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Sample records for nosocomial pneumonia due

  1. Use of proton pump inhibitors is associated with increased mortality due to nosocomial pneumonia in bedridden patients receiving tube feeding.

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    Hamai, Kosuke; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Ohshimo, Shinichiro; Wakabayashi, Yu; Ihara, Daisuke; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Hamada, Hironobu; Ono, Koichi; Hattori, Noboru

    2018-05-22

    To investigate the association between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) and nosocomial pneumonia and gastrointestinal bleeding in bedridden patients receiving tube feeding. A total of 116 bedridden hospitalized patients receiving tube feeding, of which 80 were supported by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and 36 by nasogastric tube, were included in the present study. The patients were divided into two groups: 62 patients treated with PPI (PPI group) and 54 patients without PPI (non-PPI group). Mortality due to nosocomial pneumonia was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier approach and the log-rank test. A total of 36 patients (31%) died of nosocomial pneumonia during the observation period; the mortality rate due to nosocomial pneumonia was significantly higher in the PPI group than in the non-PPI group (P = 0.0395). Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that the use of PPI and lower levels of serum albumin were independent predictors of 2-year mortality due to nosocomial pneumonia. Gastrointestinal bleeding was observed in four patients in the non-PPI group (7.7%) and in one patient in the PPI group (1.6%); there was no significant difference between the two groups. The use of PPI in bedridden tube-fed patients was independently associated with mortality due to nosocomial pneumonia, and the PPI group had a non-significant lower incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding than the non-PPI group. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 The Authors Geriatrics & Gerontology International published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. [INHALED ANTIBIOTICS IN TREATMENT OF NOSOCOMIAL PNEUMONIA].

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    Kuzovlev, A N; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care units. Currently the problem of resistance of noso-comial pathogens to miost of antibiotics is crucial. Using of inhaled antibiotics in combination with intravenous drugs is eff ective and safe method for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. The literature review describes current opportunities of ihhaled antibiotic therapy of nosocomial pneumonia, descriptions of drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment. Special attention is paid for using inhaled aminoglycosides for nosocomial pneumonia.

  3. Inhaled Antibiotics in the Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    A. N. Kuzovlev; V. V. Moroz; A. M. Golubev; S. G. Polovnikov

    2013-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units. Rational antibiotic therapy is the basis for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. There is currently a challenge of the pathogens of nosocomial pneumonia being resistant to most of the antibiotics recommended for its treatment. Inhaled antibiotics used in combination with systemic drugs are an effective and safe treatment for nosocomial pneumonia. This review of literature characterizes the current possibi...

  4. Inhaled Antibiotics in the Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial pneumonia is the most common nosocomial infection in intensive care units. Rational antibiotic therapy is the basis for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. There is currently a challenge of the pathogens of nosocomial pneumonia being resistant to most of the antibiotics recommended for its treatment. Inhaled antibiotics used in combination with systemic drugs are an effective and safe treatment for nosocomial pneumonia. This review of literature characterizes the current possibilities of inhaled antibiotic therapy for nosocomial pneumonia in detail and describes medicaments and the advantages and disadvantages of this treatment option. Despite insufficient evidence in circumstances where the microorganisms are polyresistant and where the design of novel antibiotics shows no promise, the use of inhaled antibiotics is an important alternative in the treatment of severe nosocomial pneumonia caused by polyresistant gram-negative bacteria. Key words: nosocomial pneumonia, antibiotic therapy, inhaled antibiotics, resistance.

  5. Dental hygiene intervention to prevent nosocomial pneumonias.

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    Barnes, Caren M

    2014-06-01

    Nosocomial and ventilator associated pneumonias that plague critically ill, elderly and long-term care residents could be reduced with effective oral hygiene practices facilitated collaboratively between nurses and dental hygienists. Nosocomial pneumonias, specifically aspiration pneumonias and ventilator-associated pneumonias in the elderly and infirm have become a major health care issue, The provision of oral care in hospital and hospital-like facilities presents challenges that can prevent patients from receiving optimal oral care One sequela can be aspiration pneumonia which ranks first in mortality and second in morbidity among all nosocomial infections. Since aspiration pneumonia is linked to the colonization of oral bacteria in dental plaque and biofilm, it is time to look for creative solutions to integrating the expertise of dental hygienists into health care teams in these institutional settings. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted regarding the etiology and prevalence of health care related pneumonias. Evidence describing the challenges and barriers that the nurses, nursing staff, and dental hygienists face in the provision of oral care in hospitals and long-term care facilities is provided. Intercollaborative solutions to providing optimal oral care in hospitals and long-term care facilities are suggested. Dental hygienists have the expertise and practice experience to provide oral care in hospitals, long-term care and residential facilities. They can contribute to solving oral care challenges through intercollaboration with other health care team members. Yet, there are long-standing systemic barriers that must be addressed in order to provide this optimal care. Dental hygienists becoming better assimilated within the total health care team in hospital and residential facilities can positively impact the suffering, morbidity and mortality associated with aspiration pneumonias. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pneumonia nosocomial: Actualização terapêutica

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    João Pedro Falcão Baptista

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A pneumonia nosocomial é uma doença frequente, potencialmente fatal, e que apresenta elevada mortalidade. Neste artigo, após revisão crítica dos consensos e protocolos actuais para o tratamento da pneumonia nosocomial, são actualizadas as bases racionais da antibioterapia, revendo os aspectos epidemiológicos, microbiológicos e farmacológicos. No final faz-se referência ao posicionamento dos mais recentes antibióticos disponíveis para o seu tratamento. Abstract: Nosocomial pneumonia is a common disease with high mortality rate. In this article we review the antibiotic therapy fundamentals highlighting epidemiological, microbiological and pharmacological aspects, based on the actual consensus and protocols for the management of nosocomial pneumonia. In the end we make a short review of the current antibiotherapy practiced in this clinical situation. Palavras-chave: Pneumonia nosocomial, pneumonia associada ao ventilador, tratamento empírico, descalonamento terapêutico, antibioterapia, farmacodinâmica, farmacocinética, Key words: Nosocomial pneumonia, ventilator associated pneumonia, empirical therapy, de-escalation, antibiotherapy, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics

  7. Frequency of nosocomial pneumonia in ICU Qazvin Razi hospital (2013

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    S. Makhlogi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial pneumonia is the most prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infection in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of this research was to detect the frequency and predisposing factors of nosocomial Ventilator Associated Pneumonia, by cross sectional study on 188 patients that were hospitalized in ICU Qazvin Razi Hospital. Using questionnaire based on the national nosocomial infection surveillance system (NNIS data collected and analyzed. The average age of patients was 51±24 years old, 37 hospitalized patients (19/6% in the fourth day of admission were affected Ventilator Associated Pneumonia. The most common pathogenesis of causing nosocomial pneumonia were klebsiella in 13 patients (35/1%, staph in 8 patients (21/6%, sodomona in 8 patients (21/6%, ecoli in 3 patients (8/1%, cetrobacter in 2 patients (5/4%, antrococus and Proteus each of them in 1 patient (each 2/7%. Considering (19/6% frequency of nosocomial pneumonia in this study, it’s necessary to act standard protocols in nursing care and medication process.

  8. Nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients

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    Dandagi Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The care of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU is a primary component of modern medicine. ICUs create potential for recovery in patients who otherwise may not have survived. However, they may suffer from problems associated with of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial infections are those which manifest in patients 48 hours after admission to hospital. Nosocomial infections are directly related to diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic procedures a patient undergoes in hospital, and are also influenced by the bacteriological flora prevailing within a particular unit or hospital. Urinary tract infections are the most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for more than 40% of all nosocomial infections. Critical care units increasingly use high technology medicine for patient care, hemodynamic monitoring, ventilator support, hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, and a large battery of powerful drugs, particularly antibiotics to counter infection. It is indeed a paradox that the use of high-tech medicine has brought in its wake the dangerous and all too frequent complication of nosocomial infections

  9. Nosocomial pneumonia in the ICU--year 2000 and beyond.

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    Bowton, D L

    1999-03-01

    Diagnostic and treatment strategies in ICU patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) remain controversial, largely because of the paucity of well-controlled comparison trials using clinically important end points. Recent studies indicating that early appropriate antibiotic therapy significantly lowers mortality underscore the urgent need for well-designed comparative trials. When quantitatively cultured, bronchial specimens obtained by noninvasive techniques may provide clinically useful information and avoid the higher costs and risks of invasive bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques. Previous antibiotic use before onset of nosocomial pneumonia raises the likelihood of infection with highly virulent organisms, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter sp. Thus, the empiric antibiotic regimen should be active against these Gram-negative pathogens as well as other common Gram-negative and Gram-positive causative organisms. Promising preventive modalities for nosocomial VAP include use of a semirecumbent position, endotracheal tubes that allow continuous aspiration of secretions, and heat and moisture exchangers. Rotating their standard empiric antibiotic regimens and restricting the use of third-generation cephalosporins as empiric therapy may help hospitals reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia caused by resistant Gram-negative pathogens.

  10. Diagnosis of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    A. N. Kuzovlev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the informative value of the parameters of gas exchange, lung volumetry, and central hemodynamics in the diagnosis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in nosocomial pneumonia (NP. Subjects and methods. The study included 38 patients with cancer and severe injury who were divided into 3 groups in accordance with the diagnostic criteria of ARDS and NP: 1 patients with ARDS + NP; 2 those with NP; 3 those with non-ARDS, non-PN. ARDS was diagnosed in 2 steps. At Step 1, the investigators took into account risk factors for ARDS and used the lung injury scale developed by J. Murray et al. and the ARDS diagnostic criteria defined by the American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. At Step 2, after obtaining the data of lung volume-try (1—2 hours after Step 1, they assessed the compliance of the above criteria for ARDS with those developed by the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and redistributed the patients between the groups. The stage of ARDS was determined in accordance with the classification of the above Institute. All the patients underwent a comprehensive examination the key element of which was to estimate gas exchange parameters and to monitor lung volumetry and central hemodynamics by the transpulmonary thermodilution methods, by using a Pulsion PiCCO Plus monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Germany. The findings were statistically analyzed using a Statistica 7.0 package (arithmetic mean, error of the mean, _ Student’s test, Newman-Keuls test, correlation analysis. The difference was considered to be significant if p-value was Results. The patients with ARDS + NP were observed to have a significantly lower oxygenation index (10 ml/kg and Murray scale scores (>2 than those in patients with NP without ARDS. The reference values of the pulmonary vascular permeability index due to its inadequate informative value call for further investigation. The

  11. Incidence, risk factors and outcome of nosocomial pneumonia in patients with central nervous system infections

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    Gajović Olgica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pneumonia is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units. The reported frequency varies with definition, the type of hospital or intensive care units and the population of patients. The incidence ranges from 6.8-27%. Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, risk factors and mortality of nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care patients. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively and prospectively the collected data of 180 patients with central nervous system infections who needed to stay in the intensive care unit for more than 48 hours. This study was conducted from 2003 to 2009 at the Clinical Centre of Kragujevac. Results. During the study period, 54 (30% patients developed nosocomial pneumonia. The time to develop pneumonia was 10±6 days. We found that the following risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia were statistically significant: age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score <9, mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy, presence of nasogastric tube and enteral feeding. The most commonly isolated pathogens were Klebsiella-Enterobacter spp. (33.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24.1%, Acinetobacter spp. (16.6% and Staphylococcus aureus (25.9%. Conclusion. Nosocomial pneumonia is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with central nervous system infections. Patients on mechanical ventilation are particularly at a high risk. The mortality rate of patients with nosocomial pneumonia was 54.4% and it was five times higher than in patients without pneumonia.

  12. Nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

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    Zaer F

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty four isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were studied in a period of 6 months. Maximum isolates were from burns cases and environmental sampling from burns ward also grew the same organism, indicating their role as nosocomial pathogen. Acinetobacter may initially be mistaken for Neisseria species. As the organisms show multidrug resistance to commonly used antibiotics their correct identification is important.

  13. Nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

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    Zaer, F; Deodhar, L

    1989-01-01

    Fifty four isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were studied in a period of 6 months. Maximum isolates were from burns cases and environmental sampling from burns ward also grew the same organism, indicating their role as nosocomial pathogen. Acinetobacter may initially be mistaken for Neisseria species. As the organisms show multidrug resistance to commonly used antibiotics their correct identification is important.

  14. A case of nosocomial Legionella pneumonia associated with a contaminated hospital cooling tower.

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    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of a nosocomial pneumonia case due to Legionella pneumophila linked to a contaminated hospital cooling tower in an immune-compromised patient. A 73-year-old female patient was diagnosed with nosocomial Legionella pneumonia proven by a culture of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Two strains isolated from the patient and two strains isolated from two cooling towers were found to be identical using repetitive-sequence-based-PCR with a 95% probability. This Legionella pneumonia case might be caused by aerosol from cooling towers on the roof of the hospital building which was contaminated by L. pneumophila. We increased up the temperature of hot water supply appropriately for prevention of Legionella breeding in an environment of patients' living. On the other hand, as the maintenance of cooling tower, we increased the frequency of Legionella culture tests from twice a year to three times a year. In addition, we introduced an automated disinfectants insertion machine and added one antiseptic reagent (BALSTER ST-40 N, Tohzai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan) after this Legionella disease, and thereafter, we have no additional cases of Legionella disease or detection of Legionella spp. from the cooling tower or hot water supply. This case demonstrates the importance of detecting the infection source and carrying out environmental maintenance in cooperation with the infection control team. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinantes morfológicos de prognóstico em pneumonia nosocomial: um estudo em autópsias Morphological prognostic factors in nosocomial pneumonia: an autopsy study

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    Luiz Mário Baptista Martinelli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de pneumonia nosocomial nas autópsias em um hospital público universitário; identificar os fatores de risco relacionados à pneumonia nosocomial e os potenciais fatores prognósticos relacionados à ocorrência de pneumonia nosocomial fatal; e correlacionar os achados anatomopatológicos com a ocorrência de pneumonia nosocomial e/ou pneumonia aspirativa. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo de 199 pacientes autopsiados, maiores de 1 ano de idade, internados no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu da Universidade Estadual Paulista entre 1999 e 2006, cuja causa de morte (causa básica ou associada foi pneumonia nosocomial. Testou-se a associação dos dados demográficos, clínicos e anatomopatológicos com os desfechos pneumonia nosocomial fatal e pneumonia aspirativa fatal. As variáveis significativas entraram na análise multivariada. RESULTADOS: A idade média foi de 59 ± 19 anos. A prevalência de pneumonia nosocomial em autópsias foi 29%, e essa foi a causa mortis de 22,6% dos pacientes autopsiados. A pneumonia nosocomial fatal correlacionou-se com os achados anatomopatológicos de alterações estruturais tabágicas (OR = 3,23; IC95%: 1,26-2,95; p = 0,02 e acometimento pulmonar bilateral (OR = 3,23; IC95%: 1,26-8,30; p = 0,01. Não houve associações significativas entre as variáveis e pneumonia aspirativa fatal. CONCLUSÕES: Em nossa amostra, a pneumonia nosocomial teve prevalência elevada e foi responsável por quase 25% das mortes. A mortalidade é favorecida por alterações estruturais tabágicas e pneumonia bilateral. Esses achados corroboram os resultados de diversos estudos clínicos sobre pneumonia nosocomial.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nosocomial pneumonia in autopsies at a public university hospital; to identify the risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia and the potential prognostic factors associated with fatal nosocomial pneumonia and with fatal

  16. Bacterial Clearance and Cytokine Profiles in a Murine Model of Postsurgical Nosocomial Pneumonia

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    Manderscheid, Patricia A.; Bodkin, Ryan P.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Jensen, Erik; Russo, Thomas A.; Knight, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a nosocomial pneumonia is facilitated by alterations in host innate pulmonary antibacterial defenses following surgical trauma, which can result in decreased pulmonary bacterial clearance and increased morbidity and mortality. In a murine model of postoperative nosocomial infection, surgical stress (laparotomy) decreased Escherichia coli clearance from the lungs of animals that underwent surgery. Consistent with previous studies, (i) pulmonary levels of tumor necrosis facto...

  17. Comparison of the Nosocomial Pneumonia Mortality Prediction (NPMP) model with standard mortality prediction tools.

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    Srinivasan, M; Shetty, N; Gadekari, S; Thunga, G; Rao, K; Kunhikatta, V

    2017-07-01

    Severity or mortality prediction of nosocomial pneumonia could aid in the effective triage of patients and assisting physicians. To compare various severity assessment scoring systems for predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in nosocomial pneumonia patients. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care university-affiliated hospital in Manipal, India. One hundred patients with nosocomial pneumonia, admitted in the ICUs who developed pneumonia after >48h of admission, were included. The Nosocomial Pneumonia Mortality Prediction (NPMP) model, developed in our hospital, was compared with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Mortality Probability Model II (MPM 72  II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score (MODS), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS), Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Predisposition, Insult, Response, Organ dysfunction (VAP-PIRO). Data and clinical variables were collected on the day of pneumonia diagnosis. The outcome for the study was ICU mortality. The sensitivity and specificity of the various scoring systems was analysed by plotting receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and computing the area under the curve for each of the mortality predicting tools. NPMP, APACHE II, SAPS II, MPM 72  II, SOFA, and VAP-PIRO were found to have similar and acceptable discrimination power as assessed by the area under the ROC curve. The AUC values for the above scores ranged from 0.735 to 0.762. CPIS and MODS showed least discrimination. NPMP is a specific tool to predict mortality in nosocomial pneumonia and is comparable to other standard scores. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ventilator-associated nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care units in Malaysia.

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    Gopal Katherason, Supaletchimi; Naing, Lin; Jaalam, Kamarudin; Imran Musa, Kamarul; Nik Mohamad, Nik Abdullah; Aiyar, Subramaniar; Bhojani, Kavita; Harussani, Najah; Abdul Rahman, Aisai; Ismail, Asma

    2009-10-22

    The outcome indicator of nosocomial infection (NI) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is used to benchmark the quality of patient care in Malaysia. We conducted a three-year prospective study on the incidences of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), risk factors, and patterns of the microorganisms isolated in three ICUs. A follow-up in prospective cohort surveillance was conducted on patients admitted to an adult medical-surgical ICU of a university hospital and two governmental hospitals in Malaysia from October 2003 to December 2006. VAP was detected using CDC criteria which included clinical manifestation and confirmed endotracheal secretion culture results. In total, 215 patients (2,306 patient-days) were enrolled into the study. The incidence of ICU-acquired device-related NI was 29.3 % (n = 63). The device-related VAP infection rate was 27.0 % (n = 58), with a mechanical ventilator utilization rate of 88.7%. The death rate due to all ICU-acquired NI including sepsis was 6.5%. The most common causative pathogen was Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 27). Multivariate analysis using Cox regression showed that the risk factors identified were aspiration pneumonia (HR = 4.09; 95% CI = 1.24, 13.51; P = 0.021), cancer (HR = 2.51; 95% CI = 1.27, 4.97; P = 0.008), leucocytosis (HR=3.43; 95% CI= 1.60, 7.37; P=0.002) and duration of mechanical ventilation (HR=1.04; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.08; P = 0.030). Age, gender and race were not identified as risk factors in the multivariable analysis performed. The incidence of VAP was comparable to that found in the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) System report of June 1998. The incidence of VAP was considered high for the three hospitals studied.

  19. Pediatric mortality due to nosocomial infection: a critical approach

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    Julia Marcia Maluf Lopes

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection is a frequent event with potentially lethal consequences. We reviewed the literature on the predictive factors for mortality related to nosocomial infection in pediatric medicine. Electronic searches in English, Spanish and Portuguese of the PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and Cochrane Collaboration Databases was performed, focusing on studies that had been published from 1996 to 2006. The key words were: nosocomial infection and mortality and pediatrics/neonate/ newborn/child/infant/adolescent. The risk factors found to be associated with mortality were: nosocomial infection itself, leukemia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, corticosteroid therapy, multiple organ failure, previous antimicrobial therapy, catheter use duration, candidemia, cancer, bacteremia, age over 60, invasive procedures, mechanical ventilation, transport out of the pediatric intensive care unit, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia infections, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II scores over 15. Among these factors, the only one that can be minimized is inadequate antimicrobial treatment, which has proven to be an important contributor to hospital mortality in critically-ill patients. There is room for further prognosis research on this matter to determine local differences. Such research requires appropriate epidemiological design and statistical analysis so that pediatric death due to nosocomial infection can be reduced and health care quality improved in pediatric hospitals.

  20. Modeling the economic impact of linezolid versus vancomycin in confirmed nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Patel, Dipen A; Shorr, Andrew F; Chastre, Jean; Niederman, Michael; Simor, Andrew; Stephens, Jennifer M; Charbonneau, Claudie; Gao, Xin; Nathwani, Dilip

    2014-07-22

    We compared the economic impacts of linezolid and vancomycin for the treatment of hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia. We used a 4-week decision tree model incorporating published data and expert opinion on clinical parameters, resource use and costs (in 2012 US dollars), such as efficacy, mortality, serious adverse events, treatment duration and length of hospital stay. The results presented are from a US payer perspective. The base case first-line treatment duration for patients with MRSA-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia was 10 days. Clinical treatment success (used for the cost-effectiveness ratio) and failure due to lack of efficacy, serious adverse events or mortality were possible clinical outcomes that could impact costs. Cost of treatment and incremental cost-effectiveness per successfully treated patient were calculated for linezolid versus vancomycin. Univariate (one-way) and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were conducted. The model allowed us to calculate the total base case inpatient costs as $46,168 (linezolid) and $46,992 (vancomycin). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin), with lower costs ($824 less) and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA nosocomial pneumonia). Approximately 80% of the total treatment costs were attributed to hospital stay (primarily in the intensive care unit). The results of our probabilistic sensitivity analysis indicated that linezolid is the cost-effective alternative under varying willingness to pay thresholds. These model results show that linezolid has a favorable incremental cost-effectiveness ratio compared to vancomycin for MRSA-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia, largely attributable to the higher clinical trial response rate of patients treated with linezolid. The higher drug acquisition cost of linezolid was offset by lower treatment failure

  1. The Incidence And Risk Factors Nosocomial Pneumonia In A Neuromedical Intensive Care Unit

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    Devragudi TS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study examined the incidence and factors influencing the occurrence of nonsocomial pneumonia (NP in a neuromedical intensive care unit (NICU. Of the 57 patients admitted to the NICU over one year, 26% developed nosocomial pneumonia. It was observed that the infected patients were significantly older than the noninfected (43+15 vs 22+18 years; p<0.001, had a longer NICU stay (33+31 vs 18+18 days: p=0.05 and needed longer duration of mechanical ventilation (20+25 vs 9 + 12 days: P<0.05. Patients with neuromuscular diseases had a trend towards higher incidence of NP than those with encephalopathy and therapeutic interventions such as plasmapheresis, blood transfusion and inotropic therapy did not influence the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia. The NICU mortality was not significantly influenced by nosocomial pneumonia. Pseudomonas aerugenosa was the predominant organism responsible for pneumonia. Nine percent of the tracheobronchial isolates were resistant to the routinely-tested antibiotics. In conclusion, nosocornial pneumonia is a common complication in a NICU and while it increases the duration of NICU stay, mortality appears to be uninfluenced.

  2. SAFETY-MODE RESPIRATORY SUPPORT IN NOSOCOMIAL PNEUMONIA

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    V. V. Moroz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic criteria for and approaches to differentiated treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in nosocomial pneumonia (NP have been elaborated, but approaches to preventing this syndrome in the presence of risk factors have not been investigated. Safety-mode mechanical ventilation (MV (protective MV is the most probable way of preventing ARDS in NP. Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of MV with safety parameters in preventing ARDS in NP in patients with surgical abdominal infection. Subjects and methods. This retrospective unicentric study was conducted at the clinical bases of the V. A. Negovsky Research Institute of General Reanimatology in 2013—2014. During a retrospective analysis, the patients were divided into two groups: 1 safe MV — after NP was diagnosed, the patients underwent safetymode MV (tidal volume (TV 6—8 ml/kg; 2 standard MV — after NP was diagnosed, the patients were on MV with traditional parameters (TV 8—10 ml/kg. The incidence of ARDS in the patient groups was taken as a main criterion for the efficiency of safetymode respiratory support. The duration of MV, the length of stay in an intensive care unit, and 30day mortality rates were estimated as secondary criteria for the efficiency of safety-mode respiratory support. The findings were statistically analyzed using a Statistica 7.0 package. The data were expressed as the median (± 25—75 percentiles interquartile range (IQR. The difference at p<0.05 was considered signif icant. >Results. Comparison of oxygenation index (OI and extravascular lung water index (ELWI showed that there were natural significant differences between the safe MV and standard MV groups in these indicators, beginning from day 2 of the investigation. The standard MV group displayed a significant decrease in OI and an increase in ELWI at 7 days versus at day 1 of the investigation. In the safe MV group, TV was naturally lower than that in the standard MV group on days 1

  3. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

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    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibacterial Therapy for Nosocomial Pneumonias Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms in Critical 1ll Patients

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    V. V. Moroz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of using the fourth-generation cephalosporin maxicef in the treatment of 20 patients with nosocomial pneumonia and severe concomitant injury. A control group comprised 20 patients receiving a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin. The total efficiency of the antibacterial therapy was 68.5% in the maxicef group and 40.9% in the control group (р<0.05. The therapy had to be modified in 42% of the maxicef group and in 72.7% in the control group (р<0.05. The average treatment cost was US $518 (429—606 and US $482 (368—596 in the maxicef and control groups, respectively. Nephrotoxicity was observed in 9% of the patients receiving a combination of the antibiotics. The activity of maxicef was also analyzed in vitro. Results. Maxicef was demonstrated to be highly active against the majority of gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria in vitro. Its efficacy against the most common bacteria (P.aeruginosa, S.aureus, E.coli, K.pneumonia causing infections in severe injury was in vitro significantly higher than that of ceftazidime. The comparative study indicates that the fourth-generation cephalosporin maxicef may be used as an alternative to the standard combined therapy. Key words: concomitant injury, maxicef, nosocomial pneumonia, a combination of ceftazidime and aminoglycoside, nosocomial infection pathogens.

  5. Nosocomial pneumonia in the ICU: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyllienmark, Petra; Gårdlund, Bengt; Persson, Jan-Olov; Ekdahl, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired infection among patients requiring mechanical ventilation. A prospective surveillance programme of all patients has been implemented at the ICU, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden since 2001. Within this programme, incidence and risk factors for ICU-acquired pneumonia and associated death over a 2-y period have been studied. Of 329 patients enrolled in the study, 221 required mechanical ventilation. 33 of 221 patients (15%) developed VAP, corresponding to a rate of 29 VAP/1000 ventilator d. Risk factors for VAP were aspiration (hazard ratio 3.79; 95% CI 1.48-9.68), recent surgery (HR 3.58; 95% CI 1.15-11.10) and trauma (HR 3.00; 95% CI 1.03-8.71). 11 patients of 33 (33%) with VAP died within 28 d compared to 46 of 288 (16%) without ICU-acquired pneumonia (odds ratio 2.73; 95% CI 0.97-7.63). We conclude that: 1) incidence of VAP was 15% and the most important risk factor was aspiration; 2) APACHE II score > or = 20 is a stronger predictor for poor outcome than VAP; 3) a minority of patients with APACHE II score > or = 20 develop VAP; and 4) continuous surveillance programmes are feasible and provide valuable data for improvement of quality of care.

  6. Clostridium Difficile Infection Due to Pneumonia Treatment: Mortality Risk Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewska, M; Zycinska, K; Lenartowicz, B; Hadzik-Błaszczyk, M; Cieplak, M; Kur, Z; Wardyn, K A

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common gastrointestinal infection after the antibiotic treatment of community or nosocomial pneumonia is caused by the anaerobic spore Clostridium difficile (C. difficile). The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess mortality due to C. difficile infection (CDI) in patients treated for pneumonia. We identified 94 cases of post-pneumonia CDI out of the 217 patients with CDI. The mortality issue was addressed by creating a mortality risk models using logistic regression and multivariate fractional polynomial analysis. The patients' demographics, clinical features, and laboratory results were taken into consideration. To estimate the influence of the preceding respiratory infection, a pneumonia severity scale was included in the analysis. The analysis showed two statistically significant and clinically relevant mortality models. The model with the highest prognostic strength entailed age, leukocyte count, serum creatinine and urea concentration, hematocrit, coexisting neoplasia or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In conclusion, we report on two prognostic models, based on clinically relevant factors, which can be of help in predicting mortality risk in C. difficile infection, secondary to the antibiotic treatment of pneumonia. These models could be useful in preventive tailoring of individual therapy.

  7. Organising pneumonia due to dronedarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D; Avery, S; Edey, A J; Medford, A R L

    2015-01-01

    Organising pneumonia is one of the responses of the lung to injury and can mimic bacterial pneumonia but importantly it does not respond to antibiotic therapy. We present the case of a 67-year-old male who was diagnosed with organising pneumonia secondary to dronedarone. Drug reactions are a common cause and early identification of the culprit is mandatory to prevent further morbidity and ensure a favourable outcome. On chest radiography there may be fleeting peripheral consolidation, while computed tomography can show a range of stereotyped patterns including perilobular consolidation. Bronchoscopic biopsy may not always be possible but response to steroids is often rapid following removal of the culprit drug. Dronedarone should be included in the list of possible drugs and the Pneumotox database remains a useful resource for the clinician when acute drug-related pneumotoxicity is suspected.

  8. Recurrent Pneumonia due to Double Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sedighi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumonia is one of the most common infections during childhood. In children with recurrent bacterial pneumonia complete evaluation for underlying factors is necessary. The most common underlying diseases include: antibody deficiencies , cystic fibrosis , tracheoesophageal fistula and increased pulmonary blood flow. Vascular ring and its pressure effect is a less common cause of stridor and recurrent pneumonia. Congenital abnormalities in aortic arch and main branches which form vascular ring around esophagus and trachea with variable pressure effect cause respiratory symptoms such as stridor , wheezing and recurrent pneumoniaCase Report: A 2 year old boy was admitted in our hospital with respiratory distress and cough . Chest x-Ray demonstrated right lobar pneumonia. He had history of stridor and wheezing from neonatal period and hospitalization due to pneumonia for four times. The patient received appropriate antibiotics. Despite fever and respiratory distress improvement, wheezing continued. Review of his medical documents showed fixed pressure effect on posterior aspect of esophagus in barium swallow. In CT angiography we confirmed double aortic arch.Conclusion: Double aortic arch is one of the causes of persistant respiratory symptom and recurrent pneumonia in children for which fluoroscopic barium swallow is the first non-invasive diagnostic method.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:70-74

  9. Kinetic bed therapy to prevent nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Anthony; Gray, Hilary; Laupland, Kevin B; Zuege, Danny J

    2006-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is the most important infectious complication in patients admitted to intensive care units. Kinetic bed therapy may reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients. The objective of this study was to investigate whether kinetic bed therapy reduces the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia and improves outcomes in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. We searched Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and AMED for studies, as well as reviewed abstracts of conference proceedings, bibliographies of included studies and review articles and contacted the manufacturers of medical beds. Studies included were randomized or pseudo-randomized clinical trials of kinetic bed therapy compared to standard manual turning in critically ill mechanically ventilated adult patients. Two reviewers independently applied the study selection criteria and extracted data regarding study validity, type of bed used, intensity of kinetic therapy, and population under investigation. Outcomes assessed included the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, mortality, duration of ventilation, and intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. Fifteen prospective clinical trials were identified, which included a total of 1,169 participants. No trial met all the validity criteria. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (pooled odds ratio (OR) 0.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28 to 0.53), but no reduction in mortality (pooled OR 0.96, 95%CI 0.66 to 1.14), duration of mechanical ventilation (pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) -0.14 days, 95%CI, -0.29 to 0.02), duration of intensive care unit stay (pooled SMD -0.064 days, 95% CI, -0.21 to 0.086) or duration of hospital stay (pooled SMD 0.05 days, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.27). While kinetic bed therapy has been purported to reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in mechanically ventilated patients, the overall body of evidence is insufficient to support this

  10. Nosocomial pneumonia: Search for an empiric and effective antibiotic regimen in high burden tertiary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Soneja, Manish; Ray, Yogiraj; Sahu, Monalisa; Vinod, Kutty Sharada; Kapil, Arti; Biswas, Ashutosh; Wig, Naveet; Sood, Rita

    2018-04-17

    The clinical practice guidelines on nosocomial pneumonia recommends an empirical regimen that would work in 95% of the patients based on the local antibiogram. The aim of the study was development of an antibiogram for guiding empiric therapy in settings with high prevalence of multi-drug resistant organisms. A retrospective review of electronic health records (e-hospital portal) was done to analyze all respiratory isolates from patients admitted in medical wards and intensive care unit between May 2016 and May 2017. The samples included brocho-alveolar lavage (BAL), mini broncho-alveolar lavage (mini-BAL) and endotracheal aspirate. The sensitivity pattern (combined and individual) of all bacterial isolates were analysed for commonly used antibiotics and their combinations. Out of the 269 isolates, the most common organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (125, 46%), Acinetobacter baumanni (74, 27%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (50, 19%). Cefoperazone-sulbactam (43%) had the best sensitivity pattern overall. Cefoperazone-sulbactam plus amikacin (56%) was the combination with the best combined sensitivity overall. There is a high prevalence of resistance in the commonly implicated organisms to the available antibiotics. There is an urgent need for implementation of effective anti-microbial stewardship programmes and development of newer antimicrobials.

  11. [Estimation of economic costs for the care of patients with nosocomial pneumonia in a regional peruvian hospital, 2009-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dámaso-Mata, Bernardo; Chirinos-Cáceres, Jesús; Menacho-Villafuerte, Luz

    2016-06-01

    To estimate and compare the economic costs for the care of patients with and without nosocomial pneumonia at Hospital II Huánuco EsSalud during 2009-2011, in Peru. This was a partial economic evaluation of paired cases and controls. A collection sheet was used. nosocomial pneumonia. direct health costs, direct non-health costs, indirect costs, occupation, age, comorbidities, sex, origin, and education level. A bivariate analysis was performed. Forty pairs of cases and controls were identified. These patients were hospitalized for >2 weeks and prescribed more than two antibiotics. The associated direct health costs included those for hospitalization, antibiotics, auxiliary examinations, specialized assessments, and other medications. The direct non-health costs and associated indirect costs included those for transportation, food, housing, foregone payroll revenue, foregone professional fee revenue, extra-institutional expenses, and payment to caregivers during hospitalization and by telephone. The direct health costs for nosocomial pneumonia patients were more than three times and the indirect costs were more than two times higher than those for the controls. Variables with the greatest impact on costs were identified.

  12. Doripenem in hospital infections: a focus on nosocomial pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Shien Lo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tze Shien Lo,1 Stephanie M Borchardt,2 Justin M Welch,3 Melissa A Rohrich,3 Augusto M Alonto,4 Anne V Alonto51Infectious Diseases Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 2Research Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 3Pharmacy Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 4Infectious Diseases Department, MeritCare Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota, USAAbstract: Doripenem is the latest carbapenem on the market to date. Although not an antibiotic in a new class, it offers a glimmer of hope in combating serious infections secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria when we have not seen a new class of antibacterial, particularly for Gram-negative bacteria, for more than 10 years. In vitro, doripenem exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and Amp-C β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes. Doripenem also exhibits better in vitro activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to other anti-pseudomonal carbapenems. It combines the desirable activities of both imipenem and meropenem. It has similar activity to imipenem against Gram-positive pathogens and has the antimicrobial spectrum of meropenem against Gram-negative organisms. Several randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that doripenem is non-inferior to meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, or levofloxacin in its efficacy and safety profile in treating a wide range of serious bacterial infections including intra-abdominal infection, complicated urinary tract infection, and nosocomial pneumonia. Due to its wide spectrum of activity and good safety profile it is susceptible to misuse leading to increasing rates of resistance

  13. Pneumonia due to Enterobacter cancerogenus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Tülin; Baran, Gamze; Buyukguclu, Tuncay; Sezgin, Fikriye Milletli; Kaymaz, Haci

    2014-11-01

    Enterobacter cancerogenus (formerly known as CDC Enteric Group 19; synonym with Enterobacter taylorae) has rarely been associated with human infections, and little is known regarding the epidemiology and clinical significance of this organism. We describe a community-acquired pneumonia case in a 44-year-old female due to E. cancerogenus. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganism was performed by the automatized VITEK 2 Compact system (bioMerieux, France). The clinical case suggests that E. cancerogenus is a potentially pathogenic microorganism in determined circumstances; underlying diseases such as bronchial asthma, empiric antibiotic treatment, wounds, diagnostic, or therapeutic instruments.

  14. Nosocomial pneumonia in 27 ICUs in Europe: perspectives from the EU-VAP/CAP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulenti, D; Tsigou, E; Rello, J

    2017-11-01

    We report on intensive care nosocomial pneumonia (NP) in Europe through a review of EU-VAP/CAP manuscripts: a prospective observational study, enrolling patients from 27 ICUs in nine European countries. From 2,436 eligible ICU patients, 827 cases presented NP, with 18.3 episodes of VAP per 1000 ventilator-days. Most common findings were worsening oxygenation, purulent respiratory secretions and temperature increase. At least three criteria from Clinical Pulmonary Infection score (CPIS) were present in 77.9 % of episodes, but only 0.2 % met six CPIS criteria. Diagnosis was confirmed mainly noninvasively (74.8 %), with half qualitative and quantitative cultures. The dominant isolate was S. aureus in Spain, France, Belgium and Ireland, P. aeruginosa in Italy and Portugal, Acinetobacter in Greece and Turkey, but Escherichia coli in Germany. NP resulted in 6 % higher mortality, longer ICU stay and duration of mechanical ventilation (12 and 10 days). COPD and age ≥45 years were not associated with higher VAP incidence but did correlate with increased mortality. Trauma had higher VAP incidence but lower mortality. Bacteremia (led by MRSA and Acinetobacter baumannii) was documented in 14.6 %, being associated with extra ICU stay and mortality. Vasopressors and ICUs with above 25 % prevalence of Potential Resistant Organisms (PRM) were independently associated with PRM, being documented in 50.7 % of patients with early-onset VAP without known risk factors. Most patients initially received combination therapy. Delay in appropriate antimicrobial choice significantly increased mortality, and LOS in survivors was six days longer (p < 0.05). In conclusion, NP management in Europe presents local differences and major shifts when compared to reports from North America, outcomes of randomized trials and general guidelines.

  15. A Culture-Proven Case of Community-Acquired Legionella Pneumonia Apparently Classified as Nosocomial: Diagnostic and Public Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bargellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Legionella pneumonia in a 78-year-old patient affected by cerebellar haemangioblastoma continuously hospitalised for 24 days prior to the onset of overt symptoms. According to the established case definition, this woman should have been definitely classified as a nosocomial case (patient spending all of the ten days in hospital before onset of symptoms. Water samples from the oncology ward were negative, notably the patient’s room and the oxygen bubbler, and the revision of the case history induced us to verify possible contamination in water samples collected at home. We found that the clinical strain had identical rep-PCR fingerprint of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated at home. The description of this culture-proven case of Legionnaires’ disease has major clinical, legal, and public health consequences as the complexity of hospitalised patients poses limitations to the rule-of-thumb surveillance definition of nosocomial pneumonia based on 2–10-day incubation period.

  16. Necrotizing pneumonia after pharyngitis due to fusobacterium necrophorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, P K; Flowers, R A

    1984-01-01

    A case of necrotizing pneumonia secordary to Fusobacterium necrophorum is reported. This anaerobic infection commonly originates in the upper respiratory tract and is often accompanied by multiple system disease due to hematogeneous seeding. When the lungs are involved, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia with pleural effusions and cavitation result. The course is prolonged, and the diagnosis is frequently delayed. With appropriate antibiotics, the prognosis is good.

  17. Emerging trends of nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit of a tertiary care public teaching hospital in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadade, Rakesh; Harde, Minal; deSouza, Rosemarie; More, Ashwini; Bharmal, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia poses great challenge to an intensivist. Detailed information about hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) is crucial for prevention and optimal management, thus improving quality Intensive Care Unit (ICU) care. Hence, we aimed to study the current trend of nosocomial pneumonia in ICU. It was a prospective observational cohort study, conducted in the ICU of a tertiary care teaching public hospital over a period of 18 months. We studied clinical profile and outcome of 120 adult patients who developed VAP/HAP during the study period. We also analyzed the causative organisms, antibiotic sensitivity, and resistance pattern in these patients. Out of 120 patients, 29 patients were HAP and 91 patients were VAP. Mortality was 60% (72), and development of VAP and requirement of mechanical ventilation showed significant association with mortality (P antibiotiques et le modèle de résistance chez ces patients. Résultats: Sur 120 patients, 29 patients étaient HAP et 91 patients étaient VAP. La mortalité était de 60% (72), et le développement du VAP et l'exigence de ventilation mécanique ont montré une association significative avec la mortalité (P antibiotique maximale a été observée chez la pipéracilline + tazobactam (58,8%), suivie de l'imipénème (49,5%) et du méropénem (41,8%), alors que la résistance antibiotique maximale a été observée à cefépime (95,1%), suivie de ceftazidime et de l'amoxicilline (91,2%) . la pneumonie nosocomiale a montré une incidence élevée (17,44%) et la mortalité (60%). Les organismes communs identifiés étaient S. aureus et K. pneumoniae. La résistance était élevée pour les antibiotiques couramment utilisés et une forte sensibilité aux antibiotiques pour la pipéracilline + le tazobactam et le carbapénème.

  18. Lipid aspiration pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfson, B.J.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Allen, J.L.; Panitch, H.B.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Karmazin, N.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA

    1989-01-01

    The development of lipid aspiration pneumonia after chronic nasopharyngeal installation of mineral oil was first described in 1925 by Laughlin. Since that time this entity has been well recognized and numerous substances have been identified or implicated as the aspirated material. The classic radiographic appearance of severe chronic lipid aspiration pneumonia has been described as consisting of intense perihilar infiltrates. However, the radiographic findings are more often non-specific and usually consist of varying degrees of diffuse interstitial infiltrates that tend to be more prominent in the perihilar regions and the right lung. We are reporting a case of biopsy-proven lipid aspiration pneumonia in an infant with known gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) who had medium-chain triglyceride oil administered via nasogastric tube. Serial roentgenograms demonstrated a changing pulmonary pattern from diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates initially to a diffuse alveolar pattern at the time of the lung biopsy. Modern medicine has developed new methods for providing nourishment to sick newborns and infants to improve their nutritional status and help them to grow. One such method involves the administration of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT oil) into the GI tract via a nasogastric or nasoenteral tube. The purpose of this report is to describe a significant complication of this method of providing nutrition to an infant with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the diagnostic dilemma it presented. (orig.)

  19. Linezolid Versus Vancomycin in the Empiric Treatment of Nosocomial Pneumonia: A Cost-Utility Analysis Incorporating Results from the ZEPHyR Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Curtis D; Schwemm, Ann K

    2015-07-01

    To examine the cost-effectiveness of vancomycin versus linezolid in the empiric treatment of nosocomial pneumonias incorporating results from a recent prospective, double-blind, multicenter, controlled trial in adults with suspected methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia. A decision-analytic model examining the cost-effectiveness of linezolid versus vancomycin for the empiric treatment of nosocomial pneumonia was created. Publicly available cost, efficacy, and utility data populated relevant model variables. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis varied parameters in 10,000 Monte-Carlo simulations, and univariate sensitivity analyses assessed the impact of model uncertainties and the robustness of our conclusions. Results indicated that the cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) increased 6% ($22,594 vs. $23,860) by using linezolid versus vancomycin for nosocomial pneumonia. The incremental cost per QALY gained by using linezolid over vancomycin was $6,089, and the incremental cost per life saved was $68,615 with the use of linezolid. Vancomycin dominated linezolid in the subset of patients with documented MRSA. The incremental cost per QALY gained using linezolid if no mortality benefit exists between agents or a 60-day time horizon was analyzed was $19,608,688 and $443,662, respectively. Linezolid may be a cost-effective alternative to vancomycin in the empiric treatment of patients with suspected MRSA nosocomial pneumonia; however, results of our model were highly variable on a number of important variables and assumptions including mortality differences and time frame analyzed. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Discriminatory power of three typing techniques in determining relatedness of nosocomial Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a tertiary hospital in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purighalla, Swathi; Esakimuthu, Sarita; Reddy, Mallika; Varghese, George K; Richard, Vijay S; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of two DNA-based technique and a protein-based technique for the typing of nosocomial isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A second objective was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and characterise the presence of genes encoding extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases. Forty-six K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with bloodstream infections at a tertiary care hospital in India between December 2014 and December 2015 were studied. All isolates were typed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR), randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and ESBLs were detected using the BD Phoenix system. The types of ESBL and carbapenemase genes present were detected using PCR. Isolates were subtyped into 31, 30 and 33 distinct genotypes by ERIC-PCR, RAPD and MALDI-TOF, respectively. Several isolates displaying identical DNA fingerprints were binned into different branches based on their proteomic fingerprint. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 33/46 strains were multidrug resistant (MDR); a majority of the strains (83%) were sensitive to colistin. PCR-based analysis demonstrated 19 strains to harbour two or more ESBL and carbapenemase genes. ERIC-PCR was the most reproducible method for typing K. pneumoniae isolates and could not be substituted by MALDI-TOF for clonality analysis. A high degree of genetic diversity and the presence of MDR genes highlight the challenges in treating K. pneumoniae-associated infections.

  1. Discriminatory power of three typing techniques in determining relatedness of nosocomial Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from a tertiary hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Purighalla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the discriminatory power of two DNA-based technique and a protein-based technique for the typing of nosocomial isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. A second objective was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and characterise the presence of genes encoding extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs and carbapenemases. Materials and Methods: Forty-six K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with bloodstream infections at a tertiary care hospital in India between December 2014 and December 2015 were studied. All isolates were typed using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and ESBLs were detected using the BD Phoenix system. The types of ESBL and carbapenemase genes present were detected using PCR. Results: Isolates were subtyped into 31, 30 and 33 distinct genotypes by ERIC-PCR, RAPD and MALDI-TOF, respectively. Several isolates displaying identical DNA fingerprints were binned into different branches based on their proteomic fingerprint. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests revealed that 33/46 strains were multidrug resistant (MDR; a majority of the strains (83% were sensitive to colistin. PCR-based analysis demonstrated 19 strains to harbour two or more ESBL and carbapenemase genes. Conclusion: ERIC-PCR was the most reproducible method for typing K. pneumoniae isolates and could not be substituted by MALDI-TOF for clonality analysis. A high degree of genetic diversity and the presence of MDR genes highlight the challenges in treating K. pneumoniae-associated infections.

  2. Nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus treated with linezolid or vancomycin: A secondary economic analysis of resource use from a Spanish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rello, J; Nieto, M; Solé-Violán, J; Wan, Y; Gao, X; Solem, C T; De Salas-Cansado, M; Mesa, F; Charbonneau, C; Chastre, J

    2016-11-01

    Adopting a unique Spanish perspective, this study aims to assess healthcare resource utilization (HCRU) and the costs of treating nosocomial pneumonia (NP) produced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized adults using linezolid or vancomycin. An evaluation is also made of the renal failure rate and related economic outcomes between study groups. An economic post hoc evaluation of a randomized, double-blind, multicenter phase 4 study was carried out. Nosocomial pneumonia due to MRSA in hospitalized adults. The modified intent to treat (mITT) population comprised 224 linezolid- and 224 vancomycin-treated patients. Costs and HCRU were evaluated between patients administered either linezolid or vancomycin, and between patients who developed renal failure and those who did not. Analysis of HCRU outcomes and costs. Total costs were similar between the linezolid- (€17,782±€9,615) and vancomycin-treated patients (€17,423±€9,460) (P=.69). The renal failure rate was significantly lower in the linezolid-treated patients (4% vs. 15%; Prenal failure (€19,626±€10,840 vs. €17,388±€9,369; P=.14). Among the patients who developed renal failure, HCRU (days on mechanical ventilation: 13.2±10.7 vs. 7.6±3.6 days; P=.21; ICU stay: 14.4±10.5 vs. 9.9±6.6 days; P=.30; hospital stay: 19.5±9.5 vs. 16.1±11.0 days; P=.26) and cost (€17,219±€8,792 vs. €20,263±€11,350; P=.51) tended to be lower in the linezolid- vs. vancomycin-treated patients. There were no statistically significant differences in costs per patient-day between cohorts after correcting for mortality (€1000 vs. €1,010; P=.98). From a Spanish perspective, there were no statistically significant differences in total costs between the linezolid and vancomycin pneumonia cohorts. The drug cost corresponding to linezolid was partially offset by fewer renal failure adverse events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. [Nosocomial infection due to Trichosporon asahii in a critical burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Lomas, Luis; Domínguez-Gil González, Marta; Martín Luengo, Ana Isabel; Eiros Bouza, José María; Piqueras Pérez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection is an important cause of morbimortality in patients with severe burns. The advances in burn care therapy have considerably extended the survival of seriously burned patients, exposing them to infectious complications, notably fungal infections, with increased recognition of invasive infections caused by Candida species. However, some opportunistic fungi, like Trichosporon asahii, have emerged as important causes of nosocomial infection. A case of nosocomial infection due to T. asahii in a severely ill burned patient successfully treated with voriconazole is presented. The management of invasive fungal infections in burned patients, from diagnosis to selection of the therapeutic protocol, is often a challenge. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In this case report, current treatment options are discussed, and a review of previously published cases is presented. Due to the difficulty in the diagnosis of invasive mycoses and their high associated mortality rates, it is advisable to keep a high degree of clinical suspicion of trichosporonosis in susceptible patients, including burned patients. The isolation of T. asahii in clinical specimens of this type of host must raise clinical alert, since it may precede an invasive infection. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Nosocomial Pneumonia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients Receiving Ranitidine or Sucralfate as Stress Ulcer Prophylaxis

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    Smita Prakash

    2008-01-01

    We concluded that stress ulcer prophylaxis with ranitidine increases the risk for late- onset pneumonia in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients by favoring gastric colonization by gram- negative bacilli compared with sucralfate. In patients receiving mechanical ventilation, the use of sucralfate may be preferable to H 2 blockers.

