribute to extending ADL by increasing oxygen stores and decreasing metabolic rate. Recent tagging studies, however, have challenged the view that two groups of extreme deep-diving cetaceans dive within their ADLs. Beaked whales (including Ziphius cavirostris and Mesoplodon densirostris) routinely perform the deepest and longest average dives of any air-breathing vertebrate, and short-finned pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) perform high-speed sprints at depth. We investigated the locomotor muscle morphology and estimated total body oxygen stores of several species within these two groups of cetaceans to determine whether they (1) shared muscle design features with other deep divers and (2) performed dives within their calculated ADLs. Muscle of both cetaceans displayed high myoglobin concentrations and large fibers, as predicted, but novel fiber profiles for diving mammals. Beaked whales possessed a sprinter's fiber-type profile, composed of ~80% fast-twitch (Type II) fibers with low V(mt). Approximately one-third of the muscle fibers of short-finned pilot whales were slow-twitch, oxidative, glycolytic fibers, a rare fiber type for any mammal. The muscle morphology of beaked whales likely decreases the energetic cost of diving, while that of short-finned pilot whales supports high activity events. Calculated ADLs indicate that, at low metabolic rates, both beaked and short-finned pilot whales carry sufficient onboard oxygen to aerobically support their dives.

  4. Exploring the Relation between the Degree of Novelty of Innovations and User-producer Interaction across Different Income Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harirchi, Gouya; Chaminade, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    -level data, this paper explores how collaboration with users in different income regions affects the degree of innovations’ novelty. We find that collaborating with international users is positively related to higher degrees of novelty. Furthermore, firms in low- and middle income countries will benefit more...

  5. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noer, Christina Lehmkuhl; Needham, Esther Kjær; Wiese, Ann-Sophie; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison), which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts) and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts). Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality traits.

  6. Context Matters: Multiple Novelty Tests Reveal Different Aspects of Shyness-Boldness in Farmed American Mink (Neovison vison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Lehmkuhl Noer

    Full Text Available Animal personality research is receiving increasing interest from related fields, such as evolutionary personality psychology. By merging the conceptual understanding of personality, the contributions to both fields of research may be enhanced. In this study, we investigate animal personality based on the definition of personality traits as underlying dispositional factors, which are not directly measurable, but which predispose individuals to react through different behavioural patterns. We investigated the shyness-boldness continuum reflected in the consistency of inter-individual variation in behavioural responses towards novelty in 47 farmed American mink (Neovison vison, which were raised in identical housing conditions. Different stages of approach behaviour towards novelty, and how these related within and across contexts, were explored. Our experimental design contained four tests: two novel object tests (non-social contexts and two novel animated stimuli tests (social contexts. Our results showed consistency in shyness measures across multiple tests, indicating the existence of personality in farmed American mink. It was found that consistency in shyness measures differs across non-social and social contexts, as well as across the various stages in the approach towards novel objects, revealing that different aspects of shyness exist in the farmed American mink. To our knowledge this is the first study to reveal aspects of the shyness-boldness continuum in the American mink. Since the mink were raised in identical housing conditions, inherited factors may have been important in shaping the consistent inter-individual variation. Body weight and sex had no effect on the personality of the mink. Altogether, our results suggest that the shyness-boldness continuum cannot be explained by a simple underlying dispositional factor, but instead encompasses a broader term of hesitating behaviour that might comprise several different personality

  7. Effect of age and severity of cognitive dysfunction on spontaneous activity in pet dogs - part 1: locomotor and exploratory behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, B; González-Martínez, A; Pesini, P; García-Belenguer, S; Palacio, J; Villegas, A; Suárez, M-L; Santamarina, G; Sarasa, M

    2012-11-01

    Age-related cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS) has been reported in dogs and it is considered a natural model for Alzheimer's disease in humans. Changes in spontaneous activity (including locomotor and exploratory behaviour) and social responsiveness have been related to the age and cognitive status of kennel-reared Beagle dogs. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of age and severity of CDS on locomotor and exploratory behaviour of privately owned dogs. This is the first part of a two-part report on spontaneous activity in pet dogs. An open-field (OF) test and a curiosity test were administered at baseline and 6 months later to young (1-4 years, n=9), middle-aged (5-8 years, n=9), cognitively unimpaired aged (≥ 9 years, n=31), and cognitively impaired aged ( ≥ 9 years, n=36) animals. Classification of cognitive status was carried out using an owner-based observational questionnaire, and in the cognitively impaired group, the dogs were categorised as having either mild or severe cognitive impairment. Dogs were recorded during sessions in the testing room and the video-recordings were subsequently analysed. The severity of CDS (but not age) influenced locomotion and exploratory behaviour so that the more severe the impairment, the higher the locomotor activity and frequency of corner-directed (aimless) behaviours, and the lower the frequency of door-aimed activities. Curiosity directed toward novel stimuli exhibited an age-dependent decline although severely affected animals displayed more sniffing episodes directed towards the objects. OF activity did not change after 6 months. Testing aged pet dogs for spontaneous behaviour might help to better characterise cognitively affected individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of Kappa Opioid Receptor Potentiation of Dopamine D2 Receptor Function in Quinpirole-Induced Locomotor Sensitization in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Angélica P; González, Marcela P; Meza, Rodrigo C; Noches, Verónica; Henny, Pablo; Gysling, Katia; España, Rodrigo A; Fuentealba, José A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased locomotor activity in response to the same stimulus is an index of behavioral sensitization observed in preclinical models of drug addiction and compulsive behaviors. Repeated administration of quinpirole, a D2/D3 dopamine agonist, induces locomotor sensitization. This effect is potentiated and accelerated by co-administration of U69593, a kappa opioid receptor agonist. The mechanism underlying kappa opioid receptor potentiation of quinpirole-induced locomotor sensitization remains to be elucidated. Methods Immunofluorescence anatomical studies were undertaken in mice brain slices and rat presynaptic synaptosomes to reveal kappa opioid receptor and D2R pre- and postsynaptic colocalization in the nucleus accumbens. Tonic and phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of rats repeatedly treated with U69593 and quinpirole was assessed by microdialysis and fast scan cyclic voltammetry. Results Anatomical data show that kappa opioid receptor and D2R colocalize postsynaptically in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens and the highest presynaptic colocalization occurs on the same dopamine terminals. Significantly reduced dopamine levels were observed in quinpirole, and U69593-quinpirole treated rats, explaining sensitization of D2R. Presynaptic inhibition induced by kappa opioid receptor and D2R of electrically evoked dopamine release was faster in U69593-quinpirole compared with quinpirole-repeatedly treated rats. Conclusions Pre- and postsynaptic colocalization of kappa opioid receptor and D2R supports a role for kappa opioid receptor potentiating both the D2R inhibitory autoreceptor function and the inhibitory action of D2R on efferent medium spiny neurons. Kappa opioid receptor co-activation accelerates D2R sensitization by contributing to decrease dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:28531297

  9. Gender-specific alteration of energy balance and circadian locomotor activity in the Crtc1 knockout mouse model of depression

    KAUST Repository

    Rossetti, Clara

    2017-12-06

    Obesity and depression are major public health concerns, and there is increasing evidence that they share etiological mechanisms. CREB-regulated transcription coactivator 1 (CRTC1) participates in neurobiological pathways involved in both mood and energy balance regulation. Crtc1 -/- mice rapidly develop a depressive-like and obese phenotype in early adulthood, and are therefore a relevant animal model to explore possible common mechanisms underlying mood disorders and obesity. Here, the obese phenotype of male and female Crtc1 -/- mice was further characterized by investigating CRTC1\\'s role in the homeostatic and hedonic regulation of food intake, as well as its influence on daily locomotor activity. Crtc1 -/- mice showed a strong gender difference in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance. Mutant males were hyperphagic and rapidly developed obesity on normal chow diet, whereas Crtc1 -/- females exhibited mild late-onset obesity without hyperphagia. Overeating of mutant males was accompanied by alterations in the expression of several orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic genes, thus confirming a key role of CRTC1 in the central regulation of food intake. No alteration in preference and conditioned response for saccharine was observed in Crtc1 -/- mice, suggesting that mutant males\\' hyperphagia was not due to an altered hedonic regulation of food intake. Intriguingly, mutant males exhibited a hyperphagic behavior only during the resting (diurnal) phase of the light cycle. This abnormal feeding behavior was associated with a higher diurnal locomotor activity indicating that the lack of CRTC1 may affect circadian rhythmicity. Collectively, these findings highlight the male-specific involvement of CRTC1 in the central control of energy balance and circadian locomotor activity.

  10. Involvement of dopamine receptors on locomotor stimulation and sensitization elicited by the interaction of ethanol and mazindol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaerd, M S; Takahashi, R N

    1999-07-01

    We have previously observed that the combination of ethanol (EtOH) and the anorectic drug mazindol (MZ) produces more marked effects on behavior than either substance alone. In the present study we examined whether the repeated administration of the drug combination could induce sensitization to its motor activating effects in mice and, if so, whether this response could be affected by dopamine (DA) receptors antagonists. Male Swiss albino mice were treated daily for 7 days with combined EtOH+MZ (1.2 g/kg, 5.0 mg/kg IP), EtOH (1.2 g/kg IP), MZ (5.0 mg/kg IP), or control solution coadministered with the D1 dopamine antagonist SCH-23390 (0.025 or 0.05 mg/kg IP), the mixed dopamine antagonist haloperidol (0.05 or 0.075 mg/kg IP), or vehicle. After the injections on days 1, 7, and 10, mice were assessed in activity cages at different time intervals. Repeated administration of MZ resulted in an enhancement of its locomotor activating effects, behavioral sensitization. Further, the combined EtOH+MZ treatment also resulted in sensitization to its locomotor effects. Moreover, the development of MZ and EtOH+MZ sensitization was attenuated by both SCH-23390 and haloperidol. These data demonstrate that following repeated MZ or EtOH+MZ exposure mice show locomotor sensitization through DA receptor stimulation. Also, these findings suggest that a major determinant of combined anorectic-alcohol misuse may be the increased stimulating effects produced by such combination.

  11. The effects of noradrenaline on locomotor rhythm generating networks in the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Sillar, Keith T.; Kjaerulff, O.

    1999-01-01

    activity of the ongoing rhythm. Moreover, NA did not obviously affect the left/right and rostrocaudal alternation of the NMDA/5-HT rhythm. The NMDA/5-HT locomotor rhythm sometimes displayed a time-dependent breakdown in coordination, ultimately resulting in tonic ventral root activity. However......, the addition of NA to the NMDA/5-HT saline could reinstate a well-coordinated locomotor rhythm. We conclude that exogenously applied NA can elicit tonic activity or can trigger a slow, irregular and often synchronous motor pattern. When NA is applied during ongoing locomotor activity, the amine has a distinct...

  12. [The influence of non-invasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord on the locomotor function of patients presenting with movement disorders of central genesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balykin, M V; Yakupov, R N; Mashin, V V; Kotova, E Yu; Balykin, Yu M; Gerasimenko, Yu P

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of non-invasive (transcutaneous) electrical spinal cord stimulation on the locomotor function of the patients suffering from movement disorders. The study involved 10 patients of both sexes at the age from 32 to 70 years (including 40% of men and 60% of women) presenting with the compromised locomotor function of varying severity associated with the disturbances of cerebral blood circulation caused either by an injury to the brain and spinal cord or by stroke. The transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation was applied using different frequency regimes with the placement of the electrodes in the projection onto the region of TXI-TXII vertebrae. The active factors were bipolar electrical stimuli 0.5 ms in duration; the current strength was chosen for each patient on an individual basis taking into consideration its threshold level. Electromyograms and evoked motor responses of selected muscles, viz. m. rectus femoris, m.biceps femoris, m. tibialis anterior, and m.gastrocnemius were recorded with the use of the 'Neuro-MVP-8 eight-channel electromyography' ('Neurosoft', Russia). The data obtained give evidence that the stimulation of the spinal cord with a frequency of 1 Hz induces reflectory responses with monosynaptic and polysynaptic components in the muscles of the lower extremities, with the thresholds of these responses being significantly higher in the patients presenting with serious neurological problems. Stimulation with the frequencies of 5 and 30 Hz caused in the patients with paresis the involuntary movement of the legs the characteristics of which were similar to those of the locomotor movements. It has been demonstrated that the application of transcutaneous electrical spinal cord stimulation leads to increased excitability of the lumbar spinal neural structures of the patients. The study has shown the possibility of regulation of the locomotor functions in the patients presenting

  13. Locomotor behavior in mice following exposure to fission-neutron irradiation and trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landauer, M.R.; Ledney, G.D.; Davis, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    Locomotor activity, body weights, and food and water consumption were monitored in female mice for 35 d following a sublethal wound (W), burn (B), exposure to 3 Gray fission neutron radiation (R), or combination of these injuries: radiation-wound (RW) and radiation-burn (RB). Activity in groups W and RW was depressed immediately after injury, with recovery to control levels after 5 and 14 d, respectively. Mice that received radiation alone showed a biphasic response with decrements in activity on days 0-4 and 9-11. Groups B and RB exhibited depressed activity levels that differed significantly from control levels until day 17. Food intake was reduced for about 6 d in groups R, W, RW, and RB. Body weights decreased for 4 d in groups R, W, RW, and RB, but returned to control levels by the end of the experiment. Animals in group B did not show significant reduction in food intake or body weight. Water consumption was reduced for 5-6 d in groups R and RB and was increased in groups W, RW, and B. The data suggest that behavioral responses to fission-neutron radiation are exacerbated by tissue trauma

  14. Is there a relation between novelty seeking, striatal dopamine release and frontal cortical thickness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Jaworska

    Full Text Available Novelty-seeking (NS and impulsive personality traits have been proposed to reflect an interplay between fronto-cortical and limbic systems, including the limbic striatum (LS. Although neuroimaging studies have provided some evidence for this, most are comprised of small samples and many report surprisingly large effects given the challenges of trying to relate a snapshot of brain function or structure to an entity as complex as personality. The current work tested a priori hypotheses about associations between striatal dopamine (DA release, cortical thickness (CT, and NS in a large sample of healthy adults.Fifty-two healthy adults (45M/7F; age: 23.8±4.93 underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [11C]raclopride (specific for striatal DA D2/3 receptors with or without amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg, p.o.. Structural magnetic resonance image scans were acquired, as were Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data. Amphetamine-induced changes in [11C]raclopride binding potential values (ΔBPND were examined in the limbic, sensorimotor (SMS and associative (AST striatum. CT measures, adjusted for whole brain volume, were extracted from the dorsolateral sensorimotor and ventromedial/limbic cortices.BPND values were lower in the amphetamine vs. no-drug sessions, with the largest effect in the LS. When comparing low vs. high LS ΔBPND groups (median split, higher NS2 (impulsiveness scores were found in the high ΔBPND group. Partial correlations (age and gender as covariates yielded a negative relation between ASTS ΔBPND and sensorimotor CT; trends for inverse associations existed between ΔBPND values in other striatal regions and frontal CT. In other words, the greater the amphetamine-induced striatal DA response, the thinner the frontal cortex.These data expand upon previously reported associations between striatal DA release in the LS and both NS related impulsiveness and CT in the largest sample reported to date. The findings add to the

  15. Habitual short sleep impacts frontal switch mechanism in attention to novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumenyuk, Valentina; Roth, Thomas; Korzyukov, Oleg; Jefferson, Catherine; Bowyer, Susan; Drake, Christopher L

    2011-12-01

    Reduced time in bed relative to biological sleep need is common. The impact of habitual short sleep on auditory attention has not been studied to date. In the current study, we utilized novelty oddball tasks to evaluate the effect of habitual short sleep on brain function underlying attention control processes measured by the mismatch negativity (MMN, index of pre-attentive stage), P3a (attention-dependent), and P3b (memory-dependent) event related brain potentials (ERPs). An extended time in bed in a separate study was used to evaluate the possible reversal of the impairments of these processes in habitual short sleepers. Ten self-defined short sleepers (total sleep time [TST] ≤ 6 h) and 9 normal-sleeping subjects with TST 7-8 h, participated. ERPs were recorded via a 64-channel EEG system. Two test conditions: "ignore" and "attend" were implemented. The ERPs were analyzed and compared between groups on the 2 task conditions and frontal/central/parietal electrodes by 3-factor ANOVA. Sleep diary data were compared between groups by t-test. Sleep was recorded by the Zeo sleep monitoring system for a week in both habitual and extended sleep conditions at home. The main findings of the present study show that short sleeping individuals had deficiency in activity of the MMN and P3a brain responses over frontal areas compared to normal-sleeping subjects. The P3b amplitude was increased over frontal areas and decreased over parietal with respect to the control group. Extension of time in bed for one week increased TST (from 5.7 h to 7.4 h), and concomitantly MMN amplitude increased from -0.1 μV up to -1.25 μV over frontal areas. Reduced time in bed is associated with deficiency of the neuronal process associated with change detection, which may recover after one week of sleep extension, whereas attention-dependent neural processes do not normalize after this period of time in habitually short sleeping individuals and may require longer recovery periods.

  16. The glucagon-like peptide 1 analogue Exendin-4 attenuates the nicotine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release, conditioned place preference as well as the expression of locomotor sensitization in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil Egecioglu

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal peptide glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is known to regulate consummatory behavior and is released in response to nutrient ingestion. Analogues of this peptide recently emerged as novel pharmacotherapies for treatment of type II diabetes since they reduce gastric emptying, glucagon secretion as well as enhance glucose-dependent insulin secretion. The findings that GLP-1 targets reward related areas including mesolimbic dopamine areas indicate that the physiological role of GLP-1 extends beyond food intake and glucose homeostasis control to include reward regulation. The present series of experiments was therefore designed to investigate the effects of the GLP-1 receptor agonist, Exendin-4 (Ex4, on established nicotine-induced effects on the mesolimbic dopamine system in mice. Specifically, we show that treatment with Ex4, at a dose with no effect per se, attenuate nicotine-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release as well as the expression of conditioned place preference in mice. In accordance, Ex4 also blocks nicotine-induced expression of locomotor sensitization in mice. Given that development of nicotine addiction largely depends on the effects of nicotine on the mesolimbic dopamine system these findings indicate that the GLP-1 receptor may be a potential target for the development of novel treatment strategies for nicotine cessations in humans.

  17. Comparative limb proportions reveal differential locomotor morphofunctions of alligatoroids and crocodyloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Masaya; Kubo, Tai; Kobayashi, Yoshitsugu

    2018-03-01

    Although two major clades of crocodylians (Alligatoroidea and Crocodyloidea) were split during the Cretaceous period, relatively few morphological and functional differences between them have been known. In addition, interaction of multiple morphofunctional systems that differentiated their ecology has barely been assessed. In this study, we examined the limb proportions of crocodylians to infer the differences of locomotor functions between alligatoroids and crocodyloids, and tested the correlation of locomotor and feeding morphofunctions. Our analyses revealed crocodyloids including Gavialis have longer stylopodia (humerus and femur) than alligatoroids, indicating that two groups may differ in locomotor functions. Fossil evidence suggested that alligatoroids have retained short stylopodia since the early stage of their evolution. Furthermore, rostral shape, an indicator of trophic function, is correlated with limb proportions, where slender-snouted piscivorous taxa have relatively long stylopodia and short overall limbs. In combination, trophic and locomotor functions might differently delimit the ecological opportunity of alligatoroids and crocodyloids in the evolution of crocodylians.

  18. Woodlouse locomotor behavior in the assessment of clean and contaminated field sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayley, M.; Baatrup, E. [Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biological Sciences; Bjerregaard, P. [Odense Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Biology

    1997-11-01

    Specimens of the woodlouse Oniscus asellus were collected at four clean field sites and from a recently closed iron foundry heavily contaminated with zinc, lead, chromium, and nickel. Each of the 30 woodlice per group was housed individually and acclimatized to laboratory conditions for 2 d on a humid plaster of paris substrate. Thereafter, the locomotor behavior of each animal was measured for 4 h employing automated computer-aided video tracking. Linear discriminant analysis of five locomotor parameters revealed average velocity and path length as the principle components separating the polluted site and control animals. Post hoc analysis of the discriminant variable for animals from all five sites showed that the animals from the polluted site where significantly hyperactive when compared to all controls. Further, control animals collected from sites separated by several hundred kilometers were remarkably similar in their locomotor behavior. This preliminary study highlights the potential utility of quantitative analysis of animal locomotor behavior in environmental monitoring.

  19. Polycose taste pre-exposure fails to influence behavioral and neural indices of taste novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barot, Sabiha K; Bernstein, Ilene L

    2005-12-01

    Taste novelty can strongly modulate the speed and efficacy of taste aversion learning. Novel sweet tastes enhance c-Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) in the central amygdala and insular cortex. The present studies examined whether this neural correlate of novelty extends to different taste types by measuring FLI signals after exposure to novel and familiar polysaccharide (Polycose) and salt (NaCl) tastes. Novel Polycose not only failed to elevate FLI expression in central amygdala and insular cortex, but also failed to induce stronger taste aversion learning than familiar Polycose. Novel NaCl, on the other hand, showed patterns of FLI activation and aversion learning similar to that of novel sweet tastes. Possible reasons for the resistance of Polycose to typical pre-exposure effects are discussed. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Novelty detection methods for online health monitoring and post data analysis of turbopumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hu; Niaoqing, Hu; Xinpeng, Zhang; Fengshou, Gu; Ming, Gao

    2013-01-01

    As novelty detection works when only normal data are available, it is of considerable promise for health monitoring in cases lacking fault samples and prior knowledge. We present two novelty detection methods for health monitoring of turbopumps in large-scale liquid propellant rocket engines. The first method is the adaptive Gaussian threshold model. This method is designed to monitor the vibration of the turbopumps online because it has minimal computational complexity and is easy for implementation in real time. The second method is the one-class support vector machine (OCSVM) which is developed for post analysis of historical vibration signals. Via post analysis the method not only confirms the online monitoring results but also provides diagnostic results so that faults from sensors are separated from those actually from the turbopumps. Both of these two methods are validated to be efficient for health monitoring of the turbopumps.

  1. Detection of structural damage using novelty detection algorithm under variational environmental and operational conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mountassir, M.; Yaacoubi, S.; Dahmene, F.

    2015-07-01

    Novelty detection is a widely used algorithm in different fields of study due to its capabilities to recognize any kind of abnormalities in a specific process in order to ensure better working in normal conditions. In the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), this method is utilized as damage detection technique because the presence of defects can be considered as abnormal to the structure. Nevertheless, the performance of such a method could be jeopardized if the structure is operating in harsh environmental and operational conditions (EOCs). In this paper, novelty detection statistical technique is used to investigate the detection of damages under various EOCs. Experiments were conducted with different scenarios: damage sizes and shapes. EOCs effects were simulated by adding stochastic noise to the collected experimental data. Different levels of noise were studied to determine the accuracy and the performance of the proposed method.

  2. Detection of structural damage using novelty detection algorithm under variational environmental and operational conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountassir, M El; Yaacoubi, S; Dahmene, F

    2015-01-01

    Novelty detection is a widely used algorithm in different fields of study due to its capabilities to recognize any kind of abnormalities in a specific process in order to ensure better working in normal conditions. In the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), this method is utilized as damage detection technique because the presence of defects can be considered as abnormal to the structure. Nevertheless, the performance of such a method could be jeopardized if the structure is operating in harsh environmental and operational conditions (EOCs). In this paper, novelty detection statistical technique is used to investigate the detection of damages under various EOCs. Experiments were conducted with different scenarios: damage sizes and shapes. EOCs effects were simulated by adding stochastic noise to the collected experimental data. Different levels of noise were studied to determine the accuracy and the performance of the proposed method. (paper)

  3. Novelty detection of foreign objects in food using multi-modal X-ray imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einarsdottir, Hildur; Emerson, Monica Jane; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a method for novelty detection of foreign objects in food products using grating-based multimodal X-ray imaging. With this imaging technique three modalities are available with pixel correspondence, enhancing organic materials such as wood chips, insects and soft...... plastics not detectable by conventional X-ray absorption radiography. We conduct experiments, where several food products are imaged with common foreign objects typically found in the food processing industry. To evaluate the benefit from using this multi-contrast X-ray technique over conventional X......-ray absorption imaging, a novelty detection scheme based on well known image- and statistical analysis techniques is proposed. The results show that the presented method gives superior recognition results and highlights the advantage of grating-based imaging....

  4. The GBN-dialogue model of outgroup-negative rumor transmission: group membership, belief, and novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bernard P; DiFonzo, Nicholas; Ross, David S

    2013-04-01

    A two-step agent-based mathematical model of negative rumor spread in the context of conflicting groups is presented. The GBN-Dialogue model builds on rumor theory, focuses on person-to-person interaction characteristics,and is dynamical. The model first estimates the probability of rumor transmission between two persons based on their transmission motivation (which is a function of their Group (G) memberships), the strengths of their belief (B) in the rumor, and the Novelty (N) of the rumor for each person. Psychological and sociological research informs this Transmission Probability Function. In the second step, belief levels and rumor novelty of each participant change as a result of rumor transmission and time; literature on attitude change guides these updating functions. Empirical support is presented by comparing rumor transmission literature with results of Monte Carlo simulations on different network topologies. The validity of the model's assumptions is addressed by comparison with simpler and more complex alternatives.

  5. Activation of midbrain structures by associative novelty and the formation of explicit memory in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Björn H; Sellner, Daniela B; Lauer, Corinna-J; Habib, Reza; Frey, Julietta U; Guderian, Sebastian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Düzel, Emrah

    2004-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a close functional relationship between memory formation in the hippocampus and dopaminergic neuromodulation originating in the ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra of the midbrain. Here we report midbrain activation in two functional MRI studies of visual memory in healthy young adults. In the first study, participants distinguished between familiar and novel configurations of pairs of items which had been studied together by either learning the location or the identity of the items. In the second study, participants studied words by either rating the words' pleasantness or counting syllables. The ventral tegmental area and medial substantia nigra showed increased activation by associative novelty (first study) and subsequent free recall performance (second study). In both studies, this activation accompanied hippocampal activation, but was unaffected by the study task. Thus midbrain regions seem to participate selectively in hippocampus-dependent processes of associative novelty and explicit memory formation, but appear to be unaffected by other task-relevant aspects.

  6. Limitations imposed by wearing armour on Medieval soldiers' locomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Graham N; Formenti, Federico; Minetti, Alberto E

    2012-02-22

    In Medieval Europe, soldiers wore steel plate armour for protection during warfare. Armour design reflected a trade-off between protection and mobility it offered the wearer. By the fifteenth century, a typical suit of field armour weighed between 30 and 50 kg and was distributed over the entire body. How much wearing armour affected Medieval soldiers' locomotor energetics and biomechanics is unknown. We investigated the mechanics and the energetic cost of locomotion in armour, and determined the effects on physical performance. We found that the net cost of locomotion (C(met)) during armoured walking and running is much more energetically expensive than unloaded locomotion. C(met) for locomotion in armour was 2.1-2.3 times higher for walking, and 1.9 times higher for running when compared with C(met) for unloaded locomotion at the same speed. An important component of the increased energy use results from the extra force that must be generated to support the additional mass. However, the energetic cost of locomotion in armour was also much higher than equivalent trunk loading. This additional cost is mostly explained by the increased energy required to swing the limbs and impaired breathing. Our findings can predict age-associated decline in Medieval soldiers' physical performance, and have potential implications in understanding the outcomes of past European military battles.

  7. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in the Locomotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most pains from the locomotor system arise due to involuntary, chronic tensions in the muscles or other tissues. When the patient is motivated, the pain is easily cured in most of the cases by using the tools of consciousness-based medicine, primarily therapeutic touch, conversation, and coaching the patient in a positive philosophy of life. The pains are often caused by “blockages” that may cause problems other than just pain. Often it turns out that the blocked areas develop actual physical damage over time: a slipped disk in the back, articular degeneration, or osteoarthritis when the cartilage is affected, can often be explained in this way. Apparently, the exact areas where the blockage is situated cause cellular problems, disrupting cellular order. The holistic process theory of healing and the related quality of life theories state that return to the natural state of being is possible, whenever the person gets the resources needed for existential healing. The resources needed are “holding” in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for holistic healing are trust and the intention for the healing to take place. Case stories of holistic treatment of patients with chronic back pain, low back pain, muscle problems, knee pain, and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are discussed with exercises relevant for patients with these conditions in the holistic clinic.

  8. Automated quantitative analysis of coordinated locomotor behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanger, H J; Vanwersch, R A; Wolthuis, O L

    1984-03-01

    Disturbances of motor coordination are usually difficult to quantify. Therefore, a method was developed for the automated quantitative analysis of the movements of the dyed paws of stepping rats, registered by a colour TV camera. The signals from the TV-video system were converted by an electronic interface into voltages proportional to the X- and Y-coordinates of the paws, from which a desktop computer calculated the movements of these paws in time and distance. Application 1 analysed the steps of a rat walking in a hollow rotating wheel. The results showed low variability of the walking pattern, the method was insensitive to low doses of alcohol, but was suitable to quantify overt, e.g. neurotoxic, locomotor disturbances or recovery thereof. In application 2 hurdles were placed in a similar hollow wheel and the rats were trained to step from the top of one hurdle to another. Physostigmine-induced disturbances of this acquired complex motor task could be detected at doses far below those that cause overt symptoms.

  9. Remote control of respiratory neural network by spinal locomotor generators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Patrick Le Gal

    Full Text Available During exercise and locomotion, breathing rate rapidly increases to meet the suddenly enhanced oxygen demand. The extent to which direct central interactions between the spinal networks controlling locomotion and the brainstem networks controlling breathing are involved in this rhythm modulation remains unknown. Here, we show that in isolated neonatal rat brainstem-spinal cord preparations, the increase in respiratory rate observed during fictive locomotion is associated with an increase in the excitability of pre-inspiratory neurons of the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG/Pre-I. In addition, this locomotion-induced respiratory rhythm modulation is prevented both by bilateral lesion of the pFRG region and by blockade of neurokinin 1 receptors in the brainstem. Thus, our results assign pFRG/Pre-I neurons a new role as elements of a previously undescribed pathway involved in the functional interaction between respiratory and locomotor networks, an interaction that also involves a substance P-dependent modulating mechanism requiring the activation of neurokinin 1 receptors. This neurogenic mechanism may take an active part in the increased respiratory rhythmicity produced at the onset and during episodes of locomotion in mammals.

