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Sample records for notch1-induced t-cell acute

  1. [ADAR1 Knockout Inhibits Notch1-induced T-ALL in Mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Er; Peng, Lu-Yun; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Ying-Chi; Hu, Tian-Yuan; Xu, Jing; Yuan, Wei-Ping; Cheng, Tao; Gao, Ying-Dai

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effect of ADAR1 on the occurrence and development of mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Lck-Cre; ADAR1lox/lox mice were generated through interbreeding. The lineage-cells of Lck-Cre; ADAR1lox/lox mice and the control were enriched respectively by the means of MACS, and the lin- cells were transfected with retrovirus carrying MSCV-ICN1-IRES-GFP fusion gene. Then the transfection efficiency was detected by the means of FACS, and the same number of GFP+ cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated recipient mice to observe the survival of mice in 2 recipient group after transplantation. T cell-specific knockout ADAR1 mice were generated, and Notch1-induced T-ALL mouse model was established successfully. The leukemia with T-ALL characteristics occured in the mice of control group, but did not in the ADAR1 kmockout mice after transplantation. ADAR1 plays a key role in the incidence and development of Notch1-induced T-ALL.

  2. Ulinastatin Reduces T Cell Apoptosis in Rats with Severe Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V/PI double-staining. Oxidative stress was evaluated by examining changes in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Total superoxide ... Key words: Ulinastatin, T cell, Apoptosis, Severe acute pancreatitis, Mitochondrion. Tropical ..... finally affect its structure and function.

  3. Acute T- cell lymphoblastic lymphoma - A case report | Sumba | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We highlight the case of a two year old female who presented with a two month history of left posterior auricular swelling. The swelling developed following trauma, was painless and progressively enlarging. After extensive evaluation the mass was noted to be an extramedullary presentation of Acute T cell lymphoblastic ...

  4. T-cell transcription factor GATA-3 is an immunophenotypic marker of acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, David M; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Pelton, Ashley; Unitt, Christine

    2017-07-01

    T-cell transcription factor GATA-3, known to play a role in early T-cell development and in the development of T-cell neoplasms, is expressed at high levels in fetal and adult thymus, as well as in acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation, including T-lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (22/22 cases), early T-cell precursor lymphoblastic leukemia (11/11 cases), and mixed-phenotype acute leukemia, T/myeloid (4/5 cases), but only rarely in acute myeloid leukemia/myeloid sarcoma (1/36 cases), and not in B-lymphoblastic leukemia (0/16 cases). In contrast, T-bet, the other T-cell transcription factor that controls Th1/Th2 T-cell fate, is not expressed to any significant extent in immature thymocytes or in cases of T-lymphoblastic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia/myeloid sarcoma, but is expressed in most cases (15/16) of B-lymphoblastic leukemia and in mixed-phenotype acute leukemia, B/myeloid. GATA-3-positive acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation were also found to express proto-oncogene C-MYC, in an average of 52% of neoplastic cells, which, along with GATA-3, may contribute to leukemogenesis, as suggested by transgenic mouse models. We conclude that GATA-3 is a sensitive and specific marker for the diagnosis of acute leukemias with T-cell differentiation and may be a useful addition to the panel of immunophenotypic markers for the diagnostic evaluation of acute leukemias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Utilization of two different T cell receptors by T cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, C; Bensussan, A; Boumsell, L

    1990-01-01

    We show further differences between two clinically related entities, T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL), by using several monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reacting either with constant or variable regions of T cell receptors (TcR) alpha beta and gamma delta or with various CD molecules. We analysed a panel of 15 T-ALL and 15 T-LL selected for their cell surface expression of the CD3 molecules. The results indicate that TcR gamma delta is more frequently used than TcR alpha beta in T-ALL (10 out of the 15 patients tested). This is in contrast to the results obtained with T-LL where the vast majority expressed TcR alpha beta (13 out of the 15 patients). These findings suggest that the leukemic cells could have a different origin in these two diseases. In addition analysis of TcR variable regions expressed by the leukemic blasts showed that in most cases they had rearranged functional V delta 1 gene segments (8 out of 11 patients) whereas in a unique case V delta 2 gene segment was used. Taken together these results and those indicating that T-ALL cell coexpress the CD1a,b and c molecules strengthen the possibility that even though these leukemic cells express the CD3-TcR complex at their cell surface their normal counterparts are not found in peripheral blood.

  6. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  7. Increased regulatory T cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti-Zuleha; Hassan, Norfarazieda; Lee, Le-Jie; Md Noor, Sabariah; Osman, Raudhawati; Abdul-Jalil, Marsitah; Nordin, Abdul-Jalil; Abdullah, Maha

    2015-10-01

    Regulation in adaptive immune response balances a fine line that prevents instigation of self-damage or fall into unresponsiveness permitting abnormal cell growth. Mechanisms that keep this balance in check include regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs consist of a small but heterogeneous population which may be identified by the phenotype, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127-. Role of Tregs in pathogenesis of cancers is thus far supported by evidence of increased Tregs in various cancers and may contribute to poorer prognosis. Tregs may also be important in acute leukemias. A review of the literature on Tregs in acute leukemias was conducted and Tregs were determined in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs). Studies on Tregs in B-cell ALL are few and controversial. We observed a significantly increased percentage of Tregs (mean ± SD, 9.72 ± 3.79% vs. 7.05 ± 1.74%; P = 0.047) in the bone marrow/peripheral blood of ALL (n = 17) compared to peripheral blood of normal controls (n = 35). A positive trend between Tregs and age (R = 0.474, P = 0.055, n = 17) implicates this factor of poor prognosis in B-cell ALL. Tregs in cancer are particularly significant in immunotherapy. The manipulation of the immune system to treat cancer has for a long time ignored regulatory mechanisms inducible or in place. In lymphoma studies tumor-specific mechanisms that are unlike conventional methods in the induction of Tregs have been hypothesized. In addition, tumor-infiltrating Tregs may present different profiles from peripheral blood pictures. Tregs will continue to be dissected to reveal their mysteries and their impact on clinical significance.

  8. Effector CD8+T cell-derived interleukin-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Jessica; Di Lucia, Pietro; Magini, Diletta; Moalli, Federica; Boni, Carolina; Benechet, Alexandre Pierre; Fumagalli, Valeria; Inverso, Donato; Vecchi, Andrea; Fiocchi, Amleto; Wieland, Stefan; Purcell, Robert; Ferrari, Carlo; Chisari, Francis V; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Besides secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and effector molecules, effector CD8 + T cells that arise upon acute infection with certain viruses have been shown to produce the regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and, therefore, contain immunopathology. Whether the same occurs during acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and role that IL-10 might play in liver disease is currently unknown. Mouse models of acute HBV pathogenesis, as well as chimpanzees and patients acutely infected with HBV, were used to analyse the role of CD8 + T cell-derived IL-10 in liver immunopathology. Mouse HBV-specific effector CD8 + T cells produce significant amounts of IL-10 upon in vivo antigen encounter. This is corroborated by longitudinal data in a chimpanzee acutely infected with HBV, where serum IL-10 was readily detectable and correlated with intrahepatic CD8 + T cell infiltration and liver disease severity. Unexpectedly, mouse and human CD8 + T cell-derived IL-10 was found to act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to enhance IL-2 responsiveness, thus preventing antigen-induced HBV-specific effector CD8 + T cell apoptosis. Accordingly, the use of mouse models of HBV pathogenesis revealed that the IL-10 produced by effector CD8 + T cells promoted their own intrahepatic survival and, thus supported, rather than suppressed liver immunopathology. Effector CD8 + T cell-derived IL-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology. Altogether, these results extend our understanding of the cell- and tissue-specific role that IL-10 exerts in immune regulation. Lay summary: Interleukin-10 is mostly regarded as an immunosuppressive cytokine. We show here that HBV-specific CD8 + T cells produce IL-10 upon antigen recognition and that this cytokine enhances CD8 + T cell survival. As such, IL-10 paradoxically promotes rather than suppresses liver disease. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ulinastatin Reduces T Cell Apoptosis in Rats with Severe Acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V/PI double-staining. Oxidative stress was evaluated by examining changes in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Total superoxide dismutase (SOD) in serum was tested by hydroxylamine colorimetric assay, and malondialdehyde levels were examined by thiobarbituric ...

  10. γδ T cells are involved in acute HIV infection and associated with AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis is vital to HIV control. γδ T cells play critical roles in viral infections, but their activation in acute HIV infected patients and follow up to 18 months has not been described. METHODS: Changes in γδ T cells, including subsets, function and activation, in treated and untreated acutely HIV-infected patients (n = 79 were compared by cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometry with healthy controls (n = 21 at month 0, 6, 12 and 18. RESULTS: In acutely HIV-infected patients, Vδ1 cell proportion was elevated (P = 0.027 with Vδ2 population reduced (P = 0.002. Effector and central memory γδ T cell factions were decreased (P = 0.006 and P = 0.001, respectively, while proportion of terminal γδ T cells increased (P = 0.002. γδ T cell cytotoxicity was compromised over time. Fraction of IL-17-producing cells increased (P = 0.008, and IFN-γ-producing cells were unaffected (P = 0.115. Elevation of a microbial translocation marker, sCD14, was associated with γδ T cell activation (P = 0.001, which increased in a time-dependent manner, correlating with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points and CD4 counts. Antiretroviral therapy did not affect these changes. CONCLUSIONS: γδ T cell subpopulation and functions change significantly in acute HIV infection and over time. Early γδ T cell activation was associated with CD4/CD8 T cell activation set-points, which predict AIDS progression. Therefore, γδ T cell activation represents a potential surrogate marker of AIDS progression.

  11. Prolonged activation of virus-specific CD8+T cells after acute B19 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isa, Adiba; Kasprowicz, Victoria; Norbeck, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen, causing erythema infectiosum, arthropathy, transient aplastic crisis, and intrauterine fetal death. The phenotype of CD8+ T cells in acute B19 infection has not been studied previously. METHODS AND FINDINGS......: The number and phenotype of B19-specific CD8+ T cell responses during and after acute adult infection was studied using HLA-peptide multimeric complexes. Surprisingly, these responses increased in magnitude over the first year post-infection despite resolution of clinical symptoms and control of viraemia......, with T cell populations specific for individual epitopes comprising up to 4% of CD8+ T cells. B19-specific T cells developed and maintained an activated CD38+ phenotype, with strong expression of perforin and CD57 and downregulation of CD28 and CD27. These cells possessed strong effector function...

  12. Acute Malaria Induces PD1+CTLA4+ Effector T Cells with Cell-Extrinsic Suppressor Function.

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    Maria Sophia Mackroth

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In acute Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum malaria, the pro- and anti-inflammatory immune pathways must be delicately balanced so that the parasitemia is controlled without inducing immunopathology. An important mechanism to fine-tune T cell responses in the periphery is the induction of coinhibitory receptors such as CTLA4 and PD1. However, their role in acute infections such as P. falciparum malaria remains poorly understood. To test whether coinhibitory receptors modulate CD4+ T cell functions in malaria, blood samples were obtained from patients with acute P. falciparum malaria treated in Germany. Flow cytometric analysis showed a more frequent expression of CTLA4 and PD1 on CD4+ T cells of malaria patients than of healthy control subjects. In vitro stimulation with P. falciparum-infected red blood cells revealed a distinct population of PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells that simultaneously produced IFNγ and IL10. This antigen-specific cytokine production was enhanced by blocking PD1/PDL1 and CTLA4. PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells were further isolated based on surface expression of PD1 and their inhibitory function investigated in-vitro. Isolated PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ T cells suppressed the proliferation of the total CD4+ population in response to anti-CD3/28 and plasmodial antigens in a cell-extrinsic manner. The response to other specific antigens was not suppressed. Thus, acute P. falciparum malaria induces P. falciparum-specific PD1+CTLA4+CD4+ Teffector cells that coproduce IFNγ and IL10, and inhibit other CD4+ T cells. Transient induction of regulatory Teffector cells may be an important mechanism that controls T cell responses and might prevent severe inflammation in patients with malaria and potentially other acute infections.

  13. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S; Luu, Truong V; Lee, Norman H; Hawley, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11) is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expre...

  14. FBXW7 and NOTCH1 mutations in childhood T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ja; Taki, Tomohiko; Oda, Megumi; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hara, Junichi; Horibe, Keizo; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2009-04-01

    Mutation analysis of FBXW7 and NOTCH1 genes was performed in 55 T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) and 14 T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (T-NHL) patients who were treated on the Japan Association of Childhood Leukaemia Study (JACLS) protocols ALL-97 and NHL-98. FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations were found in 22 (40.0%) of 55 T-ALL and 7 (50.0%) of 14 T-NHL patients. FBXW7 mutations were found in 8 (14.6%) of 55 T-ALL and 3 (21.4%) of 14 T-NHL patients, and NOTCH1 mutations in 17 (30.9%) of 55 T-ALL and 6 (42.9%) of 14 T-NHL patients. Three (5.4%) T-ALL and two (1.4%) T-NHL patients had mutations in both FBXW7 and NOTCH1. FBXW7 mutations included one insertion, one deletion, one deletion/insertion and nine missense mutations. NOTCH1 mutations were detected in the heterodimerization domain (HD) in 15 cases, in the PEST domain in seven cases, and in both the HD and PEST domains in one case. Five-year event-free survival and overall survival for patients with FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations were 95.5% (95% CI, 71.9-99.4%) and 100% respectively, suggesting that T-ALL patients with FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutation represent a good prognosis compared to those without FBXW7 and/or NOTCH1 mutations (63.6%, P = 0.007 and 78.8%, P = 0.023, respectively).

  15. Identification of CD3 Associated T Cell Receptor as a Diagnostic Tool in T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma or Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumsell, L; Gouttefangeas, C; Dastot, H; Schmid, M; Gelin, C; Bensussan, A

    1991-01-01

    By using several monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reacting either with the constant or variable regions of the T cell receptors (TcR) αβ and γδ or various CD molecules, differences between two clinically related entities e.g. T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL) have been demonstrated. We studied a panel of fifteen T-ALL and fifteen T-LL because of their cell surface expression of the CD3-TcR molecules. The results indicated that TcR γδ is more frequently expressed in T-ALL (10 out of the 15 patients tested) than TcR αβ. This is in contrast to the results obtained with T-LL where the vast majority showed TcR αβ (13 out of the 15 patients). We discuss the significance of these findings which may imply that the leukemic cells are of a different origin in these two diseases. In addition analysis of TcR variable regions expressed by the leukemic blasts showed that in most cases they had rearranged functional Vδ1 gene to Jδ1 or Jδ2 segments (8 out of 11 patients) whereas in a unique case Vδ2 gene segment was evident. Taken together these results and those showing that T-ALL cells coexpress the CD1a, b and c molecules strengthen the possibility that despite the fact that these leukemic cells express the CD3-TcR complex at their surface their normal counterparts are not found in peripheral blood.

  16. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-AL...

  17. Chimeric antigen receptors for adoptive T cell therapy in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, conventional therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML have high failure and relapse rates. Thus, developing new strategies is crucial for improving the treatment of AML. With the clinical success of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell therapies against B-lineage malignancies, many studies have attempted to translate the success of CAR T cell therapy to other malignancies, including AML. This review summarizes the current advances in CAR T cell therapy against AML, including preclinical studies and clinical trials, and discusses the potential AML-associated surface markers that could be used for further CAR technology. Finally, we describe strategies that might address the current issues of employing CAR T cell therapy in AML.

  18. The significance of PTEN and AKT aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Zuurbier (Linda); E.F. Petricoin (Emanuel F.); M.J. Vuerhard (Maartje); V. Calvert (V.); C. Kooi (Clarissa); J.G.C.A.M. Buijs-Gladdines (Jessica); W.K. Smits; E. Sonneveld (Edwin); A.J.P. Veerman (Anjo); W.A. Kamps (Willem); M.A. Horstmann (Martin); R. Pieters (Rob); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground PI3K/AKT pathway mutations are found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but their overall impact and associations with other genetic aberrations is unknown. PTEN mutations have been proposed as secondary mutations that follow NOTCH1-activating mutations and cause cellular

  19. The significance of PTEN and AKT aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, Linda; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Vuerhard, Maartje J.; Calvert, Valerie; Kooi, Clarissa; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G. C. A. M.; Smits, Willem K.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Veerman, Anjo J. P.; Kamps, Willem A.; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    Background PI3K/AKT pathway mutations are found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but their overall impact and associations with other genetic aberrations is unknown. PTEN mutations have been proposed as secondary mutations that follow NOTCH1-activating mutations and cause cellular resistance

  20. Effector and regulatory T cells in patients with acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, Anna; Kjærsgaard, Erik; Grigoriadis, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) is an autoimmune acute demyelinating disease of the optic nerve and may occur in patients with confirmed multiple sclerosis (MS) or as a clinically isolated syndrome. T lymphocytes play a central role in the pathogenesis of MS. The phenotype of different T cell subsets...

  1. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for the Treatment of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Ciprian Tomuleasa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T-cell technology has seen a rapid development over the last decade mostly due to the potential that these cells may have in treating malignant diseases. It is a generally accepted principle that very few therapeutic compounds deliver a clinical response without treatment-related toxicity, and studies have shown that CAR T-cells are not an exception to this rule. While large multinational drug companies are currently investigating the potential role of CAR T-cells in hematological oncology, the potential of such cellular therapies are being recognized worldwide as they are expected to expand in the patient to support the establishment of the immune memory, provide a continuous surveillance to prevent and/or treat a relapse, and keep the targeted malignant cell subpopulation in check. In this article, we present the possible advantages of using CAR T-cells in treating acute lymphoblastic leukemia, presenting the technology and the current knowledge in their preclinical and early clinical trial use. Thus, this article first presents the main present-day knowledge on the standard of care for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Afterward, current knowledge is presented about the use of CAR T-cells in cancer immunotherapy, describing their design, the molecular constructs, and the preclinical data on murine models to properly explain the background for their clinical use. Last, but certainly not least, this article presents the use of CAR T-cells for the immunotherapy of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, describing both their potential clinical advantages and the possible side effects.

  2. MicroRNA Expression Patterns of CD8+ T Cells in Acute and Chronic Brucellosis

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    Budak, Ferah; Bal, S. Haldun; Tezcan, Gulcin; Guvenc, Furkan; Akalin, E. Halis; Goral, Guher; Deniz, Gunnur

    2016-01-01

    Although our knowledge about Brucella virulence factors and the host response increase rapidly, the mechanisms of immune evasion by the pathogen and causes of chronic disease are still unknown. Here, we aimed to investigate the immunological factors which belong to CD8+ T cells and their roles in the transition of brucellosis from acute to chronic infection. Using miRNA microarray, more than 2000 miRNAs were screened in CD8+ T cells of patients with acute or chronic brucellosis and healthy controls that were sorted from peripheral blood with flow cytometry and validated through qRT-PCR. Findings were evaluated using GeneSpring GX (Agilent) 13.0 software and KEGG pathway analysis. Expression of two miRNAs were determined to display a significant fold change in chronic group when compared with acute or control groups. Both miRNAs (miR-126-5p and miR-4753-3p) were decreased (p 2). These miRNAs have the potential to be the regulators of CD8+ T cell-related marker genes for chronic brucellosis infections. The differentially expressed miRNAs and their predicted target genes are involved in MAPK signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, endocytosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion indicating their potential roles in chronic brucellosis and its progression. It is the first study of miRNA expression analysis of human CD8+ T cells to clarify the mechanism of inveteracy in brucellosis. PMID:27824867

  3. Escin sodium induces apoptosis of human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenzhen; Gao, Jian; Cai, Xueting; Zhao, Youlong; Wang, Yafei; Lu, Wuguang; Gu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Shuangquan; Cao, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Escin sodium has been used in the clinic as an antioedematous, antiexudative and vasoprotective agent for many years and has shown excellent tolerability. However, little is known about its anticancer activity. This is a report for the first time that escin sodium exerts a cytotoxic effect on human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells via the induction of apoptosis rather than cell cycle arrest. Escin sodium activated the initiator caspase-8, -9, and the effector caspase-3, degraded poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and attenuated the expression of Bcl-2. In addition, escin sodium inhibited the growth of cancer cells in a selective manner with Jurkat cells most sensitive to it. Taken together, the data show that escin sodium possesses potent apoptogenic activity toward human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2 , and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  5. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Hao Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs, which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2, and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  6. Acute interstitial nephritis in T-cell leukemia in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Erika; Szikszay, Edit; Pethő-Orosz, Petronella; Bigida, László; Balla, György; Szabó, Tamás

    2016-09-01

    Acute lymphoid leukemia is the most frequently occurring malignancy in childhood, but acute tubulointerstitial nephritis with associated acute renal failure as the leading manifestation of leukemia is extremely rare. Only a few pediatric cases have been described in the literature. We present a surprising case in which physical examination and initial investigation were not typical for leukemia. Ultrasound showed only modest kidney enlargement while laboratory results indicated acute renal failure. Renal biopsy indicated tubulointerstitial nephritis, and subsequent steroid treatment led to sudden clinical improvement. One month later, however, the patient returned with typical clinical features of leukemia. Re-evaluation of the original kidney biopsy block indicated T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia. The present case highlights the importance of renal biopsy. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. CAR-T cells and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Xi; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has a low remission rate after chemotherapy, a high relapse rate and poor long-term survival even when allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is performed. Chimeric antigen receptors redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) can enhance disease remission with a favorable outcome for relapsed/refractory ALL, though some cases quickly relapsed after CAR-T cell treatment. Thus, treatment with CAR-T cells followed by allo-HSCT may be the best way to treat relapsed/refractory ALL. In this review, we first discuss the different types of CAR-T cells. We then discuss the treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL using only CAR-T cells. Finally, we discuss the use of CAR-T cells, followed by allo-HSCT, for the treatment of relapsed/refractory ALL.

  8. Rearrangements and amplification of the ABL1 gene as an example of kinase activation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic

    OpenAIRE

    Graux, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a neoplastic disorder that develops from a single hematopoietic T-cell precursor that acquired oncogenic anomalies. T-ALL is a heterogeneous disease comprising several clinico-biological entities characterized by distinct underlying genetic defects. In the first part of this work, we attempted to correlate those numerous anomalies with the role of the corresponding non mutated genes or pathways in normal T-cell development. Mutations targeting se...

  9. Induction of Gag-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses during Acute HIV Infection Is Associated with Improved Viral Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieffer, Miriam; Jessen, Heiko K.; Oster, Alexander F.; Pissani, Franco; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Jessen, Arne B.; Zedlack, Carmen; Schultz, Bruce T.; Davis, Isaiah; Ranasinghe, Srinika; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Alter, Galit; Schumann, Ralf R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Effector CD4 T cell responses have been shown to be critically involved in the containment and clearance of viral pathogens. However, their involvement in the pathogenesis of HIV infection is less clear, given their additional role as preferred viral targets. We previously demonstrated that the presence of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses is somewhat associated with HIV control and that specific CD4 T cell functions, such as direct cytolytic activity, can contribute to control of HIV viremia. However, little is known about how the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection influences disease progression and whether responses induced during the early phase of infection are preferentially depleted. We therefore longitudinally assessed, in a cohort of 55 acutely HIV-infected individuals, HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses from acute to chronic infection. Interestingly, we found that the breadth, magnitude, and protein dominance of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses remained remarkably stable over time. Moreover, we found that the epitopes targeted at a high frequency in acute HIV infection were recognized at the same frequency by HIV-specific CD4 T cells in chronic HIV infection. Interestingly the induction of Gag-specific CD4 T cell responses in acute HIV infection was significantly inversely correlated with viral set point in chronic HIV infection (R = −0.5; P = 0.03), while the cumulative contribution of Env-specific CD4 T cell responses showed the reverse effect. Moreover, individuals with HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses dominantly targeting Gag over Env in acute HIV infection remained off antiretroviral therapy significantly longer (P = 0.03; log rank). Thus, our data suggest that the induction of HIV-specific CD4 T cell responses during acute HIV infection is beneficial overall and does not fuel disease progression. IMPORTANCE CD4 T cells are critical for the clearance and control of viral infections. However, HIV

  10. Analysis of intrahepatic HBV-specific cytotoxic T-cells during and after acute HBV infection in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, Dave; van der Molen, Renate G.; Kusters, Johannes G.; de Man, Robert A.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Schalm, Solko W.; Janssen, Harry L. A.

    2006-01-01

    Characteristics of the intrahepatic virus-specific T-cell response in patients with acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have not been studied due to the risk of complications associated with standard liver biopsies. In this study we aimed to characterize the virus-specific CD8 + T-cell response

  11. A Two-Step Model of Acute CD4 T-Cell Mediated Cardiac Allograft Rejection1

    OpenAIRE

    Grazia, Todd J.; Pietra, Biagio A.; Johnson, Zachary A.; Kelly, Brian P.; Plenter, Robert J.; Gill, Ronald G.

    2004-01-01

    CD4 T cells are both necessary and sufficient to mediate acute cardiac allograft rejection in mice. This process requires “direct” engagement of donor MHC class II molecules. That is, acute rejection by CD4+ T cells requires target MHC class II expression by the donor and not by the host. However, it is unclear whether CD4+ T cell rejection requires MHC class II expression on donor hemopoietic cells, nonhemopoietic cells, or both. To address this issue, bone marrow transplantation in mice was...

  12. Decreased Helios Expression in Regulatory T Cells in Acute Coronary Syndrome

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    Lili Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs play an essential role in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, there is debate about which Treg subsets are truly critical to ACS. Helios, a transcription factor, was recently reported to be a bona fide marker for natural Tregs or activated Tregs with a suppression function, but little is known about its role in ACS. We therefore examined Helios+ Tregs in patients with ACS, patients with stable angina, and control subjects. 73 patients with ACS, 30 patients with stable angina, and 48 control subjects were enrolled. The frequencies and estimated absolute numbers of different Treg subsets in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. Plasma cytokine level was measured by ELISA. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios in purified CD4+ T cells was determined by RT-PCR. Helios+ Tregs was decreased significantly in patients with ACS. The frequency and estimated absolute numbers of CD4+Foxp3+Helios+ Tregs were negatively correlated with IL-6 and positively correlated with circulating level of TGF-beta1 and HDL-C. The mRNA expression of Foxp3 and Helios was decreased in CD4+ T cells from patients with ACS. In summary, Helios+ Tregs was downregulated in patients with ACS and may play a role in ACS.

  13. Deregulated WNT signaling in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, O H; Erbilgin, Y; Firtina, S; Celkan, T; Karakas, Z; Aydogan, G; Turkkan, E; Yildirmak, Y; Timur, C; Zengin, E; Dongen, J J M van; Staal, F J T; Ozbek, U; Sayitoglu, M

    2014-01-01

    WNT signaling has been implicated in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells and plays an important role during T-cell development in thymus. Here we investigated WNT pathway activation in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. To evaluate the potential role of WNT signaling in T-cell leukomogenesis, we performed expression analysis of key components of WNT pathway. More than 85% of the childhood T-ALL patients showed upregulated β-catenin expression at the protein level compared with normal human thymocytes. The impact of this upregulation was reflected in high expression of known target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, TCF1 and LEF). Especially AXIN2, the universal target gene of WNT pathway, was upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels in ∼40% of the patients. When β-CATENIN gene was silenced by small interfering RNA, the cancer cells showed higher rates of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that abnormal WNT signaling activation occurs in a significant fraction of human T-ALL cases independent of known T-ALL risk factors. We conclude that deregulated WNT signaling is a novel oncogenic event in childhood T-ALL

  14. Precursor T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with rare presentation in the urinary bladder

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    Alexander Pham

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the 16th reported case of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL with involvement in the bladder. Our patient was a 22 yearold man with T-cell ALL with a mediastinal mass. He received hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone (HyperCVAD with mediastinal radiation. Prior to starting maintenance, he relapsed in the bladder and marrow. He received a nelarabine- based induction regimen and achieved remission. This was followed by an unrelated 11/12 HLA-matched myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplant. He is in complete remission for the past 409 days.

  15. Successful Treatment of Fanconi Anemia and T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Terrie Flatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. Patients are sensitive to the toxic effects of chemotherapy. We report the case of a patient with Fanconi anemia who developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He experienced chemotherapy-related complications including prolonged neutropenia, grade IV vincristine neuropathy, and disseminated aspergillosis. He was successfully treated with modified dosing of cytarabine and intrathecal methotrexate followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The aspergillosis was treated with systemic antifungal treatment and surgical resection. Now 30 months after bone marrow transplant the patient is without evidence of aspergillosis or leukemia.

  16. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  17. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  18. Loss of CD28 on Peripheral T Cells Decreases the Risk for Early Acute Rejection after Kidney Transplantation.

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    Burç Dedeoglu

    Full Text Available End-stage renal disease patients have a dysfunctional, prematurely aged peripheral T-cell system. Here we hypothesized that the degree of premature T-cell ageing before kidney transplantation predicts the risk for early acute allograft rejection (EAR.222 living donor kidney transplant recipients were prospectively analyzed. EAR was defined as biopsy proven acute allograft rejection within 3 months after kidney transplantation. The differentiation status of circulating T cells, the relative telomere length and the number of CD31+ naive T cells were determined as T-cell ageing parameters.Of the 222 patients analyzed, 30 (14% developed an EAR. The donor age and the historical panel reactive antibody score were significantly higher (p = 0.024 and p = 0.039 respectively and the number of related donor kidney transplantation was significantly lower (p = 0.018 in the EAR group. EAR-patients showed lower CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers (p<0.01 and the same trend was observed for CD8+CD28null T-cell numbers (p = 0.08. No differences regarding the other ageing parameters were found. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that higher CD4+CD28null T-cell numbers was associated with a lower risk for EAR (HR: 0.65, p = 0.028. In vitro, a significant lower percentage of alloreactive T cells was observed within CD28null T cells (p<0.001.Immunological ageing-related expansion of highly differentiated CD28null T cells is associated with a lower risk for EAR.

  19. Potential for bispecific T-cell engagers: role of blinatumomab in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Le Jeune C

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Le Jeune, Xavier Thomas Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hematology Department, Lyon-Sud Hospital, Pierre Bénite, France Abstract: Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and patients whose minimal residual disease persists during treatment have a poor leukemia-free survival. Despite improvements in front-line therapy, the outcome in these patients remains poor, especially after relapse. As there are no standard chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of patients with R/R B-precursor ALL, T-cell-based therapeutic approaches have recently come to the forefront in ALL therapy. Recently, monoclonal antibodies have been developed to target specific antigens expressed in B-lineage blast cells. In this setting, CD19 is of great interest as this antigen is expressed in B-lineage cells. Therefore, it has been selected as the target antigen for blinatumomab, a new bi-specific T-cell engager antibody. This sophisticated antibody binds sites for both CD19 and CD3, leading to T-cell proliferation and activation and B-cell apoptosis. Owing to its short serum half-life, blinatumomab has been administrated by continuous intravenous infusion with a favorable safety profile. The most significant toxicities were central nervous system events and the cytokine release syndrome. This new therapeutic approach using blinatumomab has been shown to be effective in patients with positive minimal residual disease and in patients with R/R B-precursor ALL leading to a recent approval by the US Food and Drug Administration after an accelerated review process. This review focuses on the profile of blinatumomab and its efficacy and safety. Keywords: B-cell lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia, relapsed/refractory, minimal residual disease, BiTE monoclonal antibodies, blinatumomab

  20. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang; Chen, Gong; Cai, Xiuyu; Yang, Han; Zhang, Xing; Lu, Yue; Zhou, Penghui

    2018-01-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreover, CLL-1 is expressed in leukemia stem cells (LSCs), but absent in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which may provide a potential therapeutic target for AML treatment. We tested the expression of CLL-1 antigen on peripheral blood cells and bone marrow cells in healthy donor and AML patients. Then, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) containing a CLL1-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with CD28, 4-1BB costimulatory domains, and CD3-ζ signaling domain. We further investigate the function of CLL-1 CAR-T cells. The CLL-1 CAR-T cells specifically lysed CLL-1 + cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples in vitro. Strong anti-leukemic activity was observed in vivo by using a xenograft model of disseminated AML. Importantly, CLL-1 + myeloid progenitor cells and mature myeloid cells were specifically eliminated by CLL-1 CAR-T cells, while normal HSCs were not targeted due to the lack of CLL-1 expression. CLL-1 CAR-T represents a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of AML.

  1. CD8+ T-Cells Count in Acute Myocardial Infarction in HIV Disease in a Predominantly Male Cohort

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    Oluwatosin A. Badejo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Immunodeficiency Virus- (HIV- infected persons have a higher risk for acute myocardial infarction (AMI than HIV-uninfected persons. Earlier studies suggest that HIV viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, and antiretroviral therapy are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. Whether CD8+ T-cell count is associated with CVD risk is not clear. We investigated the association between CD8+ T-cell count and incident AMI in a cohort of 73,398 people (of which 97.3% were men enrolled in the U.S. Veterans Aging Cohort Study-Virtual Cohort (VACS-VC. Compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with high baseline CD8+ T-cell counts (>1065 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk (adjusted HR=1.82, P<0.001, 95% CI: 1.46 to 2.28. There was evidence that the effect of CD8+ T-cell tertiles on AMI risk differed by CD4+ T-cell level: compared to uninfected people, HIV-infected people with CD4+ T-cell counts ≥200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with high CD8+ T-cell count, while those with CD4+ T-cell counts <200 cells/mm3 had increased AMI risk with low CD8+ T-cell count. CD8+ T-cell counts may add additional AMI risk stratification information beyond that provided by CD4+ T-cell counts alone.

  2. Pathogenesis of Metastatic Calcification and Acute Pancreatitis in Adult T-Cell Leukemia under Hypercalcemic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Senba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Hypercalcemia is common in patients with ATL. These patients rarely develop metastatic calcification and acute pancreatitis. The underlying pathogenesis of this condition is osteoclast hyperactivity with associated overproduction of parathyroid hormone-related protein, which results in hypercalcemia in association with bone demineralization. The discovery of the osteoclast differentiation factor receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, its receptor RANK, and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG, enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms of ATL-associated hypercalcemia. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1-α, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6 are important molecules that enhance the migration and differentiation of osteoclasts and the associated enhanced production of RANKL for osteoblast formation. In this paper, we focus on metastatic calcification and acute pancreatitis in ATL, highlighting recent advances in the understanding of the molecular role of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system including its interaction with various cytokines and calciotropic hormones in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis for bone resorption in hypercalcemic ATL patients.

  3. Favorable outcome after 1-year treatment of childhood T-cell lymphoma/T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, H.; Zsiros, J.; Veneberg, A.; Schutten, N. J.; Kroes, W.; Slater, R. M.; Behrendt, H.

    1998-01-01

    For T-malignancies in children a poor prognosis is reported. In these malignancies a combination of lymphoma and leukemia is commonly seen at presentation and most patients are treated according to protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). These protocols are often designed for the majority

  4. Effective control of acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia progression by telomerase specific adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; De Sanctis, Francesco; Lamolinara, Alessia; Boschi, Federico; Poffe, Ornella; Trovato, Rosalinda; Fiore, Alessandra; Sartori, Sara; Sbarbati, Andrea; Bondanza, Attilio; Cesaro, Simone; Krampera, Mauro; Scupoli, Maria T; Nishimura, Michael I; Iezzi, Manuela; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Telomerase (TERT) is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that preserves the molecular organization at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Since TERT deregulation is a common step in leukaemia, treatments targeting telomerase might be useful for the therapy of hematologic malignancies. Despite a large spectrum of potential drugs, their bench-to-bedside translation is quite limited, with only a therapeutic vaccine in the clinic and a telomerase inhibitor at late stage of preclinical validation. We recently demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of T cell transduced with an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR), which recognize human TERT with high avidity, controls human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) progression without severe side-effects in humanized mice. In the present report, we show the ability of our approach to limit the progression of more aggressive leukemic pathologies, such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Together, our findings demonstrate that TERT-based adoptive cell therapy is a concrete platform of T cell-mediated immunotherapy for leukaemia treatment.

  5. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML. © 2015 UICC.

  6. Pre-transplant donor-specific T-cell alloreactivity is strongly associated with early acute cellular rejection in kidney transplant recipients not receiving T-cell depleting induction therapy.

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    Elena Crespo

    Full Text Available Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90, to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67. We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction

  7. Gum hypertrophy - an unusual presenting feature in a case of precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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    Lingappa Appaji

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, the malignant transformation of T-cell or B-cell precursors, is the most common diagnosis in pediatric oncology. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma commonly affects adolescents, and is associated with mediastinal mass in over half of the cases, with early dissemination to bone marrow, gonads and the central nervous system. We present a rare case of precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma with initial oral manifestation, presenting with the unusual features of gum hypertrophy and involvement of upper jaw and palate in a 10-year-old boy. This report discusses the clinical presentation, histopathologic and immunologic features, and diagnosis of this malignancy.

  8. Expansion of highly activated invariant natural killer T cells with altered phenotype in acute dengue infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaladasa, A.; Wickramasinghe, N.; Adikari, T. N.; Gomes, L.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Salio, M.; Cerundolo, V.; Ogg, G. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are capable of rapid activation and production of cytokines upon recognition of antigenic lipids presented by CD1d molecules. They have been shown to play a significant role in many viral infections and were observed to be highly activated in patients with acute dengue infection. In order to characterize further their role in dengue infection, we investigated the proportion of iNKT cells and their phenotype in adult patients with acute dengue infection. The functionality of iNKT cells in patients was investigated by both interferon (IFN)‐γ and interleukin (IL)−4 ex‐vivo enzyme‐linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays following stimulation with alpha‐galactosyl‐ceramide (αGalCer). We found that circulating iNKT cell proportions were significantly higher (P = 0·03) in patients with acute dengue when compared to healthy individuals and were predominantly of the CD4+ subset. iNKT cells of patients with acute dengue had reduced proportions expressing CD8α and CD161 when compared to healthy individuals. The iNKT cells of patients were highly activated and iNKT activation correlated significantly with dengue virus‐specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibody levels. iNKT cells expressing Bcl‐6 (P = 0·0003) and both Bcl‐6 and inducible T cell co‐stimulator (ICOS) (P = 0·006) were increased significantly in patients when compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, our data suggest that in acute dengue infection there is an expansion of highly activated CD4+ iNKT cells, with reduced expression of CD161 markers. PMID:26874822

  9. L-type amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1): a therapeutic target supporting growth and survival of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosilio, C.; Nebout, M.; Imbert, V.; Griessinger, E.; Neffati, Z.; Benadiba, J.; Hagenbeek, T.; Spits, H.; Reverso, J.; Ambrosetti, D.; Michiels, J.-F.; Bailly-Maitre, B.; Endou, H.; Wempe, M. F.; Peyron, J.-F.

    2015-01-01

    The altered metabolism of cancer cells is a treasure trove to discover new antitumoral strategies. The gene (SLC7A5) encoding system L amino-acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is overexpressed in murine lymphoma cells generated via T-cell deletion of the pten tumor suppressor, and also in human T-cell acute

  10. Precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with bone marrow necrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnaw Najmaddin SH

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Bone marrow necrosis is a clinicopathological condition diagnosed most often at postmortem examination, but it is also seen during the course of malignancy and is not always associated with a poor prognosis. The morphological features of bone marrow necrosis are disruption of the normal marrow architecture and necrosis of myeloid tissue and medullary stroma. Non-malignant conditions associated with bone marrow necrosis are sickle cell anemia, infections, drugs (sulfasalazine, interferon α, all-trans retinoic acid, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and fludarabine, disseminated intravascular coagulation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and acute graft versus host diseases. The malignant causes are leukemia, lymphoma and metastatic carcinomas. Herein we report the case of a patient with precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and bone marrow necrosis at initial presentation. Case presentation A 10-year-old Kurdish boy was presented with generalized bone pain and fever of 1 month’s duration which was associated with sweating, easy fatigability, nose bleeding, breathlessness and severe weight loss. On examination, we observed pallor, tachypnea, tachycardia, low blood pressure, fever, petechial hemorrhage, ecchymoses, tortuous dilated veins over the chest and upper part of abdomen, multiple small cervical lymph node enlargements, mildly enlarged spleen, palpable liver and gross abdominal distention. Blood analysis revealed pancytopenia and elevated lactate dehydrogenase and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Imaging results showed mediastinal widening on a planar chest X-ray and diffuse focal infiltration of the axial bone marrow on magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral vertebrae. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy examination showed extensive bone marrow necrosis. Immunophenotyping analysis of the bone marrow biopsy confirmed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, as CD3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl

  11. Rapid selection of escape mutants by the first CD8 T cell responses in acute HIV-1 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The recent failure of a vaccine that primes T cell responses to control primary HIV-1 infection has raised doubts about the role of CD8+ T cells in early HIV-1 infection. We studied four patients who were identified shortly after HIV-1 infection and before seroconversion. In each patient there was very rapid selection of multiple HIV-1 escape mutants in the transmitted virus by CD8 T cells, including examples of complete fixation of non-synonymous substitutions within 2 weeks. Sequencing by single genome amplification suggested that the high rate of virus replication in acute infection gave a selective advantage to virus molecules that contained simultaneous and gained sequential T cell escape mutations. These observations show that whilst early HIV-1 specific CD8 T cells can act against virus, rapid escape means that these T cell responses are unlikely to benefit the patient and may in part explain why current HIV-1 T cell vaccines may not be protective.

  12. CD19-Targeted CAR T cells as novel cancer immunotherapy for relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Marco L; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-10-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the jump from the laboratory to the clinic, and the results have been remarkable. CD19-targeted CAR T cells have induced complete remissions of disease in up to 90% of patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), who have an expected complete response rate of 30% in response to chemotherapy. The high efficacy of CAR T cells in B-ALL suggests that regulatory approval of this therapy for this routinely fatal leukemia is on the horizon. We review the preclinical development of CAR T cells and their early clinical application for lymphoma. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of the use of CAR T cells in patients with B-ALL. In addition, we discuss the unique toxicities associated with this therapy and the management schemes that have been developed.

  13. IRF9 Prevents CD8+T Cell Exhaustion in an Extrinsic Manner during Acute Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Magdalena; Suprunenko, Tamara; Ashhurst, Thomas; Marbach, Felix; Raifer, Hartmann; Wolff, Svenja; Strecker, Thomas; Viengkhou, Barney; Jung, So Ri; Obermann, Hannah-Lena; Bauer, Stefan; Xu, Haifeng C; Lang, Philipp A; Tom, Adomati; Lang, Karl S; King, Nicholas J C; Campbell, Iain L; Hofer, Markus J

    2017-11-15

    Effective CD8 + T cell responses play an important role in determining the course of a viral infection. Overwhelming antigen exposure can result in suboptimal CD8 + T cell responses, leading to chronic infection. This altered CD8 + T cell differentiation state, termed exhaustion, is characterized by reduced effector function, upregulation of inhibitory receptors, and altered expression of transcription factors. Prevention of overwhelming antigen exposure to limit CD8 + T cell exhaustion is of significant interest for the control of chronic infection. The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) is a component of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling downstream of the IFN-I receptor (IFNAR). Using acute infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strain Armstrong, we show here that IRF9 limited early LCMV replication by regulating expression of interferon-stimulated genes and IFN-I and by controlling levels of IRF7, a transcription factor essential for IFN-I production. Infection of IRF9- or IFNAR-deficient mice led to a loss of early restriction of viral replication and impaired antiviral responses in dendritic cells, resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and chronic infection. Differences in the antiviral activities of IRF9- and IFNAR-deficient mice and dendritic cells provided further evidence of IRF9-independent IFN-I signaling. Thus, our findings illustrate a CD8 + T cell-extrinsic function for IRF9, as a signaling factor downstream of IFNAR, in preventing overwhelming antigen exposure resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and, ultimately, chronic infection. IMPORTANCE During early viral infection, overwhelming antigen exposure can cause functional exhaustion of CD8 + T cells and lead to chronic infection. Here we show that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) plays a decisive role in preventing CD8 + T cell exhaustion. Using acute infection of mice with LCMV strain Armstrong, we found that IRF9

  14. Study of the CD3-associated T-cell receptors reveals further differences between T-cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, C; Bensussan, A; Boumsell, L

    1990-02-15

    We show further differences between two clinically related entities, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LL), by using several monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) reacting with either constant or variable regions of T-cell receptors (TcR) alpha beta and gamma delta or with various CD molecules. We analyzed a panel of 15 T-ALL and 15 T-LL selected for their cell surface expression of the CD3 molecules. The results indicated that TcR gamma delta is more frequently used than TcR alpha beta in T-ALL (10 of the 15 patients tested). This is in contrast to the results obtained with T-LL where the vast majority expressed TcR alpha beta (13 of the 15 patients). These findings suggest that the leukemic cells could have a different origin in these two diseases. In addition, analysis of TcR variable regions expressed by the leukemic blasts showed that, in most cases, they had rearranged functional V delta 1 gene segments (8 of 11 patients), whereas in a unique case V delta 2 gene segment was used. Together, these results and those indicating that T-ALL cells coexpress the CD1a, b, and c molecules strengthen the possibility that although these leukemic cells express the CD3-TcR complex at their cell surface, their normal counterparts are not found in peripheral blood.

  15. Collapse of Cytolytic Potential in SIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

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    Emily R Roberts

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor maintenance of cytotoxic factor expression among HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, in part caused by dysregulated expression of the transcription factor T-bet, is associated with HIV disease progression. However, the precise evolution and context in which CD8+ T cell cytotoxic functions become dysregulated in HIV infection remain unclear. Using the rhesus macaque (RM SIV infection model, we evaluated the kinetics of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic factor expression in peripheral blood, lymph node, spleen, and gut mucosa from early acute infection through chronic infection. We identified rapid acquisition of perforin and granzyme B expression in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa that collapsed rapidly during the transition to chronic infection. The evolution of this expression profile was linked to low expression of T-bet and occurred independent of epitope specificity, viral escape patterns and tissue origin. Importantly, during acute infection SIV-specific CD8+ T cells that maintained T-bet expression retained the ability to express granzyme B after stimulation, but this relationship was lost in chronic infection. Together, these data demonstrate the loss of cytolytic machinery in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood and at tissue sites of viral reservoir and active replication during the transition from acute to chronic infection. This phenomenon occurs despite persistent high levels of viremia suggesting that an inability to maintain properly regulated cytotoxic T cell responses in all tissue sites enables HIV/SIV to avoid immune clearance, establish persistent viral reservoirs in lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa, and lead ultimately to immunopathogenesis and death.

  16. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

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    Lee Norman H

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11 is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expression profiling after downregulation of TLX1 and inhibition of the NOTCH pathway in ALL-SIL cells revealed that TLX1 synergistically regulated more than 60% of the NOTCH-responsive genes. Structure-function analysis demonstrated that TLX1 binding to Groucho-related TLE corepressors was necessary for maximal transcriptional regulation of the NOTCH-responsive genes tested, implicating TLX1 modulation of the NOTCH-TLE regulatory network. Comparison of the dataset to publicly available biological databases indicated that the TLX1/NOTCH-coregulated genes are frequently targeted by MYC. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments confirmed that MYC was an essential mediator of TLX1/NOTCH transcriptional output and growth promotion in ALL-SIL cells, with TLX1 contributing to the NOTCH-MYC regulatory axis by posttranscriptional enhancement of MYC protein levels. Functional classification of the TLX1/NOTCH-coregulated targets also showed enrichment for genes associated with other human cancers as well as those involved in developmental processes. In particular, we found that TLX1, NOTCH and MYC coregulate CD1B and RAG1, characteristic markers of early cortical thymocytes, and that concerted downregulation of the TLX1 and NOTCH pathways resulted in their irreversible repression. Conclusions We found that TLX1 and NOTCH synergistically regulate transcription in T-ALL, at least in part via the sharing of a TLE corepressor and by augmenting expression of MYC. We conclude that

  17. Role of regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing relapse-preventive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Nilsson, Malin; Rydström, Anna; Aurelius, Johan; Riise, Rebecca E; Movitz, Charlotta; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Ståhlberg, Anders; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B; Martner, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been proposed to dampen functions of anti-neoplastic immune cells and thus promote cancer progression. In a phase IV trial (Re:Mission Trial, NCT01347996, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ) 84 patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received ten consecutive 3-week cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse of leukemia in the post-consolidation phase. This study aimed at defining the features, function and dynamics of Foxp3 + CD25 high CD4 + T regs during immunotherapy and to determine the potential impact of T regs on relapse risk and survival. We observed a pronounced increase in T reg counts in peripheral blood during initial cycles of HDC/IL-2. The accumulating T regs resembled thymic-derived natural T regs (nT regs ), showed augmented expression of CTLA-4 and suppressed the cell cycle proliferation of conventional T cells ex vivo. Relapse of AML was not prognosticated by T reg counts at onset of treatment or after the first cycle of immunotherapy. However, the magnitude of T reg induction was diminished in subsequent treatment cycles. Exploratory analyses implied that a reduced expansion of T regs in later treatment cycles and a short T reg telomere length were significantly associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Our results suggest that immunotherapy with HDC/IL-2 in AML entails induction of immunosuppressive T regs that may be targeted for improved anti-leukemic efficiency.

  18. Early lymphocyte recovery after intensive timed sequential chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia: peripheral oligoclonal expansion of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakry, Christopher G; Hess, Allan D; Gocke, Christopher D; Thoburn, Christopher; Kos, Ferdynand; Meyer, Christian; Briel, Janet; Luznik, Leo; Smith, B Douglas; Levitsky, Hyam; Karp, Judith E

    2011-01-13

    Few published studies characterize early lymphocyte recovery after intensive chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). To test the hypothesis that lymphocyte recovery mirrors ontogeny, we characterized early lymphocyte recovery in 20 consecutive patients undergoing induction timed sequential chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. Recovering T lymphocytes were predominantly CD4(+) and included a greatly expanded population of CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells. Recovering CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells were phenotypically activated regulatory T cells and showed suppressive activity on cytokine production in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. Despite an initial burst of thymopoiesis, most recovering regulatory T cells were peripherally derived. Furthermore, regulatory T cells showed marked oligoclonal skewing, suggesting that their peripheral expansion was antigen-driven. Overall, lymphocyte recovery after chemotherapy differs from ontogeny, specifically identifying a peripherally expanded oligoclonal population of activated regulatory T lymphocytes. These differences suggest a stereotyped immunologic recovery shared by patients with newly diagnosed AML after induction timed sequential chemotherapy. Further insight into this oligoclonal regulatory T-cell population will be fundamental toward developing effective immunomodulatory techniques to improve survival for patients with AML.

  19. Unsupervised learning techniques reveal heterogeneity in memory CD8+T cell differentiation following acute, chronic and latent viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyong; Barton, Erik S; Jennings, Ryan N; Oldenburg, Darby G; Whirry, Juliann M; White, Douglas W; Grayson, Jason M

    2017-09-01

    CD8 + T lymphocytes are critical for the control of gammaherpesvirus latency. To determine how memory CD8 + T cells generated during latency differ from those primed during acute or chronic viral infection, we adoptively transferred naive P14 CD8 + T cells into uninfected recipients, and examined surface proteins, cytokines and transcription factors following infection with the Armstrong (acute) or Clone 13 (chronic) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), or murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) expressing the LCMV epitope D b GP33-41. By performing k-means clustering and generating self organizing maps (SOM), we observed increased short-lived effector-like, CD27 l o CD62L l o and Bcl-6 l o CD8 + T cells following latent infection. In addition, we found that memory CD8 + T cells from latent primed mice underwent less expansion following adoptive transfer and antigen rechallenge. Data from cluster models were combined and visualized by principal component analysis (PCA) demonstrating memory CD8 + T cells from latent infection occupy an intermediate differentiation space. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Blimp-1 impairs T cell function via upregulation of TIGIT and PD-1 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liuluan; Kong, Yaxian; Zhang, Jianhong; Claxton, David F; Ehmann, W Christopher; Rybka, Witold B; Palmisiano, Neil D; Wang, Ming; Jia, Bei; Bayerl, Michael; Schell, Todd D; Hohl, Raymond J; Zeng, Hui; Zheng, Hong

    2017-06-19

    T cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) domain (TIGIT) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) are important inhibitory receptors that associate with T cell exhaustion in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we aimed to determine the underlying transcriptional mechanisms regulating these inhibitory pathways. Specifically, we investigated the role of transcription factor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) in T cell response and transcriptional regulation of TIGIT and PD-1 in AML. Peripheral blood samples collected from patients with AML were used in this study. Blimp-1 expression was examined by flow cytometry. The correlation of Blimp-1 expression to clinical characteristics of AML patients was analyzed. Phenotypic and functional studies of Blimp-1-expressing T cells were performed using flow cytometry-based assays. Luciferase reporter assays and ChIP assays were applied to assess direct binding and transcription activity of Blimp-1. Using siRNA to silence Blimp-1, we further elucidated the regulatory role of Blimp-1 in the TIGIT and PD-1 expression and T cell immune response. Blimp-1 expression is elevated in T cells from AML patients. Consistent with exhaustion, Blimp-1 + T cells upregulate multiple inhibitory receptors including PD-1 and TIGIT. In addition, they are functionally impaired manifested by low cytokine production and decreased cytotoxicity capacity. Importantly, the functional defect is reversed by inhibition of Blimp-1 via siRNA knockdown. Furthermore, Blimp-1 binds to the promoters of PD-1 and TIGIT and positively regulates their expression. Our study demonstrates an important inhibitory effect of Blimp-1 on T cell response in AML; thus, targeting Blimp-1 and its regulated molecules to improve the immune response may provide effective leukemia therapeutics.