  5. An economic model to compare linezolid and vancomycin for the treatment of confirmed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel DA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dipen A Patel,1 Andre Michel,2 Jennifer Stephens,1 Bertram Weber,3 Christian Petrik,4 Claudie Charbonneau5 1Health Economic and Outcomes Research, Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Klinikum Hanau GmbH, Hanau, Germany; 3Health Technology Assessment and Outcomes Research, 4Anti-infectives, Pfizer, Berlin, Germany; 5Pfizer International Operations, Pfizer France, Paris, France Background: Across Europe, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is considered to be the primary cause of nosocomial pneumonia (NP. In Germany alone, approximately 14,000 cases of MRSA-associated NP occur annually, which may have a significant impact on health care resource use and associated economic costs. The objective of this study was to investigate the economic impact of linezolid compared with that of vancomycin in the treatment of hospitalized patients with MRSA-confirmed NP in the German health care system. Methods: A 4-week decision tree model incorporated published data and expert opinion on clinical parameters, resource use, and costs (2012 euros was constructed. The base case first-line treatment duration for patients with MRSA-confirmed NP was 10 days. Treatment success (survival, failure due to lack of efficacy, serious adverse events, and mortality were possible outcomes that could impact costs. Alternate scenarios were analyzed, such as varying treatment duration (7 or 14 days or treatment switch due to a serious adverse event/treatment failure (at day 5 or 10. Results: The model calculated total base case inpatient costs of €15,116 for linezolid and €15,239 for vancomycin. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio favored linezolid (versus vancomycin, with marginally lower costs (by €123 and greater efficacy (+2.7% absolute difference in the proportion of patients successfully treated for MRSA NP. Approximately 85%–87% of the total treatment costs were attributed to hospital stay (primarily in the intensive care unit

  6. Recurrent Aspiration Pneumonia due to Anterior Cervical Osteophyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Jun Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man presented with recurrent vomiting and aspiration pneumonia in the left lower lobe. He entered the intensive care unit to manage the pneumonia and septic shock. Although a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube was implanted for recurrent vomiting, vomiting and aspiration recurred frequently during admission. Subsequently, he complained of neck pain when in an upright position. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study showed compression of the esophagus by cervical osteophytes and tracheal aspiration caused by an abnormality at the laryngeal inlet. Cervical spine X-rays and computed tomography showed anterior cervical osteophytes at the C3-6 levels. Surgical decompression was scheduled, but was cancelled due to his frailty. Unfortunately, further recurrent vomiting and aspiration resulted in respiratory arrest leading to hypoxic brain damage and death. Physicians should consider cervical spine disease, such as diffuse skeletal hyperostosis as an uncommon cause of recurrent aspiration pneumonia.

  7. Estimating the cost-effectiveness of linezolid for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Chang; Wang, Bruce C M; Kim, Richard; Magyar, Andrew; Lai, Chung-Chih; Yang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia (NP) is associated with higher resource utilization, increased hospital stays, and mortality. We present a health economics model to understand the impact of using linezolid as the first-line treatment of MRSA NP in Taiwan. We developed a cost-effectiveness model to estimate the costs and clinical outcomes of using linezolid 600 mg b.i.d. versus vancomycin 15 mg/kg b.i.d. as the first-line treatment of MRSA NP in Taiwan. The model is a decision-analytic analysis in which a MRSA-confirmed patient is simulated to utilize one of the treatments, using data from a clinical trial. Within each treatment arm, the patient can or cannot achieve clinical cure. Regardless of whether the clinical cure was achieved or not, the patient may or may not have experienced an adverse event. The per-protocol results for clinical cure were 57.6% and 46.6% for linezolid and vancomycin, respectively. The total cost of linezolid was $376 more per patient than that of vancomycin. Drug costs were higher for linezolid than for vancomycin ($1108 vs. $233), and hospitalization costs were lower ($4998 vs. $5496). With higher cost and higher cure rates for linezolid, the incremental cost per cure was $3421. This study projects linezolid to have higher drug costs, lower hospital costs, and higher overall costs compared with vancomycin. This is balanced against the higher clinical cure rate for linezolid. Depending on the willingness to pay for clinical cure, linezolid could be cost effective as the first-line treatment of NP in Taiwan. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Klebsiella pneumoniae as a nosocomial pathogen: epidemiology and drug resistance Klebsiella pneumoniae como patógeno intrahospitalario: epidemiología y resistencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Cataño Correa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Worldwide, bacterial resistance is an increasingly serious problem, especially in hospital environments. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are the most frequently isolated microorganisms in patients with nosocomial infections. In Medellín, Colombia, however, Klebsiella pneumoniae has become increasingly important in this kind of infection, for which reason this review was carried out.

    It includes the following aspects: microbiology, epidemiology, dissemination, resistance to betalactamic antibiotics and its mechanisms, clinical impact and importance of the problem in this city.

     

    La resistencia bacteriana es un problema serio, de magnitud creciente y presentación universal, que reviste gran importancia, especialmente en los ambientes hospitalarios; los microorganismos más frecuentemente aislados de pacientes con infecciones intrahospitalarias son Staphylococcus aureus y Escherichia coli. En Medellín, sin embargo, Klebsiella pneumoniae ha cobrado gran importancia en años recientes debido a su gran incremento como agente causal de ese tipo de infecciones, lo que motiva esta revisión. Se incluyen los siguientes aspectos: microbiología, epidemiología, diseminación, resistencia a los beta-lactámicos y sus mecanismos, impacto clínico e importancia del problema

  9. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  10. Investigating hospital heterogeneity with a multi-state frailty model: application to nosocomial pneumonia disease in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liquet Benoit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multistate models have become increasingly useful to study the evolution of a patient’s state over time in intensive care units ICU (e.g. admission, infections, alive discharge or death in ICU. In addition, in critically-ill patients, data come from different ICUs, and because observations are clustered into groups (or units, the observed outcomes cannot be considered as independent. Thus a flexible multi-state model with random effects is needed to obtain valid outcome estimates. Methods We show how a simple multi-state frailty model can be used to study semi-competing risks while fully taking into account the clustering (in ICU of the data and the longitudinal aspects of the data, including left truncation and right censoring. We suggest the use of independent frailty models or joint frailty models for the analysis of transition intensities. Two distinct models which differ in the definition of time t in the transition functions have been studied: semi-Markov models where the transitions depend on the waiting times and nonhomogenous Markov models where the transitions depend on the time since inclusion in the study. The parameters in the proposed multi-state model may conveniently be computed using a semi-parametric or parametric approach with an existing R package FrailtyPack for frailty models. The likelihood cross-validation criterion is proposed to guide the choice of a better fitting model. Results We illustrate the use of our approach though the analysis of nosocomial infections (ventilator-associated pneumonia infections: VAP in ICU, with “alive discharge” and “death” in ICU as other endpoints. We show that the analysis of dependent survival data using a multi-state model without frailty terms may underestimate the variance of regression coefficients specific to each group, leading to incorrect inferences. Some factors are wrongly significantly associated based on the model without frailty terms. This

  11. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  12. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  13. Etiología bacteriana de la neumonía nosocomial y resistencia a los antimicrobianos en pacientes con y sin tratamiento antimicrobiano previo Bacterial etiology of nosocomial pneumonia and antimicrobial resistance in patients with and without antimicrobial treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Weyland

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available La neumonía nosocomial (NN se asocia a una elevada morbimortalidad y es la segunda causa de infección intrahospitalaria después de la infección urinaria. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer la etiología de la NN en adultos y evaluar el perfil de resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los microorganismos aislados teniendo en cuenta si los pacientes recibieron o no tratamiento antimicrobiano previo. Desde el año 2000 hasta el 2005 se analizaron 430 lavados broncoalveolares provenientes de 430 pacientes adultos con diagnóstico de neumonía internados en la unidad de cuidados intensivos del Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín". El 74% (199/ 269 de los pacientes con tratamiento previo tuvieron cultivos positivos, mientras que en el grupo sin tratamiento previo esta proporción fue del 83% (134/161 (p = 0,03. Los microorganismos prevalentes fueron Acinetobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus y Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37,9% ; 21,3% y 20,9% vs. 36,1%; 26,6% y 17,7% en los pacientes con tratamiento previo o sin él, respectivamente; p > 0,05. La resistencia a los antimicrobianos de los citados microorganismos cuando los aislamientos provinieron de pacientes que recibieron antes tratamiento antibiótico fue superior a la encontrada en el grupo de pacientes que no recibió tratamiento previo (p Nosocomial pneumonia (NP is associated with high morbimortality, representing the second cause of nosocomial infection after urinary tract infection. The objective of this work was to become acquainted with the etiology of NP and to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the isolated microorganisms from adult patients with and without previous antimicrobial treatment admitted in the intensive care unit (ICU. From 2000 to 2005, 430 bronchoalveolar lavages from 430 adult patients diagnosed with pneumonia admitted in the ICU were analyzed. Seventy-four percent (199/ 269 of the patients with previous treatment had positive cultures, whereas in

  14. Investigation of a nosocomial outbreak due to Serratia marcescens in a maternity hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, P; Grattard, F; Amerger, C; Frery, M C; Lucht, F; Pozzetto, B; Fargier, P

    1999-04-01

    To investigate an outbreak of Serratia marcescens in a maternity hospital (November 1994 to May 1995). Retrospective analysis of epidemiological data and prospective study of systematic bacteriological samples from patients and environment, with genotyping of strains by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction. A private maternity hospital, Saint-Etienne, France. In the neonatal unit, 1 newborn developed a bacteremia, and 36 were colonized in stools with S marcescens. As the colonization of some newborns was shown to occur only a few hours after delivery, the inquiry was extended to other maternity wards, where 8 babies and 4 mothers were found to be colonized. Environmental sampling led to the isolation of S marcescens from a bottle of enteral feed additive in the neonatal unit and from the transducers of two internal tocographs in the delivery rooms. The genotyping of 27 strains showed two different profiles: a major epidemic profile shared by 22 strains (18 from babies of the neonatal unit, 2 from babies of other units, and 2 from breast milk) and another profile shared by 5 strains (2 from transducers of internal tocographs, 2 from babies, and 1 from a mother). The strain isolated from lipid enteral feeding was not available for typing. Although this source of contamination was removed soon from the neonatal unit, the outbreak stopped only when infection control measures were reinforced in the delivery rooms, including the nonreuse of internal tocographs. In delivery rooms, the quality of hygiene needs to be as high as in surgery rooms to prevent nosocomial colonization or infection of neonates at birth.

  15. Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae KpQ3, a DHA-1 β-Lactamase-Producing Nosocomial Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Codoñer, Francisco M.; López-Camacho, Elena; Salanueva, Iñigo J.; Manrique, Marina; Brozynska, Marta; Gómez-Gil, Rosa; Martínez-Blanch, Juan F.; Álvarez-Tejado, Miguel; Pareja, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae KpQ3 is a multidrug-resistant isolate obtained from a blood culture of a patient in a burn unit in the Hospital Universitario La Paz (Madrid, Spain) in 2008. The genome contains multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including a plasmid-mediated DHA-1 cephalosporinase gene. PMID:23469341

  16. Distribution of potential nosocomial pathogens in a hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... associated/acquired infections) are those infections that develop in a patient during ... nosocomial pathogens that cause infections can come either from ... aeruginosa is a regular cause of nosocomial pneumonia, urinary tract ...

  17. The SAATELLITE and EVADE Clinical Studies Within the COMBACTE Consortium: A Public-Private Collaborative Effort in Designing and Performing Clinical Trials for Novel Antibacterial Drugs to Prevent Nosocomial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Bruno; Chastre, Jean; Eggiman, Philippe; Laterre, Pierre-François; Torres, Antoni; Sanchez, Miguel; Esser, Mark T; Bishop, Brian; Bonten, Marc; Goosens, Herman; Jafri, Hasan S

    2016-08-15

    The Innovative Medicines Initiative-funded COMBACTE consortium fosters academic-industry partnership in pioneering studies to combat serious bacterial infections. We describe how this partnership is advancing the development of 2 monoclonal antibodies, MEDI4893 and MEDI3902, for the prevention of nosocomial pneumonia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Pneumonia due to Chlamydia pecorum in a Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, J T; Gillett, A K; Palmieri, C; Feng, T; Higgins, D P

    2016-11-01

    Chlamydiosis is a common infectious disease of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), but Chlamydia spp. have not yet been demonstrated to cause pneumonia in these animals. A juvenile male koala died following an episode of respiratory disease. At necropsy examination, the lung tissue was consolidated. Microscopical lesions in the lung included pyogranulomatous bronchopneumonia, proliferation of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium and interstitial fibrosis. Hyperplastic bronchiolar epithelial cells contained aggregates of small basophilic punctate organisms, which were confirmed as chlamydiae by transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Real-time polymerase chain reaction identified these as Chlamydia pecorum. This report provides the best evidence to date of chlamydial infection causing pneumonia in a koala, and the first evidence that C. pecorum is capable of infecting the bronchiolar epithelium of the koala. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lung abscess due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case series and brief review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cilloniz, Catia; Senarega, Renata; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobes used to be the most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess, and Streptococcus species used to be the second most common cause. In recent years, this has been changing. Klebsiella pneumoniae is now an increasing cause of community- acquired lung abscess, but Streptococcus species continue to be major pathogens. Necrotizing pneumonia has generally been regarded as a rare complication of pneumococcal infection in adults. Type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae was the single most common type implicated in necrosis; however, many other serotypes were implicated. This entity predominately infects children, but is present also in adults. Lung abscess in adults due to Streptococcus pneumoniae is not common. In this regard we present a case series of pulmonary cavitation due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and discuss the possible pathogenic mechanism of the disease.

  20. Nosocomial Mycobacterium bovis-bacille Calmette-Guérin infections due to contamination of chemotherapeutics: case finding and route of transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Margreet C.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Renders, Nicole H. M.; Hartwig, Nico G.; de Man, Peter; Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Deutekom, Henk; Yntema, J. L.; Vulto, Arnold G.; Messemaker, Marja; van Soolingen, Dick

    2003-01-01

    We studied nosocomial infections due to Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Onco-TICE bacteria, transmitted by contamination of medication prepared in BCG Onco-TICE-contaminated hoods in the pharmacy, in 5 immunocompromised patients at 3 hospitals. The BCG strains cultured from the

  1. Obliterative bronchiolitis due to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isles, A.F.; Masel, J.; O' Duffy, J.

    1987-02-01

    A six-year-old girl presented with Mycoplasma pneumoniae involving the right upper and lower lobes. She made a slow but complete recovery with resolution of the radiological changes. She represented 5 years later with a productive cough, recurrent wheezing and physical and radiological signs suggestive of obliterative bronchiolitis. This diagnosis was confirmed by ventilation - perfusion (dV/dt/dQ/dt) lung scan, and bronchography. The case highlights the value of dV/dt/dQ/dt scanning in the diagnosis of obliterative bronchiolitis and confirms the previous reports that mycoplasma infections are not always benign.

  2. Factors associated with airway colonisation and invasion due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors associated with airway colonisation and invasion due to Klebsiella spp. ... for nosocomial infections which occurred more conunonly with antibiotic-resistant organisms. ... acute community-acquired chest infections, and nosocomial chest infections. Primary acute conununity-acquired pneumonia was unconunon.

  3. Environmental burden of acute respiratory infection and pneumonia due to indoor smoke in Dhading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhimal, M; Dhakal, P; Shrestha, N; Baral, K; Maskey, M

    2010-04-01

    ARI and pneumonia is one of the major public health problems in Nepal which always ranks highest position among the top ten diseases. One of the risk factor of ARI and pneumonia is indoor smoke from kitchen where primary source of cooking is solid biomass fuel. This study was carried out in order to estimate the burden of ARI and pneumonia due to indoor smoke. ARI and pneumonia was chosen as it is one of the significant public health problem among under five children in Nepal and responsible for high number of premature deaths. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Dhading district. Multistage cluster sampling technique was used for data collection considering ward as a cluster. The environmental burden of ARI and pneumonia due to indoor smoke was calculated using the WHO Environmental Burden of Disease Series. About 87 percent of households were using solid biomass fuel as a primary source of fuel. The under five children exposed to solid fuel use was 41313. The total 1284 Disability Adjusted Life Years were lost due to ARI and pneumonia and about 50 percent of it was attributed by Indoor smoke in household. The solid biomass fuel was primary source of energy for cooking in Dhading district which is attributing about 50 percent of burden of ARI and pneumonia among under five children.

  4. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). In this paper will be presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  5. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Do Vale, Simone Alves [UNESP; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). In this paper will be also presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  6. Nosocomial Legionnaires’ Disease: Clinical and Radiographic Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Marrie

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1981 to 1991, 55 patients (33 males, 22 females, mean age 58.6 years with nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were studied. The mortality rate was 64%. One-half of the patients developed nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease within three weeks of admission. A surprising clinical feature was the low rate of findings of consolidation on physical examination, despite the fact that 52% of patients had this finding on chest radiograph. More than one-half of patients had pre-existing lung disease, rendering a radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila impossible in 16% of cases despite microbiological confirmation. Nineteen per cent of patients who had blood cultures done had a pathogen other than L pneumophila isolated, suggesting dual infection in at least some of the patients. When the clinical and radiographic findings were combined it was noted that 40% of patients had one of three patterns suggestive of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease: rapidly progressive pneumonia, lobar opacity and multiple peripheral opacities. However, in 60% of patients there were no distinctive features.

  7. Epidemiología molecular de infección nosocomial por Klebsiella pneumoniae productora de beta-lactamasas de espectro extendido.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Espinal

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available La epidemiología molecular aplicada al estudio de las infecciones nosocomiales ha sido fundamental para la formulación y la evaluación de las medidas de control; con este fin, se caracterizaron microbiológica y molecularmente aislamientos de Klebsiella pneumoniae productores de beta-lactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE obtenidos de pacientes en un hospital de tercer nivel de Bogotá, D.C., Colombia. Se tipificaron quince aislamientos por electroforesis en gel de campo pulsado (PFGE y por amplificación de secuencias de ADN repetidas (REP-PCR. La susceptibilidad antimicrobiana y la producción de BLEE se determinaron de acuerdo con las normas de NCCLS. Las beta-lactamasas se evaluaron por isoelectroenfoque y PCR. El 80% de estos aislamientos se asociaron con infección nosocomial y de éstos, el 91,7% provenía de unidades de cuidado intensivo. La susceptibilidad antibiótica mostró 13 patrones de resistencia; 87% de los aislamientos presentó corresistencia a amikacina, 53% a gentamicina, 33,3% a ciprofloxacina, 40% a cefepime, 66,7% a piperacilina/tazobactam, 60% trimetoprim/sulfametoxazol y 46,7% a cloranfenicol. Todos fueron sensibles a imipenem. En la mayoría de los aislamientos se detectó producción simultánea de beta-lactamasas del tipo TEM y SHV y el 93,3% produjo ceftazidimasa de pI 8.2 del tipo SHV-5. Los 15 aislamientos fueron agrupados por PFGE y REP-PCR en 11 y 12 patrones electroforéticos, respectivamente. Esta variabilidad genética está relacionada con infecciones nosocomiales de origen endógeno más que por infecciones cruzadas.

  8. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te; Liu, Han-Tsung; Chen, Jin-Bor; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chuang, Feng-Rong

    2014-11-01

    In the face of increasing treatment options for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp) hemodialysis (HD) access-related bacteremia, the difference in clinical effectiveness between ertapenem and flomoxef remains unclear. We conducted this retrospective study to determine their efficacies and treatment outcomes. Patients on maintenance HD with fistula-, graft-, or catheter-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia were enrolled. Data related to clinical features and antibiotic treatments were collected. Outcome was determined by mortality resulting from bacteremia during the 14-day period after the collection of the first positive blood culture for flomoxef-susceptible ESBL-Kp. The 64 patients studied had severe septicemia as determined by the Pitt bacteremia score; 50% (32/64) were in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the time of bacteremia. Old age (>65 years; 57.8%), malnutrition (albumin30 days; 75%) were also highly prevalent. The study population comprised nine fistula-, 10 graft-, and 45 HD catheter-related bacteremia cases, and the mortality rate was high (38/64, 59.4%). The mortality rate was significantly higher in the flomoxef treatment group than in the ertapenem treatment group (22/30, 73% vs. 16/34, 47%, pflomoxef use (odds ratio (OR) 2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-35.17) and Pitt bacteremia score (OR 4.37, 95% CI 1.28-5.26) were independently associated with mortality. In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of imipenem in critically ill patients during empirical treatment of nosocomial pneumonia: a comparison of 0.5-h and 3-h infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipš, Michal; Siller, Michal; Strojil, Jan; Urbánek, Karel; Balík, Martin; Suchánková, Hana

    2014-10-01

    In critically ill patients, pathophysiological changes alter the pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. Imipenem exhibits primarily time-dependent killing. Its administration by prolonged infusion may increase the time for which its plasma concentration exceeds the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of suspected pathogens. The objectives of this study were to compare the pharmacokinetic parameters of imipenem administered by standard short infusion (1g imipenem/1g cilastatin over 30min three times daily) and by extended infusion with a reduced total dose (0.5g imipenem/0.5g cilastatin over 3h four times daily) and to compare the target pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices, namely percentage of the dosing interval for which the free plasma concentration of imipenem exceeds the MIC and 4× MIC (%fT>MIC and %fT>4×MIC) of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4mg/L, for these two regimens in critically ill adult patients with nosocomial pneumonia on Day 2 of empirical antibiotic therapy. The study included 22 patients. Whilst no significant differences were found between both groups for %fT>MIC, %fT>4×MIC was 87.4±12.19%, 68.6±15.08%, 47.31±6.64% and 27.81±9.52% of the 8-h interval in the short infusion group for MICs of 0.5, 1, 2 and 4mg/L, respectively, and 85.15±17.57%, 53.14±27.27%, 13.55±24.47% and 0±0% of the 6-h interval for the extended infusion group. In conclusion, administration of 0.5g of imipenem by a 3-h infusion every 6h does not provide sufficient drug concentrations to treat infections caused by pathogens with a MIC of ≥2mg/L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Pneumonia due to Rhodococcus equi in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuri de França Bonilha

    Full Text Available The authors reported a lung infection by Rhodococcus equi in a 25 years-old male patient admitted to hospital with cough, dyspnea, fever, and previous diagnosis of pleural effusion. R. equi was isolated from pleural fluid and the patient acquired nosocomial infection by Acinetobacter baumannii, isolated from chest drain. The patient was treated with antibiotics. During hospitalization, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma subtype in biopsy of pleura. After undergoing surgery for pulmonary decortication for drain empyema, the patient died due to septicemia.

  11. Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have received extra vaccinations and disease-preventing antibiotics to help prevent pneumonia and other infections caused by bacteria. ... patients are hospitalized, treatment might include intravenous (IV) antibiotics ... Can I Help Myself Feel Better? If your doctor has prescribed ...

  12. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia due to inhalation of spray lubricant (WD-40 lung).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, K P; Gale, N A

    1990-05-01

    An elderly woman developed lipoid pneumonia due to the inhalation of mist from a spray lubricant that she was using as a liniment for sore back and neck muscles. This unusual practice is reported to be common among older people bothered by rheumatism. The potential for this complication to occur in other patients leads us to present this case report.

  13. Lung abscess due to Streptococcus pneumoniae simulating pulmonary tuberculosis: presentation of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Perazzo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, anaerobes were the most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess; Streptococcus species were the second most common cause. In recent years, this has changed. Klebsiella pneumoniae is now most common cause of community- acquired lung abscess, although Streptococcus species remain pathogen of major importance. We present two cases of pulmonary cavitation due to Streptococcus pneumoniae which resembled pulmonary tuberculosis with regards to their history and radiological findings. These are examples of a common diagnosis presenting in an uncommon way. Our cases had some peculiarities: they had a clinical picture strongly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis or lung cancer rather than necrotizing infectious pneumonia in patients with no comorbidities or underlying diseases (including oral or dental pathologies. Radiological findings did not help the clinicians: pulmonary tuberculosis was the first diagnostic hypothesis in both cases. An underlying lung cancer was excluded in the first case only after invasive pulmonary procedures.

  14. Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections in a Turkish university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalcin Ata

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies associated nosocomial infections with increased hospital costs due to extra days in hospital, staff time, extra investigations and drug treatment. The cost of antibiotic treatment for these infections represents a significant part of hospital expenditure. This prospective observational study was designed to determine the daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections per infected adult patient in Akdeniz University Hospital. Methods All adult patients admitted to the ICUs between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2003 who had only one nosocomial infection during their stay were included in the study. Infection sites and pathogens, antimicrobial treatment of patient and it's cost were recorded. Daily antibiotic costs were calculated per infected patient. Results Among the 8460 study patients, 817 (16.6% developed 1407 episodes of nosocomial infection. Two hundred thirty three (2.7% presented with only one nosocomial infection. Mean daily antibiotic cost was $89.64. Daily antibiotic cost was $99.02 for pneumonia, $94.32 for bloodstream infection, $94.31 for surgical site infection, $52.37 for urinary tract infection, and $162.35 for the other infections per patient. The treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was the most expensive infection treated. Piperacillin-tazobactam and amikacin were the most prescribed antibiotics, and meropenem was the most expensive drug for treatment of the nosocomial infections in the ICU. Conclusions Daily antibiotic cost of nosocomial infections is an important part of extra costs that should be reduced providing rational antibiotic usage in hospitals.

  15. Prevention of Nosocomial Respiratory Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Karpun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of an extended package of preventive measures on the incidence of nosocomial respiratory infections in surgical patients at an intensive care unit (ICU. Subjects and methods. The study included 809 patients aged 35 to 80 years. A study group comprised 494 patients in whom an extended package of preventive measures was implemented during 7 months (March-September. A control group consisted of 315 patients treated in 2004 in the same period of time (March-September. The groups were stratified by age, gender, underlying diseases, and APACHE-2 and SOFA scores. The extended package of anti-infectious measures involved a high air purification in ICUs («Flow-M» technology, routine use of ventilatory filters, closed aspiration systems with a built-in antibacterial filter under artificial ventilation for over 2 days. Results. The proposed technologies could reduce the frequency of tracheobronchitis and ventilator-associated pneumonias in the groups of patients at high risk for nosocomial infections substantially (by more than twice. Conclusion. The findings have led to the conclusion that the extended package of preventive measures is effective in preventing respiratory infections in ICU patients. Of special note is the proper prevention of upper airway contamination with pathogenic microorganisms, by employing the closed aspiration systems with a built-in antibacterial filter. The routine use of high-tech consumables in the intensive care of surgical patients causes a considerable decrease in the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and purulent tracheobronchitis and a reduction in the number of microbiological studies. Key words: ventilator-associated pneumonia, prevention of nosocomial infections, closed aspiration system.

  16. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel's skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  17. Two cases of monomicrobial intraabdominal abscesses due to KPC - 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 clone

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    Madonia Simona

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the etiology of pyogenic liver and pancreatic abscesses is an important factor in determining the success of combined surgical and antibiotic treatment. Literature shows geographical variations in the prevalence and distribution of causative organisms, and the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing bacteria is an emerging cause of abdominal infections. Case presentation We herein describe two cases of intra-abdominal abscesses due to monomicrobial infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 258 producing K. pneumoniae carbapenemase 3 (KPC-Kp. In case 1, a 50-year-old HIV-negative Italian woman with chronic pancreatitis showed infection of a pancreatic pseudocystic lesion caused by KPC-Kp. In case 2, a 64-year-old HIV- negative Italian woman with pancreatic neoplasm and liver metastases developed a liver abscess due to KPC after surgery. Both women were admitted to our hospital but to different surgical units. The clonal relationship between the two isolates was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. In case 2, the patient was already colonized at admission and inter-hospital transmission of the pathogen was presumed. A long-term combination regimen of colistin with tigecycline and percutaneous drainage resulted in full recovery and clearance of the multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogen. Conclusions Timely microbiological diagnosis, the combined use of new and old antibiotics and radiological intervention appeared to be valuable in managing these serious conditions. The emergence and dissemination of MDR organisms is posing an increasing challenge for physicians to develop new therapeutic strategies and control and prevention frameworks.

  18. [Community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Study of 97 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, José Ramón; Montejo, José Miguel; Cancelo, Laura; Zalacaín, Rafael; López, Leyre; Fernández Gil de Pareja, Joaquín; Alonso, Eva; Oñate, Javier

    2003-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causal agent of 5% to 12% of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia cases, though rates are changing with the use of new diagnostic methods. This is a retrospective study of all patients admitted to our hospital with community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila between 1997 and 2001. Diagnostic criteria included either a positive Legionella serogroup 1 urinary antigen test or seroconversion and a chest radiograph consistent with pneumonia. A total of 97 patients were studied. Ninety cases (92.8%) were community-acquired and 7 (7.2%) were associated with travelling. In 82 cases (84.5%) the presentation was sporadic. Seventy-five patients were smokers (77.3%). The most common symptoms were fever in 91 patients (93.8%) and cough in 67 (68.1%). In five patients (5.2%) creatine phosphokinase concentrations were over 5 times their baseline values (in two over 100 times); four of these patients presented acute renal failure. Seroconversion was observed in 23/42 patients (54.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between the administration of erythromycin or clarithromycin in monotherapy, or in combination with rifampin. Nineteen patients (19.6%) presented acute renal failure and mechanical ventilation was necessary in 22 (22.7%). Twelve patients died (12.5%). Independent prognostic factors associated with death included respiratory rate > 30 breaths/min, urea > 60 mg/dL and PaO2 scale scores and the presence of complications or mortality. The Legionella urinary antigen test permits early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. The severity scale is an indicator of complications or death.

  19. Clinical outcomes of linezolid and vancomycin in patients with nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus stratified by baseline renal function: a retrospective, cohort analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Capitano, Blair; Stein, Amy; El-Solh, Ali A

    2017-05-22

    The primary objective of this study is to assess whether baseline renal function impacts treatment outcomes of linezolid and vancomycin (with a dose-optimized regimen) for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of data generated from a prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial (NCT 00084266). The analysis included 405 patients with culture-proven MRSA pneumonia. Baseline renal function was stratified based on creatinine clearance. Clinical and microbiological success rates and presence of nephrotoxicity were assessed at the end of treatment (EOT) and end of study (EOS). Multivariate logistic regression analyses of baseline patient characteristics, including treatment, were performed to identify independent predictors of efficacy. Vancomycin concentrations were analyzed using a nonlinear mixed-effects modeling approach. The relationships between vancomycin exposures, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic index (trough concentration, area under the curve over a 24-h interval [AUC 0-24 ], and AUC 0-24 /MIC) and efficacy/nephrotoxicity were assessed in MRSA pneumonia patients using univariate logistic regression or Cox proportional hazards regression analysis approach. After controlling for use of vasoactive agents, choice of antibiotic therapy and bacteremia, baseline renal function was not correlated with clinical and microbiological successes in MRSA pneumonia at either end of treatment or at end of study for both treatment groups. No positive association was identified between vancomycin exposures and efficacy in these patients. Higher vancomycin exposures were correlated with an increased risk of nephrotoxicity (e.g., hazards ratio [95% confidence interval] for a 5 μg/ml increase in trough concentration: 1.42 [1.10, 1.82]). In non-dialysis patients, baseline renal function did not impact the differences in efficacy or nephrotoxicity with treatment of linezolid versus vancomycin in MRSA

  20. Exploring the Genome and Phenotype of Multi-Drug Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae of Clinical Origin

    OpenAIRE

    João Anes; Daniel Hurley; Marta Martins; Séamus Fanning; Séamus Fanning

    2017-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important nosocomial pathogen with an extraordinary resistant phenotype due to a combination of acquired resistant-elements and efflux mechanisms. In this study a detailed molecular characterization of 11 K. pneumoniae isolates of clinical origin was carried out. Eleven clinical isolates were tested for their susceptibilities, by disk diffusion and broth microdilution and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Efflux activity was determined by measuring the extr...

  1. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted.

  2. Prevalence of Nosocomial Infection in Different Wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The CDC defines a nosocomial infection as a localized or systemic condition caused by an adverse reaction to the presence of an infectious agent(s or its toxin(s. It is an infection that occurs between 48 to 72 hours after admission of patients in the hospital or as soon after the hospital discharge and on the admission time, patients don't have this infection. Objectives This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of nosocomial infection in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods This retrospective study was conducted in all wards of the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during the 1 year period (2013; the data were collected from the wards records and HIS system and analyzed by the SPSS software (version16. Results In the present study, of total 35979 hospitalized patients in different wards of the Ghaem hospital was reported 1.1% of nosocomial infection. In the meantime, overall, the most prevalent organism was Acinetobacter baumannii with a prevalence of 37.2% and the minimum was linked to the Bacillus species with a prevalence 0.3%. The highest and lowest prevalence of the nosocomial infection was in the ICU and CCU with 49.9% and 0.3%, respectively. In general, among all wards of the mentioned hospital, the most frequent nosocomial infection was pneumonia (47.4% and the lowest belonged to CSF (2.3%. Conclusions In our study, the ICU ward was accounted for the highest rate of nosocomial infection, due to the critical importance of this ward. Preventive measures and survivelance system for reduction of nosocomial infections is needed.

  3. Time trends in primary-care morbidity, hospitalization and mortality due to pneumonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gageldonk-Lafeber, A.B. van; Bogaerts, M.A.H.; Verheij, R.; Sande, M.A.B. van der

    2009-01-01

    Most studies reporting pneumonia morbidity are restricted to hospitalized patients, although only a minority of pneumonia patients are admitted to hospital. To get a better understanding of the burden of disease in the general population, we conducted a population-based retrospective study to

  4. Risk factors for infections due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae after open heart surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsano, Antonio; Giacobbe, Daniele Roberto; Sportelli, Elena; Olivieri, Guido Maria; Brega, Carlotta; Di Biase, Carlo; Coppo, Erika; Marchese, Anna; Del Bono, Valerio; Viscoli, Claudio; Santini, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Patients undergoing major surgery are at increased risk of developing infections due to resistant organisms, including carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-Kp). In this study, we assessed risk factors for CR-Kp infections after open heart surgery in a teaching hospital in northern Italy. A retrospective study was conducted from January to December 2014. The primary outcome measure was postoperative CR-Kp infection, defined as a time-to-event end-point. The effect of potentially related variables was assessed by univariable and multivariable analyses. Secondary end-points were in-hospital mortality and 180-day postoperative mortality. Among 553 patients undergoing open heart surgery, 32 developed CR-Kp infections (6%). In the final multivariable model, CR-Kp colonization [hazard ratio (HR) 227.45, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 67.13-1225.20, P open heart surgery. CR-Kp infection after surgery significantly affected survival. Preventing colonization is conceivably the most effective current strategy to reduce the impact of CR-Kp. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. An Adult Patient with Pneumonia Due to Aspiration of Dental Prosthesis

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    Samil Gunay

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients with a new and suddenly beginning of bronchial asthma and repetitive respiratory infection, one should consider the possibility of obstruction by a foreign body. In this case we present a male patient with pneumonia due to aspiration of dental prosthesis. A 32-year-old man presented with a 4-month history of dyspnea, chest pain and new    compliants of diaphoresis and fever persistend despite of antibiotic treatment. Then the patient consultated to our chest surgery department. After the physical examination of patient we made the fiberoptic  flexible bronchoscopy according to the uncertain opasity seen in the chest radiography. Later in the operating room, with the patient under general anesthesia, we extracted the aspirated foreign body, dental prosthesis, by rigid bronchoscopy. We should think about the possibility of foreign body aspiration for the patients with suddenly beginning of the complaints such as, bronchial asthma, repetitive respiratory infection, diaphoresis, chest pain and fever. Sometimes people hides the true anamnesis because of be ashamed or amnesia.

  6. Acute Placental Infection Due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: Report of a Unique Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Lage

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old woman, gravida 9, with seven healthy children and a history of one abortion (p 7 + 1 , presented at 18 weeks of gestation with fever and malodorous vaginal discharge. Ultrasound revealed a macerated fetus. The placenta showed acute chorioamnionitis and acute villitis with microabscess formation. Blood and vaginal cultures both grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. This is the first reported case in English literature of Klebsiella pneumoniae causing suppurative placentitis leading to fetal demise.

  7. The effect of diabetes mellitus on outcomes of patients with nosocomial pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: data from a prospective double-blind clinical trial comparing treatment with linezolid versus vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equils, Ozlem; da Costa, Christopher; Wible, Michele; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2016-09-06

    The presence of diabetes mellitus increases the risk of several severe infections, but data on its effect on treatment outcomes in patients with nosocomial pneumonia (NP) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are limited. We retrospectively analyzed data from a double-blind, randomized, multi-center, international clinical trial of culture-confirmed MRSA NP that compared treatment with linezolid to vancomycin. Specifically, we evaluated the clinical and microbiologic outcomes of patients with and without diabetes in the modified intent to treat population at end-of-treatment (EOT) and end-of-study (EOS, 7-30 days post-EOT). Among 448 enrolled patients 183 (40.8 %) had diabetes mellitus, 87 (47.5 %) of whom received linezolid and 96 (52.5 %) vancomycin. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics were similar for the two treatment groups. Clinical success rates at EOS were 57.6 % with linezolid and 39.3 % with vancomycin, while microbiological success rates were 58.9 % with linezolid and 41.1 % with vancomycin. Among diabetic patients, rates of mortality and study drug-related adverse effects were similar between the treatment groups. Overall day 28 mortality rates were higher among diabetic patients compared to non-diabetic patients (23.5 vs 14.7 %, respectively: RD = 8.8 %, 95 % CI [1.4, 16.3]). Among diabetic patients with MRSA NP, treatment with linezolid, compared to vancomycin, was associated with higher clinical and microbiologic success rates, and comparable adverse event rates. NCT00084266 .

  8. Effectiveness of a multidimensional approach for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in an adult intensive care unit in Cuba: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Morales-Pérez, Clara; Rosenthal, Victor D

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of the multidimensional approach developed by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) on the reduction of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates in patients hospitalized in an adult intensive care unit (AICU) in an INICC member hospital in Havana, Cuba. We conducted a prospective surveillance pre-post study in AICU patients. The study was divided into two periods:baseline and intervention. During the baseline period, we conducted active prospective surveillance of VAP using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health Safety Network (NHSN) definition and INICC methods. During the intervention period, we implemented the INICC multidimensional approach for VAP, in addition to performing active surveillance. This multidimensional approach included the following measures: a bundle of infection control interventions, education, outcome surveillance, process surveillance, feedback of VAP rates and performance feedback of infection control practices. The baseline rates of VAP were compared to the rates obtained after intervention, and we analyzed the impact of our interventions by Poisson regression. During the baseline period, we recorded 114 mechanical ventilator (MV) days, whereas we recorded 2350MV days during the intervention period. The baseline rate of VAP was 52.63 per 1000MV days and 15.32 per 1000MV days during the intervention. At the end of the study period, we achieved a 70% reduction in the rate of VAP (RR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.12-0.7; P value, 0.003.). The implementation the INICC multidimensional approach for VAP was associated with a significant reduction in the VAP rate in the participating AICU of Cuba. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) in Danish clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Schrøder; Schumacher, Helga; Hansen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Most Gram-negative community-acquired and nosocomial infections are caused by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, among which increasing resistance due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is a major problem. We present data from the first Danish nationwide prevalence study on ESBL-pro......-producing E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Proteus mirabilis in blood and urine cultures from hospitals and the community....

  10. Prevenindo pneumonia nosocomial: cuidados da equipe de saúde ao paciente em ventilação mecânica invasiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Luzia Silvério Freire

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo exploratório e descritivo de abordagem quantitativa, realizado na Urgência e UTI, com vistas a identificar os cuidados prestados pelos profissionais e a associação entre a VM e o aparecimento de pneumonia. A população foi de 68 profissionais. Dos 38 pacientes intubados, 17 foram a óbito e 4 extubados antes de completarem 48 horas; 13 tiveram diagnóstico de PAVM, 4 com 72 horas e 9 após esse período. Feito cultura de secreção traqueal em 10 pacientes cuja etiologia mais freqüente foi a Pseudomonas aureus. Quanto aos cuidados realizados antes da VM nos ventiladores mecânicos, circuitos respiratórios e umidificadores, em 25 não foram realizadas a limpeza e desinfecção; 21 foram montados sem técnica asséptica; no momento da instalação o ventilador foi testado 26 vezes com pulmão não estéril; o condensado, presente em 87 vezes foi descartado em 70; 52 vezes os profissionais não lavaram as mãos após esse procedimento; em 11 das 17 intubações, o médico não lavou as mãos antes; nenhum utilizou EPI; das 313 aspirações, em 249 as mãos não foram lavadas antes; das 176 dietas introduzidas, em 141 vezes não houve interrupção durante a aspiração; 232 vezes o soro fisiológico estava estéril; em menos da metade, as mãos foram lavadas após; a fisioterapia respiratória foi realizada 70 vezes e desses, em 45, os profissionais não realizaram lavagem prévia das mãos; 33 não interromperam a dieta. Predominou a mudança de decúbito no horário da manhã. Concluímos que dos 17 pacientes que permaneceram no estudo, 13 tiveram diagnóstico de PAVM entre 48 e após 72 horas de uso da VM e os dados obtidos nas observações estruturadas sinalizam para o risco desses pacientes terem PAVM.

  11. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  12. Hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infections in a paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is an important preventable cause of increased ... between July 2003 and December 2010, who developed a hospital-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, was undertaken to describe the trend in ..... Bacterial nosocomial pneumonia in.

  13. Resistance to K. pneumoniae in young children with congenital heart defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Ilina

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the leading agents of nosocomial infections (NI. In Russia, Klebsiella pneumoniae is the third in frequency of gram-negative pathogen NI. For a long time one of the major clinically relevant mechanisms of acquired resistance to K. pneumoniae is multidrug resistance caused by extended spectrum -lactamase production (ESBL. Carbapenems show the greatest resistance to the action of ESB. However, now there exist registered strains of K.pneumoniae resistant to carbapenems. In connection with this in 2008 we conducted a prospective study on resistance to K. pneumoniae in young children being treated at ICU. It was found out that resistance to III-IV-generation cephalosporines, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides is determined by production of ESBL, while resistance to carbapenems occurs due to reduction of permeability of cell membranes, in combination with production of ESBL. Some features of patients colonized with multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae are described.

  14. [Community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, E; Wüst, J; Speich, R; Flury, G; Krause, M

    1993-08-21

    We report the history of a 38-year-old male native of Sri Lanka admitted to the emergency ward because of chest pain and shortness of breath. On physical and radiographic examination a bilateral predominantly right-sided pneumonia was found. The patient was admitted to the medical ICU and an antibiotic regimen with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and erythromycin was initiated. Shortly afterwards septic shock developed. The patient was intubated and received high doses of catecholamines. He died 30 hours after admission to the hospital. Cultures from sputum, tracheal aspirate and blood grew Acinetobacter baumanni. Acinetobacter is an ubiquitous gram-negative rod with coccobacillary appearance in clinical specimens, that may appear gram-positive due to poor discoloration on Gram-stain. It is a well known causative agent of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units. Community-acquired pneumonias, however, are quite rare. Sporadic cases have been reported from the US, Papua-New Guinea and Australia. Interestingly, these pneumonias are fulminant and have a high mortality. Chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol consumption appear to be predisposing factors. Due to the rapid course and poor prognosis, prompt diagnosis and adequate antibiotic treatment are indicated. Antibiotics use for community-acquired pneumonias, such as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or macrolides, are not sufficient. Appropriate antibiotics for the initial treatment of suspected Acinetobacter infections include imipenem and carboxy- and ureidopenicillins combined with an aminoglycoside.

  15. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 1

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    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature review presents modern data on the pathogen-associated molecular structures of Staphylococcus aureus and its role in the occurrence of pneumonia: activation and modulation of the immune response, oxidative and metabolic stress, apoptosis. Particular attention is paid to the factors of virulence of the pathogen, which can induce an inflammatory process without activating the image-recognition receptors.

  16. ADULT RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS SYNDROME (ARDS) DUE TO BACTEREMIC PNEUMOCOCCAL PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; BOERSMA, WG; BAUR, CHJM; POSTMUS, PE

    We describe a patient, who had no pre-existing disease, with bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a rare complication. In spite of the use of antibiotics and intensive treatment the mortality rate of this kind of infection remains high. Streptococcus

  17. Effect of case management on neonatal mortality due to sepsis and pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Robert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each year almost one million newborns die from infections, mostly in low-income countries. Timely case management would save many lives but the relative mortality effect of varying strategies is unknown. We have estimated the effect of providing oral, or injectable antibiotics at home or in first-level facilities, and of in-patient hospital care on neonatal mortality from pneumonia and sepsis for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST. Methods We conducted systematic searches of multiple databases to identify relevant studies with mortality data. Standardized abstraction tables were used and study quality assessed by adapted GRADE criteria. Meta-analyses were undertaken where appropriate. For interventions with biological plausibility but low quality evidence, a Delphi process was undertaken to estimate effectiveness. Results Searches of 2876 titles identified 7 studies. Among these, 4 evaluated oral antibiotics for neonatal pneumonia in non-randomised, concurrently controlled designs. Meta-analysis suggested reductions in all-cause neonatal mortality (RR 0.75 95% CI 0.64- 0.89; 4 studies and neonatal pneumonia-specific mortality (RR 0.58 95% CI 0.41- 0.82; 3 studies. Two studies (1 RCT, 1 observational study, evaluated community-based neonatal care packages including injectable antibiotics and reported mortality reductions of 44% (RR= 0.56, 95% CI 0.41-0.77 and 34% (RR =0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.93, but the interpretation of these results is complicated by co-interventions. A third, clinic-based, study reported a case-fatality ratio of 3.3% among neonates treated with injectable antibiotics as outpatients. No studies were identified evaluating injectable antibiotics alone for neonatal pneumonia. Delphi consensus (median from 20 respondents effects on sepsis-specific mortality were 30% reduction for oral antibiotics, 65% for injectable antibiotics and 75% for injectable antibiotics on pneumonia-specific mortality. No trials were

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteraemia due to parotitis in a patient with systemic sclerosis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yii, Irene Yuen Lin; Tan, Jamie Bee Xian; Fong, Warren Weng Seng

    2016-10-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is an uncommon and notifiable disease in Singapore. It is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We report a rare case of invasive pneumococcal bacteraemia due to parotitis in a patient with systemic sclerosis and secondary Sjögren's syndrome. We also present a retrospective review of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteraemia cases in Singapore General Hospital from January 2011 to April 2016. A 59-year-old Malay lady with a history of systemic sclerosis with secondary Sjögren's syndrome presented with fever and left parotid gland swelling. Clinical examination revealed poor salivary pooling and left parotid swelling without fluctuance. Ultrasound of the left parotid gland confirmed acute parotitis without evidence of abscess or sialolithiasis. Blood cultures were positive for S. pneumoniae . She was diagnosed to have invasive pneumococcal bacteraemia secondary to acute parotitis, and treated with intravenous benzylpenicillin with clearance of bacteraemia after 3 days. Upon discharge, her antibiotics were changed to intravenous ceftriaxone to facilitate outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy for another 2 weeks. She responded favourably to antibiotics at follow-up, with no complications from the bacteraemia. A review of the microbiological records of the Singapore General Hospital revealed 116 cases of pneumococcal bacteraemia, most (80.3 %) of which were due to pneumonia. None were due to parotitis. S. pneumoniae parotitis and subsequent bacteraemia is rare. Prompt recognition of the disease and appropriate use of antibiotics are important. This case highlights that close communication between healthcare workers (microbiologist, rheumatologist and infectious disease specialist) is essential in ensuring good clinical outcomes in patients with a potentially fatal disease.