  10. [The locomotor activity of the squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwahlen, R

    1975-03-01

    The locomotor activity of Sciurus vulgaris has been observed in the field and in caged animals.Onset and cessation of activity (data from the cage only): Activity starts before sunrise and correlation with sunrise is very high (0.838≤r≤0.990). Cessation of activity normally lies before sunset, during summer late in the afternoon, in winter often already before noon. It is scatterd to a greater extent than onset of activity, correlation with sunset being 0.535≤r ≤0.798.Daily pattern: It is a bigeminus, although widely subject to seasonal variations. The afternoon peak is lacking from November till February, begins to form in March and reaches as much as 33.5% of total activity in September. The pause occurring at noon is most distinct during summer and vanishes gradually during the autumn months. Data from the field and from the cage show essentially the same pattern.Annual pattern: In the cage, activity is least during winter, increases gradually to a maximum in September followed by a sharp decrease to the winter minimum. The curve derived from the field observations shows a bimodal shape with a first peak in April and a second, more distinct one in September. A combination of the two groups of data shows three phases: December to May with irregular variations, May to September showing a conspicuous increase to maximal activity, September to December with sharp decrease to the winter minimum.

  11. Childhood inhibitory control and adolescent impulsivity and novelty seeking as differential predictors of relational and overt aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, Katherine; Van Hulle, Carol; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H H

    2017-04-01

    Impulsivity is commonly conflated with novelty seeking, but these traits are conceptually independent and hold different predictive implications. Using a multi-informant, longitudinal design, we examined childhood inhibitory control, as well as adolescent impulsivity and novelty seeking, as predictors of aggression in a sample of 976 twins. Lower childhood inhibitory control and higher adolescent impulsivity predicted both overt and relational aggression in regression analyses that accounted for sex, puberty status, age, and socioeconomic status. As predicted, novelty seeking did not predict aggression, a finding that supports its independence from impulsivity.

  12. Large-scale phenotyping links adult hippocampal neurogenesis to the reaction to novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, R Maarten; Lazic, Stanley E; Slomianka, Lutz; Wolfer, David P; Amrein, Irmgard

    2016-05-01

    The discovery of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus has triggered a wide range of studies that link the new neurons to various behavioral functions. However, the role of new neurons in behavior is still equivocal. Conflicting results may be due to the difficulty in manipulating neurogenesis without off-target effects as well as the statistical approach used, which fail to account for neurogenesis-independent effects of experimental manipulations on behavior. In this study, we apply a more comprehensive statistical and conceptual approach. Instead of between-group analyses, we consider the within-group relationships between neurogenesis and behavior (ANCOVA and mediation analysis) in a large-scale experiment, in which distinct age- (3 and 5 months) and strain- (DBA and C57) related differences in basal levels of neurogenesis in mice are compared with a large number (∼1,500) of behavioral read outs. The analysis failed to detect any association between anxiety and motor impulsivity with neurogenesis. However, within-group adult hippocampal neurogenesis is associated with the reaction to novelty. Specifically, more neurogenesis is associated with a longer latency to explore and a lower frequency of exploratory actions, overall indicative of a phenotype where animals with more neurogenesis were slower to explore a novel environment. This effect is observed in 5-months-old, but not in 3-months-old mice of both strains. An association between the reaction to novelty and adult neurogenesis can have a major impact on results from previous studies using classical behavioral experiments, in which animals are tested in a--for the animal--novel experimental set-up. The neurogenesis-novelty association found here is also a necessary link in the relation that has been suggested to exist between neurogenesis and psychiatric disorders marked by a failure to cope with novelty. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Memory effects of sleep, emotional valence, arousal and novelty in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Marije C M; van der Heijden, Kristiaan B; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Swaab, Hanna; van Someren, Eus J W

    2017-06-01

    Effectiveness of memory consolidation is determined by multiple factors, including sleep after learning, emotional valence, arousal and novelty. Few studies investigated how the effect of sleep compares with (and interacts with) these other factors, of which virtually none are in children. The present study did so by repeated assessment of declarative memory in 386 children (45% boys) aged 9-11 years through an online word-pair task. Children were randomly assigned to either a morning or evening learning session of 30 unrelated word-pairs with positive, neutral or negative valenced cues and neutral targets. After immediately assessing baseline recognition, delayed recognition was recorded either 12 or 24 h later, resulting in four different assessment schedules. One week later, the procedure was repeated with exactly the same word-pairs to evaluate whether effects differed for relearning versus original novel learning. Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to evaluate how the probability of correct recognition was affected by sleep, valence, arousal, novelty and their interactions. Both immediate and delayed recognition were worse for pairs with negatively valenced or less arousing cue words. Relearning improved immediate and delayed word-pair recognition. In contrast to these effects, sleep did not affect recognition, nor did sleep moderate the effects of arousal, valence and novelty. The findings suggest a robust inclination of children to specifically forget the pairing of words to negatively valenced cue words. In agreement with a recent meta-analysis, children seem to depend less on sleep for the consolidation of information than has been reported for adults, irrespective of the emotional valence, arousal and novelty of word-pairs. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Grooming behavior in American cockroach is affected by novelty and odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukovskaya, Marianna I

    2014-01-01

    The main features of grooming behavior are amazingly similar among arthropods and land vertebrates and serve the same needs. A particular pattern of cleaning movements in cockroaches shows cephalo-caudal progression. Grooming sequences become longer after adaptation to the new setting. Novelty related changes in grooming are recognized as a form of displacement behavior. Statistical analysis of behavior revealed that antennal grooming in American cockroach, Periplaneta americana L., was significantly enhanced in the presence of odor.

  15. Involvement of nigral oxytocin in locomotor activity: A behavioral, immunohistochemical and lesion study in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Laura; Cocco, Cristina; Ferri, Gian-Luca; Argiolas, Antonio; Melis, Maria Rosaria; Sanna, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    Oxytocin is involved in the control of different behaviors, from sexual behavior and food consumption to empathy, social and affective behaviors. An imbalance of central oxytocinergic neurotransmission has been also associated with different mental pathologies, from depression, anxiety and anorexia/bulimia to schizophrenia, autism and drug dependence. This study shows that oxytocin may also play a role in the control of locomotor activity. Accordingly, intraperitoneal oxytocin (0.5-2000μg/kg) reduced locomotor activity of adult male rats. This effect was abolished by d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin, an oxytocin receptor antagonist, given into the lateral ventricles at the dose of 2μg/rat, which was ineffective on locomotor activity. Oxytocin (50-200ng/site) also reduced and d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)(2)-Orn(8)-vasotocin (2μg/site) increased locomotor activity when injected bilaterally into the substantia nigra, a key area in the control of locomotor activity. Conversely, the destruction of nigral neurons bearing oxytocin receptors by the recently characterized neurotoxin oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra, increased basal locomotor activity. Since oxytocin-saporin injected into the substantia nigra caused a marked reduction of neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (e.g., nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons) and for vesicular glutamate transporters VGluT1, VGluT2 and VGluT3 (e.g., glutamatergic neurons), but not for glutamic acid decarboxylase (e.g., GABAergic neurons), together these findings suggest that oxytocin influences locomotor activity by acting on receptors localized presynaptically in nigral glutamatergic nerve terminals (which control the activity of nigral GABAergic efferent neurons projecting to brain stem nuclei controlling locomotor activity), rather than on receptors localized in the cell bodies/dendrites of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Intermittent long-wavelength red light increases the period of daily locomotor activity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Amanda M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We observed that a dim, red light-emitting diode (LED triggered by activity increased the circadian periods of lab mice compared to constant darkness. It is known that the circadian period of rats increases when vigorous wheel-running triggers full-spectrum lighting; however, spectral sensitivity of photoreceptors in mice suggests little or no response to red light. Thus, we decided to test the following hypotheses: dim red light illumination triggered by activity (LEDfb increases the circadian period of mice compared to constant dark (DD; covering the LED prevents the effect on period; and DBA2/J mice have a different response to LEDfb than C57BL6/J mice. Methods The irradiance spectra of the LEDs were determined by spectrophotometer. Locomotor activity of C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice was monitored by passive-infrared sensors and circadian period was calculated from the last 10 days under each light condition. For constant dark (DD, LEDs were switched off. For LED feedback (LEDfb, the red LED came on when the mouse was active and switched off seconds after activity stopped. For taped LED the red LED was switched on but covered with black tape. Single and multifactorial ANOVAs and post-hoc t-tests were done. Results The circadian period of mice was longer under LEDfb than under DD. Blocking the light eliminated the effect. There was no difference in period change in response to LEDfb between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice. Conclusion An increase in mouse circadian period due to dim far-red light (1 lux at 652 nm exposure was unexpected. Since blocking the light stopped the response, sound from the sensor's electronics was not the impetus of the response. The results suggest that red light as background illumination should be avoided, and indicator diodes on passive infrared motion sensors should be switched off.

  17. Extending the Generalised Pareto Distribution for Novelty Detection in High-Dimensional Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, David A; Clifton, Lei; Hugueny, Samuel; Tarassenko, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Novelty detection involves the construction of a "model of normality", and then classifies test data as being either "normal" or "abnormal" with respect to that model. For this reason, it is often termed one-class classification. The approach is suitable for cases in which examples of "normal" behaviour are commonly available, but in which cases of "abnormal" data are comparatively rare. When performing novelty detection, we are typically most interested in the tails of the normal model, because it is in these tails that a decision boundary between "normal" and "abnormal" areas of data space usually lies. Extreme value statistics provides an appropriate theoretical framework for modelling the tails of univariate (or low-dimensional) distributions, using the generalised Pareto distribution (GPD), which can be demonstrated to be the limiting distribution for data occurring within the tails of most practically-encountered probability distributions. This paper provides an extension of the GPD, allowing the modelling of probability distributions of arbitrarily high dimension, such as occurs when using complex, multimodel, multivariate distributions for performing novelty detection in most real-life cases. We demonstrate our extension to the GPD using examples from patient physiological monitoring, in which we have acquired data from hospital patients in large clinical studies of high-acuity wards, and in which we wish to determine "abnormal" patient data, such that early warning of patient physiological deterioration may be provided.

  18. Novelty vs. familiarity principles in preference decisions: Task-context of past experience matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-I eLiao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Our preferences are shaped by past experience in many ways, but a systematic understanding of the factors is yet to be achieved. For example, studies of the mere exposure effect show that experience with an item leads to increased liking (familiarity preference, but the exact opposite tendency is found in other studies utilizing dishabituation (novelty preference. Recently, it has been found that image category affects whether familiarity or novelty preference emerges from repeated stimulus exposure (Park, Shimojo, and Shimojo, PNAS 2010. Faces elicited familiarity preference, but natural scenes elicited novelty preference. In their task, preference judgments were made throughout all exposures, raising the question of whether the task-context during exposure was involved. We adapt their paradigm, testing if passive exposure or objective judgment task-contexts lead to different results. Results showed that after passive viewing, familiar faces were preferred, but no preference bias in either direction was found with natural scenes, or with geometric figures (control. After exposure during the objective judgment task, familiar faces were preferred, novel natural scenes were preferred, and no preference bias was found with geometric figures. The overall results replicate the segregation of preference biases across object categories and suggest that the preference for familiar faces and novel natural scenes are modulated by task-context memory at different processing levels or selection involvement. Possible underlying mechanisms of the two types of preferences are discussed.

  19. Deep Recurrent Neural Network-Based Autoencoders for Acoustic Novelty Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Marchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the emerging field of acoustic novelty detection, most research efforts are devoted to probabilistic approaches such as mixture models or state-space models. Only recent studies introduced (pseudo-generative models for acoustic novelty detection with recurrent neural networks in the form of an autoencoder. In these approaches, auditory spectral features of the next short term frame are predicted from the previous frames by means of Long-Short Term Memory recurrent denoising autoencoders. The reconstruction error between the input and the output of the autoencoder is used as activation signal to detect novel events. There is no evidence of studies focused on comparing previous efforts to automatically recognize novel events from audio signals and giving a broad and in depth evaluation of recurrent neural network-based autoencoders. The present contribution aims to consistently evaluate our recent novel approaches to fill this white spot in the literature and provide insight by extensive evaluations carried out on three databases: A3Novelty, PASCAL CHiME, and PROMETHEUS. Besides providing an extensive analysis of novel and state-of-the-art methods, the article shows how RNN-based autoencoders outperform statistical approaches up to an absolute improvement of 16.4% average F-measure over the three databases.

  20. Deep Recurrent Neural Network-Based Autoencoders for Acoustic Novelty Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Erik; Vesperini, Fabio; Squartini, Stefano; Schuller, Björn

    2017-01-01

    In the emerging field of acoustic novelty detection, most research efforts are devoted to probabilistic approaches such as mixture models or state-space models. Only recent studies introduced (pseudo-)generative models for acoustic novelty detection with recurrent neural networks in the form of an autoencoder. In these approaches, auditory spectral features of the next short term frame are predicted from the previous frames by means of Long-Short Term Memory recurrent denoising autoencoders. The reconstruction error between the input and the output of the autoencoder is used as activation signal to detect novel events. There is no evidence of studies focused on comparing previous efforts to automatically recognize novel events from audio signals and giving a broad and in depth evaluation of recurrent neural network-based autoencoders. The present contribution aims to consistently evaluate our recent novel approaches to fill this white spot in the literature and provide insight by extensive evaluations carried out on three databases: A3Novelty, PASCAL CHiME, and PROMETHEUS. Besides providing an extensive analysis of novel and state-of-the-art methods, the article shows how RNN-based autoencoders outperform statistical approaches up to an absolute improvement of 16.4% average F -measure over the three databases.

  1. Roles of familiarity and novelty in visual preference judgments are segregated across object categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Junghyun; Shimojo, Eiko; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2010-08-17

    Understanding preference decision making is a challenging problem because the underlying process is often implicit and dependent on context, including past experience. There is evidence for both familiarity and novelty as critical factors for preference in adults and infants. To resolve this puzzling contradiction, we examined the cumulative effects of visual exposure in different object categories, including faces, natural scenes, and geometric figures, in a two-alternative preference task. The results show a clear segregation of preference across object categories, with familiarity preference dominant in faces and novelty preference dominant in natural scenes. No strong bias was observed in geometric figures. The effects were replicated even when images were converted to line drawings, inverted, or presented only briefly, and also when spatial frequency and contour distribution were controlled. The effects of exposure were reset by a blank of 1 wk or 3 wk. Thus, the category-specific segregation of familiarity and novelty preferences is based on quick visual categorization and cannot be caused by the difference in low-level visual features between object categories. Instead, it could be due either to different biological significances/attractiveness criteria across these categories, or to some other factors, such as differences in within-category variance and adaptive tuning of the perceptual system.

  2. Neural correlates of exemplar novelty processing under different spatial attention conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppel, Christian Michael; Boehler, Carsten Nicolas; Strumpf, Hendrik; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Hopf, Jens Max; Düzel, Emrah; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2009-11-01

    The detection of novel events and their identification is a basic prerequisite in a rapidly changing environment. Recently, the processing of novelty has been shown to rely on the hippocampus and to be associated with activity in reward-related areas. The present study investigated the influence of spatial attention on neural processing of novel relative to frequently presented standard and target stimuli. Never-before-seen Mandelbrot-fractals absent of semantic content were employed as stimulus material. Consistent with current theories, novelty activated a widespread network of brain areas including the hippocampus. No activity, however, could be observed in reward-related areas with the novel stimuli absent of a semantic meaning employed here. In the perceptual part of the novelty-processing network a region in the lingual gyrus was found to specifically process novel events when they occurred outside the focus of spatial attention. These findings indicate that the initial detection of unexpected novel events generally occurs in specialized perceptual areas within the ventral visual stream, whereas activation of reward-related areas appears to be restricted to events that do possess a semantic content indicative of the biological relevance of the stimulus.

  3. Improving evolvability of morphologies and controllers of developmental soft-bodied robots with novelty search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał eJoachimczak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Novelty search is an evolutionary search algorithm based on the superficially contradictory idea that abandoning goal focused fitness function altogether can lead to the discovery of higher fitness solutions. In the course of our work, we have created a biologically inspired artificial development system with the purpose of automatically designing complex morphologies and controllers of multicellular, soft-bodied robots. Our goal is to harness the creative potential of in silico evolution so that it can provide us with novel and efficient designs that are free of any preconceived notions a human designer would have. In order to do so, we strive to allow for the evolution of arbitrary morphologies. Using a fitness-driven search algorithm, the system has been shown to be capable of evolving complex multicellular solutions consisting of hundreds of cells that can walk, run and swim, yet the large space of possible designs makes the search expensive and prone to getting stuck in local minima. In this work, we investigate how a developmental approach to the evolution of robotic designs benefits from abandoning objective fitness function. We discover that novelty search produced significantly better performing solutions. We then discuss the key factors of the success in terms of the phenotypic representation for the novelty search, the deceptive landscape for co-designing morphology/brain, and the complex development-based phenotypic encoding.

  4. Bee Venom Acupuncture Reduces Interleukin-6, Increases Interleukin-10, and Induces Locomotor Recovery in a Model of Spinal Cord Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento de Souza, Raquel; Silva, Fernanda Kohn; Alves de Medeiros, Magda

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) initiate a series of molecular and cellular events in which inflammatory responses can lead to major neurological dysfunctions. The present study aims to investigate whether bee venom (BV) acupuncture applied at acupoints ST36 (Zusanli) and GV3 (Yaoyangquan) could minimize locomotor deficits and the magnitude of neural tissue losses, and change the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines after an SCI by compression. Wistar rats were subjected to an SCI model by compression in which a 2-French Fogarty embolectomy catheter was inflated in the extradural space. The effects of BV acupuncture, in which 20 μL of BV diluted in saline (0.08 mg/kg) was injected at acupoints GV3 and ST36 [BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI] was compared with BV injected at nonacupoints [BV(NP)-SCI] and with no treatment [group subjected only to SCI (CTL-SCI)]. The BV(ST36+GV3)-SCI group showed a significant improvement in the locomotor performance and a decrease of lesion size compared with the controls. BV acupuncture at the ST36 + GV3 increased the expression of interleukin-10 (anti-inflammatory) at 6 hours and reduced the expression of interleukin-6 (proinflammatory) at 24 hours after SCI compared with the controls. Our results suggest that BV acupuncture can reduce neuroinflammation and induce recovery in the SCI compression model. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

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    Zago, A. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Planeta, C.S. [Laboratório de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Programa Interinstitucional de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Fisiológicas, Universidade Federal de São Carlos/Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-18

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  6. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zago, A.; Leão, R.M.; Carneiro-de-Oliveira, P.E.; Marin, M.T.; Cruz, F.C.; Planeta, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although crosssensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P) 28-37) and adult (P60-67) rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc) and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc) or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats

  7. Oxytocin decreases cocaine taking, cocaine seeking, and locomotor activity in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Kah-Chung; Zhou, Luyi; Ghee, Shannon M; See, Ronald E; Reichel, Carmela M

    2016-02-01

    Oxytocin has been shown to decrease cocaine taking and seeking in male rats, suggesting potential treatment efficacy for drug addiction. In the present study, we extended these findings to the assessment of cocaine seeking and taking in female rats. Further, we made direct comparisons of oxytocin's impact on cocaine induced locomotor activity in both males and females. In females, systemic oxytocin (0.3, 1.0, 3.0 mg/kg) attenuated lever pressing for cocaine during self-administration and oxytocin (1.0 mg/kg) attenuated cue-induced cocaine seeking following extinction. Cocaine increased baseline locomotor activity to a greater degree in females relative to males. Oxytocin (0.1, 0.3, 1.0, and 3.0 mg/kg) reduced cocaine-induced locomotor activity in females, but not significantly in males. These data illustrate sex similarities in oxytocin's attenuation of cocaine seeking, but sex differences in cocaine-induced locomotor effects. While reductions in cocaine seeking cannot be attributed to a reduction in locomotor activity in males, attenuation of locomotor function cannot be entirely ruled out as an explanation for a decrease in cocaine seeking in females suggesting that oxytocin's effect on cocaine seeking may be mediated by different mechanisms in male and females. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. Chronic variable stress and intravenous methamphetamine self-administration – role of individual differences in behavioral and physiological reactivity to novelty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S.B.; Watterson, L.R.; Kufahl, P.R.; Nemirovsky, N.E.; Tomek, S.E.; Conrad, C.D.; Olive, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Stress is a contributing factor to the development and maintenance of addiction in humans. However, few studies have shown that stress potentiates the rewarding and/or reinforcing effects of methamphetamine in rodent models of addiction. The present study assessed the effects of exposure to 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS), or no stress as a control (CON), on the rewarding and reinforcing effects of methamphetamine in adult rats using the conditioned place preference (Experiment 1) and intravenous self-administration (Experiment 2) paradigms. In Experiment 2, we also assessed individual differences in open field locomotor activity, anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM), and physiological responses to a novel environment as possible predictors of methamphetamine intake patterns. Exposure to CVS for 14 days did not affect overall measures of methamphetamine conditioned reward or reinforcement. However, analyses of individual differences and direct vs. indirect effects revealed that rats exhibiting high physiological reactivity and locomotor activity in the EPM and open field tests self-administered more methamphetamine and reached higher breakpoints for drug reinforcement than rats exhibiting low reactivity. In addition, CVS exposure significantly increased the proportion of rats that exhibited high reactivity, and high reactivity was significantly correlated with increased levels of methamphetamine intake. These findings suggest that individual differences in physiological and locomotor reactivity to novel environments, as well as their interactions with stress history, predict patterns of drug intake in rodent models of methamphetamine addiction. Such predictors may eventually inform future strategies for implementing individualized treatment strategies for amphetamine use disorders. PMID:27163191

  9. New insights on equid locomotor evolution from the lumbar region of fossil horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katrina Elizabeth

    2016-04-27

    The specialization of equid limbs for cursoriality is a classic case of adaptive evolution, but the role of the axial skeleton in this famous transition is not well understood. Extant horses are extremely fast and efficient runners, which use a stiff-backed gallop with reduced bending of the lumbar region relative to other mammals. This study tests the hypothesis that stiff-backed running in horses evolved in response to evolutionary increases in body size by examining lumbar joint shape from a broad sample of fossil equids in a phylogenetic context. Lumbar joint shape scaling suggests that stability of the lumbar region does correlate with size through equid evolution. However, scaling effects were dampened in the posterior lumbar region, near the sacrum, which suggests strong selection for sagittal mobility in association with locomotor-respiratory coupling near the lumbosacral joint. I hypothesize that small-bodied fossil horses may have used a speed-dependent running gait, switching between stiff-backed and flex-backed galloping as speed increased. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  11. Role of hippocampal β-adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors in the novelty-induced enhancement of fear extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Feng; Yang, Chang; Deng, Jia-Hui; Yan, Wei; Wang, Hui-Min; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Shi, Hai-Shui; Meng, Shi-Qiu; Chai, Bai-Sheng; Fang, Qin; Chai, Ning; Xue, Yan-Xue; Sun, Jia; Chen, Chen; Wang, Xue-Yi; Wang, Ji-Shi; Lu, Lin

    2015-05-27

    Fear extinction forms a new memory but does not erase the original fear memory. Exposure to novelty facilitates transfer of short-term extinction memory to long-lasting memory. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Using a classical contextual fear-conditioning model, we investigated the effect of novelty on long-lasting extinction memory in rats. We found that exposure to a novel environment but not familiar environment 1 h before or after extinction enhanced extinction long-term memory (LTM) and reduced fear reinstatement. However, exploring novelty 6 h before or after extinction had no such effect. Infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) inhibitor propranolol and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) inhibitor RU486 into the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus before novelty exposure blocked the effect of novelty on extinction memory. Propranolol prevented activation of the hippocampal PKA-CREB pathway, and RU486 prevented activation of the hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)-CREB pathway induced by novelty exposure. These results indicate that the hippocampal βAR-PKA-CREB and GR-Erk1/2-CREB pathways mediate the extinction-enhancing effect of novelty exposure. Infusion of RU486 or the Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126, but not propranolol or the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMPS, into the CA1 before extinction disrupted the formation of extinction LTM, suggesting that hippocampal GR and Erk1/2 but not βAR or PKA play critical roles in this process. These results indicate that novelty promotes extinction memory via hippocampal βAR- and GR-dependent pathways, and Erk1/2 may serve as a behavioral tag of extinction. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358308-14$15.00/0.

  12. General and Specific Strategies Used to Facilitate Locomotor Maneuvers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengnan Wu

    Full Text Available People make anticipatory changes in gait patterns prior to initiating a rapid change of direction. How they prepare will change based on their knowledge of the maneuver. To investigate specific and general strategies used to facilitate locomotor maneuvers, we manipulated subjects' ability to anticipate the direction of an upcoming lateral "lane-change" maneuver. To examine specific anticipatory adjustments, we observed the four steps immediately preceding a maneuver that subjects were instructed to perform at a known time in a known direction. We hypothesized that to facilitate a specific change of direction, subjects would proactively decrease margin of stability in the future direction of travel. Our results support this hypothesis: subjects significantly decreased lateral margin of stability by 69% on the side ipsilateral to the maneuver during only the step immediately preceding the maneuver. This gait adaptation may have improved energetic efficiency and simplified the control of the maneuver. To examine general anticipatory adjustments, we observed the two steps immediately preceding the instant when subjects received information about the direction of the maneuver. When the maneuver direction was unknown, we hypothesized that subjects would make general anticipatory adjustments that would improve their ability to actively initiate a maneuver in multiple directions. This second hypothesis was partially supported as subjects increased step width and stance phase hip flexion during these anticipatory steps. These modifications may have improved subjects' ability to generate forces in multiple directions and maintain equilibrium during the onset and execution of the rapid maneuver. However, adapting these general anticipatory strategies likely incurred an additional energetic cost.

  13. Locomotor damage in rats after x-irradiation in Utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullenix, P.; Norton, S.; Culver, B.

    1975-01-01

    Alterations in gait were found in rats after whole-body irradiation with 125 R on day 14, 15, and 16 of gestation. No effects on locomotion were detected after irradiation on day 17 with 125 R or after irradiation on day 14 with 50 R. A technique was set up for quantitative evaluation of locomotion based on a modification of other methods. Walking patterns of irradiated rats were recorded, when they were adults, by requiring them to walk up a 10 0 incline through a corridor after their feet had been dipped in ink. Rats irradiated on gestational day 14 had an in-phase, hopping gait with the sine of the angle between the hind feet and the direction of progression over 0.9. Rats irradiated on gestational days 15 and 16 had an alternating, waddling gait with wider stance and broader angle than control rats. Histologic examination of serial sections of the brains of these rats showed that the 14-day rats lacked all telencephalic commissures except for a few fibers which crossed in some rats. There was a progressive improvement in the condition of the anterior and ventral hippocampal commissures up to day 17, but the corpus callosum and doral hippocampal commissure were lacking or markedly reduced in all day 17 rats. No animals showed damage to the mesencephalic posterior commissure. Since rats which used the in-phase mode of locomotion were never observed to use alternating gait, the possible causal relationship of the commissural damage to the altered locomotor patterns was considered. In view of the restricted period of damage found for the anterior and ventral hippocampal commissures and the restriction of altered locomotion to damage in the same period, primary involvement of the corpus callosum and dorsal hippocampal commissure could be excluded, but a possible role for the other telencephalic commissures remained

  14. Individual differences in ethanol locomotor sensitization are associated with dopamine D1 receptor intra-cellular signaling of DARPP-32 in the nucleus accumbens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Possa Abrahao

    Full Text Available In mice there are clear individual differences in the development of behavioral sensitization to ethanol, a progressive potentiation of its psychomotor stimulant effect. Variability in the behavioral responses to ethanol has been associated with alcohol preference. Here we investigated if the functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors observed in ethanol sensitized mice leads to an increased activation of DARPP-32, a central regulatory protein in medium spiny neurons, in the nucleus accumbens - a brain region known to play a role in drug reinforcement. Swiss Webster mice received ethanol (2.2 g/kg/day or saline i.p. administrations for 21 days and were weekly evaluated regarding their locomotor activity. From those treated with ethanol, the 33% with the highest levels of locomotor activity were classified as "sensitized" and the 33% with the lowest levels as "non-sensitized". The latter presented similar locomotor levels to those of saline-treated mice. Different subgroups of mice received intra-accumbens administrations of saline and, 48 h later, SKF-38393, D1 receptor agonist 0.1 or 1 µg/side. Indeed, sensitized mice presented functional hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the accumbens. Two weeks following the ethanol treatment, other subgroups received systemic saline or SKF 10 mg/kg, 20 min before the euthanasia. The nucleus accumbens were dissected for the Western Blot analyses of total DARPP-32 and phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression. D1 receptor activation induced higher phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression in sensitized mice than in non-sensitized or saline. The functionally hyperresponsiveness of D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens is associated with an increased phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 expression after D1 receptor activation. These data suggest that an enduring increase in the sensitivity of the dopamine D1 receptor intracellular pathway sensitivity represents a neurobiological correlate associated with the development of

  15. Social interactions between live and artificial weakly electric fish: Electrocommunication and locomotor behavior of Mormyrus rume proboscirostris towards a mobile dummy fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Worm

    Full Text Available Mormyrid weakly electric fish produce short, pulse-type electric organ discharges for actively probing their environment and to communicate with conspecifics. Animals emit sequences of pulse-trains that vary in overall frequency and temporal patterning and can lead to time-locked interactions with the discharge activity of other individuals. Both active electrolocation and electrocommunication are additionally accompanied by stereotypical locomotor patterns. However, the concrete roles of electrical and locomotor patterns during social interactions in mormyrids are not well understood. Here we used a mobile fish dummy that was emitting different types of electrical playback sequences to study following behavior and interaction patterns (electrical and locomotor between individuals of weakly electric fish. We confronted single individuals of Mormyrus rume proboscirostris with a mobile dummy fish designed to attract fish from a shelter and recruit them into an open area by emitting electrical playbacks of natural discharge sequences. We found that fish were reliably recruited by the mobile dummy if it emitted electrical signals and followed it largely independently of the presented playback patterns. While following the dummy, fish interacted with it spatially by displaying stereotypical motor patterns, as well as electrically, e.g. through discharge regularizations and by synchronizing their own discharge activity to the playback. However, the overall emission frequencies of the dummy were not adopted by the following fish. Instead, social signals based on different temporal patterns were emitted depending on the type of playback. In particular, double pulses were displayed in response to electrical signaling of the dummy and their expression was positively correlated with an animals' rank in the dominance hierarchy. Based on additional analysis of swimming trajectories and stereotypical locomotor behavior patterns, we conclude that the reception

  16. Effects of novelty-reducing preparation on exploratory behavior and cognitive learning in a science museum setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Carole A.; Olstad, Roger G.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between (a) novelty and exploratory behavior, (b) novelty and cognitive learning, and (c) exploratory behavior and cognitive learning in science museums. Sixty-four sixth-grade public school students participated in a posttest-only control group design. The control group received a treatment designed to decrease the novelty of a field trip setting through a vicarious exposure while the placebo group received an informative but not novelty-reducing treatment. Both groups then visited the field site where they were videotaped. Statistical analyses were conducted on both dependent variables with socioeconomic status and academic achievement as covariates, novelty-reducing preparation as the independent variable, and gender as moderator variable. Exploratory behavior was shown to be positively correlated with cognitive learning. Significant differences were detected for exploratory behavior. For both dependent variables, gender by treatment group interaction was significant with novelty-reducing preparation shown to be highly effective on boys but having no effect on girls.