  1. Blimp-1 impairs T cell function via upregulation of TIGIT and PD-1 in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liuluan Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM domain (TIGIT and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1 are important inhibitory receptors that associate with T cell exhaustion in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. In this study, we aimed to determine the underlying transcriptional mechanisms regulating these inhibitory pathways. Specifically, we investigated the role of transcription factor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1 in T cell response and transcriptional regulation of TIGIT and PD-1 in AML. Methods Peripheral blood samples collected from patients with AML were used in this study. Blimp-1 expression was examined by flow cytometry. The correlation of Blimp-1 expression to clinical characteristics of AML patients was analyzed. Phenotypic and functional studies of Blimp-1-expressing T cells were performed using flow cytometry-based assays. Luciferase reporter assays and ChIP assays were applied to assess direct binding and transcription activity of Blimp-1. Using siRNA to silence Blimp-1, we further elucidated the regulatory role of Blimp-1 in the TIGIT and PD-1 expression and T cell immune response. Results Blimp-1 expression is elevated in T cells from AML patients. Consistent with exhaustion, Blimp-1+ T cells upregulate multiple inhibitory receptors including PD-1 and TIGIT. In addition, they are functionally impaired manifested by low cytokine production and decreased cytotoxicity capacity. Importantly, the functional defect is reversed by inhibition of Blimp-1 via siRNA knockdown. Furthermore, Blimp-1 binds to the promoters of PD-1 and TIGIT and positively regulates their expression. Conclusions Our study demonstrates an important inhibitory effect of Blimp-1 on T cell response in AML; thus, targeting Blimp-1 and its regulated molecules to improve the immune response may provide effective leukemia therapeutics.

  2. Regulatory T cells in acute myelogenous leukemia: is it time for immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Miller, Jeffrey S; Munn, David H; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-11-10

    The microenviroment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune effector cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as a contributor factor and may be recruited and exploited by leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. Studies have shown that the frequencies of marrow and blood Tregs are greater in patients with AML than in control patients. Although increased Tregs have been associated with a decreased risk of GVHD after allogeneic HCT and hence may impede the graft-versus-tumor effect, recent findings indicate that that this may not be the case. Because there is a need to improve outcomes of standard treatment (chemotherapy with or without allogeneic HCT) in AML, targeting Tregs present an outstanding opportunity in AML because discoveries may apply throughout its treatment. Here, we review data on the roles of Tregs in mediating immune system-AML interactions. We focused on in vitro, animal, and observational human studies of Tregs in AML biology, development, prognosis, and therapy in different settings (eg, vaccination and HCT). Manipulation of Tregs or other types of immunomodulation may become a part of AML treatment in the future.

  3. Targeting oncogenic interleukin-7 receptor signalling with N-acetylcysteine in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marc R; Reed, Casie; Eisenberg, Amy R; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Daakour, Sarah; Yoda, Akinori; Rodig, Scott J; Tal, Noa; Shochat, Chen; Berezovskaya, Alla; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Weinstock, David M; Izraeli, Shai; Kung, Andrew L; Kentsis, Alex; Look, A Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane domain leading to receptor homodimerization through disulfide bond formation and ligand-independent activation of STAT5. We hypothesized that the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-tolerated drug used widely in clinical practice to treat acetaminophen overdose, would reduce disulfide bond formation, and inhibit mutant IL7R-mediated oncogenic signalling. We found that treatment with NAC disrupted IL7R homodimerization in IL7R-mutant DND-41 cells as assessed by non-reducing Western blot, as well as in a luciferase complementation assay. NAC led to STAT5 dephosphorylation and cell apoptosis at clinically achievable concentrations in DND-41 cells, and Ba/F3 cells transformed by an IL7R-mutant construct containing a cysteine insertion. The apoptotic effects of NAC could be rescued in part by a constitutively active allele of STAT5. Despite using doses lower than those tolerated in humans, NAC treatment significantly inhibited the progression of human DND-41 cells engrafted in immunodeficient mice. Thus, targeting leukaemogenic IL7R homodimerization with NAC offers a potentially effective and feasible therapeutic strategy that warrants testing in patients with T-ALL. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. CD19-Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C L; thor Straten, Per

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for cancer represents a promising new treatment modality. ACT based on the administration of cytotoxic T cells genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) recognizing CD19 expressed by B cell malignancies has been shown to induce complete lasting...... responses in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). So far, eleven clinical trials including 99 CLL and ALL patients treated with CAR T cells targeting CD19 have been published, and the results from these trials are promising with impressive clinical...... responses in heavily pretreated patients. Thus, CAR T cell therapy has induced complete responses in both CLL and ALL, and surprisingly, current results indicate that patients with ALL are more prone to respond than are CLL patients. Importantly, the majority of CAR cell studies have observed severe therapy...

  5. Impaired circulating CD4+ LAP+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome and its mechanistic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Feng Zhu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: CD4(+ latency-associated peptide (LAP(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs are a newly discovered T cell subset in humans and the role of these cells in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS has not been explored. We designed to investigate whether circulating frequency and function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs are defective in ACS. METHODS: One hundred eleven ACS patients (acute myocardial infarction and unstable angina and 117 control patients were enrolled in the study. The control patients consisted of chronic stable angina (CSA and chest pain syndrome (CPS. The frequencies of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs and the expression of the transmembrane protein glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP on CD4(+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. The function of CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs was detected using thymidine uptake. Serum interleukin-10 (IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β protein (TGF-β levels were detected using ELISA and expression of GARP mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs was measured by real time-polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: We found ACS patients had a significantly lower frequency of circulating CD4(+LAP(+ Tregs, and the function of these cells was reduced compared to controls. The expression of GARP in CD4(+ T cells and the serum levels of TGF-β in ACS patients were lower than those of control patients. The serum levels of IL-10 were similar between the two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: A novel regulatory T cell subset, defined as CD4(+LAP(+ T cells is defective in ACS patients.

  6. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia.

  7. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Iman; Zayed, Rania A; Said, Fadwa; Latif, Lamyaa Abdel

    2016-09-01

    The microenvironment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized to play a role in helping leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are essential contributors in immunomodulation of the microenvironment as they can promote differentiation of Tregs via the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) pathway. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of IDO in bone marrow derived MSCs and to study its correlation to percentage of Tregs. Thirty-seven adult bone marrow samples were cultured in appropriate culture medium to isolate MSCs. Successful harvest of MSCs was determined by plastic adherence, morphology, and positive expression of CD271 and CD105; negative expression of CD34 and CD45 using flowcytometry. MSCs were examined for IDO expression by immunocytochemistry using anti-IDO monoclonal antibody. CD4+ CD25+ cells (Tregs) were measured in bone marrow samples by flowcytometry. MSCs were successfully isolated from 20 of the 37 bone marrow samples cultured. MSCs showed higher expression of IDO and Tregs percentage was higher in AML patients compared to control subjects (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). A positive correlation was found between IDO expression and Tregs percentage (P value = 0.012, r = 0.5). In this study, we revealed an association between high IDO expression in MSCs and elevated levels of Tregs which could have an important role in the pathogenesis of AML, providing immunosuppressive microenvironment.

  8. Glucocorticoid resistance is reverted by LCK inhibition in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Valentina; Capuzzo, Giorgia; Milani, Gloria; Minuzzo, Sonia Anna; Pinazza, Marica; Bortolozzi, Roberta; Bresolin, Silvia; Porcù, Elena; Frasson, Chiara; Indraccolo, Stefano; Basso, Giuseppe; Accordi, Benedetta

    2017-12-21

    Pediatric T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients often display resistance to glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. These patients, classified as prednisone poor responders (PPR), have poorer outcome than do the other pediatric T-ALL patients receiving a high-risk adapted therapy. Because glucocorticoids are administered to ALL patients during all the different phases of therapy, GC resistance represents an important challenge to improving the outcome for these patients. Mechanisms underlying resistance are not yet fully unraveled; thus our research focused on the identification of deregulated signaling pathways to point out new targeted approaches. We first identified, by reverse-phase protein arrays, the lymphocyte cell-specific protein-tyrosine kinase (LCK) as aberrantly activated in PPR patients. We showed that LCK inhibitors, such as dasatinib, bosutinib, nintedanib, and WH-4-023, are able to induce cell death in GC-resistant T-ALL cells, and remarkably, cotreatment with dexamethasone is able to reverse GC resistance, even at therapeutic drug concentrations. This was confirmed by specific LCK gene silencing and ex vivo combined treatment of cells from PPR patient-derived xenografts. Moreover, we observed that LCK hyperactivation in PPR patients upregulates the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells signaling triggering to interleukin-4 ( IL-4 ) overexpression. GC-sensitive cells cultured with IL-4 display an increased resistance to dexamethasone, whereas the inhibition of IL-4 signaling could increase GC-induced apoptosis in resistant cells. Treatment with dexamethasone and dasatinib also impaired engraftment of leukemia cells in vivo. Our results suggest a quickly actionable approach to supporting conventional therapies and overcoming GC resistance in pediatric T-ALL patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  9. A rapid crosstalk of human gammadelta T cells and monocytes drives the acute inflammation in bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Eberl

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells are a minor subset of T cells in human blood and differ from other T cells by their immediate responsiveness to microbes. We previously demonstrated that the primary target for Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells is (E-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMB-PP, an essential metabolite produced by a large range of pathogens. Here we wished to study the consequence of this unique responsiveness in microbial infection. The majority of peripheral Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells shares migration properties with circulating monocytes, which explains the presence of these two distinct blood cell types in the inflammatory infiltrate at sites of infection and suggests that they synergize in anti-microbial immune responses. Our present findings demonstrate a rapid and HMB-PP-dependent crosstalk between Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cells and autologous monocytes that results in the immediate production of inflammatory mediators including the cytokines interleukin (IL-6, interferon (IFN-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, and oncostatin M (OSM; the chemokines CCL2, CXCL8, and CXCL10; and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Moreover, under these co-culture conditions monocytes differentiate within 18 hours into inflammatory dendritic cells (DCs with antigen-presenting functions. Addition of further microbial stimuli (lipopolysaccharide, peptidoglycan induces CCR7 and enables these inflammatory DCs to trigger the generation of CD4(+ effector alphabeta T cells expressing IFN-gamma and/or IL-17. Importantly, our in vitro model replicates the responsiveness to microbes of effluent cells from peritoneal dialysis (PD patients and translates directly to episodes of acute PD-associated bacterial peritonitis, where Vgamma9/Vdelta2 T cell numbers and soluble inflammatory mediators are elevated in patients infected with HMB-PP-producing pathogens. Collectively, these findings suggest a direct link between invading pathogens, microbe

  10. Non-HTLV-I associated pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma of the brain mimicking post-vaccinal acute inflammatory demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanschitz, J; Hainfellner, J A; Simonitsch, I; Schnizer, M; Deisenhammer, E; Terunuma, H; Iwasaki, Y; Budka, H

    1997-02-01

    Two weeks after vaccination against tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a 57-year-old female suddenly developed mental confusion and hemiparesis of the left side. Cranial MRI demonstrated extensive bilateral lesions in the fronto-parietal white matter of both hemispheres, suggesting an acute inflammatory demyelinating disease following vaccination. Despite administration of high-dose corticosteroids, the patient died 3 weeks after onset of neurological symptoms. Autopsy revealed diffuse infiltrates of a primary cerebral pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma of medium and large cell type. PCR on brain tissue for HTLV-I and serology for anti-HTLV-I antibodies in CSF and serum were negative; immunocytochemistry on brain tissue did not detect EBV-related antigen. This is the first recorded observation of a diffusely infiltrating primary central nervous system T-cell lymphoma, clinically and radiologically mimicking a fatal acute inflammatory demyelinating complication after vaccination.

  11. Hepatitis B Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Maintain Functional Exhaustion after Antigen Reexposure in an Acute Activation Immune Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Pan, Wen; Liu, Yanan; Luo, Jinzhuo; Zhu, Dan; Lu, Yinping; Feng, Xuemei; Yang, Xuecheng; Dittmer, Ulf; Lu, Mengji; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jia

    2018-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by the presence of functionally exhausted HBV-specific CD8+ T cells. To characterize the possible residual effector ability of these cells, we reexposed CD8+ T cells from chronically HBV replicating mice to HBV antigens in an acute activation immune environment. We found that after transfer into naive mice, exhausted CD8+ T cells reexpanded in a comparable magnitude as naive CD8+ T cells in response to acute HBV infection; however, their proliferation intensity was significantly lower than that of CD8+ T cells from acute-resolving HBV replicating mice (AR mice). The differentiation phenotypes driven by acute HBV replication of donor exhausted and naive CD8+ T cells were similar, but were different from those of their counterparts from AR mice. Nevertheless, exhausted CD8+ T cells maintained less activated phenotype, an absence of effector cytokine production and poor antiviral function after HBV reexposure in an acute activation immune environment. We thus conclude that exhausted CD8+ T cells undergo a stable form of dysfunctional differentiation during chronic HBV replication and switching immune environment alone is not sufficient for the antiviral functional reconstitution of these cells.

  12. The t(10;14)(q24;q11) of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia juxtaposes the δT-cell receptor with TCL3, a conserved and activated locus at 10q24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zutter, M.; Hockett, R.D.; Roberts, C.W.M.; McGuire, E.A.; Bloomstone, J.; Korsmeyer, S.J.; Morton, C.C.; Deaven, L.L.; Crist, W.M.; Carroll, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors cloned the t(10;14) recurrent translocation from CD3-negative T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. The breakpoint at 14q11 involved an intermediate rearrangement of the δ T-cell receptor locus, suggesting that the translocation arose at the time of antigen receptor assemblage. Translocation introduced chromosome segment 10q24 as proven by hybridization of a breakpoint-derived probe to flow-sorted chromosomes and metaphase chromosomes. Two t(10;14) breakpoints were clustered within a 600-base-pair region of 10q24 but no heptamer-spacer-nonamer motifs resembling T-cell receptor/immunoglobulin rearrangement signals were noted at the breakpoint. A locus distinct from terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase was found at 10q24. Evolutionarily conserved regions surrounding the 10q24 breakpoint were examined for transcriptional activity. A region telomeric to the 10q24 breakpoint, expected to translocate to the der(14) chromosome, recognized an abundant 2.9-kilobase RNA in a t(10;14) T-cell leukemia. This locus was not active in a variety of other normal and neoplastic T cells, arguing that it was deregulated by he introduction of the T-cell receptor. This locus is a candidate for a putative protooncogene, TCL3, involved in T-cell neoplasia

  13. Quantitative analysis of the acute and long-term CD4(+) T-cell response to a persistent gammaherpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    in the mediastinal lymph nodes and then in the cervical lymph nodes and the spleen. The numbers of MHV-68-specific CD4(+) T cells generated in congenic mice homozygous for disruption of the beta2-microglobulin gene tended to be higher, indicating that the absence of the CD8(+) set in this group resulted......The murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) replicates in respiratory epithelial cells, where it establishes a persistent, latent infection limited predominantly to B lymphocytes. The virus-specific CD4(+) T-cell response in C57BL/6 mice challenged intranasally with MHV-68 is detected first...... in a compensatory response. The peak frequency within the splenic CD4(+) T-cell population may reach 1:50 in the acute response; it then drops to 1:400 to 1:500 within 4 months and stays at that level in the very long term. Sorting for L-selectin (CD62L) expression established that all virus-specific CD4(+) T cells...

  14. T-cell/myeloid mixed-phenotype acute leukemia with monocytic differentiation and isolated 17p deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germison Silva Lopes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed phenotype acute leukemia is a rare subtype of leukemia that probably arises from a hematopoietic pluripotent stem cell. The co-expression of two of myeloid, B- or T-lymphoid antigens is the hallmark of this disease. Herein, the case of a 28-year-old female patient is reported who presented with hemoglobin of 5.8 g/dL, white blood cell count of 138 × 109/L and platelet count of 12 × 109/L. The differential count of peripheral blood revealed 96% of blasts. Moreover, the patient presented with lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and bone marrow infiltration by monocytoid blasts characterized as 7% positivity by Sudan Black cytochemical staining. Immunophenotyping revealed the involvement of blasts of both T- and monocytic lineages. The cytogenetic analysis showed an isolated 17p deletion. Thus, the diagnosis of T-cell/myeloid mixed phenotype acute leukemia was made with two particular rare features, that is, the monocytic differentiation and the 17p deletion as unique cytogenetic abnormalities. The possibility of concomitant expressions of T-cell and monocytic differentiation antigens in the same blast population is hard to explain using the classical model of hematopoiesis. However, recent studies have suggested that myeloid potential persists even when the lineage branches segregate toward B- and T-cells. The role of an isolated 17p deletion in the pathogenesis of this condition is unclear. At present, the patient is in complete remission after an allogeneic stem cell transplantation procedure.

  15. CD27-CD70 costimulation controls T cell immunity during acute and persistent cytomegalovirus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, Suzanne P. M.; Redeker, Anke; Franken, Kees L.; Benedict, Chris A.; Yagita, Hideo; Wensveen, Felix M.; Borst, Jannie; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Arens, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) establish lifelong infections that are controlled in part by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. To promote persistence, CMVs utilize multiple strategies to evade host immunity, including modulation of costimulatory molecules on infected antigen-presenting cells. In humans,

  16. T-cell count

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... count URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003516.htm T-cell count To use the sharing features on this ... as hepatitis or mononucleosis Lower than normal T-cell levels may be due to: Acute viral infections Aging Cancer Immune system diseases, such as HIV/AIDS ...

  17. Is T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia still a high risk leukemia in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capl, J; Foltinova, A.; Kaiserova, E.; Jamarik, M.; Jasenkova, M.; Babusikova, O.

    1998-01-01

    In a group of 21 children with T cell ALL we compared the clinical picture and laboratory finding in a subgroup of 13 patients with less mature (mCD3 negative) and a subgroup of 8 patients with mature (mCD3 positive) phenotypical type and the therapeutic response in relation to the stage of thymic differentiation of the blastic cells as well. We could not find any significant differences concerning the presence or absence of mediastinal thymic mass, organomegaly, WBC count, morphology of the blasts and their acid phosphatase and PAS reaction between cases with less mature and mature type of thymic differentiation. Concerning the therapeutic response, children with mature type of T-ALL have shown at 5 years significantly higher event free survival rate, in comparison with the group of patients with less mature type of T cells. Overall survival rate was also higher in the first group, but statistically not significant. (authors)

  18. Pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy sensitizes human acute leukemia Jurkat T cells to acacetin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Young; Jun, Do Youn; Kim, Ki Yun; Ha, Eun Ji; Woo, Mi Hee; Ko, Jee Youn; Yun, Young Ho; Oh, In-Seok; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-11-04

    Exposure of Jurkat T cell clone (J/Neo cells) to acacetin (5,7-dihydroxy-4'-methoxyflavone), which is present in barnyard millet [Echinochloa esculenta (A. Braun)] grains, resulted in cytotoxicity, accumulation of apoptotic sub-G1 cells, Bak activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and FITC-Annexin V-stainable phosphatidylserine exposure on the external surface of the cytoplasmic membrane without accompanying necrosis. These apoptotic responses were completely abrogated in Jurkat T cell clone (J/Bcl-xL) overexpressing Bcl-xL. Under these conditions, cellular autophagic responses, including suppression of the Akt-mTOR pathway and p62/SQSTM1 down-regulation, were detected both J/Neo and J/Bcl-xL cells; however, formation of acridine orange-stainable acidic vascular organelles, LC3-I/II conversion, and Beclin1 phosphorylation (Ser-15) were detected only in J/Neo cells. Correspondingly, concomitant treatment with the autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine or LY294002) appeared to enhance acacetin-induced apoptotic responses, such as Bak activation, Δψm loss, activation of caspae-9 and caspase-3, and apoptotic sub-G1 accumulation. This indicated that acacetin could induce apoptosis and cytoprotective autophagy in Jurkat T cells simultaneously. Together, these results demonstrate that acacetin induces not only apoptotic cell death via Bak activation, Δψm loss, and mitochondria-dependent activation of the caspase cascade, but also cytoprotective autophagy resulting from suppression of the Akt-mTOR pathway. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of the autophagy pathway augments Bak activation and resultant mitochondrial damage-mediated apoptosis in Jurkat T cells.

  19. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  20. Welder's pulmonary hemosiderosis associated with systemic iron overload following exacerbation of acute adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Naoto; Shiraki, Akira; Furukawa, Katsuya; Tange, Naoyuki; Murase, Atsushi; Hayakawa, Masaya; Iwata, Yosuke; Kosugi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-12

    Herein, we describe a 61-year-old man diagnosed with pulmonary hemosiderosis following chemotherapy for acute adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Liver and heart biopsy confirmed hemosiderosis. ATLL progressed, and the patient died from multiorgan damage. Welder's lung may have been involved in hemosiderosis and systemic iron overload. Abnormal iron metabolism or immune reactions may have influenced the clinical course, but these were not validated. Detailed analyses of family medical and lifestyle histories, and genetic examination should be performed in cases of systemic iron overload.

  1. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    WU, CUI-PING; QING, XI; WU, CUI-YUN; ZHU, HONG; ZHOU, HAI-YAN

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4+CD25+ Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ...

  2. Vaccination to improve the persistence of CD19CAR gene-modified T cells in relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossig, C; Pule, M; Altvater, B; Saiagh, S; Wright, G; Ghorashian, S; Clifton-Hadley, L; Champion, K; Sattar, Z; Popova, B; Hackshaw, A; Smith, P; Roberts, T; Biagi, E; Dreno, B; Rousseau, R; Kailayangiri, S; Ahlmann, M; Hough, R; Kremens, B; Sauer, M G; Veys, P; Goulden, N; Cummins, M; Amrolia, P J

    2017-05-01

    Trials with second generation CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) T-cells report unprecedented responses but are associated with risk of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Instead, we studied the use of donor Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cells (EBV CTL) transduced with a first generation CD19CAR, relying on the endogenous T-cell receptor for proliferation. We conducted a multi-center phase I/II study of donor CD19CAR transduced EBV CTL in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Patients were eligible pre-emptively if they developed molecular relapse (>5 × 10 -4 ) post first stem cell transplant (SCT), or prophylactically post second SCT. An initial cohort showed poor expansion/persistence. We therefore investigated EBV-directed vaccination to enhance expansion/persistence. Eleven patients were treated. No CRS, neurotoxicity or graft versus host disease (GVHD) was observed. At 1 month, 5 patients were in CR (4 continuing, 1 de novo), 1 PR, 3 had stable disease and 3 no response. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 10 of 11 have relapsed, 2 are alive with disease and 1 alive in CR 3 years. Although CD19CAR CTL expansion was poor, persistence was enhanced by vaccination. Median persistence was 0 (range: 0-28) days without vaccination compared to 56 (range: 0-221) days with vaccination (P=0.06). This study demonstrates the feasibility of multi-center studies of CAR T cell therapy and the potential for enhancing persistence with vaccination.

  3. Upregulation of CD200 is associated with Foxp3+ regulatory T cell expansion and disease progression in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarian, Ali; Nourizadeh, Maryam; Masoumi, Farimah; Tabrizi, Mina; Emami, Amir Hossein; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Hadjati, Jamshid; Mirahmadian, Mahroo; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    Immunosuppression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an important mechanism of tumor escape. CD200, as an immunosuppressive molecule, is overexpressed in some hematological malignancies and it has also been shown to be an independent prognostic factor in AML. In the current study, simultaneous CD200 expression and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell levels were investigated in Iranian patients with AML by flow cytometry. We also assessed the effect of CD200-CD200R blockade on Th1 and T-reg cytokine production and T cell proliferation in autologous AML- and monocyte-DC mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLRs). ELISA assay was performed to detect IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-10, and TGF-β production in MLR supernatants. Expression of Foxp3, IL-10, and TGF-β mRNAs in MLRs were detected by real-time PCR. Our results demonstrated significant overexpression of CD200 (P = 0.001) in association with higher frequencies of Foxp3(+) T cells in AML patients (r = 0.8, P T cell levels with lower Foxp3 intensity was also shown in CD200-CD200R-blocked MLRs. Expression of IL-10 mRNA declined significantly only in AML-DC MLRs where CD200-CD200R interaction was blocked and the same result was observed for TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA in both AML- and monocyte-DC MLRs. These data present a significant role for CD200 in suppressing anti-tumor immune response through stimulation of regulatory mechanisms in AML patients and suggest that CD200 may have a prognostic value in this malignancy and its blockade may be used as a target for AML immunotherapy.

  4. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Clinical Significance of Immuno phenotypic Markers in Pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIDHOM, I.; SHAABAN, Kh.; SOLIMAN, S.; HAMDY, N.; YASSIN, D.; SALEM, Sh.; HASSANEIN, H.; MANSOUR, M.T.; EZZAT, S.; EL-ANWAR, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cell-marker profiling has led to conflicting conclusions about its prognostic significance in T-ALL. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of the expression of CD34, CD10 and myeloid associated antigens (CD13/ CD33) in childhood T-ALL and to relate their presence to initial clinical and biologic features and early response to therapy. Patients and Methods: This study included 67 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T-ALL recruited from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt during the time period from July 2007 to June 2008. Immuno phenotypic markers and minimal residual disease (MRD) were studied by five-color flow cytometry. Results: The frequency of CD34 was 34.9%, CD10 33.3%, while CD13/CD33 was 18.8%. No significant association was encountered between CD34, CD10 or myeloid antigen positivity and the presenting clinical features as age, sex, TLC and CNS leukemia. Only CD10+ expression had significant association with initial CNS involvement (p=0.039). CD34 and CD13/CD33 expression was significantly associated with T-cell maturation stages (p<0.05). No relationship was observed for age, TLC, gender, NCI risk or CNS involvement with early response to therapy illustrated by BM as well as MRD day 15 and day 42. CD34+, CD13/CD33+ and early T-cell stage had high MRD levels on day 15 that was statistically highly significant (p<0.01), but CD10+ had statistically significant lower MRD level on day 15 (p=0.049). However, only CD34 retained its significance at an MRD cut-off level of 0.01%. Conclusion: CD34, CD10, CD13/CD33 expression, as well as T-cell maturation stages, may have prognostic significance in pediatric T-ALL as they have a significant impact on early clearance of leukemic cells detected by MRD day 15.

  6. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Siddiqui, Rafat A., E-mail: rsiddiqu@iuhealth.org [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  7. Acute HIV-1 infection is associated with increased plasma levels of heme oxygenase-1 and presence of heme oxygenase-1-specific regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angin, Mathieu; Fathi, Anahita; King, Melanie; Ledoux, Mary B; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Altfeld, Marcus; Addo, Marylyn M

    2017-03-13

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress response protein with potent anti-inflammatory activity and recent data suggest a potentially beneficial role in HIV pathogenesis. We investigated the impact of HO-1 and a novel subset of HO-1-specific CD8 regulatory T cells on virus-specific T-cell immunity in HIV-1-infected individuals. HO-1 protein levels were quantified in plasma from individuals at different stages of HIV-1 disease and longitudinally following primary HIV infection. HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were investigated by flow cytometry using human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I pentamers. Flow-sorted HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were cultured and tested for suppressive activity on HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-cell clones clones. HO-1 gene expression was determined in sorted peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets from individuals with acute HIV-1 infection. HO-1 plasma levels were significantly increased in HIV-1 infection, with the highest levels in individuals with acute HIV-1 infection, and gradually declined over time. The frequency of CD8 T cells specific for HO-1 was elevated in study participants with primary HIV-1 infection and flow-sorted HO-1-specific CD8 T cells were capable of suppressing HIV-1-specific lysis of cytotoxic T-cell clones clones. HO-1 gene expression was upregulated in multiple immune cell subsets during acute HIV-1 infection and HO-1 overexpression modulated anti-HIV immunity in vitro. Our data suggest that HO-1 is induced during acute HIV-1 infection, likely mediating anti-inflammatory effects and driving expansion of HO-1-specific CD8 regulatory T cells capable of suppressing HIV-1-specific immune responses in vitro. The investigation of HO-1 and the novel CD8 regulatory cell type described here provide further insight into immune regulation in HIV-1 infection and may hold potential for future immunotherapeutic intervention.

  8. Inhibitory effect of Embelin on human acute T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells through activation of the apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiu-Li; Jiang, Lian; Qu, Fan; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Zhao, Lian-Mei

    2015-08-01

    It has previously been shown that Embelin inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis, and increases sensitivity and reduces resistance to chemotherapy drugs, in various types of tumor cells. The present study examined the effects of Embelin on the proliferation of human acute T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells. Jurkat cells were treated with various concentrations of Embelin and the effects of Embelin on the inhibition of growth of Jurkat cells were evaluated. Expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP); poly ADP ribose polymerase; caspase-3; caspase-8; caspase-9; the proapoptotic protein, Bax; and the antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xl and Bcl-2, were assessed. The results showed that Embelin significantly inhibited the growth of human acute T cell lymphoma Jurkat cells. Following treatment with 5, 10 or 20 mM Embelin for 48 h, cell viability was 82.31, 58.65 and 37.62%, respectively, which was significantly reduced compared with that of the control group and the 0.1% DMSO control group (PJurkat cells in vitro , by activating the endogenous caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway through inhibition of XIAP and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members.

  9. CD8+T cells expressing both PD-1 and TIGIT but not CD226 are dysfunctional in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengjie; Bu, Jin; Zhou, Maohua; Sido, Jessica; Lin, Yu; Liu, Guanfang; Lin, Qiwen; Xu, Xiuzhang; Leavenworth, Jianmei W; Shen, Erxia

    2018-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of leukemia among adults with an overall poor prognosis and very limited treatment management. Immune checkpoint blockade of PD-1 alone or combined with other immune checkpoint blockade has gained impressive results in murine AML models by improving anti-leukemia CD8 + T cell function, which has greatly promoted the strategy to utilize combined immune checkpoint inhibitors to treat AML patients. However, the expression profiles of these immune checkpoint receptors, such as co-inhibitory receptors PD-1 and TIGIT and co-stimulatory receptor CD226, in T cells from AML patients have not been clearly defined. Here we have defined subsets of CD8 + and CD4 + T cells in the peripheral blood (PB) from newly diagnosed AML patients and healthy controls (HCs). We have observed increased frequencies of PD-1- and TIGIT- expressing CD8 + T cells but decreased occurrence of CD226-expressing CD8 + T cells in AML patients. Further analysis of these CD8 + T cells revealed a unique CD8 + T cell subset that expressed PD-1 and TIGIT but displayed lower levels of CD226 was associated with failure to achieve remission after induction chemotherapy and FLT3-ITD mutations which predict poor clinical prognosis in AML patients. Importantly, these PD-1 + TIGIT + CD226 - CD8 + T cells are dysfunctional with lower expression of intracellular IFN-γ and TNF-α than their counterparts in HCs. Therefore, our studies revealed that an increased frequency of a unique CD8 + T cell subset, PD-1 + TIGIT + CD226 - CD8 + T cells, is associated with CD8 + T cell dysfunction and poor clinical prognosis of AML patients, which may reveal critical diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and direct more efficient therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Analysis of the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy during acute HIV-1 infection on HIV-specific CD4 T cell functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Christine A.; de Cuyper, Iris M.; Steingrover, Radjin; Jurriaans, Suzanne; Sankatsing, Sanjay U. C.; Prins, Jan M.; Lange, Joep M. A.; van Baarle, Debbie; Miedema, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been reported that antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during acute HIV-1 infection may rescue HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses. Objective: To determine the duration of this preserved response by investigating the long-term effects of HAART during acute infection on HIV-specific CD4

  11. T cell exhaustion characterized by compromised MHC class I and II restricted cytotoxic activity associates with acute B lymphoblastic leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2018-02-22

    Acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) relapse contributes predominantly to the mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). However, the mechanism of B-ALL relapse after allo-HSCT remains unknown. The eradication of leukemia after allo-HSCT largely relies on graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects mediated by donor T cells. T cell exhaustion, characterized by the increased expression of inhibitory receptors and impaired function, may suppress GVL effects. In this study, we evaluated whether T cell exhaustion was involved in B-ALL relapse after allo-HSCT. The results showed that CD4 + and CD8 + T cells exhibited increased coexpression of PD-1 and Tim-3, and compromised proliferative capacity, cytokine production and cytotoxic potentials in relapsed patients. Additionally, T cells at the tumor site were more easily exhausted than T cells in the peripheral blood. Moreover, the reversal of T cell exhaustion might correlate with effective anti-leukemic responses after reinduction. These results suggested that T cell exhaustion was associated with B-ALL relapse after allo-HSCT as well as its treatment outcome. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Canine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate severe acute pancreatitis by regulating T cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Song, Woo-Jin; Li, Qiang; Han, Sei-Myoung; Jeon, Kee-Ok; Park, Sang-Chul; Ryu, Min-Ok; Chae, Hyung-Kyu; Kyeong, Kweon; Youn, Hwa-Young

    2016-12-30

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with systemic complications and high mortality rate in dogs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been investigated for their therapeutic potential in several inflammation models. In the present study, the effects of canine adipose tissue-derived (cAT)-MSCs in a rat model of SAP induced by retrograde injection of 3% sodium taurocholate solution into the pancreatic duct were investigated. cAT-MSCs labeled with dioctadecyl-3,3,3'-tetramethylindo-carbocyanine perchlorate (1 × 10⁷ cells/kg) were systemically administered to rats and pancreatic tissue was collected three days later for histopathological, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical analyses. Greater numbers of infused cAT-MSCs were detected in the pancreas of SAP relative to sham-operated rats. cAT-MSC infusion reduced pancreatic edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and acinar cell necrosis, and decreased pancreatic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -12, -17, and -23 and interferon-γ, while stimulating expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 in SAP rats. Moreover, cAT-MSCs decreased the number of clusters of differentiation 3-positive T cells and increased that of forkhead box P3-positive T cells in the injured pancreas. These results indicate that cAT-MSCs can be effective as a cell-based therapeutic strategy for treatment of SAP in dogs.

  13. Distribution of invariant natural killer T cells and dendritic cells in late pre-term birth without acute chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Yasuyuki; Shima, Yoshio; Takeshita, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Hidemi

    2017-06-01

    Acute chorioamnionitis (aCAM) is an important cause of pre-term birth. However, little is known about the pathogenesis of late pre-term birth without aCAM that was the most common category of pre-term birth. Here we analyze the kinetics of immune cells obtained from the decidua of women with late pre-term births with and without aCAM. Deciduas were obtained from women who underwent labor with late pre-term birth without aCAM (PB-n/aCAM) or with aCAM (PB-w/aCAM). The population of DEC-205 + dendritic cells (DCs), macrophages, invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, NK cells, CD8 + T cells, and CD4 + T cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. The number of iNKT cells was higher in the decidua obtained from women with PB-n/aCAM than PB-w/aCAM. DEC-205 + DCs obtained from women with PB-n/aCAM preferentially induced iNKT cell proliferation. iNKT cell accumulation with DEC-205 + DCs in PB-n/aCAM suggests that iNKT cells contribute to the onset of PB-n/aCAM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inhibition of MerTK increases chemosensitivity and decreases oncogenic potential in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, L N; Winges, A; Christoph, S; Sather, S; Migdall-Wilson, J; Schlegel, J; McGranahan, A; Gao, D; Liang, X; DeRyckere, D; Graham, D K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric leukemia survival rates have improved dramatically over the past decades. However, current treatment protocols are still largely ineffective in cases of relapsed leukemia and are associated with a significant rate of chronic health conditions. Thus, there is a continued need for new therapeutic options. Here, we show that mer receptor tyrosine kinase (MerTK) was abnormally expressed in approximately one half of pediatric T-cell leukemia patient samples and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines. Stimulation of MerTK by the ligand Gas6 led to activation of the prosurvival proteins Erk 1/2 and Stat5, and MerTK-dependent activation of the STAT pathway in leukemia represents a novel finding. Furthermore, inhibition of MerTK expression increased the sensitivity of T-ALL cells to treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and decreased the oncogenic potential of the Jurkat T-ALL cell line in a methylcellulose colony-forming assay. Lastly, inhibition of MerTK expression significantly increased median survival in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia (30.5 days vs 60 days, P<0.0001). These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for dose reduction of currently used chemotherapeutics resulting in decreased rates of therapy-associated toxicities

  15. Azacitidine augments expansion of regulatory T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Oliver C; Dennis, Mike; Jilani, Nadira Y; Loke, Justin; Siddique, Shamyla; Ryan, Gordon; Nunnick, Jane; Khanum, Rahela; Raghavan, Manoj; Cook, Mark; Snowden, John A; Griffiths, Mike; Russell, Nigel; Yin, John; Crawley, Charles; Cook, Gordon; Vyas, Paresh; Moss, Paul; Malladi, Ram; Craddock, Charles F

    2012-04-05

    Strategies that augment a GVL effect without increasing the risk of GVHD are required to improve the outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Azacitidine (AZA) up-regulates the expression of tumor Ags on leukemic blasts in vitro and expands the numbers of immunomodulatory T regulatory cells (Tregs) in animal models. Reasoning that AZA might selectively augment a GVL effect, we studied the immunologic sequelae of AZA administration after allogeneic SCT. Twenty-seven patients who had undergone a reduced intensity allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia were treated with monthly courses of AZA, and CD8(+) T-cell responses to candidate tumor Ags and circulating Tregs were measured. AZA after transplantation was well tolerated, and its administration was associated with a low incidence of GVHD. Administration of AZA increased the number of Tregs within the first 3 months after transplantation compared with a control population (P = .0127). AZA administration also induced a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response to several tumor Ags, including melanoma-associated Ag 1, B melanoma antigen 1, and Wilm tumor Ag 1. These data support the further examination of AZA after transplantation as a mechanism of augmenting a GVL effect without a concomitant increase in GVHD.

  16. DNA Methylation Adds Prognostic Value to Minimal Residual Disease Status in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borssén, Magnus; Haider, Zahra; Landfors, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increased knowledge about genetic aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), no clinically feasible treatment-stratifying marker exists at diagnosis. Instead patients are enrolled in intensive induction therapies with substantial side effects....... In modern protocols, therapy response is monitored by minimal residual disease (MRD) analysis and used for postinduction risk group stratification. DNA methylation profiling is a candidate for subtype discrimination at diagnosis and we investigated its role as a prognostic marker in pediatric T......-ALL. PROCEDURE: Sixty-five diagnostic T-ALL samples from Nordic pediatric patients treated according to the Nordic Society of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology ALL 2008 (NOPHO ALL 2008) protocol were analyzed by HumMeth450K genome wide DNA methylation arrays. Methylation status was analyzed in relation...

  17. Leukaemic infiltration and cytomegalovirus retinitis in a patient with acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukaemia in complete remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldaña Garrido, J D; Martínez Rubio, M; Carrión Campo, R; Moya Moya, M A; Rico Sergado, L

    2017-03-01

    A 43-year-old woman in remission from T- cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was referred to our hospital with suspected leukaemic retinitis. The funduscopic examination of her left eye revealed multifocal yellow-white peripheral retinitis and retinal haemorrhage. The patient was treated for cytomegalovirus retinitis after an extended haematological investigation showed no abnormalities. Initial improvement was followed by papillitis in the left eye and motility restriction in the right eye. Magnetic resonance and lumbar puncture confirmed leukaemia relapse. Specific treatment was initiated with complete resolution. Ocular involvement may precede haematological leukaemia relapse. Physicians should be alerted when ocular symptoms appear in these cases. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia show high numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells which are reduced by conventional chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Labib Salem; Mohamed Ramadan El-Shanshory; Nabila Ibrahim El-Desouki; Said Hammad Abdou; Mohamed Attia Attia; Abdel-Aziz Awad Zidan; Shymaa Sobhy Mourad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is considered as one of the most common cancer in pediatric malignancies. Among ALL, B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL) represents 80% to 85% of the childhood ALL. Problem: Although anti B-ALL chemotherapy kill B-ALL, it associates with alteration in the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and thus impacts the overall immunity. Aim: To evaluate the impact of anti B-ALL on the numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in correlation to the n...

  19. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin; Bopanna, Ramanamurthy; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    T reg cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T reg cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T reg phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T reg cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T reg cells in SMAR1 −/− mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T reg cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T reg physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T reg cells. • SMAR1 −/− T reg cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1 −/− mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T reg phenotype that controls colitis

  20. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rochelle Mikkelsen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+CD25(hiFoxP3(+ immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+ T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  1. Partial regulatory T cell depletion prior to acute feline immunodeficiency virus infection does not alter disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, S Rochelle; Long, Julie M; Zhang, Lin; Galemore, Erin R; VandeWoude, Sue; Dean, Gregg A

    2011-02-25

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats follows a disease course similar to HIV-1, including a short acute phase characterized by high viremia, and a prolonged asymptomatic phase characterized by low viremia and generalized immune dysfunction. CD4(+)CD25(hi)FoxP3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells have been implicated as a possible cause of immune dysfunction during FIV and HIV-1 infection, as they are capable of modulating virus-specific and inflammatory immune responses. Additionally, the immunosuppressive capacity of feline Treg cells has been shown to be increased during FIV infection. We have previously shown that transient in vivo Treg cell depletion during asymptomatic FIV infection reveals FIV-specific immune responses suppressed by Treg cells. In this study, we sought to determine the immunological influence of Treg cells during acute FIV infection. We asked whether Treg cell depletion prior to infection with the highly pathogenic molecular clone FIV-C36 in cats could alter FIV pathogenesis. We report here that partial Treg cell depletion prior to FIV infection does not significantly change provirus, viremia, or CD4(+) T cell levels in blood and lymphoid tissues during the acute phase of disease. The effects of anti-CD25 mAb treatment are truncated in cats acutely infected with FIV-C36 as compared to chronically infected cats or FIV-naïve cats, as Treg cell levels were heightened in all treatment groups included in the study within two weeks post-FIV infection. Our findings suggest that the influence of Treg cell suppression during FIV pathogenesis is most prominent after Treg cells are activated in the environment of established FIV infection.

  2. Novel protocol including liver biopsy to identify and treat CD8+ T-cell predominant acute hepatitis and liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Rebecca B; Berquist, William E; Nadeau, Kari C; Louie, Christine Y; Chen, Sharon F; Sibley, Richard K; Glader, Bertil E; Wong, Wendy B; Hofmann, Lawrence V; Esquivel, Carlos O; Cox, Kenneth L

    2014-08-01

    In the majority of children with ALF, the etiology is unknown and liver transplantation is often needed for survival. A patient case prompted us to consider that immune dysregulation may be the cause of indeterminate acute hepatitis and liver failure in children. Our study includes nine pediatric patients treated under a multidisciplinary clinical protocol to identify and treat immune-mediated acute liver injury. Patients with evidence of inflammation and no active infection on biopsy received treatment with intravenous immune globulin and methylprednisolone. Seven patients had at least one positive immune marker before or after treatment. All patients had a CD8+ T-cell predominant liver injury that completely or partially responded to immune therapy. Five of the nine patients recovered liver function and did not require liver transplantation. Three of these patients subsequently developed bone marrow failure and were treated with either immunosuppression or stem cell transplant. This series highlights the importance of this tissue-based approach to diagnosis and treatment that may improve transplant-free survival. Further research is necessary to better characterize the immune injury and to predict the subset of patients at risk for bone marrow failure who may benefit from earlier and stronger immunosuppressive therapy. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. MAR binding protein SMAR1 favors IL-10 mediated regulatory T cell function in acute colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirlekar, Bhalchandra; Patil, Sachin [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bopanna, Ramanamurthy [Experimental Animal Facility, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Chattopadhyay, Samit, E-mail: samit@nccs.res.in [Chromatin and Disease Biology Laboratory, National Centre for Cell Science, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India)

    2015-08-21

    T{sub reg} cells are not only crucial for controlling immune responses to autoantigens but also prevent those directed towards commensal pathogens. Control of effector immune responses by T{sub reg} cells depend on their capacity to accumulate at inflammatory site and accordingly accommodate to inflammatory environment. Till date, the factors associated with maintaining these aspects of T{sub reg} phenotype is not understood properly. Here we have shown that a known nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 is selectively expressed more in colonic T{sub reg} cells and is required for their ability to accumulate at inflammatory site and to sustain high levels of Foxp3 and IL-10 expression during acute colitis. Elimination of anti-inflammatory subsets revealed a protective role for IL-10 producing T{sub reg} cells in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. Moreover, a combined action of Foxp3 and SMAR1 restricts effector cytokine production and enhance the production of IL-10 by colonic T{sub reg} cells that controls acute colitis. This data highlights a critical role of SMAR1 in maintaining T{sub reg} physiology during inflammatory disorders. - Highlights: • SMAR1 is essential to sustain high level of Foxp3 and IL-10 in T{sub reg} cells. • SMAR1{sup −/−} T{sub reg} cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17 leads to inflammation. • IL-10 administration can control the inflammation in SMAR1{sup −/−} mice. • Both Foxp3 and SMAR1 maintain T{sub reg} phenotype that controls colitis.

  4. Repression of BIM mediates survival signaling by MYC and AKT in high-risk T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C; Roderick, J E; LaBelle, J L; Bird, G; Mathieu, R; Bodaar, K; Colon, D; Pyati, U; Stevenson, K E; Qi, J; Harris, M; Silverman, L B; Sallan, S E; Bradner, J E; Neuberg, D S; Look, A T; Walensky, L D; Kelliher, M A; Gutierrez, A

    2014-09-01

    Treatment resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is associated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletions and resultant phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation, as well as MYC overexpression, and these pathways repress mitochondrial apoptosis in established T-lymphoblasts through poorly defined mechanisms. Normal T-cell progenitors are hypersensitive to mitochondrial apoptosis, a phenotype that is dependent on the expression of proapoptotic BIM. In a conditional zebrafish model, MYC downregulation induced BIM expression in T-lymphoblasts, an effect that was blunted by expression of constitutively active AKT. In human T-ALL cell lines and treatment-resistant patient samples, treatment with MYC or PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors each induced BIM upregulation and apoptosis, indicating that BIM is repressed downstream of MYC and PI3K-AKT in high-risk T-ALL. Restoring BIM function in human T-ALL cells using a stapled peptide mimetic of the BIM BH3 domain had therapeutic activity, indicating that BIM repression is required for T-ALL viability. In the zebrafish model, where MYC downregulation induces T-ALL regression via mitochondrial apoptosis, T-ALL persisted despite MYC downregulation in 10% of bim wild-type zebrafish, 18% of bim heterozygotes and in 33% of bim homozygous mutants (P=0.017). We conclude that downregulation of BIM represents a key survival signal downstream of oncogenic MYC and PI3K-AKT signaling in treatment-resistant T-ALL.

  5. Biomarkers of Progression after HIV Acute/Early Infection: Nothing Compares to CD4+ T-cell Count?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Turk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Progression of HIV infection is variable among individuals, and definition disease progression biomarkers is still needed. Here, we aimed to categorize the predictive potential of several variables using feature selection methods and decision trees. A total of seventy-five treatment-naïve subjects were enrolled during acute/early HIV infection. CD4+ T-cell counts (CD4TC and viral load (VL levels were determined at enrollment and for one year. Immune activation, HIV-specific immune response, Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA and C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5 genotypes, and plasma levels of 39 cytokines were determined. Data were analyzed by machine learning and non-parametric methods. Variable hierarchization was performed by Weka correlation-based feature selection and J48 decision tree. Plasma interleukin (IL-10, interferon gamma-induced protein (IP-10, soluble IL-2 receptor alpha (sIL-2Rα and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α levels correlated directly with baseline VL, whereas IL-2, TNF-α, fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1β correlated directly with CD4+ T-cell activation (p < 0.05. However, none of these cytokines had good predictive values to distinguish “progressors” from “non-progressors”. Similarly, immune activation, HIV-specific immune responses and HLA/CCR5 genotypes had low discrimination power. Baseline CD4TC was the most potent discerning variable with a cut-off of 438 cells/μL (accuracy = 0.93, κ-Cohen = 0.85. Limited discerning power of the other factors might be related to frequency, variability and/or sampling time. Future studies based on decision trees to identify biomarkers of post-treatment control are warrantied.

  6. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cui-Ping; Qing, Xi; Wu, Cui-Yun; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Hai-Yan

    2012-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ALL patients, with 18 healthy individuals being selected as controls. The results suggested that 22 patients had B cell ALL (B-ALL) and 13 had T cell ALL (T-ALL) among the 35 ALL patients. In B-ALL patients, the surface antigen CD19 was most commonly expressed; in T-ALL patients, CD7 was most common. Furthermore, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients was higher compared to that of healthy individuals (Pcell culture supernatants from B-ALL and T-ALL patients were higher compared to those in the controls (Pcells, IL-2, IL-10 or TGF-β in B-ALL versus T-ALL patients. The authors concluded that CD19 and CD7 may serve as diagnostic markers of B-ALL and T-ALL, respectively. The increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and the altered levels of secreted cytokines are indicative of an immunosuppressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALL.

  7. Immunoglobulin genes and T-cell receptors as molecular markers in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazić Jelena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL is a malignant clonal disease, one of the most common malignancies in childhood. Contemporary protocols ensure high remission rate and long term free survival. The ability of molecular genetic methods help to establish submicroscopic classification and minimal residual disease (MRD follow up, in major percent responsible for relapse. Objective. The aim of the study was to detect the frequency of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements and their correlation with clinical parameters. Methods. Forty-one children with ALL were enrolled in the study group, with initial diagnosis of IgH and TCR gene rearrangements by polimerase chain reaction ( PCR. MRD follow-up was performed in induction phase when morphological remission was expected, and after intensive chemiotherapy. Results. In the study group IgH rearrangement was detected in 82.9% of children at the diagnosis, while TCR rearrangement was seen in 56.1%. On induction day 33, clonal IgH rearrangements persisted in 39% and TCR rearrangements in 36.5% of children. Conclusion. Molecular analysis of genetic alterations and their correlation with standard prognostic parameters show the importance of risk stratification revision which leads to new therapy intensification approach. MRD stands out as a precise predictive factor for the relapse of disease.

  8. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Y

    2017-03-01

    all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdcem26Il2rgem26Nju (NCG mice transplanted with CEM cells without any obvious decrease in body weight. Further studies on NCG mice model with patient-derived T-ALL cells, dhuVHH6-PE38 treatment, significantly prolonged mice survival with ~40% survival improvement. However, it was also noticed that although dhuVHH6-PE-LR showed strong antitumor effect in vitro, its in vivo antitumor efficacy was disappointing. Conclusion: We have successfully constructed a targeted CD7 molecule-modified nanobody (CD7 molecule-improved nanobody immunotoxin dhuVHH6-PE38 and demonstrated its potential for treating CD7-positive malignant tumors, especially T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Keywords: CD7, humanized nanobody, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, patient-derived xenograft model, recombinant immunotoxins, Pseudomonas exotoxin A

  9. [Change of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK Cells in peripheral blood of children with acute leukemia and its possible significance in tumor immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ze-Lin; Hu, Guan-Yu; Chen, Fu-Xiong; Lu, Hui-Min; Wu, Zi-Liang; Li, Hua-Mei; Wei, Feng-Gui; Guan, Jing-Ming; Wu, Li-Ping

    2010-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the changes of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia children at different stages, the function of immune system and the possible roles of the CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells as well as NK cells in leukemia immunity. The number and proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells were detected by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 53 acute leukemia children, including 25 patients in new diagnosis and 28 patients in continuous complete remission (CCR), and were compared with that of 20 normal children. The results indicated that the mean proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) in CD4(+) T cells of peripheral blood in newly diagnosed patients, patients with CCR and normal children were (9.55 +/- 2.41)%, (8.54 +/- 2.51)% and (6.25 +/- 0.85)% respectively, the mean proportions of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients and patients with CCR were higher than that in normal children, the mean proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients were higher than that in patients with CCR (p cell count in patients with acute leukaemia decreased as compared with normal control, while after achieving CCR, the NK cell count in patients were also less than that in normal control (4.11 +/- 3.87% and 10.41 +/- 7.20% vs 14.06 +/- 5.95%, p regulatory T cells is a simple, reproductive and accurate method, and the CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) T cells can better reflect the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The increase of regulatory T cells and decrease of NK cells in pediatric patients with acute leukemia indicate that the function of NK cells may be depressed. Treg T cells play a role in occurrence and development of leukemia, and are involved in down-regulating NK cell function.

  10. Tracking of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses after an acute resolving viral infection: a study of parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4(+) T...