  19. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 2

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    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the role of pattern-recognition receptors involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of Staphylococcus aureus. There are shown the basic operation of macrophage and monocyte NLRP3, NLRC5, NLRP7, AIM2 inflammasomes that form the active forms of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1-beta and IL-18 du-ring the development of pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. Lipid aspiration pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux. An unusual radiographic appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfson, B.J.; Allen, J.L.; Panitch, H.B.; Karmazin, N.

    1989-08-01

    The development of lipid aspiration pneumonia after chronic nasopharyngeal installation of mineral oil was first described in 1925 by Laughlin. Since that time this entity has been well recognized and numerous substances have been identified or implicated as the aspirated material. The classic radiographic appearance of severe chronic lipid aspiration pneumonia has been described as consisting of intense perihilar infiltrates. However, the radiographic findings are more often non-specific and usually consist of varying degrees of diffuse interstitial infiltrates that tend to be more prominent in the perihilar regions and the right lung. We are reporting a case of biopsy-proven lipid aspiration pneumonia in an infant with known gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) who had medium-chain triglyceride oil administered via nasogastric tube. Serial roentgenograms demonstrated a changing pulmonary pattern from diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates initially to a diffuse alveolar pattern at the time of the lung biopsy. Modern medicine has developed new methods for providing nourishment to sick newborns and infants to improve their nutritional status and help them to grow. One such method involves the administration of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT oil) into the GI tract via a nasogastric or nasoenteral tube. The purpose of this report is to describe a significant complication of this method of providing nutrition to an infant with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the diagnostic dilemma it presented. (orig.).

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia due to Staphylococcus cohnii in an HIV-infected patient: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, A; Coronado, O; Nanetti, A; Manfredi, R; Chiodo, F

    1995-10-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci recently have been implicated as a cause of serious infections in immunocompromised individuals. An unusual case of community-acquired pneumonia due to Staphylococcus cohnii in an HIV-infected drug user is described. Results of a study conducted to examine the prevalence of infection due to Staphylococcus cohnii strains and their antibiotic-sensitivity patterns show a low frequency but a high morbidity. These results and a brief review of the literature emphasize the importance of these organisms and other staphylococcal species as emerging opportunistic pathogens in patients with AIDS.

  2. Nosocomial infections and related factors in southern khorasan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Bijari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nosocomial infections are defined as infections occurring during a patient's stay at hospital (48-72h after admission.Nosocomial infections are one of the important problems of health. This study aimed was determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections, and related factors in hospitals with more than 100 beds in south Khorasan Province. Materials and Methods: In this crass-sectional study, an investigator-administered questionnaire was completed for each patient with nosocomial infections diagnosis in hospitals with more than 100 beds in South Khorasan. This questionnaire conation demographic characteristic of patients, department, duration of admission, kind of pathogen and risk factors that was designed according to standard questionnaire of Iranian Nasocomial infections surveillance system (INIS of Center for communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 software. Results and discussion: Number of patients with nosocomial infection was 358. The incidence of nosocomial infection was 0.9%. ICU had the highest incidence rate (17.3%. The most common nosocomial infection was pneumonia (43%, and urinary tract infection (UTI (15.1%. In 33.5% culture result were negative. In other cases, culture results showed klebsiella spp. (12.8% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.8% were the most prevalent bacteria. Most factors associated with nosocomial infection in patients were urinary catheters (70.4%, suction (66.8% and tracheal tube (54.2%. 24% of patients expired. The results showed lower ratio of nosocomial infection, that the main reason is failure to detection and reporting of actual cases of nosocomial infection. Promoting detection and reporting system for Prevention and control of nosocomial infection was recommended

  3. due to Klebsiella spp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Primary acute conununity-acquired pneumonia was unconunon. ... organisms such as Klebsiella spp. are frequent causes of nosocomial infections."o The larrer ... Accepted 11 Sep 1992. recognised cause of community-acquired Gram-nega-.

  4. Costos secundarios por infecciones nosocomiales en dos unidades pediátricas de cuidados intensivos Secondary costs due to nosocomial infections in two pediatric intensive care units

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    Susana Navarrete-Navarro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Estimar los costos asociados a infecciones nosocomiales en niños tratados en dos unidades de terapia intensiva. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio parcial de costos en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales (UCIN y en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Pediátricos (UTIP de un hospital infantil de tercer nivel de atención médica. Se investigaron los costos de las pruebas diagnósticas y de los recursos terapéuticos empleados, así como el exceso de estancia hospitalaria debida a la presencia de una infección nosocomial. RESULTADOS. Se detectaron 102 infecciones, 46 en UCIN y 56 en UTIP, en el lapso de un año, tiempo que duró el estudio. El costo promedio por infección fue de 91 698 pesos y el gasto global fue de 9.3 millones de pesos. Neumonía, flebitis y septicemia abarcaron 65% de los costos. En los niños infectados se registró una estancia hospitalaria extra de 9.6 días, 13.7 exámenes de laboratorio y 3.3 cultivos en promedio, debido a la presencia de una infección intrahospitalaria. La estancia hospitalaria representó 97% del gasto total. CONCLUSIONES. Esta evaluación representa una estimación de costos directos de infección. Los resultados justifican el establecimiento de programas preventivos agresivos para reducir las complicaciones dentro de los hospitales.OBJECTIVES. We estimated associated costs to nosocomial infections in two pediatric intensive care units in Mexico City. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A transversal study in the neonatal (NICU and pediatric (PICU intensive care units, was done. We reviewed use and cost of diagnostic procedures, medications, and excess of hospital stay. RESULTS. There were 102 infections, 46 in the NICU and 56 in the PICU. The average cost per infection was $11,682 USD and the overall expense was 1,184.71 USD. Infected children had an excess of hospital stay of 9.6 days, 13.7 more laboratory tests and 3.3 more cultures. Hospital stay represented 97% of the overall cost

  5. Zoonotic atypical pneumonia due to Chlamydophila psittaci: First reported psittacosis case in Taiwan

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    Yu-Jen Cheng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human psittacosis caused by Chlamydophila psittaci is one of the most common zoonotic atypical pneumonias featuring pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary infections. Most of the cases involve avian contact history especially with psittacine birds. Herein we report a 44-year-old male patient displaying atypical pneumonia symptoms of intermittent fever, dry cough, chest pain, dyspnea, headache, hepatitis, and hyponatremia. He had two sick cockatiels, one of which had died a month previously. A microimmunofluorescence test was performed to check the serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila psittaci. The serum IgM titer showed positive titer of 1:256, 1:256, and 1:128 on Days 11, 23, and 43 after disease onset, respectively. His fever subsided soon and clinical symptoms improved after minocycline was administrated on Day 12. The psittacosis case was confirmed by history of psittacine bird contact, clinical symptoms, treatment response, and positive IgM titer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a psittacosis case in Taiwan.

  6. Severe Hyponatremia due to Levofloxacin Treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia in a Patient with Oropharyngeal Cancer

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    Mihaela Mocan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia (serum Na levels of <135 mEq/L is the most common electrolyte imbalance encountered in clinical practice, affecting up to 15–28% of hospitalized patients. This case report refers to a middle-aged man with severe hyponatremia due to Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion related to four possible etiological factors: glossopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, cisplatin treatment, right basal pneumonia with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the treatment with Levofloxacin. This case report discusses a rare complication of common conditions and of a common treatment. To our knowledge this is the first case of hyponatremia related to Levofloxacin and the second related to fluoroquinolones.

  7. [Antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections' causal agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Holguín, Héctor Daniel; Cisneros-Robledo, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    The antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections (NI) causal agents constitutes a seriously global problematic that involves the Mexican Institute of Social Security's Regional General Hospital 1 in Chihuahua, Mexico; although with special features that required to be specified and evaluated, in order to concrete an effective therapy. Observational, descriptive and prospective study; by means of active vigilance all along 2014 in order to detect the nosocomial infections, for epidemiologic study, culture and antibiogram to identify its causal agents and antibiotics resistance and sensitivity. Among 13527 hospital discharges, 1079 displayed NI (8 %), standed out: the related on vascular lines, of surgical site, pneumonia and urinal track; they added up two thirds of the total. We carried out culture and antibiogram about 300 of them (27.8 %); identifying 31 bacterian species, mainly seven of those (77.9 %): Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae; showing multiresistance to 34 tested antibiotics, except in seven with low or without resistance at all: vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, piperacilin-tazobactam, amikacin and carbapenems. When we contrasted those results with the recommendations in the clinical practice guides, it aroused several contradictions; so they must be taken with reserves and has to be tested in each hospital, by means of cultures and antibiograms in practically every case of nosocomial infection.

  8. An outbreak of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in an Iranian referral hospital: epidemiology and molecular typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Shima; Pourakbari, Babak; Rahbarimanesh, Aliakbar; Abdolsalehi, Mohammad Reza; Ghadiri, Keyghobad; Mamishi, Setareh

    2018-05-07

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial infections; however, there is limited information in Iran regarding nosocomial outbreaks due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing K pneumoniae strains, particularly using molecular methods. The present study focused on the molecular mechanism of ESBL resistance and genetic relatedness in K. pneumoniae isolates causing nosocomial infections in an Iranian referral hospital. This study was evaluated the antimicrobial resistance and molecular epidemiology of K. pneumoniae causing nosocomial infections between October 2013 and March 2014. The ESBL detection was carried out for all the isolates by the CLSI method and PCR was carried out for the detection of the blaSHV, blaTEM, and blaCTX-M genes among ESBL-producing K. pneumonia. Molecular typing of the K. pneumoniae was performed using random amplification of polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). A total of 30 isolates of K. pneumoniae were used for epidemiological analysis. High rates of resistance to cefotaxime (n=29, 97%), cefazolin (n=29, 97%), cefepime (n=25, 83%) and gentamicin (n=23, 77%) were observed. A total of 29 strains (97%) produced ESBLs. The frequency of blaSHV, blaCTX-M and blaTEM genes among these isolates were 83% (n=25), 70% (n=21) and 57% (n=17), respectively. Surprisingly 11 isolated (37%) carried blaSHV, blaCTX-M and blaTEM genes simultaneously. Moreover, the concurrent presence of "blaSHV and blaCTX-M" and "blaSHV and blaTEM" was seen in 8 (27%) and 4 (13%) isolates, respectively. RAPD-PCR analyses revealed that K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to 2 RAPD-PCR types among which one cluster counted for 28 isolates. To our knowledge this is the first published report of nosocomial outbreak of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae in children in Iran. Although the epidemiology of nosocomial infections with ESBL-producing organisms has not yet been explored in depth in Iran, our findings suggest that ESBL-producing organisms are

  9. Reducing nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Eileen; Alderdice, Fiona; McCall, Emma; Jenkins, John; Craig, Stanley

    2010-09-01

    Nosocomial infection is a common problem in neonatal intensive care. A pilot quality improvement initiative focussing on hand hygiene and aimed at reducing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants was introduced in five Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Line associated laboratory confirmed bloodstream infection (LCBSI) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) were chosen as main outcome measures. In VLBW infants, the rate of line associated LCBSI per 1000 central venous catheter days fell by 24%. The rate of VAP per 1000 ventilator days in VLBW infants fell by 38%. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires showed a statistically significant increase in use of alcohol-based gels and increased knowledge of hand hygiene.

  10. Control of infectious mortality due to carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcina, A; Baldan, R; Marasco, V; Cichero, P; Bondanza, A; Noviello, M; Piemontese, S; Soliman, C; Greco, R; Lorentino, F; Giglio, F; Messina, C; Carrabba, M; Bernardi, M; Peccatori, J; Moro, M; Biancardi, A; Nizzero, P; Scarpellini, P; Cirillo, D M; Mancini, N; Corti, C; Clementi, M; Ciceri, F

    2017-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-Kp) infections are an emerging cause of death after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In allogeneic transplants, mortality rate may rise up to 60%. We retrospectively evaluated 540 patients receiving a transplant from an auto- or an allogeneic source between January 2011 and October 2015. After an Institutional increase in the prevalence of KPC-Kp bloodstream infections (BSI) in June 2012, from July 2012, 366 consecutive patients received the following preventive measures: (i) weekly rectal swabs for surveillance; (ii) contact precautions in carriers (iii) early-targeted therapy in neutropenic febrile carriers. Molecular typing identified KPC-Kp clone ST512 as the main clone responsible for colonization, BSI and outbreaks. After the introduction of these preventive measures, the cumulative incidence of KPC-Kp BSI (P=0.01) and septic shocks (P=0.01) at 1 year after HSCT was significantly reduced. KPC-Kp infection-mortality dropped from 62.5% (pre-intervention) to 16.6% (post-intervention). Day 100 transplant-related mortality and KPC-Kp infection-related mortality after allogeneic HSCT were reduced from 22% to 10% (P=0.001) and from 4% to 1% (P=0.04), respectively. None of the pre-HSCT carriers was excluded from transplant. These results suggest that active surveillance, contact precautions and early-targeted therapies, may efficiently control KPC-Kp spread and related mortality even after allogeneic HSCT.

  11. Aspiration pneumonia. Pathophysiological aspects, prevention and management. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroianni, A; Ceccarelli, D; Conti, V; Terzano, C

    2006-12-01

    Aspiration pneumonias occur more frequently than reported and, in many cases, the disease is not recognised. In hospitalised and institutionalised patients with predisposing diseases prompt diagnosis of this complication and correct preventive measures can drastically reduce the worsening of clinical conditions and the deaths due to aspiration pneumonia. Normal airway structure, effective defence mechanisms, and preventive measures are decisive in reducing aspiration episodes. An increased aspiration risk for food, fluids, medications, or secretions may lead to the development of pneumonia. Pneumonia is the most common respiratory complication in all stroke deaths and in mechanical ventilation patients. In addition, the increased incidence of aspiration pneumonia with aging may be a consequence of impairment of swallowing and the cough reflex. Dysphagia, compromised consciousness, invasive procedures, anaesthesia, insufficient oral care, sleep disorders, and vomiting are all risk factors. Aspiration pneumonia includes different characteristic syndromes based on the amount (massive, acute, chronic) and physical character of the aspirated material (acid, infected, lipoid), needing a different therapeutic approach. Chronic patients education and correct health care practices are the keys for preventing the events of aspiration. In patients at risk a clinical and instrumental assessment of dysphagia should be evaluated. Management includes the removal of etiologic factors (drugs, tubes, mobilisation, oral hygiene), supportive care, and in bacterial pneumonias a specific antibiotic therapy for community-acquired or nosocomial events.

  12. Recurrent Pneumonia due to Fibrosing Mediastinitis in a Teenage Girl: A Case Report with Long-Term Follow-Up

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    Avigdor Hevroni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A teenage girl was evaluated for recurrent right pneumonia. The evaluation revealed a calcified mediastinal mass that compressed the right intermediate and middle lobar bronchi, as well as the right pulmonary artery and veins. The clinical picture together with imaging studies and borderline positive serology testing suggested a diagnosis of fibrosing mediastinitis associated with histoplasmosis. This rare condition is characterized by the local proliferation of invasive fibrous tissue within the mediastinum due to a hyperimmune reaction to Histoplasma capsulatum. Antifungal and anti-inflammatory therapies are usually ineffective, and surgical intervention contains a high morbidity risk. Palliative surgery and stenting of the compressed airway have been suggested. In the past, the prognosis was thought to be poor, but recent studies demonstrate a more positive outcome. Our patient had been radiologically and functionally stable under follow-up for over thirteen years and has married and delivered two healthy children, both following an uneventful pregnancy.

  13. Iliopsoas Abscess Possibly due to Klebsiella pneumoniae Infection after Chemoradiotherapy for Hypopharyngeal Cancer

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    Yukiyoshi Hyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iliopsoas abscess was once an uncommon condition but now occurs somewhat more frequently due to the increasing number of immunocompromised patients, such as those with diabetes. We encountered a case of iliopsoas abscess following chemoradiotherapy for hypopharyngeal cancer. A 60-year-old man was admitted for a sore throat and left neck swelling. Hypopharyngeal cancer was diagnosed, but the patient refused surgery. After two rounds of chemotherapy, febrile neutropenia developed and chest computed tomography (CT revealed an iliopsoas abscess. The platelet count was low but recovered after administration of antibiotics and could not be explained by puncture of the abscess. CT-guided drainage eventually improved his symptoms. Even for disorders of the head and neck region, iliopsoas abscess should be suspected in immunocompromised patients who develop a fever. CT and magnetic resonance imaging should be performed at an early stage as it is important to determine whether surgical drainage is indicated.

  14. Socioeconomic Factors Influencing Hospitalized Patients with Pneumonia Due to Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Toshie; Higuera Iglesias, Anjarath Lorena; Vazquez Manriquez, Maria Eugenia; Martinez Valadez, Eduarda Leticia; Ramos, Leticia Alfaro; Izumi, Shinyu; Takasaki, Jin; Kudo, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background In addition to clinical aspects and pathogen characteristics, people's health-related behavior and socioeconomic conditions can affect the occurrence and severity of diseases including influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. Methodology and Principal Findings A face-to-face interview survey was conducted in a hospital in Mexico City at the time of follow-up consultation for hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza virus infection. In all, 302 subjects were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the period of hospitalization. Among them, 211 tested positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction during the pandemic period (Group-pdm) and 91 tested positive for influenza A virus in the post-pandemic period (Group-post). All subjects were treated with oseltamivir. Data on the demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living environment, and information relating to A(H1N1)pdm09, and related clinical data were compared between subjects in Group-pdm and those in Group-post. The ability of household income to pay for utilities, food, and health care services as well as housing quality in terms of construction materials and number of rooms revealed a significant difference: Group-post had lower socioeconomic status than Group-pdm. Group-post had lower availability of information regarding H1N1 influenza than Group-pdm. These results indicate that subjects in Group-post had difficulty receiving necessary information relating to influenza and were more likely to be impoverished than those in Group-pdm. Possible factors influencing time to seeking health care were number of household rooms, having received information on the necessity of quick access to health care, and house construction materials. Conclusions Health-care-seeking behavior, poverty level, and the distribution of information affect the occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to H1N1 virus from a socioeconomic point of view. These

  15. Socioeconomic factors influencing hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshie Manabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In addition to clinical aspects and pathogen characteristics, people's health-related behavior and socioeconomic conditions can affect the occurrence and severity of diseases including influenza A(H1N1pdm09. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A face-to-face interview survey was conducted in a hospital in Mexico City at the time of follow-up consultation for hospitalized patients with pneumonia due to influenza virus infection. In all, 302 subjects were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the period of hospitalization. Among them, 211 tested positive for influenza A(H1N1pdm09 virus by real-time reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction during the pandemic period (Group-pdm and 91 tested positive for influenza A virus in the post-pandemic period (Group-post. All subjects were treated with oseltamivir. Data on the demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, living environment, and information relating to A(H1N1pdm09, and related clinical data were compared between subjects in Group-pdm and those in Group-post. The ability of household income to pay for utilities, food, and health care services as well as housing quality in terms of construction materials and number of rooms revealed a significant difference: Group-post had lower socioeconomic status than Group-pdm. Group-post had lower availability of information regarding H1N1 influenza than Group-pdm. These results indicate that subjects in Group-post had difficulty receiving necessary information relating to influenza and were more likely to be impoverished than those in Group-pdm. Possible factors influencing time to seeking health care were number of household rooms, having received information on the necessity of quick access to health care, and house construction materials. CONCLUSIONS: Health-care-seeking behavior, poverty level, and the distribution of information affect the occurrence and severity of pneumonia due to H1N1 virus from a socioeconomic

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae preceding Lemierre's syndrome due to Fusobacterium nucleatum complicated by acute Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infectious mononucleosis in an immunocompetent host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Natalie C; Petelin, Andrew; Cunha, Burke A

    2013-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Lemierre's syndrome due to a rare species of Fusobacterium, that is, Fusobacterium nucleatum preceded by Mycoplasma pneumoniae pharyngitis and followed later by Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Systemic corticosteroids and early administration of antiviral agents for pneumonia with acute wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Kudo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia patients with wheezing due to influenza A(H1N1pdm09 were frequently treated with systemic corticosteroids in Japan although systemic corticosteroid for critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza A(H1N1pdm09 has been controversial. Applicability of systemic corticosteroid treatment needs to be evaluated. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We retrospectively reviewed 89 subjects who were diagnosed with influenza A(H1N1pdm09 and admitted to a national hospital, Tokyo during the pandemic period. The median age of subjects (45 males was 8 years (range, 0-71. All subjects were treated with antiviral agents and the median time from symptom onset to initiation of antiviral agents was 2 days (range, 0-7. Subjects were classified into four groups: upper respiratory tract infection, wheezing illness, pneumonia with wheezing, and pneumonia without wheezing. The characteristics of each group was evaluated. A history of asthma was found more frequently in the wheezing illness (55.6% and pneumonia with wheezing (43.3% groups than in the other two groups (p = 0.017. Corticosteroid treatment was assessed among subjects with pneumonia. Oxygen saturation was lower in subjects receiving corticosteroids (steroid group than in subjects not receiving corticosteroids (no-steroid group (p<0.001. The steroid group required greater oxygen supply than the no-steroid group (p<0.001. No significant difference was found by the Kaplan-Meier method between the steroid and the no-steroid groups in hours to fever alleviation from the initiation of antiviral agents and hospitalization days. In logistic regression analysis, wheezing, pneumonia and oxygen saturation were independent factors associated with using systemic corticosteroids. CONCLUSION: Patients with wheezing and a history of asthma were frequently found in the study subjects. Systemic corticosteroids together with early administration of antiviral agents to pneumonia with wheezing and

  18. Understanding Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Learn About Pneumonia Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by ... vaccinated and practicing good health habits What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection in one or both ...

  19. [Invasive nosocomial pulmonary aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaud, P; Haloun, A

    2001-04-01

    Immunodepressed patients, particularly those with neutropenia or bone marrow or organ grafts, are at risk of developing nosocomial invasive pulmonary aspergilosis. The favoring factors, early diagnostic criteria and curative treatment protocols are well known. Prognosis remains however quite severe with a death rate above 50%. Preventive measures are required for the treatment of these high-risk patients and epidemiology surveillance is needed in case of aspergillosis acquired in the hospital.

  20. Pneumonia Atipikal

    OpenAIRE

    Budastra I Nyoman; Siadi Purniti Putu; Subanada Ida Bagus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia atipikal adalah pneumonia yang disebabkan oleh mikroorganisme yang tidak dapat diidentifikasi dengan teknik diagnostik standar pneumonia pada umumnya dan tidak menunjukkan respon terhadap antibiotik b-laktam. Mikroorganisme patogen penyebab pneumonia atipikal pada umumnya adalah Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, dan Legionella pneumophila. Manifestasi klinik, pemeriksaan laboratorium dan radiologis pneumonia atipikal menunjukkan gambaran tidak spesifik. Man...

  1. [Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinosci, A; Doit, C; Koehl, B; Belhacel, K; Mariani Kurkdjian, P; Melki, I; Renaud, A; Lemaitre, C; Ammar Khodja, N; Blachier, A; Bonacorsi, S; Faye, A; Lorrot, M

    2016-11-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children requiring hospitalization. It is a very resistant and contagious virus causing nosocomial gastroenteritis. In France, the vaccine against rotavirus has been available since 2006, but the vaccine is not recommended for infant vaccination. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (NRGE) and to assess its impact on children hospitalized in the General Pediatrics Department of Robert-Debré Hospital (Paris) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of children (age, term birth, underlying diseases) and the severity of the NRGE (oral or intravenous hydration), and assessed whether these children could benefit from vaccination against rotavirus. One hundred thirty-six children presented nosocomial rotavirus infection, with an incidence of 2.5 NRGE per 1000 days of hospitalization. The incidence of NRGE was stable between 2009 and 2013 despite the introduction of specific hygiene measures. The average age of the children was 7 months (range: 0.5-111 months). Most often NRGE occurred in children hospitalized for respiratory diseases (65% of cases) and requiring prolonged hospitalization (median: 18 days). One-third of children were born premature (25%). Hydration was oral in 80 patients (59%), by intravenous infusion in 18 patients (13%), and intraosseous in one patient. Half of the patients were aged less than 5 months and could benefit from the protection afforded by vaccination. NRGE are common. Rotavirus mass vaccination should have a positive impact on the incidence of NRGE by reducing the number of children hospitalized for gastroenteritis, therefore indirectly reducing the number of hospital cross-infections of hospitalized children who are too young to be vaccinated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major source of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings. The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies. The issue is no longer whether hand hygiene is effective, but how to produce a sustained improvement in health workers' compliance.

  3. Granulomatous pneumonia due to Spirocerca lupi in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This case report describes the anatomic pathology findings in two free-ranging maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus) from central-western region of Brazil presenting granulomatous pneumonia associated with intralesional infection by Spirocerca lupi. Both wolves had multiple, white, 1-1.5 cm in diamet...

  4. The enhanced pneumococcal LAMP assay: a clinical tool for the diagnosis of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

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    Dong Wook Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease in developed and developing countries. We studied the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP technique to assess its suitability for detecting S. pneumoniae nucleic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We established an improved LAMP assay targeting the lytA gene (Streptococcus pneumoniae [Sp] LAMP. The analytical specificity of the primers was validated by using 32 reference strains (10 Streptococcus and seven non-Streptococcus species plus 25 clinical alpha-hemolytic streptococcal strains, including four S. pneumoniae strains and 21 other strains (3 S. oralis, 17 S. mitis, and one Streptococcus species harboring virulence factor-encoding genes (lytA or ply. Within 30 minutes, the assay could detect as few as 10 copies of both purified DNA and spiked CSF specimens with greater sensitivity than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The linear determination range for this assay is 10 to 1,000,000 microorganisms per reaction mixture using real-time turbidimetry. We evaluated the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the Sp LAMP assay using 106 randomly selected CSF specimens from children with suspected meningitis in Korea, China and Vietnam. For comparison, CSF specimens were also tested against conventional PCR and culture tests. The detection rate of the LAMP method was substantially higher than the rates of PCR and culture tests. In this small sample, relative to the LAMP assay, the clinical sensitivity of PCR and culture tests was 54.5% and 33.3%, respectively, while clinical specificity of the two tests was 100%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Compared to PCR, Sp LAMP detected S. pneumoniae with higher analytical and clinical sensitivity. This specific and sensitive LAMP method offers significant advantages for screening patients on a population basis and for diagnosis in clinical settings.

  5. Modelling the contact propagation of nosocomial infection in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaramillo, Cecilia; Taboada, Manel; Epelde, Francisco; Rexachs, Dolores; Luque Amat, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The nosocomial infection is a special kind of infection that is caused by microorganisms acquired inside a hospital. In the daily care process of an emergency department, the interactions between patients and sanitary staff create the environment for the transmission of such microorganisms. Rates of morbility and mortality due to nosocomial infections areimportant indicators of the quality of hospital work. In this research, we use Agent Based Modeling and Simulation tech...

  6. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Valencia, R; Torres, M J; Cantos, A; Conde, M; Aznar, J

    2006-11-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial endophthalmitis due to a common source, which was determined to be trypan blue solution prepared in the hospital's pharmacy service. We assume that viable bacteria probably gained access to the trypan blue stock solution during cooling after autoclaving. The temporal cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis was readily perceived on the basis of clinical and microbiological findings, and an exogenous source of contamination was unequivocally identified by means of DNA fingerprinting.

  7. Pneumonia due to Talaromyces marneffei in a Dog from Southern Brazil with Concomitant Canine Distemper Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, S A; Pretto-Giordano, L G; Lima, S C; Suhett, W G; Pereira, A H T; Freitas, L A; Suphoronski, S A; Oliveira, T E S; Alfieri, A F; Pereira, E C; Vilas-Boas, L A; Alfieri, A A

    2017-07-01

    The pathological and molecular findings associated with Talaromyces marneffei-induced pneumonia with concomitant infection by canine distemper virus (CDV) are described in a dog. The principal pathological alteration occurred in the lungs. Histopathology confirmed multifocal granulomatous pneumonia associated with numerous intralesional and intracellular septate fission cells consistent with T. marneffei. A molecular assay designed to amplify a partial fragment of the 18S rRNA gene of T. marneffei provided positive results from two fungal cultures derived from the lung. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses confirmed the results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Furthermore, antigens of the CDV N protein were identified within the bronchial epithelium by immunohistochemistry and a PCR assay amplified the CDV N gene from hepatic and pulmonary fragments. Collectively, the pathological and molecular techniques confirmed a diagnosis of T. marneffei-induced pneumonia with concomitant infection by CDV. These findings represent the first description of pulmonary penicilliosis in the dog and extend the geographical niche of this emerging infectious pathogen. In this case, infection by CDV may have induced immunosuppression, which facilitated the development of pulmonary penicilliosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and Antibiogram of Microbial Agents Causing Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection in Surgical Ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital

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    Tashmin Afroz Binte Islam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Bangladesh, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. Objective: We carried out this study to determine the prevalence of different microorganisms from urine in surgery ward and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern against various antibiotics. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Department of Microbiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka over a period of 12 months from July 2011 to June 2012. A total of 52 urine specimens were collected from catheterized patients admitted in general surgery ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH and incubated in blood agar, MacConkey agar media and the isolates were identified by different biochemical tests – oxidase test and reaction in MIU (motility indole urease and Simmon’s citrate and TSI (triple sugar iron media. ESBL producers were detected by double-disk synergy test (DDST. Results: Bacteria were isolated from 35 specimens and Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (23, 65.71% followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6 (17.14%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 3 (8.57%, Acinetobacter baumannii 2 (5.72% and Proteus vulgaris 1 (2.86% respectively. Among the isolates, 10 (28.57% ESBL producers were detected and the highest ESBL production was observed in Escherichia coli (8, 22.85% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 (2.86% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1 (2.86%. The isolates were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial agents. Conclusion: The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR bacteria poses a difficult task for physicians who have limited therapeutic options. However, the high rate of nosocomial infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control.

  9. Translation quality control is maintained by the penicillin resistance factor MurM in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a causative agent of nosocomial infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia. Penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae depends in part upon MurM, an aminoacyl-tRNA-ligase that attaches L-serine or L-alanine to the stem peptide lysine of Lipid II in cell wall...

  10. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One HIV-infected child died of varicella pneumonia. Other common nosocomial infections encountered in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children respectively were upper respiratory tract infections (pharyngitis, tonsillitis or rhinitis) affecting 21 and four, otitis media in five and one, oral candidiasis in seven and zero, urinary ...

  11. Pneumonia Nosokomial

    OpenAIRE

    Keliat, E.N; Abidin, Alwinsyah; Lubis, Nursyamsiah

    2017-01-01

    Pada masa yang lalu pneumonia diklasifikasikan sebagai pneumonia tipikal yang disebabkan oleh Str. Pneumonia daan atipikal yang disebabkan kuman atipik seperti halnya M. pneumonia. Kemudian ternyata manifestasi dari patogen lain seperti H. influenza, S. aureus dan bakteri Gram negatif memberikan sindrom klinik yang identik dengan pneumonia oleh Str E.N Keliat

  12. [Nosocomial virus infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, H J

    1986-12-01

    Enveloped viruses, e.g. influenza- or varicella viruses may cause highly contagious airborne infections. Their spread is difficult to control, also in hospitals. In the case of influenza and varicella immune prophylaxis and chemotherapy/chemoprophylaxis are possible. This is of particular significance, since varicella and zoster are of increasing importance for immunocompromized patients. Diarrhea is caused to a large extent by viruses. Rotavirus infections play an important role in infancy, and are frequently acquired in the hospital. In a study on infectious gastroenteritis of infants in a hospital we were able to show that 30 percent of all rotavirus infections were of nosocomial origin. Admission of a rotavirus-excreting patient (or personnel) may start a long chain of rotavirus infections on pediatric wards. Even careful hygienic measures in the hospital can hardly prevent the spread of enterovirus infections. Such infections may be severe and lethal for newborns, as shown by us in a study on an outbreak of echovirus 11 disease on a maternity ward. We have recently obtained data on the "stickiness" of enteroviruses on human skin. This could explain essential features of the spread of enteroviruses in the population.

  13. Secular trends in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated in a tertiary-care hospital: increasing prevalence and accelerated decline in antimicrobial susceptibility

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    Rodrigo de Carvalho Santana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION Klebsiella pneumoniae has become an increasingly important etiologic agent of nosocomial infections in recent years. This is mainly due to the expression of virulence factors and development of resistance to several antimicrobial drugs. METHODS This retrospective study examines data obtained from the microbiology laboratory of a Brazilian tertiary-care hospital. To assess temporal trends in prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility, K. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed from 2000 to 2013. The relative frequencies of K. pneumoniae isolation were calculated among all Gram-negative bacilli isolated in each period analyzed. Susceptibility tests were performed using automated systems. RESULTS: From 2000-2006, K. pneumonia isolates comprised 10.7% of isolated Gram-negative bacilli (455/4260. From 2007-2013, this percentage was 18.1% (965/5331. Strictly considering isolates from bloodstream infections, the relative annual prevalence of K. pneumoniae increased from 14-17% to 27-32% during the same periods. A progressive decrease in K. pneumoniae susceptibility to all antimicrobial agents assessed was detected. Partial resistance was also observed to antimicrobial drugs that have been used more recently, such as colistin and tigecycline. CONCLUSIONS Our study indicates that K. pneumoniae has become a major pathogen among hospitalized patients and confirms its recent trend of increasing antimicrobial resistance.

  14. Nosocomial infections at Clinical Centre in Kragujevac: Prevalence study

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    Ilić Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Nosocomial infections (NIs are a serious health problem in hospitals worldwide and are followed by a series of consequences, medical, judicial, ethical and economic. Objective The main aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of NIs at the Clinical Centre in Kragujevac. Methods A prevalence study of nosocomial infections was conducted from 16th till 20th May, 2005, within Second National Prevalence Study of Niš in the Republic of Serbia. Results The study included 866 patients. 40 patients had a NI, thus the prevalence of patients with NIs and prevalence of NIs was the same, 4.6%. Among NIs, the most frequent were urinary infections (45.0% followed by surgical-site infections (17.5%, skin and soft tissue infections (15% and pneumonia (12.5%. The rate of NIs was highest at departments of orthopaedics and traumatological surgery (12.0%, followed by intensive care units (8.0%. Overall, 67.5% (27/40 NIs were culture-proved; the leading pathogens were Escherichia coli (40.0%, followed by gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas species, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacteriaceae with equal frequency of 8.0%. Nosocomial infections were significantly more frequent in patients aged ≥65 years (p<0.05, with longer hospitalization ≥8 days (p<0.00, in intensive care patients (p<0.05, patients with an intravenous catheter (p<0.00, urinary catheter (p<0.00, and those under antibiotic therapy (p<0.00. Conclusion This study showed that the prevalence of nosocomial infections in our hospital is similar to the prevalence in the developed countries. The study of prevalence provides a prompt insight into basic epidemiological and ethiological characteristics of nosocomial infections, hence identification of hospital priorities and the need to undertake appropriate prevention measures. .

  15. Discrepancy between effects of carbapenems and flomoxef in treating nosocomial hemodialysis access-related bacteremia secondary to extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Chuang, Feng-Rong; Chen, Chih-Hung; Lee, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Jin-Bor; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te

    2012-09-05

    Hemodialysis (HD) patients are susceptible to extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacterial infections. Because the optimal treatment and clinical significance of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp) HD access-related bacteremia remain unclear, we conducted this retrospective study to determine the clinical outcomes of patients treated with either flomoxef or a carbapenem. The eligibility criterion was fistula or graft- or catheter- related ESBL-Kp bacteremia in patients on maintenance HD. The clinical characteristics and antibiotic management were analyzed. Outcome was determined by mortality resulting from bacteremia during the 14-day period after the first positive blood culture for flomoxef-susceptible ESBL-Kp. The 57 patients studied were predominantly elderly, malnourished, with a history of severe illnesses and broad-spectrum antibiotic use before the onset of bacteremia, and with severe septicemia as determined by the Pitt bacteremia score (PBS). The study population comprised 7 fistula, 8 graft, and 42 HD catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) cases, and the mortality rate was high (36/57, 63.2%) in these 57 patients. Of 42 patients with CRB, those in the deceased group (27/42, 64.3%) had significantly lower levels of serum albumin, longer prior hospital stay and duration of catheter-dependent HD, and higher PBS than patients in the survived group. Failure to receive effective antibiotics (flomoxef or a carbapenem) within 5 days after onset of bacteremia and treatment with flomoxef both significantly contributed to higher mortality. Multivariate analyses revealed that flomoxef use, PBS, and catheter-dependent HD >30 days were independently associated with increased mortality (OR, 3.52; 95% CI, 1.19-58.17, OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.36-6.26 and OR, 5.73; 95% CI, 1.21-63.2, respectively). Considering the high mortality rate, ESBL-Kp should be recognized as a possible pathogen in patients on maintenance HD at high risk of acquiring HD access

  16. Discrepancy between effects of carbapenems and flomoxef in treating nosocomial hemodialysis access-related bacteremia secondary to extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing klebsiella pneumoniae in patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chih-Chao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemodialysis (HD patients are susceptible to extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacterial infections. Because the optimal treatment and clinical significance of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp HD access-related bacteremia remain unclear, we conducted this retrospective study to determine the clinical outcomes of patients treated with either flomoxef or a carbapenem. Methods The eligibility criterion was fistula or graft- or catheter- related ESBL-Kp bacteremia in patients on maintenance HD. The clinical characteristics and antibiotic management were analyzed. Outcome was determined by mortality resulting from bacteremia during the 14‐day period after the first positive blood culture for flomoxef-susceptible ESBL-Kp. Results The 57 patients studied were predominantly elderly, malnourished, with a history of severe illnesses and broad-spectrum antibiotic use before the onset of bacteremia, and with severe septicemia as determined by the Pitt bacteremia score (PBS. The study population comprised 7 fistula, 8 graft, and 42 HD catheter-related bacteremia (CRB cases, and the mortality rate was high (36/57, 63.2% in these 57 patients. Of 42 patients with CRB, those in the deceased group (27/42, 64.3% had significantly lower levels of serum albumin, longer prior hospital stay and duration of catheter-dependent HD, and higher PBS than patients in the survived group. Failure to receive effective antibiotics (flomoxef or a carbapenem within 5 days after onset of bacteremia and treatment with flomoxef both significantly contributed to higher mortality. Multivariate analyses revealed that flomoxef use, PBS, and catheter-dependent HD >30 days were independently associated with increased mortality (OR, 3.52; 95% CI, 1.19–58.17, OR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.36–6.26 and OR, 5.73; 95% CI, 1.21–63.2, respectively. Conclusions Considering the high mortality rate, ESBL-Kp should be recognized as a possible pathogen in

  17. CURRENT ASPECTS OF NOSOCOMIAL LEGIONELLOSIS PROFILAXIS

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    I. S. Tartakovsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nosocomial or hospital acquired infections is one of the most important medical and social problem. Mo- dern strategy of nosocomial infections prevention include prevention of nosocomial legionellosis. Epidemic outbreaks of nosocomial legionellosis with high mortality rate (20–40% were recognized last years in different countries. The contaminated by Legionella hospital hot water supply system is a source of Legionella infection outbreaks. A risk reduction strategy of waterborne pathogens in hospital water system is important part of mo- dern conception of nosocomial infection prevention, especially among immune compromised patient including transplant patients. In revue discussed different aspects of epidemiology, laboratory diagnostic and prevention of nosocomial legionellosis. 

  18. Development of a new trend conjugate vaccine for the prevention of Klebsiella pneumoniae

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    Tarek A. Ahmad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major cause of nosocomial pneumonia, septicemia and urinary tract infections, especially in newborns, blood cancer patients, and other immunocompromised candidates. The control of K. pneumoniae is a complicated issue due to its tight pathogenesis. Immuno-prophylactic preparations, especially those directed toward the bacterium O-antigen, showed to be the most successful way to prevent the infection incidence. However, all previously proposed preparations were either of limited spectrum or non-maternal, and hence not targeting the main Klebsiella patients. Moreover, all preparations were directed only to prevent the respiratory diseases due to that pathogen. This article addresses the development of a method originally used to purify the non-capsular bacterial- endotoxins, as a new and easy method for vaccine production against K. pneumoniae. The application of this method was preceded by a biotechnological control of capsular polysaccharide production in K. pneumoniae. The new produced natural conjugate between the bacterial O-antigen and its outer membrane proteins was evaluated by physicochemical and immunological methods to investigate its purity, integrity, safety and immunogenicity. It showed to be pure, stable, safe for use, and able to elicit a protective immunoglobulin titer against different Klebsiella infections. This immune-response proved to be transferable to the offspring of the vaccinated experimental rabbits via placenta.

  19. Community-acquired pneumonia due to pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus co-infection.

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    Ronan J Murray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial pneumonia is a well described complication of influenza. In recent years, community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (cMRSA infection has emerged as a contributor to morbidity and mortality in patients with influenza. Since the emergence and rapid dissemination of pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus in April 2009, initial descriptions of the clinical features of patients hospitalized with pneumonia have contained few details of patients with bacterial co-infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP caused by co-infection with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus and cMRSA were prospectively identified at two tertiary hospitals in one Australian city during July to September 2009, the period of intense influenza activity in our region. Detailed characterization of the cMRSA isolates was performed. 252 patients with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus infection were admitted at the two sites during the period of study. Three cases of CAP due to pandemic A(H1N12009/cMRSA co-infection were identified. The clinical features of these patients were typical of those with S. aureus co-infection or sequential infection following influenza. The 3 patients received appropriate empiric therapy for influenza, but inappropriate empiric therapy for cMRSA infection; all 3 survived. In addition, 2 fatal cases of CAP caused by pandemic A(H1N12009/cMRSA co-infection were identified on post-mortem examination. The cMRSA infections were caused by three different cMRSA clones, only one of which contained genes for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinicians managing patients with pandemic A(H1N12009 influenzavirus infection should be alert to the possibility of co-infection or sequential infection with virulent, antimicrobial-resistant bacterial pathogens such as cMRSA. PVL toxin is not necessary for the development of cMRSA pneumonia in the setting of pandemic

  20. Triple leaflet perforation due to endocarditis in aortic valve complicated by pneumonia and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Elton Soydan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Valve perforation complicating infective endocarditis has been for decades a bad sign leading to severe valve destruction, intractable heart failure and even death if surgical therapy is not administered in time. Here we present a 57 years old male patient inadvertently diagnosed with pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in another hospital. After 20 days of broad spectrum antibiotics and bronchodilator therapy no improvement was achieved. During examination a severe aortic regurgitation was recognized. Immediately after, patient was transferred to our hospital for aortic valve surgery evaluation. Transthorasic echocardiography (TTE showed a severe aortic regurgitation and vegetation like echogenicity over the noncoronary leaflet. An aortic valve replacement surgical therapy was decided. During the aortic valve excision underneath the vegetations, multiple small perforations in all the three leaflets were noticed. The destructed valve was excised and a mechanical aortic prosthesis (St Jude No: 23, MN, USA was successfully replaced. After 14 days of treatment patient was healthily discharged.

  1. Case of Meningitis in a Neonate Caused by an Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Strain of Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae

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    Khalit S. Khaertynov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most important infectious agents among neonates. This pathogen has a potential to develop an increased antimicrobial resistance and virulence. The classic non-virulent strain of K. pneumoniae, producing an extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL, is associated with nosocomial infection mainly in preterm neonates. Hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains are associated with invasive infection among previously healthy ambulatory patients, and most of them exhibit antimicrobial susceptibility. During the last few years, several cases of diseases caused by hypervirulent K. pneumoniae producing ESBL have been registered in different geographical regions of the world. However, reports of such cases in neonates are rare. Here, we reported that this pathogen can cause pyogenic meningitis in full-term neonate with poor prognosis. A previously healthy, full-term, 12-day-old neonate was admitted to the infectious diseases hospital with suspected meningitis. The clinical symptoms included loss of appetite, irritability, fever, seizures, and a bulging anterior fontanelle. The analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of meningitis. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for K. pneumoniae, producing ESBL. K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to aminopenicillins, 3rd generation cephalosporins but were sensitive to imipenem and meropenem. The “string test” was positive. The study of the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae by PCR revealed the presence of the rmpA gene. A combination of K. pneumoniae virulence and drug resistance complicated by cerebral oedema led to the death of the neonate. We concluded that both the risk of developing severe forms of infection and the outcome of the disease due to K. pneumonia are associated with the phenotypic features of the pathogen such as its antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors. Emergence of the ESBL-producing strain of hypervirulent K

  2. Exposure to fine particulate matter and hospital admissions due to pneumonia: Effects on the number of hospital admissions and its costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, Nicole Vargas; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa; Mantovani, Katia Cristina C; Vieira, Luciana C P F S; Moreira, Demerval S

    2016-07-01

    Given that respiratory diseases are a major cause of hospitalization in children, the objectives of this study are to estimate the role of exposure to fine particulate matter in hospitalizations due to pneumonia and a possible reduction in the number of these hospitalizations and costs. An ecological time-series study was developed with data on hospitalization for pneumonia among children under 10 years of age living in São José do Rio Preto, state of São Paulo, using PM2.5 concentrations estimated using a mathematical model. We used Poisson regression with a dependent variable (hospitalization) associated with PM2.5 concentrations and adjusted for effective temperature, seasonality and day of the week, with estimates of reductions in the number of hospitalizations and costs. 1,161 children were admitted to hospital between October 1st, 2011, and September 30th, 2013; the average concentration of PM2.5 was 18.7 µg/m3 (≈32 µg/m3 of PM10) and exposure to this pollutant was associated with hospitalization four and five days after exposure. A 10 µg/m3 decrease in concentration would imply 256 less hospital admissions and savings of approximately R$ 220,000 in a medium-sized city.

  3. The Study of Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, A prospective study in Northwest Iran

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    Mohammad Bagher Hosseini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Therefore, in this study, the incidence and prevalence of nosocomial infections were determined in NICUs of the three largest neonatal centers in northwest Iran, and the causative bacteria were identified in order to provide potential solutions to control the infections in these hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-prospective study in which the cases of nosocomial infections were examined in the three largest hospitals in Tabriz in northwest Iran during 1 year (from June 2012 until May 2013 based on clinical findings, medical and nursing reports of patients, and laboratory results. Results: Of the 3129 patients hospitalized in NICUs of the three hospitals, 208 patients were diagnosed with nosocomial infections. The incidence rate of nosocomial infections was 11.34%.per 100 patient days with 52.4% bacteremia, 32.69% pneumonia, 5.77% urinary tract infections, 5.29% wound infections, and 3.85% necrotizing enterocolitis. There was a statistically significant relationship between invasive procedures (such as umbilical catheters, central venous catheters, surgery, and TPN and sepsis (P = 0.001. The relationships between urinary tract infection and urinary catheter (P = 0.000, and aggressive procedures (such as suctioning and intubation and pneumonia (P = 0.001 were also statistically significant. Conclusion: Incidence of nosocomial infections in premature and low birth weight newborns is considered as a health threat. The findings of this research reiterate the importance of giving further attention to prevention and control of nosocomial infections in the NICU.

  4. Sulfhydryl variable-5 extended spectrum β-lactamase in nosocomial enteric bacteria causing sepsis in mexican children

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    Angélica Flores-Pérez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enteric bacteria causing nosocomial infections are often resistant to third-generation cephalosporins due to the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. Objective: To describe and characterize the ESBLs pattern present in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Serratia marcescens strains, isolated as causative of nosocomial sepsis in pediatric patients at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría (National Institute of Pediatrics. Material and methods: We analyzed 94 strains of K. pneumoniae and 7 of S. marcescens isolated from clinical specimens from 2002-2005, causative of sepsis in a children’s hospital. We evaluated antibiotic susceptibility and detection of ESBL phenotypes by disk diffusion methods; ceftazidime-resistant isolates were further characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE; and ESBLs were phenotypically and genotypically characterized by isoelectric focusing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing. We also assed for presence of conjugative plasmids bearing the ESBL gene. Results: 51/94 (54% of K. pneumoniae isolates, and 5/7 (71% of S. marcescens isolates were resistant to ceftazidime; all carried a blaSHV-5 gene. All K. pneumoniae isolates had a distinct PFGE profile, yet all carried a ~48-Kb plasmid, that was conjugatively transferable to an Escherichia coli receptor, which expressed the resistance phenotype. On the other hand, all S. marcescens isolates had a similar PFGE profile, were unable to transfer the ceftazidime-resistance phenotype, and were isolated from the same ward in a short time-span suggesting an outbreak. Conclusions: The overall prevalence of ESBL-producing enteric bacteria in this hospital is high but similar to other Latin American reports. The sulfhydryl variable-5 (SHV-5 ESBL gene appears to reside in a highly mobile plasmid, capable of spreading among different K. pneumoniae clones and perhaps even to S. marcescens.