  17. Phenotypic Novelty in EvoDevo: The Distinction Between Continuous and Discontinuous Variation and Its Importance in Evolutionary Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Tim; Müller, Gerd B

    The introduction of novel phenotypic structures is one of the most significant aspects of organismal evolution. Yet the concept of evolutionary novelty is used with drastically different connotations in various fields of research, and debate exists about whether novelties represent features that are distinct from standard forms of phenotypic variation. This article contrasts four separate uses for novelty in genetics, population genetics, morphology, and behavioral science, before establishing how novelties are used in evolutionary developmental biology (EvoDevo). In particular, it is detailed how an EvoDevo-specific research approach to novelty produces insight distinct from other fields, gives the concept explanatory power with predictive capacities, and brings new consequences to evolutionary theory. This includes the outlining of research strategies that draw attention to productive areas of inquiry, such as threshold dynamics in development. It is argued that an EvoDevo-based approach to novelty is inherently mechanistic, treats the phenotype as an agent with generative potential, and prompts a distinction between continuous and discontinuous variation in evolutionary theory.

  18. Determinants of locomotor disability in people aged 55 years and over: The Rotterdam study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odding, Else; Valkenburg, Hans A.; Stam, Hendrik J.; Hofman, Albert

    2001-01-01

    Locomotor disability, as defined by difficulties in activities of daily living related to lower limb function, can be the consequence of diseases and impairments of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, nervous, sensory and musculoskeletal system. We estimated the associations between specific diseases and impairments and locomotor disability, and the proportion of disability attributable to each condition, controlling for age and comorbidity. The Rotterdam Study is a prospective follow-up study among people aged 55 years and over in the general population. Locomotor disability in 1219 men and 1856 women was assessed with the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire. Diseases and impairments were radiological osteoarthritis, pain of the hips and knees, morning stiffness, fractures, hypertension, vascular disease, ischemic heart disease, stroke, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), depression, Parkinson's disease, osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, overweight, and low vision. Adjusted odds ratios, etiologic and attributable fractions were calculated for locomotor disability. The occurrence of locomotor disability can partly be ascribed to joint pain, COPD, morning stiffness, diabetes and heart failure in both men and women. In addition in women osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, low vision, fractures, stroke and Parkinson's disease are significant etiologic fractions. In men with morning stiffness, joint pain, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, and COPD a significant proportion of their disability is attributable to this impairment. In women this was the case for Parkinson's disease, morning stiffness, low vision, heart failure, joint pain, diabetes, radiological osteoarthritis, stroke, COPD, osteoporosis, and fractures of the lower limbs, in that order. We conclude that locomotor complaints, heart failure, COPD and diabetes mellitus contribute considerably to locomotor disability in non-institutionalized elderly people

  19. Comparison of caffeine-induced locomotor activity between adolescent and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Marcelo T; Zancheta, Roberta; Paro, Ana H; Possi, Ana P M; Cruz, Fábio C; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2011-06-25

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant drug most consumed in the world. This drug is present in food, beverages and medicines marketed for individuals of all ages. In spite of this, caffeine effects on adolescents are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences on caffeine-induced locomotor stimulant or depressant effects in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (37-40 days old) or adult (70-74 days old) Wistar rats were tested for stimulant and depressant caffeine effects in two different experiments. The first was designed to evaluate the locomotor effect of caffeine in habituated rats. To this end, rats were previously habituated to test environment and had their locomotor activity registered following i.p. injections of vehicle or caffeine (3, 10, 30, 60 or 120 mg/kg). In the second experiment adolescent or adult rats were not habituated to the test environment and their locomotor activity was registered following i.p. injections of vehicle or caffeine (30, 60 or 120 mg/kg). In both experiments caffeine-induced a biphasic effect, with stimulation in small to moderate drug doses and no effect or locomotor depression in higher caffeine doses. Moreover, caffeine-induced locomotor stimulation was higher in adolescent than adult rats. Also, locomotor depression was only revealed in adult rats non-habituated to the test environment. These results suggest that adult and adolescent respond differently to caffeine indicating the need of more studies on the effects of caffeine in animals' models of adolescence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship between neuromuscular and perceived fatigue and locomotor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameau, Sophie; Zory, Raphael; Latrille, Christophe; Roche, Nicolas; Bensmail, Djamel

    2017-12-01

    Fatigue is a common problem in patients with multiple sclerosis; however, the impact of neuromuscular and perceived fatigue on locomotor performance is currently unknown in these patients. The aim of this study was: 1) to determine the relationship between perceived and neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance in patients with multiple sclerosis; 2) to determine if neuromuscular and perceived fatigue depend on the severity of the pathology defined by the Expanded disability status scale score (EDSS). Observational study. Outpatients from a hospital rehabilitation department. Thirty patients with multiple sclerosis underwent clinical (spasticity, strength, perceived fatigue and locomotor performance) and isokinetic evaluations (peak torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles and neuromuscular fatigue of knee extensor muscles). The main outcome measures were perceived and neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance. Secondary outcomes were strength of the weakest limb and peak isometric torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles, spasticity, EDSS. There were no significant correlations between perceived or neuromuscular fatigue and locomotor performance. Locomotor performance was correlated with EDSS, spasticity, strength of the weakest limb and peak isometric torque of knee flexor and extensor muscles. Eighty‑three percent of the variance of the 6MWT could be explained by EDSS score, strength of the weakest limb (MRCsum), torque produced during the last five contractions of the fatigue protocol and peak isometric torque of knee flexor muscles. Patients with moderate disability (EDSS Score 4-6) had greater levels of neuromuscular fatigue than patients with mild disability (neuromuscular fatigue was found to be higher in more disabled patients, locomotor performance was correlated with strength and spasticity but not with fatigue. Nevertheless, fatigue was related to 6MWT performance since torque produced during the last five contractions of the fatigue

  1. Postcranial morphology and the locomotor habits of living and extinct carnivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joshua X; Meachen, Julie A; Sakai, Stacey A

    2013-02-01

    Members of the order Carnivora display a broad range of locomotor habits, including cursorial, scansorial, arboreal, semiaquatic, aquatic, and semifossorial species from multiple families. Ecomorphological analyses from osteological measurements have been used successfully in prior studies of carnivorans and rodents to accurately infer the locomotor habits of extinct species. This study uses 20 postcranial measurements that have been shown to be effective indicators of locomotor habits in rodents and incorporates an extensive sample of over 300 individuals from more than 100 living carnivoran species. We performed statistical analyses, including analysis of variance (ANOVA) and stepwise discriminant function analysis, using a set of 16 functional indices (ratios). Our ANOVA results reveal consistent differences in postcranial skeletal morphology among locomotor groups. Cursorial species display distal elongation of the limbs, gracile limb elements, and relatively narrow humeral and femoral epicondyles. Aquatic and semiaquatic species display relatively robust, shortened femora and elongate metatarsals. Semifossorial species display relatively short, robust limbs with enlarged muscular attachment sites and elongate claws. Both semiaquatic and semifossorial species have relatively elongate olecranon process of the ulna and enlarged humeral and femoral epicondyles. Terrestrial, scansorial, and arboreal species are characterized by having primarily intermediate features, but arboreal species do show relatively elongate manual digits. Morphological indices effectively discriminate locomotor groups, with cursorial and arboreal species more accurately classified than terrestrial, scansorial, or semiaquatic species. Both within and between families, species with similar locomotor habits converge toward similar postcranial morphology despite their independent evolutionary histories. The discriminant analysis worked particularly well to correctly classify members of the

  2. The effects of sex-ratio and density on locomotor activity in the house fly, Musca domestica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Kjaersgaard, Anders; Pertoldi, Cino

    2012-01-01

    Although locomotor activity is involved in almost all behavioral traits, there is a lack of knowledge on what factors affect it. This study examined the effects of sex-ratio and density on the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity of adult Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae) using an infra...... with and without the presence of females. Overall, this study demonstrates that locomotor activity in M. domestica is affected by sex-ratio and density. Furthermore, the predictability of locomotor activity is affected by both sex-ratio, density, and circadian rhythm. These results add to our understanding...

  3. Aging reveals a role for nigral tyrosine hydroxylase ser31 phosphorylation in locomotor activity generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Salvatore

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH regulates dopamine (DA bioavailability. Its product, L-DOPA, is an established treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD, suggesting that TH regulation influences locomotion. Site-specific phosphorylation of TH at ser31 and ser40 regulates activity. No direct evidence shows that ser40 phosphorylation is the dominating mechanism of regulating TH activity in vivo, and physiologically-relevant stimuli increase L-DOPA biosynthesis independent of ser40 phosphorylation. Significant loss of locomotor activity occurs in aging as in PD, despite less loss of striatal DA or TH in aging compared to the loss associated with symptomatic PD. However, in the substantia nigra (SN, there is equivalent loss of DA or TH in aging and at the onset of PD symptoms. Growth factors increase locomotor activity in both PD and aging models and increase DA bioavailability and ser31 TH phosphorylation in SN, suggesting that ser31 TH phosphorylation status in the SN, not striatum, regulates DA bioavailability necessary for locomotor activity. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We longitudinally characterized locomotor activity in young and older Brown-Norway Fischer 344 F(1 hybrid rats (18 months apart in age at two time periods, eight months apart. The aged group served as an intact and pharmacologically-naïve source of deficient locomotor activity. Following locomotor testing, we analyzed DA tissue content, TH protein, and TH phosphorylation in striatum, SN, nucleus accumbens, and VTA. Levels of TH protein combined with ser31 phosphorylation alone reflected inherent differences in DA levels among the four regions. Measures strictly pertaining to locomotor activity initiation significantly correlated to DA content only in the SN. Nigral TH protein and ser31 phosphorylation together significantly correlated to test subject's maximum movement number, horizontal activity, and duration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these results show ser

  4. High Throughput Measurement of Locomotor Sensitization to Volatilized Cocaine in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Ana Filošević

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster can be used to identify genes with novel functional roles in neuronal plasticity induced by repeated consumption of addictive drugs. Behavioral sensitization is a relatively simple behavioral output of plastic changes that occur in the brain after repeated exposures to drugs of abuse. The development of screening procedures for genes that control behavioral sensitization has stalled due to a lack of high-throughput behavioral tests that can be used in genetically tractable organism, such as Drosophila. We have developed a new behavioral test, FlyBong, which combines delivery of volatilized cocaine (vCOC to individually housed flies with objective quantification of their locomotor activity. There are two main advantages of FlyBong: it is high-throughput and it allows for comparisons of locomotor activity of individual flies before and after single or multiple exposures. At the population level, exposure to vCOC leads to transient and concentration-dependent increase in locomotor activity, representing sensitivity to an acute dose. A second exposure leads to further increase in locomotion, representing locomotor sensitization. We validate FlyBong by showing that locomotor sensitization at either the population or individual level is absent in the mutants for circadian genes period (per, Clock (Clk, and cycle (cyc. The locomotor sensitization that is present in timeless (tim and pigment dispersing factor (pdf mutant flies is in large part not cocaine specific, but derived from increased sensitivity to warm air. Circadian genes are not only integral part of the neural mechanism that is required for development of locomotor sensitization, but in addition, they modulate the intensity of locomotor sensitization as a function of the time of day. Motor-activating effects of cocaine are sexually dimorphic and require a functional dopaminergic transporter. FlyBong is a new and improved method for inducing and measuring locomotor

  5. Evolved pesticide tolerance in amphibians: Predicting mechanisms based on pesticide novelty and mode of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, Jessica; Jones, Devin K.; Mattes, Brian M.; Cothran, Rickey D.; Relyea, Rick A.; Hoverman, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    We examined 10 wood frog populations distributed along an agricultural gradient for their tolerance to six pesticides (carbaryl, malathion, cypermethrin, permethrin, imidacloprid, and thiamethoxam) that differed in date of first registration (pesticide novelty) and mode-of-action (MOA). Our goals were to assess whether: 1) tolerance was correlated with distance to agriculture for each pesticide, 2) pesticide novelty predicted the likelihood of evolved tolerance, and 3) populations display cross-tolerance between pesticides that share and differ in MOA. Wood frog populations located close to agriculture were more tolerant to carbaryl and malathion than populations far from agriculture. Moreover, the strength of the relationship between distance to agriculture and tolerance was stronger for older pesticides compared to newer pesticides. Finally, we found evidence for cross-tolerance between carbaryl and malathion (two pesticides that share MOA). This study provides one of the most comprehensive approaches for understanding patterns of evolved tolerance in non-pest species. - Highlights: • We explored patterns of tolerance to six insecticides across 10 wood frog populations. • We found evidence that wood frogs have evolved tolerance to carbaryl and malathion. • The likelihood of evolved tolerance was stronger for older compared to newer pesticides. • We found evidence for cross-tolerance between carbaryl and malathion. • This is one of the most comprehensive approaches studying evolved tolerance in a non-pest species. - Using 10 wood frog populations, we detected evidence for evolved tolerance, found that the evolved tolerance depends on insecticide novelty, and found evidence for cross-tolerance.

  6. Injection of colchicine intra-hippocampal cortical area 1 enhances novelty seeking behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Manizheh; Riahi, Nosaibeh; Nadoushan, Mohammad Reza Jalali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Colchicine, a potent neurotoxin derived of plant has been recently identified as a degenerative toxin of small pyramidal cells in the hippocampal cortical area 1 (CA1). In this study, the effect of the alkaloid intra hippocampal CA1 on the novelty seeking behavior in the conditioning task was measured. Materials and Methods: Injections of colchicine (1-75 μg/rat, intra-CA1) were performed in cannulated male Wistar rats while being settled in the stereotaxic apparatus. Control group was solely injected saline (1 μl/rat, intra-CA1). One week later, after recovery, all the animals passed the novelty seeking paradigm using an unbiased conditioning task. They were habituated with the conditioned place preference (CPP) apparatus on day 1. Then they were confined in one part of the CPP box for 3 more days. Finally, the animals were tested in the last day. To evaluate, the possible cell injury effect of the toxin on the pyramidal cells of the CA1 both the motivational staying signal in the parts of the box and the non-motivational locomotive signs of the rats were measured. Results: Based on the present study, the alkaloid caused significant novelty seeking behavior at higher doses. It also affected the compartment entering behavior in the colchicine received group. However, the alkaloid did not show the significant effect on sniffing, rearing or grooming in the rats. Conclusion: Injection of colchicine intra-CA1 may impair the neuronal transmission of motivational information by the pyramidal cells in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:23833372

  7. The novelty-seeking phenotype modulates the long-lasting effects of adolescent MDMA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Vaccaro, Sonia; Arenas, M Carmen; Aguilar, María A; Miñarro, José

    2015-03-15

    Exposure to drugs such as ethanol or cocaine during adolescence induces alterations in the central nervous system that are modulated by the novelty-seeking trait. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of this trait on the long-term effects of MDMA administration during adolescence on spontaneous behavior and conditioned rewarding effects in adulthood. Adolescent mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS or LNS) according to the hole-board test and received either MDMA (0, 10 or 20mg/kg PND 33-42) or saline. Three weeks later, having entered adulthood (PND>68), one set of mice performed the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests, while another set performed the conditioning place preference (CPP) test induced by cocaine-(1mg/kg) or MDMA-(1mg/kg). Only HNS mice treated with MDMA during adolescence acquired CPP in adulthood with a non-effective dose of cocaine or MDMA. Although it did not produce changes in motor activity, exposure to MDMA during adolescence was associated with more aggressive behaviors (threat and attack) and increased social contacts in HNS mice, while an anxiolytic effect was noted in LNS mice pre-treated with the highest dose of MDMA (20mg/kg). Administration of MDMA (10 or 20mg/kg) induced a decrease in DA levels in the striatum in LNS mice only and lower striatal serotonin levels in mice treated with the highest MDMA dose. Our findings show that adolescent MDMA exposure results in higher sensitivity to the conditioned reinforcing properties of MDMA and cocaine in adult HNS mice, which suggests that the relationship between exposure to MDMA in adolescence and a higher probability of substance is a feature of high novelty seekers only. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Diet choice patterns in rodents depend on novelty of the diet, exercise, species, and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tiffany; Xu, Wei-Jie; York, Haley; Liang, Nu-Chu

    2017-07-01

    Prolonged consumption of a palatable, high fat (HF) diet paired with a lack of physical activity can exacerbate the development of obesity. Exercise can facilitate the maintenance of a healthy body weight, possibly though mediating changes in diet preference. Using a two-diet choice and wheel running (WR) paradigm, our laboratory previously demonstrated that WR induces HF diet avoidance with different persistency in male and female rats when HF diet and WR are introduced simultaneously. The aims of this study were to examine whether this behavior is species dependent and to what extent the novelty of the diet affects WR induced HF diet avoidance. Experiment 1 utilized male C57BL6 mice in a two-diet choice and WR paradigm. Results show that all mice preferred HF to chow diet regardless of exercise and the order in which exercise and HF diet were presented. Experiment 2A (diet novelty) utilized Sprague-Dawley rats that were first habituated to a 45% HF diet prior to the simultaneous introduction of WR and a novel high-carbohydrate, low-fat (DK) diet. All rats avoided the novel high-carbohydrate diet and neither male nor female wheel running rats exhibited reduction in HF diet intake or HF diet avoidance. After all rats were returned to a sedentary condition, female rats consumed significantly more of the DK diet than the male rats. In Experiment 2B (diet familiarity), rats remained sedentary and were re-habituated to the DK diet until intake stabilized. Subsequently, a 60% HF diet was introduced for all rats and for running rats, access to the running wheels were provided simultaneously. Consistent with our previous findings, HF diet intake and preference was significantly reduced in all wheel running rats. These data suggest that exercise induced HF diet avoidance is affected by species and the novelty of the diet. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An internal model architecture for novelty detection: implications for cerebellar and collicular roles in sensory processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sean R; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J; Pipe, Anthony G; Prescott, Tony J; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A(2) that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts.

  10. Role of genotype in the development of locomotor sensitization to alcohol in adult and adolescent mice: comparison of the DBA/2J and C57BL/6J inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melón, Laverne C; Boehm, Stephen L

    2011-07-01

    Animal models that explore differential sensitivity to the effects of acute and repeated exposure of alcohol (ethanol) may be influenced by both the developmental and genetic profile of the population. Therefore, we sought to compare the influence of ontogeny on sensitivity to ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation and on the induction of locomotor sensitization to this effect across 2 inbred strains of mice; the ethanol consuming C57BL/6J and the ethanol avoiding DBA/2J strains. C57BL/6J and DBA/2J adults (postnatal day [PD] 60 to 80) and adolescents (PD 30±2) were assessed for basal activity, acute response to 2.0 g/kg ethanol, and the expression of locomotor sensitization following repeated administration of 2.5, 3.0, or 3.5 g/kg ethanol. Basal activity was different across development for the C57BL/6J, but not DBA/2J, with adult B6 mice showing persistently greater baseline activity. Adolescents of both strains were more sensitive than adults to acute ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation; adults exhibited a decrease in their acute response across the testing session. Adolescent DBA/2J mice developed less ethanol sensitization compared to adults, with significant sensitization observed only following repeated administration of the lowest ethanol dose (2.5 g/kg), whereas DBA/2J adults sensitized to all doses. Age did not influence the development of ethanol sensitization for the C57BL/6J strain, as both adults and adolescents displayed a sensitized response following all ethanol doses. These results suggest that the developmental pattern of locomotor sensitivity to ethanol is unique to the genotypic profile of the animal model. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Effects of sex pheromones and sexual maturation on locomotor activity in female sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walaszczyk, Erin J.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Steibel, Juan Pedro; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization of male and female locomotor rhythmicity can play a vital role in ensuring reproductive success. Several physiological and environmental factors alter these locomotor rhythms. As sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, progress through their life cycle, their locomotor activity rhythm changes multiple times. The goal of this study was to elucidate the activity patterns of adult female sea lamprey during the sexual maturation process and discern the interactions of these patterns with exposure to male pheromones. During these stages, preovulated and ovulated adult females are exposed to sex pheromone compounds, which are released by spermiated males and attract ovulated females to the nest for spawning. The locomotor behavior of adult females was monitored in a natural stream with a passive integrated tag responder system as they matured, and they were exposed to a sex pheromone treatment (spermiated male washings) or a control (prespermiated male washings). Results showed that, dependent on the hour of day, male sex pheromone compounds reduce total activity (p rhythm in a vertebrate, and they suggest that the interaction between maturity stage and sex pheromone exposure contributes to the differential locomotor rhythms found in adult female sea lamprey. This phenomenon may contribute to the reproductive synchrony of mature adults, thus increasing reproductive success in this species.

  12. Effect of thiamethoxam on cockroach locomotor activity is associated with its metabolite clothianidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzidane, Yassine; Touinsi, Sarra; Motte, Emilie; Jadas-Hécart, Alain; Communal, Pierre-Yves; Leduc, Lionel; Thany, Steeve H

    2010-12-01

    In the present study, the effect of thiamethoxam and clothianidin on the locomotor activity of American cockroach, Periplaneta americana (L.), was evaluated. Because it has been proposed that thiamethoxam is metabolised to clothianidin, high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used to evaluate the amount of clothianidin on thiamethoxam-treated cockroaches. One hour after neonicotinoid treatment, the time spent in the open-field-like apparatus significantly increased, suggesting a decrease in locomotor activity. The percentage of cockroaches displaying locomotor activity was significantly reduced 1 h after haemolymph application of 1 nmol g(-1) neonicotinoid, while no significant effect was found after topical and oral administration. However, at 24 and 48 h, all neonicotinoids were able to reduce locomotor activity, depending on their concentrations and the way they were applied. Interestingly, it was found that thiamethoxam was converted to clothianidin 1 h after application, but the amount of clothianidin did not rise proportionately to thiamethoxam, especially after oral administration. The data suggest that the effect of thiamethoxam on cockroach locomotor activity is due in part to clothianidin action because (1) thiamethoxam levels remained persistent 48 h after application and (2) the amount of clothianidin in cockroach tissues was consistent with the toxicity of thiamethoxam. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Passion flower extract antagonizes the expression of nicotine locomotor sensitization in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivogel, Chris; Jamerson, Brenda

    2012-10-01

    Nicotine, a bioactive component of tobacco, is highly addictive. Numerous therapies have been developed or are currently under investigation for smoking cessation, and all have met with limited success and/or side effects, indicating the need for additional therapies. This study examines the ability of a commerically-available aqueous extract of Passiflora incarnata Linn. (Passifloraceae) to ameliorate the signs of nicotine sensitization using a rat model. Rats were administered 0.4 mg/kg nicotine or vehicle once a day for four consecutive days. Nicotine adminstration produces sensitization of locomotor activity, a phenomenon implicated in the development of nicotine dependence. On the fifth day, locomotor activity of the subjects was monitored as rats from each treatment group were administered 800 mg/kg of Passiflora incarnata extract (or its vehicle) followed by a challenge dose of 0.4 mg/kg nicotine. When given to rats sensitized to nicotine for 4 days, the challenge dose of nicotine increased locomotor activity by more than 2-fold over activity following nicotine challenge in rats treated with vehicle during the sensitization phase. The difference was significant from 15-40 min after nicotine administration. Rats sensitized to nicotine then treated with Passiflora incarnata extract prior to the nicotine challenge exhibited a level of locomotor activity the same as the vehicle-treated controls. Passiflora incarnata extract did antagonize the expression of nicotine locomotor sensitization. Passiflora incarnata extract should be examined in future studies to evaluate its potential for treating nicotine addiction in humans.

  14. Osteological postcranial traits in hylid anurans indicate a morphological continuum between swimming and jumping locomotor modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Mónica; Tulli, Maria J; Abdala, Virginia

    2017-03-01

    Anurans exhibit a particularly wide range of locomotor modes that result in wide variations in their skeletal structure. This article investigates the possible correlation between morphological aspects of the hylid postcranial skeleton and their different locomotor modes and habitat use. To do so, we analyzed 18 morphometric postcranial variables in 19 different anuran species representative of a variety of locomotor modes (jumper, hopper, walker, and swimmer) and habitat uses (arboreal, bush, terrestrial, and aquatic). Our results show that the evolution of the postcranial hylid skeleton cannot be explained by one single model, as for example, the girdles suggest modular evolution while the vertebral column suggests other evolutionary modules. In conjunction with data from several other studies, we were able to show a relationship between hylid morphology and habitat use; offering further evidence that the jumper/swimmer and walker/hopper locomotor modes exhibit quite similar morphological architecture. This allowed us to infer that new locomotor modalities are, in fact, generated along a morphological continuum. J. Morphol. 278:403-417, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Locomotor circumvention strategies are altered by stroke: II. Postural Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darekar, Anuja; Lamontagne, Anouk; Fung, Joyce

    2017-06-15

    Locomotor strategies for obstacle circumvention require appropriate postural coordination that depends on sensorimotor integration within the central nervous system. It is not known how these strategies are affected by a stroke. The objective of this study was to contrast postural coordination strategies used for obstacle circumvention between post-stroke participants (n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 12). Participants walked towards a target in a virtual environment (11 × 8 m room) with cylindrical obstacles that were stationary or approaching from head-on, or diagonally 30° left/right. Two stepping strategies for obstacle circumvention were identified: 1) side step: increase in step width by the foot ipsilateral to the side of circumvention; 2) cross step: decrease in step width by the foot contralateral to the side of circumvention. The side step strategy was favoured by post-stroke individuals in circumventing stationary and head-on approaching obstacles. In circumventing diagonally approaching obstacles, healthy controls generally veered opposite to obstacle approach (>60% trials), whereas the majority of post-stroke participants (7/12) veered to the same side of obstacle approach (V same ). Post-stroke participants who veered to the opposite side (V opp , 5/12) were more independent and faster ambulators who favoured the side step strategy in circumventing obstacles approaching from the paretic side and cross step strategy for obstacles approaching from the non-paretic side. V same participants generally favoured the side step strategy for both diagonal approaches. Segmental rotation amplitudes and latencies were largest in the V same group, and significantly greater in post-stroke participants than controls for all obstacle conditions. All participants initiated circumvention with the feet followed by the pelvis and thorax, demonstrating a caudal-rostral sequence of reorientation. Postural coordination strategies for obstacle circumvention

  16. Learning a locomotor task: with or without errors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Schneider, Jasmin; Jaeger, Lukas; Riener, Robert

    2014-03-04

    Robotic haptic guidance is the most commonly used robotic training strategy to reduce performance errors while training. However, research on motor learning has emphasized that errors are a fundamental neural signal that drive motor adaptation. Thus, researchers have proposed robotic therapy algorithms that amplify movement errors rather than decrease them. However, to date, no study has analyzed with precision which training strategy is the most appropriate to learn an especially simple task. In this study, the impact of robotic training strategies that amplify or reduce errors on muscle activation and motor learning of a simple locomotor task was investigated in twenty two healthy subjects. The experiment was conducted with the MAgnetic Resonance COmpatible Stepper (MARCOS) a special robotic device developed for investigations in the MR scanner. The robot moved the dominant leg passively and the subject was requested to actively synchronize the non-dominant leg to achieve an alternating stepping-like movement. Learning with four different training strategies that reduce or amplify errors was evaluated: (i) Haptic guidance: errors were eliminated by passively moving the limbs, (ii) No guidance: no robot disturbances were presented, (iii) Error amplification: existing errors were amplified with repulsive forces, (iv) Noise disturbance: errors were evoked intentionally with a randomly-varying force disturbance on top of the no guidance strategy. Additionally, the activation of four lower limb muscles was measured by the means of surface electromyography (EMG). Strategies that reduce or do not amplify errors limit muscle activation during training and result in poor learning gains. Adding random disturbing forces during training seems to increase attention, and therefore improve motor learning. Error amplification seems to be the most suitable strategy for initially less skilled subjects, perhaps because subjects could better detect their errors and correct them

  17. User-producer Interaction and the Degree of Novelty of Innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harirchi, Gouya; Chaminade, Cristina

    User-producer interactions have been traditionally recognized as important for innovation. With the rapid growth of emerging economies’ markets, and an increasing degree of technological sophistication of both users and producers in those markets, user-producer interaction is becoming global....... The existing literature is quite limited in explaining how collaboration with users in different income regions affects the degree of innovations’ novelty. Using original firm-level data collected in nine countries, this paper argues that collaborating with international customers is positively related...

  18. A deep learning and novelty detection framework for rapid phenotyping in high-content screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christoph; Hoefler, Rudolf; Samwer, Matthias; Gerlich, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    Supervised machine learning is a powerful and widely used method for analyzing high-content screening data. Despite its accuracy, efficiency, and versatility, supervised machine learning has drawbacks, most notably its dependence on a priori knowledge of expected phenotypes and time-consuming classifier training. We provide a solution to these limitations with CellCognition Explorer, a generic novelty detection and deep learning framework. Application to several large-scale screening data sets on nuclear and mitotic cell morphologies demonstrates that CellCognition Explorer enables discovery of rare phenotypes without user training, which has broad implications for improved assay development in high-content screening. PMID:28954863

  19. Visuospatial tasks affect locomotor control more than nonspatial tasks in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menant, Jasmine C; Sturnieks, Daina L; Brodie, Matthew A D; Smith, Stuart T; Lord, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that visuospatial processing requiring working memory is particularly important for balance control during standing and stepping, and that limited spatial encoding contributes to increased interference in postural control dual tasks. However, visuospatial involvement during locomotion has not been directly determined. This study examined the effects of a visuospatial cognitive task versus a nonspatial cognitive task on gait speed, smoothness and variability in older people, while controlling for task difficulty. Thirty-six people aged ≥75 years performed three walking trials along a 20 m walkway under the following conditions: (i) an easy nonspatial task; (ii) a difficult nonspatial task; (iii) an easy visuospatial task; and (iv) a difficult visuospatial task. Gait parameters were computed from a tri-axial accelerometer attached to the sacrum. The cognitive task response times and percentage of correct answers during walking and seated trials were also computed. No significant differences in either cognitive task type error rates or response times were evident in the seated conditions, indicating equivalent task difficulty. In the walking trials, participants responded faster to the visuospatial tasks than the nonspatial tasks but at the cost of making significantly more cognitive task errors. Participants also walked slower, took shorter steps, had greater step time variability and less smooth pelvis accelerations when concurrently performing the visuospatial tasks compared with the nonspatial tasks and when performing the difficult compared with the easy cognitive tasks. Compared with nonspatial cognitive tasks, visuospatial cognitive tasks led to a slower, more variable and less smooth gait pattern. These findings suggest that visuospatial processing might share common networks with locomotor control, further supporting the hypothesis that gait changes during dual task paradigms are not simply due to limited attentional resources

  20. Novelty-seeking trait predicts the effect of methylphenidate on creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvirts, Hila Z; Mayseless, Naama; Segev, Aviv; Lewis, D Yael; Feffer, Kfir; Barnea, Yael; Bloch, Yuval; Shamay-Tsoory, Simon G

    2017-05-01

    In recent years the use of psychostimulants for cognitive enhancement in healthy individuals with no psychiatric disorders has been on the rise. However, it is still unclear whether psychostimulants improve certain cognitive functions at the cost of others, and how these psychostimulants interact with individual personality differences. In the current study, we investigated whether the effect of one common stimulant, methylphenidate (MPH), on creativity is associated with novelty seeking. Thirty-six healthy adults, without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomology, were assigned randomly in a double-blind fashion to receive MPH or placebo. We found that the effect of MPH on creativity was dependent on novelty-seeking (NS) personality characteristics of the participants. MPH increased creativity in individuals with lower NS, while it reduced creativity levels in individuals with high NS. These findings highlight the role of the dopaminergic system in creativity, and indicate that among healthy individuals NS can be seen as a predictor of the effect of MPH on creativity.