  11. MEK and PI3K-AKT inhibitors synergistically block activated IL7 receptor signaling in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Canté-Barrett (Kirsten); J.A.P. Spijkers-Hagelstein (J A P); J.G.C.A.M. Buijs-Gladdines (Jessica); J.C.M. Uitdehaag (Joost C. M.); W.K. Smits; J. van der Zwet; R.C. Buijsman; G.J.R. Zaman; R. Pieters (Rob); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe identified mutations in the IL7Ra gene or in genes encoding the downstream signaling molecules JAK1, JAK3, STAT5B, N-RAS, K-RAS, NF1, AKT and PTEN in 49% of patients with pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Strikingly, these mutations (except RAS/NF1) were mutually

  12. Humanized CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins exhibit promising anti-T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Li, Jialu; Zhu, Xuejun; Tang, Xiaowen; Bao, Yangyi; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Yuhui; Tian, Fang; Liu, Xiaomei; Yang, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Nanobodies, named as VHHs (variable domain of heavy chain of HCAb [heavy-chain antibodies]), are derived from heavy-chain-only antibodies that circulate in sera of camelids. Their exceptional physicochemical properties, possibility of humanization, and unique antigen recognition properties make them excellent candidates for targeted delivery of biologically active components, including immunotoxins. In our previous efforts, we have successfully generated the monovalent and bivalent CD7 nanobody-based immunotoxins, which can effectively trigger the apoptosis of CD7-positive malignant cells. To pursue the possibility of translating those immunotoxins into clinics, we humanized the nanobody sequences (designated as dhuVHH6) as well as further truncated the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE)-derived PE38 toxin to produce a more protease-resistant form, which is named as PE-LR, by deleting majority of PE domain II. Three new types of immunotoxins, dhuVHH6-PE38, dVHH6-PE-LR, and dhuVHH6-PE-LR, were successfully constructed. These recombinant immunotoxins were expressed in Escherichia coli and showed that nanobody immunotoxins have the benefits of easy soluble expression in a prokaryotic expression system. Flow cytometry results revealed that all immunotoxins still maintained the ability to bind specifically to CD7-positive T lymphocyte strains without binding to CD7-negative control cells. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed that these proteins can be endocytosed into the cytoplasm after binding with CD7-positive cells and that this phenomenon was not observed in CD7-negative cells. WST-8 experiments showed that all immunotoxins retained the highly effective and specific growth inhibition activity in CD7-positive cell lines and primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Further in vivo animal model experiments showed that humanized dhuVHH6-PE38 immunotoxin can tolerate higher doses and extend the survival of NOD-Prkdc em26 Il2rg em26 Nju (NCG) mice

  13. Altered T-cell entry and egress in the absence of Coronin 1A attenuates murine acute graft versus host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, LeShara M; Taylor, Nicholas A; Coghill, James M; West, Michelle L; Föger, Niko; Bear, James E; Baldwin, Albert S; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Serody, Jonathan S

    2014-06-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) is a major limitation to the use of allogeneic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of patients with relapsed malignant disease. Previous work using animals lacking secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT) suggested that activation of donor T cells in SLT is critically important for the pathogenesis of aGvHD. However, these studies did not determine if impaired migration into, and more importantly, out of SLT, would ameliorate aGvHD. Here, we show that T cells from mice lacking Coronin 1A (Coro 1A(-/-)), an actin-associated protein shown to be important for thymocyte egress, do not mediate acute GvHD. The attenuation of aGvHD was associated with decreased expression of the critical trafficking proteins C-C chemokines receptor type 7 (CCR7) and sphingosine 1 phosphate receptor on donor T cells. This was mediated in part by impaired activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway in the absence of Coro 1A. As a result of these alterations, donor T cells from Coro 1A(-/-) mice were not able to initially traffic to SLT or exit SLT after BM transplantation. However, this alteration did not abrogate the graft-versus-leukemia response. Our data suggest that blocking T-cell migration into and out of SLT is a valid approach to prevent aGvHD. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. CD19-Targeted CAR T Cells as Novel Cancer Immunotherapy for Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Davila, Marco L.; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has demonstrated significant potential for the treatment of patients with chemotherapy-resistant hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. One type of immunotherapy involves the adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to target a tumor. These hybrid proteins are composed of the antigen-binding domains of an antibody fused to T-cell receptor signaling machinery. CAR T cells that target CD19 recently have made the ju...

  15. Lenalidomide-based maintenance therapy reduces TNF receptor 2 on CD4 T cells and enhances immune effector function in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Madondo, Mutsa; Kong, Ying Ying; Tan, Peter; Wei, Andrew; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-08-01

    A major limitation to improved outcomes in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is relapse resulting from leukemic cells that persist at clinical remission. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are increased in AML patients, can contribute to immune evasion by residual leukemic cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine present at high levels within patients, can induce TNF receptor-2 (TNFR2) expression on Tregs. We hypothesized that since TNFR2 is required for Treg stabilization and TNFR2+ Tregs are potent suppressors, targeting TNFR2+ Tregs may restore the effectiveness of immune-surveillance mechanisms. In this pilot study, we report AML patients in clinical remission have substantially increased levels of TNFR2+ T cells, including TNFR2+ Tregs and impaired effector CD4 T cell function with reduced IL-2 and IFNγ production. The immunomodulatory drug, lenalidomide, and the demethylating agent, azacitidine have been moderately successful in treating AML patients, but their combined effects on TNFR2+ T cells, including Tregs are currently unknown. Our data indicates that although treatment with lenalidomide and azacitidine increased cytokine production by effector T cells in all patients, durable clinical remissions may be observed in patients with a concomitant reduction in TNFR2+ T cells and TNFR2+ Tregs. In vitro studies further demonstrated that lenalidomide can reduce TNFR2 expression and can augment effector cytokine production by T cells, which can be further enhanced by azacitidine. These results indicate that reduction of TNFR2+ T cells in AML postremission phase may result from combined azacitidine/lenalidomide therapy and may contribute to an improved clinical outcome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The common oncogenomic program of NOTCH1 and NOTCH3 signaling in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hee Choi

    Full Text Available Notch is a major oncogenic driver in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL, in part because it binds to an enhancer that increases expression of MYC. Here, we exploit the capacity of activated NOTCH1 and NOTCH3 to induce T-ALL, despite substantial divergence in their intracellular regions, as a means to elucidate a broad, common Notch-dependent oncogenomic program through systematic comparison of the transcriptomes and Notch-bound genomic regulatory elements of NOTCH1- and NOTCH3-dependent T-ALL cells. ChIP-seq studies show a high concordance of functional NOTCH1 and NOTCH3 genomic binding sites that are enriched in binding motifs for RBPJ, the transcription factor that recruits activated Notch to DNA. The interchangeability of NOTCH1 and NOTCH3 was confirmed by rescue of NOTCH1-dependent T-ALL cells with activated NOTCH3 and vice versa. Despite remarkable overall similarity, there are nuanced differences in chromatin landscapes near critical common Notch target genes, most notably at a Notch-dependent enhancer that regulates MYC, which correlates with responsiveness to Notch pathway inhibitors. Overall, a common oncogenomic program driven by binding of either Notch is sufficient to maintain T-ALL cell growth, whereas cell-context specific differences appear to influence the response of T-ALL cells to Notch inhibition.

  17. FBXW7 regulates glucocorticoid response in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia by targeting the glucocorticoid receptor for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyukova, A; Brown, S; Papa, R; O'Brien, R; Giles, J; Trahair, T N; Dalla Pozza, L; Sutton, R; Liu, T; Haber, M; Norris, M D; Lock, R B; Sangfelt, O; Marshall, G M

    2013-04-01

    Loss of function mutation in FBXW7, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is associated with good prognosis and early glucocorticoid treatment response in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that FBXW7 targets the glucocorticoid receptor α (GRα) for ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in a manner dependent on glycogen synthase kinase 3 β-mediated phsophorylation. FBXW7 inactivation caused elevated GRα levels, and enhanced the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. There was significant enhancement of GR transcriptional responses in FBXW7-deficient cell lines and primary T-ALL samples, in particular, for those pro-apoptotic regulatory proteins, BIM and PUMA. Reduced FBXW7 expression or function promoted glucocorticoid sensitivity, but not sensitivity to other chemotherapeutic agents used in T-ALL. Moreover, this was a general feature of different cancer cell types. Taken together, our work defines GRα as a novel FBXW7 substrate and demonstrates that favorable patient prognosis in T-ALL is associated with FBXW7 mutations due to enhanced GRα levels and steroid sensitivity. These findings suggest that inactivation of FBXW7, a putative tumor suppressor protein, may create a synthetic lethal state in the presence of specific anticancer therapies.

  18. Corruption of dendritic cell antigen presentation during acute GVHD leads to regulatory T-cell failure and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Koyama, Motoko; Le Texier, Laetitia; Markey, Kate A; Cheong, Melody; Kuns, Rachel D; Lineburg, Katie E; Teal, Bianca E; Alexander, Kylie A; Clouston, Andrew D; Blazar, Bruce R; Hill, Geoffrey R; MacDonald, Kelli P A

    2016-08-11

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major cause of late mortality following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and is characterized by tissue fibrosis manifesting as scleroderma and bronchiolitis obliterans. The development of acute GVHD (aGVHD) is a powerful clinical predictor of subsequent cGVHD, suggesting that aGVHD may invoke the immunologic pathways responsible for cGVHD. In preclinical models in which sclerodermatous cGVHD develops after a preceding period of mild aGVHD, we show that antigen presentation within major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II of donor dendritic cells (DCs) is markedly impaired early after BMT. This is associated with a failure of regulatory T-cell (Treg) homeostasis and cGVHD. Donor DC-restricted deletion of MHC class II phenocopied this Treg deficiency and cGVHD. Moreover, specific depletion of donor Tregs after BMT also induced cGVHD, whereas adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated it. These data demonstrate that the defect in Treg homeostasis seen in cGVHD is a causative lesion and is downstream of defective antigen presentation within MHC class II that is induced by aGVHD. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Plumbagin exerts an immunosuppressive effect on human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yura [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soon Ae [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiyeon, E-mail: yeon@eulji.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Laboratory Science, Daejeon 34824 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-22

    Of the hematological disorders typified by poor prognoses and survival rates, T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is one of the most commonly diagnosed. Despite the development of new therapeutic agents, the treatment options for this cancer remain limited. In this manuscript, we investigated the anti-proliferative effects of plumbagin, mediated by the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and inhibition of NF-κB signaling; the human T-ALL MOLT-4 cell line was used as our experimental system. Plumbagin is a natural, plant derived compound, which exerts an anti-proliferative activity against many types of human cancer. Our experiments confirm that plumbagin induces a caspase-dependent apoptosis of MOLT-4 cells, with no significant cytotoxicity seen for normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Plumbagin also inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p65, and the transcription of NF-κB target genes. Our results now show that plumbagin is a potent inhibitor of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and suppressor of T-ALL cell proliferation. - Highlights: • Plumbagin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in T-ALL MOLT-4 cells. • Plumbagin activates phosphorylation of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) JNK and p38. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated NF-κB signaling cascade. • Plumbagin inhibits LPS-mediated transcriptional activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  20. Active Maintenance of T Cell Memory in Acute and Chronic Viral Infection Depends on Continuous Expression of FOXO1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. Utzschneider

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Immunity following an acutely resolved infection or the long-term equipoise of chronic viral infections often depends on the maintenance of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, yet the ongoing transcriptional requirements of these cells remain unclear. We show that active and continuous programming by FOXO1 is required for the functional maintenance of a memory population. Upon Foxo1 deletion following resolution of an infection, memory cells rapidly lost their characteristic gene expression, gradually declined in number, and were impaired in self-renewal. This was extended to chronic infections, as a loss of FOXO1 during a persistent viral infection led to a rapid decline of the TCF7 (a.k.a. TCF1-expressing memory-like subset of CD8+ T cells. We further establish FOXO1 regulation as a characteristic of human memory CD8+ T cells. Overall, we show that the molecular and functional longevity of a memory T cell population is actively maintained by the transcription factor FOXO1. : Utzschneider et al. find that hallmarks of CD8+ T cell memory such as longevity, self-renewal, and the ability to cycle between quiescence and cell division depend on continued expression of FOXO1. Loss of FOXO1 during any of these stages leads to the interruption of T cell memory. Keywords: immune memory, homeostatic proliferation, self-renewal, quiescence, cell survival, T cells, FOXO, TCF1/TCF7, chronic infection, LCMV

  1. Identification of Predictive Biomarkers for Cytokine Release Syndrome after Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T.; Lacey, Simon F.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Pequignot, Edward; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Chen, Fang; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Barrett, David M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Berg, Robert A.; Aplenc, Richard; Callahan, Colleen; Rheingold, Susan R.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Rose-John, Stefan; White, Jason C.; Nazimuddin, Farzana; Wertheim, Gerald; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells with anti-CD19 specificity are a highly effective novel immune therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is the most significant and life-threatening toxicity. To improve understanding of CRS, we measured cytokines and clinical biomarkers in 51 CTL019-treated patients. Peak levels of 24 cytokines, including IFNγ, IL6, sgp130, and sIL6R in the first month after infusion were highly associated with severe CRS. Using regression modeling, we could accurately predict which patients would develop severe CRS with a signature composed of three cytokines. Results validated in an independent cohort. Changes in serum biochemical markers, including C-reactive protein and ferritin, were associated with CRS but failed to predict development of severe CRS. These comprehensive profiling data provide novel insights into CRS biology, and importantly represent the first data that can accurately predict which patients have a high probability of becoming critically ill. PMID:27076371

  2. Helios expression in regulatory T cells promotes immunosuppression, angiogenesis and the growth of leukemia cells in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Li, Dong; Huang, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Panpan; Shi, Qing; Zhang, Bing; Ju, Xiuli

    2018-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) characterized by the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) are crucial for maintaining immune tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, FoxP3 does not function alone and Helios is considered a potential candidate for defining Treg subsets. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of Helios for identifying Tregs in childhood precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL). Our results demonstrated that patients with pre-B ALL had a higher percentage of Helios + FoxP3 + CD4 + Tregs. And there was a positive correlation between the expression of Helios and the suppressive function of Tregs, the risk gradation of ALL. Helios in combination with CD4 and FoxP3 may be an effective way to detect functional Tregs in pre-B ALL by promoting the secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Furthermore, Helios + Tregs could regulate angiogenesis in the BM niche of pre-B ALL via the VEGFA/VEGFR2 pathway. We also found Helios + Tregs decreased apoptosis rate of nalm-6 cells by up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptosis protein Bcl-2. In summary, these data strongly imply the physiological importance of Helios expression in Tregs, and suggest that the manipulation of Helios may serve as a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitivity and resistance towards isoliquiritigenin, doxorubicin and methotrexate in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell lines by pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youns, Mahmoud; Fu, Yu-Jie; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Kramer, Anne; Konkimalla, V Badireenath; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Sültmann, Holger; Efferth, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    The development of drug resistance in cancer cells necessitates the identification of novel agents with improved activity towards cancer cells. In the present investigation, we compared the cytotoxicity of the chalcone flavonoide, isoliquiritigenin (ISL), with that of doxorubicin (DOX) and methotrexate (MTX) in five T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cell lines (Jurkat, J-Jhan, J16, HUT78 and Karpas 45). To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms which determine the response of T-ALL cells towards ISL, DOX and MTX, we applied array-based matrix comparative genomic hybridisation and microarray-based mRNA expression profiling and compared the genomic and transcriptomic profiles of the cell lines with their 50% inhibition (IC(50)) values for these three drugs. The IC(50) values for ISL did not correlate with those for DOX or MTX, indicating that ISL was still active in DOX- or MTX-unresponsive cell lines. Likewise, the genomic imbalances of chromosomal clones and mRNA expression profile significantly correlating with IC(50) values for ISL were different from thoses correlating with IC(50) values for DOX and MTX. In conclusion, ISL represents a cytotoxic natural product with activity towards T-ALL cell lines. There was no cross-resistance between ISL and DOX or MTX, and the genomic and transcriptomic profiles pointed to different molecular modes of action of ISL as compared to DOX and MTX, indicating that ISL may be a valuable adjunct for cancer therapy to treat otherwise drug-resistant tumours.

  4. Conditional ligands for Asian HLA variants facilitate the definition of CD8+ T-cell responses in acute and chronic viral diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Cynthia X L; Tan, Anthony T; Or, Ming Yan

    2013-01-01

    exchange was accomplished for all variants as demonstrated by an ELISA-based MHC stability assay. HLA tetramers with redirected specificity could detect antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses against human cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B (HBV), dengue virus (DENV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections....... The potential of this population-centric HLA library was demonstrated with the characterization of seven novel T-cell epitopes from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, HBV, and DENV. Posthoc analysis revealed that the majority of responses would be more readily identified by our unbiased discovery...

  5. MicroRNA-193b-3p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting the MYB oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mets, E; Van der Meulen, J; Van Peer, G; Boice, M; Mestdagh, P; Van de Walle, I; Lammens, T; Goossens, S; De Moerloose, B; Benoit, Y; Van Roy, N; Clappier, E; Poppe, B; Vandesompele, J; Wendel, H-G

    2014-01-01

    The MYB oncogene is a leucine zipper transcription factor essential for normal and malignant hematopoiesis. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), elevated MYB levels can arise directly through T-cell receptor-mediated MYB translocations, genomic MYB duplications or enhanced TAL1 complex binding at the MYB locus or indirectly through the TAL1/miR-223/FBXW7 regulatory axis. In this study, we used an unbiased MYB 3′untranslated region–microRNA (miRNA) library screen and identified 33 p...

  6. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. “Haploidentical expert” centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes (“haploidentical regular”, “haploidentical expert” and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; Ptransplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  7. MicroRNA-193b-3p acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting the MYB oncogene in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, E; Van der Meulen, J; Van Peer, G; Boice, M; Mestdagh, P; Van de Walle, I; Lammens, T; Goossens, S; De Moerloose, B; Benoit, Y; Van Roy, N; Clappier, E; Poppe, B; Vandesompele, J; Wendel, H-G; Taghon, T; Rondou, P; Soulier, J; Van Vlierberghe, P; Speleman, F

    2015-04-01

    The MYB oncogene is a leucine zipper transcription factor essential for normal and malignant hematopoiesis. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), elevated MYB levels can arise directly through T-cell receptor-mediated MYB translocations, genomic MYB duplications or enhanced TAL1 complex binding at the MYB locus or indirectly through the TAL1/miR-223/FBXW7 regulatory axis. In this study, we used an unbiased MYB 3'untranslated region-microRNA (miRNA) library screen and identified 33 putative MYB-targeting miRNAs. Subsequently, transcriptome data from two independent T-ALL cohorts and different subsets of normal T-cells were used to select miRNAs with relevance in the context of normal and malignant T-cell transformation. Hereby, miR-193b-3p was identified as a novel bona fide tumor-suppressor miRNA that targets MYB during malignant T-cell transformation thereby offering an entry point for efficient MYB targeting-oriented therapies for human T-ALL.

  8. Interleukin-7 receptor-α gene mutations are not detected in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozovski, Uri; Li, Ping; Harris, David; Ohanian, Maro; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in cancer cell genes are classified according to their functional significance. Those that provide the malignant cells with significant advantage are collectively referred to as driver mutations and those that do not, are the passenger mutations. Accordingly, analytical criteria to distinguish driver mutations from passenger mutations have been recently suggested. Recent studies revealed mutations in interleukin-7 receptor-α (IL7R) gene in 10% of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients and in only a few cases of pediatric B-ALL. IL7R mutations are also frequently found in patients with lung cancer, but whereas in pediatric T-ALL IL7R mutations are “drivers” (consisting of gain-of-function mutations within a narrow 50-base pair interval at exon 6 that confer cytokine-independent cell growth and promote tumor transformation), in lung cancer, mutations are substitution mutations randomly distributed across the gene and are probably only “passenger” events. Because the treatment response of adult T-ALL is significantly poorer than that of childhood T-ALL and because exon 6 IL7R mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood T-ALL, we sought to determine how the pattern of IL7R mutations varies between adult and childhood T-ALL. To that end, we sequenced the 50-base pair interval in exon 6 of the IL7R of DNA obtained from bone marrow samples of 35 randomly selected adult patients with T-ALL. Our analysis revealed that none of these 35 samples carried an IL7R mutation in exon 6. Whether differences in the genetic makeup of adult and childhood T-ALL explain the differential response to therapy remains to be determined

  9. CCL22-specific T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinenaite, Evelina; Munir Ahmad, Shamaila; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating macrophages produce the chemokine CCL22, which attracts regulatory T cells (Tregs) into the tumor microenvironment, decreasing anticancer immunity. Here, we investigated the possibility of targeting CCL22-expressing cells by activating specific T cells. We...... analyzed the CCL22 protein signal sequence, identifying a human leukocyte antigen A2- (HLA-A2-) restricted peptide epitope, which we then used to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBCs) to expand populations of CCL22-specific T cells in vitro. T cells recognizing an epitope derived from...... the signal-peptide of CCL22 will recognize CCL22-expressing cells even though CCL22 is secreted out of the cell. CCL22-specific T cells recognized and killed CCL22-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, CCL22-specific T cells lysed acute monocytic leukemia cells in a CCL22 expression-dependent manner. Using...

  10. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias: rare T-cell receptor gene rearrangements are associated with poor outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karrman, Kristina; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Clinical characteristics and cytogenetic aberrations were ascertained and reviewed in a population-based consecutive series of 285 pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) diagnosed between 1992 and 2006 in the Nordic countries. Informative karyotypic results were obtained in 249 (87......%) cases, of which 119 (48%) were cytogenetically abnormal. Most (62%) of the aberrant T-ALLs were pseudodiploid. Structural changes were more common than numerical ones; 86% displayed at least one structural abnormality and 41% at least one numerical anomaly. The most frequent abnormalities were T....... In a multivariate analysis, two factors affected negatively the EFS, namely a WBC count of > or =200 x 10(9)/l (P cytogenetic findings were not associated...

  11. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Minagawa

    Full Text Available Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85-90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a non

  12. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Kentaro; Jamil, Muhammad O; Al-Obaidi, Mustafa; Pereboeva, Larisa; Salzman, Donna; Erba, Harry P; Lamb, Lawrence S; Bhatia, Ravi; Mineishi, Shin; Di Stasi, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia. We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85-90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean) chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a non-therapeutic dimerizer to

  13. Vγ4+γδT Cells Aggravate Severe H1N1 Influenza Virus Infection-Induced Acute Pulmonary Immunopathological Injury via Secreting Interleukin-17A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxue Xue

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 virus remains a critical global health concern and causes high levels of morbidity and mortality. Severe acute lung injury (ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS are the major outcomes among severely infected patients. Our previous study found that interleukin (IL-17A production by humans or mice infected with influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 substantially contributes to ALI and subsequent morbidity and mortality. However, the cell types responsible for IL-17A production during the early stage of severe influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 infection remained unknown. In this study, a mouse model of severe influenza A (H1N1 pdm09 infection was established. Our results show that, in the lungs of infected mice, the percentage of γδT cells, but not the percentages of CD4+Th and CD8+Tc cells, gradually increased and peaked at 3 days post-infection (dpi. Further analysis revealed that the Vγ4+γδT subset, but not the Vγ1+γδT subset, was significantly increased among the γδT cells. At 3 dpi, the virus induced significant increases in IL-17A in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum. IL-17A was predominantly secreted by γδT cells (especially the Vγ4+γδT subset, but not CD4+Th and CD8+Tc cells at the early stage of infection, and IL-1β and/or IL-23 were sufficient to induce IL-17A production by γδT cells. In addition to secreting IL-17A, γδT cells secreted interferon (IFN-γ and expressed both an activation-associated molecule, natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D, and an apoptosis-associated molecule, FasL. Depletion of γδT cells or the Vγ4+γδT subset significantly rescued the virus-induced weight loss and improved the survival rate by decreasing IL-17A secretion and reducing immunopathological injury. This study demonstrated that, by secreting IL-17A, lung Vγ4+γδT cells, at least, in part mediated influenza A (H1N1 pdm09-induced immunopathological injury. This mechanism might serve as a

  14. CD19 CAR-targeted T cells induce long-term remission and B Cell Aplasia in an immunocompetent mouse model of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco L Davila

    Full Text Available Although many adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL are induced into remission, most will relapse, underscoring the dire need for novel therapies for this disease. We developed murine CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs and an immunocompetent mouse model of B-ALL that recapitulates the disease at genetic, cellular, and pathologic levels. Mouse T cells transduced with an all-murine CD3ζ/CD28-based CAR that is equivalent to the one being used in our clinical trials, eradicate B-ALL in mice and mediate long-term B cell aplasias. In this model, we find that increasing conditioning chemotherapy increases tumor eradication, B cell aplasia, and CAR-modified T cell persistence. Quantification of recipient B lineage cells allowed us to estimate an in vivo effector to endogenous target ratio for B cell aplasia maintenance. In mice exhibiting a dramatic B cell reduction we identified a small population of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow that may serve as a reservoir for long-term CAR-modified T cell stimulation. Lastly, we determine that infusion of CD8+ CAR-modified T cells alone is sufficient to maintain long-term B cell eradication. The mouse model we report here should prove valuable for investigating CAR-based and other therapies for adult B-ALL.

  15. Program death-1 signaling and regulatory T cells collaborate to resist the function of adoptively transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes in advanced acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J; Riddle, Megan; Sharpe, Arlene H; Vallera, Daniel A; Azuma, Miyuki; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Murphy, William J; Munn, David H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2010-10-07

    Tumor-induced immune defects can weaken host immune response and permit tumor cell growth. In a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML), tumor progression resulted in increased regulatory T cells (Treg) and elevation of program death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) at the tumor site. PD-1 knockout mice were more resistant to AML despite the presence of similar percentage of Tregs compared with wild type. In vitro, intact Treg suppression of CD8(+) T-cell responses was dependent on PD-1 expression by T cells and Tregs and PD-L1 expression by antigen-presenting cells. In vivo, the function of adoptively transferred AML-reactive CTLs was reduced by AML-associated Tregs. Anti-PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment increased the proliferation and function of CTLs at tumor sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors. Treg depletion followed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade showed superior efficacy for eradication of established AML. These data demonstrated that interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can facilitate Treg-induced suppression of T-effector cells and dampen the antitumor immune response. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade coupled with Treg depletion represents an important new approach that can be readily translated into the clinic to improve the therapeutic efficacy of adoptive AML-reactive CTLs in advanced AML disease.

  16. Co-infusion of haplo-identical CD19-chimeric antigen receptor T cells and stem cells achieved full donor engraftment in refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have poor prognosis. Autologous CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T cells have potentials to cure patients with B cell ALL; however, safety and efficacy of allogeneic CD19 CAR-T cells are still undetermined. Case presentation We treated a 71-year-old female with relapsed and refractory ALL who received co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CD19-directed CAR-T cells and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC following induction chemotherapy. Undetectable minimal residual disease by flow cytometry was achieved, and full donor cell engraftment was established. The transient release of cytokines and mild fever were detected. Significantly elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, bilirubin and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase were observed from days 14 to 18, all of which were reversible after immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest that co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CAR-T cells and mobilized PBSCs may induce full donor engraftment in relapsed and refractory ALL including elderly patients, but complications related to donor cell infusions should still be cautioned. Trial registration Allogeneic CART-19 for Elderly Relapsed/Refractory CD19+ ALL. NCT02799550

  17. CD19 CAR-T cell therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia: factors affecting toxicities and long-term efficacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2018-03-15

    The prognosis of adults with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains dismal even at this day and age. With salvage chemotherapy, only 29% (range 18 to 44%) of the patients with R/R ALL can be induced into complete remission (CR), with a median overall survival (OS) of 4 months (range 2-6 months). Blinatumomab and inotuzumab ozogamycin (IO) are immunotherapeutic agents that increased CR to 80% and extended survival to 7.7 months in this high-risk population of patients. In the last few years, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)--engineered T cells have led to major progress in cancer immunotherapy. CD-19 CAR-T cells have been recently approved for high-risk R/R ALL and lymphoma. The data from long-term follow-up of a single-center phase I study of 19-28z CAR-T cell therapy for adult R/R ALL were just published. At the same time, a multicenter phase II study of 19-41BB CAR-T cell therapy for children and young adults with R/R B cell ALL was also published. The two studies provided fresh information with long-term follow-up. This research highlight analyzed the data and proposed future perspectives for further investigation in this rapidly evolving field.

  18. Notch1 is required for hypoxia-induced proliferation, invasion and chemoresistance of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Jie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Notch1 is a potent regulator known to play an oncogenic role in many malignancies including T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. Tumor hypoxia and increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α activity can act as major stimuli for tumor aggressiveness and progression. Although hypoxia-mediated activation of the Notch1 pathway plays an important role in tumor cell survival and invasiveness, the interaction between HIF-1α and Notch1 has not yet been identified in T-ALL. This study was designed to investigate whether hypoxia activates Notch1 signalling through HIF-1α stabilization and to determine the contribution of hypoxia and HIF-1α to proliferation, invasion and chemoresistance in T-ALL. Methods T-ALL cell lines (Jurkat, Sup-T1 transfected with HIF-1α or Notch1 small interference RNA (siRNA were incubated in normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Their potential for proliferation and invasion was measured by WST-8 and transwell assays. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis and assess cell cycle regulation. Expression and regulation of components of the HIF-1α and Notch1 pathways and of genes related to proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR or Western blot. Results Hypoxia potentiated Notch1 signalling via stabilization and activation of the transcription factor HIF-1α. Hypoxia/HIF-1α-activated Notch1 signalling altered expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and accelerated cell proliferation. Hypoxia-induced Notch1 activation increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2 and MMP9, which increased invasiveness. Of greater clinical significance, knockdown of Notch1 prevented the protective effect of hypoxia/HIF-1α against dexamethasone-induced apoptosis. This sensitization correlated with losing the effect of hypoxia/HIF-1α on Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL expression. Conclusions Notch1 signalling is required for hypoxia/HIF-1α-induced proliferation

  19. Prediction of outcomes by early treatment responses in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a retrospective study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Chen, Xiaojuan; Zou, Yao; Chang, Lixian; An, Wenbin; Wan, Yang; Liu, Tianfeng; Yang, Wenyu; Chen, Yumei; Guo, Ye; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2015-07-15

    Early treatment responses are important prognostic factors in childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. The predictive values of early treatment responses in Chinese childhood T-ALL patients were still unknown. From January 2003 to December 2012, 74 consecutive patients aged ≤ 15 years with newly diagnosed T-ALL were treated with BCH-2003 protocol or CCLG-2008 protocol in the Department of Pediatric, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital in China. Predictive values of early treatment responses, including prednisone response, bone marrow morphology at day 15 and day 33 during induction chemotherapy, and minimal residual disease (MRD) monitored by flow cytometry after induction therapy (time point 1, TP1) and before consolidation therapy (time point 2, TP2), were analyzed. The 5-year event free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates for these patients were 62.5% (SE, 6.4) and 62.7% (SE, 6.6), respectively. Prednisone poor responder was strongly associated with increased chance of induction failure (14.8%) and decreased survival rate (5 year EFS rate, 51.1 % (SE, 10.5)). Patients with ≥ 25% blast cells in bone marrow at day 15 were more likely to have an inferior outcome. 93.2% of the T-ALL patients achieved complete remission at day 33 while patients with resistant disease all died of disease progression. MRD ≥ 10(-2) at TP1 or MRD ≥ 10(-3) at TP2 was significantly related to dismal prognosis. Risk groups classified by MRD at two time points could stratify patients into different groups: 29.0% of the patients were MRD standard risk (MRD time points) with 3-year EFS rate of 100%, 29.0% were MRD high risk (MRD ≥ 10(-2) at TP1 or MRD ≥ 10(-2) at TP2) with 3-year EFS rate of 55.6% (SE, 16.6) , and the rest of patients were defined as MRD intermediate risk with 3-year EFS rate of 85.7% (SE, 13.2). Our study demonstrated that MRD was the most powerful predictor of treatment outcome in childhood T-ALL patients and

  20. Prenatal stress induces up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptors on lymphoid cells modifying the T-cell response after acute stress exposure in the adult life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascuan, Cecilia Gabriela; Rubinstein, Mara Roxana; Palumbo, María Laura; Genaro, Ana María

    2014-04-10

    It has been demonstrated that a short-duration stress (acute stress) may result in immunopreparatory or immunoenhancing physiological conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exposure to prenatal restraint stress (PRS) influences the impact of acute stress on the T-cell response in the adult life. We found that female mice exposed to PRS (PS mice) did not exhibit changes in the T-cell-dependent IgG antibody production with respect to prenatally non-stressed mice (no-PS mice). However, no-PS mice exposed to acute stress showed an increase of antibody production after antigen stimulation. In contrast, PS mice exhibited a decreased response after an acute situation. Spleen catecholamines and plasma corticosterone levels were increased in acute stress in both PS and no-PS mice. Nevertheless, lymphocyte response to hormones was altered in PS mice. Particularly, inhibitory effect of corticosterone was higher on lymphocytes from PS mice. In addition, an increase in protein levels and mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor was found in lymphoid cells from PS mice. These results show that prenatal stress alters the immune intrinsic regulatory mechanism that in turn induces an increased vulnerability to any stressful situation able to modify immune homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. T cell activation and proliferation following acute exercise in human subjects is altered by storage conditions and mitogen selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlik, Jacob A; Deckert, Jake A; Benedict, Stephen H; Bhatta, Anuja; Dunbar, Amanda J; Vardiman, John P; Gallagher, Philip M

    2017-07-01

    Recent work investigating exercise induced changes in immunocompetence suggests that some of the ambiguity in the literature is resultant from different cell isolation protocols and mitogen selection. To understand this effect, we compared post-exercise measures of T cell activation and proliferation using two different stimulation methods (costimulation through CD28 or stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin [PHA]). Further, we investigated whether exercise induced changes are maintained when T cell isolation from whole blood is delayed overnight in either a room temperature or chilled (4°C) environment. As expected, an increased proliferation response was observed post-exercise in T cells isolated from whole blood of previously trained individuals immediately after blood collection. Also, cells stimulated with PHA after resting overnight in whole blood were not adversely impacted by the storage conditions. In contrast, allowing cells to rest overnight in whole blood prior to stimulation through CD28, lessened the proliferation observed by cells following exercise rendering both the room temperature and chilled samples closer to the results seen in the control condition. Changes in early markers of activation (CD25), followed a similar pattern, with activation in PHA stimulated cells remaining fairly robust after overnight storage; whereas cell activation following stimulation through CD3+CD28 was disproportionately decreased by the influence of overnight storage. These findings indicate that decisions regarding cell stimulation methods need to be paired with the timeline for T cell isolation from whole blood. These considerations will be especially important for field based studies of immunocompetence where there is a delay in getting whole blood samples to a lab for processing as well as clinical applications where a failure to isolate T cells in a timely manner may result in loss of the response of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A temporal role of type I interferon signaling in CD8+ T cell maturation during acute West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia K Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A genetic absence of the common IFN-α/β signaling receptor (IFNAR in mice is associated with enhanced viral replication and altered adaptive immune responses. However, analysis of IFNAR(-/- mice is limited for studying the functions of type I IFN at discrete stages of viral infection. To define the temporal functions of type I IFN signaling in the context of infection by West Nile virus (WNV, we treated mice with MAR1-5A3, a neutralizing, non cell-depleting anti-IFNAR antibody. Inhibition of type I IFN signaling at or before day 2 after infection was associated with markedly enhanced viral burden, whereas treatment at day 4 had substantially less effect on WNV dissemination. While antibody treatment prior to infection resulted in massive expansion of virus-specific CD8(+ T cells, blockade of type I IFN signaling starting at day 4 induced dysfunctional CD8(+ T cells with depressed cytokine responses and expression of phenotypic markers suggesting exhaustion. Thus, only the later maturation phase of anti-WNV CD8(+ T cell development requires type I IFN signaling. WNV infection experiments in BATF3(-/- mice, which lack CD8-α dendritic cells and have impaired priming due to inefficient antigen cross-presentation, revealed a similar effect of blocking IFN signaling on CD8(+ T cell maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that cell non-autonomous type I IFN signaling shapes maturation of antiviral CD8(+ T cell response at a stage distinct from the initial priming event.

  3. Effector/memory T cells of the weanling mouse exhibit Type 2 cytokine polarization in vitro and in vivo in the advanced stages of acute energy deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevels, Tessa A M; Hillyer, Lyn M; Monk, Jennifer M; Fisher, Megan E; Woodward, Bill D

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the polarizing cytokine profile of the effector/memory T-cell compartment reflects the profound decline of cell-mediated inflammatory competence that characterizes acute prepubescent malnutrition. Weanling C57BL/6J mice were permitted free access to a complete purified diet, free access to an isocaloric low-protein diet or restricted intake of the complete diet for 14 days. First, interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma concentrations generated in vitro by splenic and nodal effector/memory T cells were assessed following exposure to plate-bound anti-CD3. Second, net systemic production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by the effector/memory T-cell compartment was assessed by the in vivo cytokine capture assay following anti-CD3 stimulation. In vitro stimulation generated less IFN-gamma (P=.002) but more IL-4 (P=.05) by T cells from the restricted-intake group relative to the age-matched control group. Similarly, in vivo stimulation generated low serum levels of antibody-captured IFN-gamma in the restricted-intake group vis-à-vis the age-matched control group (P=.01), while the IL-4 response was sustained (P=.39). By contrast, the 14-day low-protein model exhibited no change in T-cell cytokine signature either in vitro or in vivo. However, following extended consumption of the low-protein diet (26 days), carcass energy losses exceeded those of the 14-day protocol and serum levels of in vivo antibody-captured IFN-gamma were low after anti-CD3 challenge relative to the age-matched control group (P=.02), while levels of captured IL-4 remained unaffected (P=.07). Acute weanling malnutrition elicits a Type 2 polarizing cytokine character on the part of the effector/memory T-cell compartment, but only in the most advanced stages of energy decrement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca 2+ response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia

  5. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Zheng, Guoguang, E-mail: zhengggtjchn@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Center for Stem Cell Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  6. Regulatory T cells are strong promoters of acute ischemic stroke in mice by inducing dysfunction of the cerebral microvasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Kraft, Peter; Dreykluft, Angela; Hagedorn, Ina; Göbel, Kerstin; Schuhmann, Michael K; Langhauser, Friederike; Helluy, Xavier; Schwarz, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Mayer, Christian T; Brede, Marc; Varallyay, Csanad; Pham, Mirko; Bendszus, Martin; Jakob, Peter; Magnus, Tim; Meuth, Sven G; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Zernecke, Alma; Sparwasser, Tim; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stoll, Guido; Wiendl, Heinz

    2013-01-24

    We have recently identified T cells as important mediators of ischemic brain damage, but the contribution of the different T-cell subsets is unclear. Forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generally regarded as prototypic anti-inflammatory cells that maintain immune tolerance and counteract tissue damage in a variety of immune-mediated disorders. In the present study, we examined the role of Tregs after experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. Selective depletion of Tregs in the DEREG mouse model dramatically reduced infarct size and improved neurologic function 24 hours after stroke and this protective effect was preserved at later stages of infarct development. The specificity of this detrimental Treg effect was confirmed by adoptive transfer experiments in wild-type mice and in Rag1(-/-) mice lacking lymphocytes. Mechanistically, Tregs induced microvascular dysfunction in vivo by increased interaction with the ischemic brain endothelium via the LFA-1/ICAM-1 pathway and platelets and these findings were confirmed in vitro. Ablation of Tregs reduced microvascular thrombus formation and improved cerebral reperfusion on stroke, as revealed by ultra-high-field magnetic resonance imaging at 17.6 Tesla. In contrast, established immunoregulatory characteristics of Tregs had no functional relevance. We define herein a novel and unexpected role of Tregs in a primary nonimmunologic disease state.

  7. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  8. Interaction between the immune system and acute myeloid leukemia: A model incorporating promotion of regulatory T cell expansion by leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshiaki; Saikawa, Yutaka; Nishiyama, Nobuaki

    2018-03-01

    Population dynamics of regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for the underlying interplay between leukemic and immune cells in progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The goal of this work is to elucidate the dynamics of a model that includes Treg, which can be qualitatively assessed by accumulating clinical findings on the impact of activated immune cell infusion after selective Treg depletion. We constructed an ordinary differential equation model to describe the dynamics of three components in AML: leukemic blast cells, mature regulatory T cells (Treg), and mature effective T cells (Teff), including cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model includes promotion of Treg expansion by leukemic blast cells, leukemic stem cell and progenitor cell targeting by Teff, and Treg-mediated Teff suppression, and exhibits two coexisting, stable steady states, corresponding to high leukemic cell load at diagnosis or relapse, and to long-term complete remission. Our model is capable of explaining the clinical findings that the survival of patients with AML after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is influenced by the duration of complete remission, and that cut-off minimal residual disease thresholds associated with a 100% relapse rate are identified in AML. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A₂ in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Park, Soojin; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Ji Min; Yang, Jieun; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2016-04-30

    Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A₂ (bvPLA₂) has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA₂ six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA₂ treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA₂ treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes' mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA₂ on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA₂ in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA₂ are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA₂ in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  10. Regulatory T Cells Contribute to the Inhibition of Radiation-Induced Acute Lung Inflammation via Bee Venom Phospholipase A2 in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasom Shin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom has long been used to treat various inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Previously, we reported that bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2 has an anti-inflammatory effect through the induction of regulatory T cells. Radiotherapy is a common anti-cancer method, but often causes adverse effects, such as inflammation. This study was conducted to evaluate the protective effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced acute lung inflammation. Mice were focally irradiated with 75 Gy of X-rays in the lung and administered bvPLA2 six times after radiation. To evaluate the level of inflammation, the number of immune cells, mRNA level of inflammatory cytokine, and histological changes in the lung were measured. BvPLA2 treatment reduced the accumulation of immune cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and eosinophils. In addition, bvPLA2 treatment decreased inflammasome-, chemokine-, cytokine- and fibrosis-related genes’ mRNA expression. The histological results also demonstrated the attenuating effect of bvPLA2 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Furthermore, regulatory T cell depletion abolished the therapeutic effects of bvPLA2 in radiation-induced pneumonitis, implicating the anti-inflammatory effects of bvPLA2 are dependent upon regulatory T cells. These results support the therapeutic potential of bvPLA2 in radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis treatments.

  11. The TAL1 complex targets the FBXW7 tumor suppressor by activating miR-223 in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Marc R.; Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Li, Xiaoyu; Kreslavsky, Taras; Novina, Carl D.; Brand, Marjorie; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; von Boehmer, Harald; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in 60% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and initiates T-ALL in mouse models. By performing global microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling after depletion of TAL1, together with genome-wide analysis of TAL1 occupancy by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing, we identified the miRNA genes directly controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GAT...

  12. Allosuppressor and allohelper T cells in acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease. I. Alloreactive suppressor cells rather than killer T cells appear to be the decisive effector cells in lethal graft-vs.-host disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolink, A. G.; Radaszkiewicz, T.; Pals, S. T.; van der Meer, W. G.; Gleichmann, E.

    1982-01-01

    Splenic T cells from B10 donors were injected into irradiated (B10 x DBA/2)F1 mice. Either 5 or 6 d later, activated donor T cells were recovered from the spleens of these primary F1 (1 degree F1) recipients and transferred to groups of nonirradiated syngeneic F1 (2 degrees F1) recipients. Whereas

  13. Impact of Multi-Targeted Antiretroviral Treatment on Gut T Cell Depletion and HIV Reservoir Seeding during Acute HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananworanich, Jintanat; Schuetz, Alexandra; Vandergeeten, Claire; Sereti, Irini; de Souza, Mark; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Dewar, Robin; Marovich, Mary; van Griensven, Frits; Sekaly, Rafick; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Rutvisuttinunt, Wiriya; Chomchey, Nitiya; Paris, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Valcour, Victor; Maldarelli, Frank; Chomont, Nicolas; Michael, Nelson; Phanuphak, Praphan; Kim, Jerome H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Limited knowledge exists on early HIV events that may inform preventive and therapeutic strategies. This study aims to characterize the earliest immunologic and virologic HIV events following infection and investigates the usage of a novel therapeutic strategy. Methods and Findings We prospectively screened 24,430 subjects in Bangkok and identified 40 AHI individuals. Thirty Thais were enrolled (8 Fiebig I, 5 Fiebig II, 15 Fiebig III, 2 Fiebig IV) of whom 15 completed 24 weeks of megaHAART (tenofovir/emtricitabine/efavirenz/raltegravir/maraviroc). Sigmoid biopsies were completed in 24/30 at baseline and 13/15 at week 24. At baseline, the median age was 29 years and 83% were MSM. Most were symptomatic (87%), and were infected with R5-tropic (77%) CRF01_AE (70%). Median CD4 was 406 cells/mm3. HIV RNA was 5.5 log10 copies/ml. Median total blood HIV DNA was higher in Fiebig III (550 copy/106 PBMC) vs. Fiebig I (8 copy/106 PBMC) (p = 0.01) while the median %CD4+CCR5+ gut T cells was lower in Fiebig III (19%) vs. Fiebig I (59%) (p = 0.0008). After 24 weeks of megaHAART, HIV RNA levels of HIV DNA at week 0 predicted reservoir size at week 24 (pHIV DNA declined significantly and was undetectable in 3 of 15 in blood and 3 of 7 in gut. Frequency of CD4+CCR5+ gut T cells increased from 41% at baseline to 64% at week 24 (p>0.050); subjects with less than 40% at baseline had a significant increase in CD4+CCR5+ T cells from baseline to week 24 (14% vs. 71%, p = 0.02). Conclusions Gut T cell depletion and HIV reservoir seeding increases with progression of AHI. MegaHAART was associated with immune restoration and reduced reservoir size. Our findings could inform research on strategies to achieve HIV drug-free remission. PMID:22479485

  14. IL-7 Receptor Mutations and Steroid Resistance in Pediatric T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Genome Sequencing Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlei Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common childhood cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in children. T cell ALL (T-ALL represents about 15% of pediatric ALL cases and is considered a high-risk disease. T-ALL is often associated with resistance to treatment, including steroids, which are currently the cornerstone for treating ALL; moreover, initial steroid response strongly predicts survival and cure. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in T-ALL patients are poorly understood. In this study, we combined various genomic datasets in order to identify candidate genetic mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in children undergoing T-ALL treatment.We performed whole genome sequencing on paired pre-treatment (diagnostic and post-treatment (remission samples from 13 patients, and targeted exome sequencing of pre-treatment samples from 69 additional T-ALL patients. We then integrated mutation data with copy number data for 151 mutated genes, and this integrated dataset was tested for associations of mutations with clinical outcomes and in vitro drug response. Our analysis revealed that mutations in JAK1 and KRAS, two genes encoding components of the interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R signaling pathway, were associated with steroid resistance and poor outcome. We then sequenced JAK1, KRAS, and other genes in this pathway, including IL7R, JAK3, NF1, NRAS, and AKT, in these 69 T-ALL patients and a further 77 T-ALL patients. We identified mutations in 32% (47/146 of patients, the majority of whom had a specific T-ALL subtype (early thymic progenitor ALL or TLX. Based on the outcomes of these patients and their prednisolone responsiveness measured in vitro, we then confirmed that these mutations were associated with both steroid resistance and poor outcome. To explore how these mutations in IL7R signaling pathway genes cause steroid resistance and subsequent poor outcome, we expressed wild

  15. A live-attenuated pneumococcal vaccine elicits CD4+ T-cell dependent class switching and provides serotype independent protection against acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Jason W; Iverson, Amy R; Humann, Jessica; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Vogel, Peter; Mina, Michael; Murrah, Kyle A; Perez, Antonia C; Edward Swords, W; Tuomanen, Elaine I; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae remains one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide despite widespread vaccination. A major limitation of the currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines is the lack of efficacy against mucosal disease manifestations such as AOM, acute bacterial sinusitis and pneumonia. We sought to generate a novel class of live vaccines that (1) retain all major antigenic virulence proteins yet are fully attenuated and (2) protect against otitis media. A live vaccine candidate based on deletion of the signal recognition pathway component ftsY induced potent, serotype-independent protection against otitis media, sinusitis, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Protection was maintained in animals coinfected with influenza virus, but was lost if mice were depleted of CD4(+) T cells at the time of vaccination. The live vaccine induced a strong serum IgG2a and IgG2b response that correlated with CD4(+) T-cell mediated class switching. Deletion of genes required for microbial adaptation to the host environment is a novel live attenuated vaccine strategy yielding the first experimental vaccine effective against pneumococcal otitis media.

  16. Developmental exposure to 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin attenuates later-life Notch1-mediated T cell development and leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenhoerster, Lori S.; Leuthner, Tess C.; Tate, Everett R.; Lakatos, Peter A.; Laiosa, Michael D., E-mail: laiosa@uwm.edu

    2015-03-01

    Over half of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients have activating mutations in the Notch gene. Moreover, the contaminant 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a known carcinogen that mediates its toxicity through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and crosstalk between activated AHR and Notch signaling pathways has previously been observed. Given the importance of Notch signaling in thymocyte development and T-ALL disease progression, we hypothesized that the activated AHR potentiates disease initiation and progression in an in vivo model of Notch1-induced thymoma. This hypothesis was tested utilizing adult and developmental exposure paradigms to TCDD in mice expressing a constitutively active Notch1 transgene (Notch{sup ICN-TG}). Following exposure of adult Notch{sup ICN-TG} mice to a single high dose of TCDD, we observed a significant increase in the efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. We next exposed pregnant mice to 3 μg/kg of TCDD throughout gestation and lactation to elucidate effects of developmental AHR activation on later-life T cell development and T-ALL-like thymoma susceptibility induced by Notch1. We found that the vehicle-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring have a peripheral T cell pool heavily biased toward the CD4 lineage, while TCDD-exposed Notch{sup ICN-TG} offspring were biased toward the CD8 lineage. Furthermore, while the vehicle-exposed NotchICN-TG mice showed increased splenomegaly and B to T cell ratios indicative of disease, mice developmentally exposed to TCDD were largely protected from disease. These studies support a model where developmental AHR activation attenuates later-life Notch1-dependent impacts on thymocyte development and disease progression. - Highlights: • Adult mice exposed to 30 μg/kg TCDD have higher efficiency of CD8 thymocyte generation. • Mice carrying a constitutively active Notch transgene were exposed to 3 μg/kg TCDD throughout development. • Progression of Notch

  17. Reducing TNF receptor 2+ regulatory T cells via the combined action of azacitidine and the HDAC inhibitor, panobinostat for clinical benefit in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Tan, Peter; Walker, Patricia; Wei, Andrew; Spencer, Andrew; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) provides an environment that enables immune suppression, resulting in functionally defective effector T cells; regulatory T cells (Treg) are significant contributors to the impaired antitumor immune response. As TNF is present at high levels in AML and TNF receptor-2 (TNFR2)-expressing Tregs identify highly functional Tregs, we examine the hypothesis that TNFR2(+) Tregs are a relevant Treg subset in this cancer. We also determine the effect of the novel combinatorial therapy of the demethylating agent, azacitidine with the histone deacetylase inhibitor, panobinostat on Tregs, particularly TNFR2(+) Tregs. Thirty healthy donors and 14 patients with AML were enrolled in this study. Patients were treated with azacitidine and panobinostat for 28-day cycles. The frequency and functional relevance of TNFR2(+) Tregs were analyzed subsequently. We report that TNFR2(+) Tregs are increased in AML and have a high migration potential toward the bone marrow. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the level of TNFR2(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of patients are decreased in vivo after exposure to panobinostat and azacitidine. Reductions in TNFR2(+) Tregs were associated with increases in Interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2 production by effector T cells within the bone marrow and beneficial clinical responses. In vitro mechanistic studies indicated panobinostat as the primary driver for the reduction of Tregs. Our study provides for the first time, in vivo validation of the ability of panobinostat in combination with azacitidine to suppress prevalent TNFR2(+) Tregs, resulting in clinical benefits within patients with AML. ©2013 AACR.