  5. Time-dependent changes in pulmonary surfactant function and composition in acute respiratory distress syndrome due to pneumonia or aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchenbuch Tim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alterations to pulmonary surfactant composition have been encountered in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. However, only few data are available regarding the time-course and duration of surfactant changes in ARDS patients, although this information may largely influence the optimum design of clinical trials addressing surfactant replacement therapy. We therefore examined the time-course of surfactant changes in 15 patients with direct ARDS (pneumonia, aspiration over the first 8 days after onset of mechanical ventilation. Methods Three consecutive bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL were performed shortly after intubation (T0, and four days (T1 and eight days (T2 after intubation. Fifteen healthy volunteers served as controls. Phospholipid-to-protein ratio in BAL fluids, phospholipid class profiles, phosphatidylcholine (PC molecular species, surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, -D, and relative content and surface tension properties of large surfactant aggregates (LA were assessed. Results At T0, a severe and highly significant reduction in SP-A, SP-B and SP-C, the LA fraction, PC and phosphatidylglycerol (PG percentages, and dipalmitoylation of PC (DPPC was encountered. Surface activity of the LA fraction was greatly impaired. Over time, significant improvements were encountered especially in view of LA content, DPPC, PG and SP-A, but minimum surface tension of LA was not fully restored (15 mN/m at T2. A highly significant correlation was observed between PaO2/FiO2 and minimum surface tension (r = -0.83; p Conclusion We concluded that a profound impairment of pulmonary surfactant composition and function occurs in the very early stage of the disease and only gradually resolves over time. These observations may explain why former surfactant replacement studies with a short treatment duration failed to improve outcome and may help to establish optimal composition and duration of surfactant administration in future

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections in neonates in a hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rabea, A A; Burwen, D R; Eldeen, M A; Fontaine, R E; Tenover, F; Jarvis, W R

    1998-09-01

    To identify risk factors for Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSI) in neonates in a hospital in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Two case-control studies among hospitalized neonates during February 15-May 14, 1991, and a procedural and microbiological investigation. Hospital A, a maternity and children's hospital in KSA. Case patients had a blood culture positive for K pneumoniae after >2 days of hospitalization and had no evidence of a nonblood primary site of infection. When the 20 case patients were compared with controls, hospitalization in a critical-care unit (odds ratio [OR], 5.5; 95% confidence interval [CI95], 1.20-51.1; P=.03) was identified as a risk factor. When the case patients were compared with a second set of controls matched by critical-care status, receipt of a particular intravenous fluid (D10%/0.2NS; OR, 11.0; CI95, 1.42-85.2; P=.009) or a blood product (OR undefined; P=.04) were identified as risk factors. Infusates were administered via umbilical catheters for most case and control patients (19/20 vs 15/20, P>.05); catheters were manipulated more frequently in patients in critical-care units. Umbilical catheter tip, skin, or mucus membrane K pneumoniae colonization occurred in 47% and 53% of evaluated case and control patients, respectively. Available K pneumoniae isolates from blood cultures and colonization sites had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Emphasis on handwashing, careful preparation and administration of infusates, and aseptic technique for catheter insertion, maintenance, and manipulation was temporally associated with resolution of the epidemic. This outbreak was probably due to infusion therapy practices that led to BSI in nursery patients colonized with K pneumoniae. Both catheter-related infections and extrinsic contamination of infusates may have occurred. Hospital personnel should be aware of their potential to spread nosocomial pathogens from person to person and should implement Centers for

  7. Update on bacterial nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket, W; Hemalatha, K; Getenet, B; Wondwossen, T; Solomon, A; Zeynudin, A; Kannan, S

    2012-08-01

    With increasing use of antimicrobial agents and advance in lifesaving medical practices which expose the patients for invasive procedures, are associated with the ever increasing of nosocomial infections. Despite an effort in hospital infection control measures, health care associated infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality adding additional health care expenditure which may leads to an economic crisis. The problem is further complicated with the emergence of difficult to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) microorganism in the hospital environment. Virtually every pathogen has the potential to cause infection in hospitalized patients but only limited number of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria are responsible for the majority of nosocomial infection. Among them Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococci takes the leading. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors predispose hospitalized patients for these pathogens. Following simple hospital hygienic practices and strictly following standard medical procedures greatly reduces infection to a significant level although not all nosocomial infections are avoidable. The clinical spectrum caused by nosocomial pathogens depend on body site of infection, the involving pathogen and the patient's underlying condition. Structural and non structural virulence factors associated with the bacteria are responsible for the observed clinical manifestation. Bacteria isolation and characterization from appropriate clinical materials with antimicrobial susceptibility testing is the standard of laboratory diagnosis.

  8. Aspiration pneumonia: a review of modern trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBardino, David M; Wunderink, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The purpose was to describe aspiration pneumonia in the context of other lung infections and aspiration syndromes and to distinguish between the main scenarios commonly implied when the terms aspiration or aspiration pneumonia are used. Finally, we aim to summarize current evidence surrounding the diagnosis, microbiology, treatment, risks, and prevention of aspiration pneumonia. Medline was searched from inception to November 2013. All descriptive or experimental studies that added to the understanding of aspiration pneumonia were reviewed. All studies that provided insight into the clinical aspiration syndromes, historical context, diagnosis, microbiology, risk factors, prevention, and treatment were summarized within the text. Despite the original teaching, aspiration pneumonia is difficult to distinguish from other pneumonia syndromes. The microbiology of pneumonia after a macroaspiration has changed over the last 60 years from an anaerobic infection to one of aerobic and nosocomial bacteria. Successful antibiotic therapy has been achieved with several antibiotics. Various risks for aspiration have been described leading to several proposed preventative measures. Aspiration pneumonia is a disease with a distinct pathophysiology. In the modern era, aspiration pneumonia is rarely solely an anaerobic infection. Antibiotic treatment is largely dependent on the clinical scenario. Several measures may help prevent aspiration pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk factors for nosocomial pneumonia. Focus on prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, C A; Balaguera, H U; Craven, D E

    2001-11-01

    Despite an increased understanding of the pathogenesis of NP and advances in diagnosis and treatment, the risk, cost, morbidity, and mortality of NP remain unacceptably high. This article has identified strategic areas for primary and secondary prophylaxis that are simple and cost-effective. Realizing that the pathogenesis of NP requires bacterial colonization and the subsequent entry of these bacteria into the lower respiratory tree helps highlight the role of cross-infection and the importance of standard infection control procedures. Similarly the role of sedation and devices as risk factors can be reduced by minimizing the duration and intensity of sedation and length of exposure to invasive devices. Additional low-cost interventions that have been shown to be effective in preventing NP are the positioning of patients in a semirecumbent position and the appropriate use of enteral feeding, antibiotics, and selected medical devices. Prophylaxis of NP and VAP is carried out best by a multidisciplinary management team comprised of physicians (critical care, pulmonary medicine, infectious diseases, and primary care), critical care and infection control nurses, and respiratory therapists, even though this approach may result in decreased professional autonomy and freedom. This group should review the current guidelines, pathways, and standards for short-term and long-term prophylaxis of NP and VAP, then integrate them into and monitor their use for routine patient care. The risk factors and prophylaxis strategies for NP discussed in this article apply primarily to patients in acute care facilities, but also are relevant to alternative health care settings as well as the care of ill patients in ambulatory settings. The routine use of effective team policies for prophylaxis needs to be monitored by the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Health Care or other agencies. Research to delineate the most effective and feasible strategies for prophylaxis NP has been compromised by insufficient funding and lack of adequate, randomized multicenter studies to enable generalizability of results. Effective strategies for prophylaxis have not been disseminated widely or implemented in hospitals. Successful short-term and long-term strategies for prophylaxis must be evaluated and implemented by a team of physicians, nurses, and respiratory therapists. More than 100 years ago, Sir William Osler warned health care providers, "Remember how much you don't know." The authors would add that clinicians have acquired significant knowledge about risk factors and prophylaxis of NP in the 1980s and 1990s, but prophylaxis as a theory rather than an action. If the tree has not been planted, the time is now.

  10. Pneumonia (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia is an inflammation of the lungs caused by an infection. Many different organisms can cause it, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Pneumonia is a common illness that affects millions of ...

  11. First report of a multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type 11 causing sepsis in a free-ranging beaver (Castor fiber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilo, Paola; Vogt, Debora; Origgi, Francesco C; Endimiani, Andrea; Peterson, Susanne; Perreten, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae of sequence type (ST) 11 is a hyper-epidemic nosocomial clone spreading worldwide among humans and also emerging in pets. In this report, we describe a clinical case of fatal sepsis due to this multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen in a Eurasian beaver. The isolate showed resistance to six different classes of antimicrobials including third generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. This is the first report describing the detection of a MDR K. pneumoniae ST11 in a free-ranging animal. Our finding highlights the potential for environmental dissemination of hyper-epidemic clones of K. pneumoniae and possible spread in wildlife and cause epizootics. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Rocking pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Rijkers, Ger T.; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term “rocking pneumonia” in his 1956 song “Roll over Beethoven”, pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is ...

  13. [Ventilator associated pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, S; Nesci, M; Celotto, S; Lampati, L; Lucchini, A

    2003-04-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection that ensues in critically ill patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. The reported incidence of VAP varies between 9% and 68% with a mortality ranging between 33% and 71%. Two key factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of VAP: bacterial colonization of the upper digestive-respiratory tract and aspiration of oral secretions into the trachea. Preventive measurements are advocated to reduce the incidence of VAP, such as selective decontamination of the digestive tract (SDD), supraglottic aspiration and positioning. Prompt recognition and treatment of established VAP has also been demostrated to affect outcome. Therefore, the knowledge of risk factors associated with the development of VAP and the implementation of strategies to prevent, diagnose and treat VAP are mainstems in the nursing of mechanically ventilated patients.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Klebsiella pneumonia recovered from nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a zoonotic, Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is the causative agent of nosocomial septicemic, pneumonic, and urinary tract infections. Recently, pathogenic strains of K. pneumoniae sharing a hypermucoviscosity (HMV) phenotype have been attributed to ...

  15. Pattern of nosocomial infection in two intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, M.F.; Hassan, Y.; Abdullah, M.; Shakeel, J.; Memon, A.R.; Razvi, M.F.; Saleem, S.; Shakeel, J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the pattern of nosocomial infections in two ICUs' of a teaching hospital in terms of frequency, common sites of infection, the pathogens involved and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns. It was conducted in two medical ICUs (Neurology and Nephrology) of a public tertiary care hospital. Data was collected prospectively on patients suspected to have developed nosocomial infection after 48 hours of admission to the ICU according to objective. There were 101 cases of suspected nosocomial infection out of a total of 254 patients. The frequency of nosocomial infection was 39.7%. UTI developed in 44.6%, while 27% had blood stream infection, and 21% had pneumonia. Each of the three major sites of infection was strongly associated with the use of invasive devices. Escherichia (E.) coli was the most common organism isolated followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella. E. coli and Klebsiella showed a maximum sensitivity to Imipenem followed by Tazocin (pipericillin + tazobactam). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to Amikacin and Fosfomycin. The high frequency of nosocomial infection suggests that more strict measures regarding invasive devices should be taken in future to control the infection and limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms. (author)

  16. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Riu

    Full Text Available To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility.We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive.A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859. Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210. Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency.Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve prevention strategies

  17. The incidence of nosocomial infection in the Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia: ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozaidi, S W; Sukro, J; Dan, A

    2001-06-01

    CU-acquired nosocomial infection (NI) remains one of the major causes of ICU mortality. This study presents the incidence of ICU-acquired nosocomial infection in ICU HUKM for the years 1998 and 1999, as part of the ongoing ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program. The overall incidence was 23%. The main types of NI was lower respiratory tract infection (15.3%), primary bacteraemia (8.1%), ventilator associated pneumonia (5.4%), urinary tract infection (2.0%), skin infection (1.6%) central venous catheter sepsis (1.2%) and surgical skin infection (0.8%). The overall culture positive nosocomial infection rate was only 12.1%, majority from the lungs (12.6%), blood (7.3%), skin swabs (2.0%), and urine (1.6%). The main gram-negative organism cultured was Acinetobacter sp. (19%) and Staph. aureus (8.5%) was the gram-positive organism. The overall ICU mortality rate was 27.5% of which 60.9% of patients who died were attributed directly to sepsis.

  18. Relationship between climate conditions and nosocomial infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections constitute a global health problem. Objective: To explore the relationship between nosocomial infection rates (NIRs) and climatic factors including temperature and relative humidity in Guangzhou area of China. Methods: 30892 patients in our hospital in 2009 were investigated for ...

  19. A Descriptive Study of Nosocomial Infections in an Adult Intensive Care Unit in Fiji: 2011-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshni Naidu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit (ICU are common and associated with a high mortality but there are no published data from the Oceania region. A retrospective study in Fiji’s largest ICU (2011-12 reported that 114 of a total 663 adult ICU admissions had bacteriological culture-confirmed nosocomial infection. The commonest sites of infection were respiratory and bloodstream. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest pathogens isolated, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae (extended-spectrum β-Lactamase-producing, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species. Mortality for those with a known outcome was 33%. Improved surveillance and implementation of effective preventive interventions are needed.

  20. Prognostic factors for mortality due to pneumonia among adults from different age groups in Singapore and mortality predictions based on PSI and CURB-65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zoe Xz; Yong, Yang; Tan, Wan C; Shen, Liang; Ng, Han Seong; Fong, Kok Yong

    2017-08-14

    Pneumonia is associated with considerable mortality. However, the information on age-specific prognostic factors for death from pneumonia is limited. Patients hospitalised with a diagnosis of pneumonia through the emergency department were stratified into three age groups: 18-64 years; 65-84 years; and ≥ 85 years. Multivariate logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were conducted to evaluate prognostic factors for mortality and the performance of pneumonia severity scoring tools for mortality prediction. There were 1,902 patients (18-64 years: 614 [32.3%]; 65-84 years: 944 [49.6%]; ≥ 85 years: 344 [18.1%]) enrolled. Mortality rates increased with age (18-64 years: 7.3%; 65-84 years: 16.1%; ≥ 85 years: 29.7%; p aged 18-64 years. Male gender, malignancy, congestive heart failure and eight other parameters reflecting acute disease severity were associated with mortality among patients aged 65-84 years. For patients aged ≥ 85 years, altered mental status, tachycardia, blood urea nitrogen, hypoxaemia, arterial pH and pleural effusion were significantly predictive of mortality. Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) was more sensitive than CURB-65 (Confusion, Uraemia, Respiratory rate ≥ 30 per minute, low Blood pressure, age 65 years or older) for mortality prediction across all age groups. The predictive effect of prognostic factors for mortality varied among patients with pneumonia from the different age groups. PSI performed significantly better than CURB-65 for mortality prediction, but its discriminative power decreased with advancing age.

  1. Pneumonia Pneumosistis

    OpenAIRE

    I Wayan Gustawan; BNP Arhana; Putu Siadi Purniti; IB Subanada; K Dewi Kumara Wati

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia pnemosistis merupakan penyebab kesakitan yang serius dan kematian pada kasus gangguan sistem imun. Pneumonia pnemosistis merupakan infeksi oportunistik tersering pada kasus yang terinfeksi HIV, leukemia dan anak yang menerima transplantasi organ. Organisme penyebab adalah Pneumocystis carinii. Manifestasi klinis berupa gangguan pernapasan disertai penyakit dasarnya. Diagnosis pasti ditegakkan dengan ditemukannya organisme dalam pemeriksaan mikroskopis. Pengobatan secara ...

  2. Ventilator-associated pneumonia: clinical significance and implications for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grap, M J; Munro, C L

    1997-01-01

    Pneumonia is the second most common nosocomial infection in the United States and the leading cause of death from nosocomial infections. Intubation and mechanical ventilation greatly increase the risk of bacterial pneumonia. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurs in a patient treated with mechanical ventilation, and it is neither present nor developing at the time of intubation; it is a serious problem--with significant morbidity and mortality rates. Aspiration of bacteria from the oropharynx, leakage of contaminated secretions around the endotracheal tube, patient position, and cross-contamination from respiratory equipment and health care providers are important factors in the development of VAP. Nurses caring for patients treated with mechanical ventilation must recognize risk factors and include strategies for reducing these factors as part of their nursing care. This article summarizes the literature related to VAP: its incidence, associated factors, diagnosis, and current therapies, with an emphasis on nursing implications in the care of these patients.

  3. The acute-phase response and serum amyloid A inhibit the inflammatory response to Acinetobacter baumannii Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renckens, Rosemarijn; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Knapp, Sylvia; de Vos, Alex F.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging pathogen in nosocomial pneumonia. Trauma and postsurgical patients display a profound acute-phase protein response and are susceptible to pneumonia. METHODS: To study the way in which the acute-phase response induced by sterile tissue injury

  4. Acute pancreatitis in mice impairs bacterial clearance from the lungs, whereas concurrent pneumonia prolongs the course of pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westerloo, David J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Bruno, Marco J.; de Vos, Alex F.; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Nosocomial pneumonia is a feared complication in the critically ill patient. Serious acute pancreatitis is frequently complicated by infections. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of acute pancreatitis on host defense against Pseudomonas pneumonia and to

  5. Investigation of the presence of human or bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the lungs of mink (Neovison vison) with hemorrhagic pneumonia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark; Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Larsen, Lars Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhagic pneumonia is a disease of farmed mink (Neovison vison) caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The disease is highly seasonal in Danish mink with outbreaks occurring almost exclusively in the autumn. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been shown to augment infection with...

  6. A cluster of cases of nosocomial legionnaires disease linked to a contaminated hospital decorative water fountain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Tara N; Stock, Frida; White, Margaret; Bordner, MaryAnn; Michelin, Angela; Bennett, John E; Murray, Patrick R; Henderson, David K

    2009-08-01

    Nosocomial outbreaks of Legionnaires disease have been linked to contaminated water in hospitals. Immunocompromised patients are particularly vulnerable and, when infected, have a high mortality rate. We report the investigation of a cluster of cases of nosocomial pneumonia attributable to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 that occurred among patients on our stem cell transplantation unit. We conducted a record review to identify common points of potential exposure, followed by environmental and water sampling for Legionella species from those sources. We used an air sampler to in an attempt to detect aerosolized Legionella and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to compare clinical and environmental isolates. The most likely sources identified were the water supply in the patients' rooms and a decorative fountain in the radiation oncology suite. Samples from the patients' rooms did not grow Legionella species. Cultures of the fountain, which had been restarted 4 months earlier after being shut off for 5 months, yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 1. The isolates from both patients and the fountain were identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Both patients developed pneumonia within 10 days of completing radiation therapy, and each reported having observed the fountain at close range. Both patients' infections were identified early and treated promptly, and both recovered. This cluster was caused by contamination of a decorative fountain despite its being equipped with a filter and ozone generator. Fountains are a potential source of nosocomial Legionnaires disease despite standard maintenance and sanitizing measures. In our opinion, fountains present unacceptable risk in hospitals serving immunocompromised patients.

  7. Mortalidad en México por influenza y neumonía (1990-2005 Mortality due to influenza and pneumonia in Mexico between 1990 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Kuri-Morales

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar el impacto de la vacuna contra la influenza en personas menores de dos años y mayores de 65, a través del análisis de la mortalidad por influenza y neumonía en la República mexicana entre 1990 y 2005, y determinar el patrón estacional de comportamiento de la mortalidad, la tendencia de mortalidad por volumen de defunciones por periodo estacional y la velocidad de mortalidad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Los datos se tomaron del Sistema Epidemiológico y Estadístico de Defunciones (SEED-SSA. RESULTADOS: El análisis mostró una tendencia de defunciones a la baja con una rapidez respectiva de 509 y 29 defunciones menos por año, así como una interrupción de la tendencia ascendente de la mortalidad por la vacunación. CONCLUSIONES: La intervención por vacunación tiene costos positivos, tanto económicos como de calidad de vida, por lo que su implementación debe considerarse en un contexto que refleje una menor incidencia de hospitalizaciones y muertes.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the impact of influenza vaccine in infants less than two years of age and in elders more than sixty-five years of age, through the analysis of mortality due to influenza and pneumonia in Mexico, between 1990 and 2005. To determine the seasonal pattern of mortality, the tendency of mortality by volume of deaths per seasonal period, and the speed rate of mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were taken from the Epidemiological and Statistical Mortality System (SEED-SSA per its abbreviation in Spanish. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The analysis showed there is a tendency of deaths decrease at a rate of 509 deaths less per year in the infants group and 29 deaths less in the elders group. Also, the ascending tendency of mortality was interrupted by vaccination. The vaccination intervention has a positive economic effect and also helps improve the quality of life. Therefore, its implementation is expected to lower hospital admissions and deaths.

  8. [Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachassinne, E; Letamendia-Richard, E; Gaudelus, J

    2004-03-01

    Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in neonates has to be described according to our definitions (early onset GBS diseases excluded) and according to levels of care. Nosocomial risk exists in maternity departments (3% in postnatal beds), incidence rates are 7.5-12.7% or 1.3-8.5 per 1000 days in neonatal care units and 14.2% or 11.7 per 1000 days in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). Gram-positive cocci bloodstream infections are the most common nosocomial infections in NICU but viral gastroenteritis are more frequent in neonatal care units. Risk factors are low birthweight, small gestational age and intravascular catheter in NICU, and for viral nosocomial infections, visits and winter outbreaks.

  9. Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern of Bacteria Isolates among Patients Admitted at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahirdar, ... Wound swab and venous blood samples were collected and processed for bacterial isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing following standard ...

  10. Aspiration pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Images Pneumococci organism Bronchoscopy Lungs Respiratory system References Musher DM. Overview of pneumonia. In: Goldman L, Schafer ... University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial ...

  11. Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... among 16 patients after kidney transplantation. Journal of clinical microbiology 2008;46:966-71. Pifer LL, Hughes WT, ... diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia: a meta-analysis. Clinical microbiology and infection 2013;19:39-49. CDC. Pneumocystis ...

  12. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumonia is caused by drinking or breathing in gasoline , kerosene , furniture polish , paint thinner, or other oily ... Arterial blood gas monitoring Breathing support, including oxygen, inhalation treatment, breathing tube and ventilator (machine), in severe ...

  13. Lung Infarction due to Pulmonary Vein Stenosis after Ablation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation Misdiagnosed as Organizing Pneumonia: Sequential Changes on CT in Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Um, Sang Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis is a complication of ablation therapy for arrhythmias. We report two cases with chronic lung parenchymal abnormalities showing no improvement and waxing and waning features, which were initially diagnosed as nonspecific pneumonias, and finally confirmed as PV stenosis. When a patient presents for nonspecific respiratory symptoms without evidence of infection after ablation therapy and image findings show chronic and repetitive parenchymal abnormalities confined in localized portion, the possibility of PV stenosis should be considered.

  14. Emerging Trend of Acinetobacter Nosocomial Infection in Northeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Saed

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acinetobacter spp. emerged as an opportunistic pathogen for hospital-acquired infections. Recently, increasing antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. has worsened the problem. The aim of this study was to investigate  the  emerging  trend  of  infection  due  to Acinetobacter  in Ghaem University Hospital, Mashhad during 2006-2012.Methods: The demographic data and information about redisposing factors was collected. Appropriate bacteriological samples were collected and Acinetobacter spp. was isolated. Antibiotics susceptibility pattern of these isolates againstdifferent antimicrobials agents was determined.Results: Results confirmed that Acinetobacter spp. cause 20.9% of nosocomial infection during this period. The trend of Acinetobacter nosocomial infection was increasing and patients with risk factors such as COPD, bronchectasia, diabetes   mellitus   were   more   prone   to   infection.  There   was   significant association   between   these   infections   and   invasive   procedures   such   as catheterization, mechanical ventilation and broad-spectrum antibiotics usage. Conclusion:  Understanding  trends  in  causative  organisms  of  nosocomial infection can help us to better define our infection control policy.

  15. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3-3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31-0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49-0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92-119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India's pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our results

  16. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Farooqui

    Full Text Available The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3-3.9 million episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31-0.40 million all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths, and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths. Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49-0.64 million severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92-119 thousand pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India's pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  17. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  18. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia

  19. Antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial isolates in a teaching hospital in Goa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamat U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emergence of polyantimicrobial resistant strains of hospital pathogens has presented a challenge in the provision of good quality in-patient care. Inappropriate use of antibiotics in the hospital is largely responsible for this catastrophe. Bacteriological surveillance of the cases of nosocomial infections is crucial for framing an evidence-based antimicrobial policy for a hospital. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken among 498 patients from medicine and surgery wards in a tertiary teaching hospital in Goa. The patients were followed up clinico-bacteriologically for the occurrence of nosocomial infections (NI. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: The overall infection rate was 33.93 ± 4.16 infections per 100 patients. Urinary tract infection was the most common NI (26.63%, followed by surgical site infection (23.67%, wound infection (23% and nosocomial pneumonia (18.34%. Ninety-seven percent of the isolates were bacterial, while the others were fungal. More than 80% of the NIs were caused by Gram-negative bacteria, predominantly Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Aceinetobacter baumanii . Almost 70% of the isolates were resistant to all the antibiotics for which susceptibility was tested; the rest were sensitive to amikacin, cefoperazone-sulbactam and other antibiotics including methicillin, co-trimoxazole, teicoplenin, vancomycin and rifampicin, either singly or in combination. The proportion of MRSA was 71.4%. Resistance to a particular antibiotic was found to be directly proportional to the antibiotic usage in the study setting. Conclusion: Surveillance of nosocomial infections with emphasis on the microbiologic surveillance and frequent antimicrobial audit are critical towards curbing the evil of polyantimicrobial resistant nosocomial infections in a hospital.

  20. Risk factors and mortality for nosocomial bloodstream infections in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunes, S; Rombaut, V; Vogelaers, D; Brusselaers, N; Lizy, C; Cankurtaran, M; Labeau, S; Petrovic, M; Blot, S

    2011-10-01

    To determine risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) and associated mortality in geriatric patients in geriatric and internal medicine wards at a university hospital. Single-center retrospective (1992-2007), pairwise-matched (1:1-ratio) cohort study. Geriatric patients with nosocomial BSI were matched with controls without BSI on year of admission and length of hospitalization before onset of BSI. Demographic, microbiological, and clinical data are collected. One-hundred forty-two BSI occurred in 129 patients. Predominant microorganisms were Escherichia coli (23.2%), coagulase-negative Staphylococci (19.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.1%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (5.8%) and Candida spp. (5.8%). Matching was successful for 109 cases. Compared to matched control subjects, cases were more frequently female, suffered more frequently from arthrosis, angina pectoris and pressure ulcers, had worse Activities of Daily Living-scores, had more often an intravenous or bladder catheter, and were more often bedridden. Logistic regression demonstrated presence of an intravenous catheter (odds ratio [OR] 7.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5-22.9) and being bedridden (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.6-5.3) as independent risk factors for BSI. In univariate analysis nosocomial BSI was associated with increased mortality (22.0% vs. 11.0%; P=0.029). After adjustment for confounding co-variates, however, nosocomial BSI was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio 1.3, 95% CI 0.6-2.6). Being bedridden and increasing age were independent risk factors for death. Intravenous catheters and being bedridden are the main risk factors for nosocomial BSI. Although associated with higher mortality, this infectious complication seems not to be an independent risk factor for death in geriatric patients. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pneumonia necrotizante

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Coutinho; Nuno Príncipe

    2015-01-01

    A pneumonia adquirida na comunidade (PAC) é causa frequente de re-curso a Serviços de Urgência (SU), sendo a principal causa de sépsis em cuidados intensivos de adultos, com significativa morbi-mortalidade.1Uma das suas complicações, a pneumonia necrotizante, sendo rara, é grave e caracterizada por liquefação e necrose com cavitação do tecido pulmonar em áreas de consolidação parenquimatosa

  2. Sepse por Staphylococus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirida na comunidade no sul do Brasil Sepsis due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Cristina Gelatti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina foi inicialmente descrito como um típico microrganismo adquirido em infecções nosocomiais. No entanto, nos últimos anos Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade é causa de infecções de pele e tecidos moles, mas infecções graves como pneumonia e sepse podem ocorrer. Este relato descreve um caso de sepse em criança, complicado com pneumonia secundária a lesão em partes moles por Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade no Sul do Brasil. O paciente foi atendido em Unidade de Emergência com história de ferimento provocado por trauma em membro inferior que evoluiu para celulite, pneumonia e sepse.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was initially described as a typical microorganism acquired in nosocomial infections. However, over recent years, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been a cause of skin and soft-tissue infections. Serious infections such as pneumonia and sepsis can also occur. This report describes a case of sepsis in a child that was complicated by pneumonia secondary to soft tissue lesions that were due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil. The patient was attended at the Emergency Unit with a history of injury caused by lower-limb trauma that evolved to cellulitis, pneumonia and sepsis.

  3. Risk factors and outcomes of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Pistella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nosocomial setting, antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are a growing challenge, and alarming trends in resistance are currently reported all over the world. Isolates of Enterobacteriaceae producing ampC β-lactamases and extended spectrum β-lactamases are endemic in many hospitals, and are frequently resistant also to other classes of antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides. The risk of infections due to multi-drug resistant strains should be considered also for outpatients who have had recent contact with the health system. Both nosocomial and health-care associated infections should be treated with a combination of antibiotics active against multi-drug resistant Gram negative and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. In the absence of effective antimicrobial stewardship programs, this aggressive therapeutic approach might lead to abuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics, with consequent increase in resistances. To contain the possible antibiotic overuse, several decisional strategies, often based on risk-score systems supporting the clinical decisions, have been proposed. In this context of high antibiotic selection pressure, carbapenem-resistant pathogens recently began to spread in many hospitals. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, as well as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and P. aeruginosa, represent the new major challenges to patient safety. Against these organisms the initial empiric treatment is generally ineffective. The poor clinical outcome associated with carbapenem- resistant K. pneumoniae infections is probably due to the delete in the beginning of an appropriate antibiotic treatment, rather than to the increased virulence of pathogens. Only few therapeutic options are available, including colistin, tigecycline, aminoglycosides and carbapenems in selected cases. Several combinations of these antibiotics have been used, but no ideal regimen has been currently established.

  4. Prevent Pneumonia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-06

    CDC’s Matthew Westercamp explains what pneumonia is, its symptoms, and how to prevent it.  Created: 8/6/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Respiratory Diseases Branch (RDB).   Date Released: 8/6/2015.

  5. Neonatal nosocomial sepsis in a level-III NICU: evaluation of the causative agents and antimicrobial susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalaz, Mehmet; Cetin, Hasan; Akisu, Mete; Aydemir, Söhret; Tunger, Alper; Kültürsay, Nilgün

    2006-01-01

    Despite advances in supportive care and use of antibiotics, sepsis preserves its importance due to its high mortality and morbidity for neonates. Identifying the causative agents and antibiotic resistance yearly in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) helps the physician to choose the most appropriate empirical therapy. In this study we aimed to evaluate positive blood cultures and antibiotic susceptibilities of newborns with proven sepsis during the years 2000-2002 in our NICU. The charts of babies with sepsis were evaluated for clinical characteristics, positive cultures and antimicrobial susceptibilities, retrospectively. Although most of the admitted patients were premature (76.5%), the frequency of proven sepsis was quite low, at 9.1% among 909 newborns. Mortality rate in sepsis was 16%. The most commonly isolated micro-organisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (31.3%), fungi (19.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (13%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.5%). Methicillin resistance for CoNS was 92.3% and for S. aureus was 72.7%. In the last year, a significant increase in the frequency of Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.3 vs 14.2%), CoNS (27.1 vs 37.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.1 vs 8.6%) and fungal infections (18.8 vs 20%) was observed compared to the previous years. An initial empirical antibiotic therapy for late-onset sepsis was designed with teicoplanin + piperacillin-tazobactam/meropenem + antifungal (fluconazole or amphotericin B) as the best combination to cover this spectrum until the culture results arrive. However, this combination is only compatible with our results and may not be applied in all units. Every unit must follow the bacterial spectrum and antibacterial resistance patterns to choose their specific empirical treatment strategy for nosocomial infections.

  6. THE STUDY OF ANTIBIOTIC- AND FAGOSENSITIVITY OF NOSOCOMIAL STRAINS BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM TRANSPLANTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Gabrielan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic and fagosensitivity most etiologically important nosocomial strains of bacteria – Pseudomonas aeru- ginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp. were studied. Multiple drug-resistant bacteria as gram-positive and gram-negative, isolated from 8 substrates, had been demonstrated. With regard to the sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa >40% was observed in 40–50% of the strains to aminoglycosides – aztreonam, amikacin, netilmicin, and only 23–25% of the strains – to gentamicin and levofloxacin (an average of antibiotic susceptibility was 27%. All strains of ESBL Klebsiella drew up and were sensitive only to imipenem, meropenem and aminoglycosides. Specific phages lysed 43–48% of the strains Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, E. coli, Pro- teus spp., multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus spp. It is proposed to introduce the use of phages in clinical practice. 

  7. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial ...

  8. Major Trends in the Microbial Etiiology of Nosocomial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Schaberg; D.H. Culver; R.P. Gaynes

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo determine trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infections in the 1980s, surveillance data on the microbiology of documented nosocomial infection reported to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System and from the University of Michigan Hospital were analyzed.

  9. A case of chemical pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Woo; Eun, Choung Ki; Choi, Byung Soo; Park, Soo Sung [Chungang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    A case of chemical pneumonia due to the fumes of nitric acid and chemical compounds was encountered, and it is reported with a review of the literatures. A 19 year old Korean male working in an electric materials manufacturing factory of poor facilities dealing with chemical compounds showed initial symptoms closely similar to those of pulmonary tuberculosis of hematogenous disseminating type, and a roentgenogram was hardly helpful for differentiating chemical pneumonia from pulmonary tuberculous of hematogenous disseminating type. The clinical course in this case was very favourable as compared with those of pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia.

  10. A case of chemical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Woo; Eun, Choung Ki; Choi, Byung Soo; Park, Soo Sung

    1974-01-01

    A case of chemical pneumonia due to the fumes of nitric acid and chemical compounds was encountered, and it is reported with a review of the literatures. A 19 year old Korean male working in an electric materials manufacturing factory of poor facilities dealing with chemical compounds showed initial symptoms closely similar to those of pulmonary tuberculosis of hematogenous disseminating type, and a roentgenogram was hardly helpful for differentiating chemical pneumonia from pulmonary tuberculous of hematogenous disseminating type. The clinical course in this case was very favourable as compared with those of pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia

  11. [Nosocomial infections due to human coronaviruses in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneur, A; Legrand, M C; Picard, B; Baron, R; Talbot, P J; de Parscau, L; Sizun, J

    2002-01-01

    Human coronaviruses, with two known serogroups named 229-E and OC-43, are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses. The large RNA is surrounded by a nucleoprotein (protein N). The envelop contains 2 or 3 glycoproteins: spike protein (or protein S), matrix protein (or protein M) and a hemagglutinin (or protein HE). Their pathogen role remains unclear because their isolation is difficult. Reliable and rapid methods as immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction allow new researches on epidemiology. Human coronaviruses can survive for as long as 6 days in suspension and 3 hours after drying on surfaces, suggesting that they could be a source of hospital-acquired infections. Two prospective studies conducted in a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit demonstrated a significant association of coronavirus-positive nasopharyngal samples with respiratory illness in hospitalised preterm neonates. Positive samples from staff suggested either a patient-to-staff or a staff-to-patient transmission. No cross-infection were observed from community-acquired respiratory-syncitial virus or influenza-infected children to neonates. Universal precautions with hand washing and surface desinfection could be proposed to prevent coronavirus transmission.

  12. Nosocomial infection in a newborn intensive care unit (NICU, South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Jae

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to determine the occurrence of nosocomial infections (NIs, including infection rates, main infection sites, and common microorganisms. Patients included in the study were taken from a newborn intensive care unit (NICU, in a hospital in South Korea. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by reviewing chart. The subjects were 489 neonates who were admitted to the NICU, survived longer than 72 hours, and not transferred to another unit, between Jan. 1. 1995 to Sep. 30, 1999. NIs were identified according to the NNIS definition. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Results Cumulative incidence rate for NIs was 30.3 neonates out of 100 admissions, with a total of 44.6 infections. The incidence density was average 10.2 neonates and 15.1 infections per 1000 patient days. The most common infections were pneumonia (28%, bloodstream infection (26%, and conjunctivitis (22%. Major pathogens were Gram-positives such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. The factors associated with NI was less than 1500 g of birth weight, less than 32 weeks of gestational age, and less than 8 of apgar score. There's no statistical difference in discharge status between two groups, but hospital stay was longer in subjects with nosocomial infection than those without infection. Conclusion Although the distribution of pathogens was similar to previous reports, a high rate of nosocomial infection and in particular conjunctivitis was observed in this study that merits further evaluation.

  13. Nosocomial imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (IRAB) has emerged as a challenging nosocomial pathogen particularly in intensive care units (ICUs). Studying the risk factors associated with IRAB infection is of paramount importance for appropriate control of IRAB spread. The aim of this study was to assess ...

  14. [Hospital hygiene - outbreak management of nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2012-04-01

    According to §6, section 3 of the German Protection against Infections Act [Infektionsschutzgesetz (IfSG)] an outbreak is defined as the occurrence in large numbers of nosocomial infections for which an epidemiological relationship is probable or can be assumed. About 2-10% of nosocomial infections in hospitals (about 5% in intensive care wards) occur within the framework of an outbreak. The heaped occurrence of nosocomial infections can be declared according to the prescribed surveillance of nosocomial infections (§23 IfSG) when, in the course of this assessment, a statistically significant increase in the rate of infections becomes apparent. On the other hand, the occurrence of an outbreak can also be recognized through the vigilance of all involved personnel and a general sensibilization towards this subject. The names of patients involved in outbreaks need not be reported to the responsible health authorities. As a consequence of the report the health authorities become involved in the investigation to determine the cause and its elimination, and to provide support and advice. The outbreak management should be oriented on the respective recommendations of the Robert Koch Institute. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Perbandingan Efek Dekontaminasi Oral Listerine® Dengan Klorheksidin 0,2% Terhadap Kejadian Ventilator Associated Pneumonia Di Unit Perawatan Intensif Rumah Sakit Haji Adam Malik Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Simamora, Boynardo

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is an important nosocomial infection which form of hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) in intensive care unit (ICU). VAP is defined as pneumonia occurring more than 48 hours after patients have been intubated and received mechanical ventilation. The risk of VAP is a highest early in the course of hospital stay, and is estimated to be three percent per day during the first five days of ventilation, two percent per day during days 5 to 10 ventilation, and one...

  16. [Nosocomial sinusitis in an intensive care unit: a microbiological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsalobre Filho, Leonardo Lopes; Vieira, Fernando Mirage Jardim; Stefanini, Renato; Cavalcante, Ricardo; Santos, Rodrigo de Paula; Gregório, Luis Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial sinusitis is a common complication of patients in ICUs. Its diagnosis is important, and early treatment is required to avoid serious complications such as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, and intracranial abscesses. To identify the germs causing sinusitis in ICUs by nasal swabs and maxillary sinus puncture, and to correlate these results. ICU patients with a diagnosis (CT confirmed) of maxillary sinusitis underwent nasal swab and puncture of the sinus to collect material for culture and antibiogram. This study evaluated 22 patients. The microbial agent isolated in the swab correlated with the agent in the puncture in 14 of 22 cases (63%). Gram-negative bacteria were the most frequent, as follows: Pseudomonas aeruginosa (29% of punctures), following by Proteus mirabillis (26%) and Acinetobacter baumanni (14%). The resistance index in the antibiogram was high to antibiotics. Maxillary sinus puncture of ICU patients with sinusitis appears to be the best method for identifying bacteria; antibiograms demonstrate resistance to therapy. The swab has little diagnostic value; the correlation was 63%. It may be used when sinus puncture is contraindicated.

  17. Role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, C.; Barken, Kim Bundvig; Krogfelt, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    nosocomial infections. Most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express two types of fimbrial adhesins, type 1 fimbriae and type 3 fimbriae. In this study, we characterized the role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in K. pneumoniae biofilm formation. Results: Isogenic fimbriae mutants of the clinical K. pneumoniae...... of planktonic cells. Type 1 fimbriae did not influence biofilm formation and the expression of type 1 fimbriae was found to be down-regulated in biofilm forming cells. In contrast, expression of type 3 fimbriae was found to strongly promote biofilm formation. Conclusion: By use of well defined isogenic mutants...... we found that type 3 fimbriae, but not type 1 fimbriae, strongly promote biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae C3091. As the vast majority of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express type 3 fimbriae, this fimbrial adhesin may play a significant role in development of catheter associated K. pneumoniae...

  18. National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System–based study in north eastern of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Ziaee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available among about 10% of hospitalized patients. HAIs increase mortality and morbidity and prolonged hospital stay not to mention considerable costs they impose on the health care system. The present study was conducted in order to evaluate the prevalence of HAIs based on National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System in hospitals of Mashhad, Iran.  Methods: The current prevalence study of HAI was carried out in 26 hospitals using a protocol updated yearly in Mashhad, Iran. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance were used to define four HAIs. All patients admitted to the hospitals during a one-year period (March 1, 2015-February 30, 2016 were recruited in the study. Data was extracted using Iranian nosocomial infection surveillance software.  Results: The overall prevalence rate of HAI in our study was 0.8% among the hospitals with the most frequent HAIs found to be pneumonia (25%, followed by urinary tract infections (20%, and blood stream infections (19%. The highest prevalence rate was observed in 15- to 65-year old patients with more than 50% related to surgical site infection. Also, the most frequently isolated micro-organism was acinetobacter. In addition, the highest seasonal prevalence was seen in winter with pneumonia as the most frequent infection. A total of 4988 pathogens were isolated with 30.33% of clinical confirmation and 69.66% of positive culture.  Conclusion: These findings emphasize the need for appropriate measures for prevention, screening, labeling, and isolation precautions for infected patients.

  19. When is pneumonia not pneumonia?

    OpenAIRE

    Sasegbon, Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was admitted to hospital via the accident and emergency department with severe right-sided abdominal pain and raised inflammatory markers. His pain settled with analgaesia and he was discharged with a course of oral co-amoxiclav. He was readmitted to the hospital 7���days later reporting cough and shortness of breath. His chest X-ray showed a raised right hemi-diaphragm, presumed consolidation and a right-sided effusion. As a result, he was treated for pneumonia. Despite ant...

  20. Computed tomography findings of community-acquired Stenotrophomonas Maltophilia pneumonia in an immunocompetent patient: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yoon Ki; Kim, Jeung Sook; Park, Seong Yeon; Oh, Jin Young; Kwon, Jae Hyun [Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) is a rare, but globally emerging gram-negative multiple-drug-resistant organism usually found in a nosocomial setting in immunocompromised patients. To our best knowledge, computed tomography (CT) features of community-acquired S. maltophilia pneumonia have not been previously reported in an immunocompetent patient. Herein, we presented the CT findings of a previous healthy 56-year-old male with S. maltophilia pneumonia.

  1. Prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia through aspiration of subglottic secretions: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, A Renee; Stirlen, Joan; Lu, Shu Hua

    2012-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a subset of hospital-acquired pneumonias and is a serious, sometimes fatal, complication in patients who need mechanical ventilation. In addition, pay-for-performance initiative has placed increased emphasis on preventing nosocomial infections including VAP. Facilities may not be reimbursed for costs associated with prevalence infections. This article presents a review and meta-analysis of the prevention of VAP through the aspiration of subglottic secretion.

  2. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pneumonia KidsHealth / For Parents / Pneumonia What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Neumonía What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs . The ...

  3. Nosocomial Infections Transmitted Via Computers : A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Atanda, Angela Achieng; Nwaoha, Nkechi Naomi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to discuss how current literature described nosocomial infections transmitted via computers in hospitals. It also described the various methods used to disinfect computers. The research questions in this study were; What are nosocomial infections? How do contaminated computer devices transmit nosocomial infections? and What infection control methods are applied to decontaminate computers within hospitals? The aim of conducting this study was to create an aw...

  4. Chronic necrotising pneumonia caused by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, J; Clark, T J; Corrin, B

    1989-01-01

    A woman with asthma developed chronic necrotising semi-invasive pneumonia due to mixed Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans infection; though not severely immunosuppressed, she may have been predisposed by long term oral corticosteroid and recurrent oral antibiotic treatment. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with chronic airflow limitation who develop cavitating pneumonia. Images PMID:2763249

  5. Comparative effectiveness of flomoxef versus carbapenems in the treatment of bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae with emphasis on minimum inhibitory concentration of flomoxef: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Su, Lin-Hui; Chen, Fang-Ju; Tang, Ya-Feng; Li, Chia-Chin; Chien, Chun-Chih; Liu, Jien-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This study compared treatment outcomes of adult patients with bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-EK) receiving flomoxef versus those receiving a carbapenem as definitive therapy. In propensity score matching (PSM) analysis, case patients receiving flomoxef shown to be active in vitro against ESBL-EK were matched with controls who received a carbapenem. The primary endpoint was 30-day crude mortality. The flomoxef group had statistically significantly higher sepsis-related mortality (27.3% vs. 10.5%) and 30-day mortality (28.8% vs. 12.8%) than the carbapenem group. Of the bacteraemic episodes caused by isolates with a MICflomoxef of ≤1 mg/L, sepsis-related mortality rates were similar between the two treatment groups (8.7% vs. 6.4%; P=0.73). The sepsis-related mortality rate of the flomoxef group increased to 29.6% and 50.0% of episodes caused by isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-4 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively, which was significantly higher than the carbapenem group (12.3%). In the PSM analysis of 86 case-control pairs infected with strains with a MICflomoxef of 2-8 mg/L, case patients had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate (38.4% vs. 18.6%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that flomoxef therapy for isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-8 mg/L, concurrent pneumonia or urosepsis, and a Pitt bacteraemia score ≥4 were independently associated with 30-day mortality. Definitive flomoxef therapy appears to be inferior to carbapenems in treating ESBL-EK bacteraemia, particularly for isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-8 mg/L, even though the currently suggested MIC breakpoint of flomoxef is ≤8 mg/L. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. Nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance pattern in open-heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarpour, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Youssef; Heydarpour, Behzad; Asadmobini, Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing open heart surgery have a relatively high risk of acquiring nosocomial infections. The development of antibiotic-resistant infections is associated with prolonged hospital stays and mortalities. Objectives: The present study was conducted to investigate nosocomial infections and the antibiotic resistance pattern in bacteria causing these infections in open heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah in the west of Iran over a 4-year period from March 2011 to March 2014. Materials and methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 135 cases of nosocomial infection among open heart surgery patients. The demographic characteristics and the risk factors of each case of infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocol. The data collected were then analyzed in SPSS-16. Results: Out of the 6,000 patients who underwent open heart surgery during this 4-year period at the selected hospital, nosocomial infections developed in 135 patients (2.25%), 59.3% of whom were female and 40.7% male. Surgery site infection (SSI), pneumonia (PNEU), urinary tract infection (UTI) and blood stream infection (BSI) affected 52.6%, 37%, 9.6% and 0.8% of the cases, respectively. E.coli , Klebsiella spp. and S. aureus were the most common bacteria causing the nosocomial infections. E. coli was most frequently resistant to imipenem (23.3%) Klebsiella spp. to gentamicin (38.5%) S. aureus to co-trimoxazole (54.2%). Conclusion: SSI had a high prevalence in this study. Further studies should therefore be conducted to examine the risk factors associated with SSI in open heart surgery. Various studies have shown that antibiotic resistance patterns are different in different regions. Finding a definitive treatment therefore requires an antibiogram.