  1. Neuropsychological performance, impulsivity, ADHD symptoms, and novelty seeking in compulsive buying disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald Wayne; Shaw, Martha; McCormick, Brett; Bayless, John David; Allen, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    We examined the neuropsychological performance of people with compulsive buying disorder (CBD) and control subjects, along with trait impulsivity, symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and selected personality characteristics. Subjects received a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, depression and ADHD symptom assessment, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a version of the Temperament and Character Inventory. Persons with CBD (n=26) and controls (n=32) were comparable in terms of age, sex, and years of education. Subjects with CBD had a mean age of 36.3 years (S.D.=15.7) and an age at onset of 19.7 years (S.D.=7.0). Compulsive buyers had more lifetime mood, anxiety, and impulse control disorders. People with Compulsive buying performed significantly better on the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence Picture Completion task, a test of visual perception; otherwise, there were no consistent differences in neuropsychological measures. They also had elevated levels of self-reported depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. In conclusion, compulsive buyers have greater lifetime psychiatric comorbidity than controls, and higher levels of self-rated depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. The present study does not support the notion that there is a pattern of neuropsychological deficits associated with CBD. PMID:22766012

  2. Reward and Novelty Enhance Imagination of Future Events in a Motivational-Episodic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulganin, Lisa; Wittmann, Bianca C.

    2015-01-01

    Thinking about personal future events is a fundamental cognitive process that helps us make choices in daily life. We investigated how the imagination of episodic future events is influenced by implicit motivational factors known to guide decision making. In a two-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we controlled learned reward association and stimulus novelty by pre-familiarizing participants with two sets of words in a reward learning task. Words were repeatedly presented and consistently followed by monetary reward or no monetary outcome. One day later, participants imagined personal future events based on previously rewarded, unrewarded and novel words. Reward association enhanced the perceived vividness of the imagined scenes. Reward and novelty-based construction of future events were associated with higher activation of the motivational system (striatum and substantia nigra/ ventral tegmental area) and hippocampus, and functional connectivity between these areas increased during imagination of events based on reward-associated and novel words. These data indicate that implicit past motivational experience contributes to our expectation of what the future holds in store. PMID:26599537

  3. Neuropsychological performance, impulsivity, ADHD symptoms, and novelty seeking in compulsive buying disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Donald Wayne; Shaw, Martha; McCormick, Brett; Bayless, John David; Allen, Jeff

    2012-12-30

    We examined the neuropsychological performance of people with compulsive buying disorder (CBD) and control subjects, along with trait impulsivity, symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and selected personality characteristics. Subjects received a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, depression and ADHD symptom assessment, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and a version of the Temperament and Character Inventory. Persons with CBD (n=26) and controls (n=32) were comparable in terms of age, sex, and years of education. Subjects with CBD had a mean age of 36.3 years (S.D.=15.7) and an age at onset of 19.7 years (S.D.=7.0). Compulsive buyers had more lifetime mood, anxiety, and impulse control disorders. People with Compulsive buying performed significantly better on the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence Picture Completion task, a test of visual perception; otherwise, there were no consistent differences in neuropsychological measures. They also had elevated levels of self-reported depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. In conclusion, compulsive buyers have greater lifetime psychiatric comorbidity than controls, and higher levels of self-rated depression, ADHD symptoms, trait impulsivity, and novelty seeking. The present study does not support the notion that there is a pattern of neuropsychological deficits associated with CBD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal Encouragement to Approach Novelty: A Curvilinear Relation to Change in Anxiety for Inhibited Toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J; Premo, Julie E; Buss, Kristin A

    2016-04-01

    Various parenting behaviors (e.g., protection, intrusiveness, sensitivity) have been shown to impact young children's anxiety development, particularly for temperamentally inhibited children. These behaviors have sometimes predicted both increases and decreases in anxiety in inhibited children, suggesting that linear relations may not adequately model their influence. In the current study, we proposed the dimension of encouragement to approach novelty to characterize parenting behavior ranging from very little encouragement (i.e., protective behavior) to very strong encouragement (i.e., intrusiveness), with gentle encouragement residing in the middle. In a sample of 110 toddlers (48 female, 62 male) and their mothers, the linear and curvilinear effects of this parenting dimension were investigated in relation to change in child separation anxiety and shyness from age 2 to age 3. Inhibited temperament was also investigated as a moderator. Encouragement to approach novelty displayed the hypothesized curvilinear relation to change in separation anxiety, but not shyness, at extreme levels of inhibited temperament. Toddlers increased in separation anxiety when mothers' encouragement resided at either extreme end of the continuum, with lower child anxiety occurring when mothers displayed behavior closer to the middle of the continuum. Implications for the study of parenting outcomes for inhibited toddlers are discussed.

  5. On the path to genetic novelties: insights from programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, Francesco; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how genetic novelties arise is a central goal of evolutionary biology. To this end, programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing deserve special consideration. While programmed DNA elimination reshapes genomes by eliminating chromatin during organismal development, RNA splicing rearranges genetic messages by removing intronic regions during transcription. Small RNAs help to mediate this class of sequence reorganization, which is not error-free. It is this imperfection that makes programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing excellent candidates for generating evolutionary novelties. Leveraging a number of these two processes' mechanistic and evolutionary properties, which have been uncovered over the past years, we present recently proposed models and empirical evidence for how splicing can shape the structure of protein-coding genes in eukaryotes. We also chronicle a number of intriguing similarities between the processes of programmed DNA elimination and RNA splicing, and highlight the role that the variation in the population-genetic environment may play in shaping their target sequences. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Exploring the Experience of Novelty When Viewing Creative Adverts: An ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujin Zhou

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrophysiological correlates of experiencing novelty in creative advertising were studied in 28 healthy subjects using event-related potentials. Participants viewed images that were difficult to interpret until a description was presented providing either a creative description (CD featuring an unexpected description of the image based on the original advertisement, or a normal description (ND, which was a literal description of the image (and served as a baseline condition. Participants evaluated the level of creativity of the description. The results showed that the N2 amplitude was higher for CDs than for NDs across middle and right scalp regions between 240 and 270 ms, most likely reflecting conflict detection. Moreover, CDs demonstrated greater N400 than NDs in a time window between 380 and 500 ms, it is argued that this reflects semantic integration. The present study investigates the electrophysiological correlates of experiencing novelty in advertising with ecologically valid stimuli. This substantially extends the findings of earlier laboratory studies with more artificial stimuli.

  7. A Computable Plug-In Estimator of Minimum Volume Sets for Novelty Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Chiwoo

    2010-10-01

    A minimum volume set of a probability density is a region of minimum size among the regions covering a given probability mass of the density. Effective methods for finding the minimum volume sets are very useful for detecting failures or anomalies in commercial and security applications-a problem known as novelty detection. One theoretical approach of estimating the minimum volume set is to use a density level set where a kernel density estimator is plugged into the optimization problem that yields the appropriate level. Such a plug-in estimator is not of practical use because solving the corresponding minimization problem is usually intractable. A modified plug-in estimator was proposed by Hyndman in 1996 to overcome the computation difficulty of the theoretical approach but is not well studied in the literature. In this paper, we provide theoretical support to this estimator by showing its asymptotic consistency. We also show that this estimator is very competitive to other existing novelty detection methods through an extensive empirical study. ©2010 INFORMS.

  8. High Genetic Diversity and Novelty in Eukaryotic Plankton Assemblages Inhabiting Saline Lakes in the Qaidam Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Wang, Fang; Chu, Limin; Wang, Hao; Zhong, Zhiping; Liu, Zhipei; Gao, Jianyong; Duan, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Saline lakes are intriguing ecosystems harboring extremely productive microbial communities in spite of their extreme environmental conditions. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the genetic diversity (18S rRNA gene) of the planktonic microbial eukaryotes (nano- and picoeukaryotes) in six different inland saline lakes located in the Qaidam Basin. The novelty level are high, with about 11.23% of the whole dataset showing Basin are also dominated by Holozoa group, accounting for 26.65% of the total number of sequence reads. Notably, Chlorophyta group are only found in high abundance in Lake Gasikule (28.00%), whereas less represented in other hypersaline lakes such as Gahai (0.50%) and Xiaochaidan (1.15%). Further analysis show that the compositions of planktonic eukaryotic assemblages are also most variable between different sampling sites in the same lake. Out of the parameters, four show significant correlation to this CCA: altitude, calcium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Overall, this study shows important gaps in the current knowledge about planktonic microbial eukaryotes inhabiting Qaidam Basin (hyper) saline water bodies. The identified diversity and novelty patterns among eukaryotic plankton assemblages in saline lake are of great importance for understanding and interpreting their ecology and evolution. PMID:25401703

  9. Deep layer neurons in the rat medial entorhinal cortex fire sparsely irrespective of spatial novelty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBurgalossi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular recordings in medial entorhinal cortex have revealed the existence of spatially-modulated firing patterns, which are thought to contribute to a cognitive map of external space. Previous work indicated that during exploration of novel environments, spiking activity in deep entorhinal layers is much sparser than in superficial layers. In the present report, we ask whether this laminar activity profile is a consequence of environmental novelty. We report on a large dataset of juxtacellularly-recorded neurons (n = 70 whose spiking activity was monitored while rats explored either a novel or a familiar environment, or both within the same session. Irrespective of previous knowledge of the environment, deep layer activity was very low during exploration (median firing rate 0.4 Hz for non-silent cells, with a large fraction of silent cells (n = 19 of a total 37, while superficial layer activity was several times higher (median firing rate 2.4 Hz; n = 33. The persistence of laminar differences in firing activity both under environmental novelty and familiarity, and even in head-restrained stationary animals, suggests that sparse coding might be a constitutive feature of deep entorhinal layers.

  10. Altered Patterns of Reflex Excitability, Balance, and Locomotion Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI and Locomotor Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodip K Bose

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Spasticity is an important problem that complicates daily living in many individuals with SCI. While previous studies in human and animals revealed significant improvements in locomotor ability with treadmill locomotor training, it is not known to what extent locomotor training influences spasticity. In addition, it would be of considerable practical interest to know how the more ergonomically feasible cycle training compares with treadmill training as therapy to manage SCI-induced spasticity and to improve locomotor function. Our present studies were initiated to evaluate the influence of different types of locomotor training on measures of limb spasticity, gait, and reflex components that contribute to locomotion. For these studies, thirty animals received midthoracic SCI using the standard MASCIS protocol (10 g 2.5 cm weight drop. They were divided randomly into three equal groups: control (contused untrained, contused treadmill trained, and contused cycle trained. Velocity-dependent ankle torque was tested across a wide range of velocities (612 – 49 deg/sec to permit quantitation of tonic (low velocity and dynamic (high velocity contributions to lower limb spasticity. Treadmill and cycle training were started on post-injury day 8. By post-injury weeks 4 and 6, the untrained group revealed significant velocity-dependent ankle extensor spasticity, compared to pre-surgical control values. At these post-injury time points, spasticity was not observed in either of the two training groups. Instead, a significantly milder form of velocity dependent spasticity was detected at postcontusion week 8 through 12 in both treadmill and bicycle training groups at the four fastest ankle rotation velocities (350 - 612 deg/sec. Locomotor training using treadmill or bicycle also produced significant increase in the rate of recovery of limb placement measures (limb axis, base of support, and BBB and reflex rate depression, a quantitative assessment of

  11. Locomotor activation by theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine: involvement of adenosine and dopamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduccia, Allison A; Wang, Yuanyuan; Simms, Jeffrey A; Yi, Henry Y; Li, Rui; Bjeldanes, Leonard; Ye, Chuangxing; Bartlett, Selena E

    2012-08-01

    Purine compounds, such as caffeine, have many health-promoting properties and have proven to be beneficial in treating a number of different conditions. Theacrine, a purine alkaloid structurally similar to caffeine and abundantly present in Camellia kucha, has recently become of interest as a potential therapeutic compound. In the present study, theacrine was tested using a rodent behavioral model to investigate the effects of the drug on locomotor activity. Long Evans rats were injected with theacrine (24 or 48 mg/kg, i.p.) and activity levels were measured. Results showed that the highest dose of theacrine (48 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased locomotor activity compared to control animals and activity remained elevated throughout the duration of the session. To test for the involvement of adenosine receptors underlying theacrine's motor-activating properties, rats were administered a cocktail of the adenosine A₁ agonist, N⁶-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) and A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS-21680; 0.2 mg/kg, i.p.). Pre-treatment with theacrine significantly attenuated the motor depression induced by the adenosine receptor agonists, indicating that theacrine is likely acting as an adenosine receptor antagonist. Next, we examined the role of DA D₁ and D₂ receptor antagonism on theacrine-induced hyperlocomotion. Both antagonists, D₁R SCH23390 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) and D₂R eticlopride (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), significantly reduced theacrine-stimulated activity indicating that this behavioral response, at least in part, is mediated by DA receptors. In order to investigate the brain region where theacrine may be acting, the drug (10 or 20 μg) was infused bilaterally into nucleus accumbens (NAc). Theacrine enhanced activity levels in a dose-dependent manner, implicating a role of the NAc in modulating theacrine's effects on locomotion. In addition, theacrine did not induce locomotor

  12. The awareness of novelty for strangely familiar words: a laboratory analogue of the déjà vu experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A. Urquhart

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Déjà vu is a nebulous memory experience defined by a clash between evaluations of familiarity and novelty for the same stimulus. We sought to generate it in the laboratory by pairing a DRM recognition task, which generates erroneous familiarity for critical words, with a monitoring task by which participants realise that some of these erroneously familiar words are in fact novel. We tested 30 participants in an experiment in which we varied both participant awareness of stimulus novelty and erroneous familiarity strength. We found that déjà vu reports were most frequent for high novelty critical words (∼25%, with low novelty critical words yielding only baseline levels of déjà vu report frequency (∼10%. There was no significant variation in déjà vu report frequency according to familiarity strength. Discursive accounts of the experimentally-generated déjà vu experience suggest that aspects of the naturalistic déjà vu experience were captured by this analogue, but that the analogue was also limited in its focus and prone to influence by demand characteristics. We discuss theoretical and methodological considerations relevant to further development of this procedure and propose that verifiable novelty is an important component of both naturalistic and experimental analogues of déjà vu.

  13. Effect of physical exercise prelabyrinthectomy on locomotor balance compensation in the squirrel monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, M.; Ohashi, K.; Yoshihara, T.; MacDonald, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of physical exercise, during a prepathology state, on locomotor balance compensation after subsequent unilateral labyrinthectomy in squirrel monkeys. An experimental group underwent 3 hr. of daily running exercise on a treadmill for 3 mo. prior to the surgery, whereas a control group was not exercised. Postoperatively, the locomotor balance function of both groups was tested for 3 mo. There was no significant difference in gait deviation counts in the acute phase of compensation. However, in the chronic compensation maintenance phase, the number of gait deviation counts was fewer in the exercise group, which showed significantly better performance stability.

  14. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance in a Discordant Sensory Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, D. R.; De Dios, Y. E.; Layne, C. S.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges incurred when readapting to a gravitational environment. Sensorimotor Adaptability (SA) training has been proposed as a countermeasure to improve locomotor performance during re-adaptation, and it is suggested that the benefits of SA training may be further enhanced by improving detection of weak sensory signals via mechanisms such as stochastic resonance when a non-zero level of stochastic white noise based electrical stimulation is applied to the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS). The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of using SVS to improve short-term adaptation in a sensory discordant environment during performance of a locomotor task.

  15. Glutamatergic mechanisms for speed control and network operation in the rodent locomotor CPG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Kiehn, Ole

    2010-01-01

    in mammals have produced conflicting results regarding the necessity and role of the different ionotropic glutamate receptors (GluRs) in the CPG function. Here, we use electrophysiological and pharmacological techniques in the in vitro neonatal mouse lumbar spinal cord to investigate the role of a broad...... mechanisms acting at various network levels. AMPA and kainate receptors are necessary for generating the highest locomotor frequencies. For coordination, NMDARs are more important than non-NMDARs for conveying the rhythmic signal from the network to the motor neurons during long-lasting and steady locomotor...

  16. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not in adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F; Maust, Joel D; Corthell, John T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. We examined differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity and basal differences in striatal neuron function in adult and in adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on "junk-food" diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine-induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In rats that became obese after eating junk-food, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ∼60 % at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals, and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats.

  17. Enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization and intrinsic excitability of NAc medium spiny neurons in adult but not adolescent rats susceptible to diet-induced obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oginsky, Max F.; Maust, Joel D.; Corthell, John T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Basal and diet-induced differences in mesolimbic function, particularly within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), may contribute to human obesity; these differences may be more pronounced in susceptible populations. Objectives We determined whether there are differences in cocaine-induced behavioral plasticity in rats that are susceptible vs. resistant to diet-induced obesity, and basal differences in the striatal neuron function in adult and adolescent obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Susceptible and resistant outbred rats were identified based on “junk-food” diet-induced obesity. Then, the induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization, which is mediated by enhanced striatal function and is associated with increased motivation for rewards and reward-paired cues, were evaluated. Basal differences in mesolimbic function were examined in selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats (P70-80 and P30-40) using both cocaine induced locomotion and whole-cell patch clamping approaches in NAc core medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Results In rats that became obese after eating “junk-food”, the expression of locomotor sensitization was enhanced compared to non-obese rats, with similarly strong responses to 7.5 and 15 mg/kg cocaine. Without diet manipulation, obesity-prone rats were hyper-responsive to the acute locomotor-activating effects of cocaine, and the intrinsic excitability of NAc core MSNs was enhanced by ~60% at positive and negative potentials. These differences were present in adult, but not adolescent rats. Post-synaptic glutamatergic transmission was similar between groups. Conclusions Mesolimbic systems, particularly NAc MSNs, are hyper-responsive in obesity-prone individuals; and interactions between predisposition and experience influence neurobehavioral plasticity in ways that may promote weight gain and hamper weight loss in susceptible rats. PMID:26612617

  18. Activity of Renshaw cells during locomotor-like rhythmic activity in the isolated spinal cord of neonatal mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Restrepo, Carlos E.; Kiehn, Ole

    2006-01-01

    % of the recorded RCs fired in-phase with the ipsilateral L2 flexor-related rhythm, whereas the rest fired in the extensor phase. Each population of RCs fired throughout the corresponding locomotor phase. All RCs received both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs during the locomotor-like rhythmic activity...

  19. Alternate pathways of body shape evolution translate into common patterns of locomotor evolution in two clades of lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Philip J; Irschick, Duncan J

    2010-06-01

    Body shape has a fundamental impact on organismal function, but it is unknown how functional morphology and locomotor performance and kinematics relate across a diverse array of body shapes. We showed that although patterns of body shape evolution differed considerably between lizards of the Phrynosomatinae and Lerista, patterns of locomotor evolution coincided between clades. Specifically, we found that the phrynosomatines evolved a stocky phenotype through body widening and limb shortening, whereas Lerista evolved elongation through body lengthening and limb shortening. In both clades, relative limb length played a key role in locomotor evolution and kinematic strategies, with long-limbed species moving faster and taking longer strides. In Lerista, the body axis also influenced locomotor evolution. Similar patterns of locomotor evolution were likely due to constraints on how the body can move. However, these common patterns of locomotor evolution between the two clades resulted in different kinematic strategies and levels of performance among species because of their morphological differences. Furthermore, we found no evidence that distinct body shapes are adaptations to different substrates, as locomotor kinematics did not change on loose or solid substrates. Our findings illustrate the importance of studying kinematics to understand the mechanisms of locomotor evolution and phenotype-function relationships.

  20. Lack of adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1): consequences on corticospinal tract development and on locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nait Taleb Ali, H; Morel, M P; Doulazmi, M; Scotto-Lomassese, S; Gaspar, P; Dusart, I; Bennis, M

    2014-02-26

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathways are involved in axonal growth and regeneration. The calcium-calmodulin- stimulated adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1), a regulator of cAMP levels, is strongly expressed in the corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) in cerebral cortex layer V during development, but its role in the development of the corticospinal tract (CST) is unknown. Here, we analyse the organization of the CST pathway using anterograde and retrograde tracers in the barrelless (brl) mouse that carries an inactivating mutation of the AC1 gene. We show that in brl mice the general organization of the CST is normal but there is an increase in the number of axons in the ipsilateral contingent in the dorsal and ventral medial funiculi of the cervical spinal cord. The density of CSMN in layer V of the motor cortex is increased in brl compared to wild-type mice. Thus, lack of AC1 likely perturbs late phases of CSMN and CST development. Next, we examine the motor recovery after a spinal cord injury (SCI). We find that brl mice show enhanced locomotor functions as assessed by the BMS (Basso mouse scale) as early as 6h and up to 6 weeks after SCI, indicating a smaller responsiveness of brl mice to SCI. It is therefore possible that developmental effects on motor systems might decrease the locomotor effects consecutive to a SCI. This point is particularly important with regards to the use of transgenic animals for testing SCI recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. l-5-hydroxytryptophan resets the circadian locomotor activity rhythm of the nocturnal Indian pygmy field mouse, Mus terricolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Priyoneel; Singaravel, Muniyandi; Haldar, Chandana

    2012-03-01

    We report that l-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), a serotonin precursor, resets the overt circadian rhythm in the Indian pygmy field mouse, Mus terricolor, in a phase- and dose-dependent manner. We used wheel running to assess phase shifts in the free-running locomotor activity rhythm. Following entrainment to a 12:12 h light-dark cycle, 5-HTP (100 mg/kg in saline) was intraperitoneally administered in complete darkness at circadian time (CT)s 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21, and the ensuing phase shifts in the locomotor activity rhythm were calculated. The results show that 5-HTP differentially shifts the phase of the rhythm, causing phase advances from CT 0 to CT 12 and phase delays from CT 12 to CT 21. Maximum advance phase shift was at CT 6 (1.18 ± 0.37 h) and maximum delay was at CT 18 (-2.36 ± 0.56 h). No extended dead zone is apparent. Vehicle (saline) at any CT did not evoke a significant phase shift. Investigations with different doses (10, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) of 5-HTP revealed that the phase resetting effect is dose-dependent. The shape of the phase-response curve (PRC) has a strong similarity to PRCs obtained using some serotonergic agents. There was no significant increase in wheel-running activity after 5-HTP injection, ruling out behavioral arousal-dependent shifts. This suggests that this phase resetting does not completely depend on feedback of the overt rhythmic behavior on the circadian clock. A mechanistic explanation of these shifts is currently lacking.

  2. The 28-day exposure to fenpropathrin decreases locomotor activity and reduces activity of antioxidant enzymes in mice brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieradko-Iwanicka, Barbara; Borzęcki, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Fenpropathrin (Fen) is a pyrethroid (Pyr) insecticide. Pyrs are used in veterinary medicine, in agriculture and for domestic purposes. As their use increases, new questions about their side effects and mode of action in non-target organisms arise. The objective of this work was to characterize dose-response relationship for in vivo motor function and memory in mice exposed to Fen for 28 days and to assess its influence on activity of antioxidant enzymes in mice brains. The experiment was performed using 64 female mice. Fen at the dose of 11.9mg/kg of body mass, 5.95mg/kg or 2.38mg/kg was administered ip to the mice for 28 consecutive days. Motor function and spatial working memory were tested on days 7, 14 and 28. On day 29, the animals were sacrificed and brains were used to determine activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Fen significantly decreased locomotor activity in mice receiving the highest dose at every stage of the experiment. Lower doses reduced locomotion on days 7 and 14. Fen did not produce memory impairment. A decrease in activities of SOD and GPx was recorded in mice brains. The decrease of SOD activity in mice brains results from direct inhibition of the enzyme by Fen and/or increased utilization due to excessive free radical formation in conditions of Fen-induced oxidative stress. The reduction in GPx activity is probably due to limited glutathione availability. The reduced locomotor activity is a behavioral demonstration of Fen-induced damage in the dopaminergic system. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine on nicotine-induced locomotor activation in adolescent and adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies have shown that repeated stress experiences can result in an increase in the locomotor response to the subsequent administration of drugs of abuse, a phenomenon that has been termed behavioral cross-sensitization. Behavioral sensitization reflects neuroadaptive processes associated with drug addiction and drug-induced psychosis. Although cross-sensitization between stress- and drug-induced locomotor activity has been clearly demonstrated in adult rats, few studies have evaluated this phenomenon in adolescent rats. In the present study, we determined if the simultaneous exposure to stress and nicotine was capable of inducing behavioral sensitization to nicotine in adolescent and adult rats. To this end, adolescent (postnatal day (P 28-37 and adult (P60-67 rats received nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline (0.9% NaCl, sc and were immediately subjected to restraint stress for 2 h once a day for 7 days. The control group for stress was undisturbed following nicotine or saline injections. Three days after the last exposure to stress and nicotine, rats were challenged with a single dose of nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, sc or saline and nicotine-induced locomotion was then recorded for 30 min. In adolescent rats, nicotine caused behavioral sensitization only in animals that were simultaneously exposed to stress, while in adult rats nicotine promoted sensitization independently of stress exposure. These findings demonstrate that adolescent rats are more vulnerable to the effects of stress on behavioral sensitization to nicotine than adult rats.

  4. Locomotor sensitization to intermittent ketamine administration is associated with nucleus accumbens plasticity in male and female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C E; Schoepfer, K J; Dossat, A M; Saland, S K; Wright, K N; Kabbaj, M

    2017-07-15

    Clinical evidence suggests superior antidepressant response over time with a repeated, intermittent ketamine treatment regimen as compared to a single infusion. However, the club drug ketamine is commonly abused. Therefore, the abuse potential of repeated ketamine injections at low doses needs to be investigated. In this study, we investigated the abuse potential of repeated exposure to either 0, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg ketamine administered once weekly for seven weeks. Locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) were assayed to evaluate behavioral sensitization to the locomotor activating effects of ketamine and its rewarding properties, respectively. Our results show that while neither males nor females developed CPP, males treated with 5 mg/kg and females treated with either 2.5 or 5 mg/kg ketamine behaviorally sensitized. Furthermore, dendritic spine density was increased in the NAc of both males and females administered 5 mg/kg ketamine, an effect specific to the NAc shell (NAcSh) in males but to both the NAc core (NAcC) and NAcSh in females. Additionally, males administered 5 mg/kg ketamine displayed increased protein expression of ΔfosB, calcium calmodulin kinase II alpha (CaMKIIα), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), an effect not observed in females administered either dose of ketamine. However, males and females administered 5 mg/kg ketamine displayed increased protein expression of AMPA receptors (GluA1). Taken together, low-dose ketamine, when administered intermittently, induces behavioral sensitization at a lower dose in females than males, accompanied by an increase in spine density in the NAc and protein expression changes in pathways commonly implicated in addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Picture novelty attenuates semantic interference and modulates concomitant neural activity in the anterior cingulate cortex and the locus coeruleus.

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    Krebs, Ruth M; Fias, Wim; Achten, Eric; Boehler, Carsten N

    2013-07-01

    Goal-directed behavior requires the ability to focus on information that is relevant to a given task and to ignore information that might interfere with it. In the Stroop task, for example, the influence of an irrelevant word needs to be overcome, which is believed to be difficult because it arises in a fast and automatic fashion, which effectively renders it very salient. Here we address the question of whether this can be counteracted by increasing the saliency of the task-relevant input, for example by modulating its relative novelty, which increases saliency in a fairly implicit and controlled fashion. To test the influence of novelty on interference processing, we employed a picture-word interference task in the fMRI scanner, in which we manipulated the novelty of the task-relevant picture. We found that picture novelty indeed reduced typical behavioral interference from incongruent words. Moreover, familiar incongruent trials were associated with activity increases in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a prime conflict-processing region, as well as in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), which entertains connections both to and from the ACC. The lack of analogous activations in novel incongruent trials suggests that the reduction of behavioral interference was not related to enhanced conflict-resolution processes, but rather to the automatic prioritization of novel pictures which appears to avert the influence of irrelevant words at the front end. Interestingly, activity in the ACC and LC was slightly stronger in novel congruent trials compared to incongruent ones, which may reflect increased relevance of novel stimuli when encoded in a congruent context. In summary, the present data demonstrate that stimulus novelty clearly reduces semantic interference, and highlights a complex interaction of interference and novelty processing on the neural level, including an involvement of the noradrenergic system in the processing of cognitively and perceptually

  6. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M

    2011-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by cognitive and emotional alterations that are related to abnormal function of the frontal cortex (FC). FC is involved in working memory and decision making and is activated following exposure to a novel environment. The serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A......)R) is highly expressed in the FC where its activation induces hallucinations, while blockade of 5-HT(2A)Rs contributes to the therapeutic effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(2A)R in FC activation following exposure to a novel...... environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (∼160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A...

  7. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M

    2011-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by cognitive and emotional alterations that are related to abnormal function of the frontal cortex (FC). FC is involved in working memory and decision making and is activated following exposure to a novel environment. The serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A......)R) is highly expressed in the FC where its activation induces hallucinations, while blockade of 5-HT(2A)Rs contributes to the therapeutic effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(2A)R in FC activation following exposure to a novel...... environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (~160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A...