  18. Potent anti-leukemia activities of humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiang; Wang, Gang; Cheng, Hai; Wei, Chen; Qi, Kunming; Sang, Wei; Zhenyu, Li; Shi, Ming; Li, Huizhong; Qiao, Jianlin; Pan, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Qingyun; Zeng, Lingyu; Niu, Mingshan; Jing, Guangjun; Zheng, Junnian; Xu, Kailin

    2018-04-10

    Chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy has shown promising results for relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The immune response induced by murine single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of the CAR may limit CAR-T cell persistence and thus increases the risk of leukemia relapse. In this study, we developed a novel humanized scFv from the murine FMC63 antibody. A total of 18 R/R ALL patients with or without prior murine CD19 CAR-T therapy were treated with humanized CD19-targeted CAR-T cells (hCART19s). After lymphodepletion chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine, the patients received a single dose (1 × 10 6 /kg) of autologous hCART19s infusion. Among the 14 patients without previous CAR-T therapy, 13 (92.9%) achieved complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi) on day 30, whereas 1 of the 3 patients who failed a second murine CAR-T infusion achieved CR after hCART19s infusion. At day 180, the overall and leukemia-free survival rates were 65.8% and 71.4%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of relapse was 22.6%, and the non-relapse mortality rate was 7.1%. During treatment, 13 patients developed grade 1-2 cytokine release syndrome (CRS), 4 patients developed grade 3-5 CRS, and 1 patient experienced reversible neurotoxicity. These results indicated that hCART19s could induce remission in patients with R/R B-ALL, especially in patients who received a reinfusion of murine CAR-T. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramides Confer Mixed Cytotoxicity in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday Jr., Michael W.; Cox, Stephen B.; Kang, Min H.; Maurer, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that fenretinide (4-HPR) was cytotoxic to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines in vitro in association with increased levels of de novo synthesized dihydroceramides, the immediate precursors of ceramides. However, the cytotoxic potentials of native dihydroceramides have not been defined. Therefore, we determined the cytotoxic effects of increasing dihydroceramide levels via de novo synthesis in T-cell ALL cell lines and whether such cytotoxicity was dependent on an absolute increase in total dihydroceramide mass versus an increase of certain specific dihydroceramides. A novel method employing supplementation of individual fatty acids, sphinganine, and the dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (DES) inhibitor, GT-11, was used to increase de novo dihydroceramide synthesis and absolute levels of specific dihydroceramides and ceramides. Sphingolipidomic analyses of four T-cell ALL cell lines revealed strong positive correlations between cytotoxicity and levels of C22:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.74–0.81, P ≤ 0.04) and C24:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.84–0.90, P ≤ 0.004), but not between total or other individual dihydroceramides, ceramides, or sphingoid bases or phosphorylated derivatives. Selective increase of C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramide increased level and flux of autophagy marker, LC3B-II, and increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay) in the absence of an increase of reactive oxygen species; pan-caspase inhibition blocked DNA fragmentation but not cell death. C22:0-fatty acid supplemented to 4-HPR treated cells further increased C22:0-dihydroceramide levels (P ≤ 0.001) and cytotoxicity (P ≤ 0.001). These data demonstrate that increases of specific dihydroceramides are cytotoxic to T-cell ALL cells by a caspase-independent, mixed cell death mechanism associated with increased autophagy and suggest that dihydroceramides may contribute to 4-HPR-induced cytotoxicity. The targeted increase of specific acyl chain dihydroceramides may

  20. C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramides confer mixed cytotoxicity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W Holliday

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fenretinide (4-HPR was cytotoxic to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cell lines in vitro in association with increased levels of de novo synthesized dihydroceramides, the immediate precursors of ceramides. However, the cytotoxic potentials of native dihydroceramides have not been defined. Therefore, we determined the cytotoxic effects of increasing dihydroceramide levels via de novo synthesis in T-cell ALL cell lines and whether such cytotoxicity was dependent on an absolute increase in total dihydroceramide mass versus an increase of certain specific dihydroceramides. A novel method employing supplementation of individual fatty acids, sphinganine, and the dihydroceramide desaturase-1 (DES inhibitor, GT-11, was used to increase de novo dihydroceramide synthesis and absolute levels of specific dihydroceramides and ceramides. Sphingolipidomic analyses of four T-cell ALL cell lines revealed strong positive correlations between cytotoxicity and levels of C22:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.74-0.81, P ≤ 0.04 and C24:0-dihydroceramide (ρ = 0.84-0.90, P ≤ 0.004, but not between total or other individual dihydroceramides, ceramides, or sphingoid bases or phosphorylated derivatives. Selective increase of C22:0- and C24:0-dihydroceramide increased level and flux of autophagy marker, LC3B-II, and increased DNA fragmentation (TUNEL assay in the absence of an increase of reactive oxygen species; pan-caspase inhibition blocked DNA fragmentation but not cell death. C22:0-fatty acid supplemented to 4-HPR treated cells further increased C22:0-dihydroceramide levels (P ≤ 0.001 and cytotoxicity (P ≤ 0.001. These data demonstrate that increases of specific dihydroceramides are cytotoxic to T-cell ALL cells by a caspase-independent, mixed cell death mechanism associated with increased autophagy and suggest that dihydroceramides may contribute to 4-HPR-induced cytotoxicity. The targeted increase of specific acyl chain dihydroceramides

  1. The ratio of circulating regulatory T cells (Tregs/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+FoxP3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs and Th17 cells are known to be involved in the alloreactive responses in organ transplantation, but little is known about the relationship between Tregs and Th17 cells in the context of liver alloresponse. Here, we investigated whether the circulating Tregs/Th17 ratio is associated with acute allograft rejection in liver transplantation. In present study, thirty-eight patients who received liver transplant were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups: acute allograft rejection group (Gr-AR (n = 16 and stable allograft liver function group (Gr-SF (n = 22. The frequencies of circulating Tregs and circulating Th17 cells, as well as Tregs/Th17 ratio were determined using flow cytometry. The association between Tregs/Th17 ratio and acute allograft rejection was then analyzed. Our results showed that the frequency of circulating Tregs was significantly decreased, whereas the frequency of circulating Th17 cells was significantly increased in liver allograft recipients who developed acute rejection. Tregs/Th17 ratio had a negative correlation with liver damage indices and the score of rejection activity index (RAI after liver transplantation. In addition, the percentages of CTLA-4(+, HLA-DR(+, Ki67(+, and IL-10(+ Tregs were higher in Gr-SF group than in Gr-AR group. Our results suggested that the ratio of circulating Tregs/Th17 cells is associated with acute allograft rejection, thus the ratio may serve as an alternative marker for the diagnosis of acute rejection.

  2. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Yamanaka

    Full Text Available The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts.We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course.qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry, was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate.We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR.

  3. IFN-γ-producing Th1-like regulatory T cells may limit acute cellular renal allograft rejection: Paradoxical post-transplantation effects of IFN-γ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Qiang; Cai, Ming; Qian, Yeyong; Han, Yong; Wang, Xinying; Gao, Yu; Yuan, Ming; Xu, Liang; Yao, Chen; Xiao, Li; Shi, Bingyi

    2017-02-01

    IFN-γ is a protypical proinflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in inflammation and acute graft rejection. Accumulating evidence indicates that IFN-γ can exert previously unexpected immunoregulatory activities. However, little is known about the role of IFN-γ secreted by Th1-like regulatory T cells in human kidney transplantation. To determine the function of IFN-γ in acute T cell-mediated renal allograft rejection (ACR), we examined serum cytokine expression profiles in ACR patients by human cytokine multiplex immunoassay and analyzed the cellular origins of IFN-γ in peripheral blood and renal allograft biopsies from ACR cases and controls by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The results showed significant reduction in serum concentrations of Th1-inducing cytokines IL-12p70 and IFN-γ as well as Th2-related cytokine IL-4 in ACR patients compared with stable controls. However, levels of several Th1-, Th2- and Th17-related cytokines, such as IL-2, TNF-α, TNF-β, IL-12 (p40), IL-10, IL-15, IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23, as well as the frequencies of Th1 and Th17 cell, did not differ between ACR cases and stable controls. Moreover, we found the levels of IFN-γ were correlated with those of the anti-inflammatory factor, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in ACR. Notably, the Th1-like Treg cell-to-Foxp3 - Th1 cell ratio was significantly lower in ACR patients compared with that in stable controls. In graft biopsies from ACR patients, Treg cells and Th1-like Treg cells were less abundant than those without ACR. Our study indicates that IFN-γ secreted from Th1-like Treg cells negatively modulates ACR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Complete hematologic response of early T-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia to the γ-secretase inhibitor BMS-906024: genetic and epigenetic findings in an outlier case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoechel, Birgit; Bhatt, Ami; Pan, Li; Pedamallu, Chandra S; Severson, Eric; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Dorfman, David M; Kuo, Frank C; Kluk, Michael; Kung, Andrew L; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick; Meyerson, Matthew; Blacklow, Stephen C; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Aster, Jon C

    2015-10-01

    Notch pathway antagonists such as γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) are being tested in diverse cancers, but exceptional responses have yet to be reported. We describe the case of a patient with relapsed/refractory early T-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) who achieved a complete hematologic response following treatment with the GSI BMS-906024. Whole-exome sequencing of leukemic blasts revealed heterozygous gain-of-function driver mutations in NOTCH1, CSF3R, and PTPN11, and a homozygous/hemizygous loss-of-function mutation in DNMT3A. The three gain-of-function mutations were absent from remission marrow cells, but the DNMT3A mutation persisted in heterozygous form in remission marrow, consistent with an origin for the patient's ETP-ALL from clonal hematopoiesis. Ex vivo culture of ETP-ALL blasts confirmed high levels of activated NOTCH1 that were repressed by GSI treatment, and RNA-seq documented that GSIs downregulated multiple known Notch target genes. Surprisingly, one potential target gene that was unaffected by GSIs was MYC, a key Notch target in GSI-sensitive T-ALL of cortical T-cell type. H3K27ac super-enhancer landscapes near MYC showed a pattern previously reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that is sensitive to BRD4 inhibitors, and in line with this ETP-ALL blasts downregulated MYC in response to the BRD4 inhibitor JQ1. To our knowledge, this is the first example of complete response of a Notch-mutated ETP-ALL to a Notch antagonist and is also the first description of chromatin landscapes associated with ETP-ALL. Our experience suggests that additional attempts to target Notch in Notch-mutated ETP-ALL are merited.

  5. Induction of a central memory and stem cell memory phenotype in functionally active CD4+ and CD8+ CAR T cells produced in an automated good manufacturing practice system for the treatment of CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaeschke, Franziska; Stenger, Dana; Kaeuferle, Theresa; Willier, Semjon; Lotfi, Ramin; Kaiser, Andrew Didier; Assenmacher, Mario; Döring, Michaela; Feucht, Judith; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2018-03-31

    Relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL) remains a major therapeutic challenge. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are promising treatment options. Central memory T cells (Tcm) and stem cell-like memory T cells (Tscm) are known to promote sustained proliferation and persistence after T-cell therapy, constituting essential preconditions for treatment efficacy. Therefore, we set up a protocol for anti-CD19 CAR T-cell generation aiming at high Tcm/Tscm numbers. 100 ml peripheral blood from pediatric pre-B ALL patients was processed including CD4 + /CD8 + -separation, T-cell activation with modified anti-CD3/-CD28 reagents and transduction with a 4-1BB-based second generation CAR lentiviral vector. The process was performed on a closed, automated device requiring additional manual/open steps under clean room conditions. The clinical situation of these critically ill and refractory patients with leukemia leads to inconsistent cellular compositions at start of the procedure including high blast counts and low T-cell numbers with exhausted phenotype. Nevertheless, a robust T-cell product was achieved (mean CD4 +  = 50%, CD8 +  = 39%, transduction = 27%, Tcm = 50%, Tscm = 46%). Strong proliferative potential (up to > 100-fold), specific cytotoxicity and low expression of co-inhibitory molecules were documented. CAR T cells significantly released TH1 cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 upon target-recognition. In conclusion, partly automated GMP-generation of CAR T cells from critically small blood samples was feasible with a new stimulation protocol that leads to high functionality and expansion potential, balanced CD4/CD8 ratios and a conversion to a Tcm/Tscm phenotype.

  6. Solitary expression of CD7 among T-cell antigens in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of a group of patients with similar T-cell receptor beta and delta rearrangements and course of disease suggestive of poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A W; Hokland, M; Jørgensen, H

    1991-01-01

    to the French-American-British type M4, and four were under the age of 40. Despite intensive chemotherapy, four never obtained a complete remission and the fifth died of relapse after an allogenic bone marrow transplantation. While 12 randomly selected T-cell antigen negative AML patients showed only few...... rearrangements in Ig- or T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, such genetic alterations were demonstrated in four of five patients for the TCR delta gene and in all patients for the TCR beta gene. Interestingly, DNA fragments of similar size were demonstrated in three of five patients for both the beta and delta genes...

  7. Cooperation of IRAK1/4 inhibitor and ABT-737 in nanoparticles for synergistic therapy of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu X

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoyan Wu,1 Lin Wang,1 Yining Qiu,1 Bingyu Zhang,1 Zhenhua Hu,2 Runming Jin1 1Department of Pediatrics, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 2Department of Pharmacy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China Abstract: T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is caused by clonal expansion of variant T cell progenitors and is considered as a high risk leukemia. Contemporary single chemotherapy has a limited effect due to dynamic and versatile properties of T-ALL. Here IRAK1/4 inhibitor and ABT-737 were co-encapsulated into polyethylene glycol modified poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid nanoparticles (IRAK/ABT-NP to enhance synergistic therapy of T-ALL. The formulation was optimized to achieve high drug loading using Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. The optimal parameter comprised 2.98% polymer in acetonitrile, a ratio of oil phase to water phase of 1:8.33, and 2.12% emulsifier concentration. High drug loading and uniform spherical shape was achieved. In vitro release study showed sustained release of IRAK1/4 inhibitor for 72 hours as well as sustained release of ABT-737 for more than 120 hours. Uptake efficiency of IRAK/ABT-NP and induced apoptotic T-ALL fraction by IRAK/ABT-NP were much higher than the IRAK1/4 and ABT-737 combined solution. IC50 of IRAK/ABT-NP was two-fold lower than free drug combination in Jurkat cells. Additionally, we conducted in vivo experiments in which IRAK/ABT-NP exhibited greater cytotoxicity toward T-ALL cells, the capacity to significantly restore white blood cell number in peripheral blood, and improved survival time of T-ALL mouse model compared to the IRAK1/4 and ABT-737 combined solution. Keywords: T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, IRAK1/4 inhibitor, ABT-737, Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology, PEG-PLGA

  8. Liver injury in acute hepatitis A is associated with decreased frequency of regulatory T cells caused by Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Lee, Jeewon; Lee, Hyun Woong; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Sung, Pil Soo; Jung, Min Kyung; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Hana; Cheong, Jae Youn; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, June Sung; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-01

    Foxp3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) control immune responses, but their role in acute viral hepatitis remains elusive. Herein, we investigated alteration in the peripheral blood Treg population during acute hepatitis A (AHA) and its implication in the immune-mediated liver injury. The study included 71 patients with AHA, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated. The suppressive activity of Treg population was determined by assessing anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated proliferation of Treg-depleted and reconstituted PBMCs. Treg cell frequency, phenotype and apoptosis in PBMCs were analysed by flow cytometry. The frequency of circulating Tregs was reduced during AHA. Moreover, the suppressive activity of the total Treg pool in the peripheral blood was attenuated during AHA. Treg frequency and suppressive activity of the Treg population inversely correlated with the serum alanine aminotransferase level. Fas was overexpressed on Tregs during AHA, suggesting their susceptibility to Fas-induced apoptosis. Indeed, increased apoptotic death was observed in Tregs of patients with AHA compared with healthy controls. In addition, agonistic anti-Fas treatment further increased apoptotic death of Tregs from patients with AHA. The decreased Treg frequency and Fas overexpression on Tregs were not observed in other acute liver diseases such as acute hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C and toxic/drug-induced hepatitis. The size of the Treg pool was contracted during AHA, resulting from apoptosis of Tregs induced by a Fas-mediated mechanism. Decrease in Treg numbers led to reduced suppressive activity of the Treg pool and consequently resulted in severe liver injury during AHA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vivo approaches reveal a key role for DCs in CD4+ T cell activation and parasite clearance during the acute phase of experimental blood-stage malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Borges da Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip, with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection.

  11. Protection of Mice from Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Requires CD28 Co-stimulation on Donor CD4+ Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Uri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD is a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell plus T cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. In this study, we investigated the requirement for CD28 co-stimulation of donor CD4+ conventional (CD4+CD25−Foxp3−, Tconv and regulatory (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+, Treg T cells in aGvHD using tamoxifen-inducible CD28 knockout (iCD28KO or wild-type (wt littermates as donors of CD4+ Tconv and Treg. In the highly inflammatory C57BL/6 into BALB/c allo-HSCT transplantation model, CD28 depletion on donor CD4+ Tconv reduced clinical signs of aGvHD, but did not significantly prolong survival of the recipient mice. Selective depletion of CD28 on donor Treg did not abrogate protection of recipient mice from aGvHD until about day 20 after allo-HSCT. Later, however, the pool of CD28-depleted Treg drastically declined as compared to wt Treg. Consequently, only wt, but not CD28-deficient, Treg were able to continuously suppress aGvHD and induce long-term survival of the recipient mice. To our knowledge, this is the first study that specifically evaluates the impact of CD28 expression on donor Treg in aGvHD. Moreover, the delayed kinetics of aGvHD lethality after transplantation of iCD28KO Treg provides a novel animal model for similar disease courses found in patients after allo-HSCT.

  12. Unique amplification of BCR-ABL1 gene fusion in a case of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, Rima; Bade, Najeebah A; Sausville, Edward A; Ning, Yi; Zou, Ying

    2017-01-01

    ABL1 gene translocations can be seen in precursor T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). The typical translocation partner is the NUP214 gene. BCR-ABL translocations are relatively rare in this entity. Furthermore, while there have been unique patterns of amplification noted among the NUP214-ABL fusion genes, there have been few such reports among cases with BCR-ABL fusion genes. Here we report a unique case of a 44-year old patient with T-ALL in which the blasts demonstrated a derivative chromosome 9 involving a 9;22 translocation and a dicentric Philadelphia chromosome 22 with a homogeneously staining region at the interface of the 9;22 translocation, leading to BCR-ABL1 gene amplification. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) showed abnormal BCR/ABL1 fusions with the BCR-ABL1 gene amplification in 48% of the interphase cells analyzed. The translocation was confirmed by SNP array. We present a novel derivative chromosome 9 that shows BCR-ABL gene fusion along with a dicentric Philadelphia chromosome 22 with BCR-ABL1 gene amplification. This is a unique pattern of BCR-ABL fusion which has never been described in T-ALL. It is significant that the patient responded to standard treatment with the CALGB 10403 protocol and supplementation with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Identification of additional patients with this pattern of BCR-ABL fusion will allow for enhanced risk assessment and prognostication.

  13. Differentiation between Acute Skin Rejection in Allotransplantation and T-Cell Mediated Skin Inflammation Based on Gene Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in microsurgical techniques and immunosuppressive medication have rendered transplantation of vascularized composite allografts possible, when autologous tissue is neither available nor sufficient for reconstruction. However, skin rejection and side effects of long-term immunosuppression still remain a major hurdle for wide adoption of this excellent reconstructive technique. Histopathologic changes during acute skin rejection in vascular composite allotransplantation often mimic inflammatory skin disorders and are hard to distinguish. Hence, the identification of diagnostic and therapeutic markers specific for skin rejection is of particular clinical need. Here we present novel markers allowing for early differentiation between rejection in hind limb allotransplantation and contact hypersensitivity. Assessment of Ccl7, Il18, and Il1b expression is most indicative of distinguishing skin rejection from skin inflammatory disorders. Gene expression levels varied significantly across skin types and regions, indicating localization specific mechanism of leukocyte migration and infiltration. Expression of Il12b, Il17a, and Il1b gene expression levels differed significantly between rejection and inflammation, independent of the skin type. In synopsis of the RNA expression profile and previously assessed protein expression, the Il1 family appears as a promising option for accurate skin rejection diagnosis and, as a following step, for development of novel rejection treatments.

  14. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Danis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients.

  15. Increased percentages of regulatory T cells are associated with inflammatory and neuroendocrine responses to acute psychological stress and poorer health status in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, Amy; Gazali, Ahmad M; Zalli, Argita; Kaiser, Frank; Thompson, Stephen J; Henderson, Brian; Steptoe, Andrew; Carvalho, Livia

    2016-05-01

    The percentage of regulatory T cells (TRegs)-a subtype of T lymphocyte that suppresses the immune response-appears to be reduced in a number of stress-related diseases. The role of the TReg in stress-disease pathways has not yet been investigated. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between biological responsivity to acute psychosocial stress and the percentage of TRegs in healthy older adults. The secondary purpose was to measure the associations between TReg percentage and psychological and physical well-being in the participants. Salivary cortisol and plasma interleukin (IL)-6 samples were obtained from 121 healthy older men and women from the Whitehall II cohort following acute psychophysiological stress testing. Three years later at a follow-up visit, we measured TReg percentages and psychological and physical well-being were recorded using the Short Form 36 Health Survey and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Blunted cortisol responses (p = 0.004) and elevated IL-6 responses (p = 0.027) to acute psychophysiological stress were associated with greater TReg percentage independently of age, sex, BMI, smoking status, employment grade, time of testing, and baseline measures of cortisol and IL-6, respectively. Percentage of TRegs was associated cross-sectionally with lower physical (p = 0.043) and mental health status (p = 0.008), and higher levels of depressive symptoms (p = 0.002), independently of covariates. Increased levels of TRegs may act as a defence against increased inflammation and may be a pre-indication for chronically stressed individuals on the cusp of clinical illness.

  16. Chemotherapy alters the increased numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor and regulatory T cells in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Labib; El-Shanshory, Mohamed R; Abdou, Said H; Attia, Mohamed S; Sobhy, Shymaa M; Zidan, Mona F; Zidan, Abdel-Aziz A

    2018-04-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children. The precise mechanism behind the relapse in this disease is not clearly known. One possible mechanism could be the accumulation of immunosuppressive cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T regulatory cells (T regs ) which we and others have reported to mediate suppression of anti-tumor immune responses. In this study, we aimed to analyze the numbers of these cells in a population of B-ALL pediatric patients. Peripheral blood samples withdrawn from B-ALL pediatric patients (n = 45 before, during and after the induction phase of chemotherapy. Using multi parametric flow cytometric analysis. MDSCs were identified as Lin - HLA-DR - CD33 + CD11b + ; and T reg cells were defined as CD4 + CD25 + CD127 -/low . Early diagnosed B-ALL patients showed significant increases in the numbers of MDSCs and T regs as compared to healthy volunteers. During induction of chemotherapy, however, the patients showed higher and lower numbers of MDSCs and T reg cells, respectively as compared to early diagnosed patients (i.e., before chemotherapy). After induction of chemotherapy, the numbers of MDSCs and T reg cells showed higher increases and decreases, respectively as compared to the numbers in patients during chemotherapy. Our results indicate that B-ALL patients harbor high numbers of both MDSCs and T regs cells. This pilot study opens a new avenue to investigate the mechanism mediating the emergence of these cells on larger number of B-ALL patients at different treatment stages.

  17. T Cell Exhaustion During Persistent Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Shannon M.; Wherry, E. John; Zajac, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control. PMID:25620767

  18. E2a/Pbx1 induces the rapid proliferation of stem cell factor-dependent murine pro-T cells that cause acute T-lymphoid or myeloid leukemias in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Kamps, Mark P

    2004-02-01

    Oncoprotein E2a/Pbx1 is produced by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. E2a/Pbx1 blocks differentiation of primary myeloid progenitors but, paradoxically, induces apoptosis in established pre-B-cell lines, and no transforming function of E2a/Pbx1 has been reported in cultured lymphoid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that E2a/Pbx1 induces immortal proliferation of stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent pro-T thymocytes by a mechanism dependent upon both its transactivation and DNA-binding functions. E2a-Pbx1 cooperated with cytokines or activated signaling oncoproteins to induce cell division, as inactivation of conditional E2a/Pbx1 in either factor-dependent pro-T cells or pro-T cells made factor independent by expression of Bcr/Abl resulted in pro-T-cell quiescence, while reactivation of E2a/Pbx1 restored cell division. Infusion of E2a/Pbx1 pro-T cells in mice caused T lymphoblastic leukemia and, unexpectedly, acute myeloid leukemia. The acute lymphoblastic leukemia did not evidence further maturation, suggesting that E2a/Pbx1 establishes an early block in pro-T-cell development that cannot be overcome by marrow or thymic microenvironments. In an E2a/Pbx1 pro-T thymocyte clone that induced only pro-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia, coexpression of Bcr/Abl expanded its leukemic phenotype to include acute myeloid leukemia, suggesting that unique functions of cooperating signaling oncoproteins can influence the lymphoid versus myeloid character of E2a/Pbx1 leukemia and may cooperate with E2a/Pbx1 to dictate the pre-B-cell phenotype of human leukemia containing t(1;19).

  19. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells

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    Hojka-Osinska, Anna, E-mail: hojka@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Ziolo, Ewa, E-mail: ziolo@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland); Rapak, Andrzej, E-mail: rapak@immuno.iitd.pan.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Tumor Molecular Immunobiology, Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy, 53-114 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

  20. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells' apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro's dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days.

  1. Inhibition of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c3 activation attenuates acute lung injury and pulmonary edema in murine models of sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpurapu, Manjula; Lee, Yong Gyu; Qian, Ziqing; Wen, Jin; Ballinger, Megan N; Rusu, Luiza; Chung, Sangwoon; Deng, Jing; Qian, Feng; Reader, Brenda F; Nirujogi, Teja Srinivas; Park, Gye Young; Pei, Dehua; Christman, John W

    2018-02-13

    Specific therapies targeting cellular and molecular events of sepsis induced Acute Lung Injury (ALI) pathogenesis are lacking. We have reported a pivotal role for Nuclear Factors of Activated T cells (NFATc3) in regulating macrophage phenotype during sepsis induced ALI and subsequent studies demonstrate that NFATc3 transcriptionally regulates macrophage CCR2 and TNFα gene expression. Mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell monolayer maintained a tighter barrier function when co-cultured with LPS stimulated NFATc3 deficient macrophages whereas wild type macrophages caused leaky monolayer barrier. More importantly, NFATc3 deficient mice showed decreased neutrophilic lung inflammation, improved alveolar capillary barrier function, arterial oxygen saturation and survival benefit in lethal CLP sepsis mouse models. In addition, survival of wild type mice subjected to the lethal CLP sepsis was not improved with broad-spectrum antibiotics, whereas the survival of NFATc3 deficient mice was improved to 40-60% when treated with imipenem. Passive adoptive transfer of NFATc3 deficient macrophages conferred protection against LPS induced ALI in wild type mice. Furthermore, CP9-ZIZIT, a highly potent, cell-permeable peptide inhibitor of Calcineurin inhibited NFATc3 activation. CP9-ZIZIT effectively reduced sepsis induced inflammatory cytokines and pulmonary edema in mice. Thus, this study demonstrates that inhibition of NFATc3 activation by CP9-ZIZIT provides a potential therapeutic option for attenuating sepsis induced ALI/pulmonary edema.

  2. HSP90 inhibition leads to degradation of the TYK2 kinase and apoptotic cell death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, K; Sanda, T; Mansour, M R; Radimerski, T; DeAngelo, D J; Weinstock, D M; Look, A T

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) signaling through its downstream effector phospho-STAT1 acts to upregulate BCL2, which in turn mediates aberrant survival of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells. Here we show that pharmacologic inhibition of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) with a small-molecule inhibitor, NVP-AUY922 (AUY922), leads to rapid degradation of TYK2 and apoptosis in T-ALL cells. STAT1 protein levels were not affected by AUY922 treatment, but phospho-STAT1 (Tyr-701) levels rapidly became undetectable, consistent with a block in signaling downstream of TYK2. BCL2 expression was downregulated after AUY922 treatment, and although this effect was necessary for AUY922-induced apoptosis, it was not sufficient because many T-ALL cell lines were resistant to ABT-199, a specific inhibitor of BCL2. Unlike ABT-199, AUY922 also upregulated the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD, whose increased expression was required for AUY922-induced apoptosis. Thus, the potent cytotoxicity of AUY922 involves the synergistic combination of BCL2 downregulation coupled with upregulation of the proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. This two-pronged assault on the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery identifies HSP90 inhibitors as promising drugs for targeting the TYK2-mediated prosurvival signaling axis in T-ALL cells.

  3. Maturation stage of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia determines BCL-2 versus BCL-XL dependence and sensitivity to ABT-199.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonghaile, Triona Ni; Roderick, Justine E; Glenfield, Cian; Ryan, Jeremy; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Wood, Brent; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Stone, Richard; Harris, Marian; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kelliher, Michelle A; Letai, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a hematopoietic malignancy derived from immature B-lymphoid and T-lymphoid cells (T-ALL). In T-ALL, there is an early T-cell progenitor (ETP) subgroup that has a very high risk for relapse. In this study, we used mitochondrial BH3 profiling to determine antiapoptotic protein dependencies in T-ALL. We found that T-ALL cell lines and primary patient samples are dependent upon BCL-XL, except when the cancer bears an ETP phenotype, in which case it is BCL-2 dependent. These distinctions directly relate to differential sensitivity to the BH3 mimetics ABT-263 and ABT-199, both in vitro and in vivo. We thus describe for the first time a change of antiapoptotic protein dependence that is related to the differentiation stage of the leukemic clone. Our findings demonstrate that BCL-2 is a clinically relevant target for therapeutic intervention with ABT-199 in ETP-ALL. ETP T-ALL is a treatment-resistant subtype of T-ALL for which novel targeted therapies are urgently needed. We have discovered, through BH3 profiling, that ETP-ALL is BCL-2 dependent and is very sensitive to in vitro and in vivo treatment with ABT-199, a drug well tolerated in clinical trials. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. JAK/STAT pathway inhibition overcomes IL7-induced glucocorticoid resistance in a subset of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martin, C; Meyer, L K; Huang, B J; Shimano, K A; Zinter, M S; Nguyen, J V; Smith, G A; Taunton, J; Winter, S S; Roderick, J R; Kelliher, M A; Horton, T M; Wood, B L; Teachey, D T; Hermiston, M L

    2017-12-01

    While outcomes for children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) have improved dramatically, survival rates for patients with relapsed/refractory disease remain dismal. Prior studies indicate that glucocorticoid (GC) resistance is more common than resistance to other chemotherapies at relapse. In addition, failure to clear peripheral blasts during a prednisone prophase correlates with an elevated risk of relapse in newly diagnosed patients. Here we show that intrinsic GC resistance is present at diagnosis in early thymic precursor (ETP) T-ALLs as well as in a subset of non-ETP T-ALLs. GC-resistant non-ETP T-ALLs are characterized by strong induction of JAK/STAT signaling in response to interleukin-7 (IL7) stimulation. Removing IL7 or inhibiting JAK/STAT signaling sensitizes these T-ALLs, and a subset of ETP T-ALLs, to GCs. The combination of the GC dexamethasone and the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib altered the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors in samples with IL7-dependent GC resistance, but not in samples with IL7-independent GC resistance. Together, these data suggest that the addition of ruxolitinib or other inhibitors of IL7 receptor/JAK/STAT signaling may enhance the efficacy of GCs in a biologically defined subset of T-ALL.

  5. Characterization of activating mutations of NOTCH3 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and anti-leukemic activity of NOTCH3 inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi-Elias, P; Hu, T; Jenkins, D; Firestone, B; Gans, S; Kurth, E; Capodieci, P; Deplazes-Lauber, J; Petropoulos, K; Thiel, P; Ponsel, D; Hee Choi, S; LeMotte, P; London, A; Goetcshkes, M; Nolin, E; Jones, M D; Slocum, K; Kluk, M J; Weinstock, D M; Christodoulou, A; Weinberg, O; Jaehrling, J; Ettenberg, S A; Buckler, A; Blacklow, S C; Aster, J C; Fryer, C J

    2016-11-24

    Notch receptors have been implicated as oncogenic drivers in several cancers, the most notable example being NOTCH1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To characterize the role of activated NOTCH3 in cancer, we generated an antibody that detects the neo-epitope created upon gamma-secretase cleavage of NOTCH3 to release its intracellular domain (ICD3), and sequenced the negative regulatory region (NRR) and PEST (proline, glutamate, serine, threonine) domain coding regions of NOTCH3 in a panel of cell lines. We also characterize NOTCH3 tumor-associated mutations that result in activation of signaling and report new inhibitory antibodies. We determined the structural basis for receptor inhibition by obtaining the first co-crystal structure of a NOTCH3 antibody with the NRR protein and defined two distinct epitopes for NRR antibodies. The antibodies exhibit potent anti-leukemic activity in cell lines and tumor xenografts harboring NOTCH3 activating mutations. Screening of primary T-ALL samples reveals that 2 of 40 tumors examined show active NOTCH3 signaling. We also identified evidence of NOTCH3 activation in 12 of 24 patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models, 2 of which exhibit activation of NOTCH3 without activation of NOTCH1. Our studies provide additional insights into NOTCH3 activation and offer a path forward for identification of cancers that are likely to respond to therapy with NOTCH3 selective inhibitory antibodies.

  6. Impact of PTEN abnormalities on outcome in pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated on the MRC UKALL2003 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, S; Kirkwood, A A; Goulden, N; Vora, A; Linch, D C; Gale, R E

    2016-01-01

    PTEN gene inactivation by mutation or deletion is common in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), but the impact on outcome is unclear, particularly in patients with NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. We screened samples from 145 patients treated on the MRC UKALL2003 trial for PTEN mutations using heteroduplex analysis and gene deletions using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays, and related genotype to response to therapy and long-term outcome. PTEN loss-of-function mutations/gene deletions were detected in 22% (PTEN(ABN)). Quantification of mutant level indicated that 67% of mutated cases harbored more than one mutant, with up to four mutants detected, consistent with the presence of multiple leukemic sub-clones. Overall, 41% of PTEN(ABN) cases were considered to have biallelic abnormalities (mutation and/or deletion) with complete loss of PTEN in a proportion of cells. In addition, 9% of cases had N- or K-RAS mutations. Neither PTEN nor RAS genotype significantly impacted on response to therapy or long-term outcome, irrespective of mutant level, and there was no evidence that they changed the highly favorable outcome of patients with double NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations. These results indicate that, for pediatric patients treated according to current protocols, routine screening for PTEN or RAS abnormalities at diagnosis is not warranted to further refine risk stratification.

  7. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Interleukin-3 Receptor Subunit Alpha Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. CD8+effector memory T cells induce acute rejection of allogeneic heart retransplants in mice possibly through activating expression of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Gang; Yang, Nuo; Gong, Wenlin; Fang, Yuan; He, Jian; Zhou, Nuo; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of CD8 + memory T (Tm) cells and CD8 + effector memory T (Tem) cells on the results of allogeneic heart retransplantations performed in mice. A skin transplantation model was used to generate sensitized splenic CD8 + Tem cells for infusion into BALB/c mice. One week after infusion, the BALB/c mice underwent allogeneic heart transplantation in the abdominal cavity. Cyclosporin A was administered via intraperitoneal injection starting one day prior to transplantation to arrest immunological rejection of the transplanted heart. The effects of sensitized CD8 + T em cells on allogeneic heart graft rejection were examined by monitoring survival of the transplanted hearts, the infiltration of effector memory CD8 + T cells into myocardium, and expressions of inflammatory cytokines in blood serum. Adoptive transfer of sensitized CD8 + Tem cells prior to transplantation induced an acute rejection response which decreased the survival of transplanted hearts. The rejection response was accompanied by an infiltration of CD8 + Tem cells into the transplanted myocardial tissue. Additionally, infusion of sensitized CD8 + Tem cells induced markedly increased expressions of IL-2 and IFN-γ, and decreased expression of TGF-β in the transplanted hearts, as well as higher levels of IFN-γ and CXCL-9 in blood serum. The infusion of sensitized CD8 + Tem cells induced an acute graft rejection response and decreased the survival of grafted hearts by regulating the expressions of inflammatory cytokines including CXCL-9, IL-2, and INF-γ. Cyclosporin A had no therapeutic effect on the graft rejection response induced by sensitized CD8 + Tem cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. HA-1 T TCR T Cell Immunotherapy for the Treating of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    HLA-A*0201 HA-1 Positive Cells Present; Minimal Residual Disease; Recurrent Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Recurrent Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. A new recurrent inversion, inv(7)(p15q34), leads to transcriptional activation of HOXA10 and HOXA11 in a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speleman, F; Cauwelier, B; Dastugue, N; Cools, J; Verhasselt, B; Poppe, B; Van Roy, N; Vandesompele, J; Graux, C; Uyttebroeck, A; Boogaerts, M; De Moerloose, B; Benoit, Y; Selleslag, D; Billiet, J; Robert, A; Huguet, F; Vandenberghe, P; De Paepe, A; Marynen, P; Hagemeijer, A

    2005-03-01

    Chromosomal translocations with breakpoints in T-cell receptor (TCR) genes are recurrent in T-cell malignancies. These translocations involve the TCRalphadelta gene (14q11), the TCRbeta gene (7q34) and to a lesser extent the TCRgamma gene at chromosomal band 7p14 and juxtapose T-cell oncogenes next to TCR regulatory sequences leading to deregulated expression of those oncogenes. Here, we describe a new recurrent chromosomal inversion of chromosome 7, inv(7)(p15q34), in a subset of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by CD2 negative and CD4 positive, CD8 negative blasts. This rearrangement juxtaposes the distal part of the HOXA gene cluster on 7p15 to the TCRbeta locus on 7q34. Real time quantitative PCR analysis for all HOXA genes revealed high levels of HOXA10 and HOXA11 expression in all inv(7) positive cases. This is the first report of a recurrent chromosome rearrangement targeting the HOXA gene cluster in T-cell malignancies resulting in deregulated HOXA gene expression (particularly HOXA10 and HOXA11) and is in keeping with a previous report suggesting HOXA deregulation in MLL-rearranged T- and B cell lymphoblastic leukemia as the key factor in leukaemic transformation. Finally, our observation also supports the previous suggested role of HOXA10 and HOXA11 in normal thymocyte development.

  11. The TLX1 oncogene drives aneuploidy in T cell transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. de Keersmaecker (Kim); P.J. Real (Pedro); G.D. Gatta; T. Palomero (Teresa); M.L. Sulis; V. Tosello (Valeria); P. van Vlierberghe (Pieter); K. Barnes (Kelly); M. Castillo (Mireia); X. Sole (Xavier); M. Hadler (Michael); J. Lenz (Jack); P.D. Aplan (Peter); M. Kelliher (Michelle); B.L. Kee (Barbara); P.P. Pandolfi; D. Kappes (Dietmar); F. Gounari (Fotini); H. Petrie (Howard); J. van der Meulen (Joni); F. Speleman (Franki); E. Paietta (Elisabeth); J. Racevskis (Janis); P.H. Wiernik (Peter); J. Rowe (Jacob); J. Soulier (Jean); D. Avran (David); H. Cavé (Hélène); N. Dastugue (Nicole); S. Raimondi (Susana); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules); C. Cordon-Cardo (Carlos); A. Califano (Andrea); A.A. Ferrando (Adolfo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe TLX1 oncogene (encoding the transcription factor T cell leukemia homeobox protein-1) has a major role in the pathogenesis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). However, the specific mechanisms of T cell transformation downstream of TLX1 remain to be elucidated. Here we show

  12. Vitamin E synthetic derivate-TPGS-selectively induces apoptosis in jurkat t cells via oxidative stress signaling pathways: implications for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Moreno, Cristian; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Sierra-Garcia, Ligia; Lopez-Osorio, Betty; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) is a water-soluble derivative of natural vitamin E commonly used as a drug delivery agent. Recently, TPGS alone has been reported to induce cell death in lung, breast and prostate cancer. However, the effect of TPGS on cancer cell viability remains unclear. Thus, this study was aimed to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of TPGS on human periphral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and on T cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) Jurkat clone E6-1 cells and its possible mechanism of action. PBL and Jurkat cells were treated with TPGS (10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 μM), and morphological changes in the cell nucleus, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were determined by immune-fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cellular apoptosis markers were also evaluated by immunocytochemistry. In this study, TPGS induced apoptotic cell death in Jurkat cells, but not in PBL, in a dose-response manner with increasing nuclear DNA fragmentation, increasing cell cycle arrest, and decreasing ΔΨm. Additionally, TPGS increased dichlorofluorescein fluorescence intensity, indicative of H2O2 production, in a dose-independent fashion. TPGS increased DJ-1 Cys(106)-sulfonate, as a marker of intracellular stress and induced the activation of NF-κB, p53 and c-Jun transcription factors. Additionally, it increased the expression of apoptotic markers Bcl-2 related pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and PUMAand activated caspase-3. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine and known pharmacological inhibitors protected the cells from the TPGS induced effects. In conclusion, TPGS selectively induces apoptosis in Jurkat cells through two independent but complementary H2O2-mediated signaling pathways. Our findings support the use of TPGS as a potential treatment for ALL.

  13. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Tingfang Yang,1 Shuluan Yao,2 Xianfeng Zhang,3 Yan Guo2 1Department of Pediatrics, Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jining Medical University Affiliated Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Psychiatry, Jining Psychiatric Hospital, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 µg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. Keywords: andrographolide, PI3K, AKT, Burkitt lymphoma, Jurkat cell

  14. Andrographolide inhibits growth of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and upregulation of p38 MAPK pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tingfang; Yao, Shuluan; Zhang, Xianfeng; Guo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a prevalent hematologic malignancy is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide in children. Andrographolide (Andro), the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has been shown to possess antitumor activities in several types of cancer cells. However, whether Andro would inhibit T-ALL cell growth remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effect of Andro on human T-ALL Jurkat cells and explored the mechanisms of cell death. Cell apoptosis was assayed by flow cytometry, and the signaling transduction for Andro was analyzed by Western blotting. The results indicated 10 μg/mL Andro could significantly induce Jurkat cells’ apoptosis, depending on the inhibition of PI3K/AKT pathway. Moreover, Andro-induced apoptosis is enhanced by AKT-selective inhibitor LY294002. ERK- or JNK-selective inhibitors PD98059 and SP600125 had no effect on Andro-induced apoptosis. In addition, p38 inhibitor SB203580 could reverse Andro-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. We also found that the protein expression of p-p53 and p-p38 were increased after Andro treatments. The result of an in vivo study also demonstrated Andro’s dose-dependent inhibition in subcutaneous Jurkat xenografts. In conclusion, our findings explained a novel mechanism of drug action by Andro in Jurkat cells and suggested that Andro might be developed into a new candidate therapy for T-ALL patients in the coming days. PMID:27114702

  15. Bee venom phospholipase A2 protects against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury by modulating regulatory T cells and IL-10 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunseong; Keum, Dong June; Kwak, Jung won; Chung, Hwan-Suck; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from bee venom against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity through CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg) in mice. Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic, but an acute or cumulative overdose of acetaminophen can cause severe hepatic failure. Tregs have been reported to possess protective effects in various liver diseases and kidney toxicity. We previously found that bee venom strongly increased the Treg population in splenocytes and subsequently suppressed immune disorders. More recently, we found that the effective component of bee venom is PLA2. Thus, we hypothesized that PLA2 could protect against liver injury induced by acetaminophen. To evaluate the hepatoprotective effects of PLA2, C57BL/6 mice or interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10-/-) mice were injected with PLA2 once a day for five days and sacrificed 24 h (h) after acetaminophen injection. The blood sera were collected 0, 6, and 24 h after acetaminophen injection for the analysis of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). PLA2-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum AST, ALT, proinflammatory cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) compared with the PBS-injected control mice. However, IL-10 was significantly increased in the PLA2-injected mice. These hepatic protective effects were abolished in Treg-depleted mice by antibody treatment and in IL-10-/- mice. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that the protective effects of PLA2 against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity can be mediated by modulating the Treg and IL-10 production.

  16. miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hong; Miao, Mei-hua; Ji, Xue-qiang; Xue, Jun; Shao, Xue-jun, E-mail: xuejunshao@hotmail.com

    2015-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in leukaemia, particularly T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), has remained elusive. Here, we identified miR-664 and its predicted target gene PLP2 were differentially expressed in T-ALL using bioinformatics methods. In T-ALL cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-664, while miR-664 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation. Moreover, migration and invasion assay showed that overexpression of miR-664 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, whereas miR-664 inhibitor could reduce cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-664 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of PLP2, and western blotting showed that miR-664 suppressed the expression of PLP2 at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-664 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. - Highlights: • miR-664 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 targets 3′ UTR of PLP2 in T-ALL cells. • miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 in T-ALL cells.

  17. Contribution of CD4+ T cells to the early mechanisms of ischemia- reperfusion injury in a mouse model of acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Pinheiro

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury is the major cause of acute renal failure in native and transplanted kidneys. Mononuclear leukocytes have been reported in renal tissue as part of the innate and adaptive responses triggered by IR. We investigated the participation of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of renal IR injury. Male mice (C57BL/6, 8 to 12 weeks old were submitted to 45 min of ischemia by renal pedicle clamping followed by reperfusion. We evaluated the role of CD4+ T cells using a monoclonal depleting antibody against CD4 (GK1.5, 50 µ, ip, and class II-major histocompatibility complex molecule knockout mice. Both CD4-depleted groups showed a marked improvement in renal function compared to the ischemic group, despite the fact that GK1.5 mAb treatment promoted a profound CD4 depletion (to less than 5% compared to normal controls only within the first 24 h after IR. CD4-depleted groups presented a significant improvement in 5-day survival (84 vs 80 vs 39%; antibody treated, knockout mice and non-depleted groups, respectively and also a significant reduction in the tubular necrosis area with an early tubular regeneration pattern. The peak of CD4-positive cell infiltration occurred on day 2, coinciding with the high expression of ßC mRNA and increased urea levels. CD4 depletion did not alter the CD11b infiltrate or the IFN-g and granzyme-B mRNA expression in renal tissue. These data indicate that a CD4+ subset of T lymphocytes may be implicated as key mediators of very early inflammatory responses after renal IR injury and that targeting CD4+ T lymphocytes may yield novel therapies.

  18. Good steroid response in vivo predicts a favorable outcome in children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aricò, M; Basso, G; Mandelli, F; Rizzari, C; Colella, R; Barisone, E; Zanesco, L; Rondelli, R; Pession, A; Masera, G

    1995-04-01

    Improved outcome of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received intensive chemotherapy was observed by the Italian Association for Pediatric Hematology Oncology (AIEOP). To verify if this improved outcome was also extended to T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients after introduction of intensive chemotherapy, treatment responses of 2011 patients, including 184 with T-ALL treated over the decade 1982-1991, were analyzed. Further, the potential use of the association of presenting clinical and biologic features with treatment outcome to determine risk factors that might be useful for planning risk-directed therapeutic studies was analyzed. Of the 2011 children consecutively entered on the three sequential AIEOP trials ('82, '87, and '88), 1528 (76%) had successful immunologic studies of the bone marrow blasts. One hundred eighty-four (12%) had T-ALL. During these studies, four consecutive high-risk ALL treatment protocols (i.e., 8303, 8503, 8703, and 8803) were used. Because the treatment schedule in protocols 8503 and 8703 were almost identical, those patients were grouped together for the purpose of survival analysis. The 137 boys and 47 girls ranged in age from 16 months to 15.5 years (median, 7.8 years) at diagnosis, and 38% had a mediastinal mass. The rates of treatment response [i.e. complete remission (CR) and event free survival (EFS) rates] were compared for patients with T-ALL or B-cell progenitor ALL, overall and by individual study. Presenting features and early response to steroid monotherapy were also tested as possible prognostic factors. Overall, the CR rate was 94%, and the 7-year survival (SE) was 51.9% (4.2). T-ALL patients had a significantly worse outcome than B-lineage ALL patients [7-year EFS 40.4% (5.2) vs. 61.7% (1.7), P 50 x 10(9)/l (P = 0.04). The EFS for patients with T-ALL and good steroid response [63% (3.0)] was comparable with that of the unselected B-lineage ALL patients. EFS for patient with T-ALL has

  19. TLR2 Expression in Peripheral CD4+ T Cells Promotes Th17 Response and Is Associated with Disease Aggravation of Hepatitis B Virus-Related Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Th17 responses have been shown to play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF. The mechanism underlying the enhanced Th17 responses in these patients remains largely unclear. Here we investigated toll-like receptors (TLRs expression in peripheral T cells and their roles in Th17 cell differentiation and disease aggravation in ACLF patients. 18 healthy subjects (HS, 20 chronic HBV-infected (CHB patients, and 26 ACLF patients were enrolled and examined for TLRs expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. The correlations of T cell TLR2 expression with the antigen non-specific Th17 responses and disease aggravation, as well as the Th17 response to TLR2 ligand stimulation were evaluated in ACLF patients. Compared to HS and CHB patients, ACLF patients showed a distinct TLRs expression pattern in PBMCs. Significantly increased TLR2 expression in T cells was observed in ACLF patients. The TLR2 expression in CD4+ T cells was correlated with the Th17 responses and the clinical markers for disease aggravation in ACLF patients. Moreover, TLR2 ligands stimulation promoted Th17 cell differentiation and response in PBMCs of ACLF patients. These findings implicate that TLR2 signaling plays critical roles in Th17 cell differentiation and disease aggravation of HBV-related ACLF.

  20. Pattern of immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor-δ/γ gene rearrangements in Iranian children with B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poopak, Behzad; Saki, Najmaldin; Purfatholah, Ali Akbar; Najmabadi, Hossein; Mortazavi, Yosef; Arzanian, Mohammad T; Khosravipour, Gelareh; Haghnejad, Fariba; Salari, Fatemeh; Shahjahani, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells have unique rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH), immunoglobulin light chain (IgK), and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, which can be used as markers for clonality assay and evaluation of minimal residual disease. In this study, we have evaluated the pattern of IgH, IgK chains, and TCRG/D gene rearrangements in precursor-B ALL. In our prospective study, hyper-variable regions (CDRI and III) of IgH, TCRD (Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3), TCRG (Vγ, VγI, and VγII), and IgK (Vκ-Kde) were studied in 126 cases with diagnosis of B-precursor ALL. One hundred and fourteen (90.5%) out of 126 patients had clonal rearrangements of IgH using consensus primers for CDRI and/or CDRIII regions. Monoclonal, biclonal, and oligoclonal patterns were observed in 63 (57.8%), 38 (34.9%), and 6 (5.5%) patients with IgH (CDRIII) rearrangements, respectively. Clonal rearrangements of TCRG (Vγ) and VγI/II were present in 79.3 and 64.9% of patients, respectively, and only 5% of cases showed biclonal pattern. The VγII rearrangement was the most common (46.8%) type in TCRG. Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3 partial gene rearrangements were observed in 47 (45.2%; n = 104) and 11 (16.6%; n = 66) patients, respectively. Biclonal/oligoclonal patterns were present in 13 (27.7%) and 2 (4.3%) cases with Vδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement, respectively. Only one patient had biclonal Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement. Clonal pattern of IgK-Kde was detected in 59 cases (67%; n = 88). Our findings showed that clonal rearrangements of IgH and TCRD (Vδ2-Dδ3 and Dδ2-Dδ3) genes had similar patterns to other studies. Frequency of TCRG (VγI and VγII) and IgK rearrangements was found to be slightly higher than previous reports. Among the IgK rearrangements, VKI (25%) was the most common.

  1. Gene-based outcome prediction in multiple cohorts of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a Children's Oncology Group study

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    Sturges Nina C

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous complete clinical remission in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is now approaching 80% due to the implementation of aggressive chemotherapy protocols but patients that relapse continue to have a poor prognosis. Such patients could benefit from augmented therapy if their clinical outcome could be more accurately predicted at the time of diagnosis. Gene expression profiling offers the potential to identify additional prognostic markers but has had limited success in generating robust signatures that predict outcome across multiple patient cohorts. This study aimed to identify robust gene classifiers that could be used for the accurate prediction of relapse in independent cohorts and across different experimental platforms. Results Using HG-U133Plus2 microarrays we modeled a five-gene classifier (5-GC that accurately predicted clinical outcome in a cohort of 50 T-ALL patients. The 5-GC was further tested against three independent cohorts of T-ALL patients, using either qRT-PCR or microarray gene expression, and could predict patients with significantly adverse clinical outcome in each. The 5-GC featured the interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R, low-expression of which was independently predictive of relapse in T-ALL patients. In T-ALL cell lines, low IL-7R expression was correlated with diminished growth response to IL-7 and enhanced glucocorticoid resistance. Analysis of biological pathways identified the NF-κB and Wnt pathways, and the cell adhesion receptor family (particularly integrins as being predictive of relapse. Outcome modeling using genes from these pathways identified patients with significantly worse relapse-free survival in each T-ALL cohort. Conclusions We have used two different approaches to identify, for the first time, robust gene signatures that can successfully discriminate relapse and CCR patients at the time of diagnosis across multiple patient cohorts and platforms. Such genes and pathways

  2. T Cell factor 1 represses CD8+ effector T cell formation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemessen, Machteld M; Baert, Miranda R M; Kok, Lianne; van Eggermond, Marja C J A; van den Elsen, Peter J; Arens, Ramon; Staal, Frank J T

    2014-12-01

    The Wnt-responsive transcription factor T cell factor 1 (Tcf1) is well known for its role in thymic T cell development and the formation of memory CD8(+) T cells. However, its role in the initial phases of CD8(+) T effector cell formation has remained unexplored. We report that high levels of Wnt signaling and Tcf1 are operational in naive and memory CD8(+) T cells, whereas Wnt signaling and Tcf1 were low in effector CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells deficient in Tcf1 produce IFN-γ more rapidly, coinciding with increased demethylation of the IFN-γ enhancer and higher expression of the transcription factors Tbet and Blimp1. Moreover, virus-specific Tcf1(-/-) CD8(+) T cells show accelerated expansion in acute infection, which is associated with increased IFN-γ and TNF production and lower viral load. Genetic complementation experiments with various Tcf1 isoforms indicate that Tcf1 dosage and protein stability are critical in suppressing IFN-γ production. Isoforms lacking the β-catenin binding domain are equally effective in inhibiting CD8(+) effector T cell formation. Thus, Tcf1 functions as a repressor of CD8(+) effector T cell formation in a β-catenin/Wnt-independent manner. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. FOXO3 regulates CD8 T cell memory by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms.

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    Jeremy A Sullivan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available CD8 T cell responses have three phases: expansion, contraction, and memory. Dynamic alterations in proliferation and apoptotic rates control CD8 T cell numbers at each phase, which in turn dictate the magnitude of CD8 T cell memory. Identification of signaling pathways that control CD8 T cell memory is incomplete. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway controls cell growth in many cell types by modulating the activity of FOXO transcription factors. But the role of FOXOs in regulating CD8 T cell memory remains unknown. We show that phosphorylation of Akt, FOXO and mTOR in CD8 T cells occurs in a dynamic fashion in vivo during an acute viral infection. To elucidate the potentially dynamic role for FOXO3 in regulating homeostasis of activated CD8 T cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, we infected global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV. We found that FOXO3 deficiency induced a marked increase in the expansion of effector CD8 T cells, preferentially in the spleen, by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Mechanistically, the enhanced accumulation of proliferating CD8 T cells in FOXO3-deficient mice was not attributed to an augmented rate of cell division, but instead was linked to a reduction in cellular apoptosis. These data suggested that FOXO3 might inhibit accumulation of growth factor-deprived proliferating CD8 T cells by reducing their viability. By virtue of greater accumulation of memory precursor effector cells during expansion, the numbers of memory CD8 T cells were strikingly increased in the spleens of both global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice. The augmented CD8 T cell memory was durable, and FOXO3 deficiency did not perturb any of the qualitative attributes of memory T cells. In summary, we have identified FOXO3 as a critical regulator of CD8 T cell memory, and therapeutic modulation of FOXO3 might enhance vaccine-induced protective immunity against intracellular pathogens.

  4. FOXO3 Regulates CD8 T Cell Memory by T Cell-Intrinsic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jeremy A.; Kim, Eui Ho; Plisch, Erin H.; Peng, Stanford L.; Suresh, M.