  7. [In vitro antibacterial activity of Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) against nosocomial bacteria in Montería, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez Álvarez, Nelson; Angulo Ortíz, Alberto; Contreras Martínez, Orfa

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial resistance is a growing health problem worldwide that has serious economic and social impacts, compromising public health, and the therapeutic action of current antibiotics. Therefore, the search for new compounds with antimicrobial properties is relevant in modern studies, particularly against bacteria of clinical interest. In the present study, in vitro antibacterial activity of the ethanol extract and essential oil of Curcuma longa (Zingiberaceae) was evaluated against nosocomial bacteria, using the microdilution method. Escherichia coli strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus sp. were used, Salmonella sp. and Bacillus sp., isolated from nosocomial infections in a hospital in the city of Monteria and reference strains of S. aureus ATCC 43300, S. aureus ATCC 29213, S. aureus ATCC 25923, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, E. coli ATCC 25922 and K. pneumonia ATCC 700603. The ethanol extract antibacterial profile was more efficient at higher concentrations (1 000 ppm), obtaining significant percentages of reduction of more than 50 % against K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 and a clinical isolate of E. coli; while compared to Bacillus clinical isolate, was more active than the essential oil. For the rest of microorganisms, the reduction percentages obtained at a concentration of 1 000 ppm varied between 17 and 42 % with ethanolic extract, and 8 to 43 % with essential oil. At concentrations of 100 and 500 ppm antibacterial activity of the extracts was lower. The results indicated that the ethanolic extract and essential oil of C. longa rhizomes have active compounds with antibacterial properties that could be used in future research as a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of infections caused by nosocomial pathogens.

  8. Mycoplasmal pneumonia in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H.; Lengerke, H.J. v.

    1987-10-01

    Roentgenographic findings of bilateral interstitial pneumonia without segmental consolidation and with regional lymphadenitis, which occurs after infancy, are always suggestive of pneumonia from Mycoplasma pneumoniae, as this is one of the most frequent types of pneumonia in children. M. pneumonia can be presumed by the discrepancy between the extensive roentgenographic findings and the generally good condition of the patient. Before therapy is decided upon it is important to know what the etiology is.

  9. Mobile phones: Reservoirs for the transmission of nosocomial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shekhar; Juyal, Deepak; Adekhandi, Shamanth; Sharma, Munesh; Prakash, Rajat; Sharma, Neelam; Rana, Amit; Parihar, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Global burden of hospital-associated infection (HAI) is on the rise and contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality of the patients. Mobile phones are indispensible part of communication among doctors and other health care workers (HCWs) in hospitals. Hands of HCWs play an important role in transmission of HAI and mobile phones which are seldom cleaned and often touched during or after the examination of patients without hand washing can act as a reservoir for transmission of potent pathogens. This study aimed to investigate the rate of bacterial contamination of mobile phones among HCWs in our tertiary care hospital and to compare it with personal mobile phones of non-HCWs (control group). The mobile phones and dominant hands of 386 participants were sampled from four different groups, hospital doctors and staff (132), college faculty and staff (54), medical students (100) and control group (100). Informed consent and questionnaire was duly signed by all the participants. Samples were processed according to standard guidelines. 316 mobile phones (81.8%) and 309 hand swab samples (80%) showed growth of bacterial pathogens. The most predominant isolates were Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter species, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas species and Enterococcus species. Hundred percent contamination was found in mobile phones and hands of HCWs indicating mobile phones can be the potential source of nosocomial pathogens. Our study results suggest that use of mobile phones in health care setup should be restricted only for emergency calls. Strict adherence to infection control policies such as proper hand hygiene practices should be followed.

  10. Hospital ownership: a risk factor for nosocomial infection rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, C; Behnke, M; Geffers, C; Gastmeier, P

    2018-03-26

    In some countries, a relationship between hospital ownership and the occurrence of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) rates has been described. To investigate the association between hospital ownership and occurrence of HCAI in Germany. Five different components of the German national nosocomial infection surveillance system were analysed with regard to the influence of hospital ownership in the period 2014-2016. Endpoints included ventilator-associated pneumonia, central-venous-catheter-associated bloodstream infections, urinary-catheter-associated urinary tract infections, surgical site infections (SSI) following hip prosthesis and colon surgery, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) and hand rub consumption per 1000 patient-days. Three hospital ownership types (public, non-profit and private) were analysed using univariate and multi-variate methods. The distribution of hospitals according to the three ownership types was similar in all components. In total, 661 intensive care units (ICUs), 149 departments performing colon procedures, and 349 departments performing hip prosthesis were included. In addition, 568 hospitals provided their MRSA rates and 236 provided their CDI rates, and 1833 ICUs and 12,934 non-ICUs provided their hand rub consumption data. In general, the differences between the hospital types were rather small and not significant for the ICUs. In the multi-variate analysis, public hospitals had a lower SSI rate following hip prosthesis (odds ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.99). Hospital ownership was not found to have a major influence on the incidence of HCAI in Germany. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevention of nosocomial infection in the ICU setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, A; Raimondi, F

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this review is to focus the epidemiology and preventing measures of nosocomial infections that affect the critically ill patients. Most of them (over 80%) are related to the device utilization needed for patient life support but responsible for such complications as ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI), surgical site infections (SSI) and urinary tract infections (UTI). General recommendations include staff education and use of a surveillance program with a restrictive antibiotic policy. Adequate time must be allowed for hand washing and barrier precautions must always be used during device manipulation. The routine changing of central catheters is not necessary and increases costs; it is necessary to decrease the handling of administration sets, to use a more careful insertion technique and less frequent set replacement. Specific measures for VAP prevention are: 1). use of multi-use, closed-system suction catheters; 2). no routine change of the breathing circuit; 3). lubrication of the the endotracheal tube cuff with a water-soluble gel; 4). maintenance of patient in semi-recumbent position to improve chest physiotherapy. Specific measures for UTI prevention include: 1). use of a catheter-valve instead of a standard drainage system; 2). use of a silver-alloy, hydro gel-coated latex urinary catheter instead of uncoated catheters. By implementing effective preventive measures and maintaining strict surveillance of ICU infections, we hope to affect the associated morbidity, mortality, and cost that our patients and society bare. More clinical trials are needed to verify the efficacy of prevention measures of ICU infections.

  12. Differential roles of CD14 and toll-like receptors 4 and 2 in murine Acinetobacter pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knapp, Sylvia; Wieland, Catharina W.; Florquin, Sandrine; Pantophlet, Ralph; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Tshimbalanga, Ntambua; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE: Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is increasingly associated with gram-negative nosocomial pneumonia, but the molecular mechanisms that play a role in innate defenses during A. baumannii infection have not been elucidated. OBJECTIVE: To gain first insight

  13. Klebsiella pneumoniae triggers a cytotoxic effect on airway epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llobet-Brossa Enrique

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is a capsulated Gram negative bacterial pathogen and a frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Despite its clinical relevance, little is known about the features of the interaction between K. pneumoniae and lung epithelial cells on a cellular level, neither about the role of capsule polysaccharide, one of its best characterised virulence factors, in this interaction. Results The interaction between Klebsiella pneumoniae and cultured airway epithelial cells was analysed. K. pneumoniae infection triggered cytotoxicity, evident by cell rounding and detachment from the substrate. This effect required the presence of live bacteria and of capsule polysaccharide, since it was observed with isolates expressing different amounts of capsule and/or different serotypes but not with non-capsulated bacteria. Cytotoxicity was analysed by lactate dehydrogenase and formazan measurements, ethidium bromide uptake and analysis of DNA integrity, obtaining consistent and complementary results. Moreover, cytotoxicity of non-capsulated strains was restored by addition of purified capsule during infection. While a non-capsulated strain was avirulent in a mouse infection model, capsulated K. pneumoniae isolates displayed different degrees of virulence. Conclusion Our observations allocate a novel role to K. pneumoniae capsule in promotion of cytotoxicity. Although this effect is likely to be associated with virulence, strains expressing different capsule levels were not equally virulent. This fact suggests the existence of other bacterial requirements for virulence, together with capsule polysaccharide.

  14. Atopy: a risk factor of refractory mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yi-Xiao; Li, Jing; Tian, Ye; Liu, Quang-Hua; Bao, Jun

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the relationship of pathogen DNA copies with clinic and laboratory features among children with Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia. A total of 95 enrolled children with MP pneumonia were assigned into the high-MP-load group (>10 6 /mL) and the low-MP-load group (≤10 6 /mL) according to MP-DNA copies in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Clinical characteristics and any allergy history were collected. Aeroallergens and food allergens were detected with a skin test. Serum IgE and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) were assessed using enzyme immunoassay. BALF levels of IL-4, IFN-γ, IL-8 and TNF-α were assessed by ELISA. Compared with the low-MP-load group, 72.7% in the high-MP-load group developed refractory MP pneumonia who failed to respond to at least 1-week treatment with macrolides (72.7% vs 41.9%, P = 0.005). More children in the high-load group than those in the low-load group presented with extrapulmonary manifestations, lung consolidation, pleural effusion and atopic conditions including any allergy history, positive findings of aeroallergen test and increased serum IgE and ECP (P  0.05). Atopy may be a risk factor for the presence and severity of refractory MP pneumonia due to the high pathogen load in airway. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of communityacquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. Conclusion The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions. PMID:25909312

  16. Legionella pneumophila: risk assessment and strategy for the prevention and control of nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvo Torrisi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The term “Legionellosis” includes all forms of disease caused by microorganisms of the genus Legionella; it may manifest as a flu-like shape (Pontiac fever, or with severe pneumonia with high mortality (Legionnaires Disease. The causative agent was Legionella pneumophila in the literature although other strains of the genus Legionella are classified as pathogens, mode of transmission is through inhalation of aerosol particles produced by hot water or air conditioning systems: for this reason in community settings and nosocomial L. pneumophila represents a serious public health problem. In the light of epidemiological data since the year 2000 the Italian State has issued a series of provisions laws concerning the prevention and control of nosocomial Legionellosis environment and community.The present work aims to evaluate the presence of Legionella species and L. pneumophila comparing the different approaches proposed by the Guidelines of the regions of Lombardy and Piedmont in terms of assessment and prevention of risk “Legionellosis” in the field of nosocomial infection. The analytical methods used are those provided by the Regional Guidelines: the official method in the second CSR April 4 Method 2000 and UNI EN ISO 11731-1: 2008. Checks have been performed on equipment for the comparison of cold water, hot water and air conditioning in nursing homes, retirement homes and hospitals.The results obtained show that the method CSR April 4, 2000 restricts the search to L. pneumophila permitting, than the method EN ISO 11731-1: 2008, to carry out a risk assessment well targeted to the actual pathogen.The culture method for the detection of L. pneumophila allows you to not only prevention, but also to implement a series of targeted interventions following the directions of the legislation.

  17. Pentaglobin as an adjunct therapy in very low birthweight neonates with nosocomial sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salihoglu, O.; Can, E.; Koc, M.O.; Durmus, E.; Hatipoglu, S.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of pentaglobin treatment on clinical and laboratory parametres and the major morbidities in very low birthweight neonates with nosocomial sepsis before and after pentaglobin treatment. Methods: The prospective interventional study was conducted from January 1 to December 31, 2010, at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of the Bakirkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. Pentaglobin was initiated on the day of diagnosis of nosocomial sepsis to 13 pre-term neonates as a support therapy in addition to antibiotics; 5 ml/kg per day of pentaglobin was infused over a 4-hour period on 3 consecutive days. Clinical and laboratory parametres and major morbidities were recorded before and after pentaglobin treatment and compared using NCSS software. Results: Of the total, 8(66%) were females and 5 (40%) males. Following pentaglobin therapy, the immature-to-total neutrophil ratio and C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased, and the capillary pH and base excess were significantly increased (p 0.05). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (n=3; 23%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=2; 15.3%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1; 7.7%) were identified in blood cultures. The presence of intraventricular haemorrhages, necrotising enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia, and patent ductus arteriosus was not changed following the treatment. Adverse effects and mortality were not observed during or after the therapy. Conclusion: Pentaglobin treatment of nosocomial sepsis could be used as an adjunct therapy without any adverse short-term reactions, even in very low birthweight pre-term infants. (author)

  18. Acinetobacter spp. as nosocomial pathogens: Epidemiology and resistance features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad B. Almasaudi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter is a major cause of nosocomial infections; it is increasingly being associated with various epidemics and has become a widespread concern in a variety of hospitals worldwide. Multi-antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, is now recognized to be of great clinical significance. Numerous reports relay to the spread of A. baumannii in the hospital settings which leads to enhanced nosocomial outbreaks associated with high death rates. However, many other Acinetobacter spp. also can cause nosocomial infections. This review focused on the role of Acinetobacter spp. as nosocomial pathogens in addition to their persistence, antimicrobial resistance patterns and epidemiology. Keywords: Acinetobacter, Nosocomial infections, Multi-drug resistance, Epidemiology, Characteristics

  19. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children's hospital. Risk factors and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Jobran M

    2017-05-01

      To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia) at a Saudi children's hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen.  Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated  in Najran Maternity and Children's Hospital, Najran,  Saudi Arabia between January 2015 to February 2016. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the reference broth microdilution method.  Results: In this study, 48 (75%) isolates were identified in true infections and 16 (25%) isolates were considered colonization. The main types of S. maltophilia infection were pneumonia in 22 (45.8%) patients and bloodstream infection in 14 (29.2%) patients. The significant risk factors included exposure to invasive procedure (p=0.02), and presence of acute leukemia as an underlying disease (p=0.02). The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (100% sensitivity) and tigecycline (93.7% sensitivity). Conclusions: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen among pediatric patients. Accurate identification and susceptibility testing of this emerging pathogen are crucial for the management of infected patients and prevention of spread of this nosocomial pathogen.

  20. [Incidence and risk factors associated with nosocomial infection in pediatric heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Raya, Fidencia; Baeza-Zarco, Fabiola Janet

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are responsible for a high rate of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. Our objective was to determine the incidence and associated risk factors to nosocomial infections in this group of patients. A descriptive, prospective, clinical study was conducted in a tertiary hospital for a year. We calculated the rate of incidence, accumulated incidence and devices used. Was Applied the EPIDAT 2004 version 3.1 program OPS for obtaining of Chi-square with Yates correction for p with a confidence of 95 %, alpha of 0.05 with a degree of freedom, we calculated odds ratio, besides of the identification of microorganisms, their sensitivity and resistance to antibiotics. We calculated rates of: 45 % the incidence, 80.6 % cumulative incidence, 7.4 % of mortality, 13.3 % of case-fatality rate of infected and 2.7 % non-infected. The 44.4 % with pneumonia, 74 % associated with mechanical ventilation, 100 % nasogastric tube. The most frequently isolated microorganisms are: Acinetobacter baumanni, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with high resistance to antibiotics. Pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery have high risk of infection heart disease, cyanogen's have 5 times more risk. We observed a statistically significant association with infection using nasogastric probe and endotracheal tube, the risk increases to increased hospital stay. Infected patients have 4 times the risk of death.

  1. Controlling nosocomial infection based on structure of hospital social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Masuda, Naoki

    2008-10-07

    Nosocomial infection (i.e. infection in healthcare facilities) raises a serious public health problem, as implied by the existence of pathogens characteristic to healthcare facilities such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and hospital-mediated outbreaks of influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome. For general communities, epidemic modeling based on social networks is being recognized as a useful tool. However, disease propagation may occur in a healthcare facility in a manner different from that in a urban community setting due to different network architecture. We simulate stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered dynamics on social networks, which are based on observations in a hospital in Tokyo, to explore effective containment strategies against nosocomial infection. The observed social networks in the hospital have hierarchical and modular structure in which dense substructure such as departments, wards, and rooms, are globally but only loosely connected, and do not reveal extremely right-skewed distributions of the number of contacts per individual. We show that healthcare workers, particularly medical doctors, are main vectors (i.e. transmitters) of diseases on these networks. Intervention methods that restrict interaction between medical doctors and their visits to different wards shrink the final epidemic size more than intervention methods that directly protect patients, such as isolating patients in single rooms. By the same token, vaccinating doctors with priority rather than patients or nurses is more effective. Finally, vaccinating individuals with large betweenness centrality (frequency of mediating connection between pairs of individuals along the shortest paths) is superior to vaccinating ones with large connectedness to others or randomly chosen individuals, which was suggested by previous model studies.

  2. community acquired pneumonia among children admitted

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... associated with the disease. Design: Prospective cross ... 21% of child deaths are due to pneumonia (3), and .... recognises both indoor and outdoor pollution as .... acute lower respiratory illness in urban bangladesh children ...

  3. Nosocomial Infections and Antibiotic Administration in Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Hamedi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial Infections (NI are a frequent and relevant problem, in other hands; those are responsible of mortality especially in pediatric ICU( Intensive Care Unit and NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Healthcare-associated infections are important in wide-ranging concern in the medical field. The most cause of Nosocomial infection include: bloodstream infection, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and wound infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of the three most common NI in the Pediatric department.        Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective study in a single Pediatric department during 12 months. Children were assessed for 3 NI: wound infections, pneumonia and urinary tract infections (UTI, as the same method as Center of Disease Control criteria. All patients were followed up and individuals who had have NI and their treatment was entered in this study.          Results: In this study 811 patients were hospitalized that 60% of them were male and were older than 60 months. The main causes of hospitalization include: toxicity, seizure, respiratory infection and fever. Among them 15 cases had NI (1.87%. The most NI occurred in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and it was followed in aspect of intubation. The most cultured organism was pseudomonas that they suspected to ceftazidime and isolate from blood and endotracheal tube.           Conclusion:  NI presence was associated with increased mortality and length of stay in hospital. This study highlights the importance of NIs in children admitted to a pediatric department especially PICU in a developing country. Clinical monitoring of NIs and bacterial resistance profiles are required in all pediatric units.

  4. Pneumonia - adults (community acquired)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pneumocystis jiroveci can cause pneumonia in people whose immune system is not working well, especially people with advanced HIV infection. Viruses , such as the flu virus, are also a common cause of pneumonia. ...

  5. FastStats: Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utilization Therapeutic Drug Use Electronic Medical Records Health Expenditures Health Insurance Coverage Immunization Long Term Care Adult ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Pneumonia National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute: Pneumonia National Institute of ...

  6. Pneumonia - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000017.htm Pneumonia in adults - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. You have pneumonia, which is an infection in your lungs. In ...

  7. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  8. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different from regular pneumonia? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Walking pneumonia is an informal term ... be treated with an antibiotic. With Eric J. Olson, M.D. Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma ...

  9. [Incidence of admissions due to pneumonia in children under 24 months old before and after the introduction of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine into the National Immunization Program of Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández V, José Pablo; Goecke H, Carola; von Borries, Cecilia; Tapia R, Natalia; Santolaya de P, María Elena

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial pneumonia in children, especially in the hospitalized population. The 10-valent pneumococcal vaccine was included in the National Immunization Program of Chile in 2011. This study aims to evaluate the incidence of pneumonia in hospitalized children<24 months of age in the Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital before and after the introduction of the pneumococcal vaccine into the National Immunization Program. Passive surveillance study. Patients<24 months with discharge diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia from Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital were studied between 2009 and 2013. Data were obtained from the Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital's Statistical Service. The incidence of pneumonia was evaluated in the pre-vaccination period (2009-2010) and in the post-vaccination period (2012-2013). During the study period, an average of 4,321 discharges/year was observed in children<24 months (range: 3,587-4,702), with a significant decrease from pre- to post-vaccination vaccine period (4,644 vs 4,013, P<.001). The average incidence of pneumonia ranged from 3.4/100,000 to 1.5/100,000 in the pre- and post-vaccine period, respectively (P=.009), with an annual mean of 157 cases of pneumonia in the pre- vaccine period, and 62 cases in the postvaccine period (P<.001) and a decrease in incidence between the two periods of 56%. This study confirms information previously obtained in other countries, which show a decrease in the incidence of pneumonia associated with the implementation of a pneumococcal vaccine at the population level. Ongoing surveillance is required to evaluate if this effect is maintained over time and expands to older populations. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Kjaeldgaard, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe a nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis during four months after June 1989. SETTING--A department of infectious diseases in Copenhagen, seeing about half the patients with AIDS in Denmark. SUBJECTS--73 HIV antibody negative subjects and 60 antibody positive subjects...... admitted as inpatients during the transmission period of the outbreak (20 June-14 August), of whom 18 (17 with AIDS, one with AIDS related complex), developed cryptosporidiosis. Two further HIV negative subjects (one departmental secretary, one visiting relative) developed cryptosporidiosis. MAIN OUTCOME...... out ice for cold drinks. The mean incubation time was at least 13 days-that is, twice that in HIV-negative patients. Of the 18 patients with AIDS who developed cryptosporidiosis, five recovered, two were symptomless carriers, three died of unrelated causes, and eight died after prolonged diarrhoea...

  11. Nosocomial infections by respiratory syncytial virus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Karina Machado Echeverría

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute lower respiratory infections cause high morbidity and mortality in children. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most prevalent agent. Some viruses cause serious nosocomial infections. In Uruguay, there is no knowledge about the morbidity and mortality of nosocomial infections by RSV. Objective: To determine the prevalence and characteristics of RSV nosocomial infections. Methodology: A descriptive study of acute lower respiratory infections caused by RSV in patients younger than two years, between 1/1/2005 and 31/12/2008 at the Hospital Pediátrico del Centro Hospitalario Pereira Rossell, was made. Results: Were identified 59 patients who represented an annual rate lower than 2/1000 discharges. The monthly distribution of cases was similar to the respiratory infections. No outbreaks were reported. The age of the patients had an average of 8.9 months, 39 were younger than one year, 23 had one or more risk factors for severe disease. Six patients required admission to intensive care unit, all required invasive ventilation, 3 died, none had chronic respiratory failure following the RSV nosocomial infection. Conclusions: During the study period, the RSV nosocomial infections showed a low prevalence, despite it highly contagiousness. They mainly affected young children, carriers of risk factors for severe ALRI. Their evolution was similar to that reported for RSV respiratory infections community acquired. It is important to maintain standards for the control of nosocomial infections, to prevent nosocomial transmission of RSV and prevent the onset of severe disease in hospitalized patients.

  12. Assessing the nosocomial infections' rate and the antibiotic resistance pattern among the patient hospitalized in beheshti hospital during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Kadkhodaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Nosocomial infection is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and length of stay. Detection of infection, identify the etiology of bacterial antibiotic resistance pattern, is necessary given the widespread use of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant organisms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 288 patients admitted to the Beheshti Hospitals in Kashan based on NNIS definitions according to the state of Health and Medical education. In this study infections and antibiotic resistance symptoms were found. Data analyses were performed with Chi-square test. Results: Among the 288 patients studied, with mean out of hospital infection was 0.80%. Most cases of infection associated were pneumonia. The highest rates of infection were in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU with 51.7%. Nosocomial infection in ICU wards was associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The most common types were ventilator-associated pneumonia. Among the microorganisms, negative Gram was seen more. The common pathogens were including Acinetobacter, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella. Antimicrobial resistance was generally increasing and had emerged from selective pressure from antibiotic use and transmission through health staff. Conclusion: This study showed a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance of microorganisms is significant. Hence, it seems that reducing aggressive acts and conduct hygiene education and monitoring act of antibiotics is necessary to prevent antibiotic resistance.

  13. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

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    Gladis Isabel Yampara Guarachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement.

  14. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldera, Jonathan; Nedel, Wagner Luis; Cardoso, Paulo Ricardo Cerveira; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Coagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections. CASE REPORT The case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin. CONCLUSIONS The reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections.

  15. The comparison between proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate in incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorvash, Farzin; Abbasi, Saeed; Meidani, Mohsen; Dehdashti, Fatemeh; Ataei, Behrooz

    2014-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in intensive care unit (ICU). The ICU patients are at risk of stress ulcer and gastrointestinal bleeding for different reasons. In order to prevent this complication, anti acids are used for patients. This study compared pantoprazole with sucralfate in incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia. This randomized clinical trial was carried out on ICU patients with mechanical ventilation in Alzahra university hospital in Isfahan from 2010 to 2011. One hundred forty eight ventilated patients were randomly allocated in two groups. The first group was treated with sucralfate and the second group was treated with pantoprazole for stress ulcer prophylaxis and followed up during hospitalization in ICU for nosocomial pneumonia. Data analyzed by SPSS software. One hundred thirty seven patients were selected for study. During the study period, 34 cases (24.8%) acquired pneumonia, of which 10 were in the sucralfate group and 24 were in the pantoprazole group (14.1% vs. 36.4%). According to Chi-square test, rate of pneumonia was significantly lower in patients receiving sucralfate than the pantoprazole group (P < 0.001). On the basis of the results, there is a significant relationship between the kind of drug used for stress ulcer and ventilator associated pneumonia. According to this article, rate of pneumonia was significantly lower in patients receiving sucralfate than the pantoprazole group.

  16. The comparison between proton pump inhibitors and sucralfate in incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Khorvash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP are one of the most common nosocomial infections in intensive care unit (ICU. The ICU patients are at risk of stress ulcer and gastrointestinal bleeding for different reasons. In order to prevent this complication, anti acids are used for patients. This study compared pantoprazole with sucralfate in incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was carried out on ICU patients with mechanical ventilation in Alzahra university hospital in Isfahan from 2010 to 2011. One hundred forty eight ventilated patients were randomly allocated in two groups. The first group was treated with sucralfate and the second group was treated with pantoprazole for stress ulcer prophylaxis and followed up during hospitalization in ICU for nosocomial pneumonia. Data analyzed by SPSS software. Results: One hundred thirty seven patients were selected for study. During the study period, 34 cases (24.8% acquired pneumonia, of which 10 were in the sucralfate group and 24 were in the pantoprazole group (14.1% vs. 36.4%. According to Chi-square test, rate of pneumonia was significantly lower in patients receiving sucralfate than the pantoprazole group ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: On the basis of the results, there is a significant relationship between the kind of drug used for stress ulcer and ventilator associated pneumonia. According to this article, rate of pneumonia was significantly lower in patients receiving sucralfate than the pantoprazole group.

  17. A Model of the Costs of Community and Nosocomial Pediatric Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Canadian Hospitals

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    Philip Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately one in 10 hospitalized patients will acquire a nosocomial infection (NI after admission to hospital, of which 71% are due to respiratory viruses, including the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV. NIs are concerning and lead to prolonged hospitalizations. The economics of NIs are typically described in generalized terms and specific cost data are lacking.

  18. Pneumoniae in immunocompromised patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, Volkmar; Lehnert, Thomas; Thalhammer, Axel

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large surface area, heat, high humidity and high oxygen supply in the lung makes an ideal environment for the propagation of germs. The purpose of the immune system is to establish and maintain the balance between saprophytes and immune defense so as to depress and ultimately kill germs as they infiltrate the body. This usually is achieved by the use of a highly complex immune system. It is a perfect combination of non-specific, cellular and humoral immune mechanisms with very specific immune cells and antibodies, which are specialized on particular pathogens. The specific defenses potentiate the effect of the nonspecific defense in a large extent so as to prevent re-infection and ultimately eliminate recognized pathogens. The causes of immune deficiency can be related to either the cellular or humoral level and affect both the specific and nonspecific defenses. There is a different excitation spectrum depending on the type of immune deficiency. Immune deficiency can prevalently cause complications in the course of infections, decelerate the healing and allow the occurrence of rare pathogens. In particular, the radiological characteristics of typical and atypical pneumonia in immunocompromised patients will be discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the appearance of bacterial infections, mycobacterioses, PCP, CMV, and laid fungual pneumonia. Even it is not possible to identify certain pathogens radiologically, it is often possible to narrow the spectrum of germs causing pulmonary infections significantly by comparing with other pulmonary complications such as lymphoma or kaposisarcomas. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of a training programme for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Jam Gatell, M Rosa; Santé Roig, Montserrat; Hernández Vian, Óscar; Carrillo Santín, Esther; Turégano Duaso, Concepción; Fernández Moreno, Inmaculada; Vallés Daunis, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units (ICUs). Most published studies have analysed nurses' theoretical knowledge about a specific procedure; however, the transfer of this knowledge to the practice has received little attention. Aim To assess the impact of training session on nurses' knowledge regarding VAP, compliance with VAP preventive measures, VAP incidence and determining whether nursing workload affects complia...

  20. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia and Causative Microorganisms in Intensive Care Unit: A Two Year Retrospective Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Onur Palabıyık; Yaşar Toptaş; Aziz Öğütlü

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common nosocomial infection in the intensive care units (ICUs). It causes prolonged hospital stay and increases mortality. In this study, we aimed to investigate the rate of VAP, causative microorganisms, and their antibiotic susceptibilities in anaesthesiology and reanimation ICU (ARICU). Material and Method: This retrospective study included patients who were admitted to 12-bed ARICU between January 2013 and December 2014. The ...

  1. Care bundle for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a medical intensive care unit in Northern Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ping Zeng; Han Su; Chein-Wen Chen; Shu-Meng Cheng; Li-Fang Chang; Wen-Chii Tzeng; Bing-Hsiean Tzeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) occurs in patients requiring mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h. VAP is the most common nosocomial infection and the leading cause of complications and death in intensive care units (ICUs). Materials and Methods: Two historical comparison groups of 375 patients who used mechanical ventilators for more than 48 h in the medical ICU (MICU) from December 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012 and December 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014 were enrolled in this stud...

  2. Efecto del uso de alcohol en gel sobre las infecciones nosocomiales por Klebsiella pneumoniae multirresistente

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bermejo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available El lavado de manos es la medida de control más efectiva para interrumpir la transmisión de microorganismos patógenos nosocomiales. Sin embargo, la adherencia por parte del personal de salud es baja. Una nueva modalidad para la higiene de las manos, el frotado con alcohol-gel (AG, permite reducir el tiempo requerido y ofrece mayor comodidad. Con la finalidad de evaluar el efecto de la introducción del AG sobre las tasas de infecciones debidas a los tres agentes nosocomiales multirresistentes (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae y Pseudomonas aeruginosa más frecuentes en nuestro hospital, se realizó un estudio observacional, comparando la incidencia de infecciones en los 12 meses previos y posteriores a la intervención. Luego de la introducción del AG se redujo de manera significativa la incidencia de infecciones debidas a Klebsiella pneumoniae BLEE (RR: 0.38, especialmente las bacteriemias (RR:0.10. El uso de AG ofrece condiciones que probablemente mejoren la adherencia del personal a la higiene de manos. Sin embargo, sobre la base de este estudio, no podemos concluir que el resultado observado se deba al AG en sí mismo o a una mayor adherencia a la práctica higiénica.Handwashing is considered the most important and effective infection control measure to prevent transmission of nosocomial pathogens. However, compliance with handwashing by health care workers is low. A new modality for hand hygiene is alcohol gel rub, which reduces time required, does not damage the skin and increases health care workers compliance. An observational study was conducted to assess the effect of alcohol-gel hand antiseptic on infection rates due to the 3 more frequent multi-resistant bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae y Pseudomonas aeruginosa in our hospital. Two periods were compared, 12 months before and 12 months after starting alcohol gel use. The second period (AG use showed a significant reduction on incidence rates of

  3. Code blue: Acinetobacter baumannii, a nosocomial pathogen with a role in the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, A.M.; Kwaik, Y. Abu; Lamont, R.J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Actinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that can cause a wide range of serious conditions including pneumonia, meningitis, necrotizing fasciitis and sepsis. It is also a major cause of wound infections in military personnel injured during the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, leading to its popular nickname of ‘Iraqibacter’. Contributing to its success in clinical settings is resistance to environmental stresses such as desiccation and disinfectants. Moreover, in recent years there has been a dramatic increase in the number of A. baumannii strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes. Acinetobacter baumannii is an inhabitant of oral biofilms, which can act as a reservoir for pneumonia and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Subgingival colonization by A. baumannii increases the risk of refractory periodontitis. Pathogenesis of the organism involves adherence, biofilm formation and iron acquisition. In addition, A. baumannii can induce apoptotic cell death in epithelial cells and kill hyphal forms of Candida albicans. Virulence factors that have been identified include pili, the outer membrane protein OmpA, phospholipases and extracellular polysaccharide. Acinetobacter baumannii can sense blue light through a blue-light sensing using flavin (BLUF) domain protein, BlsA. The resulting conformational change in BlsA leads to changes in gene expression, including virulence genes. PMID:25052812

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance of Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae: Epidemiology, Hypervirulence-Associated Determinants, and Resistance Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Ro Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most clinically relevant species in immunocompromised individuals responsible for community-acquired and nosocomial infections, including pneumonias, urinary tract infections, bacteremias, and liver abscesses. Since the mid-1980s, hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, generally associated with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, has emerged as a clinically significant pathogen responsible for serious disseminated infections, such as pyogenic liver abscesses, osteomyelitis, and endophthalmitis, in a generally younger and healthier population. Hypervirulent K. pneumoniae infections were primarily found in East Asia and now are increasingly being reported worldwide. Although most hypervirulent K. pneumoniae isolates are antibiotic-susceptible, some isolates with combined virulence and resistance, such as the carbapenem-resistant hypervirulent K. pneumoniae isolates, are increasingly being detected. The combination of multidrug resistance and enhanced virulence has the potential to cause the next clinical crisis. To better understand the basic biology of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae, this review will provide a summarization and discussion focused on epidemiology, hypervirulence-associated factors, and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of such hypervirulent strains. Epidemiological analysis of recent clinical isolates in China warns the global dissemination of hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains with extensive antibiotic resistance in the near future. Therefore, an immediate response to recognize the global dissemination of this hypervirulent strain with resistance determinants is an urgent priority.

  5. 102 nosocomial infections and the challenges of control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY MAY 2010 .... international organizations including accreditation and governmental agencies, national associations and organizations, World ... coupled with research to keep nosocomial ..... medical/dental students, student nurses and other.

  6. Application of zwitterionic detergent to the solubilization of Klebsiella pneumoniae outer membrane proteins for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz-Misa, I; Serek, P; Dudek, B; Pawlak, A; Bugla-Płoskońska, G; Gamian, A

    2014-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a frequent cause of nosocomial respiratory, urinary and gastrointestinal tract infections and septicemia with the multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae being a major public health concern. Outer membrane proteins (OMPs) are important virulence factors responsible for the appropriate adaptation to the host environment. They constitute of the antigens being the first in contact with infected organism. However, K. pneumoniae strains are heavily capsulated and it is important to establish the OMPs isolation procedure prior to proteomics extensive studies. In this study we used Zwittergent Z 3-14® as a detergent to isolate the OMPs from K. pneumoniae cells and resolve them using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). As a result we identified 134 protein spots. The OMPs identified in this study are possible candidates for the development of a protein-based vaccine against K. pneumoniae infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. SPHINGOMONAS PAUCIMOBILIS INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN: NOSOCOMIAL VERSUS COMMUNITY ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

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    Nuri Bayram

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a causative agent of infection in immunocompromised patients, and healthcare-associated infections. Although the infections associated with S.paucimobilis occurs rarely, it has been encountered with increasing frequency in clinical settings. In the current study we noted the risk factors and clinical features of the children with S.paucimobilis infections, and the antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolated strains among the patients. This study was conducted in Dr. Behçet Uz Children’s Hospital, Turkey, during the period of January 2005 and December 2012. The medical records of pediatric patients with positive cultures for S.paucimobilis were reviewed. Sphingomonas paucimobilis isolates were recovered from 24 pediatric patients. The median age was 4 years (ranging from 3 days infant to 15 years and 58,3% were male. Eight (33,3% of the patients were under 1 months of age. Among the patients; 13 (54,2% infections were community related however 11(45.8% infections were nosocomial infection. The median duration of hospital stay was 7 days (ranging from 4 to 22 days. The most effective antibiotics were fluoroquinolones, carbapenems, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. This is the first largest study in children to evaluate the clinical features of S. paucimobilis infections. Sphingomonas paucimobilis may cause infections in both previously healthy and immunocompromised children. Although variable antimicrobial regimens were achieved to the patients, there was no attributable fatality due to S.paucimobilis infections due to the low virulence of the bacteria.

  8. streptococcus pneumoniae , klebsiella pneumoniae proteus vulgaris

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2-20mm) on Streptococcus pneumoniae and Proteus vulgaris when compared to the ... The result from this preliminary study suggests that the plant contains active compounds that .... Veterinary and Medical Laboratory Technology, Vom,. Jos.

  9. NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS WITH UROLITHIASIS IN THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Sadulloev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Objective: To determine the most frequent causative agents of nosocomial infection in patients with urolithiasis in the postoperative period.Material and Methods. The study is based on the results of comprehensive studies conducted in 122 patients with nosocomial urinary tract infection, detected in 823 patients with urolithiasis treated by various methods. A cohort of 823 patients is isolated from 2688 patients treated without at admission signs of infections in the urinary tract for the period 2011–2014. All patients were treated at the Urological department of Avicenna Tajik State Medical University in the Republican Clinical Center of Urology. Main results. By the method of randomly selected 823 medical records of patients with urolithiasis various operations we carried out with 122 patients revealed cases of nosocomial infections. The diagnosis of nosocomial infections on the basis of established symptomatic urinary tract infection, asymptomatic bacteriuria or the presence of wound infection, use during the hospital stay for treatment of antibiotics, antiseptics, physiotherapy and other therapies. The incidence of nosocomial infections was studied in dependence with the severity of the underlying disease, the volume of surgical, invasive, endoscopic and other urological procedures, the timing and frequency of tests, the proportion of individual clinical manifestations in the overall structure of urinary tract infections, sex and age of patients.Conclusions. The leading microflora causing nosocomial infection in patients with urolithiasis in all treatments are gram-negative microorganisms, including prevailing E.coli (24,0%.

  10. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  11. Neumonía nosocomial asociada a ventilación mecánica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Maciques Rodríguez

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Se informa que la neumonía asociada a ventilación mecánica es un tipo particular de infección nosocomial frecuente en los pacientes críticos y se asocia con altas tasas de morbilidad y mortalidad. Su origen es polimicrobiano y depende de múltiples factores de riesgo como: edad, días de ventilación, poca movilización, alcalinización gástrica, trauma, coma y uso de medicamentos como: sedantes y bloqueadores, entre otros. Las estrategias fundamentales para la prevención de esta entidad, tienen como objetivo reducir el impacto de los factores de riesgo ya sean intrínsecos o extrínsecos. Su pronóstico depende del momento de aparición de los síntomas, por lo que se clasifica de inicio temprano, aquella que aparece antes de los 4 días de ventilación, producida por los gérmenes de la orofaringe, se asocia a baja mortalidad y generalmente es de buen pronóstico y la de inicio tardío que aparece después de los 5 días de apoyo ventilatorio, producida por cepas multirresistentes y de muy mal pronóstico. El diagnóstico es difícil por los múltiples criterios propuestos a través de los diferentes estudios realizados. Los emitidos por la Sociedad Americana del Tórax en 1999 son más específicos, pues reúnen las condiciones clínicas, microbiológicas y no microbiológicas, las cuales no son invasivas, resultan fáciles y rápidas de recoger y pueden aplicarse a cualquier grupo de edad, independientemente de la causa que provocó la enfermedad. El análisis microscópico directo y el conocimiento del mapa epidemiológico de cada servicio, permiten el inicio de un tratamiento empírico más efectivo. Aunque la tendencia actual en el tratamiento es la monoterapia, no existe un antibiótico ideal que cubra la totalidad del espectro de los microorganismos responsables de esta entidad.It is reported that pneumonia associated with mechanical ventilation is a particular type of nosocomial infection that is frequently found among critical

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species in Asir Region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Nazar M; Osman, Amani A; Haimour, Waleed O; Sarhan, Mohammed A A; Mohammed, Mohammed N; Zyad, Eyhab M; Al-Ghtani, Abdalla M

    2013-03-15

    This study aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of antibiotics towards nosocomial infections caused by Acinetobacter species. The study took place during the period Dec. 2011- Dec. 2012 at Assir Central Hospital in collaboration with the department of microbiology, college of medicine, King Khalid University, Abha. A prospective study involving 150 patients presented with nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter species detected by bacteriological tests; direct microscopy, culture in blood agar media, fermentation test in MacConkey media and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) for antibiotics sensitivity using Muller Hinton media and Chemical test using API 20. A 150 nosocomial infections in this study showed gram-negative coccobacilli, non motile, glucose-negative fermentor and oxidase negative. All isolates showed 100% sensitivity to: Imipramine, Meropenem, Colistin. From the rest of tested antibiotics the higher resistant ones were; Nitrofurantoin 87% and Cefoxitin 85%. The least resistant antibiotics; Imipenem 3% and Ticarcillin 7%. While variable resistance in the rest of tested antimicrobials. A 47 patients (31.3%) have used antibiotics prior to this study. The high rate of usage occurred in elder patients. The frequency of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus baumannii complex multi-drugs resistance ABCMDR is rising including almost all commonly used antibiotics. Only few antibiotics exert 100% sensitivity towards these bacteria.

  13. Retrospective study of diseases and associated pneumonia type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    2014-09-05

    Sep 5, 2014 ... The causes and types of pneumonia in dogs have not been accorded due attention in Nigeria. It is imperative to ... records while the specific type of pneumonia was by histopathology of selected lungs tissues, using standard techniques. .... compromised immunity or those associated with stress due to early ...

  14. Fibrosing organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Brooke; Rassl, Doris

    2013-10-01

    Organising pneumonia (otherwise referred to as bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia) is characterised histologically by plugs of granulation tissue, which are present predominantly within small airways, alveolar ducts and peri-bronchiolar alveoli. This pattern is not specific for any disorder or cause, but is one type of inflammatory response to pulmonary injury, which may be seen in a wide variety of clinical conditions. Typically, organising pneumonia responds very well to corticosteroid treatment; however, a small percentage of patients appear to develop progressive fibrosis.

  15. [Nosocomial Clostridium difficile diarrhea--adverse effect of antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeni, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    C. difficile is recognised as the main cause for colitis in hospitalised patients which are treated with antibiotics, chemotherapics or other drugs that disturb intestinal microbiota. Thus, a rapid and correct diagnostic of Clostridium difficile infections is essential for preventing nosocomial infection spread. Empiric therapy, regardless of the laboratory investigation results, is inadequate, especially in epidemic situations, as not all the cases of diarrhoea are due to C. difficile infection. Other risk factors for CDAD (Clostridiumn difficile Associated Diseases might be: prolonged hospitalization or residency in an asylum, age, existence of a severe chronic disease in the background nasogastric intubation, anti-ulcer drugs, at less extent gastrointestinal surgery, other immunosuppresive compounds etc. In our country, C. difficile infection is rather frequent in adults, though it is not always reported by clinicians. The circulation of endemic rybotype 027 in Romania is not well documented, the rybotype being extremely virulent and spread in other European countries. Hence the importance of extending the diagnostic capacity of C. difficile infection in order to allow detection of this rybotype among the strains isolated in our country.

  16. Nosocomial klebsiella infection in neonates in a tertiary care hospital: Protein profile by SDS-page and klebocin typing as epidemiological markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malik A

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To find out the prevalence of Klebsiella in hospital acquired neonatal infections in a tertiary care set up and to evaluate the role of klebocin typing and protein profile by SDS-PAGE in epidemiological typing of the isolates. METHODS: Hospital born neonates transferred to the neonatal unit after birth and available in the unit 48 hours later comprised the study group. Two hundred and three neonates were found eligible for inclusion in the study. Repeated blood cultures, other relevant clinical specimens and environmental samples were collected and identified according to the standard techniques. Isolated clinical and environmental Klebsiella pneumoniae strains were subjected to klebocin typing and protein profiling by SDS-PAGE at regular intervals. RESULTS: Multi drug resistant K. pneumoniae were the commonest organism isolated in 30 neonates leading to the incidence of Klebsiella nosocomial infection to be 14.7%. Klebocin typing of the K. pneumoniae isolates showed four patterns with type 312 being the commonest (43.4%. Whole cell protein analysis by SDS-PAGE of K. pneumoniae isolates revealed four types of banding pattern. Analysis of the typing method showed that the typeability and reproducibility of klebocin was 83.3% and 73.3% respectively whereas typeability and reproducibility of SDS-PAGE was 100%. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present study it is concluded that SDS-PAGE typing method is better than klebocin typing in neonatal nosocomial infection. It is also suggested that protein profile by SDS-PAGE may be used as a tool for epidemiological typing of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in laboratories where genomic based molecular typing technique is not available.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-udløst autoimmun hæmolyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anne Lisbeth; Aagaard, Thomas Granum; Birgens, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is naturally resistant to betalactamase antibiotics but is sensitive to macrolides. Occasionally, infections with M. pneumoniae can lead to severe anaemia due to its ability to cause haemolysis when cold agglutination occurs. Increasing bacterial resistance to macrolid...

  18. Nitrofurantoin-Associated Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E Fenton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to nitrofurantoin has rarely been reported and is associated with poor outcomes. A case of nitrofurantoin-associated bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia responsive to drug withdrawal and corticosteroids is presented.

  19. [Prevalence of nosocomial infections in two hospitals in Conakry (Guinea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Alpha Kabinet; Doumbouya, Naman; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Konaté, Bintou; Dabo, Yacouba; Panzo, Daniel Agbo; Keita, Mamady

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections can be prevented by applying simple hygiene rules. However, they have not been sufficiently studied in the Republic of Guinea. For this purpose, we conducted a one-day study in the Conakry University Hospital surgery wards and intensive care units. Fourteen units (12 surgical wards and 2 intensive care units) participated in the study. A total of 310 patients were included. A nosocomial infection was observed in 62 patients, [20%, 95%CI 15.9-24.8%]. Surgical site infections were significantly more frequent with 42/62 cases [67.7%, 95%CI 55.3-78.1%, p = 0.0001] than other types of infections (urinary tract, skin and digestive) with 20/62 cases [32.3% 95%CI 21.9-44.6%]. The average hospital stay of 29.1 ± 23.4 days [95%CI, 23.2 ± 35.04] for patients with nosocomial infection was significantly different (p = 0.0001) from that observed in patients without nosocomial infection: 15.9 ± 16.3 days [95%CI, 13.8 ± 17.9]. Staphylococcus aureus was the pathogen most commonly isolated: 32/62 (51.6%; 95%CI 39.5-63.6%). Escherichia coli infection was identified in the bladder catheters of 13 patients [20.9%, 95%CI 12.7-32.6%]. Finally, five deaths were observed among the 62 patients with nosocomial infection. This study shows that nosocomial infections are common in Conakry University Hospital. Further studies must be conducted to identify the risk factors for nosocomial infections and to propose solutions.

  20. [Chlamydia pneumoniae--etiology of ophthalmia neonatorum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krásný, J; Borovanská, J; Hrubá, D

    2003-07-01

    The authors observed mucous discharge in palpebral aperture, accompanied by a different degree of effusion of eyelids and chemosis of conjunctivae, particularly the tarsal ones, in 12 physiological newborns. Chlamydia pneumoniae proved to be the etiological agent in the newborn ophthalmia. The eye infection was not detected in the same period of time and in the same maternity hospital in the period of observation from September 1999 to March 2001. The detection of Chlamydia pneumoniae was performed in conjunctiva smears. The impression films on slides were examined by the method of indirect immunofluorescence with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies (medac, Germany). In the early stages the secretion included a sanguineous component, which was then changing into a mucoid or mucopurulent form. The character of conjunctival symptoms was changing in the course of inflammation. Effusion of the lower transitory fold (plica) was gradually accompanied by a picture of pseudofollicular changes on the tarsal conjunctiva. Clarithromycin in the form of syrup at daily doses of 15 mg/kg/day for the period of two weeks offered an efficient therapy of the affection. Control smears after 14 days were always negative and, at the same time, the pathological finding on the conjunctivae disappeared. The nasolacrimal obstruction was the only complication of this chlamydia infection, taking place in seven sucklings, i.e. in 58%. The passage through lacrimal drainage system reappeared in all the affected infants until they reached one year of age. The remaining question to be answered is the way the newborns encountered the infection. A nosocomial infection may be the case, but Chlamydia pneumoniae could also be present in the urogenital tract of mothers and transferred to the newborn via the birth canal similarly as is the case of Chlamydia trachomatis infection. The mode of infection deserves further investigation.