  8. Nanomolar oxytocin synergizes with weak electrical afferent stimulation to activate the locomotor CpG of the rat spinal cord in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dose

    Full Text Available Synergizing the effect of afferent fibre stimulation with pharmacological interventions is a desirable goal to trigger spinal locomotor activity, especially after injury. Thus, to better understand the mechanisms to optimize this process, we studied the role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (previously shown to stimulate locomotor networks on network and motoneuron properties using the isolated neonatal rat spinal cord. On motoneurons oxytocin (1 nM-1 μM generated sporadic bursts with superimposed firing and dose-dependent depolarization. No desensitization was observed despite repeated applications. Tetrodotoxin completely blocked the effects of oxytocin, demonstrating the network origin of the responses. Recording motoneuron pool activity from lumbar ventral roots showed oxytocin mediated depolarization with synchronous bursts, and depression of reflex responses in a stimulus and peptide-concentration dependent fashion. Disinhibited bursting caused by strychnine and bicuculline was accelerated by oxytocin whose action was blocked by the oxytocin antagonist atosiban. Fictive locomotion appeared when subthreshold concentrations of NMDA plus 5HT were coapplied with oxytocin, an effect prevented after 24 h incubation with the inhibitor of 5HT synthesis, PCPA. When fictive locomotion was fully manifested, oxytocin did not change periodicity, although cycle amplitude became smaller. A novel protocol of electrical stimulation based on noisy waveforms and applied to one dorsal root evoked stereotypic fictive locomotion. Whenever the stimulus intensity was subthreshold, low doses of oxytocin triggered fictive locomotion although oxytocin per se did not affect primary afferent depolarization evoked by dorsal root pulses. Among the several functional targets for the action of oxytocin at lumbar spinal cord level, the present results highlight how small concentrations of this peptide could bring spinal networks to threshold for fictive locomotion in

  9. Adaptation of the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor rating scale for use in a clinical model of spinal cord injury in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rachel B; Basso, D Michele; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Fisher, Lesley C; Mo, Xiaokui; Moore, Sarah A

    2016-08-01

    Naturally occurring acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in pet dogs provides an important clinical animal model through which to confirm and extend findings from rodent studies; however, validated quantitative outcome measures for dogs are limited. We adapted the Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) scale for use in a clinical dog model of acute thoracolumbar SCI. Based on observation of normal dogs, modifications were made to account for species differences in locomotion. Assessments of paw and tail position, and trunk stability were modified to produce a 19 point scale suitable for use in dogs, termed the canine BBB scale (cBBB). Pet dogs with naturally occurring acute SCI were assigned cBBB scores at 3, 10 and 30days after laminectomy. Scores assigned via the cBBB were stable across testing sessions in normal dogs but increased significantly between days 3 and 30 in SCI-affected dogs (p=0.0003). The scale was highly responsive to changes in locomotor recovery over a 30day period, with a standardized response mean of 1.34. Concurrent validity was good, with strong correlations observed between the cBBB and two other locomotor scales, the OSCIS (r=0.94; p<0.001) and the MFS (r=0.85; p<0.0001). cBBB scores inversely correlated with other assessments of recovery including mechanical sensory threshold (r=-0.68; p<0.0001) and coefficient of variation of stride length (r=-0.49; p<0.0001). These results support the use of the cBBB to assess locomotor recovery in canine clinical translational models of SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation of the Basso–Beattie–Bresnahan locomotor rating scale for use in a clinical model of spinal cord injury in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rachel B.; Basso, D. Michele; da Costa, Ronaldo C.; Fisher, Lesley C.; Mo, Xiaokui; Moore, Sarah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Naturally occurring acute spinal cord injury (SCI) in pet dogs provides an important clinical animal model through which to confirm and extend findings from rodent studies; however, validated quantitative outcome measures for dogs are limited. New method We adapted the Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) scale for use in a clinical dog model of acute thoracolumbar SCI. Based on observation of normal dogs, modifications were made to account for species differences in locomotion. Assessments of paw and tail position, and trunk stability were modified to produce a 19 point scale suitable for use in dogs, termed the canine BBB scale (cBBB). Pet dogs with naturally occurring acute SCI were assigned cBBB scores at 3, 10 and 30 days after laminectomy. Results Scores assigned via the cBBB were stable across testing sessions in normal dogs but increased significantly between days 3 and 30 in SCI-affected dogs (p = 0.0003). The scale was highly responsive to changes in locomotor recovery over a 30 day period, with a standardized response mean of 1.34. Comparison with existing methods Concurrent validity was good, with strong correlations observed between the cBBB and two other locomotor scales, the OSCIS (r = 0.94; p < 0.001) and the MFS (r = 0.85; p < 0.0001). cBBB scores inversely correlated with other assessments of recovery including mechanical sensory threshold (r = −0.68; p < 0.0001) and coefficient of variation of stride length (r = −0.49; p < 0.0001). Conclusions These results support the use of the cBBB to assess locomotor recovery in canine clinical translational models of SCI. PMID:27155106

  11. Locomotor stability and adaptation during perturbed walking across the adult female lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCrum, Christopher; Epro, Gaspar; Meijer, Kenneth; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Brueggemann, Gert-Peter; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine locomotor stability and, adaptation across the adult female lifespan during perturbed walking on the treadmill. 11 young, 11 middle and 14 older-aged female adults (mean and SD: 25.5(2.1), 50.6(6.4) and 69.0(4.7) years old respectively) walked on a treadmill. We

  12. Disruption of locomotor adaptation with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia Tsok Lam; Bouyer, Laurent J; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Locomotor patterns are adapted on a trial-and-error basis to account for predictable dynamics. Once a walking pattern is adapted, the new calibration is stored and must be actively de-adapted. Here, we tested the hypothesis that storage of newly acquired ankle adaptation in walking is dependent o...

  13. Impairment of the organization of locomotor and exploratory behaviors in bile duct-ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; de Oliveira, Diogo L; Mussulini, Ben Hur M.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) arises from acute or chronic liver diseases and leads to several problems, including motor impairment. Animal models of chronic liver disease have extensively investigated the mechanisms of this disease. Impairment of locomotor activity has been described in different ...

  14. The morphological development of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, CM; Butler, PJ; ElHaj, AJ; Egginton, S; Loonen, MJJE

    The masses of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of wild barnacle goose goslings, from a migratory population, were examined systematically during development and their values compared to those of pre-migratory geese. Pre-flight development was typified by approximately linear increases of body, leg,

  15. Drugs that Target Dopamine Receptors: Changes in Locomotor Activity in Larval Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an effort at the US Environmental Protection Agency to develop a rapid in vivo screen for prioritization of toxic chemicals, we have begun to characterize the locomotor activity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) larvae. This includes assessing the acute effects of drugs known...

  16. NeuroRecovery Network provides standardization of locomotor training for persons with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Sarah A; Forrest, Gail F; VanHiel, Leslie R; Davé, Michele; D'Urso, Denise

    2012-09-01

    To illustrate the continuity of care afforded by a standardized locomotor training program across a multisite network setting within the Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation NeuroRecovery Network (NRN). Single patient case study. Two geographically different hospital-based outpatient facilities. This case highlights a 25-year-old man diagnosed with C4 motor incomplete spinal cord injury with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade D. Standardized locomotor training program 5 sessions per week for 1.5 hours per session, for a total of 100 treatment sessions, with 40 sessions at 1 center and 60 at another. Ten-meter walk test and 6-minute walk test were assessed at admission and discharge across both facilities. For each of the 100 treatment sessions percent body weight support, average, and maximum treadmill speed were evaluated. Locomotor endurance, as measured by the 6-minute walk test, and overground gait speed showed consistent improvement from admission to discharge. Throughout training, the patient decreased the need for body weight support and was able to tolerate faster treadmill speeds. Data indicate that the patient continued to improve on both treatment parameters and walking function. Standardization across the NRN centers provided a mechanism for delivering consistent and reproducible locomotor training programs across 2 facilities without disrupting training or recovery progression. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Robotic-assisted locomotor training enhances ankle performance in adults with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vennila; Kindig, Matthew; Mirbagheri, Mehdi

    2016-10-12

    Ankle joint control plays an important role in independent walking. This study investigated the effects of robotic-assisted locomotor training on impaired ankle joint control in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury. Sixteen individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury underwent 12 one-h sessions of robotic-assisted locomotor training for 4 weeks, while 16 individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury served as inactive controls. Changes in ankle control measures, torque and co-activation were evaluated during maximal voluntary contractions in dorsi- and plantar-flexion. Changes in walking performance measures using Timed Up and Go (TUG), 10-m walk (10MWT) and 6-min walk (6MWT) tests were evaluated at 2 time points: baseline and after 4 weeks. Maximal voluntary contractions torque during both dorsi- and plantar-flexion contractions improved markedly in the robotic-assisted locomotor training group compared with baseline. Furthermore, after the training, co-activation during the dorsi-flexion maximal voluntary contractions decreased in the training group compared with controls. In addition, the training group significantly improved walking mobility (TUG) and speed (10MWT) compared with baseline. Finally, correlation analysis indicated a significant linear relationship between maximal voluntary contraction torques and walking performance measures. These findings provide evidence that robotic-assisted locomotor training improves ankle joint control, which may translate into enhanced walking performance in individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury.

  18. MRT of the locomotor system. 4. rev. and enl. ed.; MRT des Bewegungsapparats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahlensieck, Martin [Praxisnetz Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin Bonn Bad Godesberg - RheinSieg, Bonn (Germany); Reiser, Maximilian (ed.) [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2015-02-01

    The book on MRT of the locomotor system covers the following topics: relevant NMT imaging techniques, spinal cord, shoulder, elbows, wrist and fingers, hip region, knee, lower leg - ankle - foot, temporomandibular joint, skeletal muscles, bone marrow, bone and soft tissue tumors, osteoporosis, sacroiliac joint, jaw and periodontium.

  19. EphA4 defines a class of excitatory locomotor-related interneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, S. J B; Lundfald, Line; Kiehn, Ole

    2005-01-01

    of the role of these cells in the network. One such marker is the EphA4 axon guidance receptor. EphA4-null mice display an abnormal rabbit-like hopping gait that is thought to be the result of synchronization of the normally alternating, bilateral locomotor network via aberrant crossed connections...

  20. Efficacy of Static Magnetic Field for Locomotor Activity of Experimental Osteopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Taniguchi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine the effectiveness of applying a static magnetic field (SMF for increasing bone mineral density (BMD, we assessed the degree of osteopenia by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA, the metabolism measuring system, and histological examination of bone tissue in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model. Thirty-six female Wistar rats (8 weeks old, 160–180 g were divided into three groups. The rats in the OVX-M group were exposed to SMF for 12 weeks after ovariectomy. The ovariectomized rats in the OVX-D group were not exposed to SMF as a control. The rats in the normal group received neither ovariectomy nor exposure to SMF. Twelve-week exposure to SMF in the OVX-M group inhibited the reduction in BMD that was observed in the OVX-D group. Moreover, in the OVX rats, before exposure to SMF, there was no clear difference in the level of locomotor activity between the active and resting phases, and the pattern of locomotor activity was irregular. After exposure of OVX rats to SMF, the pattern of locomotor activity became diphasic with clear active and resting phases, as was observed in the normal group. In the OVX-M group, the continuity of the trabecular bone was maintained more favorably and bone mass was higher than the respective parameters in the OVX-D group. These results demonstrate that exposure to SMF increased the level of locomotor activity in OVX rats, thereby increasing BMD.

  1. Functional organization of locomotor interneurons in the ventral lumbar spinal cord of the newborn rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Antri

    Full Text Available Although the mammalian locomotor CPG has been localized to the lumbar spinal cord, the functional-anatomical organization of flexor and extensor interneurons has not been characterized. Here, we tested the hypothesis that flexor and extensor interneuronal networks for walking are physically segregated in the lumbar spinal cord. For this purpose, we performed optical recordings and lesion experiments from a horizontally sectioned lumbar spinal cord isolated from neonate rats. This ventral hemi spinal cord preparation produces well-organized fictive locomotion when superfused with 5-HT/NMDA. The dorsal surface of the preparation was visualized using the Ca(2+ indicator fluo-4 AM, while simultaneously monitoring motor output at ventral roots L2 and L5. Using calcium imaging, we provided a general mapping view of the interneurons that maintained a stable phase relationship with motor output. We showed that the dorsal surface of L1 segment contains a higher density of locomotor rhythmic cells than the other segments. Moreover, L1 segment lesioning induced the most important changes in the locomotor activity in comparison with lesions at the T13 or L2 segments. However, no lesions led to selective disruption of either flexor or extensor output. In addition, this study found no evidence of functional parcellation of locomotor interneurons into flexor and extensor pools at the dorsal-ventral midline of the lumbar spinal cord of the rat.

  2. A Novelty Design Of Minimization Of Electrical Losses In A Vector Controlled Induction Machine Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryza, Solly; Irwanto, M.; Lubis, Zulkarnain; Putera Utama Siahaan, Andysah; Rahim, Robbi; Furqan, Mhd.

    2018-01-01

    The induction motor has in the industry . More attention has been a focus to develop and design of induction motor drive. With the method of vector control novelty prove the efficiency of induction motor over their entire speed range. In this paper desirable to design a loss minimization controller which can improve the efficiency. Also, this research described Modeling of an induction motor with core loss included. Realization of methods vector control for an induction motor drive with loss element included. The case of the loss minimization condition. The procedure was successful to calculate the gains of a PI controller. Though the problem of obtaining a robust and sensorless induction motor drive is by no means completely solved, the results obtained as part of this work point in a promising direction.

  3. Coral reefs promote the evolution of morphological diversity and ecological novelty in labrid fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, S A; Holzman, R; Near, T J; Wainwright, P C

    2011-05-01

    Although coral reefs are renowned biodiversity hotspots it is not known whether they also promote the evolution of exceptional ecomorphological diversity. We investigated this question by analysing a large functional morphological dataset of trophic characters within Labridae, a highly diverse group of fishes. Using an analysis that accounts for species relationships, the time available for diversification and model uncertainty we show that coral reef species have evolved functional morphological diversity twice as fast as non-reef species. In addition, coral reef species occupy 68.6% more trophic morphospace than non-reef species. Our results suggest that coral reef habitats promote the evolution of both trophic novelty and morphological diversity within fishes. Thus, the preservation of coral reefs is necessary, not only to safeguard current biological diversity but also to conserve the underlying mechanisms that can produce functional diversity in future. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  4. Cholinergic modulation of auditory processing, sensory gating and novelty detection in human participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Inge; Blokland, Arjan; Riedel, Wim J; Sambeth, Anke

    2013-02-01

    Suppression of redundant auditory information and facilitation of deviant, novel, or salient sounds can be assessed with paired-click and oddball tasks, respectively. Electrophysiological correlates of perturbed auditory processing found in these paradigms are likely to be a trait marker or candidate endophenotype for schizophrenia. This is the first study to investigate the effects of the muscarinic M1 antagonist biperiden and the cholinesterase inhibitor rivastigmine on auditory-evoked potentials (AEPs), sensory gating, and mismatch negativity (MMN) in young, healthy volunteers. Biperiden increased P50 amplitude and prolonged N100 and P200 latency in the paired-click task but did not affect sensory gating. Rivastigmine was able to reverse the effects of biperiden on N100 and P200 latency. Biperiden increased P50 latency in the novelty oddball task, which was reversed by concurrent administration of rivastigmine. Rivastigmine shortened N100 latency and enhanced P3a amplitude in the novelty oddball paradigm, both of which were reversed by biperiden. The muscarinic M1 receptor appears to be involved in preattentive processing of auditory information in the paired-click task. Additional effects of biperiden versus rivastigmine were reversed by a combination treatment, which renders attribution of these findings to muscarinic M1 versus muscarinic M2-M5 or nicotinic receptors much more difficult. It remains to be seen whether the effects of cholinergic drugs on AEPs are specifically related to the abnormalities found in schizophrenia. Alternatively, aberrant auditory processing could also be indicative of a general disturbance in neural functioning shared by several neuropsychiatric disorders and/or neurodegenerative changes seen in aging.

  5. Hybrid floral scent novelty drives pollinator shift in sexually deceptive orchids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cozzolino Salvatore

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexually deceptive orchids of the genus Ophrys attract their pollinators, male insects, on a highly specific basis through the emission of odour blends that mimic the female sex pheromone of the targeted species. In this study, we have investigated a contact site between Ophrys arachnitiformis and O. lupercalis, two sympatric orchid species that are usually reproductively isolated via the exploitation of different pollinator "niches", but occasionally hybridise despite their apparent combination of ethological and mechanical isolation barriers. In particular, we have investigated the extent to which these Ophrys hybrids generate "emergent" combinations (i.e. novel and unpredictable from the parents' phenotypes of floral traits, and how these phenotypic novelties, particularly the odour blends emitted by the flower, could facilitate the invasion of a novel pollinator "niche" and induce the rapid formation of reproductive isolation, a prerequisite for adaptive evolutionary divergence. Results Our chemical analyses of floral scents show that the Ophrys F1 hybrids investigated here produce more compounds, significantly different ratios (% of odour compounds in the total blend, as well as new compounds in their floral odour compared to their progenitors. When tested for their attractiveness to the pollinator of each parent orchid species, we found that floral scent extracts of the hybrids triggered less inspecting flights and contacts by the male bees with the scented dummy than those of the parental orchid species. However, a series of additional behavioural bioassays revealed that the novel floral scent of the hybrids was significantly more attractive than either of the two parents to a pollinator species not initially involved in the pollination of any of the parent Ophrys species. Conclusions Collectively, our results illustrate that the process of hybridisation can lead to the generation of evolutionary novelties, and that

  6. Appearance of morphological novelty in a hybrid zone between two species of land snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Satoshi

    2005-08-01

    On the small oceanic island of Chichijima, two endemic species of land snails, Mandarina mandarina and M. chichijimana, have discrete distributions separated by a hybrid zone. This study investigates the potential of hybridization as a source of morphological novelty in these snails. Mandarina mandarina possesses a shell with a higher whorl expansion rate and a smaller protoconch than M. chichijimana, relative to shell size. The number of whorls and shell size of M. mandarina do not differ from those of M. chichijimana, because the effect of higher expansion rate on number of whorls and size of the former is compensated for by its smaller protoconch. The whorl expansion rate and protoconch diameter of the individuals from the hybrid populations are intermediate or typical of either of the two species, and their average values show clinal changes along the hybrid zone. However, the hybrid populations include exceptionally high shells with many whorls and flat shells with few whorls, which are never found in the pure populations of either species. In addition, gradual increases in variance in shell height and number of whorls were found from the edges to the center of the hybrid zone. A combination of low expansion rate (typical of M. chichijimana) and a small protoconch (typical of M. mandarina) produces a shell with an extremely large number of whorls because of the geometry of shell coiling. However, the combination of high expansion rate and a large protoconch produces a shell with an extremely small number of whorls. Because of the correlation between the number of whorls and shell height, shells with an exceptional number of whorls possess an extraordinarily high or flat spire. Hybrids can inherit a mosaic of characters that, as they play out during growth, lead to novel adult morphologies. These findings emphasize the importance of hybridization as a source of morphological variation and evolutionary novelty in land snails.

  7. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  8. The effects of long-term dopaminergic treatment on locomotor behavior in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira de Almeida, Welinton Alessandro; Maculano Esteves, Andrea; Leite de Almeida-Júnior, Canuto; Lee, Kil Sun; Kannebley Frank, Miriam; Oliveira Mariano, Melise; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Tulio de Mello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Long-term treatments with dopaminergic agents are associated with adverse effects, including augmentation. Augmentation consists of an exacerbation of restless legs syndrome (a sleep-related movement disorder) symptoms during treatment compared to those experienced during the period before therapy was initiated. The objective of this study was to examine locomotor activity in rats after long-term dopaminergic treatment and its relationship with expression of the D2 receptor, in addition to demonstrating possible evidence of augmentation. The rats were divided into control (CTRL) and drug (Pramipexole—PPX) groups that received daily saline vehicle and PPX treatments, respectively, for 71 days. The locomotor behavior of the animals was evaluated weekly in the Open Field test for 71 days. The expression of the dopamine D2 receptor was evaluated by Western Blot analysis. The animals that received the PPX demonstrated a significant reduction in locomotor activity from day 1 to day 57 and a significant increase in immobility time from day 1 to day 64 relative to baseline values, but these values had returned to baseline levels at 71 days. No changes in the expression of the D2 receptor were demonstrated after treatment with a dopaminergic agonist. This study suggests changes in locomotor activity in rats after long-term PPX treatment that include an immediate reduction of locomotion and an increase in immobilization, and after 64 days, these values returned to baseline levels without evidence of augmentation. In addition, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between locomotor activity and the expression of D2 receptors under these conditions. PMID:26483930

  9. The effects of long-term dopaminergic treatment on locomotor behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welinton Alessandro Oliveira de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term treatments with dopaminergic agents are associated with adverse effects, including augmentation. Augmentation consists of an exacerbation of restless legs syndrome (a sleep-related movement disorder symptoms during treatment compared to those experienced during the period before therapy was initiated. The objective of this study was to examine locomotor activity in rats after long-term dopaminergic treatment and its relationship with expression of the D2 receptor, in addition to demonstrating possible evidence of augmentation. The rats were divided into control (CTRL and drug (Pramipexole—PPX groups that received daily saline vehicle and PPX treatments, respectively, for 71 days. The locomotor behavior of the animals was evaluated weekly in the Open Field test for 71 days. The expression of the dopamine D2 receptor was evaluated by Western Blot analysis. The animals that received the PPX demonstrated a significant reduction in locomotor activity from day 1 to day 57 and a significant increase in immobility time from day 1 to day 64 relative to baseline values, but these values had returned to baseline levels at 71 days. No changes in the expression of the D2 receptor were demonstrated after treatment with a dopaminergic agonist. This study suggests changes in locomotor activity in rats after long-term PPX treatment that include an immediate reduction of locomotion and an increase in immobilization, and after 64 days, these values returned to baseline levels without evidence of augmentation. In addition, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between locomotor activity and the expression of D2 receptors under these conditions.

  10. The influence of locomotor rehabilitation on module quality and post-stroke hemiparetic walking performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routson, Rebecca L; Clark, David J; Bowden, Mark G; Kautz, Steven A; Neptune, Richard R

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested the biomechanical subtasks of walking can be produced by a reduced set of co-excited muscles or modules. Individuals post-stroke often exhibit poor inter-muscular coordination characterized by poor timing and merging of modules that are normally independent in healthy individuals. However, whether locomotor therapy can influence module composition and timing and whether these improvements lead to improved walking performance is unclear. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of a locomotor rehabilitation therapy on module composition and timing and post-stroke hemiparetic walking performance. Twenty-seven post-stroke hemiparetic subjects participated in a 12-week locomotor intervention incorporating treadmill training with body weight support and manual trainers accompanied by training overground walking. Electromyography (EMG), kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected from subjects both pre- and post-therapy and from 19 age-matched healthy controls walking on an instrumented treadmill at their self-selected speed. Non-negative matrix factorization was used to identify the module composition and timing from the EMG data. Module timing and composition, and various measures of walking performance were compared pre- and post-therapy. In subjects with four modules pre- and post-therapy, locomotor training resulted in improved timing of the ankle plantarflexor module and a more extended paretic leg angle that allowed the subjects to walk faster and with more symmetrical propulsion. In addition, subjects with three modules pre-therapy increased their number of modules and improved walking performance post-therapy. Thus, locomotor training has the potential to influence module composition and timing, which can lead to improvements walking performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of physical activity and 217-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on rat locomotor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasol Zeidabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays the widespread use of cell phones has increased concerns about the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on human body. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of physical activity in moderating the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF emitted from cell phones on rat locomotor activity. Material and Methods: Male Albino-Wistar rats (no=70 were divided into seven groups: Short and Long- term physical activity; Control, ELF-EMF; Sham; Long-term physical activity+ELF-EMF; Short-term physical activity+ELF-EMF. Short and Long- term physical activity groups were forced to daily treadmill running (30 minutes for one week and one month, respectively. ELF-EMF group was exposed to ELF-EMF cell phone simulator for three hours during the period. Having placed in the ELF-EMF simulator device, the physical activity+ELF-EMF groups were transferred to treadmill. Locomotor activity were analyzed as distance, time and speed of movement in open field apparatus. Results: The results showed that the ELF-EMF from cell phones can significantly decrease the locomotor activity in the exposed rats. On the other hand, short and long-term physical activity significantly increased motor activity in the trained rats (P≤0.05. However, there was no significant difference between the combination groups (Physical activity+ELF-EMF and ELF group in locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results revealed that the physical activity could not prevent the decrease of locomotor activity caused by ELF-EMF from cell phone.

  12. Decrease of GSK3β phosphorylation in the rat nucleus accumbens core enhances cocaine-induced hyper-locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wha Y; Jang, Ju K; Lee, Jung W; Jang, Hyunduk; Kim, Jeong-Hoon

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which is abundantly present in the brain, is known to contribute to psychomotor stimulant-induced locomotor behaviors. However, most studies have been focused in showing that GSK3β is able to attenuate psychomotor stimulants-induced hyperactivity by increasing its phosphorylation levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). So, here we examined in the opposite direction about the effects of decreased phosphorylation of GSK3β in the NAcc core on both basal and cocaine-induced locomotor activity by a bilateral microinjection into this site of an artificially synthesized peptide, S9 (0.5 or 5.0 μg/μL), which contains sequences around N-terminal serine 9 residue of GSK3β. We found that decreased levels of GSK3β phosphorylation in the NAcc core enhance cocaine-induced hyper-locomotor activity, while leaving basal locomotor activity unchanged. This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that the selective decrease of GSK3β phosphorylation levels in the NAcc core may contribute positively to cocaine-induced locomotor activity, while this is not sufficient for the generation of locomotor behavior by itself without cocaine. Taken together, these findings importantly suggest that GSK3β may need other molecular targets which are co-activated (or deactivated) by psychomotor stimulants like cocaine to contribute to generation of locomotor behaviors. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Organophosphate pesticides induce morphological abnormalities and decrease locomotor activity and heart rate in Danio rerio and Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Fiona L; Schmidt, Hayden; Turman, Zackery K; Hole, Natalie; Garcia, Hena; Gregg, Jonathan; Tilghman, Joseph; Fradinger, Erica A

    2014-06-01

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs), a class of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, are used widely in agriculture to reduce insect populations. Because of the conservation of acetylcholinesterase between invertebrates and vertebrates, OPs also can adversely affect nontarget species, such as aquatic and terrestrial animals. This study used uniform conditions to analyze the morphological and physiological effects caused by developmental exposure to 3 commonly used OPs-chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, and diazinon-on 2 aquatic vertebrate species, Danio rerio (zebrafish) and Xenopus laevis. Survival, locomotor activity, heart rate, and gross anatomical abnormalities, including kyphosis and edema, were observed over a 5-d period in response to OP concentrations ranging from 0 µM to 1000 µM. Both zebrafish and Xenopus showed decreased survival for all 3 OPs at higher concentrations. However, Xenopus showed higher mortality than zebrafish at lower chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos concentrations. Both models showed a dose-dependent decrease in heart rate and free-swimming larval activity in response to chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos. In addition, kyphosis and decreased spine length were prominent in Xenopus in response to 10 µM of chlorpyrifos and 0.1 µM dichlorvos. Although diazinon induced no effects on skeletal and cardiac motor activity in either species, it did induce cardiac edemas in zebrafish. Differences in the biological actions of OPs and their differential effects in these 2 vertebrate models demonstrate the importance of using common protocols and multiple models to evaluate the ecotoxicology of OPs. © 2014 SETAC.

  14. Taxonomic and geographic novelties in the genus Plantago (Plantaginaceae) in Chile, including the description of a new species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Shipunov, Alexey; Rønsted, Nina

    2018-01-01

    We present taxonomic and geographic novelties in the genus Plantago from Chile. More specifically, we describe P. nebularis, a new species endemic to Cerro Moreno, Antofagasta region, and propose P. zoellneriana, a new name for P. sericea subsp. araucana. We also lectotypify the name P. sericea, ...

  15. Novelty-Induced Arousal Enhances Memory for Cued Classical Fear Conditioning: Interactions between Peripheral Adrenergic and Brainstem Glutamatergic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stanley O., II; Williams, Cedric L.

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to novel contexts produce heightened states of arousal and biochemical changes in the brain to consolidate memory. However, processes permitting simple exposure to unfamiliar contexts to elevate sympathetic output and to improve memory are poorly understood. This shortcoming was addressed by examining how novelty-induced changes in…

  16. Neonatal exposure of rats to antidepressants affects behavioral reactions to novelty and social interactions in a manner analogous to autistic spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Porcel, Federico; Green, Donald; Khatri, Nidhi; Harris, Sharonda Swilley; May, Warren L; Lin, Rick C S; Paul, Ian A

    2011-10-01

    We have demonstrated that neonatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors has lasting effects on behavior and serotonergic neurons in Long Evans rats. Hyperserotoninemia and altered sensory processing are reported in autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). We hypothesized that early life exposure to SSRIs alters sensory processing, disrupts responses to novelty, and impairs social interactions in a manner similar to that observed in ASD. Male and female Long-Evans rat pups were administered citalopram, buproprion, fluoxetine, or saline from postnatal day (P) 8-21. Rats were tested for response to a novel tone before weaning (P25). Later, rats were tested 2× for response to a novel object (P39), and to a novel conspecific (P78, P101). In addition, rats were assessed for juvenile play behaviors (P32-P34) and later, we assessed sexual response to an estrus female in male rats (P153-184). Antidepressant exposure increased freezing after tone, diminished novel object exploration, and reduced conspecific interaction up to 3× compared to saline exposed rats. Juvenile play was profoundly reduced in antidepressant-exposed males when compared to saline exposed groups. Exposure to the SSRIs, but not bupropion disrupted male sexual behaviors. Moreover, specific male responses to female proceptive behaviors were disrupted in SSRI, but not bupropion exposed rats. We conclude that neonatal exposure to antidepressants in rats results in sensory and social abnormalities that parallel many of those reported in ASD. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Repeated MDMA administration increases MDMA-produced locomotor activity and facilitates the acquisition of MDMA self-administration: role of dopamine D2 receptor mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wetering, Ross; Schenk, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to ±3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) produces sensitization to MDMA-produced hyperactivity, but the mechanisms underlying the development of this sensitized response or the relationship to the reinforcing effects of MDMA is unknown. This study determined the effect of a sensitizing regimen of MDMA exposure on the acquisition of MDMA self-administration and investigated the role of dopamine D 2 receptor mechanisms. Rats received the selective D 2 antagonist, eticlopride (0.0 or 0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and MDMA (0.0 or 10.0 mg/kg, i.p.) during a five-day pretreatment regimen. Two days following the final session, the locomotor activating effects of MDMA (5 mg/kg, i.p.) and the latency to acquisition of MDMA self-administration were determined. Pretreatment with MDMA enhanced the locomotor activating effects of MDMA and facilitated the acquisition of MDMA self-administration. Administration of eticlopride during MDMA pretreatment completely blocked the development of sensitization to MDMA-produced hyperactivity but failed to significantly alter the facilitated acquisition of MDMA self-administration. Pretreatment with eticlopride alone facilitated the acquisition of self-administration. These data suggest that repeated MDMA exposure sensitized both the locomotor activating and reinforcing effects of MDMA. Activation of D 2 receptors during MDMA pretreatment appears critical for the development of sensitization to MDMA-produced hyperactivity. The role of D 2 receptor mechanisms in the development of sensitization to the reinforcing effects of MDMA is equivocal.