    2012-01-01

    CD8 T cell responses have three phases: expansion, contraction, and memory. Dynamic alterations in proliferation and apoptotic rates control CD8 T cell numbers at each phase, which in turn dictate the magnitude of CD8 T cell memory. Identification of signaling pathways that control CD8 T cell memory is incomplete. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway controls cell growth in many cell types by modulating the activity of FOXO transcription factors. But the role of FOXOs in regulating CD8 T cell memory remains unknown. We show that phosphorylation of Akt, FOXO and mTOR in CD8 T cells occurs in a dynamic fashion in vivo during an acute viral infection. To elucidate the potentially dynamic role for FOXO3 in regulating homeostasis of activated CD8 T cells in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, we infected global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus (LCMV). We found that FOXO3 deficiency induced a marked increase in the expansion of effector CD8 T cells, preferentially in the spleen, by T cell-intrinsic mechanisms. Mechanistically, the enhanced accumulation of proliferating CD8 T cells in FOXO3-deficient mice was not attributed to an augmented rate of cell division, but instead was linked to a reduction in cellular apoptosis. These data suggested that FOXO3 might inhibit accumulation of growth factor-deprived proliferating CD8 T cells by reducing their viability. By virtue of greater accumulation of memory precursor effector cells during expansion, the numbers of memory CD8 T cells were strikingly increased in the spleens of both global and T cell-specific FOXO3-deficient mice. The augmented CD8 T cell memory was durable, and FOXO3 deficiency did not perturb any of the qualitative attributes of memory T cells. In summary, we have identified FOXO3 as a critical regulator of CD8 T cell memory, and therapeutic modulation of FOXO3 might enhance vaccine-induced protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. PMID:22359505

  5. The impact of chronic GVHD on survival of Patients with acute myeloid leukemia after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling peripheral blood stem cells transplantation

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    farhad Shahsavar

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the occurrence of cGVHD is an important predictor of outcome of non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling allogeneic PBSCT, in those AML patients who develope cGVHD have a high chance of survival.

  6. Characterization of the CDR3 structure of the Vβ21 T cell clone in patients with P210(BCR-ABL)-positive chronic myeloid leukemia and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xianfeng; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Li, Bo; Chen, Yu; Yan, Xiaojuan; Li, Yangqiu

    2011-10-01

    The clonally expanded T cells identified in most cancer patients that respond to tumor-associated antigen such as P210(BCR-ABL) protein have definite, specific antitumor cytotoxicity. T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ CDR3 repertoire diversity was analyzed in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and BCR-ABL(+) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) by GeneScan. A high frequency of oligoclonal expansion of the TCR Vβ21 subfamily was observed in the peripheral blood of CML and B-ALL patients. These clonally expanded Vβ21 T cells were correlated with the pathophysiologic process of CML. A conserved amino acid motif (SLxxV) was observed within the CDR3 region in only 3 patients with CML. Preferential usage of the Jβ segments was also observed in a minority of patients. The 3-dimensional structures of the CDR3 region containing the same motif or using the same Jβ segment displayed low similarity; on the contrary, the conformation of the CDR3 region containing no conserved motif in some T cell clones was highly similar. In conclusion, our findings indicate a high frequency of TCR Vβ21 subfamily expansion in p210(BCR-ABL)-positive CML and B-ALL patients. The characterization of the CDR3 structure was complex. Regrettably, at this time it was not possible to confirm that the Vβ21 T cell clones were derived from the stimulation of p210(BCR-ABL) protein. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. T-cell costimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1996-01-01

    The CD40L molecule expressed by CD4+ regulatory T lymphocytes is known to deliver signals that activate B cells and macrophages. It now appears that CD40L regulates T cells themselves, during both their development and their participation in adaptive immune responses....

  8. HY-Specific Induced Regulatory T Cells Display High Specificity and Efficacy in the Prevention of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Heinrichs, Jessica; Haarberg, Kelley; Semple, Kenrick; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Liu, Chen; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Naturally derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) may prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) while preserving graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. However, clinical application of naturally derived regulatory T cells has been severely hampered by their scarce availability and nonselectivity. To overcome these limitations, we took alternative approaches to generate Ag-specific induced Tregs (iTregs) and tested their efficacy and selectivity in the prevention of GVHD in preclinical models of bone marrow transplantation. We selected HY as a target Ag because it is a naturally processed, ubiquitously expressed minor histocompatibility Ag (miHAg) with a proven role in GVHD and GVL effect. We generated HY-specific iTregs (HY-iTregs) from resting CD4 T cells derived from TCR transgenic mice, in which CD4 cells specifically recognize HY peptide. We found that HY-iTregs were highly effective in preventing GVHD in male (HY(+)) but not female (HY(-)) recipients using MHC II-mismatched, parent→F1, and miHAg-mismatched murine bone marrow transplantation models. Interestingly, the expression of target Ag (HY) on the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartment alone was sufficient for iTregs to prevent GVHD. Furthermore, treatment with HY-iTregs still preserved the GVL effect even against pre-established leukemia. We found that HY-iTregs were more stable in male than in female recipients. Furthermore, HY-iTregs expanded extensively in male but not female recipients, which in turn significantly reduced donor effector T cell expansion, activation, and migration into GVHD target organs, resulting in effective prevention of GVHD. This study demonstrates that iTregs specific for HY miHAgs are highly effective in controlling GVHD in an Ag-dependent manner while sparing the GVL effect. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Preemptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy of acute cytomegalovirus infection prevents lethal disease, limits the burden of latent viral genomes, and reduces the risk of virus recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, H P; Kurz, S; Holtappels, R; Reddehase, M J

    1998-03-01

    In the immunocompetent host, primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is resolved by the immune response without causing overt disease. The viral genome, however, is not cleared but is maintained in a latent state that entails a risk of virus recurrence and consequent organ disease. By using murine CMV as a model, we have shown previously that multiple organs harbor latent CMV and that reactivation occurs with an incidence that is determined by the viral DNA load in the respective organ (M. J. Reddehase, M. Balthesen, M. Rapp, S. Jonjic, I. Pavic, and U. H. Koszinowski. J. Exp. Med. 179:185-193, 1994). This predicts that a therapeutic intervention capable of limiting the load of latent viral genome should also reduce the risk of virus recurrence. Here we demonstrate the benefits and the limits of a preemptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy of CMV infection in the immunocompromised bone marrow transplantation recipient. Antiviral CD8 T cells prevented CMV disease and accelerated the resolution of productive infection. The therapy also resulted in a lower load of latent CMV DNA in organs and consequently reduced the incidence of recurrence. The data thus provide a further supporting argument for clinical trials of preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease with CD8 T cells. However, CD8 T cells failed to clear the viral DNA. The therapy-susceptible portion of the DNA load differed between organs and was highest in the lungs. The existence of an invariant, therapy-resistant load suggests a role for immune system evasion mechanisms in the establishment of CMV latency.

  10. High efficacy and safety of low-dose CD19-directed CAR-T cell therapy in 51 refractory or relapsed B acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J; Yang, J F; Deng, B P; Zhao, X J; Zhang, X; Lin, Y H; Wu, Y N; Deng, Z L; Zhang, Y L; Liu, S H; Wu, T; Lu, P H; Lu, D P; Chang, A H; Tong, C R

    2017-12-01

    Refractory or relapsed B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients have a dismal outcome with current therapy. We treated 42 primary refractory/hematological relapsed (R/R) and 9 refractory minimal residual disease by flow cytometry (FCM-MRD + ) B-ALL patients with optimized second generation CD19-directed CAR-T cells. The CAR-T-cell infusion dosages were initially ranged from 0.05 to 14 × 10 5 /kg and were eventually settled at 1 × 10 5 /kg for the most recent 20 cases. 36/40 (90%) evaluated R/R patients achieved complete remission (CR) or CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and 9/9 (100%) FCM-MRD + patients achieved MRD - . All of the most recent 20 patients achieved CR/CRi. Most cases only experienced mild to moderate CRS. 8/51 cases had seizures that were relieved by early intervention. Twenty three of twenty seven CR/CRi patients bridged to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remained in MRD - with a median follow-up time of 206 (45-427) days, whereas 9 of 18 CR/CRi patients without allo-HCT relapsed. Our results indicate that a low CAR-T-cell dosage of 1 × 10 5 /kg, is effective and safe for treating refractory or relapsed B-ALL, and subsequent allo-HCT could further reduce the relapse rate.

  11. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO) Enzyme Links Innate Immunity and Altered T-Cell Differentiation in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Chiara; Severino, Anna; Flego, Davide; Ruggio, Aureliano; Pedicino, Daniela; Giglio, Ada Francesca; Trotta, Francesco; Lucci, Claudia; D'Amario, Domenico; Vinci, Ramona; Pisano, Eugenia; La Rosa, Giulio; Biasucci, Luigi Marzio; Crea, Filippo; Liuzzo, Giovanna

    2017-12-26

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation by promoting a tolerogenic environment through the expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an intracellular enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism. IDO expression and activity was analyzed in monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs) from non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) patients, stable angina (SA) patients and healthy controls (HC) by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) before and after in vitro maturation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The amount of tryptophan catabolite; kynurenine; was evaluated in the culture supernatants of mature-MDDCs by ELISA assay. Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) between mature-MDDCs and naïve T-cells was carried out to study the differentiation towards T-helper 1 (Th1) and induced regulatory T-cells (iTreg). Analysis of IDO mRNA transcripts in mature-MDDCs revealed a significant reduction in cells isolated from NSTEMI (625.0 ± 128.2; mean ± SEM) as compared with those from SA (958.5 ± 218.3; p = 0.041) and from HC (1183.6 ± 231.6; p = 0.034). Furthermore; the concentration of kynurenine was lower in NSTEMI patients (2.78 ± 0.2) and SA (2.98 ± 0.25) as compared with HC (5.1 ± 0.69 ng/mL; p = 0.002 and p = 0.016; respectively). When IDO-competent mature-MDDCs were co-cultured with allogeneic naïve T-cells, the ratio between the percentage of generated Th1 and iTreg was higher in NSTEMI (4.4 ± 2.9) than in SA (1.8 ± 0.6; p = 0.056) and HC (0.9 ± 0.3; p = 0.008). In NSTEMI, the tolerogenic mechanism of the immune response related to IDO production by activated MDDCs is altered, supporting their role in T-cell dysregulation.

  12. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO Enzyme Links Innate Immunity and Altered T-Cell Differentiation in Non-ST Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Zara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by a complex interplay between innate and adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs play a key role in T-cell activation and regulation by promoting a tolerogenic environment through the expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO, an intracellular enzyme involved in tryptophan catabolism. IDO expression and activity was analyzed in monocytes derived DCs (MDDCs from non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI patients, stable angina (SA patients and healthy controls (HC by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR before and after in vitro maturation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The amount of tryptophan catabolite; kynurenine; was evaluated in the culture supernatants of mature-MDDCs by ELISA assay. Autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR between mature-MDDCs and naïve T-cells was carried out to study the differentiation towards T-helper 1 (Th1 and induced regulatory T-cells (iTreg. Analysis of IDO mRNA transcripts in mature-MDDCs revealed a significant reduction in cells isolated from NSTEMI (625.0 ± 128.2; mean ± SEM as compared with those from SA (958.5 ± 218.3; p = 0.041 and from HC (1183.6 ± 231.6; p = 0.034. Furthermore; the concentration of kynurenine was lower in NSTEMI patients (2.78 ± 0.2 and SA (2.98 ± 0.25 as compared with HC (5.1 ± 0.69 ng/mL; p = 0.002 and p = 0.016; respectively. When IDO-competent mature-MDDCs were co-cultured with allogeneic naïve T-cells, the ratio between the percentage of generated Th1 and iTreg was higher in NSTEMI (4.4 ± 2.9 than in SA (1.8 ± 0.6; p = 0.056 and HC (0.9 ± 0.3; p = 0.008. In NSTEMI, the tolerogenic mechanism of the immune response related to IDO production by activated MDDCs is altered, supporting their role in T-cell dysregulation.

  13. Malaria drives T cells to exhaustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle N Wykes

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a significant global burden but after >30 years of effort there is no vaccine on the market. While the complex life cycle of the parasite presents several challenges, many years of research have also identified several mechanisms of immune evasion by Plasmodium spp.. Recent research on malaria, has investigated the Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1 pathway which mediates exhaustion of T cells, characterized by poor effector functions and recall responses and in some cases loss of the cells by apoptosis. Such studies have shown exhaustion of CD4+ T cells and an unappreciated role for CD8+ T cells in promoting sterile immunity against blood stage malaria. This is because PD-1 mediates up to a 95% reduction in numbers and functional capacity of parasite-specific CD8+ T cells, thus masking their role in protection. The role of T cell exhaustion during malaria provides an explanation for the absence of sterile immunity following the clearance of acute disease which will be relevant to future malaria-vaccine design and suggests the need for novel therapeutic solutions. This review will thus examine the role of PD-1-mediated T cell exhaustion in preventing lasting immunity against malaria.

  14. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-25

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Associated With Chronic Inflammation; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Elderly; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  15. Fusion of NUP98 and the SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) gene in a paediatric acute T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(11;18)(p15;q12).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Kerndrup, Gitte; Carlsen, Niels; Strömbeck, Bodil; Isaksson, Margareth; Johansson, Bertil

    2007-01-01

    Three NUP98 chimaeras have previously been reported in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL): NUP98/ADD3, NUP98/CCDC28A, and NUP98/RAP1GDS1. We report a T-ALL with t(11;18)(p15;q12) resulting in a novel NUP98 fusion. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation showed NUP98 and SET binding protein 1(SETBP1) fusion signals; other analyses showed that exon 12 of NUP98 was fused in-frame with exon 5 of SETBP1. Nested polymerase chain reaction did not amplify the reciprocal SETBP1/NUP98, suggesting that NUP98/SETBP1 transcript is pathogenetically important. SETBP1 has previously not been implicated in leukaemias; however, it encodes a protein that specifically interacts with SET, fused to NUP214 in a case of acute undifferentiated leukaemia.

  16. GLYCAN-DIRECTED CAR-T CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Migliorini, Denis; King, Tiffany R; Mandel, Ulla; June, Carl H; Posey, Avery D

    2018-01-23

    Cancer immunotherapy is rapidly advancing in the treatment of a variety of hematopoietic cancers, including pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and diffuse large B cell lymphoma, with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cells. CARs are genetically encoded artificial T cell receptors that combine the antigen specificity of an antibody with the machinery of T cell activation. However, implementation of CAR technology in the treatment of solid tumors has been progressing much slower. Solid tumors are characterized by a number of challenges that need to be overcome, including cellular heterogeneity, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), and, in particular, few known cancer-specific targets. Post-translational modifications that differentially occur in malignant cells generate valid cell surface, cancer-specific targets for CAR-T cells. We previously demonstrated that CAR-T cells targeting an aberrant O-glycosylation of MUC1, a common cancer marker associated with changes in cell adhesion, tumor growth, and poor prognosis, could control malignant growth in mouse models. Here, we discuss the field of glycan-directed CAR-T cells and review the different classes of antibodies specific for glycan-targeting, including the generation of high affinity O-glycopeptide antibodies. Finally, we discuss historic and recently investigated glycan targets for CAR-T cells and provide our perspective on how targeting the tumor glycoproteome and/or glycome will improve CAR-T immunotherapy. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  18. huJCAR014 CAR-T Cells in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-26

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; BCL2 Gene Rearrangement; BCL6 Gene Rearrangement; CD19 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; MYC Gene Rearrangement; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  19. Engineering CAR-T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liu, Jun; Zhong, Jiang F; Zhang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor redirected T cells (CAR-T cells) have achieved inspiring outcomes in patients with B cell malignancies, and are now being investigated in other hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. CAR-T cells are generated by the T cells from patients' or donors' blood. After the T cells are expanded and genetically modified, they are reinfused into the patients. However, many challenges still need to be resolved in order for this technology to gain widespread adoption. In this review, we first discuss the structure and evolution of chimeric antigen receptors. We then report on the tools used for production of CAR-T cells. Finally, we address the challenges posed by CAR-T cells.

  20. Chronic Inflammation and  T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan S Fay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial tissues of the skin, lungs, reproductive tract, and intestines are the largest physical barriers the body has to protect against infection. Epithelial tissues are woven with a matrix of immune cells programmed to mobilize the host innate and adaptive immune responses. Included among these immune cells are  T cells that are unique in their TCR usage, location, and functions in the body. Stress reception by  T cells as a result of traumatic epithelial injury, malignancy, and/or infection induces  T cell activation. Once activated,  T cells function to repair tissue, induce inflammation, recruit leukocytes, and lyse cells. Many of these functions are mediated via the production of cytokines and growth factors upon  T cell activation. Pathogenesis of many chronic inflammatory diseases involve  T cells; some of which are exacerbated by their presence, while others are improved.  T cells require a delicate balance between their need for acute inflammatory mediators to function normally and the detrimental impact imparted by chronic inflammation. This review will focus on the recent progress made in understanding how epithelial  T cells influence the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and how a balance between acute and chronic inflammation impacts  T cell function. Future studies will be important to understand how this balance is achieved.

  1. [Acute T cells lymphoblastic leukemia with a t(1;19)(q23;p13) and E2A-PBX1 in an adult: one case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Sheng; Zhang, Xu-Hui; Yao, Li; Zhang, Ri; Chen, Zi-Xing; Wu, De-Pei; Sun, Ai-Ning; Jin, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Hui-Ying; Hu, Xiao-Hui

    2009-10-01

    To report a case of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with t(1;19)(q23;pl3) and E2A-PBX1 fusion gene, which is a characteristic translocation of childhood B cell ALL (B-ALL). The chromosome, karyotype, immunophenotype and mRNA for fusion gene of the leukemic cells were examined by cytogenetic analysis, flow cytometry (FCM) and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), respectively. The cytogenetic karyotype of the patient was 47, XY, 9p+, 15p+, 17q-, der(19), t(1;19)(q23;pl3)\\[5\\]/46, XY\\[15\\], and E2A-PBX1 was positive. The leukemic cells expressed T cell markers. The patient was induced with hyper CVAD regimen (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, adriamycin, and dexamethasone), and achieved complete remission with normal cytogenetic karyotype 46 XY\\[10\\], and negative E2A-PBX1. t(1;19)E2A-PBX1(+) can be implicated in adult T-ALL, besides childhood B-ALL.

  2. Fusion of NUP98 and the SET binding protein 1 (SETBP1) gene in a paediatric acute T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia with t(11;18)(p15;q12)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Kerndrup, Gitte; Carlsen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Three NUP98 chimaeras have previously been reported in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL): NUP98/ADD3, NUP98/CCDC28A, and NUP98/RAP1GDS1. We report a T-ALL with t(11;18)(p15;q12) resulting in a novel NUP98 fusion. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation showed NUP98 and SET binding protein 1......(SETBP1) fusion signals; other analyses showed that exon 12 of NUP98 was fused in-frame with exon 5 of SETBP1. Nested polymerase chain reaction did not amplify the reciprocal SETBP1/NUP98, suggesting that NUP98/SETBP1 transcript is pathogenetically important. SETBP1 has previously not been implicated...

  3. TNF activity and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Amit K; Gracias, Donald T; Croft, Michael

    2018-01-01

    TNF (tumor necrosis factor) is both a pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine that is central to the development of autoimmune disease, cancer, and protection against infectious pathogens. As well as a myriad other activities, TNF can be a product of T cells and can act on T cells. Here we review old and new data on the importance of TNF produced by T cells and how TNF signaling via TNFR2 may directly impact alternate aspects of T cell biology. TNF can promote the activation and proliferation of naïve and effector T cells, but also can induce apoptosis of highly activated effector T cells, further determining the size of the pathogenic or protective conventional T cell pool. Moreover, TNF can have divergent effects on regulatory T cells. It can both downregulate their suppressive capacity, but also contribute in other instances to their development or accumulation. Biologics that block TNF or stimulate TNFR2 therefore have the potential to strongly modulate the balance between effector T cells and Treg cells which could impact disease in both positive and negative manners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Minimal residual disease (MRD detection with translocations and T-cell receptor and immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muge Sayitoglu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monitoring minimal residual disease has become increasingly important in clinical practice of ALL management. Break-point fusion regions of leukaemia related chromosomal aberrations and rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig and T cell-receptor (TCR genes are used as leukaemia specific markers in genetic studies of MRD.Material and Methods: A total of 31 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed ALL were screened for eligibility criteria. Of those 26 were included in the study. One patient with partial response following induction therapy and four patients who were lost to follow-up after induction were excluded from the study; thus 21 patients were evaluated for MRD by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR, heteroduplex analysis, sequencing and quantitative real time PCR techniques. Results: Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 5 (24% of the patients and were used for MRD monitoring. Three patients had t(9;22 translocation, the other 2 had t(4;11 and t(1;19. MRD-based risk stratification of the16 patients analysed for Ig/TCR rearrangements revealed 3 low-risk, 11 intermediate-risk and 2 high-risk patients.Conclusion: MRD monitoring is progressively getting to be a more important predictive factor in adult ALL patients. As reported by others confirmed by our limited data there is a good correlation between MRD status and clinical outcome in patients receiving chemotherapy. The pilot-study presented here is the first that systematically and consecutively performs a molecular MRD monitoring of ALL patients in Turkey.

  5. Using epigenetics to define vaccine-induced memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Ben; Hale, J Scott; Akondy, Rama

    2013-06-01

    Memory T cells generated from acute infection or vaccination have the potential to provide the host with life-long immunity against re-infection. Protection by memory T cells is achieved through their acquired ability to persist at anatomical sites of the primary infection as well as maintaining a heightened ability to recall effector functions. The maintenance of CD8 and CD4 T cell function in a state of readiness is key to life-long immunity and manifest through changes in transcriptional regulation. Yet, the ability to identify poised transcriptional programs at the maintenance stage of the response is lacking from most transcriptional profiling studies of memory T cells. Epigenetic profiling allows for the assessment of transcriptionally poised (promoters that are readily accessible for transcription) states of antigen-specific T cells without manipulation of the activation state of the cell. Here we review recent studies that have examined epigenetic programs of effector and memory T cell subsets. These reports demonstrate that acquisition of epigenetic programs during memory T cell differentiation to acute and chronic infections is coupled to, and potentially regulate, the cell's recall response. We discuss the usefulness of epigenetic profiling in characterizing T cell differentiation state and function for preclinical evaluation of vaccines and the current methodologies for single locus versus genome-wide epigenetic profiling. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. CD8 T cell persistence in treated HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, J. C.; Lederman, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Many treated HIV infected persons maintain persistently high circulating CD8 T cell numbers, even after many years of therapy. Recent reports suggest that persistent CD8 T cell expansion is associated with higher risk of morbid non-AIDS events. Thus, assessing the mechanisms of CD8 T cell expansion and persistence may give insights into a feature of HIV disease that is clinically important. Recent findings Acute HIV infection is associated with activation and expansion of the CD8 T cell compartment. Expanded CD8 T cells persist throughout disease course and, in contrast to the plasticity that typically characterizes immune responses to most other pathogens, circulating CD8 T cell numbers do not normalize in many patients despite pharmacological suppression of HIV replication. We suspect that residual inflammation in treated HIV infection contributes to antigen-independent CD8 T cell expansion and persistence as most of these cells are not HIV-reactive. Summary Circulating CD8 T cell numbers remain abnormally elevated in many treated HIV-infected patients and this elevation is associated with adverse clinical events. Future studies will need to assess the mechanisms of CD8 T cell expansion and to define the role of CD8 lymphocytosis in the clinical course of treated HIV disease. PMID:25010897

  7. T cell receptor-engineered T cells to treat solid tumors: T cell processing toward optimal T cell fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Lamers (Cor); S. van Steenbergen-Langeveld (Sabine); M. van Brakel (Mandy); C.M. Groot-van Ruijven (Corrien); P.M.M.L. van Elzakker (Pascal); B.A. van Krimpen (Brigitte); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractTherapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T

  8. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  9. Chronic but not acute virus infection induces sustained expansion of myeloid suppressor cell numbers that inhibit viral-specific T cell immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Brian A; Uebelhoer, Luke S; Nakaya, Helder I; Price, Aryn A; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-02-21

    Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72 hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers and stimulated antiviral CD8(+) T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after infection, there was an increase in Ly6C(hi) monocytic and Gr-1(hi) neutrophilic cells in lymphoid organs and blood. This expansion in cell numbers was enhanced and sustained in C13 infection, whereas it occurred only transiently with ARM infection. These cells resembled myeloid-derived suppressor cells and potently suppressed T cell proliferation. The reduction of monocytic cells in Ccr2(-/-) mice or after Gr-1 antibody depletion enhanced antiviral T cell function. Thus, innate cells have an important immunomodulatory role throughout chronic infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Innate-like Cytotoxic Function of Bystander-Activated CD8+T Cells Is Associated with Liver Injury in Acute Hepatitis A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Chang, Dong-Yeop; Lee, Hyun Woong; Lee, Hoyoung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Sung, Pil Soo; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Hong, Seon-Hui; Kang, Wonseok; Lee, Jino; Shin, So Youn; Yu, Hee Tae; You, Sooseong; Choi, Yoon Seok; Oh, Insoo; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Jung, Min Kyung; Suh, Kyung-Suk; Hwang, Shin; Kim, Won; Park, Su-Hyung; Kim, Hyung Joon; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2018-01-16

    Acute hepatitis A (AHA) involves severe CD8 + T cell-mediated liver injury. Here we showed during AHA, CD8 + T cells specific to unrelated viruses became activated. Hepatitis A virus (HAV)-infected cells produced IL-15 that induced T cell receptor (TCR)-independent activation of memory CD8 + T cells. TCR-independent activation of non-HAV-specific CD8 + T cells were detected in patients, as indicated by NKG2D upregulation, a marker of TCR-independent T cell activation by IL-15. CD8 + T cells derived from AHA patients exerted innate-like cytotoxicity triggered by activating receptors NKG2D and NKp30 without TCR engagement. We demonstrated that the severity of liver injury in AHA patients correlated with the activation of HAV-unrelated virus-specific CD8 + T cells and the innate-like cytolytic activity of CD8 + T cells, but not the activation of HAV-specific T cells. Thus, host injury in AHA is associated with innate-like cytotoxicity of bystander-activated CD8 + T cells, a result with implications for acute viral diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; Bonin, M von; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo

  12. Low numbers of FOXP3 positive regulatory T cells are present in all developmental stages of human atherosclerotic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Onno J.; van der Meer, Jelger J.; Teeling, Peter; van der Loos, Chris M.; van der Wal, Allard C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T cell mediated inflammation contributes to atherogenesis and the onset of acute cardiovascular disease. Effector T cell functions are under a tight control of a specialized T cell subset, regulatory T cells (Treg). At present, nothing is known about the in situ presence of Treg in human

  13. Laquinimod interferes with migratory capacity of T cells and reduces IL-17 levels, inflammatory demyelination and acute axonal damage in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Christiane; Stadelmann, Christine; Pförtner, Ramona; Raymond, Emanuel; Feigelson, Sara; Alon, Ronen; Timan, Bracha; Hayardeny, Liat; Brück, Wolfgang

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the effect of laquinimod on inflammatory demyelination, axonal damage, cytokine profiles and migratory capacities of lymphocytes in C57BL/6 mice with active EAE induced with MOG(35-55) peptide. The mice were treated at disease induction and after disease onset. Spinal cords were assessed histologically. Cytokines and adhesive properties were analyzed in splenocytes. Preventive and therapeutic laquinimod treatment reduced clinical signs, inflammation, and demyelination. VLA-4-mediated adhesiveness and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17 were down-regulated in treated animals. Within lesions, treated mice showed similar axonal densities, but less acute axonal damage than controls. Laquinimod might thus protect myelin and axons by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and impairing the migratory capacity of lymphocytes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Arsenic trioxide decreases the amount and inhibits the function of regulatory T cells, which may contribute to its efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Li, Xiaoxia; Quan, Lina; Yao, Jiying; Mu, Guannan; Guo, Jingjie; Wang, Yitong

    2018-03-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) exhibits substantial clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Here, we investigated whether ATO exerts its efficacy by affecting regulatory T (Treg) cells. We determined whether ATO treatment influenced the amount and function of purified Treg cells. We also examined the effect of ATO treatment on Treg cells from APL patients. ATO treatment induced apoptosis in purified Treg cells and dampened the inhibition of effector T (Teff) cells proliferation and the secretion of cytokine by Treg cells. Treg cell levels in the peripheral blood and serum IL-10 levels were dramatically decreased in APL patients after single ATO treatment. In summary, our results show that ATO decreases the amount and inhibits the function of Treg cells, thereby enhancing Teff cell function and overall anti-tumor immunity.

  15. The individuality of (virus-specific) CD8⁺ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalderen, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    CD8⁺ T cells are specialized in detecting intracellular pathology. As such, acute phase and memory CD8⁺ T cell responses form an essential line of defense against viral infections. Much of the current knowledge on virus-specific CD8⁺ T cell responses derives from mouse models. However, since mice do

  16. A novel Leu153Ser mutation of the Fanconi anemia FANCD2 gene is associated with severe chemotherapy toxicity in a pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, A; Locasciulli, A; Bianco, A M; Criscuolo, M; Conti, V; Grammatico, P; Cappellacci, S; Zatterale, A; Morgese, F; Cucciolla, V; Delia, D; Della Ragione, F; Savoia, A

    2007-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by pancitopenia, congenital malformations, predisposition to cancers and chromosomal instability. We report the clinical and molecular features of a patient initially identified as a potential FA case only because of chemotherapy toxicity during the treatment of a T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cells from this patient showed a moderate chromosomal instability, increasing sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents but normal response to ionizing radiation. The analysis of FA proteins demonstrated a marked reduction of FANCD2 (>95%), but normal levels of FANCA or FANCG. Interestingly, this defect was associated with a homozygous missense mutation of FANCD2, resulting in a novel amino-acid substitution (Leu153Ser) at residue Leu153, which is highly conserved through evolution. The FANCD2(L153S) protein, whose reduced expression was not due to impaired transcription, was detected also in its monoubiquitinated form in the nucleus, suggesting that the mutation does not affect post-translation modifications or subcellular localization but rather the stability of FANCD2. Therefore, the hypomorphic Leu153Ser mutation represents the first example of a FANCD2 defect that might promote clonal progression of tumors, such as T-ALL, and severe chemotherapy toxicity in patients without any clinical manifestations typical of FA.

  17. Human renal tubular epithelial cells suppress alloreactive T cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmers, M W H J; Korevaar, S S; Roemeling-van Rhijn, M; van den Bosch, T P P; Hoogduijn, M J; Betjes, M G H; Weimar, W; Baan, C C; Rowshani, A T

    2015-03-01

    Renal tubular epithelial cells (TECs) are one of the main targets of alloreactive T cells during acute rejection. We hypothesize that TECs modulate the outcome of alloimmunity by executing immunosuppressive effects in order to dampen the local inflammation. We studied whether TECs possess immunosuppressive capacities and if indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) might play a role in suppressing T cell alloreactivity. Next, we studied the role of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 with regard to TEC-related immunomodulatory effects. CD3/CD28 and alloactivated peripheral blood mononuclear cells were co-cultured with activated TECs. We analysed CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation and apoptosis in the absence or presence of IDO inhibitor 1-methyl-L-tryptophan (1-L-MT), anti-PD-L1 and anti-ICAM-1. Further, we examined whether inhibition of T cell proliferation was cell-cell contact-dependent. We found that TECs dose-dependently inhibited CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation (Pcell proliferation was only partially restored or failed to restore using 1-L-MT. Activated TECs increased early and late apoptosis of proliferating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells; only CD4(+) T cell apoptosis was statistically affected by 1-L-MT. Transwell experiments revealed that TEC-mediated immunosuppression is cell-cell contact-dependent. We found that anti-ICAM-1 affected only CD4(+) T cell apoptosis and not T cell proliferation. Our data show that TECs suppress both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation contact dependently. Interestingly, inhibition of proliferation and enhancement of apoptosis of T cell subsets is differentially regulated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and ICAM-1, with no evidence for the involvement of PD-L1 in our system. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Haploidentical Transplantation Without In Vitro T-Cell Depletion Results in Outcomes Equivalent to Those of Contemporaneous Matched Sibling and Unrelated Donor Transplantation for Acute Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sijian; Fan, Qian; Sun, Jing; Fan, Zhiping; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Qianli; Huang, Fen; Xuan, Li; Dai, Min; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Hui; Liu, Qi-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to determine whether HLA-haploidentical-related donor (HRD) transplant can achieve equivalent outcomes and have stronger GVL compared to HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) and HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplants. A total of 355 consecutive patients with acute leukemia undergoing allogeneic transplant at our single institute between March 2008 and March 2014 were enrolled in this retrospective investigation. Of the 355 patients, 96 cases received HRD, 153 MSD, and 106 MUD transplants. HRD transplant was associated with higher incidences of grade II to IV aGVHD (40.6%) compared with MSD (23.5%, P = 0.002) and MUD transplants (34.0%, P = 0.049), whereas incidences of grade III to IV aGVHD (11.4%, 7.8%, 10.5%, respectively; P = 0.590) and cGVHD (29.5%, 24.0%, 29.5%, respectively; P = 0.538) did not differ among 3 groups. Five-year relapse rates were 19.2%, 26.8%, and 23.0% in 3 groups, respectively (P = 0.419). However, of 206 high-risk patients, the relapse rate in HRD transplant was lower than in MSD transplant (23.8% vs 41.9%, P = 0.026). Multivariate analysis showed that HRD had beneficial impact on relapse (for MSD: P = 0.006). Five-year transplant-related mortality was lower in MSD transplant compared with those in HRD (17.3% vs 26.4%, P = 0.041) and MUD transplants (17.3% vs 24.1%, P = 0.037). Five-year overall survival were 60.4%, 64.6%, and 61.0%, respectively, in HRD, MSD, and MUD groups (P = 0.371); 5-year disease-free survival were 59.6%, 58.8%, and 54.9%, respectively (P = 0.423). Our results suggest that HRD transplant results in outcomes equivalent to MSD and MUD transplants. HRD might carry a superior GVL effect compared to MSD for high-risk patients. PMID:26986108

  19. Theoretical models for T-cell vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Borghans, J.A.M.

    1995-01-01

    T cell vaccination (TCV) is a term for a whole collection of phenomena in which the injection of T cells provides protection against autoimmunity. Vaccination with T cells has been investigated for several autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, adjuvant

  20. The number of regulatory T cells in transbronchial lung allograft biopsies is related to FoxP3 mRNA levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and to the degree of acute cellular rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Dorrit; Madsen, Caroline B; Iversen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (FoxP3) is a marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs) - a subset of T cells known to suppress a wide range of immune responses. These cells are considered to be pivotal for the induction of tolerance to donor antigens in human allografts. We aimed to correlate...

  1. Blockade of CD7 expression in T cells for effective chimeric antigen receptor targeting of T-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Yi Tian; Vinanica, Natasha; Kamiya, Takahiro; Shimasaki, Noriko; Coustan-Smith, Elaine; Campana, Dario

    2017-11-28

    Effective immunotherapies for T-cell malignancies are lacking. We devised a novel approach based on chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T lymphocytes. We selected CD7 as a target because of its consistent expression in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), including the most aggressive subtype, early T-cell precursor (ETP)-ALL. In 49 diagnostic T-ALL samples (including 14 ETP-ALL samples), median CD7 expression was >99%; CD7 expression remained high at relapse (n = 14), and during chemotherapy (n = 54). We targeted CD7 with a second-generation CAR (anti-CD7-41BB-CD3ζ), but CAR expression in T lymphocytes caused fratricide due to the presence of CD7 in the T cells themselves. To downregulate CD7 and control fratricide, we applied a new method (protein expression blocker [PEBL]), based on an anti-CD7 single-chain variable fragment coupled with an intracellular retention domain. Transduction of anti-CD7 PEBL resulted in virtually instantaneous abrogation of surface CD7 expression in all transduced T cells; 2.0% ± 1.7% were CD7 + vs 98.1% ± 1.5% of mock-transduced T cells (n = 5; P < .0001). PEBL expression did not impair T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion, or cytotoxicity, and eliminated CAR-mediated fratricide. PEBL-CAR T cells were highly cytotoxic against CD7 + leukemic cells in vitro and were consistently more potent than CD7 + T cells spared by fratricide. They also showed strong anti-leukemic activity in cell line- and patient-derived T-ALL xenografts. The strategy described in this study fits well with existing clinical-grade cell manufacturing processes and can be rapidly implemented for the treatment of patients with high-risk T-cell malignancies.

  2. Anti-regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    Our initial understanding of immune-regulatory cells was based on the discovery of suppressor cells that assure peripheral T-cell tolerance and promote immune homeostasis. Research has particularly focused on the importance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) for immune modulation, e.g. directing host...... responses to tumours or inhibiting autoimmunity development. However, recent studies report the discovery of self-reactive pro-inflammatory T cells—termed anti-regulatory T cells (anti-Tregs)—that target immune-suppressive cells. Thus, regulatory cells can now be defined as both cells that suppress immune...... reactions as well as effector cells that counteract the effects of suppressor cells and support immune reactions. Self-reactive anti-Tregs have been described that specifically recognize human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes derived from proteins that are normally expressed by regulatory immune cells...

  3. Global transcriptional characterization of CD8+ T cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Jan; Knolle, Percy A

    2015-02-01

    The differentiation of memory CD8T cells after acute infections comprises generation of functionally distinct populations that either have proliferative potential or display cytotoxic effector functions and that either recirculate into lymphoid tissues or remain tissue-resident. The development of these functionally distinct cell populations is dictated by defined signals from the microenvironment that result in a coordinated expression of a network of transcription factors, which determine the functionality of memory T cells. Distinct transcriptional regulation observed during chronic viral infection that results in generation of T cells that control viral replication in the absence of immunopathology suggests the existence of so far unappreciated functional adaptation of T cell function to the particular need during chronic infections to control infection and avoid immunopathology. Furthermore, the non-canonical generation of CD8T cell memory outside of lymphoid tissues in the liver in the absence of inflammation is correlated with a distinct transcriptional profile and indicates further complexity in the commensurate immune response to infectious pathogens that escape innate immunity. Taken together, distinct profiles of transcriptional regulation are linked to CD8T cells with different functions and provide important mechanistic insight into the continuous functional adaptation of CD8T cells to generate a commensurate immune response to infectious challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Death of effector memory T cells characterizes AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireille, Laforge; Anna, Senik; Marie-Christine, Cumont; Valerie, Monceaux; Bruno, Hurtrel; Jerome, Estaquier

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive effector CD4+ T helper-mediated immune response is highly heterogeneous, based on the development of distinct subsets that are characterized by the expression of different profiles of cell surface markers. Functional impairment of T cells is characteristic of many chronic mouse and human viral infections. Excessive induction of apoptosis in infected and uninfected CD4+ T cells has been proposed as one of the pathogenic mechanisms that may impair the immune response and cause the development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Thus, the death of effector/memory CD4+ T cells during both the acute and chronic phase represents one the main characteristic of such viral infection that predicts disease outcome. Improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the death of memory CD4+ T cells should enable us to improve vaccination protocols and treatments, by combining them with antiretroviral drugs and molecules designed to decrease apoptotic phenomena.

  5. γδ T cells in infection and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lifei; Wang, Tian; Sun, Jiaren

    2015-10-01

    Standing at the interface of innate and adaptive immune, γδ T cells play important pathophysiologic roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumorigenesis. Recent studies indicate that γδ T cells could be categorized into IFN-γ(+) and IL-17(+) subsets, both of which possess select TCR usages, bear unique surface markers and require different cytokine signaling to maintain the homeostasis. In addition, as the major innate IL-17 producers, γδ T cells are increasingly appreciated for their involvement in various acute infections and injuries. This review will summarize the characteristics of IFN-γ(+) (γδ T-IFN-γ) and IL-17(+) γδ T cells (γδT17) and discuss their distinct pathogenic functions in different disease models. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. New development in CAR-T cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenguang Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  7. Establishing guidelines for CAR-T cells: challenges and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Di-Yuan; Zhang, Bing-Lan; Wei, Wei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-04-01

    T cells, genetically modified by chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-T), are endowed with specificity to a desired antigen and are cytotoxic to cells expressing the targeted antigen. CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy is a promising therapy for curing hematological malignancy, such as acute lymphoid leukemia, and is promising for extending their efficacy to defeat solid tumors. To date, dozens of different CAR-T cells have been evaluated in clinical trials to treat tumors; this necessitates the establishment of guidelines for the production and application of CAR-T cells. However, it is challenging to standardize CAR-T cancer therapy because it involves a combination of gene therapy and cell therapy. In this review, we compare the existing guidelines for CAR-T cells and discuss the challenges and considerations for establishing guidance for CAR-T-based cancer immunotherapy.

  8. New development in CAR-T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenguang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Han, Weidong

    2017-02-21

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  9. Evidence of endothelial inflammation, T cell activation, and T cell reallocation in uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elhassan, I M; Hviid, L; Satti, G

    1994-01-01

    To explain the observation that acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria is associated with a transient inability of peripheral blood cells to respond to antigenic stimulation in vitro, we have postulated the disease-induced reallocation of peripheral lymphocytes, possibly by adhesion to inflamed...... with the control donors. In addition, we found a disease-induced depletion of T cells with high expression of the LFA-1 antigen, particularly in the CD4+ subset. The results obtained provide further support for the hypothesis of T cell reallocation to inflamed endothelium in acute P. falciparum malaria....

  10. Perforin and Fas in murine gammaherpesvirus-specific CD8(+) T cell control and morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topham, D J; Cardin, R C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The immune system uses both virus-specific T cells and B cells to control the acute and latent phases of respiratory infection with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68). We sought to further define the important effector mechanisms for CD8(+) T cells. First, depletion of the CD4(+) T cells...... cells and a Fas(-/-) lung failed to limit the shedding of infectious virus, regardless of whether CD4 T cells were present. In addition, we noted that having P(-/-) T cells in irradiated Fas(+/+) hosts caused a lethal disease that was not apparent in the non-chimeric (unirradiated) P(-/-) (Fas...

  11. A copper chelate induces apoptosis and overcomes multidrug resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia through redox imbalance and inhibition of EGFR/PI3K/Akt expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Das, Satyajit; Sarkar, Avijit; Chatterjee, Mitali; Biswas, Jaydip; Choudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive form of cancer and the therapeutic outcome for T-ALL patients remains poor. Thus innovative therapeutic strategies with less toxic drugs are of immense need. Moreover combinational effect of redox imbalance with modulated EGFR/PI3K/Akt axis in T-ALL is still elusive. To explore more effective drugs we developed and characterized 5-SMAG, Cu-5-SMAG and Cu-OBPHA complexes by different spectroscopic methods and revealed that introduction of methoxy group and copper to the previously synthesized Schiff base ligand, NG can efficiently target leukemia by sparing the normal cells and overcomes MDR in T-ALL through induction of caspase3 dependent apoptosis as assessed by MTT, Cell-cycle, Annexin-V and caspase3 activation assay. However the ligand 5-SMAG fails to exert significant cytotoxicity. Moreover introduction of copper does not increase the efficacy of the drug molecule as Cu-OBPHA fails to exert significant effect compared to Cu-5-SMAG. Moreover Cu-5-SMAG targets T-ALL cells more than Cu-OBPHA because Cu-5-SMAG generates greater extent of redox imbalance compared to Cu-OBPHA and when this redox imbalance is reduced by application of NAC and PEG-Catalase, highest abrogation of apoptosis is observed following Cu-5-SMAG treatment In addition, Cu-5-SMAG significantly down-regulates the activation and expression of EGFR1, Akt and PI3K in drug-resistant T-ALL cells. Furthermore Cu-5-SMAG significantly increases the life-span of doxorubicin resistant and sensitive Ehrlich ascites carcinoma bearing Swiss albino mice without inducing any significant systemic toxicity compared to 5-SMAG and Cu-OBPHA treatment. Therefore typical architect of Cu-5-SMAG made it a promising new anti-leukemic agent irrespective of the MDR phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. New insights into Notch1 regulation of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling axis: targeted therapy of γ-secretase inhibitor resistant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Eric C; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H

    2014-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is characterized as a high-risk stratified disease associated with frequent relapse, chemotherapy resistance, and a poorer prognostic outlook than B-precursor ALL. Many of the challenges in treating T-ALL reflect the lack of prognostic cytogenetic or molecular abnormalities on which to base therapy, including targeted therapy. Notch1 activating mutations were identified in more than 50% of T-ALL cases and can be therapeutically targeted with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Mutant Notch1 can activate cMyc and PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling in T-ALL. In T-ALLs with wild-type phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), Notch1 transcriptionally represses PTEN, an effect reversible by GSIs. Notch1 also promotes growth factor receptor (IGF1R and IL7Rα) signaling to PI3K-AKT. Loss of PTEN is common in primary T-ALLs due to mutation or posttranslational inactivation and results in chronic activation of PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling, GSI-resistance, and repression of p53-mediated apoptosis. Notch1 itself might regulate posttranslational inactivation of PTEN. PP2A is activated by Notch1 in PTEN-null T-ALL cells, and GSIs reduce PP2A activity and increase phosphorylation of AKT, AMPK, and p70S6K. This review focuses on the central role of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR1 signaling in T-ALL, including its regulation by Notch1 and potential therapeutic interventions, with emphasis on GSI-resistant T-ALL. © 2013.

  13. Fish T cells: recent advances through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Kerry J.; Hansen, John D.

    2011-01-01

    This brief review is intended to provide a concise overview of the current literature concerning T cells, advances in identifying distinct T cell functional subsets, and in distinguishing effector cells from memory cells. We compare and contrast a wealth of recent progress made in T cell immunology of teleost, elasmobranch, and agnathan fish, to knowledge derived from mammalian T cell studies. From genome studies, fish clearly have most components associated with T cell function and we can speculate on the presence of putative T cell subsets, and the ability to detect their differentiation to form memory cells. Some recombinant proteins for T cell associated cytokines and antibodies for T cell surface receptors have been generated that will facilitate studying the functional roles of teleost T cells during immune responses. Although there is still a long way to go, major advances have occurred in recent years for investigating T cell responses, thus phenotypic and functional characterization is on the near horizon.

  14. A highly restricted T-cell receptor dominates the CD8+ T-cell response to parvovirus B19 infection in HLA-A*2402-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, V; Isa, Adiba; Jeffery, K

    2006-01-01

    Six of seven HLA-A*2402-positive individuals with acute parvovirus B19 infections made vigorous CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to the viral epitope FYTPLADQF. All responders showed highly focused T-cell receptor (TCR) usage, using almost exclusively BV5.1. The BV5.1 TCR dominated...

  15. Human rotavirus specific T cells: quantification by ELISPOT and expression of homing receptors on CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Olga Lucia; Gonzalez, Ana Maria; Gonzalez, Rosabel; Perez-Schael, Irene; Greenberg, Harry B.; Franco, Manuel A.; Angel, Juana

    2003-01-01

    Using an intracellular cytokine assay, we recently showed that the frequencies of rotavirus (RV)-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells secreting INFγ, circulating in RV infected and healthy adults, are very low compared to the frequencies of circulating cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive T cells in comparable individuals. In children with acute RV infection, these T cells were barely or not detectable. In the present study, an ELISPOT assay enabled detection of circulating RV-specific INFγ-secreting cells in children with RV diarrhea but not in children with non-RV diarrhea without evidence of a previous RV infection. Using microbead-enriched CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets, IFNγ-secreting RV-specific CD8 + but not CD4 + T cells were detected in recently infected children. Using the same approach, both CD4 + and CD8 + RV-specific T cells were detected in healthy adults. Furthermore, stimulation of purified subsets of PBMC that express lymphocyte homing receptors demonstrated that RV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells from adult volunteers preferentially express the intestinal homing receptor α4β7, but not the peripheral lymph node homing receptor L-selectin. In contrast, CMV-specific INFγ-secreting CD4 + T cells preferentially express L-selectin but not α4β7. These results suggest that the expression of homing receptors on virus-specific T cells depends on the organ where these cells were originally stimulated and that their capacity to secrete INFγ is independent of the expression of these homing receptors

  16. Immunological control of a murine gammaherpesvirus independent of CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, P G; Cardin, R D; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1999-01-01

    Adult thymectomized C57 BL/6J mice were depleted of T cell subsets by MAb treatment either prior to, or after, respiratory challenge with murine gammaherpesvirus-68. Protection against acute infection was maintained when either the CD4+ or the CD8+ T cell population was greatly diminished, whereas...... the concurrent removal of both T cell subsets proved invariably fatal. The same depletions had little effect on mice with established infection. The results indicate firstly that both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells play a significant part in dealing with the acute infection, and secondly that virus-specific antibody...

  17. Aire and T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S; Su, Maureen A

    2011-04-01

    In the thymus, developing T cells that react against self-antigens with high affinity are deleted in the process of negative selection. An essential component of this process is the display of self-antigens, including those whose expression are usually restricted to specific tissues, to developing T cells within the thymus. The Autoimmune Regulator (Aire) gene plays a crucial role in the expression of tissue specific self-antigens within the thymus, and disruption of Aire function results in spontaneous autoimmunity in both humans and mice. Recent advances have been made in our understanding of how Aire influences the expression of thousands of tissue-specific antigens in the thymus. Additional roles of Aire, including roles in chemokine and cytokine expression, have also been revealed. Factors important in the differentiation of Aire-expressing medullary thymic epithelial cells have been defined. Finally, the identity of antigen presenting cells in negative selection, including the role of medullary thymic epithelial cells in displaying tissue specific antigens to T cells, has also been clarified. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lower incidence of acute GVHD is associated with the rapid recovery of CD4+CD25+CD45RA+ regulatory T cells in patients who received haploidentical allografts from NIMA-mismatched donors: A retrospective (development) and prospective (validation) cohort-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Y, Kong; Liua, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Chang, Ying-Jun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of non-inherited maternal antigen (NIMA) on clinical outcomes and immune recovery, especially of regulatory T cells (Tregs), in patients who underwent unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation. A retrospective cohort (n = 57) and a prospective cohort (n = 88) were included. All patients received haploidentical allografts from sibling donors. Reconstitution of immune subsets, including Tregs, was determined using multicolor flow cytometry. In the retrospective cohort, the cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD in patients with NIMA-mismatched donors was significantly lower than that of cases with NIPA-mismatched donors (14.8% vs. 43.30%, p = 0.018). Patients with higher percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD45RA + T cells (naive Tregs) within CD4 + T cells recovered on day 30 (≥1.55%) experienced a significantly lower incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD than that of cases with lower percentages of naive Tregs (<1.55%) (13.8% vs. 46.4%, p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis showed that NIMA mismatch and the percentages of naive Tregs were associated with the incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD [ p = 0.050, and 0.031, respectively]. In the prospective cohort, the association of NIMA mismatch [HR = 0.365, 95% CI, 0.169-0.786, p = 0.010] or higher percentages of naive Tregs recovered on day 30 (≥1.55%) [HR = 0.114, 95% CI, 0.027-0.479, p = 0.003] with a lower cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was further demonstrated. No effects of NIMA mismatch on chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival were found. Our results confirmed the role of NIMA mismatch in acute GVHD and provided the first demonstration, based on clinical data, that recovered Tregs may be involved in the effects of NIMA on acute GVHD in a haploidentical transplant setting.

  19. Perforin and Fas in murine gammaherpesvirus-specific CD8(+) T cell control and morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topham, D J; Cardin, R C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    2001-01-01

    The immune system uses both virus-specific T cells and B cells to control the acute and latent phases of respiratory infection with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68). We sought to further define the important effector mechanisms for CD8(+) T cells. First, depletion of the CD4(+) T cells...... of IFN-gamma in CD4-depleted P(+/+), P(-/-) or Fas(-/-) mice had no effect. To define the requirements for Fas or perforin more clearly, two sets of chimeric mice were constructed differing in perforin expression by the T cells, and Fas on infected epithelial cells or lymphocytes. Animals with P(-/-) T...... cells and a Fas(-/-) lung failed to limit the shedding of infectious virus, regardless of whether CD4 T cells were present. In addition, we noted that having P(-/-) T cells in irradiated Fas(+/+) hosts caused a lethal disease that was not apparent in the non-chimeric (unirradiated) P(-/-) (Fas...

  20. Burn-injury affects gut-associated lymphoid tissues derived CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Nadeem; Shelip, Alla; Alzahrani, Alhusain J

    2013-01-01

    After scald burn-injury, the intestinal immune system responds to maintain immune balance. In this regard CD4+T cells in Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues (GALT), like mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches (PP) respond to avoid immune suppression following major injury such as burn. Therefore, we hypothesized that the gut CD4+T cells become dysfunctional and turn the immune homeostasis towards depression of CD4+ T cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. In the current study we show down regulation of mucosal CD4+ T cell proliferation, IL-2 production and cell surface marker expression of mucosal CD4+ T cells moving towards suppressive-type. Acute burn-injury lead to up-regulation of regulatory marker (CD25+), down regulation of adhesion (CD62L, CD11a) and homing receptor (CD49d) expression, and up-regulation of negative co-stimulatory (CTLA-4) molecule. Moreover, CD4+CD25+ T cells of intestinal origin showed resistance to spontaneous as well as induced apoptosis that may contribute to suppression of effector CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, gut CD4+CD25+ T cells obtained from burn-injured animals were able to down-regulate naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation following adoptive transfer of burn-injured CD4+CD25+ T cells into sham control animals, without any significant effect on cell surface activation markers. Together, these data demonstrate that the intestinal CD4+ T cells evolve a strategy to promote suppressive CD4+ T cell effector responses, as evidenced by enhanced CD4+CD25+ T cells, up-regulated CTLA-4 expression, reduced IL-2 production, tendency towards diminished apoptosis of suppressive CD4+ T cells, and thus lose their natural ability to regulate immune homeostasis following acute burn-injury and prevent immune paralysis.