  1. Point-of-care controls for nosocomial legionellosis combined with chlorine dioxide potable water decontamination: a two-year survey at a Welsh teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, I K; Hill, D W; Tan, T Y; Butchart, E G; Wilson, K; Finlay, G; Burge, S; Ribeiro, C D

    2005-10-01

    This study reports a two-year programme of attempted eradication of Legionella colonization in the potable water supply of a 1000-bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Wales. There was a simultaneous, point-of-care, sterile-water-only policy for all intensive care units (ICU) and bone marrow and renal transplant units in order to prevent acquisition of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. The programme was initiated following a case of nosocomial pneumonia caused by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1-Bellingham-like genotype A on the cardiac ICU. The case occurred 14 days after mitral and aortic valve replacement surgery. Clinical and epidemiological investigations implicated aspiration of hospital potable water as the mechanism of infection. Despite interventions with chlorine dioxide costing over 25000 UK pounds per annum, Legionella has remained persistently present in significant numbers (up to 20000 colony forming units/L) and with little reduction in the number of positive sites. Two further cases of nosocomial disease occurred over the following two-year period; in one case, aspiration of tap water was implicated again, and in the other case, instillation of contaminated water into the right main bronchus via a misplaced nasogastric tube was implicated. These cases arose because of inadvertent non-compliance with the sterile-water-only policy in high-risk locations. Enhanced clinical surveillance over the same two-year period detected no other cases of nosocomial disease. This study suggests that attempts at eradication of Legionella spp. from complex water systems may not be a cost-effective measure for prevention of nosocomial infections, and to the best of our knowledge is the first study from the UK to suggest that the introduction of a sterile-water-only policy for ICUs and other high-risk units may be a more cost-effective approach.

  2. Pneumonia in patients on the background of blood cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertseva T.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Problematic issues of etiologic diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia are being studied actively. At the same time specific features of pneumonia in patients with severe immune defects, against blood cancer including are studied insufficiently. By the result of microbiological examinations of 149 patients with pneumonia on the background of blood cancer, who have undergone treatment in hematological center of CE “Dnipropetrovsk local multi-field clinical hospital №4” in 2010-2012, bacterial causative agents were determined in 59,7% of accidents, among which gram-negative microorganisms made up 69,7%, gram-positive – 30,3%. In 63% of accidents the asso¬ciations of causative agents were determined: the combination of fungal flora made up 58, 4% bacterial associations – 25, 8%. Invasive methods of research have demonstrated a considerably bigger informativeness in determination of possible etiological diagnosis of pneumonia. In determination of causative agent in fluid of brochoalveolar lavage the part of positive results made up 77,4% against 30,3% in examination of sputum.

  3. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  4. Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Pneumonia Symptoms, Causes, and Risk Factors Anyone can get ... risk for pneumonia. What Are the Symptoms of Pneumonia? Pneumonia symptoms can vary from mild to severe, ...

  5. Validación de un programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales Validation of a nosocomial infections surveillance program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sigfrido Rangel-Frausto

    1999-01-01

    for nosocomial infections, hospital length of stay and mortality. RESULTS. During the study period 429 were admitted, 45 developed a nosocomial infection (cases and 384 did not (controls. The incidence of nosocomial infections was 10.48 cases/100 discharges. The sensitivity and specificity of the surveillance system was 95.3 and 98.7%, respectively. Mortality in infected was 11.11% and in non infected was 2.4%. The average length of stay was 20 and 11days for cases and non infected respectively (p< 0.01. Urinary tract infections were the most common NI (42%, secondary bacteremia (14­%, pneumonia (11.11% and deep surgical site infection (9.25%. The surgical wound infection rates were: 1.3%, 1.9% and 1.9% for clean, clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds. Patients with rapidly fatal diseases had an increased frequency of infections. The microorganisms most commonly isolated were Escherichia coli (28%, Staphylococcus aureus (11.11%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.6%. The level of antibiotic resistance was in average of 43% for those antibiotics tested. CONCLUSIONS. The sensitivity and specificity of the surveillance system was excelent. Patients with nosocomial infections had an increased length of stay and a higher mortality compared to those without NI. The validation of the surveillance system allows the production of trustable conclusions about nosocomial infections.

  6. Emergence and nosocomial spread of carbapenem-resistant OXA-232-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Brunei Darussalam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul Momin, Muhd Haziq Fikry; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M.; Wareham, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are identified as a major global health concern. The success of CRE is facilitated by the emergence, acquisition and spread of successful clones carrying plasmid-encoded resistance genes. In this study, an outbreak of carbapenem-resistant

  7. Clinical, epidemiological and evolution of severe nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Arroyo- Sanchez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, evolution and to identify mortality factors associated in patients with SNP. Material and Methods: Descriptive study of a serie of cases of the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of a General Hospital. Medical records of patients which received medical attention and who meet the selection criteria were reviewed Results: Forty-one clinical records were evaluated. The average age was 69 old, predominantly male (68,3%. SNP was the reason of admission in 60.9% and 95.1% required mechanical ventilation. Hospital stay prior to diagnosis was 10 days, 65% of patients had some risk factor for multi resistence organisms, CPIS of entry was 9.3, cultures were positive in 39% of the cases and of these, 48.8% received proper antibiotic according to culture results. The days of stay in ICU were 20.6 days and 20 of the 41 medical records were for death patients. The clinical and epidemiological characteristics were similar between death and alive patients. An analysis of factors that could be associated with mortality SNP was made and it was found that for an age ≥ 70 years, the presence of any risk factor for multidrug resistence organism and control CPIS ≥ 6 were associated with higher mortality; while acquisition of the ICU was associated to lower mortality. Conclusions: The clinical, epidemiological characteristics and evolution of patients with SNP in our ICU were similar to those describe in the literature. Three factors associated with mortality in the ICU were identified.

  8. Secondary acute pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Pathological changes, promoting the development of secondary pneumonias, are investigated. To this group belong: blood circulation disturbance in small circle, bronchial passability disturbance, aspiration of liquids, gases and vapors, infections and purulent processes, intoxications, injuries, operative interference. Roetgenologic symptomatics of each secondary acute pneumonia form is presented in detail

  9. What Is Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pneumonia. Pulse oximetry. For this test, a small sensor is attached to your finger or ear. The sensor uses light to estimate how much oxygen is ... brain injury, swallowing problem, or excessive use of alcohol or drugs. Aspiration pneumonia can cause lung abscesses. ...

  10. Nosocomial Infections in Nuclear Medicine Departments: some considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metello, L.F.; Cunha, L.; Martins, M.; Isabel, O.; Ribeiro, G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Surveillance for Nosocomial Infection has become an integral part of hospital practice. Studies conducted more than 30 years ago by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documented the efficacy of these surveillance activities in reducing Nosocomial Infection occurrence. It is clear that surveillance for Nosocomial Infection involves more than just documenting infection rates. However, many times the professionals involved have tended to stop at the point where rates are reported and fail to complete the task of implementing changes based on the analysis of rates or disseminating information. Moreover specific documentation regarding Nuclear Medicine Departments is not available. We therefore decided to produce this work based in the recognition of this specific need. Methods and Conclusions: Having previously defined the 'state-of-the-art' from science and technology concerning Nosocomial Infection Control and after particular study regarding technical/clinical reality of Nuclear Medicine Departments, namely introducing the radioactivity as a factor that must be taken into account with all its implications and interactions, we have obtained a group of considerations and/or recommendations to be considered in order to accomplish the maximum Quality and Efficiency regarding the Control of Nosocomial Infection in Nuclear Medicine Departments

  11. Estudio clínico y epidemiológico de un brote nosocomial producido por klebsiella oxytoca productora de IMP-8

    OpenAIRE

    Vergara López, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Falta resumen Klebsiella oxytoca, al igual que K. pneumoniae, son dos patógenos humanos asociados a múltiples cuadros clínicos, pero fundamentalmente importantes como patógenos oportunistas. El progresivo aumento de las enfermedades crónicas, la inmunodepresión y los procedimientos agresivos, la capacidad de este género de bacterias para adaptarse al ambiente nosocomial, adquirir determinantes de resistencia frente a distintos antimicrobianos y diseminarse explican esta situación. Específi...

  12. Clinico-pathological conference (CPC: a previously healthy patient with respiratory insuficiency due to intersticial pneumonia = Conferencia Clínico Patológica (CPC: paciente previamente sana con insuficiencia respiratoria debida a neumonía intersticial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna Ortiz, Carlos Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 40-year-old woman, with no remarkable past medical history, who was admitted to San Vicente Foundation University Hospital, in Medellín, Colombia; she complained of respiratory symptoms lasting 20 days. Interstitial pneumonia associated with AIDS was diagnosed, which progressed to respiratory failure that did not respond to therapy directed against the opportunistic infections that were identified. She finally developed multiorgan failure that caused death.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns of different bacteria isolated from patients with ventilator associated pneumonia (vap).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Abdulrahman M

    2005-09-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a frequent complication of mechanical ventilation (MV) and it is a leading cause of death in MV patients. The development of VAP has been demonstrated as being due to aspiration of oropharyngeal secretion, ventilator tubing condensate, or gastric contents that are colonized with pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of the present study is to isolate and identify bacteria that cause VAP and to study antibiotic susceptibility. This study was carried out on 95 patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for VAP. Quantitative cultures of endotracheal aspirates (EA) using a cut-off point of 10(6) cfu/ml was done. The microbiological results revealed that gram negative bacilli were the most common bacterial agents responsible for VAP and accounted for 78.8% of all the causative agents. The most common isolated organisms were Klebsiella pnemouniae (30.9 %) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (21.2%), Eschericia coli (12.8 %), Proteus spp. (9.8%), and Citrobacter spp. (2.8%). Blood cultures were positive in 25.9% of patients with Klebsiella pnemouniae in about 33.3%. From this study, it can be concluded that VAP is an important nosocomial infection. EA is a simple procedure to obtain respiratory samples and perform sensitivity testing in patients with VAP. Also, the commonest cause of VAP is gram negative bacilli.

  14. The function of probiotics on the treatment of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP): facts and gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacaer, Feride; Hamed, Imen; Özogul, Fatih; Glew, Robert H; Özcengiz, Dilek

    2017-09-01

    Probiotics have been used for centuries in making fermented dairy products. The health benefits related to probiotics consumption are well recognized and they are generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Their therapeutic effects are due to the production of a variety of antimicrobial compounds, such as short-chain fatty acids, organic acids (such as lactic, acetic, formic, propionic and butyric acids), ethanol, hydrogen peroxide and bacteriocins. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial infection associated with high mortality in intensive care units. VAP can result from endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. These interventions increase the risk of infection as patients lose the natural barrier between the oropharynx and the trachea, which in turn facilitates the entry of pathogens through the aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions containing bacteria into the lung. In order to prevent this, probiotics have been used extensively against VAP. This review is an update containing information extracted from recent studies on the use of probiotics to treat VAP. In addition, probiotic safety, the therapeutic properties of probiotics, the probiotic strains used and the action of the probiotics mechanism are reviewed. Furthermore, the therapeutic effects of probiotic treatment procedures for VAP are compared to those of antibiotics. Finally, the influences of bacteriocin on the growth of human pathogens, and the side-effects and limitations of using probiotics for the treatment of VAP are addressed.

  15. Requirement for Serratia marcescens cytolysin in a murine model of hemorrhagic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Mares, Chris A; Hinojosa, Cecilia A; Medina, Jorge L; Cantwell, Angelene; Dube, Peter H; Orihuela, Carlos J; Bergman, Molly A

    2015-02-01

    Serratia marcescens, a member of the carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, is an important emerging pathogen that causes a wide variety of nosocomial infections, spreads rapidly within hospitals, and has a systemic mortality rate of ≤41%. Despite multiple clinical descriptions of S. marcescens nosocomial pneumonia, little is known regarding the mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis and the host immune response. To address this gap, we developed an oropharyngeal aspiration model of lethal and sublethal S. marcescens pneumonia in BALB/c mice and extensively characterized the latter. Lethal challenge (>4.0 × 10(6) CFU) was characterized by fulminate hemorrhagic pneumonia with rapid loss of lung function and death. Mice challenged with a sublethal dose (marcescens strains that failed to cause profound weight loss, extended illness, hemorrhage, and prolonged lung pathology in mice. This study describes a model of S. marcescens pneumonia that mimics known clinical features of human illness, identifies neutrophils and the toxin ShlA as a key factors important for defense and infection, respectively, and provides a solid foundation for future studies of novel therapeutics for this important opportunistic pathogen. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. A Study of Plazomicin Compared With Colistin in Patients With Infection Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-03

    Bloodstream Infections (BSI) Due to CRE; Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (HABP) Due to CRE; Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia (VABP) Due to CRE; Complicated Urinary Tract Infection (cUTI) Due to CRE; Acute Pyelonephritis (AP) Due to CRE

  17. Prevention of nosocomial infections in developing countries, a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murni, Indah; Duke, Trevor; Triasih, Rina; Kinney, Sharon; Daley, Andrew J; Soenarto, Yati

    2013-05-01

    Prevention of nosocomial infection is key to providing good quality, safe healthcare. Infection control programmes (hand-hygiene campaigns and antibiotic stewardship) are effective in reducing nosocomial infections in developed countries. However, the effectiveness of these programmes in developing countries is uncertain. To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for preventing nosocomial infections in developing countries. A systematic search for studies which evaluated interventions to prevent nosocomial infection in both adults and children in developing countries was undertaken using PubMed. Only intervention trials with a randomized controlled, quasi-experimental or sequential design were included. Where there was adequate homogeneity, a meta-analysis of specific interventions was performed using the Mantel-Haenzel fixed effects method to estimate the pooled risk difference. Thirty-four studies were found. Most studies were from South America and Asia. Most were before-and-after intervention studies from tertiary urban hospitals. Hand-hygiene campaigns that were a major component of multifaceted interventions (18 studies) showed the strongest effectiveness for reducing nosocomial infection rates (median effect 49%, effect range 12.7-100%). Hand-hygiene campaigns alone and studies of antibiotic stewardship to improve rational antibiotic use reduced nosocomial infection rates in three studies [risk difference (RD) of -0.09 (95%CI -0.12 to -0.07) and RD of -0.02 (95% CI -0.02 to -0.01), respectively]. Multifaceted interventions including hand-hygiene campaigns, antibiotic stewardship and other elementary infection control practices are effective in developing countries. The modest effect size of hand-hygiene campaigns alone and negligible effect size of antibiotic stewardship reflect the limited number of studies with sufficient homogeneity to conduct meta-analyses.

  18. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); A. Ott (Alewijn); A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M.H.M. Meester (Marlene); P.H.J. van Keulen (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical

  19. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster Varicella zoster pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos¹. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema.Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults. The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review.

  20. Computed tomographic study on Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Koba, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takuji; Mori, Masaki; Tsunematsu, Kazunori; Natori, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Akira; Doi, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    Serologically proven 21 patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia that showed infiltrative shadows on chest radiograms were studied by computed tomography (CT). Localization of the lesion and the fashion of its progression through the lung were analyzed. Following 3 loci were defined on the basis of the investigations of critical analysis of the chest radiograms, and of radiopathological analysis of the experimental animal model of mycoplasmal pneumonia with soft X-ray image. I: Peribronchial and periarterial interstitium. II: Bronchiole and its surroundings. III: Lung parenchyma, on hilar area as IIIh, on marginal area as IIIm. Even in the early phase of this disease, radiopathological findings on CT have been distributed in all loci mentioned above. The Shadow disappeared from locus III approximately 14th day from the onset. The shadow have remained, however, loci I, II for a long period. Those findings suggest that locus I and II are one of the major focus of Mycoplasma neumoniae pneumonia. Volume loss in the locus III was observed 78 % of the cases at 28th day from the onset. The shadow on locus IIIh was more prominent than locus IIIm. Reported analytical method with CT could be widely applied to disclose a radiopathological details in other infectious diseases of the lung. (author)

  1. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  2. [Listeria monocytogenes nosocomial infection in the maternity ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, D; Croize, J; Hirtz, P; Legeais, C; Pelloux, I; Favier, M; Mallaret, M R; Le Noc, P; Rambaud, P

    1991-01-01

    Nosocomial infection with Listeria monocytogenes 4b occurred in January 1990 in a maternity hospital in Grenoble. The 3 patients involved were born within a 24 hour-interval. The premature newborn responsible for contamination was asymptomatic. Two other newborns without any perinatal infectious risk presented with meningitis, one on the 5th day of life in the maternity hospital, the other one on the 11th day while already at home. The 3 strains of Listeria had the same serovar and lysovar. Epidemiologic investigations led to suspect a contamination in the delivery room and during the care of the children. Strict respect of hygiene orders is imperative to avoid nosocomial infections.

  3. Salmonella Typhimurium pneumonia in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia; Kumar, V Anil; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Mehta, Asmita; Backer, Binita; Dinesh, Kavitha R

    2015-04-01

    Pneumonia due to non-typhoidal Salmonella is a rarely reported entity. A fatal case of Salmonella pneumonia is reported here where Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from the endotracheal aspirate and blood culture. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Retrospective study of diseases and associated pneumonia type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The causes and types of pneumonia in dogs have not been accorded due attention in Nigeria. It is imperative to investigate the incidence and type of pneumonia commonly observed during post-mortem at the Department of Veterinary Pathology arm of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. This investigation ...

  5. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae meningoencephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambonie, G; Sarran, N; Leboucq, N; Luc, F; Bongrand, A F; Slim, G; Lassus, P; Fournier-Favre, S; Montoya, F; Astruc, J; Rieu, D

    1999-03-01

    Severe central nervous system diseases, such as encephalitis, have been reported in association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections. After an ENT infection, a 9-year-old boy with Down's syndrome developed encephalitis revealed by an acute alteration in consciousness. Head computed tomography showed, after 2 weeks, an infiltration in the basal ganglia region. The diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis was made; recovery was complete in a few weeks. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection should be considered in all cases of acute encephalopathy; yet the pathogenesis of the disorder is unknown and the treatment uncertain.

  6. Republished: Fibrosing organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Brooke; Rassl, Doris

    2014-08-01

    Organising pneumonia (otherwise referred to as bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia) is characterised histologically by plugs of granulation tissue, which are present predominantly within small airways, alveolar ducts and peri-bronchiolar alveoli. This pattern is not specific for any disorder or cause, but is one type of inflammatory response to pulmonary injury, which may be seen in a wide variety of clinical conditions. Typically, organising pneumonia responds very well to corticosteroid treatment; however, a small percentage of patients appear to develop progressive fibrosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Emergence of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia nosocomial isolates in a Saudi children’s hospital. Risk factors and clinical characteristics

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    Jobran M. Alqahtani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To describe the clinical characteristics of pediatric patients colonized or infected by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (S. maltophilia at a Saudi children’s hospital, to identify risk factors associated with infection, and to investigate the antimicrobial resistance patterns of this emerging pathogen. Methods: In this cross-sectional observational study, 64 non-duplicating S. maltophilia strains were isolated in Najran Maternity and Children’s Hospital, Najran, Saudi Arabia between January 2015 to February 2016. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the reference broth microdilution method. Results: In this study, 48 (75% isolates were identified in true infections and 16 (25% isolates were considered colonization. The main types of S. maltophilia infection were pneumonia in 22 (45.8% patients and bloodstream infection in 14 (29.2% patients. The significant risk factors included exposure to invasive procedure (p=0.02, and presence of acute leukemia as an underlying disease (p=0.02. The most active antimicrobials were trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (100% sensitivity and tigecycline (93.7% sensitivity. Conclusions: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen among pediatric patients. Accurate identification and susceptibility testing of this emerging pathogen are crucial for the management of infected patients and prevention of spread of this nosocomial pathogen.

  8. Comparison of Disk Diffusion and E-Test Methods for Doripenem Susceptibility of Nosocomial Acinetobacter Baumannii Strains

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    Yesim Cekin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Acinetobacter species are amoung the most common two cause of infections isolated from patients of intensive care unit in our hospital. Doripenem which acts by inhibiting cell wall synthesis is resently introduced for use in our country is broad spectrum antibiotic belonging to carbapenems. There are many studies investigating the susceptibility of doripenem of Acinetobacter baumannii which is isolated as a cause of ventilatory associated pneumonia in the literature. We aimed to compare e-test and disc diffusion methods for doripenem susceptibility of acinetobacter baumannii strains as nosocomial infections Acinetobacter baumanni isolates detected as nosocomial infection. Material and Method:. Between January to December, 2009 a total of 94 Acinetobacter baumanni strains isolated from different clinical specimens from intensive care units have been studied for doripenem susceptibility by disc diffusion and E-test methods. Minimal inhibitory consantrations (MIC were accepted as; sensitive %u22641 %u03BCg/ml, intermadiate 2-4 %u03BCg/ml, resistant >4 %u03BCg/ml and diameters of inhibition zone with 10 µg disc; sensitive

  9. Risk Factors for Stroke-associated Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study

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    Alexis Suárez Quesada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: stroke-associated pneumonia prolongs hospital stay and is an important risk factor for morbidity and mortality. Objective: to determine risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Methods: a prospective single-cohort study was conducted involving 390 patients aged 16-93 years who met clinical and neuroimaging criteria for acute stroke treated at the Carlos Manuel de Céspedes Hospital from January 2012 through March 2015. Univariate comparison of qualitative variables was performed by using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox regression model was applied for multivariate analysis of risk factors for pneumonia. The area under the ROC curve was used to determine the discriminatory power of the model. Results: two hundred thirteen patients (54.6 % with ischemic stroke and 177 (45.4 % with hemorrhagic stroke were studied. Cases of nosocomial pneumonia after acute stroke accounted for 25.4 %. Subjects who developed pneumonia had lower scores on the Glasgow scale and higher scores on the modified Rankin scale. The following risk factors were identified using the Cox regression model: Glasgow coma score (Exp (B: 0.687; 95 % CI 0.630 to 0.750 and stroke subtype (Exp (B: 1.723; 95 % CI 1.137 to 2.610. The area under the ROC curve was 0.88. Conclusions: the risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia after acute stroke found were the level of consciousness and suffering a hemorrhagic stroke. Other influencing variables are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart disease as a comorbid condition.

  10. Acute interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo M, Francisco; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    The paper refers to a 71 year-old patient, to who is diagnosed acute interstitial pneumonia; with square of 20 days of evolution of cough dry emetizant, fever, general uneasiness, migraine, progressive dyspnoea and lost of weight

  11. Nosocomial transmission of Cupriavidus pauculus during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, S H; Wisdom, C; McKamie, W; Ware, W; Dedman, H; Fiser, R T

    2010-01-01

    Patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are at increased risk of infection. We present the first known report of nosocomial infection with Cupriavidus pauculus attributable to contamination from ECMO equipment and describe the measures taken to halt subsequent infections. A cluster of infections in ECMO patients should prompt team members to consider contamination of equipment with environmental pathogens as a possible cause.

  12. Comparison of two nosocomial infection surveillance in a neonatal ward

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    Masomeh Abedini

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It seems that a large part of this considerable differences between the results of this study compared to NNIS based study, is this fact that, for nosocomial infection surveillance in the neonatal field, the presence of a specialist as a performer and leader of the team, is necessary.

  13. Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis in two Iranian hospitals. ... Vol 11, No 17 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Acinetobacter baumannii may cause meningitis and ventriculitis, particularly after head trauma and/or neurosurgery. The rate of ...

  14. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  15. Risk factors for postoperative nosocomial infections among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify possible risk factors for post operative nosocomial infections among operated patients at Felege Hiwot Referral ... Bacterial culture confirmation was done for all patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of surgical site and/or bloodstream infection starting from the ...

  16. Monitoring of nosocomial infections as an element of prevention

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    Izabela Gąska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hospital infections are one of the most serious threats to the hospitalised patient and their monitoring is recognised as one of the most important criteria of care quality for modern hospitals. The aim of the work was to present the problem of nosocomial infections and desired behaviours and activities in the field of infection prophylaxis. Material and method. The analysis of the current scientific literature was carried out with particular attention to the prevention of infections in treatment wards and the need to monitor the patient's condition and the environment in the case of an infection. Results. The lack of developed and implemented programmes for the control of nosocomial infections is a fundamental element that increases the risk of nosocomial infections. This disrupts the proper functioning of the hospital and causes additional health problems for the patient and the ward staff. In addition, the hospital suffers losses instead of savings, which is a priority aim in the current funding system. Conclusions. The basis for eliminating or minimising the incidence of nosocomial infections is a well-developed and implemented programme of hospital infection control based on the education of medical personnel in the field of infection prevention. Constant, comprehensive assessment of the procedures used and the standards of conduct, epidemiological data as well as microbiological data can ensure quick identification and elimination of the threat.

  17. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster

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    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos1. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto.Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema. Abstract: Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults.The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review. Palavras-chave: Varicela, pneumonia, ARDS, Key-words: Chickenpox, pneumonia, ARDS

  18. Prevalence of Acquired Carbapenemase Genes in Klebsiella Pneumoniae by Multiplex PCR in Isfahan

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    Farzin Khorvash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as a serious global threat. This study was done to investigate carbapenemase producing genomes among K. pneumoniae isolates in Isfahan, Central Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study from 2011 to 2012, 29 carbapenem resistant (according to disc diffusion method carbapenemase producing (according to modified Hodge test K. pneumoniae strains were collected from Intensive Care Unit (ICUs of Al-Zahra referral Hospital. In the strains with the lack of sensitivity to one or several carbapenems, beta-lactams, or beta-lactamases, there has been performed modified Hodge test to investigate carbapenmase and then only strains producing carbapenmases were selected for molecular methods. Results: In this study, there have been 29 cases of K. pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients in the (ICU. Three cases (10.3% contained blaVIM, 1 case (3.4% contained blaIMP, and 1 case (3.4% contained blaOXA. The genes blaNDM and blaKPC were not detected. Then, 16 cases (55.2% from positive cases of K. pneumoniae were related to the chip, 4 cases (13.8% to catheter, 6 cases (20.7% to urine, and 3 cases (10.3% to wound. Conclusion: It is necessary to monitor the epidemiologic changes of these carbapenemase genes in K. pneumoniae in our Hospital. More attention should be paid to nosocomial infection control measures. Other carbapenemase producing genes should be investigated.

  19. Detection of plant DNA in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

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    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections such as nosocomial pneumonia are a serious cause of mortality for hospitalized patients, especially for those admitted to intensive care units (ICUs. Despite the number of the studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely known. Herein, we found by molecular technique that vegetable and tobacco DNA may be detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we studied bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL from patients admitted to ICUs with ventilator-associated pneumonia. BAL fluids were assessed with molecular tests, culture and blood culture. We successfully identified plant DNA in six patients out of 106 (6% with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Inhalation was confirmed in four cases and suspected in the other two cases. Inhalation was significantly frequent in patients with plant DNA (four out of six patients than those without plant DNA (three out of 100 patients (P<0.001. Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast DNA was identified in three patients who were smokers (cases 2, 3 and 6. Cucurbita pepo, Morus bombycis and Triticum aestivum DNA were identified in cases 1, 4 and 5 respectively. Twenty-three different bacterial species, two viruses and five fungal species were identified from among these six patients by using molecular and culture techniques. Several of the pathogenic microorganisms identified are reported to be food-borne or tobacco plant-associated pathogens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that plants DNA may be identified in the BAL fluid of pneumonia patients, especially when exploring aspiration pneumonia, but the significance of the presence of plant DNA and its role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia is unknown and remains to be investigated. However, the identification of these plants may be a potential marker of aspiration in patients with pneumonia.

  20. 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene is associated with multiple organ dysfunction and septic shock in pneumonia induced severe sepsis: prospective, observational, genetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in sepsis. The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to worse outcome in pneumonia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of functionally relevant 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene in pneumonia induced sepsis. Methods We enrolled 208 Caucasian patients with severe sepsis due to pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed up until ICU discharge or death. Clinical data were collected prospectively and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, septic shock or death. Results We found that carriers of the PAI-1 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes have a 2.74-fold higher risk for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.335 - 5.604; p = 0.006) and a 2.57-fold higher risk for septic shock (OR 95%CI = 1.180 - 5.615; p = 0.018) than 5G/5G carriers. The multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for independent predictors, such as age, nosocomial pneumonia and positive microbiological culture also supported that carriers of the 4G allele have a higher prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.957; 95%CI = 1.306 -6.698; p = 0.009) and septic shock (aOR = 2.603; 95%CI = 1.137 - 5.959; p = 0.024). However, genotype and allele analyses have not shown any significant difference regarding mortality in models non-adjusted or adjusted for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II. Patients bearing the 4G allele had higher disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score at admission (p = 0.007) than 5G/5G carriers. Moreover, in 4G allele carriers the length of ICU stay

  1. 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene is associated with multiple organ dysfunction and septic shock in pneumonia induced severe sepsis: prospective, observational, genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madách, Krisztina; Aladzsity, István; Szilágyi, Agnes; Fust, George; Gál, János; Pénzes, István; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Activation of inflammation and coagulation are closely related and mutually interdependent in sepsis. The acute-phase protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key element in the inhibition of fibrinolysis. Elevated levels of PAI-1 have been related to worse outcome in pneumonia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of functionally relevant 4G/5G polymorphism of PAI-1 gene in pneumonia induced sepsis. We enrolled 208 Caucasian patients with severe sepsis due to pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed up until ICU discharge or death. Clinical data were collected prospectively and the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Patients were stratified according to the occurrence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, septic shock or death. We found that carriers of the PAI-1 4G/4G and 4G/5G genotypes have a 2.74-fold higher risk for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (odds ratio [OR] 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.335 - 5.604; p = 0.006) and a 2.57-fold higher risk for septic shock (OR 95%CI = 1.180 - 5.615; p = 0.018) than 5G/5G carriers. The multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for independent predictors, such as age, nosocomial pneumonia and positive microbiological culture also supported that carriers of the 4G allele have a higher prevalence of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.957; 95%CI = 1.306 -6.698; p = 0.009) and septic shock (aOR = 2.603; 95%CI = 1.137 - 5.959; p = 0.024). However, genotype and allele analyses have not shown any significant difference regarding mortality in models non-adjusted or adjusted for acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II. Patients bearing the 4G allele had higher disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) score at admission (p = 0.007) than 5G/5G carriers. Moreover, in 4G allele carriers the length of ICU stay of non-survivors was longer

  2. The Immune Response against Acinetobacter baumannii, an Emerging Pathogen in Nosocomial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patiño, María Guadalupe; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Licona-Limón, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the etiologic agent of a wide range of nosocomial infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and skin infections. Over the last 45 years, an alarming increase in the antibiotic resistance of this opportunistic microorganism has been reported, a situation that hinders effective treatments. In order to develop effective therapies against A. baumannii it is crucial to understand the basis of host–bacterium interactions, especially those concerning the immune response of the host. Different innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells have been identified as important effectors in the defense against A. baumannii; among them, neutrophils represent a key immune cell indispensable for the control of the infection. Several immune strategies to combat A. baumannii have been identified such as recognition of the bacteria by immune cells through pattern recognition receptors, specifically toll-like receptors, which trigger bactericidal mechanisms including oxidative burst and cytokine and chemokine production to amplify the immune response against the pathogen. However, a complete picture of the protective immune strategies activated by this bacteria and its potential therapeutic use remains to be determined and explored. PMID:28446911

  3. Nosocomial infection with Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 and 8 in a neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, G; Bornstein, N; Rayet, I; Pozzetto, B; Lenormand, P H

    1990-01-01

    A case of pneumonia related to 2 serogroups (1 and 8) of Legionella pneumophila (Lp) in a 10-day-old boy is described together with the epidemiological survey in the maternity ward which made it possible to establish its nosocomial origin. Rodshaped bacteria reacting with an Lp genus-specific monoclonal antibody and serogroup 1 and 8 polyclonal sera were detected in bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) collected on day 13. Serogroups 1 and 8 were recovered from cultures of BAL collected on days 12 and 13. Fourfold or more antibody rises to serogroups 1, 5, 8 and 10 of Lp were observed in sequential serum specimens. Water samples collected from the tank and mixer of the maternity ward grew serogroups 1 and 8 of Lp. Serogroup 1 was detected in large amounts in water samples taken at several points of the hot water supply system and from the oxygen nebulizers and the feeding-bottle heater. Analysis of the Lp serogroup 1 strains isolated from the water by subgroup-specific monoclonal antibodies revealed the presence of 4 different subgroups, one of which was identical to the Lp 1 subgroup isolated from the neonate's BAL. This latter subgroup, reactive with McKinney monoclonal antibody Mab 2, has been described as highly virulent. No other case of legionellosis was recorded in the maternity ward.

  4. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging antibiotic resistance due to extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production limited the use of β-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. This observational study was conducted at the Microbiology department of the Children's Hospital, Lahore Pakistan, from June, 2009 to ...

  5. Microbial aetiologic agents associated with pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the immunosuppressed patients. The aim of this study was to determine the etiologic agents and predisposing factors associated with pneumonia infections in immunocompromised patients. Cross-sectional survey of 100 immunocompromised patients due ...

  6. Rinossinusite nosocomial em unidade de terapia intensiva: estudo microbiológico Nosocomial sinusitis in an intensive care unit: a microbiological study

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    Leonardo Lopes Balsalobre Filho

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rinossinusite Nosocomial é uma complicação frequente de pacientes tratados em UTI. É importante o diagnóstico e tratamento precoce para prevenir complicações graves como pneumonia, sepse, meningite e abscesso intracraniano. OBJETIVO: Identificar os agentes causadores de sinusite em UTI através do swab nasal e da punção de seio maxilar, correlacionando seus resultados. MÉTODO: Pacientes atendidos nas unidades de terapia intensiva com diagnóstico tomográfico de sinusopatia maxilar uni ou bilateral foram submetidos ao swab nasal e punção do seio acometido com material enviado para cultura e antibiograma. RESULTADOS: O presente estudo avaliou 22 pacientes. Houve concordância entre o agente microbiano isolado no swab e na punção em 14 dos 22 casos (63%. A flora aeróbia gram negativa foi a mais encontrada com predomínio da Pseudomonas aeruginosa (29% nas punções, seguido de Proteus mirabillis (26% e Acinetobacter baumanni (14%. Houve alto índice de resistência aos antibióticos usados. CONCLUSÃO: A punção direta do seio maxilar acometido em pacientes em UTI com sinusite parece ser o melhor método para identificar os agentes bacterianos e, através do seu antibiograma, direcionar a conduta terapêutica antimicrobiana. O swab mostrou ter pouco valor diagnóstico, com concordância de 63%, podendo ser reservado para casos onde a punção está contraindicada.Nosocomial sinusitis is a common complication of patients in ICUs. Its diagnosis is important, and early treatment is required to avoid serious complications such as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, and intracranial abscesses. AIM: To identify the germs causing sinusitis in ICUs by nasal swabs and maxillary sinus puncture, and to correlate these results. METHODS: ICU patients with a diagnosis (CT confirmed of maxillary sinusitis underwent nasal swab and puncture of the sinus to collect material for culture and antibiogram. RESULTS: This study evaluated 22 patients. The

  7. Rapid and high-resolution distinction of community-acquired and nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates with identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and spa types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, Corinna; Sabat, Artur J.; Dreisbach, Annette; Larsen, Anders R.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Skov, Robert L.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represent a serious threat for public health worldwide. Of particular concern is the emergence of community-acquired MRSA, which is often difficult to distinguish from nosocomial MRSA due to a lack of suitable typing methods for early detection. For

  8. A diagnostic dilemma of cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, K

    2012-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia is a rare lung condition, which has incidence of 6-9 cases per 1,000,000 people with onset at age group between 50-60. The pathogenesis of this condition remains unknown. It mimics like pneumonia but has a good outcome with steroid treatment. Early recognition is very important and treatment with steroid therapy can save lives. This case highlights the unusual cause of shortness of breath due to COP and co existing incidental severe AS where we faced a diagnostic dilemma till lung biopsy was performed.

  9. Nosocomial infection of CCHF among health care workers in Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pragya D; Patil, Deepak Y; Shete, Anita M; Kokate, Prasad; Goyal, Pulkit; Jadhav, Santosh; Sinha, Sanjeev; Zawar, Divya; Sharma, Surendra K; Kapil, Arti; Sharma, D K; Upadhyay, Kamlesh J; Mourya, Devendra T

    2016-11-03

    Ever since Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever [CCHF] discovered in India, several outbreaks of this disease have been recorded in Gujarat State, India. During the year 2011 to 2015 several districts of Gujarat and Rajasthan state (Sirohi) found to be affected with CCHF including the positivity among ticks and livestock. During these years many infected individuals succumbed to this disease; which subsequently led to nosocomial infections. Herein, we report CCHF cases recorded from Rajasthan state during January 2015. This has affected four individuals apparently associated with one suspected CCHF case admitted in a private hospital in Jodhpur, Rajasthan. A 30-year-old male was hospitalized in a private hospital in Jodhpur, Rajasthan State, who subsequently had developed thrombocytopenia and showed hemorrhagic manifestations and died in the hospital. Later on, four nursing staff from the same hospital also developed the similar symptoms (Index case and Case A, B, C). Index case succumbed to the disease in the hospital at Jodhpur followed by the death of the case A that was shifted to AIIMS hospital, Delhi due to clinical deterioration. Blood samples of the index case and Case A, B, C were referred to the National institute of Virology, Pune, India for CCHF diagnosis from the different hospitals in Rajasthan, Delhi and Gujarat. However, a sample of deceased suspected CCHF case was not referred. Subsequently, blood samples of 5 nursing staff and 37 contacts (Case D was one of them) from Pokhran area, Jaisalmer district were referred to NIV, Pune. It clearly indicated that nursing staff acquired a nosocomial infection while attending the suspected CCHF case in an Intensive Care Unit of a private hospital in Jodhpur. However, one case was confirmed from the Pokhran area where the suspected CCHF case was residing. This case might have got the infection from suspected CCHF case or through other routes. CCHF strain associated with these nosocomial infections shares the

  10. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond.

  11. Development of an optimized random amplified polymorphic DNA protocol for fingerprinting of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashayeri-Panah, M; Eftekhar, F; Feizabadi, M M

    2012-04-01

    To develop an optimized random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) protocol for fingerprinting clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Employing factorial design of experiments, repeatable amplification patterns were obtained for 54 nosocomial isolates using 1 μmol 1(-1) primer, 4 mmol 1(-1) MgCl(2), 0·4 mmol 1(-1) dNTPs, 2·5 U Taq DNA polymerase and 90 ng DNA template in a total volume of 25 μl. The optimum thermocycling program was: initial denaturation at 94°C for 4 min followed by 50 cycles of 1 min at 94°C, 2 min at 34°C, 2 min at 72°C and a final extension at 72°C for 10 min. The optimized RAPD protocol was highly discriminatory (Simpson's diversity index, 0·982), and all isolates were typable with repeatable patterns (Pearson's similarity coefficient ≈ 100%). Seven main clusters were obtained on a similarity level of 70% and 32 distinct clusters on a similarity level of 85%, reflecting the heterogeneity of the isolates. Systematic optimization of RAPD generated reliable DNA fingerprints for nosocomial isolates of K. pneumoniae. This is the first report on RAPD optimization based on factorial design of experiments for discrimination of K. pneumoniae. © 2012 The Authors. Letters in Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. [Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda Solas, V; Pérez Benito, A; Domingo Puiggros, M; Larramona Carrera, H; Segura Porta, F; Fontanals Aymerich, D

    2002-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia in children. The reference standard for etiological diagnosis is isolation of S. pneumoniae from blood Since the advent of conjugate vaccines, disease caused by this organism can now be prevented. Many studies have been performed of the global incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections and of pneumococcal meningitis but few studies investigated bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and its complications in children. To determine the incidence, patient characteristics, clinical signs, laboratory data, percentage and days of hospitalization, response to antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance, complications and causal serogroups of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in our environment in order to estimate requirements for systematic vaccination programs. From January 1990 to May 2001, data on all pediatric cases of invasive pneumococcal infections diagnosed in our hospital were collected. Several characteristics of patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were analyzed. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia was diagnosed in patients with positive blood or pleural fluid cultures for S. pneumoniae and radiographically evident pulmonary infiltrate. The incidence of both types of pneumonia were determined according to population census data. All S. pneumonia strains were sent to the Pneumococci Reference Laboratory of the Instituto Carlos III in Madrid for serotyping. We estimated the serotype coverage of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine according to the serotypes included in this vaccine and their distribution. Forty cases of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were diagnosed, yielding an incidence of 17,10 and 5 cases per 10(5) children aged less than 2, 4 and 15 years old respectively. The mean age was 50 months and 43% were aged less than 4 years. Peaks occurred in January, March, April and May. A total of 77.5% of the patients were admitted to hospital and the

  13. Corticosteroids for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Anat; Skalsky, Keren; Avni, Tomer; Carrara, Elena; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2017-12-13

    Pneumonia is a common and potentially serious illness. Corticosteroids have been suggested for the treatment of different types of infection, however their role in the treatment of pneumonia remains unclear. This is an update of a review published in 2011. To assess the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids in the treatment of pneumonia. We searched the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and LILACS on 3 March 2017, together with relevant conference proceedings and references of identified trials. We also searched three trials registers for ongoing and unpublished trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed systemic corticosteroid therapy, given as adjunct to antibiotic treatment, versus placebo or no corticosteroids for adults and children with pneumonia. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We estimated risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and pooled data using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model when possible. We included 17 RCTs comprising a total of 2264 participants; 13 RCTs included 1954 adult participants, and four RCTs included 310 children. This update included 12 new studies, excluded one previously included study, and excluded five new trials. One trial awaits classification.All trials limited inclusion to inpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), with or without healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP). We assessed the risk of selection bias and attrition bias as low or unclear overall. We assessed performance bias risk as low for nine trials, unclear for one trial, and high for seven trials. We assessed reporting bias risk as low for three trials and high for the remaining 14 trials.Corticosteroids significantly reduced mortality in adults with severe pneumonia (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.40 to 0

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Infecção hospitalar e mortalidade Infección hospitalar y mortalidad Nosocomial infection and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Natalia Teresa Turrini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se estudo retrospectivo do registro de 69 óbitos ocorridos em hospital pediátrico em 1993 para identificar a relação da infecção hospitalar com o óbito. As principais infecções diagnosticadas foram as pneumonias e infecções de corrente sangüínea com um predomínio de bactérias gram-negativas. Em 30,4% das crianças, a infecção hospitalar foi causa direta do óbito e em 50,8% foi contribuinte. A infecção hospitalar foi mais importante como causa de óbito nos pacientes com afecção classificada como não fatal à admissão.Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de registro de 69 óbitos ocurridos en un hospital pediátrico, en 1993, para identificar la relación de la infección hospitalar con el óbito. Las principales infecciones diagnosticadas fueron pneumonias e infecciones de la corriente sanguínea con predominio de bacterias gram-negativas. En 30.4% de los niños, la infección hospitalar fue la causa directa del óbito y en 50.8% fue contribuyente. La infeción hospitalar fue más importante como causa de óbito en los pacientes com afección clasificada como no fatal a la admisión.A retrospective study with 69 deaths ocurred at a pediatric hospital in 1993 was undertaken to identify the relationship of nosocomial infection with death. Pneumonia and bloodstream infection were the main site of infection: A higher prevalence of gram-negative bacteria was also observed. The hospital infection was causally related to death in 30,4% and contributed to death in 50,8% of children. The nosocomial infection was causally related to death more frequently in patients classified as having a non fatal disease at admission.

  16. Inadequate ventilation for nosocomial tuberculosis prevention in public hospitals in Central Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamjarasrangsi, W; Bualert, S; Chongthaleong, A; Chaindamporn, A; Udomsantisuk, N; Euasamarnjit, W

    2009-04-01

    Forty-two community and general hospitals in central Thailand. To examine the adequacy of indoor ventilation for nosocomial tuberculosis (TB) prevention in public hospitals in central Thailand. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 323 patient care and ancillary areas in the target hospitals. Data on indoor ventilation rate were collected by the tracer gas method and reported as air changes per hour (ACH). The adequacy of the measured ventilation rates were then determined by comparison with the international recommended standard values. Indoor ventilation rates were inadequate in almost half of the studied areas (144/323, 44.6%). The inadequacy was particularly serious in the emergency rooms (ERs) and radiological areas, where 73.8% (31/42 each) of the rooms had ACH below the recommended standards. Detailed analysis showed that most of the rooms with natural ventilation had air exchange rates that exceeded the recommended standards, while the opposite was the case for rooms with air-conditioning, particularly the window or wall-mount type. Indoor ventilation in high-risk nosocomial TB areas in public hospitals in Thailand was inadequate due to the installation of air-conditioning systems in modern buildings.

  17. PNEUMONIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Eržen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in advanced age. Prognosis of the disease depends on premorbid condition and immune competence of the patient, severity of the disease and causative microorganism. In our analysis we wanted to establish clinical, x-ray and microbiological characteristics of pneumonia in nursing home residents, estimate suitability of therapeutic measures and find out risk factors for adverse outcome in this group of patients.Material and methods. This retrospective study includes all nursing home residents hospitalised due to CAP in Hospital Golnik in 2000. Clinical data was/were evaluated according to case history. Microbiological data and laboratory results were gathered from the patients files. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis.Results. 30 patients, 17 women were included, aged 82.5 ± 11.7 years. 60% of patients had at least 2 accompanying diseases, most frequently cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. At admittance 83% of patients presented with severe form of the disease. Dispnea (93%, tachypnea, cough (67% and confusion (47% dominate clinical picture. Patients rarely expectorate, are frequently hypoxemic (93%, have leucocytosis (63%, electrolyte disturbances and elevated urea (67%. According to the microbiologic results most frequent causative agents are Enterobacteriae, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and also some multiresistant bacteria. Amoxycillin with clavulanic acid was the most frequently used antibiotic, followed by macrolides and 3rd generation cephalosporines.9 patients died, mortality rate was 30%. Their average age was 83,4 years, 67% of them had more than 2 accompanying diseases, all of them severe form of the disease, 89% severe respiratory insufficiency and 22% positive hemoculture.Conclusions. Patients are characterised with numerous comorbidities and advanced age. Clinical presentation is unspecific. Mortality is high

  18. Pediatric Round Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Wu, Ping-Sheng; Tsai, Li-Ping; Tsai, Wen-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    “Round pneumonia” or “spherical pneumonia” is a well-characterized clinical entity that seems to be less addressed by pediatricians in Taiwan. We herein report the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with prolonged fever, cough, and chest X-rays showing a well-demarcated round mass measuring 5.9 × 5.6 × 4.3 cm in the left lower lung field, findings which were typical for round pneumonia. The urinary pneumococcal antigen test was positive, and serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody titer...

  19. Postviral Complications: Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, Jason E; Deng, Jane C

    2017-03-01

    Secondary bacterial pneumonia after viral respiratory infection remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Susceptibility is mediated by a variety of viral and bacterial factors, and complex interactions with the host immune system. Prevention and treatment strategies are limited to influenza vaccination and antibiotics/antivirals respectively. Novel approaches to identifying the individuals with influenza who are at increased risk for secondary bacterial pneumonias are urgently needed. Given the threat of further pandemics and the heightened prevalence of these viruses, more research into the immunologic mechanisms of this disease is warranted with the hope of discovering new potential therapies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Fermín; Colón Rivera, Xavier; González Monroig, Hernán A; Garcia Puebla, Juan

    2018-01-30

    BACKGROUND Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. CASE REPORT A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. CONCLUSIONS Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia.

  1. Hand hygiene for the prevention of nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Günter; Löffler, Harald; Gastmeier, Petra

    2009-10-01

    The WHO regards hand hygiene as an essential tool for the prevention of nosocomial infection, but compliance in clinical practice is often low. The relevant scientific literature and national and international evidence-based recommendations (Robert Koch Institute [Germany], WHO) were evaluated. Hygienic hand disinfection has better antimicrobial efficacy than hand-washing and is the procedure of choice to be performed before and after manual contact with patients. The hands should be washed, rather than disinfected, only when they are visibly soiled. Skin irritation is quite common among healthcare workers and is mainly caused by water, soap, and prolonged wearing of gloves. Compliance can be improved by training, by placing hand-rub dispensers at the sites where they are needed, and by physicians setting a good example for others. Improved compliance in hand hygiene, with proper use of alcohol-based hand rubs, can reduce the nosocomial infection rate by as much as 40%.

  2. Asymptomatic carriers contribute to nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Thomas; Gradel, Kim Oren; Homann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects...... of of asymptomatic carriers on nosocomial C difficile infections. METHODS: We performed a population-based prospective cohort study at 2 university hospitals in Denmark, screening all patients for toxigenic C difficile in the intestine upon admittance, from October 1, 2012, to January 31, 2013. Screening results...... were blinded to patients, staff, and researchers. Patients were followed during their hospital stay by daily registration of wards and patient rooms. The primary outcomes were rate of C difficile infection in exposed and unexposed patients and factors associated with transmission. RESULTS: C difficile...