  18. Effect of fractionated extracts and isolated pure compounds of Spondias mombin (L. Anacardiaceae) leaves on novelty-induced rearing and grooming behaviours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoka, Abiodun O; Owolabi, Rotimi A; Bamitale, Samuel K; Akomolafe, Rufus O; Aladesanmi, Joseph A; Ukponmwan, Eghe O

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to elucidate the neurotransmitter systems involved in the neurophysiological properties of ethanolic extract, fractions and pure isolates of Spondias mombin leaves in mice (n = 6) after intraperitoneal (i.p.) route of administration.The crude ethanolic extract of Spondian mombin leaves was fractionated using the partitioning method to obtain the ethylacetate, butanolic and aqueous fractions. Open column chromatographic fractionation of the ethylacetate fraction yielded seven sub-fractions, out of which the pure coumaroyl, quercetin and gallic acid derivatives were obtained after purification on Sephadex LH 20. The ethanolic extract, butanolic fraction, ethylacetate subfractions and pure isolates of the Spondian mombin leaves were tested on novelty-induced rearing and grooming behaviours in mice with standard pharmacological tools using the open field method. The extract and its fractions decreased novelty-induced rearing in a dose-dependent manner. While the Coumaroyl derivative had no effect on novelty-induced rearing, it significantly reversed the inhibitory effect of yohimbine, propranolol and haloperidol on novelty-induced rearing. Quercetin significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of yohimbine on novelty-induced rearing. Naloxone significantly potentiated the quercetin-induced suppression of novelty-induced rearing. Gallic acid derivative significantly potentiated the inhibitory effect of yohimbine on novelty-induced rearing. Naloxone, atropine and haloperidol pretreatments significantly potentiated gallic acid derivative-induced suppression of novelty-induced rearing.The extract and its fractions had biphasic effect on novelty-induced grooming in mice. Coumaroyl derivative significantly increased novelty-induced grooming, while quercetin and gallic acid derivative decreased novelty-induced grooming significantly. The three pure isolates significantly reversed the effects of yohimbine and atropine on the novelty-induced grooming in

  19. Locomotor Dysfunction after Long-duration Space Flight and Development of Countermeasures to Facilitate Faster Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Wood, Scott; Cohen, Helen; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight induces adaptive modification in sensorimotor function allowing astronauts to operate in this unique environment. This adaptive state, however, is inappropriate for a 1-g environment. Consequently astronauts must spend time readapting to Earth's gravity following their return to Earth. During this readaptation period, alterations in sensorimotor function cause various disturbances in astronaut gait during postflight walking. They often rely more on vision for postural and gait stability and many report the need for greater cognitive supervision of motor actions that previous to space flight were fully automated. Over the last several years our laboratory has investigated postflight astronaut locomotion with the aim of better understanding how adaptive changes in underlying sensorimotor mechanisms contribute to postflight gait dysfunction. Exposure to the microgravity conditions of space flight induces adaptive modification in the control of vestibularly-mediated reflexive head movement during locomotion after space flight. Furthermore, during motor learning, adaptive transitions are composed of two main mechanisms: strategic and plastic. Strategic mechanisms represent immediate and transitory modifications in control to deal with changes in the prevailing environment that, if prolonged, induce plastic mechanisms designed to automate new behavioral responses. The goal of the present study was to examine the contributions of sensorimotor subsystems such as the vestibular and body load sensing (BLS) somatosensory influences on head movement control during locomotion after long-duration space flight. Further we present data on the two motor learning processes during readaptation of locomotor function after long-duration space flight. Eighteen astronauts performed two tests of locomotion before and after 6 months of space flight: a treadmill walking test to examine vestibular reflexive mechanisms controlling head

  20. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  1. Bidirectional QoS support for novelty detection applications based on hierarchical wireless sensor network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark; Hu, Fei; Kumar, Sunil

    2004-10-01

    The research on the Novelty Detection System (NDS) (called as VENUS) at the authors' universities has generated exciting results. For example, we can detect an abnormal behavior (such as cars thefts from the parking lot) from a series of video frames based on the cognitively motivated theory of habituation. In this paper, we would like to describe the implementation strategies of lower layer protocols for using large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) to NDS with Quality-of-Service (QoS) support. Wireless data collection framework, consisting of small and low-power sensor nodes, provides an alternative mechanism to observe the physical world, by using various types of sensing capabilities that include images (and even videos using Panoptos), sound and basic physical measurements such as temperature. We do not want to lose any 'data query command' packets (in the downstream direction: sink-to-sensors) or have any bit-errors in them since they are so important to the whole sensor network. In the upstream direction (sensors-to-sink), we may tolerate the loss of some sensing data packets. But the 'interested' sensing flow should be assigned a higher priority in terms of multi-hop path choice, network bandwidth allocation, and sensing data packet generation frequency (we hope to generate more sensing data packet for that novel event in the specified network area). The focus of this paper is to investigate MAC-level Quality of Service (QoS) issue in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) for Novelty Detection applications. Although QoS has been widely studied in other types of networks including wired Internet, general ad hoc networks and mobile cellular networks, we argue that QoS in WSN has its own characteristics. In wired Internet, the main QoS parameters include delay, jitter and bandwidth. In mobile cellular networks, two most common QoS metrics are: handoff call dropping probability and new call blocking probability. Since the main task of WSN is to detect and report

  2. Dopaminergic neuronal loss and dopamine-dependent locomotor defects in Fbxo7-deficient zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianna Zhao

    Full Text Available Recessive mutations in the F-box only protein 7 gene (FBXO7 cause PARK15, a mendelian form of early-onset, levodopa-responsive parkinsonism with severe loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. However, the function of the protein encoded by FBXO7, and the pathogenesis of PARK15 remain unknown. No animal models of this disease exist. Here, we report the generation of a vertebrate model of PARK15 in zebrafish. We first show that the zebrafish Fbxo7 homolog protein (zFbxo7 is expressed abundantly in the normal zebrafish brain. Next, we used two zFbxo7-specific morpholinos (targeting protein translation and mRNA splicing, respectively, to knock down the zFbxo7 expression. The injection of either of these zFbxo7-specific morpholinos in the fish embryos induced a marked decrease in the zFbxo7 protein expression, and a range of developmental defects. Furthermore, whole-mount in situ mRNA hybridization showed abnormal patterning and significant decrease in the number of diencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase-expressing neurons, corresponding to the human nigrostriatal or ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurons. Of note, the number of the dopamine transporter-expressing neurons was much more severely depleted, suggesting dopaminergic dysfunctions earlier and larger than those due to neuronal loss. Last, the zFbxo7 morphants displayed severe locomotor disturbances (bradykinesia, which were dramatically improved by the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. The severity of these morphological and behavioral abnormalities correlated with the severity of zFbxo7 protein deficiency. Moreover, the effects of the co-injection of zFbxo7- and p53-specific morpholinos were similar to those obtained with zFbxo7-specific morpholinos alone, supporting further the contention that the observed phenotypes were specifically due to the knock down of zFbxo7. In conclusion, this novel vertebrate model reproduces pathologic and behavioral hallmarks of human parkinsonism (dopaminergic

  3. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance During Adaptation to Visuomotor and Somatosensory Distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, David R; De Dios, Yiri E; Layne, Charles S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P

    2018-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges affecting balance control when readapting to Earth's gravity upon return from spaceflight. Small amounts of electrical noise applied to the vestibular system have been shown to improve balance control during standing and walking under discordant sensory conditions in healthy subjects, likely by enhancing information transfer through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that imperceptible levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) could improve short-term adaptation to a locomotor task in a novel sensory discordant environment. Healthy subjects (14 males, 10 females, age = 28.7 ± 5.3 years, height = 167.2 ± 9.6 cm, weight = 71.0 ± 12.8 kg) were tested for perceptual thresholds to sinusoidal currents applied across the mastoids. Subjects were then randomly and blindly assigned to an SVS group receiving a 0-30 Hz Gaussian white noise electrical stimulus at 50% of their perceptual threshold (stim) or a control group receiving zero stimulation during Functional Mobility Tests (FMTs), nine trials of which were done under conditions of visual discordance (wearing up/down vision reversing goggles). Time to complete the course (TCC) was used to test the effect of SVS between the two groups across the trials. Adaptation rates from the normalized TCCs were also compared utilizing exponent values of power fit trendline equations. A one-tailed independent-samples t -test indicated these adaptation rates were significantly faster in the stim group ( n = 12) than the control ( n = 12) group [ t (16.18) = 2.00, p = 0.031]. When a secondary analysis was performed comparing "responders" (subjects who showed faster adaptation rates) of the stim ( n = 7) group to the control group ( n = 12), independent-samples t -tests revealed significantly faster trial times for the last five trials with goggles in the stim group "responders" than the controls. The data

  4. Shared strategies for behavioral switching: understanding how locomotor patterns are turned on and off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A Mesce

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Animals frequently switch from one behavior to another, often to meet the demands of their changing environment or internal state. What factors control these behavioral switches and the selection of what to do or what not to do? To address these issues, we will focus on the locomotor behaviors of two distantly related ‘worms’, the medicinal leech Hirudo verbana (clade Lophotrochozoa and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (clade Ecdysozoa. Although the neural architecture and body morphology of these organisms are quite distinct, they appear to switch between different forms of locomotion by using similar strategies of decision-making. For example, information that distinguishes between liquid and more solid environments dictates whether an animal swims or crawls. In the leech, dopamine biases locomotor neural networks so that crawling is turned on and swimming is turned off. In C. elegans, dopamine may also promote crawling, a form of locomotion that has gained new attention.

  5. Effect of Locomotor Training on Exhaustion of Leg Muscle Activity in Chronic Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafl-Altermatt, Miriam; Dietz, Volker; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle electromyographic (EMG) exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in untrained patients at ∼6 months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study, exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to an untrained patient, no more EMG exhaustion was observed in the very chronic stage. At this time (12 years after injury) a basic locomotor pattern of leg muscle activity of reduced amplitude could still be elicited, but it was resistant to exhaustion and unchanged in amplitude after 12 min of assisted stepping. It is suggested that fatigue-resistant motor units prevail at this stage and can still be activated during stepping as a result of the training.

  6. [On mechanism of functional changes in the organism of teenagers at different levels of locomotor activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindubaeva, F A; Shukurov, F A; Salikhova, Y Y; Niyazova, Y I; Ramazanov, A K

    2015-02-01

    Comprehensive study of the cardiovascular system functional condition of 15-16 teenagers while in normal daily locomotor activity and in the mode of regular moderate physical activity was performed. The features of cerebral circulation and myocardium functional condition of teenagers are studied depending on initial tonus of the autonomic nervous system and locomotor activity level in the process of continuous step physical activity on tredmil. The condition of regulatory mechanisms, providing adaptation of teenagers in the conditions of modern school was studied. Research results showed, that elasticity of cerebrum arterial vessels, veins tone, venous outflow for teenagers not having regular physical activity, considerably mionectic. More adequate reaction of coronary blood flow in the process of physical activity is educed for the trained teenagers with the balanced autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm. This group showed a higher level and regulation quality of organism reserve possibilities.

  7. A new automated method for rat sleep deprivation with minimal confounding effects on corticosterone and locomotor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, C.H.; Dematteis, M.; Joosten, R.N.J.M.; Eggels, L.; Sandberg, H.; Schirris, M.; Feenstra, M.G.P.; van Someren, E.J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The function of sleep in physiology, behaviour and cognition has become a primary focus of neuroscience. Its study inevitably includes experimental sleep deprivation designs. However, concerns exist regarding confounds like stress, increased locomotor activity levels, and decreased motivation to

  8. Locomotor training with body weight support in SCI : EMG improvement is more optimally expressed at a low testing speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyns, P.; Van de Crommert, H. W. A. A.; Rijken, H.; van Kuppevelt, D. H. J. M.; Duysens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Case series. Objectives: To determine the optimal testing speed at which the recovery of the EMG (electromyographic) activity should be assessed during and after body weight supported (BWS) locomotor training. Setting: Tertiary hospital, Sint Maartenskliniek, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

  9. The paraplegic Viking and the one-armed pianist--some well known persons with locomotor disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensman, R

    1983-01-01

    A review is given of persons from history, culture and science, with locomotor disability, who by different reasons have become well known. It is shown that these persons, in spite of their disabilities, have reached prominent positions.

  10. An Intensive Locomotor Training Paradigm Improves Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Compression Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, Elizabeth A; Sagen, Jacqueline

    2015-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is often associated with both locomotor deficits and sensory dysfunction, including debilitating neuropathic pain. Unfortunately, current conventional pharmacological, physiological, or psychological treatments provide only marginal relief for more than two-thirds of patients, highlighting the need for improved treatment options. Locomotor training is often prescribed as an adjunct therapy for peripheral neuropathic pain but is rarely used to treat central neuropathic pain. The goal of this study was to evaluate the potential anti-nociceptive benefits of intensive locomotor training (ILT) on neuropathic pain consequent to traumatic SCI. Using a rodent SCI model for central neuropathic pain, ILT was initiated either 5 d after injury prior to development of neuropathic pain symptoms (the "prevention" group) or delayed until pain symptoms fully developed (∼3 weeks post-injury, the "reversal" group). The training protocol consisted of 5 d/week of a ramping protocol that started with 11 m/min for 5 min and increased in speed (+1 m/min/week) and time (1-4 minutes/week) to a maximum of two 20-min sessions/d at 15 m/min by the fourth week of training. ILT prevented and reversed the development of heat hyperalgesia and cold allodynia, as well as reversed developed tactile allodynia, suggesting analgesic benefits not seen with moderate levels of locomotor training. Further, the analgesic benefits of ILT persisted for several weeks once training had been stopped. The unique ability of an ILT protocol to produce robust and sustained anti-nociceptive effects, as assessed by three distinct outcome measures for below-level SCI neuropathic pain, suggests that this adjunct therapeutic approach has great promise in a comprehensive treatment strategy for SCI pain.

  11. Comparative potentialities of X-ray and remote thermographic diagnosis of locomotor system diseases and injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenfel'd, L.G.; Ternovoj, N.K.; Samokhin, A.V.; Likhosherst, E.K.

    1988-01-01

    The advisability of applying remote infrared tomography to diagnoze locomotor system diseases and injuries is substantiated. 764 patients with different bone and tissue system diseases and injuries are examined. Thermosemiotics in the case of deforming arthrosis of knee and hip joints, inflammatory diseases of joints of various ethiologies, acute chronic osteomyelitis and its exacerbation, is described. The place of remote infrared thermography in the complecx diagnostic examination of a given contingent of patients, is determined. 6 refs.; 4 figs

  12. Hindbrain V2a neurons in the excitation of spinal locomotor circuits during zebrafish swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yukiko; Satou, Chie; Fujioka, Shunji; Shoji, Wataru; Umeda, Keiko; Ishizuka, Toru; Yawo, Hiromu; Higashijima, Shin-ichi

    2013-05-20

    During locomotion in vertebrates, reticulospinal neurons in the hindbrain play critical roles in providing descending excitation to the spinal cord locomotor systems. However, despite the fact that many genes that are used to classify the neuronal identities of neurons in the hindbrain have been identified, the molecular identity of the reticulospinal neurons that are critically involved in locomotor drive is not well understood. Chx10-expressing neurons (V2a neurons) are ipsilaterally projecting glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and the hindbrain. Many of the V2a neurons in the hindbrain are known to project to the spinal cord in zebrafish, making hindbrain V2a neurons a prime candidate in descending locomotor drive. We investigated the roles of hindbrain V2a neurons using optogenetic and electrophysiological approaches. The forced activation of hindbrain V2a neurons using channelrhodopsin efficiently evoked swimming, whereas the forced inactivation of them using Archearhodopsin3 or Halorhodpsin reliably stopped ongoing swimming. Electrophysiological recordings of two populations of hindbrain reticulospinal V2a neurons showed that they were active during swimming. One population of neurons, small V2a neurons in the caudal hindbrain, fired with low rhythmicity, whereas the other population of neurons, large reticulospinal V2a neurons, called MiV1 neurons, fired more rhythmically. These results indicated that hindbrain reticulospinal V2a neurons play critical roles in providing excitation to the spinal locomotor circuits during swimming by providing both tonic and phasic inputs to the circuits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of caffeine-induced locomotor activity between adolescent and adult rats

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, Marcelo Tadeu [UNESP; Zancheta, Roberta [UNESP; Paro, Ana H. [UNESP; Possi, Ana P. M. [UNESP; Cruz, Fabio C. [UNESP; Planeta, Cleopatra da Silva [UNESP

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant drug most consumed in the world. This drug is present in food, beverages and medicines marketed for individuals of all ages. In spite of this, caffeine effects on adolescents are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the differences on caffeine-induced locomotor stimulant or depressant effects in adolescent and adult rats. Adolescent (37-40 days old) or adult (70-74 days old) Wistar rats were tested for stimulant and depressant caffeine effec...

  14. QRFP and Its Receptors Regulate Locomotor Activity and Sleep in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Audrey; Chiu, Cindy N; Mosser, Eric A; Kahn, Sohini; Spence, Rory; Prober, David A

    2016-02-10

    The hypothalamus plays an important role in regulating sleep, but few hypothalamic sleep-promoting signaling pathways have been identified. Here we demonstrate a role for the neuropeptide QRFP (also known as P518 and 26RFa) and its receptors in regulating sleep in zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate. We show that QRFP is expressed in ∼10 hypothalamic neurons in zebrafish larvae, which project to the hypothalamus, hindbrain, and spinal cord, including regions that express the two zebrafish QRFP receptor paralogs. We find that the overexpression of QRFP inhibits locomotor activity during the day, whereas mutation of qrfp or its receptors results in increased locomotor activity and decreased sleep during the day. Despite the restriction of these phenotypes to the day, the circadian clock does not regulate qrfp expression, and entrained circadian rhythms are not required for QRFP-induced rest. Instead, we find that QRFP overexpression decreases locomotor activity largely in a light-specific manner. Our results suggest that QRFP signaling plays an important role in promoting sleep and may underlie some aspects of hypothalamic sleep control. The hypothalamus is thought to play a key role in regulating sleep in vertebrate animals, but few sleep-promoting signaling pathways that function in the hypothalamus have been identified. Here we use the zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate, to functionally and anatomically characterize the neuropeptide QRFP. We show that QRFP is exclusively expressed in a small number of neurons in the larval zebrafish hypothalamus that project widely in the brain. We also show that QRFP overexpression reduces locomotor activity, whereas animals that lack QRFP signaling are more active and sleep less. These results suggest that QRFP signaling participates in the hypothalamic regulation of sleep. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/361823-18$15.00/0.

  15. Effect of temporal organization of the visuo-locomotor coupling on the predictive steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Philippe Rybarczyk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the direction of a driver’s gaze while taking a bend show that the individual looks towards the tangent-point of the inside curve. Mathematically, the direction of this point in relation to the car enables the driver to predict the curvature of the road. In the same way, when a person walking in the street makes a turn at the corner, his/her gaze anticipates the rotation of the body. A current explanation for the visuo-motor anticipation over the locomotion would be that the brain, involved in a steering behaviour, executes an internal model of the trajectory that anticipates the path completion, and not the contrary. This paper proposes to test this hypothesis by studying the effect of an artificial manipulation of the visuo-locomotor coupling on the trajectory prediction. In this experiment, subjects remotely control a mobile robot with a pan-tilt camera. This experimental paradigm is chosen to easily and precisely manipulate the temporal organization of the visuo-locomotor coupling. Results show that only the visuo-locomotor coupling organized from the visual sensor to the locomotor organs enables i a significant smoothness of the trajectory and ii a velocity-curvature relationship that follows the 2/3 Power Law. These findings are consistent with the theory of an anticipatory construction of an internal model of the trajectory. This mental representation used by the brain as a forward prediction of the path formation seems conditioned by the motor program. The overall results are discussed in terms of the sensorimotor scheme bases of the predictive coding.

  16. Effects of dopaminergic therapy on locomotor adaptation and adaptive learning in persons with Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemmich, Ryan T.; Hack, Nawaz; Akbar, Umer; Hass, Chris J.

    2014-01-01

    Persons with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are characterized by multifactorial gait deficits, though the factors which influence the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store new gait patterns are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dopaminergic therapy on the abilities of persons with PD to adapt and store gait parameters during split-belt treadmill (SBT) walking. Ten participants with idiopathic PD who were being treated with stable doses of orally-administered dopaminergic therapy participated. All participants performed two randomized testing sessions on separate days: once while optimally-medicated (ON meds) and once after 12-hour withdrawal from dopaminergic medication (OFF meds). During each session, locomotor adaptation was investigated as the participants walked on a SBT for ten minutes while the belts moved at a 2:1 speed ratio. We assessed locomotor adaptive learning by quantifying: 1) aftereffects during de-adaptation (once the belts returned to tied speeds immediately following SBT walking) and 2) savings during re-adaptation (as the participants repeated the same SBT walking task after washout of aftereffects following the initial SBT task). The withholding of dopaminergic medication diminished step length aftereffects significantly during de-adaptation. However, both locomotor adaptation and savings were unaffected by levodopa. These findings suggest that dopaminergic pathways influence aftereffect storage but do not influence locomotor adaptation or savings within a single session of SBT walking. It appears important that persons with PD should be optimally-medicated if walking on the SBT as gait rehabilitation. PMID:24698798

  17. Effect of temporal organization of the visuo-locomotor coupling on the predictive steering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarczyk, Yves Philippe; Mestre, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the direction of a driver's gaze while taking a bend show that the individual looks toward the tangent-point of the inside curve. Mathematically, the direction of this point in relation to the car enables the driver to predict the curvature of the road. In the same way, when a person walking in the street turns a corner, his/her gaze anticipates the rotation of the body. A current explanation for the visuo-motor anticipation over the locomotion would be that the brain, involved in a steering behavior, executes an internal model of the trajectory that anticipates the completion of the path, and not the contrary. This paper proposes to test this hypothesis by studying the effect of an artificial manipulation of the visuo-locomotor coupling on the trajectory prediction. In this experiment, subjects remotely control a mobile robot with a pan-tilt camera. This experimental paradigm is chosen to manipulate in an easy and precise way the temporal organization of the visuo-locomotor coupling. The results show that only the visuo-locomotor coupling organized from the visual sensor to the locomotor organs enables (i) a significant smoothness of the trajectory and (ii) a velocity-curvature relationship that follows the "2/3 Power Law." These findings are consistent with the theory of an anticipatory construction of an internal model of the trajectory. This mental representation used by the brain as a forward prediction of the formation of the path seems conditioned by the motor program. The overall results are discussed in terms of the sensorimotor scheme bases of the predictive coding.

  18. Chromosome 1 replacement increases brain orexins and antidepressive measures without increasing locomotor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pingfu; Hu, Yufen; Vurbic, Drina; Akladious, Afaf; Strohl, Kingman P

    2014-12-01

    Decreased orexin level has been well demonstrated in patients suffering from narcolepsy, depression accompanied with suicide attempt; obstructive sleep apnea and comorbidity were also demonstrated in these diseases. As C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more "depressed" and have lower brain orexins than A/J mice, B6 mice having chromosome 1 replacement (B6A1 mice) might have restored orexin levels and less depressive behavior. We studied the behavior of 4-6 month old B6, A/J and B6A1 mice with forced swim, tail suspension, and locomotor activity tests. The animals were then sacrificed and hypothalamus and medullas dissected from brain tissue. Orexins-A and -B were determined by radioimmunoassay. Compared with A/J mice, B6 mice displayed several signs of depression, including increased immobility, increased locomotors activity, and decreased orexin A and -B levels in both the hypothalamus and medulla. Compared to B6 mice, B6A1 mice exhibited significantly higher levels of orexins-A and -B in both brain regions. B6A1 mice also exhibited antidepressive features in most of measured variables, including decreased locomotor activity, decreased immobility and increased swim in tail suspension test; compared with B6 mice, however. B6A1 mice also reversed immobility in the early phase of the swim test. In summary, B6 mice exhibited depressive attributes compared with A/J mice, including increased locomotor activity, greater immobility, and decreased brain orexins, these were largely reversed in B6A1 mice. We conclude that orexin levels modulate these B6 behaviors, likely due to expression of A/J alleles on Chromosome 1. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. NO INFLUENCE OF HYPOXIA ON COORDINATION BETWEEN RESPIRATORY AND LOCOMOTOR RHYTHMS DURING ROWING AT MODERATE INTENSITY

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    Nicolas Fabre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides neuro-mechanical constraints, chemical or metabolic stimuli have also been proposed to interfere with the coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. In the light of the conflicting data observed in the literature, this study aimed to assess whether acute hypoxia modifies the degree of coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms during rowing exercises in order to investigate competitive interactions between neuro-mechanical (movement and chemical (hypoxia respiratory drives. Nine male healthy subjects performed one submaximal 6-min rowing exercise on a rowing ergometer in both normoxia (altitude: 304 m and acute hypoxia (altitude: 2877 m. The exercise intensity was about 40 % and 35 % (for normoxia and hypoxia conditions, respectively of the individual maximal power output measured during an incremental rowing test to volitional exhaustion carried out in normoxia. Metabolic rate and minute ventilation were continuously collected throughout exercise. Locomotor movement and breathing rhythms were continuously recorded and synchronized cycle-by-cycle. The degree of coordination was expressed as a percentage of breaths starting during the same phase of the locomotor cycle. For a same and a constant metabolic rate, acute hypoxia did not influence significantly the degree of coordination (mean ± SEM, normoxia: 20.0 ± 6.2 %, hypoxia: 21.3 ± 11.1 %, p > 0.05 while ventilation and breathing frequency were significantly greater in hypoxia. Our results may suggest that during rowing exercise at a moderate metabolic load, neuro-mechanical locomotion-linked respiratory stimuli appear "stronger" than peripheral chemoreceptors- linked respiratory stimuli induced by hypoxia, in the context of our study

  20. Classification of rhythmic locomotor patterns in electromyographic signals using fuzzy sets

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    Thrasher Timothy A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Locomotor control is accomplished by a complex integration of neural mechanisms including a central pattern generator, spinal reflexes and supraspinal control centres. Patterns of muscle activation during walking exhibit an underlying structure in which groups of muscles seem to activate in united bursts. Presented here is a statistical approach for analyzing Surface Electromyography (SEMG data with the goal of classifying rhythmic "burst" patterns that are consistent with a central pattern generator model of locomotor control. Methods A fuzzy model of rhythmic locomotor patterns was optimized and evaluated using SEMG data from a convenience sample of four able-bodied individuals. As well, two subjects with pathological gait participated: one with Parkinson's Disease, and one with incomplete spinal cord injury. Subjects walked overground and on a treadmill while SEMG was recorded from major muscles of the lower extremities. The model was fit to half of the recorded data using non-linear optimization and validated against the other half of the data. The coefficient of determination, R2, was used to interpret the model's goodness of fit. Results Using four fuzzy burst patterns, the model was able to explain approximately 70-83% of the variance in muscle activation during treadmill gait and 74% during overground gait. When five burst functions were used, one function was found to be redundant. The model explained 81-83% of the variance in the Parkinsonian gait, and only 46-59% of the variance in spinal cord injured gait. Conclusions The analytical approach proposed in this article is a novel way to interpret multichannel SEMG signals by reducing the data into basic rhythmic patterns. This can help us better understand the role of rhythmic patterns in locomotor control.

  1. Slow Versus Fast Robot-Assisted Locomotor Training After Severe Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thais Amanda; Goroso, Daniel Gustavo; Westgate, Philip M; Carrico, Cheryl; Batistella, Linamara R; Sawaki, Lumy

    2017-10-01

    Robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill is a rehabilitation intervention that compels repetitive practice of gait movements. Standard treadmill speed may elicit rhythmic movements generated primarily by spinal circuits. Slower-than-standard treadmill speed may elicit discrete movements, which are more complex than rhythmic movements and involve cortical areas. Compare effects of fast (i.e., rhythmic) versus slow (i.e., discrete) robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in subjects with chronic, severe gait deficit after stroke. Subjects (N = 18) were randomized to receive 30 sessions (5 d/wk) of either fast or slow robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill in an inpatient setting. Functional ambulation category, time up and go, 6-min walk test, 10-m walk test, Berg Balance Scale, and Fugl-Meyer Assessment were administered at baseline and postintervention. The slow group had statistically significant improvement on functional ambulation category (first quartile-third quartile, P = 0.004), 6-min walk test (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.8 to 49.0, P = 0.040), Berg Balance Scale (95% CI = 7.4 to 14.8, P Fugl-Meyer Assessment (95% CI = 24.1 to 45.1, P Scale (95% CI = 1.5 to 10.5, P = 0.02). In initial stages of robot-assisted locomotor training on a bodyweight-supported treadmill after severe stroke, slow training targeting discrete movement may yield greater benefit than fast training.

  2. Opioid administration following spinal cord injury: Implications for pain and locomotor recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Woller, Sarah A.; Hook, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one-third of people with a spinal cord injury (SCI) will experience persistent neuropathic pain following injury. This pain negatively affects quality of life and is difficult to treat. Opioids are among the most effective drug treatments, and are commonly prescribed, but experimental evidence suggests that opioid treatment in the acute phase of injury can attenuate recovery of locomotor function. In fact, spinal cord injury and opioid administration share several common feature...

  3. Novelties in Begonia sect. Coelocentrum: B. longgangensis and B. ferox from limestone areas in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ching-I; Yang, Hsun-An; Kono, Yoshiko; Chung, Kuo-Fang; Huang, Yu-Song; Wu, Wang-Hui; Liu, Yan

    2013-12-01

    The spectacular karst limestone landscape in Guangxi harbors high-level diversity and endemism of Begonia species, especially those of sect. Coelocentrum. In continuation of our studies in this area, we report the discovery of two attractive new species from southwestern Guangxi: Begonia longgangensis and B. ferox. Begonia longgangensis resembles B. liuyanii, also from Longgang Nature Reserve, in the broadly ovate to suborbicular leaf blade, differing by the much smaller leaves, subglabrous leaf surface, pink flowers, dichasial cymes and the remarkably long stolons sent out from rhizomes. Unexpectedly, both diploid (2n = 30) and triploid counts (2n = 45) were observed in plants collected from the type locality. Begonia ferox probably has the most prominent bullate leaves for the genus. In this aspect, it is similar to B. nahangensis reported from northern Vietnam recently, but is readily distinguishable by the ovate, chartaceous leaves with an acuminate apex; tomentose peduncle not exceeding petioles; and the much larger stature in vegetative parts. A diploid count of 2n = 30 was determined for this unique new species. All available data support the recognition of the two new species. Begonia longgangensis has remarkably long stolons and B. ferox is characterized by the prominent bullate leaves. Line drawings, color plates and comparisons are provided to aid in identification of the novelties.