  1. Role of cranial radiotherapy for childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with high WBC count and good response to prednisone. Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica and the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conter, V; Schrappe, M; Aricó, M; Reiter, A; Rizzari, C; Dördelmann, M; Valsecchi, M G; Zimmermann, M; Ludwig, W D; Basso, G; Masera, G; Riehm, H

    1997-08-01

    The ALL-BFM 90 and AIEOP-ALL 91 studies share the same treatment backbone and have 5-year event-free survival (EFS) rates close to 75%. This study evaluated the impact of differing presymptomatic CNS therapies in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients with a good response to prednisone (PGR) according to WBC count and Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) risk factor (RF). A total of 192 patients (141 boys; median age, 7.5 years) with T-ALL, PGR, RF less than 1.7, and no CNS leukemia diagnosed between 1990 and 1995 were enrolled onto the ALL-BFM 90 (n = 123) or AIEOP-ALL 91 (n = 69) study. Presymptomatic CNS therapy consisted of cranial radiation (CRT) and intrathecal methotrexate (I.T. MTX) (11 doses) in the BFM study and of extended triple intrathecal therapy (T.I.T.) (17 doses) in the Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica (AIEOP) study. Patients were divided into a low-WBC group (WBC count 100,000/microL). EFS was compared using the log-rank test. For patients treated with CRT and I.T. MTX (BFM group), the 3-year EFS rate was 89.8% (SE = 3.5) for 99 patients in the low-WBC group versus 81.9% (SE = 8.2) in the high-WBC group (difference not significant). Conversely, for patients treated with T.I.T. alone (AIEOP group), the EFS rate was 80.6% (SE = 5.6) in 55 patients with a low WBC count versus 17.9% (SE = 11.0) in 14 patients with a high WBC count (P < .001). These data suggest that CRT may not be necessary in PGR T-ALL patients with a WBC count less than 100,000/microL; on the contrary, in patients with a high count, extended T.I.T. may be inferior to CRT and I.T. MTX.

  2. Notch1 receptor regulates AKT protein activation loop (Thr308) dephosphorylation through modulation of the PP2A phosphatase in phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-null T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Eric C; Orr, Steven M; Larson Gedman, Amanda; Taub, Jeffrey W; Matherly, Larry H

    2013-08-02

    Notch1 activating mutations occur in more than 50% of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases and increase expression of Notch1 target genes, some of which activate AKT. HES1 transcriptionally silences phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in AKT activation, which is reversed by Notch1 inhibition with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs). Mutational loss of PTEN is frequent in T-ALL and promotes resistance to GSIs due to AKT activation. GSI treatments increased AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation and signaling in PTEN-deficient, GSI-resistant T-ALL cell lines (Jurkat, CCRF-CEM, and MOLT3), suggesting that Notch1 represses AKT independent of its PTEN transcriptional effects. AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation and downstream signaling were also increased by knocking down Notch1 in Jurkat (N1KD) cells. This was blocked by treatment with the AKT inhibitor perifosine. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and the protein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor okadaic acid both impacted AKT-Thr(308) phosphorylation to a greater extent in nontargeted control than N1KD cells, suggesting decreased dephosphorylation of AKT-Thr(308) by PP2A in the latter. Phosphorylations of AMP-activated protein kinaseα (AMPKα)-Thr(172) and p70S6K-Thr(389), both PP2A substrates, were also increased in both N1KD and GSI-treated cells and responded to okadaic acid treatment. A transcriptional regulatory mechanism was implied because ectopic expression of dominant-negative mastermind-like protein 1 increased and wild-type HES1 decreased phosphorylation of these PP2A targets. This was independent of changes in PP2A subunit levels or in vitro PP2A activity, but was accompanied by decreased association of PP2A with AKT in N1KD cells. These results suggest that Notch1 can regulate PP2A dephosphorylation of critical cellular regulators including AKT, AMPKα, and p70S6K.

  3. Temporal Dynamics of CD8+ T Cell Effector Responses during Primary HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Korey R.; Makedonas, George; Buggert, Marcus; Eller, Michael A.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Li, Chris K.; Eller, Leigh Anne; Rono, Kathleen; Maganga, Lucas; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kibuuka, Hannah; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Slifka, Mark K.; Haynes, Barton F.; Bernard, Nicole F.; Robb, Merlin L.; Betts, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of HIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic function is a primary factor underlying progressive HIV infection, but whether HIV-specific CD8+ T cells initially possess cytolytic effector capacity, and when and why this may be lost during infection, is unclear. Here, we assessed CD8+ T cell functional evolution from primary to chronic HIV infection. We observed a profound expansion of perforin+ CD8+ T cells immediately following HIV infection that quickly waned after acute viremia resolution. Selective expression of the effector-associated transcription factors T-bet and eomesodermin in cytokine-producing HIV-specific CD8+ T cells differentiated HIV-specific from bulk memory CD8+ T cell effector expansion. As infection progressed expression of perforin was maintained in HIV-specific CD8+ T cells with high levels of T-bet, but not necessarily in the population of T-betLo HIV-specific CD8+ T cells that expand as infection progresses. Together, these data demonstrate that while HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in acute HIV infection initially possess cytolytic potential, progressive transcriptional dysregulation leads to the reduced CD8+ T cell perforin expression characteristic of chronic HIV infection. PMID:27486665

  4. Tracing T cell differentiation by genetic barcoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijst, Jeroen Waltherus Johannes van

    2010-01-01

    Following antigen encounter, activated T cells can give rise to functionally distinct T cell subsets. Understanding how different T cell subsets arise requires technologies that can monitor the developmental potential of single precursor cells (chapter 2). This thesis describes the development and

  5. Human CD8(+) T-cell differentiation in response to viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, René A. W.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; Gamadia, Laila E.

    2003-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells are essential in the defence against viruses. Recently, peptide-HLA class I tetramers have been used to study immune responses to viruses in humans. This approach has indicated consecutive stages of human CD8(+) T-cell development in acute viral infection and has illustrated the

  6. HIV-specific CD4+ T cells and viremia: who's in control?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Christine A.; van Baarle, Debbie; Miedema, Frank

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that HIV-specific CD4+ T cells with a central memory phenotype might be involved in controlling HIV replication. Based on recent data (lack of protective effects of HIV-specific CD4+ T-cell responses in acutely infected patients undergoing treatment interruptions; loss of

  7. HIV-1 induces DCIR expression in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Lambert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin receptor DCIR, which has been shown very recently to act as an attachment factor for HIV-1 in dendritic cells, is expressed predominantly on antigen-presenting cells. However, this concept was recently challenged by the discovery that DCIR can also be detected in CD4(+ T cells found in the synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Given that RA and HIV-1 infections share common features such as a chronic inflammatory condition and polyclonal immune hyperactivation status, we hypothesized that HIV-1 could promote DCIR expression in CD4(+ T cells. We report here that HIV-1 drives DCIR expression in human primary CD4(+ T cells isolated from patients (from both aviremic/treated and viremic/treatment naive persons and cells acutely infected in vitro (seen in both virus-infected and uninfected cells. Soluble factors produced by virus-infected cells are responsible for the noticed DCIR up-regulation on uninfected cells. Infection studies with Vpr- or Nef-deleted viruses revealed that these two viral genes are not contributing to the mechanism of DCIR induction that is seen following acute infection of CD4(+ T cells with HIV-1. Moreover, we report that DCIR is linked to caspase-dependent (induced by a mitochondria-mediated generation of free radicals and -independent intrinsic apoptotic pathways (involving the death effector AIF. Finally, we demonstrate that the higher surface expression of DCIR in CD4(+ T cells is accompanied by an enhancement of virus attachment/entry, replication and transfer. This study shows for the first time that HIV-1 induces DCIR membrane expression in CD4(+ T cells, a process that might promote virus dissemination throughout the infected organism.

  8. T cell reconstitution in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielsen, K; Jordan, K K; Uhlving, H H

    2015-01-01

    Infections and acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) are major causes of treatment-related mortality and morbidity following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Both complications depend on reconstitution of the T-lymphocyte population based on donor T cells. Although...... it is well established that Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a cytokine essential for de novo T cell development in the thymus and homoeostatic peripheral expansion of T cells, associations between circulating levels of IL-7 and T cell reconstitution following HSCT have not been investigated previously. We...... in patients treated with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) compared with those not treated with ATG (P = 0.0079). IL-7 levels at day +7 were negatively associated with T cell counts at day +30 to +60 (at day +60: CD3(+) : β = -10.6 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.0030; CD8(+) : β = -8.4 × 10(6) cells/l, P = 0.061; CD4...

  9. PD-L1-specific T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Borch, Troels Holz; Hansen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -specific T cells that recognize both PD-L1-expressing immune cells and malignant cells. Thus, PD-L1-specific T cells have the ability to modulate adaptive immune reactions by reacting to regulatory cells. Thus, utilization of PD-L1-derived T cell epitopes may represent an attractive vaccination strategy...... for targeting the tumor microenvironment and for boosting the clinical effects of additional anticancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes present information about PD-L1 as a T cell antigen, depicts the initial findings about the function of PD-L1-specific T cells in the adjustment of immune responses...

  10. Tim-3 co-stimulation promotes short-lived effector T cells, restricts memory precursors, and is dispensable for T cell exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lyndsay; Filderman, Jessica; Szymczak-Workman, Andrea L; Kane, Lawrence P

    2018-02-20

    Tim-3 is highly expressed on a subset of T cells during T cell exhaustion in settings of chronic viral infection and tumors. Using lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) Clone 13, a model for chronic infection, we found that Tim-3 was neither necessary nor sufficient for the development of T cell exhaustion. Nonetheless, expression of Tim-3 was sufficient to drive resistance to PD-L1 blockade therapy during chronic infection. Strikingly, expression of Tim-3 promoted the development of short-lived effector T cells, at the expense of memory precursor development, after acute LCMV infection. These effects were accompanied by increased Akt/mTOR signaling in T cells expressing endogenous or ectopic Tim-3. Conversely, Akt/mTOR signaling was reduced in effector T cells from Tim-3-deficient mice. Thus, Tim-3 is essential for optimal effector T cell responses, and may also contribute to exhaustion by restricting the development of long-lived memory T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that Tim-3 is actually more similar to costimulatory receptors that are up-regulated after T cell activation than to a dominant inhibitory protein like PD-1. These findings have significant implications for the development of anti-Tim-3 antibodies as therapeutic agents.

  11. T cell exhaustion and Interleukin 2 downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkhi, Mumtaz Y; Ma, Qiangzhong; Ahmad, Shazia; Junghans, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    T cells reactive to tumor antigens and viral antigens lose their reactivity when exposed to the antigen-rich environment of a larger tumor bed or viral load. Such non-responsive T cells are termed exhausted. T cell exhaustion affects both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. T cell exhaustion is attributed to the functional impairment of T cells to produce cytokines, of which the most important may be Interleukin 2 (IL2). IL2 performs functions critical for the elimination of cancer cells and virus infected cells. In one such function, IL2 promotes CD8+ T cell and natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activities. Other functions include regulating naïve T cell differentiation into Th1 and Th2 subsets upon exposure to antigens. Thus, the signaling pathways contributing to T cell exhaustion could be linked to the signaling pathways contributing to IL2 loss. This review will discuss the process of T cell exhaustion and the signaling pathways that could be contributing to T cell exhaustion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced microglial clearance of myelin debris in T cell-infiltrated central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helle Hvilsted; Ladeby, Rune; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Acute multiple sclerosis lesions are characterized by accumulation of T cells and macrophages, destruction of myelin and oligodendrocytes, and axonal damage. There is, however, limited information on neuroimmune interactions distal to sites of axonal damage in the T cell-infiltrated central nervous...... system. We investigated T-cell infiltration, myelin clearance, microglial activation, and phagocytic activity distal to sites of axonal transection through analysis of the perforant pathway deafferented dentate gyrus in SJL mice that had received T cells specific for myelin basic protein (TMBP...

  13. Memory B and T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitetta, E S; Berton, M T; Burger, C; Kepron, M; Lee, W T; Yin, X M

    1991-01-01

    Three remarkable and unique features of the immune system are specificity, diversity, and memory. Immunological memory involves both T and B cells and results in a secondary antibody response that is faster, of higher affinity, and results in the secretion of non-IgM isotypes of Ig. In this review we discuss the properties of memory T and B cells, their specific receptors, and the events which occur both in the nucleus and on the cell surface during generation and activation of these cells. Although memory T and B cells use different mechanisms to elaborate memory, there are a number of interesting analogies: lymphokines vs antibodies and affinity maturation of B cell antigen receptors vs upregulation of adhesion molecules on T cells. Finally, we discuss the importance of these cells in health and disease and suggest what impact additional information about these cells might have on the manipulation of the immune response.

  14. Chimeric Antigen Receptors T Cell Therapy in Solid Tumor: Challenges and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Mirzaei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACT employing engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs has demonstrated promising antitumor effects in advanced hematologic cancers, such as relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, supporting the translation of ACT to non-hematological malignancies. Although CAR T cell therapy has made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematological cancers, in solid tumors success has been limited likely due to heterogeneous antigen expression, immunosuppressive networks in the tumor microenvironment limiting CAR T cell function and persistence, and suboptimal trafficking to solid tumors. Here, we outline specific approaches to overcome barriers to CAR T cell effectiveness in the context of the tumor microenvironment and offer our perspective on how expanding the use of CAR T cells in solid tumors may require modifications in CAR T cell design. We anticipate these modifications will further expand CAR T cell therapy in clinical practice.

  15. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells restrict memory CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursar, Mischo; Bonhagen, Kerstin; Fensterle, Joachim; Köhler, Anne; Hurwitz, Robert; Kamradt, Thomas; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2002-12-16

    CD4+ T cell help is important for the generation of CD8+ T cell responses. We used depleting anti-CD4 mAb to analyze the role of CD4+ T cells for memory CD8+ T cell responses after secondary infection of mice with the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, or after boost immunization by specific peptide or DNA vaccination. Surprisingly, anti-CD4 mAb treatment during secondary CD8+ T cell responses markedly enlarged the population size of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. After boost immunization with peptide or DNA, this effect was particularly profound, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations were enlarged at least 10-fold. In terms of cytokine production and cytotoxicity, the enlarged CD8+ T cell population consisted of functional effector T cells. In depletion and transfer experiments, the suppressive function could be ascribed to CD4+CD25+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that CD4+ T cells control the CD8+ T cell response in two directions. Initially, they promote the generation of a CD8+ T cell responses and later they restrain the strength of the CD8+ T cell memory response. Down-modulation of CD8+ T cell responses during infection could prevent harmful consequences after eradication of the pathogen.

  16. Improved survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients of HLA-A3/11 absent for donor KIR3DL2 after non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cells transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farhad shahsavar

    2011-08-01

    Conclusion: These data indicate that the absence of HLA class I ligand in the recipient for donor-inhibitory KIR can be a prognostic factor for transplantation outcomes in non-T-cell depleted HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation and that the lack of HLA-A3/11 for donor KIR3DL2 can contribute to improved survival for patients with ALL.

  17. Modification of T cell responses by stem cell mobilization requires direct signaling of the T cell by G-CSF and IL-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Le Texier, Laetitia; Zhang, Ping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of allogeneic stem cell transplants are currently undertaken using G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood stem cells. G-CSF has diverse biological effects on a broad range of cells and IL-10 is a key regulator of many of these effects. Using mixed radiation chimeras in which...... the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartments were wild-type, IL-10(-/-), G-CSFR(-/-), or combinations thereof we demonstrated that the attenuation of alloreactive T cell responses after G-CSF mobilization required direct signaling of the T cell by both G-CSF and IL-10. IL-10 was generated principally by radio......, stem cell mobilization with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 did not alter the donor T cell's ability to induce acute GVHD. These studies provide an explanation for the effects of G-CSF on T cell function and demonstrate that IL-10 is required to license regulatory function but T cell production of IL-10...

  18. Driving CAR T-cells forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Hollie J.; Rafiq, Sarwish; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2017-01-01

    The engineered expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on the surface of T cells enables the redirection of T-cell specificity. Early clinical trials using CAR T cells for the treatment of patients with cancer showed modest results, but the impressive outcomes of several trials of CD19-targeted CAR T cells in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies have generated an increased enthusiasm for this approach. Important lessons have been derived from clinical trials of CD19-specific CAR T cells, and ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in haematological and solid malignancies. In this Review, we discuss these trials and present strategies that can increase the antitumour efficacy and safety of CAR T-cell therapy. Given the fast-moving nature of this field, we only discuss studies with direct translational application currently or soon-to-be tested in the clinical setting. PMID:27000958

  19. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  20. REGULATORY T CELLS AND VASECTOMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Claudia; Wheeler, Karen; Jeffrey, Sarah; Qiao, Hui; Luu, Brian; Tewalt, Eric F; Engelhard, Victor H; Tardif, Stephen; Hardy, Daniel; del Rio, Roxana; Teuscher, Cory; Tung, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) strongly influence the early and late autoimmune responses to meiotic germ cell antigens (MGCA) and the gonadal immunopathology in vasectomized mice. This is supported by the published and recently acquired information presented here. Within 24 hours of unilateral vasectomy (uni-vx) the ipsilateral epididymis undergoes epithelial cell apoptosis followed by necrosis, severe inflammation, and granuloma formation. Unexpectedly, vasectomy alone induced MGCA-specific tolerance. In contrast, uni-vx plus simultaneous Treg depletion resulted in MGCA-specific autoimmune response and bilateral autoimmune orchitis. Both tolerance and autoimmunity were strictly linked to the early epididymal injury. We now discovered that testicular autoimmunity in uni-vx mice did not occur when Treg depletion was delayed by one week. Remarkably, this delayed Treg depletion also prevented tolerance induction. Therefore, tolerance depends on a rapid de novo Treg response to MGCA exposed after vasectomy. Moreover, tolerance was blunted in mice genetically deficient in PD-1 ligand, suggesting the involvement of induced Treg. We conclude that pre-existing natural Treg prevents post-vasectomy autoimmunity, whereas vasectomy-induced Treg maintains post-vasectomy tolerance. We further discovered that vasectomized mice were still resistant to autoimmune orchitis induction for at least 12–16 months; thus, tolerance is long-lasting. Although significant sperm autoantibodies of low titers became detectable in uni-vx mice at seven months, the antibody titers fluctuated over time, suggesting a dynamic “balance” between the autoimmune and tolerance states. Finally, we observed severe epididymal fibrosis and hypo-spermatogenesis at 12 months after uni-vx: findings of highly critical clinical significance. PMID:24080233

  1. T cell immunity to infection with dengue virus in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eWeiskopf

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the etiologic agent of dengue fever, the most significant mosquito-borne viral disease in humans. Up to 400 million DENV infections occur every year, and severity can range from asymptomatic to an acute self-limiting febrile illness. In a small proportion of patients, the disease can exacerbate and progress to dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and/or dengue shock syndrome (DSS, characterized by severe vascular leakage, thrombocytopenia, and hemorrhagic manifestations. A unique challenge in vaccine development against DENV is the high degree of sequence variation, characteristically associated with RNA viruses. This is of particular relevance in the case of DENV since infection with one DENV serotype (primary infection presumably affords life-long serotype-specific immunity but only partial and temporary immunity to other serotypes in secondary infections settings. The role of T cells in dengue virus infection and subsequent disease manifestations is not fully understood. According to the original antigenic sin theory, skewing of T cell responses induced by primary infection with one serotype causes less effective response upon secondary infection with a different serotype, predisposing to severe disease. Our recent study has suggested an HLA linked protective role for T cells. Herein we will discuss the role of T cells in protection and pathogenesis from severe disease as well as the implications for vaccine design.

  2. P21-activated kinase 2 is essential in maintenance of peripheral Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinyong; Pease, David Randall; Chen, Siqi; Zhang, Bin; Phee, Hyewon

    2018-01-03

    The p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), an effector molecule of the Rho family GTPases Rac and Cdc42, regulates diverse functions of T cells. Previously, we showed that Pak2 is required for development and maturation of T cells in the thymus, including thymus-derived regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, whether Pak2 is required for the functions of various subsets of peripheral T cells, such as naive CD4 and helper T-cell subsets including Foxp3 + Treg cells, is unknown. To determine the role of Pak2 in CD4 T cells in the periphery, we generated inducible Pak2 knockout (KO) mice, in which Pak2 was deleted in CD4 T cells acutely by administration of tamoxifen. Temporal deletion of Pak2 greatly reduced the number of Foxp3 + Treg cells, while minimally affecting the homeostasis of naive CD4 T cells. Pak2 was required for proliferation and Foxp3 expression of Foxp3 + Treg cells upon T-cell receptor and interleukin-2 stimulation, differentiation of in vitro induced Treg cells, and activation of naive CD4 T cells. Together, Pak2 is essential in maintaining the peripheral Treg cell pool by providing proliferation and maintenance signals to Foxp3 + Treg cells. © 2018 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Licensing Virus-Specific T Cells to Secrete the Neutrophil Attracting Chemokine CXCL-8 during Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Adam J.; Koh, Sarene; Chia, Adeline; Paramasivam, Komathi; Chew, Valerie Suk Peng; Ho, Zi Zong; Lee, Kang Hoe; Maini, Mala K.; Madhavan, Krishnakumar; Lim, Seng Gee; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    T cell functional plasticity helps tailor antiviral immunity during different phases of infections. We tested whether, during different phases of HBV infection, virus-specific T cells can acquire specific proinflammatory functions that could drive granulocyte/mononuclear cell liver infiltration. Multifunctional analysis of HBV-specific T cells during acute and chronic HBV infection revealed that HBV-specific T cells had the capacity to produce the neutrophil chemokine CXCL-8 but not IL-17. CXCL-8 producing T cells were detectable in the liver of chronic HBV patients with active hepatitis; while in acute HBV patients CXCL-8 production by T cells was temporally limited to the acute phase of disease, concomitant with the peak of liver inflammation. Characterization of the conditions necessary for the development of CXCL-8 producing T cells showed a requirement for IL-7 and IL-15 during T cell expansion. These data show that functional plasticity of virus-specific T cells spontaneously occurs during HBV infection and that an environment rich IL-7 and IL-15 can license T cells with the ability to produce CXCL-8 and potentially influence liver pathology. PMID:21876747

  4. Human thymus regeneration and T cell reconstitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legrand, Nicolas; Dontje, Wendy; van Lent, Anja U.; Spits, Hergen; Blom, Bianca

    2007-01-01

    The thymus supports the development of T cells throughout life from hematopoietic progenitor cells migrating from the bone marrow. During the early years after birth thymic activity is highest, but progressively declines resulting in diminished naïve T cell output. Underlying causes of thymic

  5. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    Spatial and temporal elements. – Cellular sites for the integration of cell death and survival cues. – Spatial regulation of Notch activity for cell survival. Page 4. Cell survival is determined by the availability and uptake of nutrients live dead. Activated T-cells. T-cells. Page 5. dead wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342.

  6. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell ...

  7. Carbohydrates and T cells: A sweet twosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y.; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically-linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease. PMID:23757291

  8. Regulation of T cell responses in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puijvelde, Gijsbrecht Henricus Maria van

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important characteristics of atherosclerosis is the chronic inflammatory response in which T cells and NKT cells are very important. In this thesis several methods to modulate the activity of these T and NKT cells in atherosclerosis are described. The induction of regulatory T cells

  9. T cell immunosurveillance controls B lymphoma development

    OpenAIRE

    Kallies, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We recently showed a critical role for T cells in the immunosurveillance of nascent B cell lymphomas arising from mutations impacting plasma cell differentiation. Our data suggest that CD8+ T cells continuously eliminate mutated B cells that fail to downregulate their co-stimulatory machinery and the Fas death receptor, thus constraining B lymphoma pathogenesis.

  10. Pre-existing hypertension dominates γδT cell reduction in human ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz G Adamski

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes may play an important role in the evolution of ischemic stroke. Depletion of γδT cells has been found to abrogate ischemia reperfusion injury in murine stroke. However, the role of γδT cells in human ischemic stroke is unknown. We aimed to determine γδT cell counts and γδT cell interleukin 17A (IL-17A production in the clinical setting of ischemic stroke. We also aimed to determine the associations of γδT cell counts with ischemic lesion volume, measures of clinical severity and with major stroke risk factors. Peripheral blood samples from 43 acute ischemic stroke patients and 26 control subjects matched on race and gender were used for flow cytometry and complete blood count analyses. Subsequently, cytokine levels and gene expression were measured in γδT cells. The number of circulating γδT cells was decreased by almost 50% (p = 0.005 in the stroke patients. γδT cell counts did not correlate with lesion volume on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging or with clinical severity in the stroke patients, but γδT cells showed elevated levels of IL-17A (p = 0.048. Decreased γδT cell counts were also associated with older age (p = 0.004, pre-existing hypertension (p = 0.0005 and prevalent coronary artery disease (p = 0.03, with pre-existing hypertension being the most significant predictor of γδT cell counts in a multivariable analysis. γδT cells in human ischemic stroke are reduced in number and show elevated levels of IL-17A. A major reduction in γδT lymphocytes also occurs in hypertension and may contribute to the development of hypertension-mediated stroke and vascular disease.

  11. Bcl-2 Allows Effector and Memory CD8+ T Cells To Tolerate Higher Expression of Bim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E.; Sholl, Allyson; Katz, Jonathan D.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Hildeman, David A.

    2014-01-01

    As acute infections resolve, most effector CD8+ T cells die, whereas some persist and become memory T cells. Recent work showed that subsets of effector CD8+ T cells, identified by reciprocal expression of killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1) and CD127, have different lifespans. Similar to previous reports, we found that effector CD8+ T cells reported to have a longer lifespan (i.e., KLRG1lowCD127high) have increased levels of Bcl-2 compared with their shorter-lived KLRG1highCD127low counterparts. Surprisingly, we found that these effector KLRG1lowCD127high CD8+ T cells also had increased levels of Bim compared with KLRG1highCD127low cells. Similar effects were observed in memory cells, in which CD8+ central memory T cells expressed higher levels of Bim and Bcl-2 than did CD8+ effector memory T cells. Using both pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we found that survival of both subsets of effector and memory CD8+ T cells required Bcl-2 to combat the proapoptotic activity of Bim. Interestingly, inhibition or absence of Bcl-2 led to significantly decreased expression of Bim in surviving effector and memory T cells. In addition, manipulation of Bcl-2 levels by IL-7 or IL-15 also affected expression of Bim in effector CD8+ T cells. Finally, we found that Bim levels were significantly increased in effector CD8+ T cells lacking Bax and Bak. Together, these data indicate that cells having the highest levels of Bim are selected against during contraction of the response and that Bcl-2 determines the level of Bim that effector and memory T cells can tolerate. PMID:21451108

  12. Targeting regulatory T cells in cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, William L

    2012-01-31

    Infiltration of tumors by regulatory T cells confers growth and metastatic advantages by inhibiting antitumor immunity and by production of receptor activator of NF-kappaB (RANK) ligand, which may directly stimulate metastatic propagation of RANK-expressing cancer cells. Modulation of regulatory T cells can enhance the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Strategies include depletion, interference with function, inhibition of tumoral migration, and exploitation of T-cell plasticity. Problems with these strategies include a lack of specificity, resulting in depletion of antitumor effector T cells or global interruption of regulatory T cells, which may predispose to autoimmune diseases. Emerging technologies, such as RNA interference and tetramer-based targeting, may have the potential to improve selectivity and efficacy.

  13. CMV-specific T cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsele, Hermann; Kapp, Markus; Grigoleit, Götz Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection continues to be one of the most important and life threatening complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). The reconstitution of CMV-specific T cell responses after SCT has been demonstrated to be protective against the development of CMV disease. To improve T cell immunity against CMV in bone marrow transplant patients, different strategies were explored. On one hand, CMV-specific T cells can be selected from the donor, and can be transferred to the patient without any further in vitro expansion. On the other hand, CMV-specific T cells can be activated and expanded in vitro by stimulation with antigen presenting cells (APCs) loaded with specific proteins or peptides. Here, we review the therapeutic application of CMV-specific T cells to fight CMV infection.

  14. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Hildeman, David A

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immunization, naïve T cells undergo a massive expansion culminating in the generation of a robust effector T cell population. This peak effector response is relatively short-lived and, while most effector T cells die by apoptosis, some remain and develop into memory cells. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this cell fate decision remain incompletely defined, substantial progress has been made, particularly with regards to CD8(+) T cells. For example, the effector CD8(+) T cells generated during a response are heterogeneous, consisting of cells with more or less potential to develop into full-fledged memory cells. Development of CD8(+) T cell memory is regulated by the transcriptional programs that control the differentiation and survival of effector T cells. While the type of antigenic stimulation and level of inflammation control effector CD8(+) T cell differentiation, availability of cytokines and their ability to control expression and function of Bcl-2 family members governs their survival. These distinct differentiation and survival programs may allow for finer therapeutic intervention to control both the quality and quantity of CD8(+) T cell memory. Effector to memory transition of CD4(+) T cells is less well characterized than CD8(+) T cells, emerging details will be discussed. This review will focus on the recent progress made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of T cell memory with an emphasis on factors controlling survival of

  15. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema eKurtulus

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immunization, naïve T cells undergo a massive expansion culminating in the generation of a robust effector T cell population. This peak effector response is relatively short-lived and, while most effector T cells die by apoptosis, some remain and develop into memory cells. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying this cell fate decision remain incompletely defined, substantial progress has been made, particularly with regards to CD8+ T cells. For example, the effector CD8+ T cells generated during a response are heterogeneous, consisting of cells with more or less potential to develop into full-fledged memory cells. Development of CD8+ T cell memory is regulated by the transcriptional programs that control the differentiation and survival of effector T cells. While the type of antigenic stimulation and level of inflammation control effector CD8+ T cell differentiation, availability of cytokines and their ability to control expression and function of Bcl-2 family members governs their survival. These distinct differentiation and survival programs may allow for finer therapeutic intervention to control both the quality and quantity of CD8+ T cell memory. Effector to memory transition of CD4+ T cells is less well characterized than CD8+ T cells, emerging details will be discussed. This review will focus on the recent progress made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of T cell memory with an emphasis on factors controlling survival of

  16. Molecular Pathology of Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm of highly pleomorphic lymphoid cells. ATLL is usually widely disseminated, and it is caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). It is a disease with a long latency, and affected individuals are usually exposed to the virus very early in life. The cumulative incidence of ATLL is estimated to be 2.5% among HTLV-1 carriers. ATLL cells express CD2, CD3, CD5, CD4, and CD25, as well as CCR4 and FoxP3 of the regulatory T-cell marker. HTLV-1 is causally linked to ATLL, but infection alone is not sufficient to result in neoplastic transformation. A significant finding in this connection is that the Tax viral protein leads to transcriptional activation of many genes, while the HTLV-1 basic leucine zipper factor is thought to be important for T-cell proliferation and oncogenesis. Half of ATLL cases retain the ability to express HTLV-1 Tax, which is a target of HTLV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). An increase in HTLV-1-specific CTL responses is observed in some asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers. Although HTLV-1-specific CTL are also present in the peripheral blood of ATLL patients, they do not expand sufficiently. We investigated the clinicopathological features and analyzed the staining of Tax-specific CTL and FoxP3. Tax-specific CTL correlated inversely with FoxP3, an increase in the ratio of CD163+ tumor-associated macrophages was associated with worse clinical prognosis, and ATLL cell lines proliferated significantly following direct co-culture with M2 macrophages. Several clinical variants of ATLL have been identified: acute, lymphomatous, chronic, and smoldering. Oligo-array comparative genomic hybridization revealed that genomic loss of 9p21.3 was a significant characteristic of acute-type, but not of chronic-type ATLL. Furthermore, we found that genomic alteration of CD58, which is implicated in immune escape, is more frequently observed in acute than in chronic ATLL. Interestingly

  17. Commentary: T cells get by with a little help from their friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenerman, Paul

    2004-02-01

    In animal models, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) may be controlled after acute infection or may establish various levels of persistence. Cytotoxic responses mediated by CD8(+) T cells are responsible for both initial control of LCMV and for immunopathology. As discussed in this article, there is emerging evidence that the levels of antigen to which the immune system is exposed over time are important in controlling CD8(+) T cell activation, memory responses and exhaustion, and that these levels are affected by the efficiency of T cell help and the presence of antibody. To enable lasting control of LCMV infection, CD8(+) T cells, CD4(+) T cell help and B cells are all required. These findings have important implications for the prevention and treatment of infection by viruses such as hepatitis B and C viruses, cytomegalovirus and HIV. See accompanying article http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/eji.200324717

  18. Chimeric-antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy for solid tumors: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, An-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Lu, Yi-Jun; Lu, Xiao-Jie; Sun, Beicheng

    2017-10-27

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have been shown to have unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most notably in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate using anti-CD19 CAR-T cells. However, CAR T-cell therapy for solid tumors currently is faced with numerous challenges such as physical barriers, the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and the specificity and safety. The clinical results in solid tumors have been much less encouraging, with multiple cases of toxicity and a lack of therapeutic response. In this review, we will discuss the current stats and challenges of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors, and propose possibl e solutions and future perspectives.

  19. Anti-viral CD8 T cells and the cytokines that they love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Maureen A.; Kahan, Shannon M.; Zajac, Allan J.

    2013-01-01

    Viral infections cause an immunological disequilibrium that provokes CD8 T cell responses. These cells play critical roles in purging acute infections, limiting persistent infections, and conferring life-long protective immunity. At every stage of the response anti-viral CD8 T cells are sensitive to signals from cytokines. Initially cytokines operate as immunological warning signs that inform of the presence of an infection, and also influence the developmental choices of the responding cells. Later during the course of the response other sets of cytokines support the survival and maintenance of the differentiated anti-viral CD8 T cells. Although many cytokines promote virus-specific CD8 T cells, other cytokines can suppress their activities and thus favor viral persistence. In this review we discuss how select cytokines act to regulate anti-viral CD8 T cells throughout the response and influence the outcome of viral infections. PMID:23217625

  20. Human Zika infection induces a reduction of IFN-γ producing CD4 T-cells and a parallel expansion of effector Vδ2 T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Eleonora; Castilletti, Concetta; Sacchi, Alessandra; Casetti, Rita; Bordoni, Veronica; Romanelli, Antonella; Turchi, Federica; Martini, Federico; Tumino, Nicola; Nicastri, Emanuele; Corpolongo, Angela; Di Caro, Antonino; Kobinger, Gary; Zumla, Alimuddin; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Agrati, Chiara

    2017-07-24

    The definition of the immunological response to Zika (ZIKV) infection in humans represents a key issue to identify protective profile useful for vaccine development and for pathogenesis studies. No data are available on the cellular immune response in the acute phase of human ZIKV infection, and its role in the protection and/or pathogenesis needs to be clarified. We studied and compared the phenotype and functionality of T-cells in patients with acute ZIKV and Dengue viral (DENV) infections. A significant activation of T-cells was observed during both ZIKV and DENV infections. ZIKV infection was characterized by a CD4 T cell differentiation toward effector cells and by a lower frequency of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. Moreover, a substantial expansion of CD3 + CD4 - CD8 - T-cell subset expressing Vδ2 TCR was specifically observed in ZIKV patients. Vδ2 T cells presented a terminally differentiated profile, expressed granzyme B and maintained their ability to produce IFN-γ. These findings provide new knowledge on the immune response profile during self-limited infection that may help in vaccine efficacy definition, and in identifying possible immuno-pathogenetic mechanisms of severe infection.

  1. T Cell Repertoire and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Croitoru

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of the T cell receptor repertoire is generated through rearrangement of the variable, junctional and constant region genes. Selection processes in the thymus and periphery serve to eliminate self-reacting T cells, thereby preventing autoimmune disease. The possibility that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease has led to the search for an auto-antigen. In addition, studies are exploring the T cell receptor repertoire in IBD patients for changes that may provide clues regarding etiopathogenesis. Using monoclonal antibodies to T cell receptor variable-gene products or polymerase chain reaction analysis of variable-gene mRNA expression, the mucosal T cell repertoire has been examined in humans. The intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes show a significant degree of oligoclonal expansion that may represent local antigen exposure or unique selection processes. This is in keeping with studies that show that murine intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes undergo positive and possibly negative selection independent of the thymus. In the inflamed human gut, shifts in the T cell receptor repertoire may also reflect recruitment of peripheral T cells to the gut. In one study, a subset of Crohn’s disease patients was shown to have an increase in the proportion of variable β8 peripheral blood lymphocyte and mesenteric lymph node cells, suggesting a superantigen effect. The authors hypothesized that changes in the functional T cell receptor repertoire can also occur which might be independent of changes in the distribution of T cells expressing variable β T cell receptors. In fact, the authors have shown there is a selective decrease in the cytotoxic function of peripheral variable β8 T cells in Crohn’s disease. Furthermore, stimulation with the variable β8 selective bacterial enterotoxin staphylococcal enterotoxin E failed to increase the cytotoxic function in this subset of Crohn’s disease patients compared with

  2. Protecting and rescuing the effectors: roles of differentiation and survival in the control of memory T cell development

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtulus, Sema; Tripathi, Pulak; Hildeman, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines, arguably the single most important intervention in improving human health, have exploited the phenomenon of immunological memory. The elicitation of memory T cells is often an essential part of successful long-lived protective immunity. Our understanding of T cell memory has been greatly aided by the development of TCR Tg mice and MHC tetrameric staining reagents that have allowed the precise tracking of antigen-specific T cell responses. Indeed, following acute infection or immuniz...

  3. Oseltamivir Prophylaxis Reduces Inflammation and Facilitates Establishment of Cross-Strain Protective T Cell Memory to Influenza Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Nicola L.; Olson, Matthew R.; Hurt, Aeron C.; Oshansky, Christine M.; Oh, Ding Yuan; Reading, Patrick C.; Chua, Brendon Y.; Sun, Yilun; Tang, Li; Handel, Andreas; Jackson, David C.; Turner, Stephen J.; Thomas, Paul G.; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells directed against conserved viral regions elicit broad immunity against distinct influenza viruses, promote rapid virus elimination and enhanced host recovery. The influenza neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, is prescribed for therapy and prophylaxis, although it remains unclear how the drug impacts disease severity and establishment of effector and memory CD8(+) T cell immunity. We dissected the effects of oseltamivir on viral replication, inflammation, acute CD8(+) T cell r...

  4. Childhood tuberculosis is associated with decreased abundance of T cell gene transcripts and impaired T cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Hemingway

    Full Text Available The WHO estimates around a million children contract tuberculosis (TB annually with over 80 000 deaths from dissemination of infection outside of the lungs. The insidious onset and association with skin test anergy suggests failure of the immune system to both recognise and respond to infection. To understand the immune mechanisms, we studied genome-wide whole blood RNA expression in children with TB meningitis (TBM. Findings were validated in a second cohort of children with TBM and pulmonary TB (PTB, and functional T-cell responses studied in a third cohort of children with TBM, other extrapulmonary TB (EPTB and PTB. The predominant RNA transcriptional response in children with TBM was decreased abundance of multiple genes, with 140/204 (68% of all differentially regulated genes showing reduced abundance compared to healthy controls. Findings were validated in a second cohort with concordance of the direction of differential expression in both TBM (r2 = 0.78 p = 2x10-16 and PTB patients (r2 = 0.71 p = 2x10-16 when compared to a second group of healthy controls. Although the direction of expression of these significant genes was similar in the PTB patients, the magnitude of differential transcript abundance was less in PTB than in TBM. The majority of genes were involved in activation of leucocytes (p = 2.67E-11 and T-cell receptor signalling (p = 6.56E-07. Less abundant gene expression in immune cells was associated with a functional defect in T-cell proliferation that recovered after full TB treatment (p<0.0003. Multiple genes involved in T-cell activation show decreased abundance in children with acute TB, who also have impaired functional T-cell responses. Our data suggest that childhood TB is associated with an acquired immune defect, potentially resulting in failure to contain the pathogen. Elucidation of the mechanism causing the immune paresis may identify new treatment and prevention strategies.

  5. Transcription factor regulation of CD8+ T-cell memory and exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John

    2010-07-01

    During an infection, antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo numerous cellular and transcriptional changes as they develop from naive T cells into effector and memory cells. However, when the antigen persists in a chronic infection, the cellular programs governing effector and memory development are influenced by chronic stimulation, and dysfunctional or exhausted CD8+ T cells are generated. Recently, exhausted CD8+ T cells were found to differ dramatically from naive and functional memory CD8+ T cells on a transcriptional level, demonstrating that exposure to chronic antigen can impact T cells at a fundamental level. While transcriptional changes in CD8+ T cells during memory development is currently a topic of particular interest, the transcriptional changes related to exhaustion and other forms of T-cell dysfunction have received less attention. New computational methods are not only uncovering important transcription factors in these developmental processes but are also going further to define and connect these transcription factors into transcriptional modules that work in parallel to control cell fate and state. Understanding the molecular processes behind the development of CD8+ T-cell memory and exhaustion should not only increase our understanding of the immune system but also could reveal therapeutic targets and treatments for infectious and immunological diseases. Here, we provide a basic overview of acute and chronic viral infections and the transcription factors known to influence the development of virus-specific T cells in both settings. We also discuss recent innovations in genomic and computational tools that could be used to enhance the way we understand the development of T-cell responses to infectious disease.

  6. CD8 T-cells and E-cadherin in host responses against oropharyngeal candidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, K.; Lilly, E.A.; Zacharek, M.; McNulty, K.; Leigh, J.E.; Vazquez, J.E.; Fidel, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is the most common oral infection in HIV+ persons. Previous studies suggest a role for CD8+ T-cells against OPC when CD4+ T-cells are lost, but enhanced susceptibility to infection occurs when CD8+ T-cell migration is inhibited by reduced tissue E-cadherin. Objective Conduct a longitudinal study of tissue CD8+ T-cells and E-cadherin expression before, during, and after episodes of OPC. Methods Oral fungal burden was monitored and tissue was evaluated for CD8+ T-cells and E-cadherin over a one-year period in HIV+ persons with a history of, or an acute episode of OPC. Results While longitudinal analyses precluded formal interpretations, point prevalence analyses of the dataset revealed that when patients experiencing OPC were successfully treated, tissue E-cadherin expression was similar to patients who had not experienced OPC, and higher numbers of CD8+ T-cells were distributed throughout OPC− tissue under normal expression of E-cadherin. Conclusion These results suggest that 1) reduction in tissue E-cadherin expression in OPC+ patients is not permanent, and 2) high numbers of CD8+ T-cells can be distributed throughout OPC− tissue under normal E-cadherin expression. Together these results extend our previous studies and continue to support a role for CD8+ T-cells in host defense against OPC. PMID:21958417

  7. Rhoh deficiency reduces peripheral T-cell function and attenuates allogenic transplant rejection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porubsky, Stefan; Wang, Shijun; Kiss, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Rhoh is a hematopoietic system-specific GTPase. Rhoh-deficient T cells have been shown to have a defect in TCR signaling manifested during their thymic development. Our aims were to investigate the phenotype of peripheral Rhoh-deficient T cells and to explore in vivo the potential benefit of Rhoh...... deficiency in a clinically relevant situation, in which T-cell inhibition is desirable. In murine allogenic kidney transplantation, Rhoh deficiency caused a significant 75% reduction of acute and chronic transplant rejection accompanied by 75% lower alloantigen-specific antibody levels and significantly...

  8. The TLX1 oncogene drives aneuploidy in T-cell transformation

    OpenAIRE

    De Keersmaecker, Kim; Real, Pedro Jose; Gatta, Giusy Della; Palomero, Teresa; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Tosello, Valeria; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Barnes, Kelly; Castillo, Mireia; Sole, Xavier; Hadler, Michael; Lenz, Jack; Aplan, Peter D.; Kelliher, Michelle; Kee, Barbara L.

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe TLX1 oncogene (encoding the transcription factor T cell leukemia homeobox protein-1) has a major role in the pathogenesis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). However, the specific mechanisms of T cell transformation downstream of TLX1 remain to be elucidated. Here we show that transgenic expression of human TLX1 in mice induces T-ALL with frequent deletions and mutations in Bcl11b (encoding B cell leukemia/lymphoma-11B) and identify the presence of recurrent mutati...

  9. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    The formation of higher order apoptotic structures at the mitochondrion precedes cellular collapse dead. Tracking bax multimerization at mitochondria wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342. Apoptotic T-cells ...

  10. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  11. CD19 CAR-T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Yeung, Cecilia; Wood, Brent; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Maloney, David G

    2016-06-01

    T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR-T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR-T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR-T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR-T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR-T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR-T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR-T cell persistence and disease-free survival. Immunotherapy with a CAR-T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR-T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR-T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation.

  12. Mechanical regulation of T-cell functions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei; Zhu, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    T cells are key players of the mammalian adaptive immune system. They experience different mechanical microenvironments during their life cycles, from the thymus, secondary lymph organs, and peripheral tissues that are free of externally applied force but display variable substrate rigidities, to the blood and lymphatic circulation systems where complicated hydrodynamic forces are present. Regardless of whether T cells are subject to external forces or generate their own internal forces, they...

  13. Understanding and Exploiting the T - Cell Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshipra Chandrashekhar1

    Full Text Available Immunological memory is one of the lesser understood aspects of adaptive immunity which protects organisms from recurrent and persistent attack by pathogens. The central event in the generation of both humoral and cell mediated immune responses is the activation and clonal expansion of T cells. T cell activation is initiated by interaction of the TCR-CD3 complex with processed antigenic peptide bound to either a class I (CD8+cells or class II (CD 4+cells MHC molecule on the surface of antigen presenting cell (APC. On interaction of a naïve T cell with the processed antigen initiates a cascade of events which activates the resting T cell to enter the cell cycle, proliferating and developing into a clone of progeny cells, which differentiate into memory or effector T cells. Memory T cells are generated by antigen interaction and remain long but quiescent in nature, however responding with greater reactivity to a subsequent challenge with the same antigen, generating a secondary response. Memory cells, though in the G0 stage of the cell cycle require a lower level of activation than so naïve cells. A lot of work in this direction can yield a whole lot of interesting findings which will help us develop better vaccines for chronic animal diseases like Tuberculosis, Johne’s disease using suitable animal models. A better understanding of these issues may lead to improvements in the design of vaccines which can be used to generate potent protective T cell memory against pathogens. In the present article various properties of memory T cells along with their implications to vaccine development have been reviewed. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(7.000: 343-345

  14. T cell activation in APECED patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mannerström, Helga

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidasis-ectodermal dystrophy, APECED, is a rare monogenic autoimmune disease in humans, which is caused by loss-of-function mutation in Autoimmune Regulator gene, AIRE. Previous results have shown impairments in the circulating T cells of the APECED patients. In this study we wanted to look closer on the disturbance in the T cell receptor development of APECED patients. By studying the TCR-mediated responsiveness of CD3 stimulation and comparing the activation...

  15. CD4+ T cell effects on CD8+ T cell location defined using bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Azadniv

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes of the CD8+ class are critical in delivering cytotoxic function and in controlling viral and intracellular infections. These cells are "helped" by T lymphocytes of the CD4+ class, which facilitate their activation, clonal expansion, full differentiation and the persistence of memory. In this study we investigated the impact of CD4+ T cells on the location of CD8+ T cells, using antibody-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion and imaging the antigen-driven redistribution of bioluminescent CD8+ T cells in living mice. We documented that CD4+ T cells influence the biodistribution of CD8+ T cells, favoring their localization to abdominal lymph nodes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this was associated with an increase in the expression of specific integrins. The presence of CD4+ T cells at the time of initial CD8+ T cell activation also influences their biodistribution in the memory phase. Based on these results, we propose the model that one of the functions of CD4+ T cell "help" is to program the homing potential of CD8+ T cells.

  16. Neurohypophysial Receptor Gene Expression by Thymic T Cell Subsets and Thymic T Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Hansenne

    2004-01-01

    transcribed in thymic epithelium, while immature T lymphocytes express functional neurohypophysial receptors. Neurohypophysial receptors belong to the G protein-linked seven-transmembrane receptor superfamily and are encoded by four distinct genes, OTR, V1R, V2R and V3R. The objective of this study was to identify the nature of neurohypophysial receptor in thymic T cell subsets purified by immunomagnetic selection, as well as in murine thymic lymphoma cell lines RL12-NP and BW5147. OTR is transcribed in all thymic T cell subsets and T cell lines, while V3R transcription is restricted to CD4+ CD8+ and CD8+ thymic cells. Neither V1R nor V2R transcripts are detected in any kind of T cells. The OTR protein was identified by immunocytochemistry on thymocytes freshly isolated from C57BL/6 mice. In murine fetal thymic organ cultures, a specific OTR antagonist does not modify the percentage of T cell subsets, but increases late T cell apoptosis further evidencing the involvement of OT/OTR signaling in the control of T cell proliferation and survival. According to these data, OTR and V3R are differentially expressed during T cell ontogeny. Moreover, the restriction of OTR transcription to T cell lines derived from thymic lymphomas may be important in the context of T cell leukemia pathogenesis and treatment.

  17. Core Fucosylation of the T Cell Receptor Is Required for T Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Mao, Shanshan; Sun, Shijie; Li, Ming; Li, Zhi; Yu, Rui; Ma, Tonghui; Gu, Jianguo; Zhang, Jianing; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Li, Wenzhe

    2018-01-01

    CD4 + T cell activation promotes the pathogenic process of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). T cell receptor (TCR) complex are highly core fucosylated glycoproteins, which play important roles in T cell activation. In this study, we found that the core fucosylation of CD4 + T cells was significantly increased in SLE patients. Loss of core fucosyltransferase (Fut8), the sole enzyme for catalyzing the core fucosylation of N-glycan, significantly reduced CD4 + T cell activation and ameliorated the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis-induced syndrome in Fut8 -/- mice. T cell activation with OVA 323-339 loaded major histocompatibility complex II (pMHC-II) on B cell was dramatically attenuated in Fut8 -/- OT-II CD4 + T cells compared with Fut8 +/+ OT-II CD4 + T cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 was significantly reduced in Fut8 +/+ OT-II CD4 + T cells by the treatment of fucosidase. Our results suggest that core fucosylation is required for efficient TCR-pMHC-II contacts in CD4 + T cell activation, and hyper core fucosylation may serve as a potential novel biomarker in the sera from SLE patients.

  18. Aberrant phenotypes in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastrup, N; Ralfkiaer, E; Pallesen, G

    1989-01-01

    Seventy six peripheral T cell lymphomas were examined immunohistologically to test their reactivity with a panel of monoclonal antibodies against 11 T cell associated antigens (CD1-8, CD27, UCHL1, and the T cell antigen receptor). Sixty two (82%) lymphomas showed aberrant phenotypes, and four main categories were distinguished as follows: (i) lack of one or several pan-T cell antigens (49, 64% of the cases); (ii) loss of both the CD4 and CD8 antigens (11, 15% of the cases); (iii) coexpression of the CD4 and CD8 antigens (13, 17% of the cases); and (iv) expression of the CD1 antigen (eight, 11% of the cases). No correlation was seen between the occurrence of aberrant phenotypes and the histological subtype. It is concluded that the demonstration of an aberrant phenotype is a valuable supplement to histological assessment in the diagnosis of peripheral T cell lymphomas. It is recommended that the panel of monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens should be fairly large, as apparently any antigen may be lost in the process of malignant transformation. Images Figure PMID:2469701

  19. Memory CD4 T cells in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zens, Kyra D; Farber, Donna L

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly among young children and the elderly. Current vaccines induce neutralizing antibody responses directed toward highly variable viral surface proteins, resulting in limited heterosubtypic protection to new viral serotypes. By contrast, memory CD4 T cells recognize conserved viral proteins and are cross-reactive to multiple influenza strains. In humans, virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were found to be the protective correlate in human influenza challenge studies, suggesting their key role in protective immunity. In mouse models, memory CD4 T cells can mediate protective responses to secondary influenza infection independent of B cells or CD8 T cells, and can influence innate immune responses. Importantly, a newly defined, tissue-resident CD4 memory population has been demonstrated to be retained in lung tissue and promote optimal protective responses to an influenza infection. Here, we review the current state of results regarding the generation of memory CD4 T cells following primary influenza infection, mechanisms for their enhanced efficacy in protection from secondary challenge including their phenotype, localization, and function in the context of both mouse models and human infection. We also discuss the generation of memory CD4 T cells in response to influenza vaccines and its future implications for vaccinology.