  3. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, 1999-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Widodo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection are one of the main problem in hospital which are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and increased economic cost. Surveillance should be attempted regularly to obtain local data of incidence of nosocomial infections, types of infection, pathogen and resistance pattern. We reported the results of nosocomial surveillance in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, in year 1999 to 2002. The data were obtained from surveillance, conducted by Nosocomial Infection Control Committee. Surveillance were performed to patient in risk of nosocomial infections such as underwent surgical procedure, urinary catheter, peripheral or central venous catheter, ventilator and other invasive procedure. Criteria for nosocomial infection which were used, based on technical guidelines of nosocomial infection in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, year 1999; which referred to CDC definition of nosocomial infections. Incidence rate of nosocomial infections in year 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 were 1.1, 0.9, 0.6 and 0.4 % respectively. Type of nosocomial infection include catheter related, surgical wound, urinary tract and respiratory tract infections, ranged between 0 to 5.6 %. Gram negative bacteria consist of Pseudomonas sp, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis were the most common nosocomial pathogen. Gram positive bacteria consist of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus anhemolyticus. Trend of increasing incidence of Gram positive nosocomial infection also showed in our surveillance. Mostly Gram negative bacteria had been resistant to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and 3rd generation cephalosporin, but still sensitive to 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. The Gram positive bacteria were still sensitive to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 107

  4. Weekly screening supports terminating nosocomial transmissions of vancomycin-resistant enterococci on an oncologic ward – a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Kampmeier

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the impact of weekly screening within the bundle of infection control measures to terminate vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE transmissions on an oncologic ward. Methods A cluster of 12 VRE colonisation and five infections was detected on an oncologic ward between January and April 2015. Subsequently, the VRE point prevalence was detected and, as part of a the bundle of infection control strategies to terminate the VRE cluster, we isolated affected patients, performed hand hygiene training among staff on ward, increased observations by infection control specialists, intensified surface disinfection, used personal protective equipment and initiated an admission screening in May 2015. After a further nosocomial VRE infection in August 2015, a weekly screening strategy of all oncology patients on the respective ward was established while admission screening was continued. Whole genome sequencing (WGS-based typing was applied to determine the clonal relationship of isolated strains. Results Initially, 12 of 29 patients were VRE colonised; of these 10 were hospital-acquired. During May to August, on average 7 of 40 patients were detected to be VRE colonised per week during the admission screening, showing no significant decline compared to the initial situation. WGS-based typing revealed five different clusters of which three were due to vanB- and two vanA-positive enterococci. After an additional weekly screening was established, the number of colonised patients significantly declined to 1/53 and no further nosocomial cases were detected. Conclusions Weekly screening helped to differentiate between nosocomial and community-acquired VRE cases resulting in earlier infection control strategies on epidemic situations for a successful termination of nosocomial VRE transmissions.

  5. [Orion (Outbreak Reports and Intervention studies of Nosocomial Infection) used for evaluating interventions and investigations of nosocomial infection outbreaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Cronenberger, S; Nicolle, M-C; Voirin, N; Giard, M; Luxemburger, C; Vanhems, P

    2009-04-01

    British colleagues have developed the Outbreak Reports and Intervention studies of Nosocomial Infection (Orion) guidelines with the aim to promote transparency of publications in the field of health-care associated infections and particularly for reports of outbreak investigation or intervention studies. The aim of this study was to translate the Orion criteria and to promote their use in France. The Orion guidelines include a checklist of 22 commented items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of a scientific article. Specific points for each item are developed to enhance its relevance. The use of Orion guidelines by authors and editors should be encouraged and should improve the quality of standards in research, intervention studies, and publications on nosocomial infections and health-care associated infections.

  6. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9] ... Detailed history and physical examination notes were reviewed in all ... related. UTI was related to the catheter and pneumonia to ventilator. ... protein. UTI: Urinary tract infection, CVP: Central venous pressure, CFU: Colony-forming unit,.

  7. Exogenous lipid pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, A.; Gavelli, G.; Zompatori, M.; Galleri, C.; Zanasi, A.; Fabbri, M.; Bazzocchi, F.

    1988-01-01

    Exogenous lipid pneumonia (ELP) is caused by the aspiration of animal, vegetal or, more often, mineral oils. Even though it may also be acute, ELP is most frequently a chronic disease, affecting people with predisposing factors, such as neuromuscular disorders, structural abnormalities and so on; very often exogenous lipid pneumonia is found in tracheotomized patients. The pathology of lipid pneumonia is a chronic inflammatory process evolving in foreign-body-like reaction, and eventually in ''end-stage lung'' condition. Clinically, most patients are asymptomatic; few cases only present with cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Eight cases of ELP, studied over the past 3 years, are described in this paper. All the patients were examined by chest radiographs and standard tomograms; 3 patients underwent CT. X-ray features were mono/bilateral consolidation of the lower zones, with air bronchogram and variable reduction in volume. CT density was not specific for fat tissue. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed at biopsy. In 5 patients, followed for at least one year, clinical-radiological features showed no change. Thus, complications of ELP (especially malignant evolution) could be excluded. The authors conclude that lipid pneumonia must be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with history of usage of oils and compatible X-ray findings. The usefulness of an accurate follow-up is stressed

  8. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  9. Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae: critical tools for antibiotic resistance pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmini, Nagarajan; Ajilda, Antony Alex Kennedy; Sivakumar, Natesan; Selvakumar, Gopal

    2017-06-01

    Drug resistance is a phenomenon where by an organism becomes fully or partially resistant to drugs or antibiotics being used against it. Antibiotic resistance poses an exacting intimidation for people with underlying medical immune conditions or weakened immune systems. Infections caused by the enzyme extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing multi drug resistance (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae are resistant to a broad range of beta lactams, including third generation cephalosporins. Among all the pathogens, these two MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae have emerged as one of the world's greatest health threats in past two decades. The nosocomial infections caused by these ESBL producing MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae complicated the therapy and limit treatment options. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: CT features in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Inho; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hye-Kyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the computed tomography (CT) features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings of 16 patients (M:F=9:7, age range 1-74 years, median 9 years) with serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and with chest CT scan available. Two distinctive patterns of CT features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia were noted between the paediatric (age <18 years) and the adult (age {>=}18 years) groups. The pediatric group (n=11) showed lobar or segmental consolidation (100%) with frequent pleural effusion (82%) and regional lymphadenopathy (82%) and mild volume decrease of the involved lobe (73%), while four of the five adult patients showed diffuse and/or multifocal, centrilobular or peribronchovascular areas of ground-glass attenuation (80%) with a lobular distribution, and frequent thickening of interlobular septa (60%) and the bronchial walls (40%) were also detected at high-resolution CT. The CT finding of a lobar or segmental consolidation with a parapneumonic effusion seen in our children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia was similar to that of bacterial lobar pneumonia. In contrast, the CT findings noted in our adult patients consisted of a mixture of a bacterial bronchopneumonia pattern and a viral interstitial pneumonia pattern. (orig.)

  11. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: CT features in 16 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Inho; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hye-Kyung

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the computed tomography (CT) features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings of 16 patients (M:F=9:7, age range 1-74 years, median 9 years) with serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and with chest CT scan available. Two distinctive patterns of CT features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia were noted between the paediatric (age <18 years) and the adult (age ≥18 years) groups. The pediatric group (n=11) showed lobar or segmental consolidation (100%) with frequent pleural effusion (82%) and regional lymphadenopathy (82%) and mild volume decrease of the involved lobe (73%), while four of the five adult patients showed diffuse and/or multifocal, centrilobular or peribronchovascular areas of ground-glass attenuation (80%) with a lobular distribution, and frequent thickening of interlobular septa (60%) and the bronchial walls (40%) were also detected at high-resolution CT. The CT finding of a lobar or segmental consolidation with a parapneumonic effusion seen in our children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia was similar to that of bacterial lobar pneumonia. In contrast, the CT findings noted in our adult patients consisted of a mixture of a bacterial bronchopneumonia pattern and a viral interstitial pneumonia pattern. (orig.)

  12. Bleeding and pneumonia in intensive care patients given ranitidine and sucralfate for prevention of stress ulcer: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messori, A; Trippoli, S; Vaiani, M; Gorini, M; Corrado, A

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effectiveness of ranitidine and sucralfate in the prevention of stress ulcer in critical patients and to assess if these treatments affect the risk of nosocomial pneumonia. Design Published studies retrieved through Medline and other databases. Five meta-analyses evaluated effectiveness in terms of bleeding rates (A: ranitidine v placebo; B: sucralfate v placebo) and infectious complications in terms of incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (C: ranitidine v placebo; D: sucralfate v placebo; E: ranitidine v sucralfate). Trial quality was determined with an empirical ad hoc procedure. Main outcome measures Rates of clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding and nosocomial pneumonia (compared between the two study arms and expressed with odds ratios specific for individual studies and meta-analytic summary odds ratios). Results Meta-analysis A (five studies) comprised 398 patients; meta-analysis C (three studies) comprised 311 patients; meta-analysis D (two studies) comprised 226 patients: and meta-analysis E (eight studies) comprised 1825 patients. Meta-analysis B was not carried out as the literature search selected only one clinical trial. In meta-analysis A ranitidine was found to have the same effectiveness as placebo (odds ratio of bleeding 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.30 to 1.70, P=0.46). In placebo controlled studies (meta-analyses C and D) ranitidine and sucralfate had no influence on the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia. In comparison with sucralfate, ranitidine significantly increased the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia (meta-analysis E: 1.35, 1.07 to 1.70, P=0.012). The mean quality score in the four analyses (on a 0 to 10 scale) ranged from 5.6 in meta-analysis E to 6.6 in meta-analysis A. Conclusions Ranitidine is ineffective in the prevention of gastrointestinal bleeding in patients in intensive care and might increase the risk of pneumonia. Studies on sucralfate do not provide conclusive results. These findings are

  13. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  14. Molecular characterization of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-hua Hou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Selective pressure, the extensive use of antibiotics, and the conjugational transmission of antibiotic resistance genes across bacterial species and genera facilitate the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR K. pneumoniae. Here, we examined the occurrence, phenotypes and genetic features of MDR K. pneumoniae isolated from patients in intensive care units (ICUs at the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University in Xiamen, China, from January to December 2011. Thirty-eight MDR K. pneumoniae strains were collected. These MDR K. pneumoniae isolates possessed at least seven antibiotic resistance determinants, which contribute to the high-level resistance of these bacteria to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones and β-lactams. Among these isolates, 24 strains were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, 2 strains were AmpC producers, and 12 strains were both ESBL and AmpC producers. The 38 MDR isolates also contained class I (28/38 and class II integrons (10/38. All 28 class I-positive isolates contained aacC1, aacC4, orfX, orfX’ and aadA1 genes. β-lactam resistance was conferred through blaSHV (22/38, blaTEM (10/38, and blaCTX-M (7/38. The highly conserved blaKPC-2 (37/38 and blaOXA-23(1/38 alleles were responsible for carbapenem resistance, and a gyrAsite mutation (27/38 and the plasmid-mediated qnrB gene (13/38 were responsible for quinolone resistance. Repetitive-sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR fingerprinting of these MDR strains revealed the presence of five groups and sixteen patterns. The MDR strains from unrelated groups showed different drug resistance patterns; however, some homologous strains also showed different drug resistance profiles. Therefore, REP-PCR-based analyses can provide information to evaluate the epidemic status of nosocomial infection caused by MDR K. pneumoniae; however, this test lacks the power to discriminate some

  15. Identification of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fereshte sadat Hashemizadeh

    2013-05-01

    Results: In this study of 202 isolates of Klebsiella, 180 isolates (89.1% of K. pneumoniae and 22 isolates (10.9% of Klebsiella oxytoca were isolated from patients. More than 55% of isolates showed multiple-drug resistance and also above 40% resistance to imipeneme and meropeneme was recorded. The MIC of isolates which were resistant to carbapenemes was above 32µg/ml.The PCR results showed that 22 cases (11.9% of isolates had blakpc gene which most of them had been isolated from urine and blood samples of patients who were hospitalized in the ICU and pediatrics. Conclusion: Regarding the existence of blakpc gene in K. pneumoniae and possibility of transformation of these genes to the other bacteria, reconsideration in antibiotics consumption patterns and more attention to nosocomial infections control criteria are inevitable.

  16. Assessment of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos state hospitals and radio-diagnostic centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpochafor, M.O.; Eze, C.U.; Adeneye, S.O.; Ajekigbe, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Methods: Microbiological cultures were carried out on samples obtained from ultrasound probes, gel and couch before and after scanning period. Cultures were incubated in a culture plate (Chocolate and MacConkey agar) for 48 h at a temperature of 37 ° in order to grow microorganism, after which the culture plate was examined microscopically against a bright light in order to identify the isolated organisms based on their colonial characteristics. Results: Transabdominal ultrasound probes, transvaginal probe, ultrasound couch and ultrasound gel all were contaminated with microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent and most common organisms found (33.8%). Other organisms such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (15.4%), Candida albicans (6.2%), aerobic spore formers (26.2%), Klebsiella pneumonia (6.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.1%), among others were also identified. Conclusion: The ultrasound equipment posed a significant risk for infection transmission. Patients who underwent ultrasonography within the period of the study had significant chances of being infected with Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aerobic spore formers. - Highlights: • Ultrasound equipment has been shown to be a possible source of nosocomial infection for patient undergoing ultrasonography. • The study showed that Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism. • Transabdominal probe was the most commonly contaminated ultrasound equipment in the finding. • The ultrasound gel was also contaminated with organisms like S. aureus, etc. • There was a statistical significant difference between site of collection of sample and growth density of microorganisms (p = 0.03)

  17. [Nosocomial infection/colonization of the respiratory tract caused by Acinetobacter baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas Coronas, J; Cabezas Fernández, T; Alvarez-Ossorio García de Soria, R; Rogado González, M C; Delgado Fernández, M; Díez García, F

    2002-10-01

    To present the epidemiology of the outbreak and the description of patients with infection or colonization of the respiratory tract caused by A. baumannii in an Internal Medicine ward. 20 consecutively patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine ward were studied during 18 months with isolation of multiresistant A. baumanni in respiratory tract specimens with or without clinical signs of infection. Starting on an index case, that was a patient coming from other hospital with diagnosis of nosocomial Acinetobacter pneumonia, we detected 20 patients. The age of the patients ranged from 48 to 95 years, with a mean of 71.4 years. Eighty percent were males. The clinical features were similar: advanced age, with chronic diseases (35 percent diabetics, 45 percent with chronic lung diseases), and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics agents, fundamentally third generation cephalosporin (70 percent), clarithromycin (55 percent) and quinolones (30 percent). 75 percent of patients were in the same ward. Eight (40 percent) of the patients with chronic lung diseases were subjects with COPD, two with asthma and chronic glucocorticoids treatment, and one with a sleep apnea. In four cases the isolation was considered a colonization. The mean stay was 26.15 days, and the mortality 40 percent. The nosocomial infection caused by Acinetobacter baumannii is responsible of a high morbi-mortality between the patients hospitalized in an Internal Medicine ward, and produce an increase in length of stay. It is necessary a combination of control measures to prevent the transmission in the hospital and the outbreak of new multiresistant strains.

  18. The diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae surface polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follador, Rainer; Heinz, Eva; Wyres, Kelly L; Ellington, Matthew J; Kowarik, Michael; Holt, Kathryn E; Thomson, Nicholas R

    2016-08-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is considered an urgent health concern due to the emergence of multi-drug-resistant strains for which vaccination offers a potential remedy. Vaccines based on surface polysaccharides are highly promising but need to address the high diversity of surface-exposed polysaccharides, synthesized as O-antigens (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and K-antigens (capsule polysaccharide, CPS), present in K. pneumoniae . We present a comprehensive and clinically relevant study of the diversity of O- and K-antigen biosynthesis gene clusters across a global collection of over 500 K. pneumoniae whole-genome sequences and the seroepidemiology of human isolates from different infection types. Our study defines the genetic diversity of O- and K-antigen biosynthesis cluster sequences across this collection, identifying sequences for known serotypes as well as identifying novel LPS and CPS gene clusters found in circulating contemporary isolates. Serotypes O1, O2 and O3 were most prevalent in our sample set, accounting for approximately 80 % of all infections. In contrast, K serotypes showed an order of magnitude higher diversity and differ among infection types. In addition we investigated a potential association of O or K serotypes with phylogenetic lineage, infection type and the presence of known virulence genes. K1 and K2 serotypes, which are associated with hypervirulent K. pneumoniae , were associated with a higher abundance of virulence genes and more diverse O serotypes compared to other common K serotypes.

  19. Biofilm inhibitory effect of chlorhexidine conjugated gold nanoparticles against Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Khan, Anum Khalid; Anwar, Ayaz; Ali, Syed Abid; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2016-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) is one of the major pathogen associated with nosocomial infections, especially catheter associated urinary tract infections which involved biofilm formation. This study was designed to evaluate the antibiofilm efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugated with chlorhexidine (Au-CHX) against K. pneumoniae isolates. Au-CHX was synthesized and analyzed for stability by using UV-Visible spectrophotometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). Biofilm inhibition and eradication was performed by crystal violet, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays and further confirmed by florescence and AFM microscopy. Au-CHX showed the maxima surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 535 nm, spherical morphology and polydispersity with size in the range of 20-100 nm. The micro molar concentrations (i.e. 25 and 100 μM) of Au-CHX completely inhibited the biofilm formation and metabolic activity within biofilms of K. pneumoniae reference and three tested clinical isolates, respectively. Time dependant biofilm inhibition assay showed that Au-CHX inhibited the early stage of biofilm formation. While at 75 and 100 μM concentrations, it also eradicated the established biofilms of K. pneumoniae isolates as compared to 2 mM chlorhexidine. Reduced florescence signals and surface roughness during microscopic analysis further confirms the antibiofilm activity of Au-CHX against K. pneumoniae ATCC13882 and clinical isolates. Thus it is concluded that chlorhexidine coated gold nanoparticle not only inhibits the biofilm formation of K. pneumoniae ATCC and clinical isolates but also eradicated the preformed biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Epidemic of Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial infections resistant to methicillin in a maternity ward].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Coq, M; Simon, I; Sire, C; Tissot-Guerraz, F; Fournier, L; Aho, S; Noblot, G; Reverdy, M E; Françoise, M

    2001-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial infections frequently occur in the hospital environment, but their incidence is less often observed in neonates. In the present investigation, seventeen cases were recorded over a nine-week period (two cases per week). Pulsed field gradient gel electrophoresis confirmed the clonal character of the strain. The hypothesis of manually-transmitted infection due to contamination from multiple sources was reinforced by the fact the epidemic persisted in spite of the elimination of the main human infectious source and an absence of risk factors determined by the case-control study. The role of environmental factors in the persistence of this outbreak of MRSA infection has been considered.

  1. Investigation of the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens causing nosocomial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaman, Akgun; Kibar, Filiz; Buyukcelik, Ozlem; Tasova, Yesim; Inal, A.S.; Saltoglu, Nese; Kurtaran, Behice; Dundal, Ismail H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the resistance patterns of bacteria causing nosocomial infections. The outcome of this resistance was followed for 3 years. This study was carried out during 2000 to 2002 at a university hospital in Turkey. The resistance patterns of 570 bacteria (390 Gram-negative, 180 Gram-positive) against meropenem, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were investigated using the E-test. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was determined using ceftazidime and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid E-test strips. Meropenem was the most effective antibiotic against Gram-negative organisms (89.0%); this was followed by imipenem (87.2%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (66.4%). The most active antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria was imipenem (87.2%) and this was followed by piperacillin/tazobactam (81.7%) and meropenem (77.8%). The rates of production of ESBL by Escherichia coli were 20.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 50% and Serratia marcescens were 46.7%. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production increased each year (21.7%, 22.1% and 45.5%). All of the ESBL producing isolates were sensitive to meropenem and 98.5% sensitive to imipenem. AmpC beta-lactamase was produced by 20.9% of the Enterobacter species spp, Citrobacter spp. and Serratia marcescens. All of these were sensitive to meropenem and 77.8% to imipenem and ciprofloxacin. Multi-drug resistance rates in Acinetobacter spp were 45.4% and 37.7% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. As in the entire world, resistance to antibiotics is a serious problem in our country. Solving of this problem depends primarily on prevention of the development of resistance. (author)

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae Invasive Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Evangelista

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome (KPIS is a rare clinical condition characterized by primary liver abscess associated with metastatic infection. Most case reports are from Southeast Asia, with only one case described in Portugal. The Authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with a history of fever, dry cough and cervicalgia. A thoracic computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic nodules, suggestive of metastatic malignancy. Both blood cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imaging studies were repeated during his hospital stay, showing a reduction in both number and volume of identified lesions, thus revealing their infectious nature. This case illustrates how much this entity can mimic other illnesses.

  3. Th17 cells are associated with protection from ventilator associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Orlov

    Full Text Available CD4+ T-helper 17 (Th17 cells and Interleukin (IL-17A play an important role in clearing pathogens in mouse models of pneumonia. We hypothesized that numbers of Th17 cells and levels of IL-17A are associated with risk for nosocomial pneumonia in humans.We collected bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid from mechanically ventilated (n = 25 patients undergoing quantitative bacterial culture to evaluate for ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP. We identified Th17 cells by positive selection of CD4+ cells, stimulation with ionomycin and PMA, then staining for CD4, CD45, CCR6, IL-17A, and IFN-γ followed by flow cytometric analysis (n = 21. We measured inflammatory cytokine levels, including IL-17A, in BAL fluid by immunoassay.VAP was detected in 13 of the 25 subjects. We identified a decreased percentage of IL-17A producing Th17 cells in BAL fluid from patients with VAP compared to those without (p = 0.02. However, we found no significant difference in levels of IL-17A in patients with VAP compared to those without (p = 0.07. Interestingly, IL-17A levels did not correlate with Th17 cell numbers. IL-17A levels did show strong positive correlations with alveolar neutrophil numbers and total protein levels.Th17 cells are found at lower percentages in BAL fluid from mechanically ventilated patients with VAP and IL-17A levels correlated with Th17 cell percentages in non-VAP subjects, but not those with VAP. These findings suggest that Th17 cells may be protective against development of nosocomial pneumonia in patients receiving mechanical ventilation and that alveolar IL-17A in VAP may be derived from sources other than alveolar Th17 cells.

  4. Community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [de

  5. Pneumonia in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tow Keang; Siow, Wen Ting

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia in the tropics poses a heavy disease burden. The complex interplay of climate change, human migration influences and socio-economic factors lead to changing patterns of respiratory infections in tropical climate but also increasingly in temperate countries. Tropical and poorer countries, especially South East Asia, also bear the brunt of the global tuberculosis (TB) pandemic, accounting for almost one-third of the burden. But, as human migration patterns evolve, we expect to see more TB cases in higher income as well as temperate countries, and rise in infections like scrub typhus from ecotourism activities. Fuelled by the ease of air travel, novel zoonotic infections originating from the tropics have led to global respiratory pandemics. As such, clinicians worldwide should be aware of these new conditions as well as classical tropical bacterial pneumonias such as melioidosis. Rarer entities such as co-infections of leptospirosis and chikungunya or dengue will need careful consideration as well. In this review, we highlight aetiologies of pneumonia seen more commonly in the tropics compared with temperate regions, their disease burden, variable clinical presentations as well as impact on healthcare delivery. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. Clinicoroentgenological control in chronic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamilyaev, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive clinicoroentgenological study was used to examine 494 patients with chronic pneumonia. Morphological and functional changes observed in the pulmonary pare and functional changes observed in the pulmonary parenchyma and bronchial tree were studied. Types of pneumosclerosis, tigns of exacerbation of chronic pneumonia and abscess formation, morphological and functional disorders of bronchial penetrability in the pneumonic zone were described. Three forms of chronic pneumonia: bronchial, bronchiectatic and abscessing are signled out. The bronchial form is subdivided into chronic pneumonia with chronic bronchitis without deformity and wi.th deforming chronic bronchitis. In the bronchiectatic form pneumonia can be with cylindrical, saccular and cyst-like bronchiectasia. The general diagnosis of chronic pneumonia is established clinically depending on type and variants in 89-94% of cases, by X-ray and sonographic findings in all patients; types and variants of disease are most frequently defined after bronchography

  7. EXPERIMENTAL PNEUMONIA (FRIEDLANDER TYPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W R; Walker, I C

    1915-12-01

    The foregoing experiments show that in cats a definite lobar pneumonia may be caused by Bacillus mucosus capsulatus. Judging both from the clinical course and from the pathological findings, this form of pulmonary infection differs from the usual pneumococcus types of pneumonia and closely resembles the so called Friedländer's bacillus or Bacillus pneumonioe in man. In all instances in which a lobar pneumonia was found after the injection of the bacillus, a similar organism was recovered from the lung, and in no case was this associated with other organisms. The course of the disease in cats is very short, the animals developing early symptoms of profound toxemia. In 87 per cent of the animals showing a lobar pneumonia positive blood cultures were obtained. The pathological findings, judging from the early stages of the disease, are subject to considerable variation. In some instances the process may suggest a pseudolobar or confluent lobular distribution. In these cases the lung has a mottled, marble-like appearance. In the majority of cases, however, the process gave a more homogeneous appearance, suggesting a diffuse and uniform distribution. Foci of hemorrhage were not uncommon in both. Such areas cause the mottled appearance sometimes found. In all instances the consolidated lung presents a greater infiltration of tissue than is usually seen in other types of experimental pneumonia. Although the exudate as seen on the cut surface may be abundant and especially viscid in character, this is not present in most cases. The cut surface of the consolidated lung does not present a granular appearance. The histological findings are also subject to considerable variation. In most instances the infundibular and alveolar spaces are completely filled with an exudate made up chiefly of polymorphonuclear cells. Associated with these are the capsulated bacilli, large vacuolated mononuclear phagocytic cells, and red blood cells, and occasionally small amounts of fibrin. The

  8. Does atopy affect the course of viral pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, S B; Can, D; Girit, S; Çatal, F; Şen, V; Pekcan, S; Yüksel, H; Bingöl, A; Bostancı, I; Erge, D; Ersu, R

    The presence of atopy is considered as a risk factor for severe respiratory symptoms in children. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of atopy on the course of disease in children hospitalised with viral pneumonia. Children between the ages of 1 and 6 years hospitalised due to viral pneumonia between the years of 2013 and 2016 were included to this multicentre study. Patients were classified into two groups as mild-moderate and severe according to the course of pneumonia. Presence of atopy was evaluated with skin prick tests. Groups were compared to evaluate the risk factors associated with severe viral pneumonia. A total of 280 patients from nine centres were included in the study. Of these patients, 163 (58.2%) were male. Respiratory syncytial virus (29.7%), Influenza A (20.5%), rhinovirus (18.9%), adenovirus (10%), human metapneumovirus (8%), parainfluenza (5.2%), coronavirus (6%), and bocavirus (1.6%) were isolated from respiratory samples. Eighty-five (30.4%) children had severe pneumonia. Atopic sensitisation was found in 21.4% of the patients. Ever wheezing (RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.4), parental asthma (RR: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1-2.2), other allergic diseases in the family (RR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9) and environmental tobacco smoke (RR: 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) were more common in the severe pneumonia group. When patients with mild-moderate pneumonia were compared to patients with severe pneumonia, frequency of atopy was not different between the two groups. However, parental asthma, ever wheezing and environmental tobacco smoke exposure are risk factors for severe viral pneumonia in children. Copyright © 2017 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Pneumonia and wheezing in the first year: An international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Marcos, Luis; Mallol, Javier; Solé, Dirceu; Brand, Paul L P; Martinez-Torres, Antonela; Sanchez-Solis, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between pneumonia and recurrent wheezing (RW) and the factors associated to pneumonia in wheezing and non-wheezing infants have not been compared between affluent and non-affluent populations. The International Study of Wheezing in Infants (EISL) is a large population-based cross-sectional study carried out in Latin America (LA) and Europe (EU). We used a validated questionnaire for identifying wheeze in the first year of life. The questionnaire also inquired about pneumonia diagnosis, together with other potentially related factors. Associations between both conditions and between potential risk/protective factors for pneumonia were tested by random-effects logit model and adjusting for all factors found previously associated to RW in this cohort. Pneumonia and RW were strongly associated to each other in LA and EU (aOR 5.42; 95%CI: 4.87-6.04 and aOR 13.99; 95%CI: 9.61-20.36, respectively). Infant eczema was the most consistent risk factor of pneumonia in both continents, in the whole population and also among wheezers and non-wheezers (aOR ranging from 1.30; 95%CI: 1.11-1.52 to 2.65; 95%CI: 1.68-4.18); while breast feeding for at least 3 months was the most consistent protective factor (aOR ranging from 0.60; 95%CI: 0.51-0.71 to 0.76; 95%CI: 0.69-0.84). Factors associated to pneumonia were similar between continents among wheezers, but differed considerably among non-wheezers. Pneumonia and RW are associated conditions sharing many risk/protective factors in EU and LA among wheezing infants, but not among non-wheezing infants. The association between pneumonia and RW could be due to shared pathophysiology or by diagnostic confusion between the two conditions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What can you tell me about cryptogenic organizing pneumonia? Answers from Teng Moua, M.D. Previously called bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) is a rare lung ...

  11. [Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial gram-negative bacilli from intensive care units in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Jun; Wang, Hui

    2003-03-10

    To investigate the change of antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial gram-negative bacilli, especially those of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from intensive care units from 1994 to 2001 in China. E test was made to determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 10 279 isolates of gram-negative bacilli (including 5 829 strains of bacilli of Enterobacteriaceae) from 32 hospitals in China from 1994 to 2001. The most common pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp, Acinetobacter spp. Enterobacter spp, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The most common pathogens in respiratory tract specimens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (25%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18%), and Acinetobacter baumanni (11%). The most common pathogens in blood and urine specimens were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antibiotic remaining the most active against all of the gram-negative bacilli for 7 years was imipenem (with a susceptibility rate of 87%), followed by cefoperazone/sulbactam (however, with a susceptibility rate decreasing from 86% to 75%), amikacin (75%), ceftazidime (73%), cefepime (72%), and piperacillin/tazobactam (71%). The susceptibility rate of Escherichia coli Klebsiella pneumoniae to imipenem remained 98% with a MIC(90) of 0.5 micro g/ml during the 7 years, much higher than those to amikacin (84%), ceftazidime (83%), cefoperazone/sulbactam (83%), piperacillin/tazobactam (80%), and cefepime (80%). The susceptibility rate of these two species to cefoperazone/sulbactam decreased from 90% in 1996 to 74% in 2001. While the susceptibility to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone decreased from 82% to 57%. The susceptibility rate of Escherichia coli to ciprofloxacin decreased from 54% to 25% and that of Klebsiella pneumoniae to ciprofloxacin decreased from 90% to 75%. The prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamases in these two species increased from 11% in 1994 to 34% in 2001. The most active antibiotics against

  12. Predicting nosocomial lower respiratory tract infections by a risk index based system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yong; Shan, Xue; Zhao, Jingya; Han, Xuelin; Tian, Shuguang; Chen, Fangyan; Su, Xueting; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Wang, Hongyuan; Han, Li

    2017-01-01

    Although belonging to one of the most common type of nosocomial infection, there was currently no simple prediction model for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). This study aims to develop a risk index based system for predicting nosocomial LRTIs based on data from a large point-prevalence

  13. Rational approaches to the therapy of nosocomial infections caused by gram-positive microorganisms in cancer p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Aginova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by gram-positive organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci (Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis are steadily increasing in almost all clinics around the world. Cancer patients have a higher risk of hospital-acquired infections than non-cancer patients. Cancer patients are immunosuppressed due to increased use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs, radiation therapy, surgery and use of steroids. This paper presents an analysis of resistance of gram-positive bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents to determine treatment strategy for cancer patients.

  14. Nosocomial Candidiasis: Antifungal Stewardship and the Importance of Rapid Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia and other forms of candidiasis are associated with considerable excess mortality and costs. Despite the addition of several new antifungal agents with improved spectrum and potency, the frequency of Candida infection and associated mortality have not decreased in the past two decades. The lack of rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests has led to considerable overuse of antifungal agents resulting in increased costs, selection pressure for resistance, unnecessary drug toxicity, and adverse drug interactions. Both the lack of timely diagnostic tests and emergence of antifungal resistance pose considerable problems for antifungal stewardship. Whereas antifungal stewardship with a focus on nosocomial candidiasis should be able to improve the administration of antifungal therapy in terms of drug selection, proper dose and duration, source control and de-escalation therapy, an important parameter, timeliness of antifungal therapy, remains a victim of slow and insensitive diagnostic tests. Fortunately, new proteomic and molecular diagnostic tools are improving the time to species identification and detection. In this review we will describe the potential impact that rapid diagnostic testing and antifungal stewardship can have on the management of nosocomial candidiasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  16. Nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients in the burn unit of Hospital Universitario San José, Popayán - Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Arroyave

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence and microbiological behavior of the infections in hospitalized patients in the burn unit of the University Hospital San José ( HUSJ at Popayan, Colombia, 2010-2011. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in patients admitted to the burn unit of HUSJ between the years 2010–2011. Patients were characterized sociodemographic and clinically. The prevalence of nosocomial infections was estimated. Frequency and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms isolated was described. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results. 113 patients was enrolled, the average age was 17.7 years and male gender predominated (55.8%. Hot liquids (64.6% were the principal cause, the average of body surface area burned was 11.3% and the average hospital stay was 19.8 days. 13.3% of the patients had some nosocomial infection. The most frequently diagnosed infections were sepsis (24%, urinary tract infection (20% and pneumonia (20%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent bacteria (41.7% followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, mostly meticilino-resistant. The mean length of hospital stay and burned surface area (BSA in patients with diagnosis of infection was 36.6 days and 17.3% respectively. Conclusions. The prevalence of infection is similar to that reported in Colombia. The resistance of the isolates was high. The meticilinoresistance of Staphylococcus was associated with clindamicina resistance.

  17. Evaluation of antibacterial efficacy of phyto fabricated silver nanoparticles using Mukia scabrella (Musumusukkai) against drug resistance nosocomial gram negative bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakar, Kandasamy; Sivalingam, Periyasamy; Mohamed Rabeek, Siyed Ibrahim; Muthuselvam, Manickam; Devarajan, Naresh; Arjunan, Annavi; Karthick, Rajamanickam; Suresh, Micky Maray; Wembonyama, John Pote

    2013-04-01

    Given the fact in the limitation of the therapeutic options for emerging multidrug resistance gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) of respiratory tract infections, the present study was focused on green synthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using leaf extract of Mukia scabrella. An obvious color change to brown color and surface plasmon resonance by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) indicated a well observable peak at 440 nm confirming the synthesis of AgNPs. Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicates protein as possible capping agents. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) spectroscopy results showed major signal for elemental silver. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates the formation of metallic silver nanomaterials. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) study showed the nanoparticles in the size range of 18-21 nm with spherical shape. Zeta potential analysis showed -21.7 mV characteristic for stable AgNPs. The biosynthesized AgNPs exhibited significant antimicrobial activity against MDR-GNB nosocomial pathogens of Acinetobacter sp., Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results from the current study suggested that M. scabrella material could be exploited for the fabrication of AgNPs with potential therapeutic applications in nanomedicine especially for nosocomial bacterial infections. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O padrão histológico de Pneumonia Aguda Fibrinosa e Organizante (AFOP – Acute Fibrinous And Organizing Pneumonia, descrito por Beasley em 2002, caracteriza-se pela existência de fibrina intra-alveolar sob a forma de bolas de fibrina e pneumonia organizativa difusa. A apresentação clínica desta doença intersticial pulmonar pode ser aguda ou subaguda, diferindo no entanto dos outros padrões histológicos habitualmente associados a lesão pulmonar aguda – Lesão Alveolar Difusa (DAD, Pneumonia Organizativa (OP e Pneumonia Eosinofílica (EP.A propósito deste tema, os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura e descrevem o caso clínico de um doente de 44 anos, com aspectos imagiológicos e evolução pouco habituais. Abstract: The histologic pattern of Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP, described by Beasley in 2002, is characterized by the existence of intra alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin “balls” and diffuse organizing pneumonia. Presenting symptoms of this interstitial pulmonary disease can be acute or subacute. However, it differs from the well-recognized histologic patterns of acute pulmonary lesion – Diffuse Alveolar Damage (DAD, Organizing Pneumonia (OP and Eosinophilic Pneumonia (EP.The authors carry out a review of the literature concerning this topic and describe the clinical case of a 44-year-old patient with unusual imaging features and outcome. Palavras-chave: AFOP, bolas de fibrina, pneumonia organizativa, Key-word: AFOP, fibrin balls, organizing pneumonia

  19. Aspiration-related organizing pneumonia complicating laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: A lung cancer mimicker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Aljohaney

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several described pulmonary complications due to laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. We report a rare case of a 32-year-old male who presented with pulmonary symptoms and a solitary lung mass 12 years after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. A bronchoscopic lung biopsy showed organizing pneumonia that was induced by aspiration pneumonia. The atypical radiological appearance of the aspiration pneumonia may pose a diagnostic challenge, and clinicians' awareness regarding such an entity is needed to avoid unnecessary intervention.

  20. Genetic dissection of host immune response in pneumonia development and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelaya, Tamara V; Belopolskaya, Olesya B; Smirnova, Svetlana V; Kuzovlev, Artem N; Moroz, Viktor V; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Pabalan, Noel A; Salnikova, Lyubov E

    2016-10-11

    The role of host genetic variation in pneumonia development and outcome is poorly understood. We studied common polymorphisms in the genes of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6 rs1800795, IL8 rs4073, IL1B rs16944), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL10 rs1800896, IL4 rs2243250, IL13 rs20541) and toll-like receptors (TLR2 rs5743708 and rs4696480, TLR4 rs4986791, TLR9 rs352139, rs5743836 and rs187084) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) (390 cases, 203 controls) and nosocomial pneumonia (355 cases, 216 controls). Experimental data were included in a series of 11 meta-analyses and eight subset analyses related to pneumonia susceptibility and outcome. TLR2 rs5743708 minor genotype appeared to be associated with CAP/Legionnaires' disease/pneumococcal disease. In CAP patients, the IL6 rs1800795-C allele was associated with severe sepsis/septic shock/severe systemic inflammatory response, while the IL10 rs1800896-A allele protected against the development of these critical conditions. To contribute to deciphering of the above results, we performed an in silico analysis and a qualitative synthesis of literature data addressing basal and stimulated genotype-specific expression level. This data together with database information on transcription factors' affinity changes caused by SNPs in putative promoter regions, the results of linkage disequilibrium analysis along with SNPs functional annotations supported assumptions about the complexity underlying the revealed associations.

  1. Prevalence of Device-associated Nosocomial Infections Caused By Gram-negative Bacteria in a Trauma Intensive Care Unit in Libya

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    Abdulaziz Zorgani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Device-associated nosocomial infections (DANIs have a major impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Our study aimed to determine the distribution rate of DANIs and causative agents and patterns of antibiotic resistance in the trauma-surgical intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: Our study was conducted at Abusalim Trauma Hospital in Tripoli, Libya. All devices associated with nosocomial infections, including central venous catheters (CVC, endotracheal tubes (ETT, Foley’s urinary catheters, chest tubes, nasogastric tubes (NGT, and tracheostomy tubes, were removed aseptically and examined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB. Results: During a one-year study period, 363 patients were hospitalized; the overall mortality rate was 29%. A total of 79 DANIs were identified, the most common site of infection was ETT (39.2%, followed by urinary catheters (19%, NGTs (18%, tracheostomy tubes (11%, CVCs (10%, and chest tubes (3%. The most frequently isolated organisms were Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%, 20%, and 14%, respectively. Extremely high resistance rates were observed among GNB to ampicillin (99%, cefuroxime (95%, amoxicillin-clavulante (92%, and nitrofurantoin (91%. Lower levels of resistance were exhibited to amikacin (38%, imipenem (38%, and colistin (29%. About 39% of the isolates were defined as multi-drug resistant (MDR. Overall, extended spectrum β-lactmase producers were expressed in 39% of isolates mainly among K. pneumonia (88%. A. baumannii isolates exhibited extremely high levels of resistance to all antibiotics except colistin (100% sensitive. In addition, 56.3% of A. baumannii isolates were found to be MDR. P. aeruginosa isolates showed 46%–55% effectiveness to anti-pseudomonas antibiotics. Conclusion: High rates of DANI’s and the emergence of MDR organisms poses a serious threat to patients. There is a need to strengthen infection control within the ICU environment

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

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    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  3. Sublethal Concentrations of Carbapenems Alter Cell Morphology and Genomic Expression of Klebsiella pneumoniae Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laar, Tricia A.; Chen, Tsute; You, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a Gram-negative bacterium, is normally associated with pneumonia in patients with weakened immune systems. However, it is also a prevalent nosocomial infectious agent that can be found in infected surgical sites and combat wounds. Many of these clinical strains display multidrug resistance. We have worked with a clinical strain of K. pneumoniae that was initially isolated from a wound of an injured soldier. This strain demonstrated resistance to many commonly used antibiotics but sensitivity to carbapenems. This isolate was capable of forming biofilms in vitro, contributing to its increased antibiotic resistance and impaired clearance. We were interested in determining how sublethal concentrations of carbapenem treatment specifically affect K. pneumoniae biofilms both in morphology and in genomic expression. Scanning electron microscopy showed striking morphological differences between untreated and treated biofilms, including rounding, blebbing, and dimpling of treated cells. Comparative transcriptome analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology identified a large number of open reading frames (ORFs) differentially regulated in response to carbapenem treatment at 2 and 24 h. ORFs upregulated with carbapenem treatment included genes involved in resistance, as well as those coding for antiporters and autoinducers. ORFs downregulated included those coding for metal transporters, membrane biosynthesis proteins, and motility proteins. Quantitative real-time PCR validated the general trend of some of these differentially regulated ORFs. Treatment of K. pneumoniae biofilms with sublethal concentrations of carbapenems induced a wide range of phenotypic and gene expression changes. This study reveals some of the mechanisms underlying how sublethal amounts of carbapenems could affect the overall fitness and pathogenic potential of K. pneumoniae biofilm cells. PMID:25583711

  4. Ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael Jan

    2005-05-01

    This review summarises some of the notable papers on ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) from January 2003 to October 2004. Ventilator-associated pneumonia remains an important drain on hospital resources. All population groups are affected, but patients with VAP are more likely to be older, sicker, and male, with invasive medical devices in situ. Early VAP diagnosis is desirable to reduce VAP mortality and to retard emergence of multidrug-resistant microbes. This may be possible using preliminary culture results or intracellular organism in polymorphonuclear cells. In most intensive care units, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are the commonest organisms isolated in VAP. However, causative organisms vary between and within hospitals. Consequently, individual intensive care units should develop empirical antibiotic policies to target the pathogenic bacteria prevalent in their patient populations. Preventative strategies aimed at reducing aerodigestive tract colonisation by pathogenic organisms, and also their subsequent aspiration, are becoming increasingly important. Educating medical staff about these simple measures is therefore pertinent. To reduce the occurrence of multidrug-resistant organisms, limiting the duration of antibiotic treatment to 8 days and antimicrobial rotation should be contemplated. Empirical therapy with antipseudomonal penicillins plus beta-lactamase inhibitors should be considered. If methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus VAP is a possibility, linezolid may be better than vancomycin. Prevention remains the key to reducing VAP prevalence.

  5. Herpes simplex type 2 pneumonia

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    Calore Edenilson Eduardo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive reviews of pulmonary infections in AIDS have reported few herpetic infections. Generally these infections are due to Herpes simplex type 1. Pneumonia due to herpes type 2 is extremely rare. We describe a 40 year-old HIV positive woman who complained of fever, cough and dyspnea for seven years. She had signs of heart failure and the appearance of her genital vesicles was highly suggestive of genital herpes. Echocardiography showed marked pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid insufficiency. After a few days of hospitalization she was treated with Aciclovir and later with Ganciclovir. An open pulmonary biopsy revealed an interstitial inflammation, localized in the alveolar walls. Some pulmonary arteries had widened walls and focal hyaline degeneration. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the nuclei had herpes simplex virus type 2 in many endothelial cells (including vessels with widened walls, macrophages in the alveolar septa and pneumocytes. There was clinical improvement after treatment for herpes. We concluded that as a consequence of herpes infection, endothelial involvement and interstitial inflammation supervene, with thickening of vascular walls and partial obliteration of the vessel lumen. A direct consequence of these changes in pulmonary vasculature was pulmonary hypertension followed by heart failure.

  6. Herpes simplex type 2 pneumonia

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    Edenilson Eduardo Calore

    Full Text Available Extensive reviews of pulmonary infections in AIDS have reported few herpetic infections. Generally these infections are due to Herpes simplex type 1. Pneumonia due to herpes type 2 is extremely rare. We describe a 40 year-old HIV positive woman who complained of fever, cough and dyspnea for seven years. She had signs of heart failure and the appearance of her genital vesicles was highly suggestive of genital herpes. Echocardiography showed marked pulmonary hypertension, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid insufficiency. After a few days of hospitalization she was treated with Aciclovir and later with Ganciclovir. An open pulmonary biopsy revealed an interstitial inflammation, localized in the alveolar walls. Some pulmonary arteries had widened walls and focal hyaline degeneration. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the nuclei had herpes simplex virus type 2 in many endothelial cells (including vessels with widened walls, macrophages in the alveolar septa and pneumocytes. There was clinical improvement after treatment for herpes. We concluded that as a consequence of herpes infection, endothelial involvement and interstitial inflammation supervene, with thickening of vascular walls and partial obliteration of the vessel lumen. A direct consequence of these changes in pulmonary vasculature was pulmonary hypertension followed by heart failure.

  7. Impact of daily chlorhexidine baths and hand hygiene compliance on nosocomial infection rates in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Reséndez, Michel Fernando; Garza-González, Elvira; Mendoza-Olazaran, Soraya; Herrera-Guerra, Alexis; Rodríguez-López, Juan Manuel; Pérez-Rodriguez, Edelmiro; Mercado-Longoria, Roberto; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián

    2014-07-01

    Up to 25% of all nosocomial infections (NIs) develop in critically ill patients. Our objective was to evaluate chlorhexidine (CHX) bathing and hand hygiene (HH) compliance in the reduction of NIs in the intensive care unit. The study comprised three 6-month periods: preintervention (PIP; soap/water bathing), intervention (IP; bathing with CHX-impregnated wipes), and postintervention (PoIP; soap/water bathing). An HH program was implemented during the IP and PoIP. Primary outcomes were global and specific NI rates. A total of 1007 patients were included. Infection rates per 100 discharges were higher in the PIP compared with the IP and also higher in the PoIP compared with the IP (P = .0004 and .0109, respectively). Global infection rates per 1000 hospital-days were higher in the PIP than in the IP (P = .0268). The rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) were higher in the PIP than in the IP (P = .036 and .0001, respectively). Isolation of Acinetobacter baumannii from VAP specimens (P = .0204) and isolation of Candida spp from CAUTI specimens (P = .0005) decreased as well. The combined intervention reduced global and specific infection rates, including rates of VAP associated with A baumannii and CAUTI associated with Candida spp. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae against bacterial multiresistant strains isolated from nosocomial patients

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    Adalberto Coelho da Costa

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are considered the main therapeutic option to treat bacterial infections; however, there is the disadvantage of increasing bacterial resistance. Thus, the research of antimicrobials of plant origin has been an important alternative. This work aimed at determining the in vitro antibacterial activity of the essential oil of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae on multiresistant bacteria isolated from biological materials. 24 strains of nosocomial bacteria were used and divided into six different species that were inhibited by the essential oil in the preliminary "screening" which was accomplished by the diffusion technique in agar. MIC was determined by the microdilution method, beginning with solutions with the final concentrations: 8 up to 0.125% with the following results: The four samples (100% of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and MRSA were inhibited by the essential oil at the concentration of 0.125%. Three samples (75% of Acinetobacter baumannii at 0.125% and a sample (25% at 0.5%; Klebsiella pneumoniae (75% at 0.125% and 25% at 0.25%; Pseudomonas aeruginosa (75% at 0.5% and 25% at 0.25%. MIC varied from 78 to 83%. It was concluded through the obtained data that there was not difference in the minimum bactericidal concentration (0.5% of the referred oil for Gram positive as well for Gram negative microorganisms.