  4. Ensembles of novelty detection classifiers for structural health monitoring using guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Gerges; Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2018-01-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses sparse sensor networks embedded in sophisticated structures for defect detection and characterization. The biggest challenge of those sensor networks is developing robust techniques for reliable damage detection under changing environmental and operating conditions (EOC). To address this challenge, we develop a novelty classifier for damage detection based on one class support vector machines. We identify appropriate features for damage detection and introduce a feature aggregation method which quadratically increases the number of available training observations. We adopt a two-level voting scheme by using an ensemble of classifiers and predictions. Each classifier is trained on a different segment of the guided wave signal, and each classifier makes an ensemble of predictions based on a single observation. Using this approach, the classifier can be trained using a small number of baseline signals. We study the performance using Monte-Carlo simulations of an analytical model and data from impact damage experiments on a glass fiber composite plate. We also demonstrate the classifier performance using two types of baseline signals: fixed and rolling baseline training set. The former requires prior knowledge of baseline signals from all EOC, while the latter does not and leverages the fact that EOC vary slowly over time and can be modeled as a Gaussian process.

  5. Music as the Means to Stimulate Novelty and Challenge Seeking in Persons with Intellectual Disability

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    Maria Chong Abdullah

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of the study was to determine whether challenge seeking behaviour could be increased by stimulating persons with intellectual disability with music. The intention was also to evaluate whether the participants would attempt to seek challenges when they felt bored with a music experience. Method: Thirty adolescents and young adults with mild to moderate intellectual disability were randomly selected to take part in a repeated-measure experimental design, under three different conditions. In the first condition, the participants were provided adequate challenges through teaching fundamental musical skills. In the second condition, no optimal challenge was provided, and in the third condition, using special strategies, the participants were stimulated to look for novelty and challenge through involvement in creative musical tasks. Level of innovation, as an index of challenge seeking, was measured during the 8 minutes of free choice interval at the end of each condition. Results: Using Friedman’s ANOVA and Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the findings showed that the low and statistically similar levels of challenge seeking behaviour in conditions 1 and 2 significantly increased to a high level in condition 3. It confirmed that participants with intellectual disability are capable of demonstrating challenge seeking behaviour if they are stimulated to do so. The results also confirmed that the tendency to demonstrate challenge seeking behaviour during a boring musical situation was low.

  6. Ensembles of novelty detection classifiers for structural health monitoring using guided waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dib, Gerges; Karpenko, Oleksii; Koricho, Ermias; Khomenko, Anton; Haq, Mahmoodul; Udpa, Lalita

    2017-11-17

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses sparse sensor networks embedded in sophisticated structures for defect detection and characterization. The biggest challenge of those sensor networks is developing robust techniques for reliable damage detection under changing environmental and operating conditions. To address this challenge, we develop a novelty classifier for damage detection based on one class support vector machines. We identify appropriate features for damage detection and introduce a feature aggregation method which quadratically increases the number of available training observations.We adopt a two-level voting scheme by using an ensemble of classifiers and predictions. Each classifier is trained on a different segment of the guided wave signal, and each classifier makes an ensemble of predictions based on a single observation. Using this approach, the classifier can be trained using a small number of baseline signals. We study the performance using monte-carlo simulations of an analytical model and data from impact damage experiments on a glass fiber composite plate.We also demonstrate the classifier performance using two types of baseline signals: fixed and rolling baseline training set. The former requires prior knowledge of baseline signals from all environmental and operating conditions, while the latter does not and leverages the fact that environmental and operating conditions vary slowly over time and can be modeled as a Gaussian process.

  7. Qualitative novelty in seventeenth-century science: Hydrostatics from Stevin to Pascal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Alan F

    2015-06-01

    Two works on hydrostatics, by Simon Stevin in 1586 and by Blaise Pascal in 1654, are analysed and compared. The contrast between the two serves to highlight aspects of the qualitative novelty involved in changes within science in the first half of the seventeenth century. Stevin attempted to derive his theory from unproblematic postulates drawn from common sense but failed to achieve his goal insofar as he needed to incorporate assumptions involved in his engineering practice but not sanctioned by his postulates. Pascal's theory went beyond common sense by introducing a novel concept, pressure. Theoretical reflection on novel experiments was involved in the construction of the new concept and experiment also provided important evidence for the theory that deployed it. The new experimental reasoning was qualitatively different from the Euclidean style of reasoning adopted by Stevin. The fact that a conceptualization of a technical sense of pressure adequate for hydrostatics was far from obvious is evident from the work of those, such as Galileo and Descartes, who did not make significant moves in that direction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sedative effect of Clozapine is a function of 5-HT2A and environmental novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Radhika S; Quadros, Rolen; Drumm, Michael; Ain, Rupasri; Panicker, Mitradas M

    2017-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs are the mainstay in the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. However, antipsychotics often exhibit sedation or activity suppression among many other side effects, and the factors that influence them remain poorly understood. We now show, using a 5-HT 2A knockout (Htr2a -/- ) mouse, that environmental circumstances can affect suppression of activity induced by the atypical antipsychotic- Clozapine. We observed that Htr2a -/- mice were more resistant to Clozapine-induced suppression of activity (CISA) and this behaviour was dependent on the environment being 'novel'. In their 'home' environment, at identical doses the mice exhibited CISA. Interestingly, the effect of genotype and environmental novelty on CISA could not be extended to the other antipsychotics that were tested, i.e. Haloperidol and Risperidone. Haloperidol-induced activity suppression was independent of context and genotype. Whereas context affected Risperidone-induced activity suppression only in the Htr2a +/+ mice. Furthermore, we observed that caffeine, a stimulant, elicited resistance to CISA similar to that seen in the 'novel' context. Our study establishes a previously unknown interaction between the environmental context, 5-HT 2A and CISA and emphasises the role of non-pharmacological factors such as environment on the effects of the drug, which seem antipsychotic-specific. Our findings should advance the understanding of the side effects of individual antipsychotics and the role of environment to overcome side effects such as sedation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. THE MAIN NOVELTIES AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE NEW GENERAL DATA PROTECTION REGULATION

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    Simona Chirica

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation (EU 2016/679 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Directive 95/46/EC (General Data Protection Regulation - GDPR will become applicable beginning with 25.05.2018. As a general characteristic, the regulations adopted at EU level, have direct applicability in all EU member states, and they are automatically integrated in the national legislation beginning with entry into force. Therefore, as of 25.05.2018, the GDPR provisions will be applicable and mandatory for all natural and legal persons that process personal data, including in Romania. Based on the above, GDPR brings a series of changes affecting all the involved parties (data subjects, data controllers, supervisory authorities. This article aims to present an analysis of the main novelties brought by the new regulation, and to present a comparison with the current regulation together with the practical implications of these changes in relation to the data subjects, data controllers, and supervisory authorities.

  10. HIGH ETHANOL DOSE DURING EARLY ADOLESCENCE INDUCES LOCOMOTOR ACTIVATION AND INCREASES SUBSEQUENT ETHANOL INTAKE DURING LATE ADOLESCENCE

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, María Belén; Molina, Juan Carlos; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Adolescent initiation of ethanol consumption is associated with subsequent heightened probability of ethanol-use disorders. The present study examined the relationship between motivational sensitivity to ethanol initiation in adolescent rats and later ethanol intake. Experiment 1 determined that ethanol induces locomotor activation shortly after administration but not if tested at a later post-administration interval. In Experiment 2, adolescents were assessed for ethanol-induced locomotor ac...

  11. The effect of kinesio tape on the area of knee on locomotor activity in patients after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Trčálková, Pavla

    2013-01-01

    Title: The effect of kinesio tape on the area of knee on locomotor activity in patients after stroke Abstract: This bachelor thesis is focused on evaluating the effect of kinesio tape on locomotor activity in patients after stroke. The purpose of this thesis is to compare quality of stereotype of the gait of this patients before and after application of kinesio tape on the area of the knee joint. The theoretical part includes detailed information on kinesio tape, its characteristics, its effe...

  12. Shared human-chimpanzee pattern of perinatal femoral shaft morphology and its implications for the evolution of hominin locomotor adaptations.

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    Naoki Morimoto

    Full Text Available Acquisition of bipedality is a hallmark of human evolution. How bipedality evolved from great ape-like locomotor behaviors, however, is still highly debated. This is mainly because it is difficult to infer locomotor function, and even more so locomotor kinematics, from fossil hominin long bones. Structure-function relationships are complex, as long bone morphology reflects phyletic history, developmental programs, and loading history during an individual's lifetime. Here we discriminate between these factors by investigating the morphology of long bones in fetal and neonate great apes and humans, before the onset of locomotion.Comparative morphometric analysis of the femoral diaphysis indicates that its morphology reflects phyletic relationships between hominoid taxa to a greater extent than taxon-specific locomotor adaptations. Diaphyseal morphology in humans and chimpanzees exhibits several shared-derived features, despite substantial differences in locomotor adaptations. Orangutan and gorilla morphologies are largely similar, and likely represent the primitive hominoid state.These findings are compatible with two possible evolutionary scenarios. Diaphyseal morphology may reflect retained adaptive traits of ancestral taxa, hence human-chimpanzee shared-derived features may be indicative of the locomotor behavior of our last common ancestor. Alternatively, diaphyseal morphology might reflect evolution by genetic drift (neutral evolution rather than selection, and might thus be more informative about phyletic relationships between taxa than about locomotor adaptations. Both scenarios are consistent with the hypothesis that knuckle-walking in chimpanzees and gorillas resulted from convergent evolution, and that the evolution of human bipedality is unrelated to extant great ape locomotor specializations.

  13. Music and methamphetamine: conditioned cue-induced increases in locomotor activity and dopamine release in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polston, J E; Rubbinaccio, H Y; Morra, J T; Sell, E M; Glick, S D

    2011-03-01

    Associations between drugs of abuse and cues facilitate the acquisition and maintenance of addictive behaviors. Although significant research has been done to elucidate the role that simple discriminative or discrete conditioned stimuli (e.g., a tone or a light) play in addiction, less is known about complex environmental cues. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of a musical conditioned stimulus by assessing locomotor activity and in vivo microdialysis. Two groups of rats were given non-contingent injections of methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg) or vehicle and placed in standard conditioning chambers. During these conditioning sessions both groups were exposed to a continuous conditioned stimulus, in the form of a musical selection ("Four" by Miles Davis) played repeatedly for 90 min. After seven consecutive conditioning days subjects were given one day of rest, and subsequently tested for locomotor activity or dopamine release in the absence of drugs while the musical conditioned stimulus was continually present. The brain regions examined included the basolateral amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex. The results show that music is an effective contextual conditioned stimulus, significantly increasing locomotor activity after repeated association with methamphetamine. Furthermore, this musical conditioned stimulus significantly increased extracellular dopamine levels in the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens. These findings support other evidence showing the importance of these brain regions in conditioned learning paradigms, and demonstrate that music is an effective conditioned stimulus warranting further investigation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conditioned Reinforcement and Locomotor Activating Effects of Caffeine and Ethanol Combinations in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Megan L.T.; May, Christina E.; Griffin, William C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing trend among ethanol drinkers, especially young adults, is to combine caffeinated energy drinks with ethanol during a drinking episode. The primary active ingredient of these mixers is caffeine, which may significantly interact with ethanol. We tested the two hypotheses that caffeine would enhance ethanol-conditioned place preference and also enhance ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity. The interactive pharmacology of ethanol and caffeine was examined in C57BL/6J (B6) mice in a conditioned place preference procedure with 1.75 g/kg ethanol and 3 mg/kg caffeine. Additionally, we used B6 mice to evaluate ethanol/caffeine combinations on locomotor activity using 3 doses of ethanol (1.75, 2.5 and 3.25 g/kg) and 2 two doses of caffeine (3 and 15 mg/kg). Both ethanol and caffeine administered alone increased preference for the drug paired side, though the effect of caffeine was more modest than that of ethanol. The drug combination produced significant place preference itself, but this was not greater than that for ethanol alone. Additionally, the combination of caffeine and ethanol significantly increased locomotion compared to giving either drug alone. The effect was strongest with a stimulatory dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg) and waned with increasing doses of ethanol. Thus, combinations of caffeine and ethanol had significant conditioned reinforcing and locomotor activating effects in mice. PMID:23872371

  15. Catalase inhibition in the Arcuate nucleus blocks ethanol effects on the locomotor activity of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Segura, Carles; Correa, Mercé; Miquel, Marta; Aragon, Carlos M G

    2005-03-07

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there is a bidirectional modulation of ethanol-induced locomotion produced by drugs that regulate brain catalase activity. In the present study we have assessed the effect in rats of intraperitoneal, intraventricular or intracraneal administration of the catalase inhibitor sodium azide in the locomotor changes observed after ethanol (1 g/kg) administration. Our results show that sodium azide prevents the effects of ethanol in rats locomotion not only when sodium azide was systemically administered but also when it was intraventricularly injected, then confirming that the interaction between catalase and ethanol takes place in Central Nervous System (CNS). Even more interestingly, the same results were observed when sodium azide administration was restricted to the hypothalamic Arcuate nucleus (ARC), a brain region which has one of the highest levels of expression of catalase. Therefore, the results of the present study not only confirm a role for brain catalase in the mediation of ethanol-induced locomotor changes in rodents but also point to the ARC as a major neuroanatomical location for this interaction. These results are in agreement with our reports showing that ethanol-induced locomotor changes are clearly dependent of the ARC integrity and, especially of the POMc-synthesising neurons of this nucleus. According to these data we propose a model in which ethanol oxidation via catalase could produce acetaldehyde into the ARC and to promote a release of beta-endorphins that would activate opioid receptors to produce locomotion and other ethanol-induced neurobehavioural changes.

  16. Effects of lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-6 on cataleptic immobility and locomotor activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazovkina, Daria V; Tibeikina, Marina A; Kulikov, Alexander V; Popova, Nina K

    2011-01-10

    Catalepsy (animal hypnosis, tonic immobility) is a type of passive defensive behavior. Its exaggerated form is a syndrome of some psychopathological disorders. Numerous neurotransmitters have impact on the regulation of catalepsy. In this paper we demonstrated the involvement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the mechanism of cataleptic immobility. Effects of exogenous IL-6 treatment (7.5 and 10μg/kg, i.p) or stimulation of endogenous IL-6 secretion with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration (50, 100 and 200μg/kg, i.p.) on catalepsy and locomotor activity were studied in adult C57BL/6 male mice. IL-6 induced catalepsy in 70% (7.5μg/kg) or 72.7% (10μg/kg) of animals with no effect on locomotor activity. LPS administration reduced distance travelled and number of rears in the open field at any dose used, however, only high doses (100 or 200μg/kg) of the toxin induced catalepsy in 50% of mice. This result indicates that IL-6 is involved in the regulation of catalepsy, this effect is specific and does not arise from inhibition of locomotor activity. The study provides a new evidence on participation of IL-6 in mechanisms of abnormal behavior. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced persistency of resting and active periods of locomotor activity in schizophrenia.

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    Wataru Sano

    Full Text Available Patients with schizophrenia frequently exhibit behavioral abnormalities associated with its pathological symptoms. Therefore, a quantitative evaluation of behavioral dynamics could contribute to objective diagnoses of schizophrenia. However, such an approach has not been fully established because of the absence of quantitative biobehavioral measures. Recently, we studied the dynamical properties of locomotor activity, specifically how resting and active periods are interwoven in daily life. We discovered universal statistical laws ("behavioral organization" and their alterations in patients with major depressive disorder. In this study, we evaluated behavioral organization of schizophrenic patients (n = 19 and healthy subjects (n = 11 using locomotor activity data, acquired by actigraphy, to investigate whether the laws could provide objective and quantitative measures for a possible diagnosis and assessment of symptoms. Specifically, we evaluated the cumulative distributions of resting and active periods, defined as the periods with physical activity counts successively below and above a predefined threshold, respectively. Here we report alterations in the laws governing resting and active periods; resting periods obeyed a power-law cumulative distribution with significantly lower parameter values (power-law scaling exponents, whereas active periods followed a stretched exponential distribution with significantly lower parameter values (stretching exponents, in patients. Our findings indicate enhanced persistency of both lower and higher locomotor activity periods in patients with schizophrenia, probably reflecting schizophrenic pathophysiology.

  18. Atmospheric oxygen, giant Paleozoic insects and the evolution of aerial locomotor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, R

    1998-04-01

    Uniformitarian approaches to the evolution of terrestrial locomotor physiology and animal flight performance have generally presupposed the constancy of atmospheric composition. Recent geophysical data as well as theoretical models suggest that, to the contrary, both oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations have changed dramatically during defining periods of metazoan evolution. Hyperoxia in the late Paleozoic atmosphere may have physiologically enhanced the initial evolution of tetrapod locomotor energetics; a concurrently hyperdense atmosphere would have augmented aerodynamic force production in early flying insects. Multiple historical origins of vertebrate flight also correlate temporally with geological periods of increased oxygen concentration and atmospheric density. Arthropod as well as amphibian gigantism appear to have been facilitated by a hyperoxic Carboniferous atmosphere and were subsequently eliminated by a late Permian transition to hypoxia. For extant organisms, the transient, chronic and ontogenetic effects of exposure to hyperoxic gas mixtures are poorly understood relative to contemporary understanding of the physiology of oxygen deprivation. Experimentally, the biomechanical and physiological effects of hyperoxia on animal flight performance can be decoupled through the use of gas mixtures that vary in density and oxygen concentration. Such manipulations permit both paleophysiological simulation of ancestral locomotor performance and an analysis of maximal flight capacity in extant forms.

  19. A disparity between locomotor economy and territory-holding ability in male house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeremy S; Ruff, James S; Potts, Wayne K; Carrier, David R

    2017-07-15

    Both economical locomotion and physical fighting are important performance traits to many species because of their direct influence on components of Darwinian fitness. Locomotion represents a substantial portion of the total daily energy budget of many animals. Fighting performance often determines individual reproductive fitness through the means of resource control, social dominance and access to mates. However, phenotypic traits that improve either locomotor economy or fighting ability may diminish performance in the other. Here, we tested for a predicted disparity between locomotor economy and competitive ability in wild-derived house mice ( Mus musculus ). We used 8 week social competition trials in semi-natural enclosures to directly measure male competitive ability through territorial control and female occupancy within territories. We also measured oxygen consumption during locomotion for each mouse using running trials in an enclosed treadmill and open-flow respirometry. Our results show that territory-holding males have higher absolute and mass-specific oxygen consumption when running (i.e. reduced locomotor economy) compared with males that do not control territories. This relationship was present both before and after 8 week competition trials in semi-natural enclosures. This disparity between physical competitive ability and economical locomotion may impose viability costs on males in species for which competition over mates is common and may constrain the evolution of behavioral and phenotypic diversity, particularly in natural settings with environmental and resource variability. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Reciprocal activation/inactivation of ERK in the amygdala and frontal cortex is correlated with the degree of novelty of an open-field environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguedo, Frederico Velasco; Dias, Caio Vitor Bueno; Dias, Flavia Regina Cruz; Samuels, Richard Ian; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-03-01

    Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has been used to identify brain areas activated by exogenous stimuli including psychostimulant drugs. Assess the role of the amygdala in emotional responses. Experimental manipulations were performed in which environmental familiarity was the variable. To provide the maximal degree of familiarity, ERK was measured after removal from the home cage and re-placement back into the same cage. To maximize exposure to an unfamiliar environment, ERK was measured following placement into a novel open field. To assess whether familiarity was the critical variable in the ERK response to the novel open field, ERK was also measured after either four or eight placements into the same environment. ERK quantification was carried out in the amygdala, frontal cortex, and the nucleus accumbens. After home cage re-placement, ERK activation was found in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens but was absent in the amygdala. Following placement in a novel environment, ERK activation was more prominent in the amygdala than the frontal cortex or nucleus accumbens. In contrast, with habituation to the novel environment, ERK phosphors declined markedly in the amygdala but increased in the frontal cortex and nucleus accumbens to the level observed following home cage re-placement. The differential responsiveness of the amygdala versus the frontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens to a novel versus a habituated environment is consistent with a reciprocal interaction between these neural systems and points to their important role in the mediation of behavioral activation to novelty and behavioral inactivation with habituation.

  1. Mechanisms of Left-Right Coordination in Mammalian Locomotor Pattern Generation Circuits: A Mathematical Modeling View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized “hopping” pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left–right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  2. Conditioned Place Preference to Acetone Inhalation and the Effects on Locomotor Behavior and 18FDG Uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, J.C.; Dewey, S.L.; Schiffer, W.; Lee, D.

    2006-01-01

    Acetone is a component in many inhalants that have been widely abused. While other solvents have addictive potential, such as toluene, it is unclear whether acetone alone contains addictive properties. The locomotor, relative glucose metabolism and abusive effects of acetone inhalation were studied in animals using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm and [18F]2-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) imaging. The CPP apparatus contains two distinct conditioning chambers and a middle adaptation chamber, each lined with photocells to monitor locomotor activity. Adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16; 90-110 g) were paired with acetone in least preferred conditioning chamber, determined on the pretest day. The animals were exposed to a 10,000 ppm dose for an hour, alternating days with air. A CPP test was conducted after the 3rd, 6th and 12th pairing. In these same animals, the relative glucose metabolism effects were determined using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18FDG. Following the 3rd pairing, there was a significant aversion to the acetone paired chamber (190.9 ± 13.7 sec and 241.7 ± 16.9 sec, acetone and air, respectively). After the 6th pairing, there was no significant preference observed with equal time spent in each chamber (222 ± 21 sec and 207 ± 20 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). A similar trend was observed after the 12th pairing (213 ± 21 sec and 221 ± 22 sec, acetone and air-paired, respectively). Locomotor analysis indicated a significant decrease (p<0.05) from air pairings to acetone pairings on the first and sixth pairings. The observed locomotor activity was characteristic of central nervous system (CNS) depressants, without showing clear abusive effects in this CPP model. In these studies, acetone vapors were not as reinforcing as other solvents, shown by overall lack of preference for the acetone paired side of the chamber. PET imaging indicated a regionally specific distribution of 18FDG uptake following

  3. Zebrafish Locomotor Responses Predict Irritant Potential of Smoke Particulate Matter from Five Biomass Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past few decades, the drying and warming trends of global climate change have increased wildland fire (WF) season length, as well as geographic area impacted. Consequently, exposures to WF fine particulate matter (PM2.5; aerodynamic diameter <2.5 µm) are likely ...

  4. Enhanced novelty-induced corticosterone spike and upregulated serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors in adolescent BTBR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Georgianna G; Burke, Teresa F; Osorio, Miguel D; Smolik, Corey M; Zhang, Wynne Q; Onaivi, Emmanuel S; Gu, Ting-Ting; DeSilva, Mauris N; Hensler, Julie G

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis responses to change and social challenges during adolescence can influence mental health and behavior into adulthood. To examine how HPA tone in adolescence may contribute to psychopathology, we challenged male adolescent (5 weeks) and adult (16 weeks) BTBR T(+)tf/J (BTBR) and 129S1/SvImJ (129S) mice with novelty in sociability tests. In prior studies these strains had exaggerated or altered HPA stress responses and low sociability relative to C57BL/6J mice in adulthood. In adolescence these strains already exhibited similar or worse sociability deficits than adults or age-matched C57 mice. Yet BTBR adolescents were less hyperactive and buried fewer marbles than adults. Novelty-induced corticosterone (CORT) spikes in adolescent BTBR were double adult levels, and higher than 129S or C57 mice at either age. Due to their established role in HPA feedback, we hypothesized that hippocampal Gαi/o-coupled serotonin 5-HT1A and cannabinoid CB1 receptor function might be upregulated in BTBR mice. Adolescent BTBR mice had higher hippocampal 5-HT1A density as measured by [(3)H] 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) binding than C57 mice, and adult BTBR 8-OH-DPAT-stimulated GTPγS binding was higher than in either C57 or 129S mice in this region. Further, BTBR hippocampal CB1 density measured by [(3)H]CP55,940 binding was 15-20% higher than in C57. CP55,940-stimulated GTPγS binding in adult BTBR dentate gyrus was 30% higher then 129S (p<0.05), but was not a product of greater neuronal or cell density defined by NeuN and DAPI staining. Hence hyperactive HPA responsiveness during adolescence may underlie 5-HT1A and CB1 receptor up-regulation and behavioral phenotype of BTBR mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Local tidal regime dictates plasticity of expression of locomotor activity rhythms of American horseshoe crabs,Limulus polyphemus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rebecca L; Watson, Winsor H; Chabot, Christopher C

    2017-04-01

    While horseshoe crabs Limulus polyphemus from regions with two daily tides express endogenous circatidal (~ 12.4 h) activity rhythms, much less is known about locomotor rhythm expression in horseshoe crabs from other tidal regimes. This study investigated whether horseshoe crabs (1) always express activity rhythms consistent with their natural tides, and (2) can alter activity rhythm expression in response to novel tide cycles. Activity rhythms of animals from environments with two daily tides (Gulf of Maine, 43°6' N/70°52' W, and Massachusetts, 41°32' N/70°40'W), one dominant daily tide (Apalachee Bay, Florida, 29°58' N/84°20' W), and microtides (Indian River Lagoon, Florida, 28°5' N/80°35' W) were recorded in 2011-2013 during three artificial tide conditions: no tides, a 12.4 h tidal cycle, and a 24.8 h tidal cycle. Interestingly, L. polyphemus from the microtidal site ( n = 7) appeared "plastic" in their responses; they were able to express both bimodal and unimodal rhythms in response to different tide cycles. In contrast, the other two populations exhibited more fixed responses: regardless of the tides they were exposed to, animals from areas with one dominant daily tide ( n = 18) consistently expressed unimodal rhythms, while those from areas with two daily tides ( n = 28) generally expressed bimodal rhythms. Rhythms expressed by L. polyphemus thus appear to be a function of endogenous clocks, the tidal cues to which animals are exposed, and tidal cues that animals experience throughout ontogeny.

  6. Repeated assessment of exploration and novelty seeking in the human behavioral pattern monitor in bipolar disorder patients and healthy individuals.

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    Arpi Minassian

    Full Text Available Exploration and novelty seeking are cross-species adaptive behaviors that are dysregulated in bipolar disorder (BD and are critical features of the illness. While these behaviors have been extensively quantified in animals, multivariate human paradigms of exploration are lacking. The human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM, a human version of the animal open field, identified a signature pattern of hyper-exploration in manic BD patients, but whether exploratory behavior changes with treatment is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the hBPM to changes in manic symptoms, a necessary step towards elucidating the neurobiology underlying BD.Twelve acutely hospitalized manic BD subjects and 21 healthy volunteers were tested in the hBPM over three sessions; all subjects were retested one week after their first session and two weeks after their second session. Motor activity, spatial and entropic (degree of unpredictability patterns of exploration, and interactions with novel objects were quantified. Manic BD patients demonstrated greater motor activity, extensive and more unpredictable patterns of exploration, and more object interactions than healthy volunteers during all three sessions. Exploration and novelty-seeking slightly decreased in manic BD subjects over the three sessions as their symptoms responded to treatment, but never to the level of healthy volunteers. Among healthy volunteers, exploration did not significantly decrease over time, and hBPM measures were highly correlated between sessions.Manic BD patients showed a modest reduction in symptoms yet still demonstrated hyper-exploration and novelty seeking in the hBPM, suggesting that these illness features may be enduring characteristics of BD. Furthermore, behavior in the hBPM is not subject to marked habituation effects. The hBPM can be reliably used in a repeated-measures design to characterize exploration and novelty seeking and, in parallel with

  7. Active robotic training improves locomotor function in a stroke survivor

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    Krishnan Chandramouli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical outcomes after robotic training are often not superior to conventional therapy. One key factor responsible for this is the use of control strategies that provide substantial guidance. This strategy not only leads to a reduction in volitional physical effort, but also interferes with motor relearning. Methods We tested the feasibility of a novel training approach (active robotic training using a powered gait orthosis (Lokomat in mitigating post-stroke gait impairments of a 52-year-old male stroke survivor. This gait training paradigm combined patient-cooperative robot-aided walking with a target-tracking task. The training lasted for 4-weeks (12 visits, 3 × per week. The subject’s neuromotor performance and recovery were evaluated using biomechanical, neuromuscular and clinical measures recorded at various time-points (pre-training, post-training, and 6-weeks after training. Results Active robotic training resulted in considerable increase in target-tracking accuracy and reduction in the kinematic variability of ankle trajectory during robot-aided treadmill walking. These improvements also transferred to overground walking as characterized by larger propulsive forces and more symmetric ground reaction forces (GRFs. Training also resulted in improvements in muscle coordination, which resembled patterns observed in healthy controls. These changes were accompanied by a reduction in motor cortical excitability (MCE of the vastus medialis, medial hamstrings, and gluteus medius muscles during treadmill walking. Importantly, active robotic training resulted in substantial improvements in several standard clinical and functional parameters. These improvements persisted during the follow-up evaluation at 6 weeks. Conclusions The results indicate that active robotic training appears to be a promising way of facilitating gait and physical function in moderately impaired stroke survivors.

  8. Novelty detection and repetition suppression in a passive picture viewing task: a possible approach for the evaluation of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Frank; Manka, Christoph; Scheef, Lukas; Granath, Dirk-Oliver; Schild, Hans H; Heun, Reinhard

    2002-12-01

    The applicability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or schizophrenia is frequently limited by cognitive impairment, which prevents the adequate execution of complex tasks. An experimental design that puts only minor demands on the patients' cognitive ability but engages disease-relevant brain structures would be of benefit. Novelty detection and repetition suppression are two basic components of memory that might be used to investigate specific brain areas under these conditions. Novelty detection has been related to hippocampal activation increases. Stimulus repetition related activation decreases (suppression) have been observed in the extrastriate cortex and have been related to perceptual priming. Both processes have been examined primarily in neuroimaging studies with complex cognitive tasks. We used event-related fMRI to investigate novelty- and repetition-related effects in an attended but passive picture-viewing task in healthy subjects. The differential activation, detected in the novel vs. repeated contrast, was located in the bilateral anterior hippocampus and in bilateral occipital and inferior-temporal areas. The hippocampal activation is of interest because medial temporal lobe lesions are key features in AD and schizophrenia. The repetition-related activation decreases in the extrastriate areas are of potential value in investigating the conflicting results regarding perceptual priming impairment in both disorders. Our results indicate that activation of disease-relevant brain regions under passive task conditions is possible. This might increase the utility of functional imaging in cognitively impaired patients. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Viewing the Personality Traits Through a Cerebellar Lens: a Focus on the Constructs of Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, and Alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosini, Laura; Cutuli, Debora; Picerni, Eleonora; Laricchiuta, Daniela

    2017-02-01

    The variance in the range of personality trait expression appears to be linked to structural variance in specific brain regions. In evidencing associations between personality factors and neurobiological measures, it seems evident that the cerebellum has not been up to now thought as having a key role in personality. This paper will review the most recent structural and functional neuroimaging literature that engages the cerebellum in personality traits, as novelty seeking and harm avoidance, and it will discuss the findings in the context of contemporary theories of affective and cognitive cerebellar function. By using region of interest (ROI)- and voxel-based approaches, we recently evidenced that the cerebellar volumes correlate positively with novelty seeking scores and negatively with harm avoidance scores. Subjects who search for new situations as a novelty seeker does (and a harm avoiding does not do) show a different engagement of their cerebellar circuitries in order to rapidly adapt to changing environments. The emerging model of cerebellar functionality may explain how the cerebellar abilities in planning, controlling, and putting into action the behavior are associated to normal or abnormal personality constructs. In this framework, it is worth reporting that increased cerebellar volumes are even associated with high scores in alexithymia, construct of personality characterized by impairment in cognitive, emotional, and affective processing. On such a basis, it seems necessary to go over the traditional cortico-centric view of personality constructs and to address the function of the cerebellar system in sustaining aspects of motivational network that characterizes the different temperamental traits.