  20. Prior Dengue virus exposure shapes T cell immunity to Zika virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, Alba; Pham, John; Sidney, John; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; Martini, Sheridan R; de Silva, Aruna D; Ricciardi, Michael J; Magnani, Diogo M; Silveira, Cassia G T; Maestri, Alvino; Costa, Priscilla R; de-Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal; Damasco, Paulo Vieira; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; de Silva, Aravinda M; Collins, Matthew; Durbin, Anna; Diehl, Sean A; Cerpas, Cristhiam; Balmaseda, Angel; Kuan, Guillermina; Coloma, Josefina; Harris, Eva; Crowe, James E; Stone, Mars; Norris, Phillip J; Busch, Michael; Vivanco-Cid, Hector; Cox, Josephine; Graham, Barney S; Ledgerwood, Julie E; Turtle, Lance; Solomon, Tom; Kallas, Esper G; Watkins, David I; Weiskopf, Daniela; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-10-04

    While progress has been made in characterizing humoral immunity to Zika virus (ZIKV) in humans, little is known regarding the corresponding T cell responses to ZIKV. Here we investigate the kinetics and viral epitopes targeted by T cells responding to ZIKV and address the critical question of whether pre-existing dengue virus (DENV) T cell immunity modulates these responses. We find that memory T cell responses elicited by prior infection with DENV or vaccination with Tetravalent Dengue Attenuated Vaccines (TDLAV) recognize ZIKV-derived peptides. This cross-reactivity is explained by the sequence similarity of the two viruses, as the ZIKV peptides recognized by DENV-elicited memory T cells are identical or highly conserved in DENV and ZIKV. DENV exposure prior to ZIKV infection also influences the timing and magnitude of the T cell response. ZIKV-reactive T cells in the acute phase of infection are detected earlier and in greater magnitude in DENV-immune patients. Conversely, the frequency of ZIKV-reactive T cells continues to rise in the convalescent phase in DENV-naive donors, but declines in DENV pre-exposed donors, compatible with more efficient control of ZIKV replication and/or clearance of ZIKV antigen. The quality of responses is also influenced by previous DENV exposure, and ZIKV-specific CD8 T cells form DENV pre-exposed donors selectively up-regulated granzyme B and PD1, as compared to DENV-naïve donors. Finally, we discovered that ZIKV structural proteins (E, prM and C) are major targets of both the CD4 and CD8 T cell responses, whereas DENV T cell epitopes are found primarily in nonstructural proteins. IMPORTANCE The issue of potential ZIKV and DENV cross-reactivity and how pre-existing DENV T cell immunity modulates ZIKA T cell responses is of great relevance as the two viruses often co-circulate and ZIKA virus has been spreading in geographical regions where DENV is endemic or hyper-endemic. Our data show that memory T cell responses elicited by

  1. Mechanistic Study of the Phytocompound, 2-β-D-Glucopyranosyloxy-1-hydroxytrideca-5,7,9,11-tetrayne in Human T-Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells by Using Combined Differential Proteomics and Bioinformatics Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeng-Yuan Shiau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bidens pilosa, a medicinal herb worldwide, is rich in bioactive polyynes. In this study, by using high resolution 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry analysis, as many as 2000 protein spots could be detected and those whose expression was specifically up- or downregulated in Jurkat T cells responsive to the treatment with 2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-1-hydroxytrideca-5,7,9,11-tetrayne (GHTT can be identified. GHTT treatment can upregulate thirteen proteins involved in signal transduction, detoxification, metabolism, energy pathways, and channel transport in Jurkat cells. Nine proteins, that is, thioredoxin-like proteins, BH3 interacting domain death agonist (BID protein involving apoptosis, methylcrotonoyl-CoA carboxylase beta chain, and NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase, were downregulated in GHTT-treated Jurkat cells. Further, bioinformatics tool, Ingenuity software, was used to predict signaling pathways based on the data obtained from the differential proteomics approach. Two matched pathways, relevant to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis, in Jurkat cells were inferred from the proteomics data. Biochemical analysis further verified both pathways involving GHTT in Jurkat cells. These findings do not merely prove the feasibility of combining proteomics and bioinformatics methods to identify cellular proteins as key players in response to the phytocompound in Jurkat cells but also establish the pathways of the proteins as the potential therapeutic targets of leukemia.

  2. Neuron-mediated generation of regulatory T cells from encephalitogenic T cells suppresses EAE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawei; Teige, Ingrid; Birnir, Bryndis

    2006-01-01

    ) inflammation. Neurons induce the proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells through B7-CD28 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-TGF-beta receptor signaling pathways, resulting in amplification of T-cell receptor signaling through phosphorylated ZAP-70, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-9. The interaction between......Neurons have been neglected as cells with a major immune-regulatory function because they do not express major histocompatibility complex class II. Our data show that neurons are highly immune regulatory, having a crucial role in governing T-cell response and central nervous system (CNS...... neurons and T cells results in the conversion of encephalitogenic T cells to CD25+ TGF-beta1+ CTLA-4+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells that suppress encephalitogenic T cells and inhibit experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Suppression is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4...

  3. A novel method to generate T-cell receptor-deficient chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Wong, Desmond; Png, Yi Tian; Campana, Dario

    2018-03-13

    Practical methods are needed to increase the applicability and efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies. Using donor-derived CAR-T cells is attractive, but expression of endogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) carries the risk for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). To remove surface TCRαβ, we combined an antibody-derived single-chain variable fragment specific for CD3ε with 21 different amino acid sequences predicted to retain it intracellularly. After transduction in T cells, several of these protein expression blockers (PEBLs) colocalized intracellularly with CD3ε, blocking surface CD3 and TCRαβ expression. In 25 experiments, median TCRαβ expression in T lymphocytes was reduced from 95.7% to 25.0%; CD3/TCRαβ cell depletion yielded virtually pure TCRαβ-negative T cells. Anti-CD3ε PEBLs abrogated TCRαβ-mediated signaling, without affecting immunophenotype or proliferation. In anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells, expression of an anti-CD19-41BB-CD3ζ CAR induced cytokine secretion, long-term proliferation, and CD19 + leukemia cell killing, at rates meeting or exceeding those of CAR-T cells with normal CD3/TCRαβ expression. In immunodeficient mice, anti-CD3ε PEBL-T cells had markedly reduced GVHD potential; when transduced with anti-CD19 CAR, these T cells killed engrafted leukemic cells. PEBL blockade of surface CD3/TCRαβ expression is an effective tool to prepare allogeneic CAR-T cells. Combined PEBL and CAR expression can be achieved in a single-step procedure, is easily adaptable to current cell manufacturing protocols, and can be used to target other T-cell molecules to further enhance CAR-T-cell therapies. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  5. CD19 CAR–T cells of defined CD4+:CD8+ composition in adult B cell ALL patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Berger, Carolina; Gooley, Theodore A.; Cherian, Sindhu; Hudecek, Michael; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Melville, Katherine; Pender, Barbara; Budiarto, Tanya M.; Robinson, Emily; Steevens, Natalia N.; Chaney, Colette; Soma, Lorinda; Chen, Xueyan; Li, Daniel; Cao, Jianhong; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jensen, Michael C.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Maloney, David G.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells that have been modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) have antitumor activity in B cell malignancies; however, identification of the factors that determine toxicity and efficacy of these T cells has been challenging in prior studies in which phenotypically heterogeneous CAR–T cell products were prepared from unselected T cells. METHODS. We conducted a clinical trial to evaluate CD19 CAR–T cells that were manufactured from defined CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets and administered in a defined CD4+:CD8+ composition to adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after lymphodepletion chemotherapy. RESULTS. The defined composition product was remarkably potent, as 27 of 29 patients (93%) achieved BM remission, as determined by flow cytometry. We established that high CAR–T cell doses and tumor burden increase the risks of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurotoxicity. Moreover, we identified serum biomarkers that allow testing of early intervention strategies in patients at the highest risk of toxicity. Risk-stratified CAR–T cell dosing based on BM disease burden decreased toxicity. CD8+ T cell–mediated anti-CAR transgene product immune responses developed after CAR–T cell infusion in some patients, limited CAR–T cell persistence, and increased relapse risk. Addition of fludarabine to the lymphodepletion regimen improved CAR–T cell persistence and disease-free survival. CONCLUSION. Immunotherapy with a CAR–T cell product of defined composition enabled identification of factors that correlated with CAR–T cell expansion, persistence, and toxicity and facilitated design of lymphodepletion and CAR–T cell dosing strategies that mitigated toxicity and improved disease-free survival. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01865617. FUNDING. R01-CA136551; Life Science Development Fund; Juno Therapeutics; Bezos Family Foundation. PMID:27111235

  6. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells. It is therefore mandatory to explore if these important molecules for T cell cytotoxicity are expressed by cancer target cells. We have indications that different types of immunotherapy can modify the tumor microenvironment and up-regulate reduced HLA class I expression in cancer cells but only if the associated molecular mechanisms is reversible (soft). However, in case of structural (hard) aberrations causing HLA class I loss, tumor cells will not be able to recover HLA class I expression and as a consequence will escape T-cell lysis and continue to growth. Characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the lack or downregulation of HLA class I expression, seems to be a crucial step predicting clinical responses to T cell mediated immunotherapy, and possibly aid the

  7. Regulatory T-cells and autoimmunity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    Approximately 20% of the population is affected by autoimmune or inflammatory diseases mediated by an abnormal immune response. A characteristic feature of autoimmune disease is the selective targeting of a single cell type, organ or tissue by certain populations of autoreactive T-cells. Examples of such diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all of which are characterized by chronic inflammation, tissue destruction and target organ malfunction. Although strong evidence links most autoimmune diseases to specific genes, considerable controversy prevails regarding the role of regulatory T-cell populations in the disease process. These cells are now also believed to play a key role in mediating transplantation tolerance and inhibiting the induction of tumor immunity. Though the concept of therapeutic immune regulation aimed at treating autoimmune pathology has been validated in many animal models, the development of strategies for the treatment of human autoimmune disorders remains in its infancy. The main obstacles to this include the conflicting findings of different model systems, as well as the contrasting functions of regulatory T-cells and cytokines involved in the development of such disorders. This review examines the role of regulatory T-cells in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and describes the therapeutic potential of these cells for the prevention of immune-mediated pathologies in the future. Although much remains to be learned about such pathologies, a clearer understanding of the mechanisms by which regulatory T-cells function will undoubtedly lead to exciting new possibilities for immunotherapeutics.

  8. Immunosuppression after Sepsis: Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis Induce a Loss of Naïve T-Cells but No Enduring Cell-Autonomous Defects in T-Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwart, Robby; Condotta, Stephanie A.; Requardt, Robert P.; Borken, Farina; Schubert, Katja; Weigel, Cynthia; Bauer, Michael; Griffith, Thomas S.; Förster, Martin; Brunkhorst, Frank M.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Rubio, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis describes the life-threatening systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) of an organism to an infection and is the leading cause of mortality on intensive care units (ICU) worldwide. An acute episode of sepsis is characterized by the extensive release of cytokines and other mediators resulting in a dysregulated immune response leading to organ damage and/or death. This initial pro-inflammatory burst often transits into a state of immune suppression characterised by loss of immune cells and T-cell dysfunction at later disease stages in sepsis survivors. However, despite these appreciations, the precise nature of the evoked defect in T-cell immunity in post-acute phases of SIRS remains unknown. Here we present an in-depth functional analysis of T-cell function in post-acute SIRS/sepsis. We document that T-cell function is not compromised on a per cell basis in experimental rodent models of infection-free SIRS (LPS or CpG) or septic peritonitis. Transgenic antigen-specific T-cells feature an unaltered cytokine response if challenged in vivo and ex vivo with cognate antigens. Isolated CD4+/CD8+ T-cells from post-acute septic animals do not exhibit defects in T-cell receptor-mediated activation at the the level of receptor-proximal signalling, activation marker upregulation or expansion. However, SIRS/sepsis induced transient lymphopenia and gave rise to an environment of immune attenuation at post acute disease stages. Thus, systemic inflammation has an acute impact on T-cell numbers and adaptive immunity, but does not cause major cell-autonomous enduring functional defects in T-cells. PMID:25541945

  9. T cell differentiation stages identified by molecular and immunologic analysis of the T cell receptor complex in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirro, J; Kitchingman, G; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Goorha, R M

    1987-03-01

    T cell differentiation was investigated by determining the relationship of T cell receptor (Ti) gene rearrangement and transcription to the expression of surface and cytoplasmic T3 antigen using blast cells from five children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of thymic origin. Patterns of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) reactivity indicated that these cases were representative of the three recognized stages (I, II, III) of human thymocyte development. The T3 antigen, which becomes linked to the Ti to form a functional T cell receptor complex on mature thymocytes, was expressed on the cell surface in two cases (stage III). However, in the remaining three cases that were surface T3 negative (stages I and II), large amounts of T3 were identified in the cytoplasm by immunoperoxidase staining and flow cytometry. Leukemic blasts from all five patients showed rearranged genes encoding the beta-chain portion of the Ti heterodimer. RNA transcripts of Ti beta-chain genes were also evident in lymphoblasts from all five cases, but transcripts coding for the alpha-chain portion of Ti were found only in cases that expressed T3 on the cell surface. Thus the absence of surface T3 (and presumably Ti) coincides with the absence of Ti alpha-chain RNA, suggesting that transcription of alpha-chain genes is a critical regulatory event in the surface expression of the Ti-T3 complex. Leukemic T cells that rearrange and express Ti beta-chain genes but lack Ti alpha-chain messenger RNA (mRNA) may represent a stage of differentiation analogous to pre-B cells, where heavy-chain immunoglobulin (Ig) genes are rearranged and expressed but light-chain Ig genes are not expressed.

  10. T cell recognition of breast cancer antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nadia Viborg; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Andersen, Rikke Sick

    Recent studies are encouraging research of breast cancer immunogenicity to evaluate the applicability ofimmunotherapy as a treatment strategy. The epitope landscape in breast cancer is minimally described, thus it is necessary to identify T cell targets to develop immune mediated therapies.......This project investigates four proteins commonly upregulated in breast cancer and thus probable tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Aromatase, prolactin, NEK3, and PIAS3 contribute to increase growth, survival, and motility of malignant cells. Aspiring to uncover novel epitopes for cytotoxic T cells, a reverse...... recognition utilizing DNA barcode labeled MHC multimers to screen peripheral blood lymphocytes from breast cancer patients and healthy donor samples. Signif-icantly more TAA specific T cell responses were detected in breast cancer patients than healthy donors for both HLA-A*0201 (P

  11. T Cell exhaustion in protozoan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigley, Jason P.; Bhadra, Rajarshi; Moretto, Magali M.; Khan, Imtiaz A.

    2012-01-01

    Protozoan parasites cause severe morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide, especially in developing countries where access to chemotherapeutic agents is limited. Although parasites initially evoke a robust immune response, subsequent immunity fails to clear infection, ultimately leading to the chronic stage. This enigmatic situation was initially addressed in chronic viral models, where T cells lose their function, a phenomenon referred to as ’exhaustion‘. However, recent studies demonstrate that this paradigm can be extended to protozoan diseases as well, albeit with notable differences. These studies have revealed that T cell responses generated against Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp. can become dysfunctional. This Review discusses T cell exhaustion in parasitic infection, mechanisms of development, and a possible role in disease outcome. PMID:22832368

  12. Tissue-resident memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Haina; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2013-09-01

    Tissues such as the genital tract, skin, and lung act as barriers against invading pathogens. To protect the host, incoming microbes must be quickly and efficiently controlled by the immune system at the portal of entry. Memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, which confers long-term protection and is the basis for efficacious vaccines. While the majority of existing vaccines rely on circulating antibody for protection, struggles to develop antibody-based vaccines against infections such as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have underscored the need to generate memory T cells for robust antiviral control. The circulating memory T-cell population is generally divided into two subsets: effector memory (TEM ) and central memory (TCM ). These two subsets can be distinguished by their localization, as TCM home to secondary lymphoid organs and TEM circulate through non-lymphoid tissues. More recently, studies have identified a third subset, called tissue-resident memory (TRM ) cells, based on its migratory properties. This subset is found in peripheral tissues that require expression of specific chemoattractants and homing receptors for T-cell recruitment and retention, including barrier sites such as the skin and genital tract. In this review, we categorize different tissues in the body based on patterns of memory T-cell migration and tissue residency. This review also describes the rules for TRM generation and the properties that distinguish them from circulating TEM and TCM cells. Finally, based on the failure of recent T-cell-based vaccines to provide optimal protection, we also discuss the potential role of TRM cells in vaccine design against microbes that invade through the peripheral tissues and highlight new vaccination strategies that take advantage of this newly described memory T-cell subset. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Immune activation and CD8+ T-cell differentiation towards senescence in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Papagno

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the fight against the HIV/AIDS epidemic is hindered by our failure to elucidate the precise reasons for the onset of immunodeficiency in HIV-1 infection. Increasing evidence suggests that elevated immune activation is associated with poor outcome in HIV-1 pathogenesis. However, the basis of this association remains unclear. Through ex vivo analysis of virus-specific CD8(+ T-cells and the use of an in vitro model of naïve CD8(+ T-cell priming, we show that the activation level and the differentiation state of T-cells are closely related. Acute HIV-1 infection induces massive activation of CD8(+ T-cells, affecting many cell populations, not only those specific for HIV-1, which results in further differentiation of these cells. HIV disease progression correlates with increased proportions of highly differentiated CD8(+ T-cells, which exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence and probably indicate a decline in T-cell competence of the infected person. The differentiation of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells towards a state of replicative senescence is a natural process. It can be driven by excessive levels of immune stimulation. This may be part of the mechanism through which HIV-1-mediated immune activation exhausts the capacity of the immune system.

  14. The Loss of TET2 Promotes CD8+T Cell Memory Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Shannon A; Gohil, Mercy; Banks, Lauren B; Cotton, Renee M; Johnson, Matthew E; Stelekati, Erietta; Wells, Andrew D; Wherry, E John; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2018-01-01

    T cell differentiation requires appropriate regulation of DNA methylation. In this article, we demonstrate that the methylcytosine dioxygenase ten-eleven translocation (TET)2 regulates CD8 + T cell differentiation. In a murine model of acute viral infection, TET2 loss promotes early acquisition of a memory CD8 + T cell fate in a cell-intrinsic manner without disrupting Ag-driven cell expansion or effector function. Upon secondary recall, TET2-deficient memory CD8 + T cells demonstrate superior pathogen control. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified a number of differentially methylated regions in TET2-deficient versus wild-type CD8 + T cells. These differentially methylated regions did not occur at the loci of differentially expressed memory markers; rather, several hypermethylated regions were identified in known transcriptional regulators of CD8 + T cell memory fate. Together, these data demonstrate that TET2 is an important regulator of CD8 + T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Acquired transcriptional programming in functional and exhausted virus-specific CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Ben; Wherry, E John; Ahmed, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    Failure to control viral infections such as HIV results in T-cell receptor (TCR) and inhibitory receptor driven exhaustion of antigen-specific T cells. Persistent signaling by these receptors during chronic viral infection sculpts the transcriptional regulatory programs of virus-specific T cells. The resulting gene expression profile is tailored to temper the potentially damaging effector functions of cytotoxic T cells and adapt them to an antigen-rich and inflammation-rich environment. Here we review recent studies investigating mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of effector, functional memory, and exhausted T-cell functions during acute versus chronic infections. Patterns of gene expression in virus-specific CD8 T cells are a result of a combination of pro and inhibitory signals from antigen presentation (TCR-mediated) and co-inhibitory receptor ligation (PD-1, 2B4). Further, memory-specific transcriptional regulation of 2B4 expression and signaling impose a self-limiting secondary effector response to a prolonged viral infection. Additionally, differentiation of functional memory CD8 T cells is coupled with acquisition of a repressive epigenetic program for PD-1 expression. However, chronic infection provides a signal that blocks the acquisition of these epigenetic modifications reinforcing the suppression of cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) functions in exhausted cells. Current findings suggest that the mechanism(s) that delineate functional memory versus exhaustion are coupled with acquisition of transcriptional programs at the effector stage of differentiation, reinforced by cessation or persistence of TCR signaling.

  16. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards.

  17. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  18. PD-L1 Expression Induced by the 2009 Pandemic Influenza A(H1N1 Virus Impairs the Human T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuriban Valero-Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PD-L1 expression plays a critical role in the impairment of T cell responses during chronic infections; however, the expression of PD-L1 on T cells during acute viral infections, particularly during the pandemic influenza virus (A(H1N1pdm09, and its effects on the T cell response have not been widely explored. We found that A(H1N1pdm09 virus induced PD-L1 expression on human dendritic cells (DCs and T cells, as well as PD-1 expression on T cells. PD-L1 expression impaired the T cell response against A(H1N1pdm09 by promoting CD8+ T cell death and reducing cytokine production. Furthermore, we found increased PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells from influenza-infected patients from the first and second 2009 pandemic waves in Mexico City. PD-L1 expression on CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with T cell proportions in patients infected with A(H1N1pdm09. Therefore, PD-L1 expression on DCs and T cells could be associated with an impaired T cell response during acute infection with A(H1N1pdm09 virus.

  19. Synthetic biology approaches to engineer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Rupp, Levi J; Roybal, Kole T; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-08-01

    There is rapidly growing interest in learning how to engineer immune cells, such as T lymphocytes, because of the potential of these engineered cells to be used for therapeutic applications such as the recognition and killing of cancer cells. At the same time, our knowhow and capability to logically engineer cellular behavior is growing rapidly with the development of synthetic biology. Here we describe how synthetic biology approaches are being used to rationally alter the behavior of T cells to optimize them for therapeutic functions. We also describe future developments that will be important in order to construct safe and precise T cell therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  1. Peripheral T cell lymphoma: Not otherwise specified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha H Pai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors originating from mature T cells, which constitutes less than 15% of all non-Hodgkins lymphomas in adults. Primary cutaneous PTCL-not otherwise specified (NOS represent a subgroup of PTCLs with no consistent immunophenotypic, genetic or clinical features. PTCL-NOS frequently has an aggressive course with a tendency for systemic involvement, however, a well-defined therapeutic and prognostic approach has not been outlined yet. We report a case of PTCL-NOS with multiple cutaneous lesions in a young adult male with an emphasis on the treatment modality used.

  2. Regulatory T Cell Immunity in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilman Zulkifli Amin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder involving innate and adaptive immunity process. Effector T cell (Teff responses promote atherosclerotic disease, whereas regulatory T cells (Tregs have been shown to play a protective role against atherosclerosis by down-regulating inflammatory responses which include multiple mechanisms. Compelling experimental data suggest that shifting the Treg/Teff balance toward Tregs may be a possible therapeutic approach for atherosclerotic disease, although the role of Tregs in human atherosclerotic disease has not been fully elucidated. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the roles of Tregs and Teffs in experimental atherosclerosis, as well as human coronary artery disease.

  3. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  4. E2a/Pbx1 Induces the Rapid Proliferation of Stem Cell Factor-Dependent Murine Pro-T Cells That Cause Acute T-Lymphoid or Myeloid Leukemias in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sykes, David B.; Kamps, Mark P.

    2004-01-01

    Oncoprotein E2a/Pbx1 is produced by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation of human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia. E2a/Pbx1 blocks differentiation of primary myeloid progenitors but, paradoxically, induces apoptosis in established pre-B-cell lines, and no transforming function of E2a/Pbx1 has been reported in cultured lymphoid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that E2a/Pbx1 induces immortal proliferation of stem cell factor (SCF)-dependent pro-T thymocytes by a mechanism dependent upon bo...

  5. TCR down-regulation controls T cell homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Nielsen, Bodil L

    2009-01-01

    was caused by the combination of reduced thymic output, decreased T cell apoptosis, and increased transition of naive T cells to memory T cells. Experiments with bone marrow chimeric mice confirmed that the CD3gammaLLAA mutation exerted a T cell intrinsic effect on T cell homeostasis that resulted...... in an increased transition of CD3gammaLLAA naive T cells to memory T cells and a survival advantage of CD3gammaLLAA T cells compared with wild-type T cells. The experimental observations were further supported by mathematical modeling of T cell homeostasis. Our study thus identifies an important role of CD3gamma......-mediated TCR down-regulation in T cell homeostasis....

  6. Characterization of in vivo Dlg1 deletion on T cell development and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Humphries

    Full Text Available The polarized reorganization of the T cell membrane and intracellular signaling molecules in response to T cell receptor (TCR engagement has been implicated in the modulation of T cell development and effector responses. In siRNA-based studies Dlg1, a MAGUK scaffold protein and member of the Scribble polarity complex, has been shown to play a role in T cell polarity and TCR signal specificity, however the role of Dlg1 in T cell development and function in vivo remains unclear.Here we present the combined data from three independently-derived dlg1-knockout mouse models; two germline deficient knockouts and one conditional knockout. While defects were not observed in T cell development, TCR-induced early phospho-signaling, actin-mediated events, or proliferation in any of the models, the acute knockdown of Dlg1 in Jurkat T cells diminished accumulation of actin at the IS. Further, while Th1-type cytokine production appeared unaffected in T cells derived from mice with a dlg1 germline-deficiency, altered production of TCR-dependent Th1 and Th2-type cytokines was observed in T cells derived from mice with a conditional loss of dlg1 expression and T cells with acute Dlg1 suppression, suggesting a differential requirement for Dlg1 activity in signaling events leading to Th1 versus Th2 cytokine induction. The observed inconsistencies between these and other knockout models and siRNA strategies suggest that 1 compensatory upregulation of alternate gene(s may be masking a role for dlg1 in controlling TCR-mediated events in dlg1 deficient mice and 2 the developmental stage during which dlg1 ablation begins may control the degree to which compensatory events occur.These findings provide a potential explanation for the discrepancies observed in various studies using different dlg1-deficient T cell models and underscore the importance of acute dlg1 ablation to avoid the upregulation of compensatory mechanisms for future functional studies of the Dlg1 protein.

  7. Vitamin D controls T cell antigen receptor signaling and activation of human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, Marina Rode; Kongsbak-Wismann, Martin; Schjerling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes are key signaling proteins downstream of many extracellular stimuli. Here we show that naive human T cells had very low expression of PLC-gamma1 and that this correlated with low T cell antigen receptor (TCR) responsiveness in naive T cells. However, TCR triggering...... led to an upregulation of approximately 75-fold in PLC-gamma1 expression, which correlated with greater TCR responsiveness. Induction of PLC-gamma1 was dependent on vitamin D and expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Naive T cells did not express VDR, but VDR expression was induced by TCR...... signaling via the alternative mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 pathway. Thus, initial TCR signaling via p38 leads to successive induction of VDR and PLC-gamma1, which are required for subsequent classical TCR signaling and T cell activation....

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell (Car T Cell Therapy In Hematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Ataca

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well demonstrated that immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and cause less off-target toxicities. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR modified T cells. On July 1, 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the beneficiaries of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical-clinical studies, effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  9. TCR Down-Regulation Controls Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus......-specific CD8(+) T cell responses....

  10. TCR down-regulation controls virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné; Haks, Mariëlle; Nielsen, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    The CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif plays a central role in TCR down-regulation. However, little is understood about the role of the CD3gamma di-leucine-based motif in physiological T cell responses. In this study, we show that the expansion in numbers of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells is impaired...... molecule Bcl-2. This resulted in a 2-fold reduction in the clonal expansion of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells during the acute phase of vesicular stomatitis virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections. These results identify an important role of CD3gamma-mediated TCR down-regulation in virus......-specific CD8(+) T cell responses....

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment responsiveness depends on the degree of CD8+ T cell activation in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Gong, Fang-Qi; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Hu, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) has become the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children and is also a risk factor for ischemic heart disease in adults. However, Kawasaki disease lacks specific laboratory diagnostic indices. Thus, this study analyzed the T cell activation profiles of Kawasaki disease and assessed their value in the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease and the prediction of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) sensitivity. We analyzed human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR), CD69 and CD25 expression on peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the acute phase of KD. We compared the percentages of HLA-DR+/CD69+/CD25+ T cells in the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations of IVIG-effective and IVIG-resistant groups. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to assess the diagnostic value of the above parameters. The median percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells and the median ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD25+ T cells were significantly elevated in the patient group compared with those in the control group during the acute phase of KD. Regarding the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease, the area under the ROC curve was 0.939 for the percentage of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells. There was a significant difference in the ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells between IVIG-resistant patients and IVIG-sensitive patients. Regarding IVIG sensitivity, the area under the ROC curve was 0.795 for it. Excessive CD8+ T cell activation, as well as an imbalance between CD8+ T cell activation and inhibition, underlies the pathogenesis of Kawasaki disease. The percentage of CD8+ HLA-DR+ T cells may be used as an index to diagnose Kawasaki disease. IVIG inhibits CD8+ T cell activation, but excessive CD8+ T cell activation may cause IVIG resistance. The ratio of CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells/CD8+CD69+ T cells may be used as a predictor of IVIG sensitivity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. T Cell Phenotype and T Cell Receptor Repertoire in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

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    Kostas Patas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available While a link between inflammation and the development of neuropsychiatric disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD is supported by a growing body of evidence, little is known about the contribution of aberrant adaptive immunity in this context. Here, we conducted in-depth characterization of T cell phenotype and T cell receptor (TCR repertoire in MDD. For this cross-sectional case–control study, we recruited antidepressant-free patients with MDD without any somatic or psychiatric comorbidities (n = 20, who were individually matched for sex, age, body mass index, and smoking status to a non-depressed control subject (n = 20. T cell phenotype and repertoire were interrogated using a combination of flow cytometry, gene expression analysis, and next generation sequencing. T cells from MDD patients showed significantly lower surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6, which are known to be central to T cell differentiation and trafficking. In addition, we observed a shift within the CD4+ T cell compartment characterized by a higher frequency of CD4+CD25highCD127low/− cells and higher FOXP3 mRNA expression in purified CD4+ T cells obtained from patients with MDD. Finally, flow cytometry-based TCR Vβ repertoire analysis indicated a less diverse CD4+ T cell repertoire in MDD, which was corroborated by next generation sequencing of the TCR β chain CDR3 region. Overall, these results suggest that T cell phenotype and TCR utilization are skewed on several levels in patients with MDD. Our study identifies putative cellular and molecular signatures of dysregulated adaptive immunity and reinforces the notion that T cells are a pathophysiologically relevant cell population in this disorder.

  13. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Pregnancy persistently affects memory T cell populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieffer, Tom E. C.; Faas, Marijke M.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Prins, Jelmer R.

    Pregnancy is an immune challenge to the maternal immune system. The effects of pregnancy on maternal immunity and particularly on memory T cells during and after pregnancy are not fully known. This observational study aims to show the short term and the long term effects of pregnancy on the

  15. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  16. Glutathione Primes T Cell Metabolism for Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tak W.; Grusdat, Melanie; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin-1 (mTOR) and expression of NFAT and Myc transcription factors, abrogating the energy utilization and Myc-dependent metabolic reprogramming that allows activated T cells to switch to glycolysis and glutaminolysis. In vivo, T-cell-specific ablation of murine Gclc...

  17. A Novel Cryptic Three-Way Translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33 with Deletion of Tumor Suppressor Genes in 9p21.3 and 13q14 in a T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moneeb A. K. Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemia often presents with pure chromosomal resolution; thus, aberrations may not be detected by banding cytogenetics. Here, a case of 26-year-old male diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and a normal karyotype after standard GTG-banding was studied retrospectively in detail by molecular cytogenetic and molecular approaches. Besides fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and high resolution array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH were applied. Thus, cryptic chromosomal aberrations not observed before were detected: three chromosomes were involved in a cytogenetically balanced occurring translocation t(2;9;18(p23.2;p21.3;q21.33. Besides a translocation t(10;14(q24;q11 was identified, an aberration known to be common in T-ALL. Due to the three-way translocation deletion of tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A/INK4A/p16, CDKN2B/INK4B/p15, and MTAP/ARF/p14 in 9p21.3 took place. Additionally RB1 in 13q14 was deleted. This patient, considered to have a normal karyotype after low resolution banding cytogenetics, was treated according to general protocol of anticancer therapy (ALL-BFM 95.

  18. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  19. Monitoring circulating gammadelta T cells in cancer patients to optimize gammadelta T cell-based immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Heinrich eOberg; Christian eKellner; Matthias ePeipp; Susanne eSebens; Sabine eAdam-Klages; Martin eGramatzki; Dieter eKabelitz; Daniela eWesch

    2014-01-01

    The success of gammadelta (gd) T cell-based immunotherapy, where the cytotoxic activity of circulating gd T lymphocytes is activated by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (n-BP), or possibly by bispecific antibodies or the combination of both, requires a profound knowledge of patients´ gd T cells. A possible influence of radio- or chemotherapy on gd T cells as well as their reported exhaustion after repetitive treatment with n-BP or their lack of response to various cancers can be easily det...

  20. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, D. M.; Kater, A. P.; Hazenberg, M. D.; Hagenbeek, A.; Kersten, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be

  1. Oseltamivir Prophylaxis Reduces Inflammation and Facilitates Establishment of Cross-Strain Protective T Cell Memory to Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola L Bird

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells directed against conserved viral regions elicit broad immunity against distinct influenza viruses, promote rapid virus elimination and enhanced host recovery. The influenza neuraminidase inhibitor, oseltamivir, is prescribed for therapy and prophylaxis, although it remains unclear how the drug impacts disease severity and establishment of effector and memory CD8(+ T cell immunity. We dissected the effects of oseltamivir on viral replication, inflammation, acute CD8(+ T cell responses and the establishment of immunological CD8(+ T cell memory. In mice, ferrets and humans, the effect of osteltamivir on viral titre was relatively modest. However, prophylactic oseltamivir treatment in mice markedly reduced morbidity, innate responses, inflammation and, ultimately, the magnitude of effector CD8(+ T cell responses. Importantly, functional memory CD8(+ T cells established during the drug-reduced effector phase were capable of mounting robust recall responses. Moreover, influenza-specific memory CD4(+ T cells could be also recalled after the secondary challenge, while the antibody levels were unaffected. This provides evidence that long-term memory T cells can be generated during an oseltamivir-interrupted infection. The anti-inflammatory effect of oseltamivir was verified in H1N1-infected patients. Thus, in the case of an unpredicted influenza pandemic, while prophylactic oseltamivir treatment can reduce disease severity, the capacity to generate memory CD8(+ T cells specific for the newly emerged virus is uncompromised. This could prove especially important for any new influenza pandemic which often occurs in separate waves.

  2. An "off-the-shelf" fratricide-resistant CAR-T for the treatment of T cell hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Matthew L; Choi, Jaebok; Staser, Karl; Ritchey, Julie K; Devenport, Jessica M; Eckardt, Kayla; Rettig, Michael P; Wang, Bing; Eissenberg, Linda G; Ghobadi, Armin; Gehrs, Leah N; Prior, Julie L; Achilefu, Samuel; Miller, Christopher A; Fronick, Catrina C; O'Neal, Julie; Gao, Feng; Weinstock, David M; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fulton, Robert S; DiPersio, John F

    2018-02-20

    T cell malignancies represent a group of hematologic cancers with high rates of relapse and mortality in patients for whom no effective targeted therapies exist. The shared expression of target antigens between chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and malignant T cells has limited the development of CAR-T because of unintended CAR-T fratricide and an inability to harvest sufficient autologous T cells. Here, we describe a fratricide-resistant "off-the-shelf" CAR-T (or UCART7) that targets CD7+ T cell malignancies and, through CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing, lacks both CD7 and T cell receptor alpha chain (TRAC) expression. UCART7 demonstrates efficacy against human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines and primary T-ALL in vitro and in vivo without the induction of xenogeneic GvHD. Fratricide-resistant, allo-tolerant "off-the-shelf" CAR-T represents a strategy for treatment of relapsed and refractory T-ALL and non-Hodgkin's T cell lymphoma without a requirement for autologous T cells.

  3. Adoptive T Cell Therapies: A Comparison of T Cell Receptors and Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel T.; Kranz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-killing properties of T cells provide tremendous opportunities to treat cancer. Adoptive T cell therapies have begun to harness this potential by endowing a functionally diverse repertoire of T cells with genetically modified, tumor-specific recognition receptors. Normally, this antigen recognition function is mediated by an αβ T cell receptor (TCR), but the dominant therapeutic forms currently in development are synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). While CAR-based adoptive cell therapies are already showing great promise, their basic mechanistic properties have been studied in less detail compared with those of αβ TCRs. In this review, we compare and contrast various features of TCRs versus CARs, with a goal of highlighting issues that need to be addressed to fully exploit the therapeutic potential of both. PMID:26705086

  4. CD8+ memory T-cell inflation renders compromised CD4+ T-cell-dependent CD8+ T-cell immunity via naïve T-cell anergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aizhang Xu,1,2 Andrew Freywald,3 Yufeng Xie,4 Zejun Li,5 Jim Xiang1,2 1Cancer Research Cluster, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 2Department of Oncology, 3Department of Pathology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada; 4Department of Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, Soochow University, Suzhou, 5Shanghai Veterinary Research Institute, Shanghai, China Abstract: Whether inflation of CD8+ memory T (mT cells, which is often derived from repeated prime-boost vaccinations or chronic viral infections in the elderly, would affect late CD8+ T-cell immunity is a long-standing paradox. We have previously established an animal model with mT-cell inflation by transferring ConA-stimulated monoclonal CD8+ T cells derived from Ova-specific T-cell-receptor transgenic OTI mice into irradiation-induced lymphopenic B6 mice. In this study, we also established another two animal models with mT-cell inflation by transferring, 1 ConA-stimulated monoclonal CD8+ T cells derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein-specific T-cell-receptor transgenic P14 mice, and 2 ConA-stimulated polyclonal CD8+ T cells derived from B6.1 mice into B6 mice with irradiation-induced lymphopenia. We vaccinated these mice with recombinant Ova-expressing Listeria monocytogenes and Ova-pulsed dendritic cells, which stimulated CD4+ T cell-independent and CD4+ T-cell-dependent CD8+ T-cell responses, respectively, and assessed Ova-specific CD8+ T-cell responses by flow cytometry. We found that Ova-specific CD8+ T-cell responses derived from the latter but not the former vaccination were significantly reduced in mice with CD8+ mT-cell inflation compared to wild-type B6 mice. We determined that naïve CD8+ T cells purified from splenocytes of mice with mT-cell inflation had defects in cell proliferation upon stimulation in vitro and in vivo and upregulated T-cell anergy-associated Itch and GRAIL molecules. Taken together, our data reveal that CD8+ mT-cell inflation renders

  5. The Transcription Factor NFAT1 Participates in the Induction of CD4+T Cell Functional Exhaustion during Plasmodium yoelii Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Rachel Y; Ting, Li-Min; Gendlina, Inessa; Kim, Kami; Macian, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    Repeated stimulation of T cells that occurs in the context of chronic infection results in progressively reduced responsiveness of T cells to pathogen-derived antigens. This phenotype, known as T cell exhaustion, occurs during chronic infections caused by a variety of pathogens, from persistent viruses to parasites. Unlike the memory cells that typically form after successful pathogen clearance following an acute infection, exhausted T cells secrete lower levels of effector cytokines, proliferate less in response to cognate antigen, and upregulate cell surface inhibitory molecules such as PD-1 and LAG-3. The molecular events that lead to the induction of this phenotype have, however, not been fully characterized. In T cells, members of the NFAT family of transcription factors not only are responsible for the expression of many activation-induced genes but also are crucial for the induction of transcriptional programs that inhibit T cell activation and maintain tolerance. Here we show that NFAT1-deficient CD4 + T cells maintain higher proliferative capacity and expression of effector cytokines following Plasmodium yoelii infection and are therefore more resistant to P. yoelii -induced exhaustion than their wild-type counterparts. Consequently, gene expression microarray analysis of CD4 + T cells following P. yoelii -induced exhaustion shows upregulation of effector T cell-associated genes in the absence of NFAT1 compared with wild-type exhausted T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NFAT1-deficient CD4 + T cells into mice infected with P. yoelii results in increased production of antibodies to cognate antigen. Our results support the idea that NFAT1 is necessary to fully suppress effector responses during Plasmodium -induced CD4 + T cell exhaustion. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Inhibition of apoptosis in T cells expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, K F; Haaksma, A G; Goudsmit, J; Krammer, P H; Heeney, J L

    1994-10-01

    This study set out to determine whether T cell dysfunction associated with HTLV-I led to increased sensitivity of infected cells to apoptosis or, owing to their potential to develop ATL, if infected cells would become resistant to this process. To test this hypothesis we utilized the monoclonal antibody anti-APO-1, which has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in human T cells. Human T cell lines expressing HTLV-I showed reduced susceptibility to anti-APO-1-induced apoptosis despite expression of high levels of cell surface APO-1. Cell-free supernatant of the Tax-expressing cell line C8166 and heat-inactivated supernatant of the HTLV-I-producing cell line MT2 transferred increased resistance to anti-APO-1 to susceptible Jurkat T cells. Susceptible T cells transfected with an HTLV-I Tax-expressing vector or treated with soluble Tax protein became less susceptible to anti-APO-1-induced cell death. Furthermore, primary human lymphocytes treated with soluble Tax were less susceptible to apoptosis induced by anti-APO-1. The protective effect of Tax in T cell lines and primary human lymphocytes was reversed by the addition of anti-Tax antibodies. Anti-APO-1-induced apoptosis was also found to be inhibited in Jurkat cells by the induction of protein kinase C (PKC) with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Resistance to apoptosis conferred by HTLV-I Tax and an active PKC pathway may be factors contributing to the survival of dysregulated HTLV-I-infected T cells prone to the development of adult T cell leukemia.

  7. Ageing combines CD4 T cell lymphopenia in secondary lymphoid organs and T cell accumulation in gut associated lymphoid tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Martinet , Kim ,; Bloquet , Stéphane; Bourgeois , Christine

    2014-01-01

    International audience; BackgroundCD4 T cell lymphopenia is an important T cell defect associated to ageing. Higher susceptibility to infections, cancer, or autoimmune pathologies described in aged individuals is thought to partly rely on T cell lymphopenia. We hypothesize that such diverse effects may reflect anatomical heterogeneity of age related T cell lymphopenia. Indeed, no data are currently available on the impact of ageing on T cell pool recovered from gut associated lymphoid tissue ...

  8. [Malignant T-cell lymphoma with osteomyelitis-like bone infiltration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, H; Schmitt, O

    1980-01-01

    After a short review on the late literature, existing about various forms of acute lymphoblastic leucemias, it is reported on a rare case of malignant T-cell-Lymphoma with ostemyelitis-like, painfull bone infiltration. The clinical symptoms, as well as differential-diagnostic criterias to other leucemias are described.

  9. STAT3-mediated constitutive expression of SOCS-3 in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brender, C; Nielsen, M; Kaltoft, K

    2001-01-01

    ) obtained from affected skin from a patient with mycosis fungoides (MF) and from peripheral blood from a patient with Sezary syndrome (SS). In contrast, constitutive SOCS-3 expression is not found in the leukemic Jurkat T-cell line, the MOLT-4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, and the monocytic...

  10. Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Perica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT. Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  11. Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Chronic Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohleen Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL is a rare but distinct type of T cell lymphoma with an aggressive course and high mortality. Most patients are diagnosed late in the disease and usually present with generalized lymphadenopathy. A minority have skin lesions at the time of diagnosis, more commonly in the form of nonspecific maculopapular rash with or without pruritus. We report a rare case of AITL presenting with chronic, recurrent angioedema and urticaria-like lesions and no palpable peripheral adenopathy. Primary Care physicians, dermatologists, and allergists must maintain a high index of suspicion for cutaneous manifestations of lymphoma, especially if the skin lesions are refractory to standard treatment. Timely diagnosis is essential to improve survival.

  12. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  13. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  14. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered...... from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  15. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Min Sook [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Min-Yeong [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, The Graduate School, Ajou University (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Daeho [Department of Microbiology, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Gangneung, Gangwon-do 210-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Allen E. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Kye Yong [Department of Pathology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Dongjak-gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sun [Department of Microbiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, In Kyoung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Ajou University School of Medicine, 164, World cul-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 443-380 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  16. T Cells in Osteoarthritis: Alterations and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu-sheng; Luo, Wei; Zhu, Shou-an; Lei, Guang-hua

    2017-01-01

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) has been traditionally regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, reports increasingly suggest that it is inflammatory, at least in certain patients. OA patients often exhibit inflammatory infiltration of synovial membranes by macrophages, T cells, mast cells, B cells, plasma cells, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, granulocytes, etc. Although previous reviews have summarized the knowledge of inflammation in the pathogenesis of OA, as far as we know, no report r...

  17. Regulatory T cells: immune suppression and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Yisong Y

    2010-01-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) were originally identified as critical in maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The immunosuppressive functions of Tregs are widely acknowledged and have been extensively studied. Recent studies have revealed many diverse roles of Tregs in shaping the immune system and the inflammatory response. This review will discuss our efforts as well as the efforts of others towards understanding the multifaceted function of Treg...

  18. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    curative treatment is available currently. Hai and colleagues found that the Hedgehog signaling pathway in salivary glands was activated during... salivary gland hypofunction by preserving salivary stem/progenitor cells and the parasympathetic innervation in mice. Similar effects on expression of genes...cytotoxic T lymphocytes without enhancement of regulatory T-cell inhibition. Clin Cancer Res. Clin Cancer Res. 2014 Jan 1;20(1):131-9. Highlited article

  19. Elementary Steps in T Cell Receptor Triggering

    OpenAIRE

    Dushek, Omer

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism by which antigen binding to the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) generates intracellular signaling, a process termed TCR triggering, is incompletely understood. A large body of experimental evidence has implicated multiple biophysical/biochemical effects and multiple molecules in the process of TCR triggering, which likely reflect the uniquely demanding role of the TCR in recognizing diverse antigenic ligands. In this perspective, I propose that breaking down the process of TCR tri...

  20. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek C. Macallan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy.

  1. Human T Cell Memory: A Dynamic View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macallan, Derek C.; Borghans, José A. M.; Asquith, Becca

    2017-01-01

    Long-term T cell-mediated protection depends upon the formation of a pool of memory cells to protect against future pathogen challenge. In this review we argue that looking at T cell memory from a dynamic viewpoint can help in understanding how memory populations are maintained following pathogen exposure or vaccination. For example, a dynamic view resolves the apparent paradox between the relatively short lifespans of individual memory cells and very long-lived immunological memory by focussing on the persistence of clonal populations, rather than individual cells. Clonal survival is achieved by balancing proliferation, death and differentiation rates within and between identifiable phenotypic pools; such pools correspond broadly to sequential stages in the linear differentiation pathway. Each pool has its own characteristic kinetics, but only when considered as a population; single cells exhibit considerable heterogeneity. In humans, we tend to concentrate on circulating cells, but memory T cells in non-lymphoid tissues and bone marrow are increasingly recognised as critical for immune defence; their kinetics, however, remain largely unexplored. Considering vaccination from this viewpoint shifts the focus from the size of the primary response to the survival of the clone and enables identification of critical system pinch-points and opportunities to improve vaccine efficacy. PMID:28165397

  2. Force Dynamics During T Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, David A.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    T cell activation is an essential step in the adaptive immune response. The binding of the T cell receptor (TCR) with antigen triggers signaling cascades and cell spreading. Physical forces exerted on the TCR by the cytoskeleton have been shown to induce signaling events. While cellular forces are known to depend on the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton, the biophysical mechanisms underlying force induced activation of TCR-antigen interactions unknown. Here, we use traction force microscopy to measure the force dynamics of activated Jurkat T cells. The movements of beads embedded in an elastic gel serve as a non-invasive reporter of cytoskeletal and molecular motor dynamics. We examined the statistical structure of the force profiles throughout the cell during signaling activation. We found two spatially distinct active regimes of force generation characterized by different time scales. Typically, the interior of the cells was found to be more active than the periphery. Inhibition of myosin motor activity altered the correlation time of the bead displacements indicating additional sources of stochastic force generation. Our results indicate a complex interaction between myosin activity and actin polymerization dynamics in producing cellular forces in immune cells.

  3. Evolution of two prototypic T cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Li, Jianxu; Hirano, Masayuki; Sutoh, Yoichi; Herrin, Brantley R; Cooper, Max D

    2015-07-01

    Jawless vertebrates, which occupy a unique position in chordate phylogeny, employ leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-based variable lymphocyte receptors (VLR) for antigen recognition. During the assembly of the VLR genes (VLRA, VLRB and VLRC), donor LRR-encoding sequences are copied in a step-wise manner into the incomplete germ-line genes. The assembled VLR genes are differentially expressed by discrete lymphocyte lineages: VLRA- and VLRC-producing cells are T-cell like, whereas VLRB-producing cells are B-cell like. VLRA(+) and VLRC(+) lymphocytes resemble the two principal T-cell lineages of jawed vertebrates that express the αβ or γδ T-cell receptors (TCR). Reminiscent of the interspersed nature of the TCRα/TCRδ locus in jawed vertebrates, the close proximity of the VLRA and VLRC loci facilitates sharing of donor LRR sequences during VLRA and VLRC assembly. Here we discuss the insight these findings provide into vertebrate T- and B-cell evolution, and the alternative types of anticipatory receptors they use for adaptive immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. T Cell Therapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Basso, M Zecca, P Merli, A Gurrado, S Secondino, G Quartuccio, I Guido, P Guerini, G Ottonello, N Zavras, R Maccario, P Pedrazzoli, P Comoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the novel biologic therapeutics that will increase our ability to cure human cancer in the years to come, T cell therapy is one of the most promising approaches. However, with the possible exception of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes therapy for melanoma, clinical trials of adoptive T-cell therapy for solid tumors have so far provided only clear proofs-of-principle to build on with further development. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-associated malignancies offer a unique model to develop T cell-based immune therapies, targeting viral antigens expressed on tumor cells. In the last two decades, EBV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL have been successfully employed for the prophylaxis and treatment of EBV-related lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised hosts. More recently, this therapeutic approach has been applied to the setting of EBV-related solid tumors, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The results are encouraging, although further improvements to the clinical protocols are clearly necessary to increase anti-tumor activity. Promising implementations are underway, including harnessing the therapeutic potential of CTLs specific for subdominant EBV latent cycle epitopes, and delineating strategies aimed at targeting immune evasion mechanisms exerted by tumor cells.

  5. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingshan Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  6. Clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingshan; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2017-10-23

    Novel immunotherapeutic agents targeting tumor-site microenvironment are revolutionizing cancer therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells are widely studied for cancer immunotherapy. CD19-specific CAR-T cells, tisagenlecleucel, have been recently approved for clinical application. Ongoing clinical trials are testing CAR designs directed at novel targets involved in hematological and solid malignancies. In addition to trials of single-target CAR-T cells, simultaneous and sequential CAR-T cells are being studied for clinical applications. Multi-target CAR-engineered T cells are also entering clinical trials. T cell receptor-engineered CAR-T and universal CAR-T cells represent new frontiers in CAR-T cell development. In this study, we analyzed the characteristics of CAR constructs and registered clinical trials of CAR-T cells in China and provided a quick glimpse of the landscape of CAR-T studies in China.

  7. Cytotoxic and proliferative T cell responses in HIV-1-infected Macaca nemestrina.

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, S J; Corey, L; Agy, M B; Morton, W R; McElrath, M J; Greenberg, P D

    1995-01-01

    Macaca nemestrina has been described as an animal model for acute HIV-1 infection. This animal, unlike most infected humans, appears to contain HIV-1 replication. Therefore analysis of HIV-1-specific proliferative and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses following HIV-1 challenge of M. nemestrina may provide information into the role of such responses in both the control of acute HIV infection and protective immunity. Although CD4+ T cell responses to HIV-1 are generally difficult to detect...

  8. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation

  9. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  10. Phase I trials using Sleeping Beauty to generate CD19-specific CAR T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaei, Partow; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, M. Helen; Figliola, Matthew J.; Bassett, Roland; Olivares, Simon; Jena, Bipulendu; Dawson, Margaret J.; Kumaresan, Pappanaicken R.; Su, Shihuang; Maiti, Sourindra; Dai, Jianliang; Moriarity, Branden; Forget, Marie-Andrée; Senyukov, Vladimir; Orozco, Aaron; Liu, Tingting; McCarty, Jessica; Jackson, Rineka N.; Moyes, Judy S.; Rondon, Gabriela; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Ciurea, Stefan; Alousi, Amin; Nieto, Yago; Rezvani, Katy; Marin, David; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Keating, Michael; Wierda, William; Do, Kim Anh; Largaespada, David A.; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. T cells expressing antigen-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) improve outcomes for CD19-expressing B cell malignancies. We evaluated a human application of T cells that were genetically modified using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express a CD19-specific CAR. METHODS. T cells were genetically modified using DNA plasmids from the SB platform to stably express a second-generation CD19-specific CAR and selectively propagated ex vivo with activating and propagating cells (AaPCs) and cytokines. Twenty-six patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia safely underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and infusion of CAR T cells as adjuvant therapy in the autologous (n = 7) or allogeneic settings (n = 19). RESULTS. SB-mediated genetic transposition and stimulation resulted in 2,200- to 2,500-fold ex vivo expansion of genetically modified T cells, with 84% CAR expression, and without integration hotspots. Following autologous HSCT, the 30-month progression-free and overall survivals were 83% and 100%, respectively. After allogeneic HSCT, the respective 12-month rates were 53% and 63%. No acute or late toxicities and no exacerbation of graft-versus-host disease were observed. Despite a low antigen burden and unsupportive recipient cytokine environment, CAR T cells persisted for an average of 201 days for autologous recipients and 51 days for allogeneic recipients. CONCLUSIONS. CD19-specific CAR T cells generated with SB and AaPC platforms were safe, and may provide additional cancer control as planned infusions after HSCT. These results support further clinical development of this nonviral gene therapy approach. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Autologous, NCT00968760; allogeneic, NCT01497184; long-term follow-up, NCT01492036. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, private foundations, and institutional funds. Please see Acknowledgments for details. PMID:27482888

  11. CD18 is required for optimal lymphopenia-induced proliferation of mouse T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    Lymphocyte numbers are tightly regulated; with acute lymphopenia, T cell numbers are reestablished through lymphopenia-induced proliferation. In contrast to the costimulation requirements of antigen-driven proliferation, a number of costimulatory molecules are not required for lymphopenia-induced proliferation. However, the requirement for major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-T cell receptor (TCR) interactions and the enhanced lymphopenia-induced proliferation in T cells with higher TCR affinity argue for a role for surface molecules that contribute to efficient MHC-TCR interactions, in particular adhesion molecules. CD18 is an integrin that contributes to the activation of peripheral and intestinal T cells through adhesive and costimulatory mechanisms. We found that CD18 is required for optimal polyclonal and monoclonal CD4+ T cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation in recombination-activating gene 1-deficient (RAG-1−/−) mice; this requirement persisted over time. Uniquely, the dependency on CD18 in CD4+ T cells is in the rapid proliferation in RAG-1−/− recipients and in the slow homeostatic proliferation in irradiated Balb/c recipients. Consistent with the proposed role for intestinal microbiota in lymphopenia-induced rapid proliferation in RAG−/− mice, we observed a significant reduction in rapid proliferation upon treatment of mice with antibiotics; however, the dependency on CD18 for optimal lymphopenia-induced proliferation persisted. Moreover, the dependency for CD18 is maintained over a wide range of numbers of initially transferred T cells, including a low number of initially transferred T cells, when the drive for proliferation is very strong and proliferation is more rapid. Overall, these data argue for an essential and broad role for CD18 in lymphopenia-induced proliferation. PMID:22821945

  12. Adaptive Immunity to Leukemia Is Inhibited by Cross-Reactive Induced Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Luke S; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Jenkins, Marc K; Farrar, Michael A

    2015-10-15

    BCR-ABL(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific Ag that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL(+) leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL(+) leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC class II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4(+) T cells. Naive mice harbored a small population of BCR-ABL-specific T cells that proliferated modestly upon immunization. The small number of naive BCR-ABL-specific T cells was due to negative selection in the thymus, which depleted BCR-ABL-specific T cells. Consistent with this observation, we saw that BCR-ABL-specific T cells were cross-reactive with an endogenous peptide derived from ABL. Despite this cross-reactivity, the remaining population of BCR-ABL reactive T cells proliferated upon immunization with the BCR-ABL fusion peptide and adjuvant. In response to BCR-ABL(+) leukemia, BCR-ABL-specific T cells proliferated and converted into regulatory T (Treg) cells, a process that was dependent on cross-reactivity with self-antigen, TGF-β1, and MHC class II Ag presentation by leukemic cells. Treg cells were critical for leukemia progression in C57BL/6 mice, as transient Treg cell ablation led to extended survival of leukemic mice. Thus, BCR-ABL(+) leukemia actively suppresses antileukemia immune responses by converting cross-reactive leukemia-specific T cells into Treg cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. CD30 Is Dispensable for T-Cell Responses to Influenza Virus and Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Clone 13 but Contributes to Age-Associated T-Cell Expansion in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C. Zhou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available CD30 is a tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR family member whose expression is associated with Hodgkin’s disease, anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and other T and B lymphoproliferative disorders in humans. A limited number of studies have assessed the physiological role of CD30/CD30 ligand interactions in control of infection in mice. Here, we assess the role of CD30 in T-cell immunity to acute influenza and chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV clone 13 infection, two viral infections in which other members of the TNFR superfamily are important for T-cell responses. We show that CD30 is expressed on activated but not resting CD4 and CD8 T cells in vitro, as well as on regulatory T cells and marginally on T helper 1 cells in vivo during influenza infection. Despite this, CD4 and CD8 T-cell expansion in response to influenza virus was comparable in CD30+/+ and CD30−/− littermates, with no discernable role for the pathway in the outcome of influenza infection. Similarly, during persistent infection with LCMV clone 13, CD30 plays no obvious role in CD4 or CD8 T-cell responses, the level of T-cell exhaustion or viral control. In contrast, in the steady state, we observed increased numbers of total CD4 and CD8 T cells as well as increased numbers of regulatory T cells in unimmunized older (~8 months CD30+/+ but not in CD30−/− age-matched littermates. Naive T-cell numbers were unchanged in the aged CD30+/+ mice compared to their CD30−/− littermate controls, rather the T-cell expansions were explained by an increase in CD4+ and CD8+ CD44mid-hiCD62L− effector memory cells, with a similar trend in the central memory T-cell compartment. In contrast, CD30 did not impact the numbers of T cells in young mice. These data suggest a role for CD30 in the homeostatic regulation of T cells during aging, contributing to memory T-cell expansions, which may have relevance for CD30 expression in human T-cell lymphoproliferative diseases.

  14. Artificial intelligence methods for predicting T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingdong; Sung, Myong-Hee; Simon, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Identifying epitopes that elicit a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted T-cell response is critical for designing vaccines for infectious diseases and cancers. We have applied two artificial intelligence approaches to build models for predicting T-cell epitopes. We developed a support vector machine to predict T-cell epitopes for an MHC class I-restricted T-cell clone (TCC) using synthesized peptide data. For predicting T-cell epitopes for an MHC class II-restricted TCC, we built a shift model that integrated MHC-binding data and data from T-cell proliferation assay against a combinatorial library of peptide mixtures.

  15. Molecular and cellular insights into T cell exhaustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wherry, E. John; Kurachi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In chronic infections and cancer, T cells are exposed to persistent antigen and/or inflammatory signals. This scenario is often associated with the deterioration of T cell function: a state called ‘exhaustion’. Exhausted T cells lose robust effector functions, express multiple inhibitory receptors and are defined by an altered transcriptional programme. T cell exhaustion is often associated with inefficient control of persisting infections and tumours, but revitalization of exhausted T cells can reinvigorate immunity. Here, we review recent advances that provide a clearer molecular understanding of T cell exhaustion and reveal new therapeutic targets for persisting infections and cancer. PMID:26205583

  16. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  17. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  18. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma treatment in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Dantas Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is a peripheral disease associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1. Treatment is carried out according to clinical type with watchful waiting being recommended for less aggressive types. Aggressive adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is generally treated with chemotherapy and/or antivirals. The objective of this study was to correlate the survival of patients diagnosed in Bahia, Brazil, with the therapeutic approaches employed and to evaluate what issues existed in their treatment processes. Methods: Eighty-three adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma patients (26 smoldering, 23 chronic, 16 acute, 13 lymphoma and five primary cutaneous tumoral with available data were included in this study. Results: Complete response was achieved in seven smoldering patients with symptomatic treatment, in two with chronic disease using antivirals/chemotherapy, in one with acute disease using antivirals and in one lymphoma using the LSG15 regimen [vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisolone (VCAP; doxorubicin, ranimustine, and prednisolone (AMP; and vindesine, etoposide, carboplatin, and prednisolone (VECP]. Smoldering patients who received symptomatic treatment presented longer survival. Favorable chronic patients treated with antivirals presented longer survival compared to the unfavorable subtype. However, for the acute form, first-line chemotherapy was better, albeit without significance, than antivirals. Only one of the patients with lymphoma and primary cutaneous tumors responded. Conclusions: Watchful waiting associated with phototherapy represents the best option for smoldering adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma with survival in Bahia being superior to that described in Japan. There was a trend of better results with zidovudine/interferon-alpha in favorable chronic disease. Excellent results were achieved in the lymphoma type treated with the LSG15 protocol. Patients are diagnosed late

  19. Synchronous Collagenous Sprue and Enteropathy-Type T Cell Lymphoma: Variants of the Same Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Medlicott, SAC; Beck, PL; Loken, S; Crabtree, T

    2004-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with treated hypothyroidism had 10 months of diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia and recent involuntary 13.6 kg weight loss. He presented to hospital with an acute abdomen that had a radiological correlate of free air under the diaphragm. He was diagnosed with a perforated mid-jejunum due to an ulcerated enteropathy-type T cell lymphoma (ETL), complicating collagenous sprue and cryptic celiac disease. Polymerase chain reaction verified monoclonal g- and b-T cell receptor gene...

  20. Natural Killer T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Shiny; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are specialized CD1d-restricted T cells that recognize lipid antigens. Following stimulation, NKT cells lead to downstream activation of both innate and adaptive immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. This has impelled the development of NKT cell-targeted immunotherapies for treating cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the stimulatory and regulatory functions of NKT cells in tumor immunity as well as highlight preclinical and clinical studies based on NKT cells. Finally, we discuss future perspectives to better harness the potential of NKT cells for cancer therapy. PMID:29018445

  1. Tolerance and Exhaustion: Defining Mechanisms of T cell Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietinger, Andrea; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    CD8 T cell activation and differentiation is tightly controlled, and dependent on the context in which naïve T cells encounter antigen, can either result in functional memory or T cell dysfunction, including exhaustion, tolerance, anergy, or senescence. With the identification of phenotypic and functional traits shared in different settings of T cell dysfunction, distinctions between such dysfunctional `states' have become blurred. Here, we discuss distinct states of CD8 T cell dysfunction, with emphasis on (i) T cell tolerance to self-antigens (self-tolerance), (ii) T cell exhaustion during chronic infections, and (iii) tumor-induced T cell dysfunction. We highlight recent findings on cellular and molecular characteristics defining these states, cell-intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that induce and maintain them, and strategies that can lead to their reversal. PMID:24210163

  2. Blocking of PDL-1 interaction enhances primary and secondary CD8 T cell response to herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudragouda Channappanavar

    Full Text Available The blocking of programmed death ligand-1 (PDL-1 has been shown to enhance virus-specific CD8 T cell function during chronic viral infections. Though, how PDL-1 blocking at the time of priming affects the quality of CD8 T cell response to acute infections is not well understood and remains controversial. This report demonstrates that the magnitude of the primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 infection is subject to control by PDL-1. Our results showed that after footpad HSV-1 infection, PD-1 expression increases on immunodominant SSIEFARL peptide specific CD8 T cells. Additionally, post-infection, the level of PDL-1 expression also increases on CD11c+ dendritic cells. Intraperitoneal administration of anti-PDL-1 monoclonal antibody given one day prior to and three days after cutaneous HSV-1 infection, resulted in a marked increase in effector and memory CD8 T cell response to SSIEFARL peptide. This was shown by measuring the quantity and quality of SSIEFARL-specific CD8 T cells by making use of ex-vivo assays that determine antigen specific CD8 T cell function, such as intracellular cytokine assay, degranulation assay to measure cytotoxicity and viral clearance. Our results are discussed in terms of the beneficial effects of blocking PDL-1 interactions, while giving prophylactic vaccines, to generate a more effective CD8 T cell response to viral infection.

  3. Isolated Post-Transplantation Lymphoproliferative Disease Involving the Breast and Axilla as Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji-Young [Department of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 150-950 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Suk; Lee, Jee Eun [Department of Radiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Sun Hee [Department of Pathology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul 158-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) are a heterogeneous group of diseases that represent serious complications following immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic-cell recipients. In contrast to B-cell PTLD, T-cell PTLD is less frequent and is not usually associated with Epstein Barr Virus infection. Moreover, to our knowledge, isolated T-cell PTLD involving the breast is extremely rare and this condition has never been reported previously in the literature. Herein, we report a rare case of isolated T-cell PTLD of the breast that occurred after a patient had been treated for allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  4. Metabolism, migration and memory in cytotoxic T cells

    OpenAIRE

    FINLAY, DAVID

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED The transcriptional and metabolic programmes that control CD8(+) T cells are regulated by a diverse network of serine/threonine kinases. The view has been that the kinases AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) control T cell metabolism. Here, we challenge this paradigm and discuss an alternative role for these kinases in CD8(+) T cells, namely to control cell migration. Another emerging concept is that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family members control T cell metab...

  5. Human antigen-specific regulatory T cells generated by T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M Brusko

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Therapies directed at augmenting regulatory T cell (Treg activities in vivo as a systemic treatment for autoimmune disorders and transplantation may be associated with significant off-target effects, including a generalized immunosuppression that may compromise beneficial immune responses to infections and cancer cells. Adoptive cellular therapies using purified expanded Tregs represents an attractive alternative to systemic treatments, with results from animal studies noting increased therapeutic potency of antigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal populations. However, current methodologies are limited in terms of the capacity to isolate and expand a sufficient quantity of endogenous antigen-specific Tregs for therapeutic intervention. Moreover, FOXP3+ Tregs fall largely within the CD4+ T cell subset and are thus routinely MHC class II-specific, whereas class I-specific Tregs may function optimally in vivo by facilitating direct tissue recognition.To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel means for generating large numbers of antigen-specific Tregs involving lentiviral T cell receptor (TCR gene transfer into in vitro expanded polyclonal natural Treg populations. Tregs redirected with a high-avidity class I-specific TCR were capable of recognizing the melanoma antigen tyrosinase in the context of HLA-A*0201 and could be further enriched during the expansion process by antigen-specific reactivation with peptide loaded artificial antigen presenting cells. These in vitro expanded Tregs continued to express FOXP3 and functional TCRs, and maintained the capacity to suppress conventional T cell responses directed against tyrosinase, as well as bystander T cell responses. Using this methodology in a model tumor system, murine Tregs designed to express the tyrosinase TCR effectively blocked antigen-specific effector T cell (Teff activity as determined by tumor cell growth and luciferase reporter-based imaging.These results support the

  6. Development of alphabeta T cells in the human thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, Hergen

    2002-01-01

    The thymus is the main producer of alphabeta T cells and is, therefore, crucial for a normal immune system. The intrathymic developmental pathway of human alphabeta T cells has now been delineated. The production of new T cells by the thymus decreases with age, and the thymus was thought to be

  7. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A

    2001-01-01

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affini...

  8. T-cell dynamics in chronic viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veel, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate how chronic HIV and CMV infections impact on the human T-cell compartment. How untreated HIV infection affects the turnover of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is described in chapter 2. In this chapter, T-cell turnover in untreated HIV infected individuals is compared to

  9. Unraveling Natural Killer T-Cells Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bianca Bennstein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T-cells are a subset of innate-like T-cells with the ability to bridge innate and adaptive immunity. There is great interest in harnessing these cells to improve tumor therapy; however, greater understanding of invariant NKT (iNKT cell biology is needed. The first step is to learn more about NKT development within the thymus. Recent studies suggest lineage separation of murine iNKT cells into iNKT1, iNKT2, and iNKT17 cells instead of shared developmental stages. This review will focus on these new studies and will discuss the evidence for lineage separation in contrast to shared developmental stages. The author will also highlight the classifications of murine iNKT cells according to identified transcription factors and cytokine production, and will discuss transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations, and the role of mammalian target of rapamycin. Finally, the importance of these findings for human cancer therapy will be briefly discussed.

  10. Aging impairs recipient T cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors in response to transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Shen

    Full Text Available As increasing numbers of older people are listed for solid organ transplantation, there is an urgent need to better understand how aging modifies alloimmune responses. Here, we investigated whether aging impairs the ability of donor dendritic cells or recipient immunity to prime alloimmune responses to organ transplantation.Using murine experimental models, we found that aging impaired the host environment to expand and activate antigen specific CD8(+ T cells. Additionally, aging impaired the ability of polyclonal T cells to induce acute allograft rejection. However, the alloimmune priming capability of donor dendritic cells was preserved with aging.Aging impairs recipient responses, both T cell intrinsic and extrinsic, in response to organ transplantation.

  11. Establishment of memory CD8+ T cells with live attenuated influenza virus across different vaccination doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongfang; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Nuessing, Simone; Chua, Brendon Yew Loong; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Huber, Victor C; Jackson, David C; Thomas, Paul G; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-12-01

    FluMist has been used in children and adults for more than 10 years. As pre-existing CD8+ T cell memory pools can provide heterologous immunity against distinct influenza viruses, it is important to understand influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses elicited by different live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) regimens. In this study, we immunized mice intranasally with two different doses of live-attenuated PR8 virus (PR8 ts, H1N1), low and high, and then assessed protective efficacy by challenging animals with heterosubtypic X31-H3N2 virus at 6 weeks post-vaccination. Different LAIV doses elicited influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses in lungs and spleen, but unexpectedly not in bronchoalveolar lavage. Interestingly, the immunodominance hierarchy at the acute phase after immunization varied depending on the LAIV dose; however, these differences disappeared at 6 weeks post-vaccination, resulting in generation of comparable CD8+ T cell memory pools. After vaccination with either dose, sufficient numbers of specific CD8+ T cells were generated for recall and protection of mice against heterosubtypic H1N1→H3N2 challenge. As a result, immunized mice displayed reduced weight loss, diminished inflammatory responses and lower viral titres in lungs, when compared to unvaccinated animals. Interestingly, the higher dose led to enhanced viral clearance on day 5 post-challenge, though this was not associated with increased CD8+ T cell responses, but with higher levels of non-neutralizing antibodies against the priming virus. Our study suggests that, while different LAIV doses result in distinct immune profiles, even a low dose produces sufficient protective CD8+ T cell memory against challenge infection, though the high dose results in more rapid viral clearance and reduced inflammation.

  12. T-cell memory differentiation: insights from transcriptional signatures and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Ben; Hale, J Scott; Ahmed, Rafi

    2013-07-01

    A critical component of vaccine design is to generate and maintain antigen-specific memory lymphocytes of sufficient quantity and quality to give the host life-long protection against re-infection. Therefore, it is important to understand how memory T cells acquire the ability for self-renewal while retaining a potential for heightened recall of effector functions. During acute viral infection or following vaccination, antigen-specific T cells undergo extensive phenotypic and functional changes during differentiation to the effector and memory phases of the immune response. The changes in cell phenotype that accompany memory T-cell differentiation are predominantly mediated through acquired transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, in part achieved through epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones. Here we review our current understanding of epigenetic mechanisms regulating the off-on-off expression of CD8 and CD4 T-cell effector molecules at naive, effector and memory stages of differentiation, respectively, and how covalent modifications to the genome may serve as a mechanism to preserve 'poised' transcriptional states in homeostatically dividing memory cells. We discuss the potential of such mechanisms to control genes that undergo on-off-on patterns of expression including homing and pro-survival genes, and the implications on the development of effector-memory and central-memory T-cell differentiation. Lastly, we review recent studies demonstrating epigenetic modifications as a mechanism for the progressive loss of transcriptional adaptation in antigen-specific T cells that undergo sustained high levels of T-cell receptor signalling. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Donor lung derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells differentially regulate T cell proliferation and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Heather L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct allorecognition, i.e., donor lung-derived dendritic cells (DCs stimulating recipient-derived T lymphocytes, is believed to be the key mechanism of lung allograft rejection. Myeloid (cDCs and plasmacytoid (pDCs are believed to have differential effects on T cell activation. However, the roles of each DC type on T cell activation and rejection pathology post lung transplantation are unknown. Methods Using transgenic mice and antibody depletion techniques, either or both cell types were depleted in lungs of donor BALB/c mice (H-2d prior to transplanting into C57BL/6 mice (H-2b, followed by an assessment of rejection pathology, and pDC or cDC-induced proliferation and cytokine production in C57BL/6-derived mediastinal lymph node T cells (CD3+. Results Depleting either DC type had modest effect on rejection pathology and T cell proliferation. In contrast, T cells from mice that received grafts depleted of both DCs did not proliferate and this was associated with significantly reduced acute rejection scores compared to all other groups. cDCs were potent inducers of IFNγ, whereas both cDCs and pDCs induced IL-10. Both cell types had variable effects on IL-17A production. Conclusion Collectively, the data show that direct allorecognition by donor lung pDCs and cDCs have differential effects on T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Depletion of both donor lung cDC and pDC could prevent the severity of acute rejection episodes.

  14. Deletion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in genetically targeted mice supports development of intestinal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boehm Franziska

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells develop severe tissue inflammation in lung, skin, and liver with premature death, whereas the intestine remains uninflamed. This study aims to demonstrate the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the activation of T cells and the development of intestinal inflammation. Methods Foxp3-GFP-DTR (human diphtheria toxin receptor C57BL/6 mice allow elimination of Foxp3+ Treg by treatment with Dx (diphtheria toxin. The influence of Foxp3+ Treg on intestinal inflammation was tested using the CD4+ T-cell transfer colitis model in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice and the acute DSS-colitis model. Results Continuous depletion of Foxp3+ Treg in Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice led to dramatic weight loss and death of mice by day 28. After 10 days of depletion of Foxp3+ Treg, isolated CD4+ T-cells were activated and produced extensive amounts of IFN-γ, IL-13, and IL-17A. Transfer of total CD4+ T-cells isolated from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice did not result in any changes of intestinal homeostasis in Rag−/− C57BL/6 mice. However, administration of DTx between days 14 and 18 after T-cell reconstitution, lead to elimination of Foxp3+ Treg and to immediate weight loss due to intestinal inflammation. This pro-inflammatory effect of Foxp3+ Treg depletion consecutively increased inflammatory cytokine production. Further, the depletion of Foxp3+ Treg from Foxp3-GFP-DTR mice increased the severity of acute dSS-colitis accompanied by 80% lethality of Treg-depleted mice. CD4+ effector T-cells from Foxp3+ Treg-depleted mice produced significantly more pro-inflammatory cytokines. Conclusion Intermittent depletion of Foxp3+ Treg aggravates intestinal inflammatory responses demonstrating the importance of Foxp3+ Treg for the balance at the mucosal surface of the intestine.

  15. Gamma delta T cell reconstitution is associated with fewer infections and improved event-free survival after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perko, Ross; Kang, Guolian; Sunkara, Anusha; Leung, Wing; Thomas, Paul G; Dallas, Mari H

    2015-01-01

    After hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), successful engraftment and immune recovery is necessary to protect the patient from relapse and infection. Many studies highlight the importance of conventional αβ T cell recovery after HSCT, but the impact of γδ T cell recovery has not been well described. Here, we investigate the recovery of γδ T cells in 102 pediatric patients with acute leukemia in first clinical remission who underwent allogeneic HSCT at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital from 1996 to 2011. Mean patient age was 10.5 ± 5.9 years (range, .6 to 25.2), and mean survivor follow-up was 2.7 ± 1.8 years (range, .12 to 6.0). Diagnoses included 59% patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 41% patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Multivariate analysis demonstrated significant impact of the maximum number of CD3(+), CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells and donor source on the γδ T cell recovery (P < .0001, P < .0001, P < .0001, and P < .004, respectively). Univariate and multivariate models found the number of γδ T cells after HSCT to be associated with infections (P = .026 and P = .02, respectively). We found the probability of infections for patients with an elevated number of γδ T cells was significantly lower compared with patients with low or normal γδ T cells after HSCT (18% versus 54%; P = .025). Bacterial infections were not observed in patients with elevated γδ T cells. Finally, event-free survival was significantly higher in patients with enhanced γδ T cell reconstitution compared with patients with low/normal γδ T cell reconstitution after HSCT (91% versus 55%; P = .04). Thus, γδ T cells may play an important role in immune reconstitution after HSCT. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulatory T cells ameliorate tissue plasminogen activator-induced brain haemorrhage after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Leilei; Li, Peiying; Zhu, Wen; Cai, Wei; Liu, Zongjian; Wang, Yanling; Luo, Wenli; Stetler, Ruth A; Leak, Rehana K; Yu, Weifeng; Gao, Yanqin; Chen, Jun; Chen, Gang; Hu, Xiaoming

    2017-07-01

    Delayed thrombolytic treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) may exacerbate blood-brain barrier breakdown after ischaemic stroke and lead to lethal haemorrhagic transformation. The immune system is a dynamic modulator of stroke response, and excessive immune cell accumulation in the cerebral vasculature is associated with compromised integrity of the blood-brain barrier. We previously reported that regulatory T cells, which function to suppress excessive immune responses, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage after cerebral ischaemia. This study assessed the impact of regulatory T cells in the context of tPA-induced brain haemorrhage and investigated the underlying mechanisms of action. The number of circulating regulatory T cells in stroke patients was dramatically reduced soon after stroke onset (84 acute ischaemic stroke patients with or without intravenous tPA treatment, compared to 115 age and gender-matched healthy controls). Although stroke patients without tPA treatment gradually repopulated the numbers of circulating regulatory T cells within the first 7 days after stroke, post-ischaemic tPA treatment led to sustained suppression of regulatory T cells in the blood. We then used the murine suture and embolic middle cerebral artery occlusion models of stroke to investigate the therapeutic potential of adoptive regulatory T cell transfer against tPA-induced haemorrhagic transformation. Delayed administration of tPA (10 mg/kg) resulted in haemorrhagic transformation in the ischaemic territory 1 day after ischaemia. When regulatory T cells (2 × 106/mouse) were intravenously administered immediately after delayed tPA treatment in ischaemic mice, haemorrhagic transformation was significantly decreased, and this was associated with improved sensorimotor functions. Blood-brain barrier disruption and tight junction damages were observed in the presence of delayed tPA after stroke, but were mitigated by regulatory T cell transfer. Mechanistic

  17. Immortalization of T-Cells Is Accompanied by Gradual Changes in CpG Methylation Resulting in a Profile Resembling a Subset of T-Cell Leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Degerman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described gene expression changes during spontaneous immortalization of T-cells, thereby identifying cellular processes important for cell growth crisis escape and unlimited proliferation. Here, we analyze the same model to investigate the role of genome-wide methylation in the immortalization process at different time points pre-crisis and post-crisis using high-resolution arrays. We show that over time in culture there is an overall accumulation of methylation alterations, with preferential increased methylation close to transcription start sites (TSSs, islands, and shore regions. Methylation and gene expression alterations did not correlate for the majority of genes, but for the fraction that correlated, gain of methylation close to TSS was associated with decreased gene expression. Interestingly, the pattern of CpG site methylation observed in immortal T-cell cultures was similar to clinical T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL samples classified as CpG island methylator phenotype positive. These sites were highly overrepresented by polycomb target genes and involved in developmental, cell adhesion, and cell signaling processes. The presence of non-random methylation events in in vitro immortalized T-cell cultures and diagnostic T-ALL samples indicates altered methylation of CpG sites with a possible role in malignant hematopoiesis.

  18. Frequency of regulatory T cells determines the outcome of the T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab in patients with B-precursor ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duell, J; Dittrich, M; Bedke, T; Mueller, T; Eisele, F; Rosenwald, A; Rasche, L; Hartmann, E; Dandekar, T; Einsele, H; Topp, M S

    2017-10-01

    Blinatumomab can induce a complete haematological remission in patients in 46.6% with relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (r/r ALL) resulting in a survival benefit when compared with chemotherapy. Only bone marrow blast counts before therapy have shown a weak prediction of response. Here we investigated the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs), measured by CD4/CD25/FOXP3 expression, in predicting the outcome of immunotherapy with the CD19-directed bispecific T-cell engager construct blinatumomab. Blinatumomab responders (n=22) had an average of 4.82% Tregs (confidence interval (CI): 1.79-8.34%) in the peripheral blood, whereas non-responders (n=20) demonstrated 10.25% Tregs (CI: 3.36-65.9%). All other tested markers showed either no prediction value or an inferior prediction level including blast BM counts and the classical enzyme marker lactate dehydrogenase. With a cutoff of 8.525%, Treg enumeration can identify 100% of all blinatumomab responders and exclude 70% of the non-responders. The effect is facilitated by blinatumomab-activated Tregs, leading to interleukin-10 production, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation and reduced CD8-mediated lysis of ALL cells. Proliferation of patients' T cells can be restored by upfront removal of Tregs. Thus, enumeration of Treg identifies r/r ALL patients with a high response rate to blinatumomab. Therapeutic removal of Tregs may convert blinatumomab non-responders to responders.

  19. Malignant T cells exhibit CD45 resistant Stat 3 activation and proliferation in cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, T; Helvad, Rikke; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    -cell lymphoma (CTCL), the malignant T cells exhibit constitutive activation of the Jak3/Stat3 signalling pathway and uncontrolled proliferation. We show that CD45 expression is down-regulated on malignant T cells when compared to non-malignant T cells established from CTCL skin lesions. Moreover, CD45 cross...

  20. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. ► Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. ► Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Decreased expression of IL-7Rα, IL-2Rα and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. ► Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7Rα and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2Rα expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  1. Cytokine-dependent induction of CD4+ T cells with cytotoxic potential during influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Laiqing; Yao, Shuyu; Pham, Duy; Jiang, Li; Wright, Jeffrey; Sawant, Deepali; Dent, Alexander L; Braciale, Thomas J; Kaplan, Mark H; Sun, Jie

    2013-11-01

    Recent evidence has identified the role of granzyme B- and perforin-expressing CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential in antiviral immunity. However, the in vivo cytokine cues and downstream pathways governing the differentiation of these cells are unclear. Here, we have identified that CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential are specifically induced at the site of infection during influenza virus infection. The development of CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential in vivo was dependent on the cooperation of the STAT2-dependent type I interferon signaling and the interleukin-2/interleukin-2 receptor alpha pathway for the induction of the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. We showed that Blimp-1 promoted the binding of T-bet to the promoters of cytolytic genes in CD4(+) T cells and was required for the cytolytic function of the in vitro- and in vivo-generated CD4(+) T cells with cytotoxic potential. Thus, our data define the molecular basis of regulation of the in vivo development of this functionally cytotoxic Th subset during acute respiratory virus infection. The potential implications for the functions of these cells are discussed.

  2. Translation is actively regulated during the differentiation of CD8+ effector T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Koichi; Morita, Masahiro; Bederman, Annelise G; Konieczny, Bogumila T; Kissick, Haydn T; Sonenberg, Nahum; Ahmed, Rafi

    2017-09-01

    Translation is a critical process in protein synthesis, but translational regulation in antigen-specific T cells in vivo has not been well defined. Here we have characterized the translatome of virus-specific CD8 + effector T cells (T eff cells) during acute infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Antigen-specific T cells exerted dynamic translational control of gene expression that correlated with cell proliferation and stimulation via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). The translation of mRNAs that encode translation machinery, including ribosomal proteins, was upregulated during the T cell clonal-expansion phase, followed by inhibition of the translation of those transcripts when the CD8 + T eff cells stopped dividing just before the contraction phase. That translational suppression was more pronounced in terminal effector cells than in memory precursor cells and was regulated by antigenic stimulation and signals from the kinase mTOR. Our studies show that translation of transcripts encoding ribosomal proteins is regulated during the differentiation of CD8 + T eff cells and might have a role in fate 'decisions' involved in the formation of memory cells.

  3. Grading of cytokine release syndrome associated with the CAR T cell therapy tisagenlecleucel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David; Frey, Noelle; Wood, Patricia A; Weng, Yanqiu; Grupp, Stephan A

    2018-03-02

    Anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy has demonstrated high response rates in patients with relapsed or refractory (r/r) B cell malignancies but is associated with significant toxicity. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is the most significant complication associated with CAR T cell therapy, and it is critical to have a reproducible and easy method to grade CRS after CAR T cell infusions. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events scale is inadequate for grading CRS associated with cellular therapy. Clinical experience with the anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy tisagenlecleucel at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) was used to develop the Penn grading scale for CRS. The Penn grading scale depends on easily accessible clinical features; does not rely on location of care or quantitation of supportive care; assigns grades to guide CRS management; distinguishes between mild, moderate, severe, and life-threatening CRS; and applies to both early-onset and delayed-onset CRS associated with T cell therapies. Clinical data from 55 pediatric patients with r/r B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 42 patients with r/r chronic lymphocytic lymphoma treated with tisagenlecleucel were used to demonstrate the current application of the Penn grading scale. We show that the Penn grading scale provides reproducible CRS grading that can be useful to guide therapy and that can be applied across clinical trials and treatment platforms.

  4. Catch me if you can: Leukemia Escape after CD19-Directed T Cell Immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Ruella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is the revolution in cancer treatment of this last decade. Among multiple approaches able to harness the power of the immune system against cancer, T cell based immunotherapies represent one of the most successful examples. In particular, biotechnological engineering of protein structures, like the T cell receptor or the immunoglobulins, allowed the generation of synthetic peptides like chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies that are able to redirect non-tumor specific T cells to recognize and kill leukemic cells. The anti-CD19/CD3 bispecific antibody blinatumomab and anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CART19 have produced deep responses in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell acute leukemias. However, although the majority of these patients responds to anti-CD19 immunotherapy, a subset of them still relapses. Interestingly, a novel family of leukemia escape mechanisms has been described, all characterized by the apparent loss of CD19 on the surface of leukemic blasts. This extraordinary finding demonstrates the potent selective pressure of CART19/blinatumomab that drives extreme and specific escape strategies by leukemic blasts. Patients with CD19-negative relapsed leukemia have very poor prognosis and novel approaches to treat and ideally prevent antigen-loss are direly needed. In this review we discuss the incidence, mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for CD19-negative leukemia relapses occuring after CD19-directed T cell immunotherapies and present our future perspective.

  5. Intravital imaging of donor allogeneic effector and regulatory T cells with host dendritic cells during GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaifeng Lisa; Fulton, LeShara M; Berginski, Matthew; West, Michelle L; Taylor, Nicholas A; Moran, Timothy P; Coghill, James M; Blazar, Bruce R; Bear, James E; Serody, Jonathan S

    2014-03-06

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a systemic inflammatory response due to the recognition of major histocompatibility complex disparity between donor and recipient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). T-cell activation is critical to the induction of GVHD, and data from our group and others have shown that regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent GVHD when given at the time of HSCT. Using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, we examined the single cell dynamics of donor T cells and dendritic cells (DCs) with or without Tregs postallogeneic transplantation. We found that donor conventional T cells (Tcons) spent very little time screening host DCs. Tcons formed stable contacts with DCs very early after transplantation and only increased velocity in the lymph node at 20 hours after transplant. We also observed that Tregs reduced the interaction time between Tcons and DCs, which was dependent on the generation of interleukin 10 by Tregs. Imaging using inducible Tregs showed similar disruption of Tcon-DC contact. Additionally, we found that donor Tregs induce host DC death and down-regulate surface proteins required for donor T-cell activation. These data indicate that Tregs use multiple mechanisms that affect host DC numbers and function to mitigate acute GVHD.

  6. Dissection of T-cell antigen specificity in human melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Albæk Thrue, Charlotte; Junker, Niels

    2012-01-01

    -associated antigens and applying a novel technology for high-throughput analysis of T-cell responses, we dissected the composition of melanoma-restricted T-cell responses in 63 TIL cultures. T-cell reactivity screens against 175 melanoma-associated epitopes detected 90 responses against 18 different epitopes...... predominantly from differentiation and cancer-testis antigens. Notably, the majority of these responses were of low frequency and tumor-specific T-cell frequencies decreased during rapid expansion. A further notable observation was a large variation in the T-cell specificities detected in cultures established...

  7. The Role of Lymphatic Niches in T Cell Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Tara; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    Long-term immunity to many viral and bacterial pathogens requires CD8+ memory T cell development, and the induction of long-lasting CD8+ memory T cells from a naïve, undifferentiated state is a major goal of vaccine design. Formation of the memory CD8+ T cell compartment is highly dependent on the early activation cues received by naïve CD8+ T cells during primary infection. This review aims to highlight the cellularity of various niches within the lymph node and emphasize recent evidence suggesting that distinct types of T cell activation and differentiation occur within different immune contexts in lymphoid organs. PMID:27306645

  8. Regulation of Mu Opioid Receptor Expression in Developing T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lily; Belkowski, Judith Sliker; Briscoe, Tammi; Rogers, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported that functionally active μ-opioid receptors (MOR) are constitutively expressed at relatively low levels by developing T cells in the thymus. However, very little is known about the regulation of MOR expression by immature T cells. In this report, we first attempted to determine the effect of T cell receptor-induced T cell activation on the expression of MOR. We activated T cells with either the combination of anti-CD3 and CD28, or with superantigen, and observed a ...

  9. Potential roles of self-reactive T cells in autoimmunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    that recognize proteins involved in three, well-defined immunosuppressive mechanisms: (1) inhibitory T cell pathways (i.e., PD-L1), (2) regulatory T cells (i.e., Foxp3(+)), and (3) metabolic enzymes, like indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase. Cytotoxic T cells can eliminate regulatory cells, thereby suppressing and....../or delaying local immune suppression; conversely, regulatory CD4(+) and non-cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells enhance target-mediated immune suppression. The apparent lack of tolerance against endogenous proteins expressed by regulatory cells is intriguing, because it suggests that self-reactive T cells play a general...

  10. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  11. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdegaal, Els M. E.; De Miranda, Noel F. C. C.; Visser, Marten

    2016-01-01

    is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either...... by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer...

  12. CD8+ T cells in inflammatory demyelinating disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Hanne A; Millward, Jason M; Owens, Trevor

    2007-01-01

    We review the contribution made by CD8+ T cells to inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and discuss their role in the animal model Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE). We show that the inflammatory cytokines interferon-gamma and interleukin-17...... are differentially regulated in CNS-infiltrating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in EAE, and that CD8+ T cells regulate disease. In MS, CD8+ T cells appear to play a role in promotion of disease, so cytokine regulation is likely different in CD8+ T cells in MS and EAE...

  13. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Primary intestinal T cell lymphomas in Indian patients - In search of enteropathic T cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shet Tanuja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This series of six intestinal T cell lymphomas (ITCL attempts to document enteropathy-associated T cell lymphoma (EATCL in India. Materials and Methods: A total of six ITCL were selected from 170 gastrointestinal lymphomas in last 10 years. Results: The cases studied included EATCL (4, ITCL with a CD4 positive phenotype (1 and ITCL NK/T cell type (1. Of the four EATCL, two occurred in the ileum, one in right colon and one in duodenum. In three EATCL cases, there was history of celiac disease or lactose intolerance and enteropathic changes were noted in the adjacent mucosa. These tumors had CD3+/CD8+/CD56 (+/-/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ immunophenotype. One EATCL was monomorphic small cell type (type II EATCL with a CD3+/CD8-CD56+/CD4-/ Granzyme B+ phenotype. EBER- ISH (Epstein Barr virus coded RNA′s- in situ hybridization revealed positive tumor cells in ITCL NK/T cell type and in bystander cells in three EATCL. Conclusion: ITCL are rare in Indian patients but do occur and comprise a mixture of the enteropathic and non-enteropathic subtypes.

  15. MMP19 is essential for T cell development and T cell-mediated cutaneous immune responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beck, Inken; Ruckert, R.; Brandt, K.; Mueller, M.S.; Sadowski, T.; Brauer, R.; Schirmacher, P.; Mentlein, R.; Sedláček, Radislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 6 (2008), e2343-e2343 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : matrix metalloproteinase * T cell * immune response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  16. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M.; De Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  17. Optimal T cell cross-reactivity and the role of regulatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saeki, Koichi; Doekes, Hilje M; De Boer, Rob J; Sub Theoretical Biology; Sub Theoretical Biology & Bioinformatics; Theoretical Biology and Bioinformatics

    2014-01-01

    The T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system constitute a highly diverse repertoire of clones expressing a unique T cell receptor (TCR). It has been argued that TCRs are cross-reactive, meaning that one receptor can recognize a multitude of epitopes. Cross-reactivity between self and foreign

  18. T cell depletion in HIV-1 infection: how CD4+ T cells go out of stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, M. D.; Hamann, D.; Schuitemaker, H.; Miedema, F.

    2000-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by a gradual loss of CD4+ T cells and progressive immune deficiency that leads to opportunistic infections, otherwise rare malignancies and ultimately death. Extensive research over the past two decades has increased our insight into the pathogenic mechanisms

  19. Green tea EGCG, T-cell function, and T-cell-mediated autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autoimmune diseases are common, disabling immune disorders affecting millions of people. Recent studies indicate that dysregulated balance of different CD4+ T-cell subpopulations plays a key role in immune pathogenesis of several major autoimmune diseases. Green tea and its active ingredient, epigal...

  20. Green tea EGCG, T cells, and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the proposed health benefits of consuming green tea is its protective effect on autoimmune diseases. Research on the immunopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases has made significant progression in the past few years and several key concepts have been revised. T cells, particularly CD4+ T helper...

  1. Protective role of gamma/delta T cells and alpha/beta T cells in tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladel, C H; Blum, C; Dreher, A; Reifenberg, K; Kaufmann, S H

    1995-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease which causes major health problems globally. Although acquired resistance crucially depends on alpha/beta lymphocytes, circumstantial evidence suggests that, in addition, gamma/delta T lymphocytes contribute to protection against tuberculosis. We have studied Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in TcR-delta-/- or TcR-beta-/- gene deletion mutants which completely lack gamma/delta T cells or alpha/beta T cells, respectively. Low inocula of M. tuberculosis led to death of TcR-beta-/- mice and transient disease exacerbation in TcR-delta-/- mutants. Infection with higher inocula caused rapid death of TcR-delta-/- mice. The development of and bacterial containment in granulomatous lesions was markedly impaired in TcR-beta-/-, and less severely affected in TcR-delta-/- mutants. Mycobacteria-induced IFN-gamma production by spleen cells in vitro was almost abolished in TcR-beta-/- and virtually unaffected in TcR-delta-/- mice. Our data confirm the crucial role of alpha/beta T cells in protection against established tuberculosis and formally prove a protective role of gamma/delta T cells in early tuberculosis.

  2. Inhibition of apoptosis in T cells expressing human T cell leukemia virus type I Tax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copeland, K. F.; Haaksma, A. G.; Goudsmit, J.; Krammer, P. H.; Heeney, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    This study set out to determine whether T cell dysfunction associated with HTLV-I led to increased sensitivity of infected cells to apoptosis or, owing to their potential to develop ATL, if infected cells would become resistant to this process. To test this hypothesis we utilized the monoclonal

  3. Role of the T cell receptor ligand affinity in T cell activation by bacterial superantigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Geisler, C; Buus, S

    2001-01-01

    Similar to native peptide/MHC ligands, bacterial superantigens have been found to bind with low affinity to the T cell receptor (TCR). It has been hypothesized that low ligand affinity is required to allow optimal TCR signaling. To test this, we generated variants of Staphylococcus enterotoxin C3...

  4. Role of T cell receptor affinity in the efficacy and specificity of adoptive T cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D. Stone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional alpha-beta T cell receptor (TCR against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment (scFv linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the alpha-beta TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly.

  5. T cell avidity and tumor recognition: implications and therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszkowski Jeffrey J

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last two decades, great advances have been made studying the immune response to human tumors. The identification of protein antigens from cancer cells and better techniques for eliciting antigen specific T cell responses in vitro and in vivo have led to improved understanding of tumor recognition by T cells. Yet, much remains to be learned about the intricate details of T cell – tumor cell interactions. Though the strength of interaction between T cell and target is thought to be a key factor influencing the T cell response, investigations of T cell avidity, T cell receptor (TCR affinity for peptide-MHC complex, and the recognition of peptide on antigen presenting targets or tumor cells reveal complex relationships. Coincident with these investigations, therapeutic strategies have been developed to enhance tumor recognition using antigens with altered peptide structures and T cells modified by the introduction of new antigen binding receptor molecules. The profound effects of these strategies on T cell – tumor interactions and the clinical implications of these effects are of interest to both scientists and clinicians. In recent years, the focus of much of our work has been the avidity and effector characteristics of tumor reactive T cells. Here we review concepts and current results in the field, and the implications of therapeutic strategies using altered antigens and altered effector T cells.

  6. Behavior and function of tissue-resident memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariotti, Silvia; Haanen, John B; Schumacher, Ton N

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of memory T cell function in mice and men is to date in large part restricted to the behavior of circulating memory T cells. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that in addition to such systemic memory T cell populations, a separate population of locally confined memory T cells is generated at former sites of antigen encounter. Here, we discuss the potential function of these long-term tissue-resident memory T cells (T(TRM)), how such local T cell memory can be maintained for prolonged periods of time, and how the induction of long-term tissue-resident memory T cells may potentially be exploited during vaccination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Metabolism, migration and memory in cytotoxic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, David; Cantrell, Doreen A

    2011-02-01

    The transcriptional and metabolic programmes that control CD8(+) T cells are regulated by a diverse network of serine/threonine kinases. The view has been that the kinases AKT and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) control T cell metabolism. Here, we challenge this paradigm and discuss an alternative role for these kinases in CD8(+) T cells, namely to control cell migration. Another emerging concept is that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family members control T cell metabolism and determine the effector versus memory fate of CD8(+) T cells. We speculate that one link between metabolism and immunological memory is provided by kinases that originally evolved to control T cell metabolism and have subsequently acquired the ability to control the expression of key transcription factors that regulate CD8(+) T cell effector function and migratory capacity.

  8. Adoptive T cell therapy targeting CD1 and MR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxi eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential.

  9. Regulatory T Cells in Post-stroke Immune Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesz, Arthur; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The secondary neuroinflammatory response has come into focus of experimental stroke research. Immunological mechanisms after acute stroke are being investigated in the hope to identify novel and druggable pathways that contribute to secondary infarct growth after stroke. Among a variety of neuroimmunological events after acute brain ischemia, including microglial activation, brain leukocyte invasion, and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors, lymphocytes have been identified as the key leukocyte subpopulation driving the neuroinflammatory response and contributing to stroke outcome. Several studies have shown that pro-inflammatory lymphocyte subpopulations worsen stroke outcome and that inhibiting their invasion to the injured brain is neuroprotective. In contrast to the effector functions of pro-inflammatory lymphocytes, regulatory T cells (Treg) are critically involved in maintaining immune homeostasis and have been characterized as disease-limiting protective cells in several inflammatory conditions, particularly in primary inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). However, due to the complex function of regulatory cells in immune homeostasis and disease, divergent findings have been described for the role of Treg in stroke models. Emerging evidence suggests that this discrepancy arises from potentially differing functions of Treg depending on the predominant site of action within the neurovascular unit and the surrounding inflammatory milieu. This article will provide a comprehensive review of current findings on Treg in brain ischemia models and discuss potential reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  10. Self-presentation of beryllium by BAL CD4+ T cells: T cell-T cell interactions and their potential role in chronic beryllium disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Andrew P; Edwards, David M; Chou, Yuan K; Mack, Douglas G; LaTocha, Dorian; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Burrows, Gregory G

    2006-04-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is characterized pathologically by granulomatous inflammation in the lung, composed of a large core of epithelioid cells surrounded by a dense shell of CD4+ T cells. Using beryllium-specific CD4+ T cell lines derived from the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of CBD patients, we show that purified CD4+ T cells produced significant amounts of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha upon exposure to beryllium in the absence of antigen-presenting cells (APC). However, unlike BAL T cells stimulated by beryllium in the presence of APC, self-presentation by BAL T cells did not induce detectable IL-2 production, and in its absence these activated T cells die from programmed cell death. Resting BAL CD4+ T cells constitutively express high levels of HLA-DP, lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) and ICAM-3. When stimulated with beryllium/APC, the adhesion molecule ICAM-1 was up-regulated, as well as several costimulation molecules including CD28, OX-40 (CD134), 4-1-BB (CD137) and B7-1 (CD80). Notably, CD28 was not up-regulated during self-presentation by BAL T cells, and these cells do not express OX-40L, suggesting that lack of appropriate costimulation was responsible for programmed cell death observed upon beryllium self-presentation. Restricting anti-MHC class II mAb completely eliminated beryllium-induced T cell proliferation during self-presentation and significantly reduced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha production. Our data demonstrate for the first time that self-presentation by BAL T cells in response to beryllium can occur ex vivo, in the absence of professional APC, with a specific dependence on T cell-expressed MHC class II molecules and exogenous IL-2 for survival.

  11. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  12. Decreased number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells that express the interleukin-7 receptor in blood and tissues of SIV-infected macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniuszko, Marcin; Edghill-Smith, Yvette; Venzon, David; Stevceva, Liljana; Nacsa, Janos; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta; Tsai, Wen-Po; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2006-01-01

    Acute HIV/SIV (human/simian immunodeficiency virus) infection results in severe CD4 + T cell depletion in lymphoid compartments. During the chronic phase of infection, CD4 + T cell numbers rebound in blood but remain low in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), even when viral replication is suppressed by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thus, strategies to repopulate lymphoid compartments may ameliorate the clinical outcome of HIV/SIV infection. Interleukin (IL)-7 is a key cytokine for the maintenance of homeostatic proliferation of T cells. In HIV/SIV infection, IL-7 expression is increased, likely to compensate for T cell loss, suggesting that supraphysiological administration of IL-7 could provide additional benefit. However, the ability of T cells to respond to IL-7 is dependent on the level of expression of the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R) in T cells in various body compartments. In here, we investigated the proportion of IL-7R + T cells in blood, spleen, gut, and genitourinary tract of healthy and SIV-infected macaques with various degrees of CD4 + T cell depletion. We found that the percentage of T cells expressing IL-7R was significantly lower in both CD4 + and CD8 + T cell subsets in SIV-infected macaques than in healthy animals and this decrease directly correlated with the CD4 + T cell number. Importantly, the proportion of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing IL-7R in blood paralleled that found in tissues. IL-7R + T cells within the SIV-specific CD8 + T cells varied and were lowest in most tissues of viremic macaques, likely reflecting continuous antigen stimulation of effector cells

  13. Is psoriasis a T-cell disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickoloff, B J; Schröder, J M; von den Driesch, P; Raychaudhuri, S P; Farber, E M; Boehncke, W H; Morhenn, V B; Rosenberg, E W; Schön, M P; Holick, M F

    2000-10-01

    The etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis--one of the most common chronic, inflammatory, hyperproliferative skin disorders of man--have long fascinated dermatologists, pathologists and biologists alike. Here, we have a model disease that offers to study neuroectodermal-mesenchymal interactions in the widest sense possible. Epithelial, endothelial, and hematopoietic cells as well as neurons projecting into the skin apparently all interact with each other to generate the characteristic psoriatic lesion. For decades, the ongoing controversy on the molecular nature, choreography and hierarchy of these complex interactions e.g. between epidermal keratinocytes, T cells, neurotrophils, endothelial cells and sensory nerves has served as a driving force propelling investigative dermatology to ever new horizons. This debate has not only been at the heart of our quest to develop more effective forms of therapy for this socially crippling disease, but it also has profoundly influenced how we view the skin as a whole: the numerous competing theories on the pathogenesis of psoriasis published so far also are reflections on the evolution of mainstream thought in skin biology over the last decades. These days, conventional wisdom infatuated with a T-cell-centered approach to inflammatory skin diseases-- portrays psoriasis as an autoimmune disease, where misguided T lymphocyte activities cause secondary epithelial abnormalities. And yet, as this CONTROVERSIES feature reminds us, some authoritative "pockets of academic resistance" are still quite alive, and interpret psoriasis e.g. as a genetically determined, abnormal epithelial response pattern to infectious and/or physicochemical skin insults. Weighing the corresponding lines of argumentation is not only an intriguing, clinically relevant intellectual exercise, but also serves as a wonderful instrument for questioning our own views of the skin universe and its patterns of deviation from a state of homeostasis.

  14. Regulatory T Cells in Radiotherapeutic Responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaue, Dörthe; Xie, Michael W.; Ratikan, Josephine A.; McBride, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling “danger.” The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift toward a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs), suppressor macrophages, and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the “brakes” on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  15. Regulatory T cells in radiotherapeutic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörthe eSchaue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling danger. The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift towards a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs, suppressor macrophages and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the brakes on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  16. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: The importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2002-01-01

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases. PMID:11773639

  17. Avoiding horror autotoxicus: the importance of dendritic cells in peripheral T cell tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph Marvin; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2002-01-08

    The immune system generally avoids horror autotoxicus or autoimmunity, an attack against the body's own constituents. This avoidance requires that self-reactive T cells be actively silenced or tolerized. We propose that dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in establishing tolerance, especially in the periphery, after functioning T cells have been produced in the thymus. In the steady state, meaning in the absence of acute infection and inflammation, DCs are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. Nevertheless, immature DCs continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature DCs silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. This capacity of DCs to induce peripheral tolerance can work in two opposing ways in the context of infection. In acute infection, a beneficial effect should occur. The immune system would overcome the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation if, before infection, tolerance were induced to innocuous environmental proteins as well as self antigens captured from dying infected cells. For chronic or persistent pathogens, a second but dire potential could take place. Continuous presentation of a pathogen by immature DCs, HIV-1 for example, may lead to tolerance and active evasion of protective immunity. The function of DCs in defining immunologic self provides a new focus for the study of autoimmunity and chronic immune-based diseases.

  18. Liposome-Coupled Peptides Induce Long-Lived Memory CD8+ T Cells Without CD4+ T Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Taneichi, Maiko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Uchida, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells provide broad immunity to viruses, because they are able to recognize all types of viral proteins. Therefore, the development of vaccines capable of inducing long-lived memory CD8(+) T cells is desired to prevent diseases, especially those for which no vaccines currently exist. However, in designing CD8(+) T cell vaccines, the role of CD4(+) T cells in the induction and maintenance of memory CD8(+) T cells remains uncertain. In the present study, the necessity or not of CD4(+) ...

  19. CD28 expression is required after T cell priming for helper T cell responses and protective immunity to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linterman, Michelle A; Denton, Alice E; Divekar, Devina P; Zvetkova, Ilona; Kane, Leanne; Ferreira, Cristina; Veldhoen, Marc; Clare, Simon; Dougan, Gordon; Espéli, Marion; Smith, Kenneth G C

    2014-10-27

    The co-stimulatory molecule CD28 is essential for activation of helper T cells. Despite this critical role, it is not known whether CD28 has functions in maintaining T cell responses following activation. To determine the role for CD28 after T cell priming, we generated a strain of mice where CD28 is removed from CD4(+) T cells after priming. We show that continued CD28 expression is important for effector CD4(+) T cells following infection; maintained CD28 is required for the expansion of T helper type 1 cells, and for the differentiation and maintenance of T follicular helper cells during viral infection. Persistent CD28 is also required for clearance of the bacterium Citrobacter rodentium from the gastrointestinal tract. Together, this study demonstrates that CD28 persistence is required for helper T cell polarization in response to infection, describing a novel function for CD28 that is distinct from its role in T cell priming.

  20. Expression and functional importance of collagen-binding integrins, alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1, on virus-activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne Ø; Thomsen, Allan R; Koteliansky, Victor E

    2003-01-01

    decreased responses were seen upon transfer of alpha(1)-deficient activated/memory T cells. Thus, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) integrins on activated T cells is directly functionally important for generation of inflammatory responses within tissues. Finally, the inhibitory effect......Adhesive interactions are crucial to cell migration into inflammatory sites. Using murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus as an Ag model system, we have investigated expression and function of collagen-binding integrins, alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1), on activated and memory T cells. Using...... this system and MHC tetramers to define Ag-specific T cells, we demonstrate that contrary to being VLAs, expression of alpha(1)beta(1) and alpha(2)beta(1) can be rapidly induced on acutely activated T cells, that expression of alpha(1)beta(1) remains elevated on memory T cells, and that expression of alpha(1...

  1. Lack of CD27-CD45RA-V gamma 9V delta 2+ T cell effectors in immunocompromised hosts and during active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Cristiana; Agrati, Chiara; Casetti, Rita; Cairo, Cristiana; Borsellino, Giovanna; Battistini, Luca; Mancino, Giorgio; Goletti, Delia; Colizzi, Vittorio; Pucillo, Leopoldo P; Poccia, Fabrizio

    2002-02-01

    In humans, the circulating pool of mycobacteria-reactive Vgamma9