  10. 16p11.2 Deletion mice display cognitive deficits in touchscreen learning and novelty recognition tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mu; Lewis, Freeman C; Sarvi, Michael S; Foley, Gillian M; Crawley, Jacqueline N

    2015-12-01

    Chromosomal 16p11.2 deletion syndrome frequently presents with intellectual disabilities, speech delays, and autism. Here we investigated the Dolmetsch line of 16p11.2 heterozygous (+/-) mice on a range of cognitive tasks with different neuroanatomical substrates. Robust novel object recognition deficits were replicated in two cohorts of 16p11.2+/- mice, confirming previous findings. A similarly robust deficit in object location memory was discovered in +/-, indicating impaired spatial novelty recognition. Generalizability of novelty recognition deficits in +/- mice extended to preference for social novelty. Robust learning deficits and cognitive inflexibility were detected using Bussey-Saksida touchscreen operant chambers. During acquisition of pairwise visual discrimination, +/- mice required significantly more training trials to reach criterion than wild-type littermates (+/+), and made more errors and correction errors than +/+. In the reversal phase, all +/+ reached criterion, whereas most +/- failed to reach criterion by the 30-d cutoff. Contextual and cued fear conditioning were normal in +/-. These cognitive phenotypes may be relevant to some aspects of cognitive impairments in humans with 16p11.2 deletion, and support the use of 16p11.2+/- mice as a model system for discovering treatments for cognitive impairments in 16p11.2 deletion syndrome. © 2015 Yang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Nobiletin improves emotional and novelty recognition memory but not spatial referential memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jiyun; Shin, Jung-Won; Kim, Yoo-Rim; Swanberg, Kelley M; Kim, Yooseung; Bae, Jae Ryong; Kim, Young Ki; Lee, Jinwon; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Sohn, Nak-Won; Maeng, Sungho

    2017-01-01

    How to maintain and enhance cognitive functions for both aged and young populations is a highly interesting subject. But candidate memory-enhancing reagents are tested almost exclusively on lesioned or aged animals. Also, there is insufficient information on the type of memory these reagents can improve. Working memory, located in the prefrontal cortex, manages short-term sensory information, but, by gaining significant relevance, this information is converted to long-term memory by hippocampal formation and/or amygdala, followed by tagging with space-time or emotional cues, respectively. Nobiletin is a product of citrus peel known for cognitive-enhancing effects in various pharmacological and neurodegenerative disease models, yet, it is not well studied in non-lesioned animals and the type of memory that nobiletin can improve remains unclear. In this study, 8-week-old male mice were tested using behavioral measurements for working, spatial referential, emotional and visual recognition memory after daily administration of nobiletin. While nobiletin did not induce any change of spontaneous activity in the open field test, freezing by fear conditioning and novel object recognition increased. However, the effectiveness of spatial navigation in the Y-maze and Morris water maze was not improved. These results mean that nobiletin can specifically improve memories of emotionally salient information associated with fear and novelty, but not of spatial information without emotional saliency. Accordingly, the use of nobiletin on normal subjects as a memory enhancer would be more effective on emotional types but may have limited value for the improvement of episodic memories.

  12. Adenylyl Cyclase 1 Is Required for Ethanol-Induced Locomotor Sensitization and Associated Increases in NMDA Receptor Phosphorylation and Function in the Dorsal Medial Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Kelly E; Oginsky, Max F; Susick, Laura L; Ramalingam, Sailesh; Ferrario, Carrie R; Conti, Alana C

    2017-11-01

    Neuroadaptive responses to chronic ethanol, such as behavioral sensitization, are associated with N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) recruitment. Ethanol enhances GluN2B-containing NMDAR function and phosphorylation (Tyr-1472) of the GluN2B-NMDAR subunit in the dorsal medial striatum (DMS) through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Ethanol-induced phosphorylation of PKA substrates is partially mediated by calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), which is enriched in the dorsal striatum. As such, AC1 is poised as an upstream modulator of ethanol-induced DMS neuroadaptations that promote drug responding, and thus represents a therapeutic target. Our hypothesis is that loss of AC1 activity will prevent ethanol-induced locomotor sensitization and associated DMS GluN2B-NMDAR adaptations. We evaluated AC1's contribution to ethanol-evoked locomotor responses and DMS GluN2B-NMDAR phosphorylation and function using AC1 knockout (AC1KO) mice. Results were mechanistically validated with the AC1 inhibitor, NB001. Acute ethanol (2.0 g/kg) locomotor responses in AC1KO and wild-type (WT) mice pretreated with NB001 (10 mg/kg) were comparable to WT ethanol controls. However, repeated ethanol treatment (10 days, 2.5 g/kg) failed to produce sensitization in AC1KO or NB001 pretreated mice, as observed in WT ethanol controls, following challenge exposure (2.0 g/kg). Repeated exposure to ethanol in the sensitization procedure significantly increased pTyr-1472 GluN2B levels and GluN2B-containing NMDAR transmission in the DMS of WT mice. Loss of AC1 signaling impaired ethanol-induced increases in DMS pGluN2B levels and NMDAR-mediated transmission. Together, these data support a critical and specific role for AC1 in striatal signaling that mediates ethanol-induced behavioral sensitization, and identify GluN2B-containing NMDARs as an important AC1 target. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  13. CRFR1 in the ventromedial caudate putamen modulates acute stress-enhanced expression of cocaine locomotor sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuli; Wang, Zhiyan; Li, Yijing; Sun, Xiaowei; Ge, Feifei; Yang, Mingda; Wang, Xinjuan; Wang, Na; Wang, Junkai; Cui, Cailian

    2017-07-15

    Repeated exposure to psychostimulants induces a long-lasting enhancement of locomotor activity called behavioral sensitization, which is often reinforced by stress after drug withdrawal. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena remain elusive. Here we explored the effects of acute stress 3 or 14 days after the cessation of chronic cocaine treatment on the expression of locomotor sensitization induced by a cocaine challenge in rats and the key brain region and molecular mechanism underlying the phenomenon. A single session of forced swimming, as an acute stress (administered 2 days after the cessation of cocaine), significantly enhanced the expression of cocaine locomotor sensitization 14 days after the final cocaine injection (challenge at 12 days after acute stress) but not 3 days after the cessation of cocaine (challenge at 1 day after acute stress). The result indicated that acute stress enhanced the expression of cocaine locomotor sensitization after incubation for 12 days rather than 1 day after the last cocaine injection. Moreover, the enhancement in locomotor sensitization was paralleled by a selective increase in the number of the c-Fos + cells, the level of CRFR1 mRNA in the ventromedial caudate putamen (vmCPu). Furthermore, the enhancement was significantly attenuated by CRFR1 antagonist NBI-27914 into the vmCPu, implying that the up-regulation of CRFR1 in the vmCPu seems to be critical in the acute stress-enhanced expression of cocaine locomotor sensitization. The findings demonstrate that the long-term effect of acute stress on the expression of cocaine locomotor sensitization is partially mediated by CRFR1 in the vmCPu. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function.

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    Alexandra Vaccaro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0 and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1 clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila.

  15. Repeated agouti related peptide (83-132) injections inhibit cocaine-induced locomotor sensitisation, but not via the nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alserda, Edwin; Adan, Roger A H; Ramakers, Geert M J

    2013-11-05

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease for which many of the underlying neuronal mechanisms are yet to be unravelled. There seems to be an interaction between the melanocortin system and drugs of abuse. For instance, infusion of the melanocortin MC4 receptor antagonist SHU9119 (Ac-Nle-cyclo(-Asp-His-D-2-Nal-Arg-Trp-Lys)-NH2) into the nucleus accumbens results in conditioned place avoidance, reduces the amount of lever presses for cocaine and blocks development of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitisation. The aim of this study is to determine whether the induction of locomotor sensitisation to repeated cocaine is inhibited by the melanocortin MC4 receptor inverse agonist Agouti Related Peptide (AgRP83-132). Rats were sensitised to daily cocaine injections for 5 consecutive days and 30 min prior to every daily cocaine injection, rats received an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intra nucleus accumbens injection with AgRP(83-132) or saline, to determine whether we could inhibit cocaine-induced locomotor sensitisation. We show that i.c.v. injections of AgRP(83-132) inhibit cocaine-induced locomotor sensitisation. This effect is not regulated via the nucleus accumbens, since injecting the melanocortin receptor inverse agonist AgRP(83-132) directly into the nucleus accumbens was unable to inhibit the cocaine-induced locomotor sensitisation. This implicates that the nucleus accumbens is an unlikely site to inhibit the induction of locomotor sensitisation via the melanocortin MC4 receptor. This is in contrast to other studies that show an effect of the melanocortin MC4 receptor antagonist SHU9119 on locomotor sensitisation when injected into the nucleus accumbens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Examination of the Patient’s Locomotor System Disability Evaluated in the Board of Health for Disabled

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    Rabia Terzi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our goal was to evaluate patients who admitted to Board of Health for Disabled in our hospital, and evaluate the characteristics and disability rates of patients with locomotor disability. Also to examine its co-occurrence with other system disabilities, the whole body function loss rates and the distribution of these parameters according to age. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 2263 cases admitted to the Board of Health in Derince Training and Research Hospital were retrospectively analyzed between March 2012 and March 2013. Examinational findings and diagnoses of 672 (29.6% patients who took diagnosis related with locomotor system were reviewed. Results: Of the 2263 patients admitted to the board of health for disabled, 672 (29.6% had locomotor system pathology. Of these patients, 366 were males (54.4%, 306 were females (45.6% and the mean age was 49.6±26 years. The mean total body disability rates of the patients (TBDR were 69.5±28.4, while the locomotor system disability rates (LSDR was 49.43±17.1. Of the 672 patients, 379 (56.3% were assessed as severely disabled by the medical council. 554 patients (82.4% had permanent disability. LSDR was highest in individuals aged 10-19 years; lowest in the individuals aged 40-49 years. The most commonly detected locomotor system pathologies were osteoarthritis (OA, hemiplegia, cerebral palsy, joint contractures and spinal cord diseases. The highest LSDR was in the spinal cord injury patients. The most frequent comorbid diagnoses were neurogenic bladder, mental retardation, and hypertension. Conclusion: Most of the patients who admitted to the Board of Health for locomotor system disability had permanent and severe disabilities. Observing that other system disabilities are frequently concomitant with locomotor system disability is important in terms of the social support for these patients and for planning of the appropriate treatment. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2014;20: 60-4

  17. Limb Bone Structural Proportions and Locomotor Behavior in A.L. 288-1 ("Lucy".

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    Christopher B Ruff

    Full Text Available While there is broad agreement that early hominins practiced some form of terrestrial bipedality, there is also evidence that arboreal behavior remained a part of the locomotor repertoire in some taxa, and that bipedal locomotion may not have been identical to that of modern humans. It has been difficult to evaluate such evidence, however, because of the possibility that early hominins retained primitive traits (such as relatively long upper limbs of little contemporaneous adaptive significance. Here we examine bone structural properties of the femur and humerus in the Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 ("Lucy", 3.2 Myr that are known to be developmentally plastic, and compare them with other early hominins, modern humans, and modern chimpanzees. Cross-sectional images were obtained from micro-CT scans of the original specimens and used to derive section properties of the diaphyses, as well as superior and inferior cortical thicknesses of the femoral neck. A.L. 288-1 shows femoral/humeral diaphyseal strength proportions that are intermediate between those of modern humans and chimpanzees, indicating more mechanical loading of the forelimb than in modern humans, and by implication, a significant arboreal locomotor component. Several features of the proximal femur in A.L. 288-1 and other australopiths, including relative femoral head size, distribution of cortical bone in the femoral neck, and cross-sectional shape of the proximal shaft, support the inference of a bipedal gait pattern that differed slightly from that of modern humans, involving more lateral deviation of the body center of mass over the support limb, which would have entailed increased cost of terrestrial locomotion. There is also evidence consistent with increased muscular strength among australopiths in both the forelimb and hind limb, possibly reflecting metabolic trade-offs between muscle and brain development during hominin evolution. Together these findings imply

  18. The effects of opioid drugs on dopamine mediated locomotor activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leathern, L.L.

    1986-12-01

    Opioid drugs influence various behavioural parameters including locomotor activity in experimental animals. The interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems is one possible explanation for the effect of opioid drugs on locomotor activity. In this study behavioural and biochemical assays were done to investigate the interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems. Behavioural studies were done by measurement of locomotor activity (LA) of rats after acute or chronic pretreatment with opioid and/or dopaminergic drugs. Biochemical studies were in the form of radioligand binding assays, the effect on the number (Bmax) and affinity (K D ) of receptors was measured after chronic pretreatment with opioid and/or dopaminergic drugs. The opioid drugs used are morphine, nalbuphine and naloxone. Dopaminergic drugs used included: agonists-apomorphine and piribedil; antagonists-pimozide, haloperidol, chlorpromazine. In the acute situation increased LA was obtained with morphine and the DA agonists. A correlation between the behavioural and biochemical assays was found. Chronic pretreatment with morphine enhanced apomorphine induced LA, this supersensitivity was also measured as an increased receptor density (Bmax) of D2 receptors in the striatum. Chronic morphine pretreatment caused a decrease in morphine induced LA, while this subsensitivity was not apparent in the ligand binding assays - where no change in receptor number was observed. Chronic naloxone pretreatment enhanced morphine induced LA, as well as increased the Bmax of opioid receptors in the whole brain. It is concluded that an interaction between the opioid and dopaminergic systems does exist, and may account for the mechanism of action of the opioids

  19. A behaviorally related developmental switch in nitrergic modulation of locomotor rhythmogenesis in larval Xenopus tadpoles

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    Currie, Stephen P.; Combes, Denis; Scott, Nicholas W.; Simmers, John

    2016-01-01

    Locomotor control requires functional flexibility to support an animal's full behavioral repertoire. This flexibility is partly endowed by neuromodulators, allowing neural networks to generate a range of motor output configurations. In hatchling Xenopus tadpoles, before the onset of free-swimming behavior, the gaseous modulator nitric oxide (NO) inhibits locomotor output, shortening swim episodes and decreasing swim cycle frequency. While populations of nitrergic neurons are already present in the tadpole's brain stem at hatching, neurons positive for the NO-synthetic enzyme, NO synthase, subsequently appear in the spinal cord, suggesting additional as yet unidentified roles for NO during larval development. Here, we first describe the expression of locomotor behavior during the animal's change from an early sessile to a later free-swimming lifestyle and then compare the effects of NO throughout tadpole development. We identify a discrete switch in nitrergic modulation from net inhibition to overall excitation, coincident with the transition to free-swimming locomotion. Additionally, we show in isolated brain stem-spinal cord preparations of older larvae that NO's excitatory effects are manifested as an increase in the probability of spontaneous swim episode occurrence, as found previously for the neurotransmitter dopamine, but that these effects are mediated within the brain stem. Moreover, while the effects of NO and dopamine are similar, the two modulators act in parallel rather than NO operating serially by modulating dopaminergic signaling. Finally, NO's activation of neurons in the brain stem also leads to the release of NO in the spinal cord that subsequently contributes to NO's facilitation of swimming. PMID:26763775

  20. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  1. Individual differences in circadian locomotor parameters correlate with anxiety- and depression-like behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Anyan

    Full Text Available Disrupted circadian rhythms are a core feature of mood and anxiety disorders. Circadian rhythms are coordinated by a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Animal models of mood and anxiety disorders often exhibit blunted rhythms in locomotor activity and clock gene expression. Interestingly, the changes in circadian rhythms correlate with mood-related behaviours. Although animal models of depression and anxiety exhibit aberrant circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior, it is possible that the methodology being used to induce the behavioral phenotype (e.g., brain lesions, chronic stress, global gene deletion affect behavior independently of circadian system. This study investigates the relationship between individual differences in circadian locomotor parameters and mood-related behaviors in healthy rats. The circadian phenotype of male Lewis rats was characterized by analyzing wheel running behavior under standard 12h:12h LD conditions, constant dark, constant light, and rate of re-entrainment to a phase advance. Rats were then tested on a battery of behavioral tests: activity box, restricted feeding, elevated plus maze, forced swim test, and fear conditioning. Under 12h:12h LD conditions, percent of daily activity in the light phase and variability in activity onset were associated with longer latency to immobility in the forced swim test. Variability in onset also correlated positively with anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Rate of re-entrainment correlated positively with measures of anxiety in the activity box and elevated plus maze. Lastly, we found that free running period under constant dark was associated with anxiety-like behaviors in the activity box and elevated plus maze. Our results provide a previously uncharacterized relationship between circadian locomotor parameters and mood-related behaviors in healthy rats and provide a basis for future examination into circadian clock

  2. Dopamine receptors modulate ethanol's locomotor-activating effects in preweanling rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Carlos; Mlewski, Estela C.; Hansen, Cristian; Molina, Juan Carlos; Paglini, Maria Gabriela; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    Near the end of the second postnatal week motor activity is increased soon after ethanol administration (2.5 g/kg) while sedation-like effects prevail when blood ethanol levels reach peak values. This time course coincides with biphasic reinforcement (appetitive and aversive) effects of ethanol determined at the same age. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that ethanol-induced activity during early development in the rat depends on the dopamine system, which is functional in modulating motor activity early in ontogeny. Experiments 1a and 1b tested ethanol-induced activity (0 or 2.5 g/kg) after a D1-like (SCH23390; 0, 0.015, 0.030 or 0.060 mg/kg) or a D2-like (sulpiride; 0, 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) receptor antagonist, respectively. Ethanol-induced stimulation was suppressed by SCH23390 or sulpiride. The dopaminergic antagonists had no effect on blood ethanol concentration (Experiments 2a and 2b). In Experiment 3, 2.5 g/kg ethanol increased dopamine concentration in striatal tissue as well as locomotor activity in infant Wistar rats. Adding to our previous results showing a reduction in ethanol induced activity by a GABA B agonist or a nonspecific opioid antagonist, the present experiments implicate both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors in ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation during early development. According to these results, the same mechanims that modulate ethanol-mediated locomotor stimulation in adult rodents seem to regulate this particular ethanol effect in the infant rat. PMID:19842128

  3. α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors influence locomotor activity and ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamens, Helen M; Peck, Colette; Garrity, Caitlin; Gechlik, Alex; Jenkins, Brenita C; Rajan, Akshat

    2017-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the mesolimbic dopamine system have been implicated in ethanol behaviors. In particular, work in genetically engineered mice has demonstrated that α6-containing nAChRs are involved in ethanol consumption and sedation. A limitation of these studies is that the alteration in the receptor was present throughout development. The recently described α6β2 antagonist, N,N-decane-1,10-diyl-bis-3-picolinium diiodide (bPiDI), now makes it possible to test for the involvement of these receptors using a pharmacological approach. The aim of this study was to examine the role of α6β2 nAChRs in ethanol behaviors using a pharmacological approach. Adolescent C57BL/6J mice were treated with bPiDI 30 min prior to testing the mice for binge-like ethanol consumption in the drinking-in-the-dark (DID) test, ethanol-induced motor incoordination using the balance beam, and ethanol-induced sedation using the Loss of Righting Reflex (LORR) paradigm. Adolescent animals were chosen because they express a high amount of α6 mRNA relative to adult animals. Control studies were also performed to determine the effect of bPiDI on locomotor activity and ethanol metabolism. Female mice treated with 20 mg/kg bPiDI had reduced locomotor activity compared to saline-treated animals during the first 30 min following an acute injection. Pretreatment with the α6β2 antagonist reduced adolescent ethanol consumption but also reduced saccharin consumption. No significant effects were observed on ethanol-induced ataxia, sedation, or metabolism. This study provides evidence that α6β2 nAChRs are involved in locomotor activity as well as ethanol and saccharin consumption in adolescent animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mouse shoulder morphology responds to locomotor activity and the kinematic differences of climbing and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David J; Richmond, Brian G; Miran, Sara L

    2012-12-01

    Mechanical loads play a significant role in determining long bone shape and strength, but less work has explored how these loads influence flat bones like the scapula, which has been shown to vary with locomotor preference among primate taxa. Here, we tested the effects of voluntary running and climbing exercise in mice to examine how the mechanical loads borne from different locomotor patterns influence shoulder morphological development. Ninety-nine female wild-type mice were distributed equally among sedentary control, activity-wheel running, and vertical climbing experimental conditions. Running mice had the lowest body masses, larger intrinsic shoulder muscles, and the most pronounced differences in scapular size and shape relative to the other groups. Climbing mouse scapular morphology also differed significantly from the control individuals, but these differences were not as marked as those between the running and control mice. This might be attributable in part to greater levels of activity in the wheel-runners relative to the climbers. Additionally, climbing mice held their bodies closer to the substrate and maintained more flexed limbs and posterior hand positions compared with the kinematics of running. As a result, climbers differed significantly from both the running and control mice in developing a relatively broader infraspinous region, which is likely related to preferential recruitment of the infraspinatus and teres minor muscles to maintain flexed shoulder postures. The results of this study demonstrate that variation in activity level and type of locomotor regime over a significant portion of the life history influences muscle and bone development in the shoulder. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Center of mass motion in swimming fish: effects of speed and locomotor mode during undulatory propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Grace; Lauder, George V

    2014-08-01

    Studies of center of mass (COM) motion are fundamental to understanding the dynamics of animal movement, and have been carried out extensively for terrestrial and aerial locomotion. But despite a large amount of literature describing different body movement patterns in fishes, analyses of how the center of mass moves during undulatory propulsion are not available. These data would be valuable for understanding the dynamics of different body movement patterns and the effect of differing body shapes on locomotor force production. In the present study, we analyzed the magnitude and frequency components of COM motion in three dimensions (x: surge, y: sway, z: heave) in three fish species (eel, bluegill sunfish, and clown knifefish) swimming with four locomotor modes at three speeds using high-speed video, and used an image cross-correlation technique to estimate COM motion, thus enabling untethered and unrestrained locomotion. Anguilliform swimming by eels shows reduced COM surge oscillation magnitude relative to carangiform swimming, but not compared to knifefish using a gymnotiform locomotor style. Labriform swimming (bluegill at 0.5 body lengths/s) displays reduced COM sway oscillation relative to swimming in a carangiform style at higher speeds. Oscillation frequency of the COM in the surge direction occurs at twice the tail beat frequency for carangiform and anguilliform swimming, but at the same frequency as the tail beat for gymnotiform locomotion in clown knifefish. Scaling analysis of COM heave oscillation for terrestrial locomotion suggests that COM heave motion scales with positive allometry, and that fish have relatively low COM oscillations for their body size. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. The Role of the Serotonergic System in Locomotor Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi eGhosh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT, a monoamine neurotransmitter synthesized in various populations of brainstem neurons, plays an important role in modulating the activity of spinal networks involved in vertebrate locomotion. Following spinal cord injury (SCI there is a disruption of descending serotonergic projections to spinal motor areas, which results in a subsequent depletion in 5-HT, the dysregulation of serotonin transporters as well as the elevated expression, super-sensitivity and/or constitutive auto-activation of specific serotonin receptors. These changes in the serotonergic system can produce varying degrees of locomotor dysfunction through to paralysis. To date, various approaches targeting the different components of the serotonergic system have been employed to restore limb coordination and improve locomotor function in experimental models of SCI. These strategies have included pharmacological modulation of serotonergic receptors, through the administration of specific 5-HT receptor agonists, or by elevating the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan, which produces a global activation of all classes of 5-HT receptors. Stimulation of these receptors leads to the activation of the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG below the site of injury to facilitate or improve the quality and frequency of movements, particularly when used in concert with the activation of other monoaminergic systems or coupled with electrical stimulation. Another approach has been to employ cell therapeutics to replace the loss of descending serotonergic input to the CPG, either through transplanted fetal brainstem 5-HT neurons at the site of injury that can supply 5-HT to below the level of the lesion or by other cell types to provide a substrate at the lesion for encouraging serotonergic axon regrowth across the lesion to the caudal spinal cord for restoring locomotion.

  7. Role of the 5-HT2A receptor in the locomotor hyperactivity produced by phenylalkylamine hallucinogens in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstadt, Adam L.; Powell, Susan B.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor mediates the effects of serotonergic hallucinogens and may play a role in the pathophysiology of certain psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Given these findings, there is a need for animal models to assess the behavioral effects of 5-HT2A receptor activation. Our previous studies demonstrated that the phenylalkylamine hallucinogen and 5-HT2A/2C agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI) produces dose-dependent effects on locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice, increasing activity at low to moderate doses and reducing activity at high doses. DOI did not increase locomotor activity in 5-HT2A knockout mice, indicating the effect is a consequence of 5-HT2A receptor activation. Here, we tested a series of phenylalkylamine hallucinogens in C57BL/6J mice using the Behavioral Pattern Monitor (BPM) to determine whether these compounds increase locomotor activity by activating the 5-HT2A receptor. Low doses of mescaline, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylamphetamine (DOET), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-propylamphetamine (DOPR), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2), and the conformationally restricted phenethylamine (4-bromo-3,6-dimethoxybenzocyclobuten-1-yl)methylamine (TCB-2) increased locomotor activity. By contrast, the non-hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine 2,5-dimethoxy-4-tert-butylamphetamine (DOTB) did not alter locomotor activity at any dose tested (0.1-10 mg/kg i.p.). The selective 5-HT2A antagonist M100907 blocked the locomotor hyperactivity induced by mescaline and TCB-2. Similarly, mescaline and TCB-2 did not increase locomotor activity in 5-HT2A knockout mice. These results confirm that phenylalkylamine hallucinogens increase locomotor activity in mice and demonstrate that this effect is mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. Thus, locomotor hyperactivity in mice can be used to assess phenylalkylamines for 5-HT2A agonist activity and hallucinogen-like behavioral effects. These studies provide additional support for the link between 5-HT2A activation and

  8. Clinical efficiency of roentgenopaque study of muscles in patients with disorders of locomotor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'yachkova, G.V.

    1996-01-01

    Radiopaque studies of soft tissues in patients with disorders and diseases of locomotor system in the case of perosseous osteosynthesis were performed. To correct the diagnosis, control the soft tissue state during treatment, assess its results more than 1000 radiopaque studies of muscles were conducted. Application of the radiopaque studies of femur muscles in patients with extension contractures of knee joint permitted to specify the character of contracture, to determine the character of muscles changes in patients with immobilization and arthrogenetic contractures which depended on disease duration

  9. Integration of Descending Command Systems for the Generation of Context-Specific Locomotor Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda H. Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade there has been a renaissance in our understanding of spinal cord circuits; new technologies are beginning to provide key insights into descending circuits which project onto spinal cord central pattern generators. By integrating work from both the locomotor and animal behavioral fields, we can now examine context-specific control of locomotion, with an emphasis on descending modulation arising from various regions of the brainstem. Here we examine approach and avoidance behaviors and the circuits that lead to the production and arrest of locomotion.

  10. Effects of cortisol on aggression and locomotor activity in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øverli, Øyvind; Kotzian, Susann; Winberg, Svante

    2002-08-01

    Noninvasive administration of cortisol through the diet resulted in relatively rapid (Aggressive behavior was also inhibited by long-term cortisol treatment, but not by short-term exposure to cortisol. Cortisol treatment had no effect on locomotor activity in undisturbed fish, indicating that the behavioral effects of cortisol were mediated through interaction with other signal systems activated during the simulated territorial intrusion test. This study demonstrates for the first time that cortisol has time- and context-dependent effects on behavior in teleost fish.

  11. Locomotor Adaptation Improves Balance Control, Multitasking Ability and Reduces the Metabolic Cost of Postural Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. D.; Miller, C. A.; Ploutz-Snyder, R. J.; Guined, J. R.; Buxton, R. E.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The overall goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to these environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene. It provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. Greater metabolic cost incurred during balance instability means more physical work is required during adaptation to new environments possibly affecting crewmembers? ability to perform mission critical tasks during early surface operations on planetary expeditions. The goal of this study was to characterize adaptation to a discordant sensory challenge across a number of performance modalities including locomotor stability, multi-tasking ability and metabolic cost. METHODS: Subjects (n=15) walked (4.0 km/h) on a treadmill for an 8 -minute baseline walking period followed by 20-minutes of walking (4.0 km/h) with support surface motion (0.3 Hz, sinusoidal lateral motion, peak amplitude 25.4 cm) provided by the treadmill/motion-base system. Stride frequency and auditory reaction time were collected as measures of locomotor stability and multi-tasking ability, respectively. Metabolic data (VO2) were collected via a portable metabolic gas analysis system. RESULTS: At the onset of lateral support surface motion, subj ects walking on our treadmill showed an increase in stride frequency and auditory reaction time indicating initial balance and multi-tasking disturbances. During the 20-minute adaptation period, balance control and multi-tasking performance improved. Similarly, throughout the 20-minute adaptation period, VO2 gradually

  12. Oxytocin decreases cocaine taking, cocaine seeking, and locomotor activity in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Leong, Kah-Chung; Zhou, Luyi; Ghee, Shannon M.; See, Ronald E.; Reichel, Carmela M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin has been shown to decrease cocaine taking and seeking in male rats, suggesting potential treatment efficacy for drug addiction. In the present study, we extended these findings to the assessment of cocaine seeking and taking in female rats. Further, we made direct comparisons of oxytocin’s impact on cocaine induced locomotor activity in both males and females. In females, systemic oxytocin (0.3, 1.0, 3.0 mg/kg) attenuated lever pressing for cocaine during self-administration and oxyt...

  13. Lifetime substance abuse, family history of alcohol abuse/dependence and novelty seeking in eating disorders: comparison study of eating disorder subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Isabel; Pinheiro, Andrea Poyastro; Bulik, Cynthia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Penelo, Eva; Masuet, Cristina; Agüera, Zaida; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2009-02-01

    To assess lifetime substance abuse, family history of alcohol abuse/dependence, and novelty seeking in three different eating disorder groups (anorexia nervosa-restrictive; anorexia nervosa-binge eating/purging; anorexia nervosa to bulimia nervosa). A total sample of 371 eating disorder patients participated in the current study. Assessment measures included the prevalence of substance abuse and family history of alcohol abuse/dependence as well as the