  9. Age group analysis of psychological, physical and functional deterioration in patients hospitalized for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Salvador, Adelina; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Sáez-Roca, Germán; López-Torres, Isabel; Rodríguez-Alzueta, Elisabeth; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Hospital admissions due to pneumonia range from 1.1 to 4 per 1,000 patients and this figure increases with age. Hospitalization causes a decline in functional status. Physical impairment impedes recovery and constitutes a higher risk of disability and mortality in elderly people. The objective of this study is to assess the impact of hospital stay in patients with pneumonia related with age. A total of 116 patients with pneumonia were included in this study, and divided into two age groups:psychological and emotional profile were evaluated. Pneumonia severity, nutritional status, independence and comorbidities were also assessed. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences between both age groups in pneumonia severity and comorbidities. Significant improvements between admission and discharge were found in lung function in both groups (pgroup. Hospitalization leads to a significant physical impairment in patients admitted for pneumonia. This deterioration increases with age. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood--nervous system disorder during or after a respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Sauteur, P M; Streuli, J C; Iff, T; Goetschel, P

    2011-07-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important aetiological agent of encephalitis in children, with encephalitis being the most frequent paediatric extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infections. Evidence of M. pneumoniae involvement in childhood encephalitis is difficult to obtain, because M. pneumoniae is seldom detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and the clinical picture shows gradual onset. Therefore, we present a small case-study as a paradigm of M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood and illustrate the importance of this entity based on a review of previously published cases. We describe neurological signs and symptoms of 2 patients with M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood. Respiratory symptoms with fever occurred in both children. They were seropositive for M. pneumoniae, but did not have the organism detected by PCR from cerebrospinal fluid. No long-term neurologic sequelae occurred. M. pneumoniae has to be considered as a responsible pathogen of encephalitis in children, even if respiratory symptoms do not occur. Due to the seldom detection of M. pneumoniae in cerebrospinal fluid, evidence of m. pneumoniae involvement in childhood encephalitis is difficult to obtain.Faced with a neurological disease with no organism detected in CNS in the majority of cases assumes that M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis is most likely a paradigm for an autoimmune disease with uniform pathogenesis mediated by an immunologic response to an antecedent antigenic stimulus from M. pneumoniae. It is important to relate this organism to this relatively common and potentially devastating clinical syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Prevention of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients with lactoferrin (PREVAIL study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscedere, John; Maslove, David; Boyd, John Gordon; O'Callaghan, Nicole; Lamontagne, Francois; Reynolds, Steven; Albert, Martin; Hall, Rick; McGolrick, Danielle; Jiang, Xuran; Day, Andrew G

    2016-09-29

    Nosocomial infections remain an important source of morbidity, mortality, and increased health care costs in hospitalized patients. This is particularly problematic in intensive care units (ICUs) because of increased patient vulnerability due to the underlying severity of illness and increased susceptibility from utilization of invasive therapeutic and monitoring devices. Lactoferrin (LF) and the products of its breakdown have multiple biological effects, which make its utilization of interest for the prevention of nosocomial infections in the critically ill. This is a phase II randomized, multicenter, double-blinded trial to determine the effect of LF on antibiotic-free days in mechanically ventilated, critically ill, adult patients in the ICU. Eligible, consenting patients will be randomized to receive either LF or placebo. The treating clinician will remain blinded to allocation during the study; blinding will be maintained by using opaque syringes and containers. The primary outcome will be antibiotic-free days, defined as the number of days alive and free of antibiotics 28 days after randomization. Secondary outcomes will include: antibiotic utilization, adjudicated diagnosis of nosocomial infection (longer than 72 h of admission to ICU), hospital and ICU length of stay, change in organ function after randomization, hospital and 90-day mortality, incidence of tracheal colonization, changes in gastrointestinal permeability, and immune function. Outcomes to inform the conduct of a larger definitive trial will also be evaluated, including feasibility as determined by recruitment rates and protocol adherence. The results from this study are expected to provide insight into a potential novel therapeutic use for LF in critically ill adult patients. Further, analysis of study outcomes will inform a future, large-scale phase III randomized controlled trial powered on clinically important outcomes related to the use of LF. The trial was registered at www

  12. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a tertiary care paediatric intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, M.H.; Maqbool, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency, causative organisms and susceptibility pattern of nosocomial bloodstream infections in children. All children admitted to the unit during the study period were daily evaluated for features suggestive of nosocomial infection. In addition to other investigations, blood cultures were done in all suspected cases for the confirmation of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). Nosocomial infection was defined according to the criteria set by Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Demographic, microbiological and other variables were carefully studied to analyze frequency, incidence rate, spectrum of isolates and susceptibility pattern. Children with and without nosocomial BSI were compared with regard to age, duration of stay in hospital, need and duration of ventilation and the outcome. Of the total 406 admissions, 134 children were suspected to have nosocomial infection on at least 214 occasions (episodes). Blood cultures yielded growth of pathological organisms in 62 of these episodes, giving the frequency of nosocomial BSI as 15.2 per 100 admissions (62/406 episodes). Children with nosocomial bloodstream infection were found to have younger mean age (2.1 vs. 4.1 years), longer average duration of stay (13.1 vs. 6.6 days), more frequent need for ventilation (64% vs. 34%) and longer duration of ventilation (9.7 vs. 4.8 days). Majority of isolates (77%) were gram-negative bacteria; Klebsiella being the most common isolate (n= 23). Aztreonam, Ceftiazidime, Ceforuxime and Ciprofloxacin showed high resistance pattern (33-50%). Isolates showed good sensitivity to Vancomycin (100%), Imipenem (80%), Meropenem (100%) and Co-amoxiclav (88%). The frequency of nosocomial BSI in the observed setting was quite high, having marked impact on the duration of stay and outcome. Emergence of resistant pathogens is alarming. (author)

  13. Nursing Care Model Based on Knowledge Management in Preventing Nosocomial Infection After Caesarean Section in Hospital

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    Ahsan Ahsan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infection is one indicator of the quality of health services in the community, which also determines the image of health care institutions becauseit was a major cause of morbidityand death rate (mortality in hospital. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identification knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post section caesarea. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasi experimental design. The population was all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation in hospitals A and B as much as 46 people. Sample was the total population. Data was collected through questionnaire, observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data was analyzed using t test B 1.274 dan p=0.028 Result: The result showed that 1 there was difference in knowledge management implementation before and after training; 2 there was difference in nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection before and after training; 3 there is significant relationship between nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection and infection incidence; 4 there is no significant difference of nursing care impementation on nosocomial incidence. Discussion: In conclusion, the development of nursing care based on knowledge management as a synthesis or induction of findings directed at 1 nurses’ knowledge does not affect the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 2 knowledge management has a positive effect on the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 3 implementation of infection prevention is integrated capabilities between knowledge, skills and attitudes of nurses in implementing performance in care. Keywords: model prevention, nosocomial infections, nursing care, knowledge management, sectio Caesarea

  14. The Diagnostic Utility of Induced Sputum Microscopy and Culture in Childhood Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, David R; Morpeth, Susan C; Hammitt, Laura L; Driscoll, Amanda J; Watson, Nora L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Adrian, Peter V; Ahmed, Dilruba; Alam, Muntasir; Awori, Juliet O; DeLuca, Andrea N; Higdon, Melissa M; Karron, Ruth A; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Machuka, Eunice M; Makprasert, Sirirat; McLellan, Jessica; Moore, David P; Mwaba, John; Mwarumba, Salim; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Sangwichian, Ornuma; Sissoko, Seydou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zeger, Scott L; Howie, Stephen R C

    2017-06-15

    Sputum microscopy and culture are commonly used for diagnosing the cause of pneumonia in adults but are rarely performed in children due to difficulties in obtaining specimens. Induced sputum is occasionally used to investigate lower respiratory infections in children but has not been widely used in pneumonia etiology studies. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of induced sputum microscopy and culture in patients enrolled in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study, a large study of community-acquired pneumonia in children aged 1-59 months. Comparisons were made between induced sputum samples from hospitalized children with radiographically confirmed pneumonia and children categorized as nonpneumonia (due to the absence of prespecified clinical and laboratory signs and absence of infiltrate on chest radiograph). One induced sputum sample was available for analysis from 3772 (89.1%) of 4232 suspected pneumonia cases enrolled in PERCH. Of these, sputum from 2608 (69.1%) met the quality criterion of <10 squamous epithelial cells per low-power field, and 1162 (44.6%) had radiographic pneumonia. Induced sputum microscopy and culture results were not associated with radiographic pneumonia, regardless of prior antibiotic use, stratification by specific bacteria, or interpretative criteria used. The findings of this study do not support the culture of induced sputum specimens as a diagnostic tool for pneumonia in young children as part of routine clinical practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  15. Radiographic features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: differential diagnosis and performance timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugiu, Tadaaki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Oka, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines propose a differential diagnosis for atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia using a scoring system for the selection of appropriate antibiotic. In order to improve this scoring system, the guidelines are seeking new specific parameter. The purpose of this study was to clarify the pattern of abnormalities with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia on chest computed tomography (CT) and whether the radiographic findings could distinguish M. pneumoniae pneumonia from Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. A retrospective review was performed of the CT findings of 64 cases and 68 cases where M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae, respectively, were the only pathogen identified by the panel of diagnostic tests used. Of the 64 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, bronchial wall thickening was observed most frequently (81%), followed by centrilobular nodules (78%), ground-glass attenuation (78%), and consolidation (61%). Bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules were observed more often in M. pneumoniae patients than in S. pneumoniae patients (p < 0.0001). The presence of bilateral bronchial wall thickening or centrilobular nodules was only seen in patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Using the scoring system of the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines and chest CT findings, 97% of M. pneumoniae patients were suspected to be M. pneumoniae pneumonia without serology. When comparing the CT findings between early stage and progressed stage in the same patients with severe pneumonia, the radiographic features of early stage M. pneumoniae pneumonia were not observed clearly in the progressed stage. The present results indicate that the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia would appear to be reliable when found with a combination of bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules in the CT findings. However, these CT findings are not observed in progressed severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients

  16. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature

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    Jonathan Soldera

    Full Text Available CONTEXTCoagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections.CASE REPORTThe case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin.CONCLUSIONSThe reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections.

  17. Case report 558: Multicentric Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedlaenders bacillus) osteomyelitis in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpani, A.R.; Sundaram, M.; Ramani, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This patient represents a unique combination of multicentric osteomyelitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, lesions in the skull, pathological fracture of a long bone and no evidence of pulmonary disease. That Klebsiella pneumoniae osteomyelitis can occur in sickle cell anemia should be considered when such bone changes are seen. The remarkable resolution on conservative management also needs to be noted. (orig./GDG)

  18. Management of Adults With Hospital-acquired and Ventilator-associated Pneumonia: 2016 Clinical Practice Guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Thoracic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Andre C.; Metersky, Mark L.; Klompas, Michael; Muscedere, John; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Palmer, Lucy B.; Napolitano, Lena M.; O'Grady, Naomi P.; Bartlett, John G.; Carratalà, Jordi; El Solh, Ali A.; Ewig, Santiago; Fey, Paul D.; File, Thomas M.; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Roberts, Jason A.; Waterer, Grant W.; Cruse, Peggy; Knight, Shandra L.; Brozek, Jan L.

    2016-01-01

    It is important to realize that guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. IDSA considers adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determination regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patient's individual circumstances. These guidelines are intended for use by healthcare professionals who care for patients at risk for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), including specialists in infectious diseases, pulmonary diseases, critical care, and surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, and any clinicians and healthcare providers caring for hospitalized patients with nosocomial pneumonia. The panel's recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of HAP and VAP are based upon evidence derived from topic-specific systematic literature reviews. PMID:27418577

  19. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassirer, E Frances; Plowright, Raina K; Manlove, Kezia R; Cross, Paul C; Dobson, Andrew P; Potter, Kathleen A; Hudson, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    1. Bighorn sheep mortality related to pneumonia is a primary factor limiting population recovery across western North America, but management has been constrained by an incomplete understanding of the disease. We analysed patterns of pneumonia-caused mortality over 14 years in 16 interconnected bighorn sheep populations to gain insights into underlying disease processes. 2. We observed four age-structured classes of annual pneumonia mortality patterns: all-age, lamb-only, secondary all-age and adult-only. Although there was considerable variability within classes, overall they differed in persistence within and impact on populations. Years with pneumonia-induced mortality occurring simultaneously across age classes (i.e. all-age) appeared to be a consequence of pathogen invasion into a naïve population and resulted in immediate population declines. Subsequently, low recruitment due to frequent high mortality outbreaks in lambs, probably due to association with chronically infected ewes, posed a significant obstacle to population recovery. Secondary all-age events occurred in previously exposed populations when outbreaks in lambs were followed by lower rates of pneumonia-induced mortality in adults. Infrequent pneumonia events restricted to adults were usually of short duration with low mortality. 3. Acute pneumonia-induced mortality in adults was concentrated in fall and early winter around the breeding season when rams are more mobile and the sexes commingle. In contrast, mortality restricted to lambs peaked in summer when ewes and lambs were concentrated in nursery groups. 4. We detected weak synchrony in adult pneumonia between adjacent populations, but found no evidence for landscape-scale extrinsic variables as drivers of disease. 5. We demonstrate that there was a >60% probability of a disease event each year following pneumonia invasion into bighorn sheep populations. Healthy years also occurred periodically, and understanding the factors driving these

  20. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassirer, E. Frances; Plowright, Raina K.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Potter, Kathleen A.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Bighorn sheep mortality related to pneumonia is a primary factor limiting population recovery across western North America, but management has been constrained by an incomplete understanding of the disease. We analysed patterns of pneumonia-caused mortality over 14 years in 16 interconnected bighorn sheep populations to gain insights into underlying disease processes. 2. We observed four age-structured classes of annual pneumonia mortality patterns: all-age, lamb-only, secondary all-age and adult-only. Although there was considerable variability within classes, overall they differed in persistence within and impact on populations. Years with pneumonia-induced mortality occurring simultaneously across age classes (i.e. all-age) appeared to be a consequence of pathogen invasion into a naïve population and resulted in immediate population declines. Subsequently, low recruitment due to frequent high mortality outbreaks in lambs, probably due to association with chronically infected ewes, posed a significant obstacle to population recovery. Secondary all-age events occurred in previously exposed populations when outbreaks in lambs were followed by lower rates of pneumonia-induced mortality in adults. Infrequent pneumonia events restricted to adults were usually of short duration with low mortality. 3. Acute pneumonia-induced mortality in adults was concentrated in fall and early winter around the breeding season when rams are more mobile and the sexes commingle. In contrast, mortality restricted to lambs peaked in summer when ewes and lambs were concentrated in nursery groups. 4. We detected weak synchrony in adult pneumonia between adjacent populations, but found no evidence for landscape-scale extrinsic variables as drivers of disease. 5. We demonstrate that there was a >60% probability of a disease event each year following pneumonia invasion into bighorn sheep populations. Healthy years also occurred periodically, and understanding the factors driving these

  1. Urethritis due to corynebacterium striatum: An emerging germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikh, Mohammed; El Yaagoubi, Imad; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Corynedbacterium striatum (CS) is a Gram-positive coryneform bacillus that is part of mucous and skin flora. It has been considered as a causative agent of many infections in intensive care, neurology, traumatology and urology, but was never implicated in non-gonococcal urethritis. We report the case of a nosocomial urethritis due to Corynebacterium striatum following resection of an intrameatus condyloma.

  2. Costs and risk factors for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a Turkish University Hospital's Intensive Care Unit: A case-control study

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    Serin Simay

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP which is an important part of all nosocomial infections in intensive care unit (ICU is a serious illness with substantial morbidity and mortality, and increases costs of hospital care. We aimed to evaluate costs and risk factors for VAP in adult ICU. Methods This is a-three year retrospective case-control study. The data were collected between 01 January 2000 and 31 December 2002. During the study period, 132 patients were diagnosed as nosocomial pneumonia of 731 adult medical-surgical ICU patients. Of these only 37 VAP patients were assessed, and multiple nosocomially infected patients were excluded from the study. Sixty non-infected ICU patients were chosen as control patients. Results Median length of stay in ICU in patients with VAP and without were 8.0 (IQR: 6.5 and 2.5 (IQR: 2.0 days respectively (P Conclusion Respiratory failure, coma, depressed consciousness, enteral feeding and length of stay are independent risk factors for developing VAP. The cost of VAP is approximately five-fold higher than non-infected patients.

  3. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonization in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: risk factors for progression to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Hacer; Sutcu, Murat; Somer, Ayper; Aydın, Derya; Cihan, Rukiye; Ozdemir, Aslı; Coban, Asuman; Ince, Zeynep; Citak, Agop; Salman, Nuran

    2016-01-01

    .1-61.0) and previous surgical procedure (OR: 7.4; 95% CI: 1.9-28.5) as independent risk factors for carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in patients colonized with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Out of 24 patients with carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection, 4 (16.6%) died of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis. Asymptomatic colonization with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in intensive care units of pediatric departments should alert health care providers about forthcoming carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae infection. Those carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae colonized patients at risk of developing infection due to carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae may be targeted for interventions to reduce subsequent infection occurence and also for timely initiation of empirical carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae active treatment, when necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with or without radiologically confirmed pneumonia

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    Dafne C. Andrade

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: Among children with clinical diagnosis of community‐acquired pneumonia submitted to chest radiograph, those with radiologically confirmed pneumonia present a higher rate of infection by S. pneumoniae when compared with those with a normal chest radiograph.

  5. CNS Complications of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute central nervous system disease occurring subsequent to infection with M pneumoniae are reported from University College, Institute of Child Health, and Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

  6. Radiological alterations in tularemic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simay, A.; Muennich, D.

    1980-01-01

    Pneumonia of tularemic origin exhibited the following radiological symptoms: confluent oval shaped infiltrations in the lungs, enlarged lymph nodes in the hilus, and in 50-70% of the cases accumulation of intrapleural fluid. (L.E.)

  7. Acquired pneumonia in the community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo Rodriguez, Hugo Alberto

    2002-01-01

    The pneumonia is an inflammatory process unchained by a pathogen that affects bronchioles, alveoli and interstice causing exudative consolidation and alteration in the gassy exchange. The paper includes epidemiology, physiopathology, etiology and factors of risk among other topics

  8. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy

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    Chih-Chao Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  9. [Changing medical practices and nosocomial infection rates in French maternity units from 1997 to 2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Boulétreau, A; Caillat-Vallet, E; Dumas, A M; Ayzac, L; Chapuis, C; Emery, M N; Girard, R; Haond, C; Lafarge-Leboucher, J; Tissot-Guerraz, F; Fabry, J

    2005-04-01

    In this study we describe the changes in medical practices and nosocomial infection rates in obstetrics observed through a surveillance network in the South East of France. The maternity units which belong to this network participated in voluntary surveillance using the network's methodology. The criteria for the diagnosis of nosocomial infections were in accordance with the methods described by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 101240 pregnancies including 18503 caesareans (18.3%) were included in the network from 1997 to 2000. During the study period, nosocomial infection rates following caesarean section and vaginal delivery decreased respectively from 7.8% to 4.3% (p infection control programs in maternity units has been confirmed by the results of this surveillance network. During the study period, both obstetrics-related risk factors for nosocomial infection and observed hospital-acquired infection rates were dramatically reduced, what prove an improvement of quality of care in maternity units.

  10. Clinical and antimicrobial profile of Acinetobacter spp.: An emerging nosocomial superbug

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    Purti C Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Acinetobacter nosocomial infections resistant to most antimicrobials have emerged, especially in ICU. Early identification and continued surveillance of prevalent organism will help prevent the spread of Acinetobacter in hospital environment.

  11. [Role of donor human milk feeding in preventing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Juan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Qiu-Fen

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of donor human milk in the prevention of nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants. MeETHODS: A total of 105 hospitalized preterm infants with a very low birth weight were enrolled. They were classified into mother's own milk feeding group, donor human milk feeding group, and preterm formula feeding group, with 35 infants in each group. The three groups were compared in terms of incidence rates of nosocomial infection, necrotizing enterocolitis, and feeding intolerance, time to full enteral feeding, and early growth indices. Compared with the preterm formula feeding group, the donor human milk feeding group and the mother's own milk feeding group had significantly lower incidence rates of nosocomial infection and necrotizing enterocolitis and shorter time to full enteral feeding (Pmilk can be used in case of a lack of mother's own milk and may help to reduce nosocomial infection.

  12. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, J H; Mcdonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Strepto...

  13. Massive empyema caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in an adult: A case report

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    Ron Merav

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for more than 20% of community acquired pneumonia cases, and capable of causing upper respiratory illness as well. Complications of M.pneumoniae infections include CNS involvement but other as pericarditis were also reported. The lack of feasible culture methods and under appreciation of the pathogens ability to cause invasive disease leads to reduced number of diagnosed M.pneumoniae related complications. In contrast to many other respiratory pathogens causing pneumonia, M. pneumoniae related severe pleural complications were almost never reported. Case presentation We report a previously healthy 57 years old woman presented with indolent massive right pleural effusion, leukocytosis and elevated ESR. Extensive microbiological evaluation didn't reveal any pathogen in the pus even before antibiotic treatment was started. Surprisingly, M.pneumoniae DNA was detected in the pus from the empyema using PCR designed to detect M.pneumoniae. A serological assay (Serodia-Myco II using convalescent serum was indeterminate with a titer of 1:80. The patient responded well to a treatment that included right thoracotomy with pleural decortication and a combination of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications. Conclusion M.pneumoniae related empyema was never reported before in adult patients and was reported in only a few pediatric patients. In our patient there was no evidence to any common pathogens even before initiating antibiotic treatment. The only pathogen detected was M.pneumoniae. In this patient, serology was not helpful in establishing the diagnosis of M.pneumoniae related diseases, as was suggested before for older patients. We suggest that M.pneumoniae related empyema is probably under-diagnosed complication due to insensitivity of serology in older patients and under use of other diagnosis methods.

  14. Low Compliance to Handwashing Program and High Nosocomial Infection in a Brazilian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Lizandra Ferreira de Almeida e; Rocha, Lilian Alves; Nunes, Maria José; Gontijo Filho, Paulo Pinto

    2012-01-01

    Background. It is a fact that hand hygiene prevents nosocomial infection, but compliance with recommended instructions is commonly poor. The purpose of this study was to implement a hand hygiene program for increase compliance with hand hygiene and its relationship with nosocomial infection (NI) and MRSA infection/colonization rates. Methods. Compliance to hand hygiene was evaluated in a hospital by direct observation and measured of health care-associated infections, including methicillin re...

  15. Community acquired pneumonia in the elderly: the Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE study protocol by the Italian Society of Hospital and Community Geriatrics (SIGOT

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    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a frequent cause of hospital admission in elderly patients. Diagnosis of pneumonia in elderly persons with comorbidity may be challenging, due to atypical presentation and complex clinical scenarios. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP arises out-of-hospital in subjects without previous contact with the healthcare system. Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP occurs in patients who have frequent contacts with the healthcare system and should be treated with empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy also covering multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Recent findings, however, have questioned this approach, because the worse prognosis of HCAP compared to CAP may better reflect increased level of comorbidity and frailty (poor functional status, older age of HCAP patients, as well as poorer quality of hospital care provided to such patients, rather than pneumonia etiology by MDR pathogens. The Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE Study, promoted by the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedale e Territorio (SIGOT, is an observational prospective cohort study of patients consecutively admitted because of pneumonia to hospital acute care units of Geriatrics throughout Italy. Detailed information regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, etiology, comprehensive geriatric assessment, antibiotic therapy, possible complications and comorbidities was recorded to identify factors potentially predicting in-hospital mortality (primary endpoint, 3-month mortality, length of hospital stay, postdischarge rate of institutionalization and other secondary endpoints. This paper describes the rationale and method of PIACE Study and reviews the main evidence on pneumonia in the elderly.

  16. [Contribution of urinary pneumococcal antigen detection combined with the research of legionella antigen for diagnosis of pneumonia in hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honoré, S; Trillard, M; Ould-Hocine, Z; Lesprit, P; Deforges, L; Legrand, P

    2004-10-01

    Bacteriological confirmation of pneumonia (PNM) in hospitalized patients is often erratic or belated. Because of importance of prognosis, early adaptation of treatment requires an empirical antimicrobial therapy (generally aminopenicillin and macrolide combination). The starting therapeutic strategy should profit by a fast and reliable test asserting a pneumococcal etiology. The Binax Now S. pneumoniae (BNP) test allows an urinary pneumococcal antigen (UPA) detection using an immunochromatographic membrane assay within 15 minutes. We first evaluated the BNP test for 28 patients with pneumococcal PNM proved by culture, and 118 negative control patients without PNM. The BNP test was then evaluated by testing urine from 158 hospitalized patients with a clinical picture of PNM (community-acquired: 90, nosocomial: 68) for whom a research of urinary Legionella antigen (Binax Now) was prescribed and was positive for only two cases. 57 patients (36.1%) were hospitalized in ICU. The sensitivity was 71.4% (85.7% for the 21 bacteriemic PNM), and the specificity was 98.3%; that is consistent with previous published data. Among the 158 patients with PNM, UPA was detected in 17 cases (10.8%): 15 within the community-acquired PNM (16.7%) and 2 (2.9%) within the nosocomial cases. The pneumococcal etiology was confirmed by bacteriological samples in 7/17 patients (6 by blood cultures). The 10 others showed clinical and radiological features in agreement with a pneumococcal PNM. Among the 141 patients with negative AUP, S. pneumoniae was isolated from 6 of them (2 in blood cultures). The Binax Now S. pneumoniae test allowed a fast and reliable etiological diagnosis in 10.8% of hospitalized PNM (16.7% of the community-acquired cases) having a research of urinary Legionella antigen (conceiving with severity factors). So it could conduce to an improved adjustment of the starting antimicrobial therapy of hospitalized adult patients with PNM.

  17. Economic effect of pneumonia and pleurisy in lambs in New Zealand.

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    Goodwin-Ray, K A; Stevenson, M A; Heuer, C; Cogger, N

    2008-06-01

    To estimate the cost of pneumonia and pleurisy in lambs to the sheep industry in New Zealand, in order to provide a reference for future cost-benefit calculations for control programmes to reduce the incidence of pneumonia. An estimate of the economic cost of pneumonia and pleurisy in lambs was based on: cohort studies of the association between growth rate and the extent of pneumonic lesions at slaughter (n=14 flocks), the prevalence of moderate to severe (MS) pneumonia (> or =10% lung surface area affected) and pleurisy (n=1,719 flocks), the correlation between the prevalence of MS pneumonia and economic loss at the flock level, and data on annual slaughter statistics and carcass value in New Zealand. A stochastic spreadsheet model was developed and run with 1,000 iterations. Input variables represented by probability distributions were growth rate, average cost of loss according to the prevalence of pneumonia per month, carcass value, prevalence of pleurisy, and carcasses downgraded for pleurisy, and annual national slaughter statistics. The output was a posterior distribution of the annual cost of disease. The cost of pneumonia only included the loss associated with reduced growth rate, while mortality due to pneumonia was assumed to be low and was ignored. The cost of pleurisy included the loss associated with downgraded or condemned carcasses. Thus, the simulated annual average cost of pneumonia was NZ$28.1 (95% CI=NZ$15.0-42.0) million, and that of pleurisy NZ$25.1 (95% CI=NZ$10.2-48.1) million. The combined cost of pneumonia and pleurisy averaged NZ$53.2 (95% CI=NZ$32.4-78.9) million. The parameters with the greatest impact on the combined cost of pneumonia and pleurisy were prevalence of pleurisy between March and May, and cost of reduced growth due to pneumonia for lambs slaughtered in June. The average cost of pneumonia and pleurisy to the sheep industry in New Zealand due to reduced lamb growth and decreased carcass value is likely to be between NZ$32

  18. NURSING CARE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT BASED TRAINING DECREASE NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION INCIDEN IN POST SECTIO CESAREA PATIENTS

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    Ahsan Ahsan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Model of nursing care based on knowledge management can reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections through the performance of nurses in the prevention of infection. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identi fi cation knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post caesarean section. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasy experimental design. The population were all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation and a number of patients who is treated in hospitals A and B post sectio caesarea. Sample is comparised a total population all the nursing staff who worked in obstetrics installation according to criteria of the sample, and most of patients were taken care by nursing staff post caesarean section which is taken by random sampling 15 patients. Data was collected through observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data analysis which is used the t test. Result: The result was showed that there was signi fi cant difference in the incidence of nosocomial infection in patients with post sesctio caesarea in hospital before and after nursing care training based on knowledge management (tvalue = 2.316 and p = 0.028 < α = 0.05 level, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was lower after training than before training. Discussion: It can be concluded that training knowledge management based on nursing care effectives to reduce Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in Patients after Sectio Caesarea.

  19. Prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care unit and nursing practices

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    Sevilay Yüceer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections which are considered as the primary indicator of the quality of care in hospitals, cause to prolong hospitalization at intensive care unit and hospital, increase morbidity, mortality, and the cost of treatment. Although only 5-10% of the patients are treated in the intensive care units, 20-25% of all nosocomial infections are seen in these units. Preventing nosocomial infections in intensive care units is a process started at the patient acceptance to unit that requires an interdisciplinary team approach of intensive care staffs’ and Infection Control Committee members.Intensive care nurses who are in constant contact with patients have important responsibilities in preventing nosocomial infections. Intensive care nurses should be aware that the nosocomial infections can be prevented. They should have current knowledge about universal precautions related to prevention and control of infections, which are accepted by the entire world and they reinforce this knowledge by practice and should provide the most effective care to patients.In this article, nursing practices for prevention of nosocomial infections in intensive care units are discussed based on universal precautions.

  20. The roentgenological study of measles pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Song, C. H.; Lee, H. Y.; Chung, H. K.; Joo, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Measles is important infectious disease of pediatrics and pneumonia is the most commonest complication of measles. We have experienced 20 cases of pneumonia among 31 cases of measles in infant nursing home of Chae Chun during of December. 1981. The results a are as follows; 1. The incidence of measles pneumonia is 64.5%. 2. The patterns of pneumonic infiltration is : The pneumonia may have a bronchopneumonia (60%), Lobar pneumonia (15%), or combined form (35%). 3. Both lungs are involved by measles pneumonia: Right lung only (30%), Left lung only (5%), or Bilateral (65%). 4. Hilar lymphadenopathy (51.6%). Hilar lymphadenopathy with pneumonia (82.2%) and hilar lymphadenopathy without pneumonia (17.8%). 5. There is no pulmonary nodule which is noted frequently in atypical measles pneumonia as a seguale

  1. Severe pneumonia associated with ibrutinib monotherapy for CLL and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiniz, Natalia; Bejar, Jacob; Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) particularly since the development of novel therapeutic agents, mostly "biological drugs." One of the obvious advantages of these agents is the decreased rate of infectious complications occurring during the course of therapy, compared to the use of standard immuno-chemotherapy regimens. Here, we describe 3 patients with CLL and 1 with mantle cell lymphoma who developed severe life-threatening pneumonias, during monotherapy with ibrutinib. The first case was a 70-year-old woman with relapsed CLL who developed bilateral pneumonia with hypoxia 1 week after starting ibrutinib. She did not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics and was treated empirically with trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and improved. In the second case, we describe a 76-year-old woman with relapsed CLL who developed recurrent pneumonia after 3 years of treatment with ibrutinib. Presuming that ibrutinib was the cause of pneumonitis with secondary infection, it was stopped with subsequent improvement. The third patient a 67 year-old man died because of severe bilateral necrotizing pneumonia due to invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis with pulmonary hemorrhage. The fourth patient with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma died because of severe bilateral pneumonia, caused by pseudomonas and candida, despite receiving appropriate antibiotics. From this experience, we hypothesize that the etiology of severe pneumonia associated with ibrutinib treatment is probably multifactorial, involving factors like preexisting immune-suppression, drug induced pneumonitis and infections. We suggest that patients with CLL or other lymphoproliferative disorders with suspected pneumonia during monotherapy with ibrutinib should be very carefully evaluated and need to undergo complete diagnostic workup to establish an exact diagnosis. Understanding which patients with CLL or lymphoma treated with kinase inhibitors are at a

  2. [Seroprevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Poland in 2008-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałużewski, Stanisław; Rastawicki, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common causative agent of tracheobronchitis and atypical pneumonia, mainly in children and adolescents. The infections are often seen as epidemics occurring in autumn-winter seasons at intervals of 4-7 years. Epidemiological studies showed that M. pneumoniae is responsible for 30% to 40% of all cases of bacterial respiratory infections in Poland. The aim of the study was estimate the seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae in Poland in 2008-2013 in comparing to results obtained in other European countries. The results of diagnostic serological tests (ELISA) in particular immunoglobulin classes for infection with M. pneumoniae performed in 16.825 persons were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were mostly children at the preschool and school age with clinical symptoms of respiratory tract infection. The data were obtained from Bacteriology Department of National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene in Warsaw and from 13 Sanitary and Epidemiological Stations through the country which send quarterly or monthly reports. The serological results showed that in autumn-winter seasons of 2011-2012 the "early antibodies" (IgA and/or IgM) for M. pneumoniae were twice more often diagnosed in sera of patients with respiratory tract infection than in analogous seasons of 2008-2010. The antibodies were detected in 34% and 42% of patients, respectively in third quarter of 2011 and 2012. Epidemic increase of M. pneumoniae infections in Poland in autumn-winter seasons of 2011-2012 was mainly observed due to diagnosis of the IgA and/or IgM antibodies in serological tests.

  3. [The influence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection on acute coronary syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Choroszy-Król, Irena; Zyśko, Dorota; Teryks-Wołyniec, Dorota; Halawa, Bogumił

    2003-07-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is one of the infectious factors the role of which is considered in the process of atherosclerosis and its complications. Of the study was to assess the incidence of Ch. pneumoniae infection in the patients with acute coronary events. The study was carried out in 36 patients, mean age 61.2 +/- 13.4 years, 27 men and 9 women hospitalised in our Department with the diagnosis of previous or recent acute myocardial infarction. The control group consisted of 19 subjects, aged 61.1 +/- 14.3 years, 10 men and 9 women hospitalised due to other reasons. In all studied patients during the first 24 hours venous blood was taken for the assessment of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and titres of IgA and IgG anti-Ch. pneumoniae antibodies, and pharyngeal swabs were done for Ch. pneumoniae assessment. Positive swab tests were found in 19% of the patients, positive IgG titres in 80% and IgA in 64% of the patients. In the control group the corresponding values were 11, 79, 42%, respectively. In the patients with positive IgG titres, negative IgA titre result was observed in 21% and in the control group in 53% (p < 0.05). The CRP level was significantly higher in the studied patients than in the control group (24.2 vs 4.2 mg/l; p < 0.05). 1. The high percentage of positive serologic tests and rare positive results of pharyngeal swabs indicate a frequent contact with Ch. pneumoniae in human population. 2. Ch. pneumoniae infection exerts no significant influence on the unspecific markers of inflammation. 3. The higher frequency of seroconversion-positive IgG and negative IgA titres--in the control group indicates the role of prolonged or acute Ch. pneumoniae infection in the development or progression of coronary atherosclerosis and its complications.

  4. Comprehensive clinical and epidemiological assessment of colonisation and infection due to carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Baena, Zaira R; Oteo, Jesús; Conejo, Carmen; Larrosa, M Nieves; Bou, Germán; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; González-López, Juan José; Pintado, Vicente; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Pomar, Virginia; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Rivera, María Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Ruiz-Carrascoso, Guillermo; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Zamorano, Laura; Bautista, Verónica; Ortega, Adriana; Morales, Isabel; Pascual, Álvaro; Campos, José; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2016-02-01

    Most available information on carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) is usually associated with specific types of infection or patient or with descriptions of outbreaks. The aim of this study was to comprehensively analyse the clinical epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of colonisation and infections due to CPE in Spain. A multicentre prospective cohort study was carried out in 34 Spanish hospitals from February to May 2013. All new patients testing positive for CPE in clinical samples were included. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of mortality. Overall, 245 cases were included. The most frequent organism was Klebsiella pneumoniae (74%) and the carbapenemases belonged to the OXA-48 (74%), metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) (24%) and KPC (2%) groups. Acquisition was nosocomial in 145 cases (60%) and healthcare-associated (HCA) in 91 (37%); 42% of the latter were nursing home residents, in whom OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae ST405 predominated. MBLs and OXA-48 predominated in ICU and medical patients, respectively. Overall, 67% of patients had infections. The most frequent infections identified in this study were urinary tract (43%) and skin structure (21%) infections, and 10% of infections were bacteraemic. Crude mortality was 20%. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was independently associated with an increased risk of death (OR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.34-8.11). We found some differences in the epidemiology of CPE depending on the type of carbapenemase produced. Although a low proportion of CPE infections were bacteraemic, active antibiotic therapy was a protective factor for reducing mortality. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive infections over a decade at Kilifi County Hospital in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Sonal P; Boinett, Christine J; Ellington, Matthew J; Kagia, Ngure; Mwarumba, Salim; Nyongesa, Sammy; Mturi, Neema; Kariuki, Samuel; Scott, J Anthony G; Thomson, Nicholas R; Morpeth, Susan C

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. Recent years have seen an explosion of resistance to extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and emergence of carbapenem resistance. Here, we examine 198 invasive K. pneumoniae isolates collected from over a decade in Kilifi County Hospital (KCH) in Kenya. We observe a significant increase in MDR K. pneumoniae isolates, particularly to third generation cephalosporins conferred by ESBLs. Using whole-genome sequences, we describe the population structure and the distribution of antimicrobial resistance genes within it. More than half of the isolates examined in this study were ESBL-positive, encoding CTX-M-15, SHV-2, SHV-12 and SHV-27, and 79% were MDR conferring resistance to at least three antimicrobial classes. Although no isolates in our dataset were found to be resistant to carbapenems we did find a plasmid with the genetic architecture of a known New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase-1 (NDM)-carrying plasmid in 25 isolates. In the absence of carbapenem use in KCH and because of the instability of the NDM-1 gene in the plasmid, the NDM-1 gene has been lost in these isolates. Our data suggests that isolates that encode NDM-1 could be present in the population; should carbapenems be introduced as treatment in public hospitals in Kenya, resistance is likely to ensue rapidly. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing the risk of ventilator-acquired pneumonia through head of bed elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Libby

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that placing critically ill ventilated patients in a semirecumbent position minimizes the likelihood of nosocomial pneumonia. This pilot study explores whether the incidence of ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) can be reduced by elevating the head of the bed to 45 degrees. The design is quantitative in nature, using a randomized controlled trial. The method involves adult ventilated patients being randomly assigned to one of two positions, i.e. 45 degrees raised head of bed (treatment group) or 25 degrees raised head of bed (control group). Data collection relied upon the diagnosis of clinically suspected and microbiologically confirmed pneumonia defined by the Consensus Conference on VAP. Thirty patients were included in the study--17 in the treatment group and 13 in the control group. Results showed that 29% (five) in the treatment group and 54% (seven) in the control group contracted VAP (P VAP in the patients nursed at 45 degrees. However, because of the sample size this difference did not reach statistical significance.

  7. Mannose-binding lectin codon 54 gene polymorphism in relation to risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Cumhur; Onay, Huseyin; Oguz, Serife Suna; Ozdemir, Taha Resid; Erdeve, Omer; Ozkinay, Ferda; Dilmen, Ugur

    2011-09-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to infection due to a combination of sub-optimal immunity and increased exposure to invasive organisms. Invasive fungal infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among preterm infants cared for in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a component of the innate immune system, which may be especially important in the neonatal setting. The objective of this study was to investigate the presence of any association between MBL gene polymorphism and nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates. Codon 54 (B allele) polymorphism in exon 1 of the MBL gene was investigated in 31 patients diagnosed as nosocomial invasive fungal infection and 30 control preterm neonates. AB genotype was determined in 26% and 30% of patient and control groups, respectively, and the difference was not statistically significant. AA genotype was determined in 74% of the patient group and in 67% of the control group, and the difference was not statistically significant. B allele frequency was not different significantly in the patient group (13%) compared to the control group (18%). In our study, no relationship was found between MBL codon 54 gene polymorphism and the risk of nosocomial invasive fungal infection in preterm neonates in NICU.

  8. [Risk of nosocomial infection in Intertropical Africa. Part 4: prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebaudet, S; De Pina, J J; Rapp, C; Kraemer, P; Savini, H; Demortiere, E; Simon, F

    2008-02-01

    Nosocomial infections have long been neglected in Sub-Saharan Africa, even though their prevalence is higher than in developed countries. Recently, however, this major public health problem has been the focus of a growing number of recommendations not only from the World Health Organization but also from some national health ministries. Because of the numerous limitations especially in financial resources in these regions, priority must be given to the implementation of simple and cost-effective measures. Accordingly the greatest efforts must be devoted to educating healthcare workers and patients about the importance of handwashing, eliminating unnecessary injections and transfusions, performing the latter acts in aseptic conditions, isolating patients with communicable diseases, handling waste products safely, and using antimicrobials properly. Amid the daunting health issues facing Sub-Saharan Africa, implementing these inexpensive measures that could save the lives of thousands of patients and healthcare workers appears easy. However it will require a cultural revolution. The keys to success will be changing the organizational culture, developing a commitment to prevention and evaluating performance regularly.

  9. Prevalencia de infecciones nosocomiales en niños: encuesta de 21 hospitales en México Nosocomial infections in children: Prevalence survey in 21 public hospitals in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Avila-Figueroa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Determinar la prevalencia de infecciones nosocomiales, los factores de riesgo, su microbiología, la prevalencia de uso de antibióticos y la mortalidad asociada en niños hospitalizados. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio transversal en 21 hospitales públicos que atienden a niños. Se incluyeron pacientes desde recién nacidos hasta de 17 años de edad. Los riesgos ajustados se estimaron mediante regresión logística múltiple. RESULTADOS. En 1 183 niños estudiados se identificaron 116 pacientes con infección nosocomial, con una prevalencia de 9.8% (IC95% 8.1-11.6. Los sitios de infección más frecuentes fueron: neumonía (25%, sepsis/bacteriemia (19% e infección del tracto urinario (5%. El principal microrganismo identificado en hemocultivo fue Klebsiella pneumoniae (31%. La prevalencia de uso de antibióticos fue de 49% con una variación de entre 3 y 83%. Mediante regresión logística múltiple se encontraron cuatro factores independientemente asociados con el desarrollo de infección nosocomial: exposición a catéteres intravenosos (RM 3.3, IC95% 1.9-5.9, alimentación parenteral (RM 2.1, IC95% 1.0-4.5, ventilación mecánica (RM 2.3, IC95% 1.2-4.1 y ser recién nacido de bajo peso (RM 2.6, IC95% 1.0-6.8. La mortalidad general fue de 4.8%; sin embargo, el riesgo de morir en pacientes con infección nosocomial fue del doble comparado con los no infectados (RM 2.6, IC95% 1.3-5.1. CONCLUSIONES. Esta evaluación rápida, usando una metodología estándar, ha permitido caracterizar la epidemiología de las infecciones nosocomiales en niños. Los resultados dieron lugar a programas preventivos dirigidos específicamente al cuidado de catéteres intravasculares y al uso de ventilación asistida, a fin de reducir la ocurrencia de sepsis/bacteriemia y neumonías, infecciones nosocomiales de alta prevalencia y mortalidad.OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections

  10. Swallowing dysfunction as a factor that should be remembered in recurrent pneumonia: videofluoroscopic swallow study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymaz, Nazan; Özçelik, Uğur; Demir, Numan; Cinel, Güzin; Yalçin, Ebru; Ersöz, Deniz D; Kiper, Nural

    2017-10-01

    The swallow function is one of the strong defense mechanism against aspiration. Aspiration and pneumonia are unavoidable in patients with defective mechanism of swallowing. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with recurrent pneumonia in terms of videofluoroscopic examination results. The study comprised fifty pediatric cases (22 boys, 28 girls) with an average age of 2.9 years (2 months-7.5 years) who were referred to our clinic due to suffering from recurrent pneumonia. The videofluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS) was performed on all patients. The presence of a correlation with pneumonia was investigated. In 45 of the children, VFSS results were not normal. Of the children, 41 had mental-motor retardation. The results of the videofluoroscopic study show that silent aspiration was the most common pathology in participants with the percentage of 40 (27.5% mild, 17.5% severe). Patients in the study had pneumonia with an incidence of 2.6 illnesses per year. Having one than more results on VFSS was found to be associated with more number of annual pneumonia episodes. Children with neurological impairments are at risk of recurrent acute pneumonia due to aspiration. Disturbances of swallowing phases should be remembered as a cause of pneumonia in these patients.

  11. Kytococcus schroeteri Pneumonia in Two Patients with a Hematological Malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodiamont, C. J.; Huisman, C.; Spanjaard, L.; van Ketel, R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Neutropenic patients are susceptible to infections with usually harmless microorganisms. We report two cases of severe pneumonia in hematological patients due to Kytococcus schroeteri, a saprophyte of the human skin. When blood cultures or respiratory specimens yield micrococcus-like colonies,

  12. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, W. M.; Lobatto, S.; Weening, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function

  13. The Growing Resistance of Klebsiella pneumonia ; the Need to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the course of her treatment she acquired various infections that led to her exposure to antimicrobials from almost all classes at various times; including bacteremia due to a pan-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. She was successfully treated with a combination of ...

  14. Relationship between Vitamin D Levels and Outcome of Pneumonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Pneumonia, a common childhood infection in. Nigerian children with a number of debilitating complications such as empyema thoracis, has been linked to vitamin D deficiency due to its ability to modulate the T lymphocyte of the immune system . OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between vitamin ...

  15. A Rare Case of Pneumonia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, nonfermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. In some very rare cases Shewanella putrefaciens can be a human pathogen. It can produce a wide variety of clinical syndromes including bacteremia as well as skin and soft tissue infections. However, pneumonia due to S. putrefaciens is rare; there are a total of 4 reported cases in the literature. We present a case of 63-year-old male who was presented to emergency room status after cardiac arrest, fell into sea water face down. On the second day of hospitalization, he was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Empirical antibiotic treatment with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of endotracheal aspirate yielded gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown from endotracheal aspirate culture was identified as S. putrefaciens by Biomerieux API 20 NE technique. On review of the literature and according to culture and sensitivity results, therapy in our patient was changed to cefepime. Patient’s pneumonia improved with treatment with cefepime. We believe that our patient developed pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens, after near drowning in sea water. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  16. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup [College of Medicine, Chungang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan.

  17. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan

  18. A Rare Case of Pediatric Nosocomial Liver Abscess Developing During Dialysis Therapy

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    Mittal

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Liver abscess developing during hospital stay in pediatric patients on dialysis for acute kidney injury has been previously unreported. Impaired immunity, prolonged use of antibiotics, diabetes and malnutrition predispose to liver abscess in chronic hemodialysis patients. Case Presentation We reported a case of liver abscess developing in a 6-year-old boy admitted with sepsis and multiorgan dysfunction syndrome including acute kidney injury. He received peritoneal and subsequently hemodialysis, as he did not improve on peritoneal dialysis. He developed fever while on hemodialysis, which was due to a liver abscess developing during the course of hospital stay. The abscess was in the right lobe of the liver with a volume of 40 mL. Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of pyogenic liver abscesses in children and infection acquired from hospital. The patient received vancomycin and responded well with complete resolution and did not require any drainage procedure. He may have acquired bacteremia during dialysis with subsequent hepatic seeding. Conclusions Though rare, liver abscess may develop even in patients undergoing short-term dialysis therapy. Liver abscess is a medical emergency and if not treated promptly may lead to significant mortality. Invasive therapeutic procedures, like drainage is associated with further risk of complications. Therefore, a high index of suspicion should be kept when evaluating a patient who develops unexplained fever while being on hemodialysis. Early medical intervention through appropriate antibiotics can significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality. Strict infection control policies should be followed to prevent such nosocomial infections.

  19. Ventilator associated pneumonia: risk factors and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, J L; Lobo, S; Struelens, M

    2001-11-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a common nosocomial infection associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Various risk factors for VAP have been identified and include the duration of ICU stay and of mechanical ventilation, a diagnosis of trauma, and severity of illness. Knowledge of these factors can promote early diagnosis and hence treatment. In addition to simple, but very effective, basic hygiene, different preventative strategies have been suggested, and can be divided into those that aim to limit airway colonization, and those that improve host defense mechanisms. Of the former, non-invasive ventilation is effective but not always applicable or available, nursing the patient in the semi-recumbent position is also associated with a reduced incidence of VAP but carries its own problems, stress ulcer prophylaxis remains controversial, and selective digestive decontamination is probably only relevant to certain subgroups of patients. Methods to improve host defense include early nutrition. Immunostimulatory therapies, such as interferon and granulocyte colony stimulating factor, require further research to confirm their place in the prevention or management of VAP.

  20. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae among Children Hospitalized with Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Preeta K; Jain, Seema; Taylor, Thomas H; Bramley, Anna M; Diaz, Maureen H; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Winchell, Jonas M; Schrag, Stephanie J; Hicks, Lauri A

    2018-05-17

    The burden and epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) among U.S. children (<18 years) hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are poorly understood. In the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, we prospectively enrolled 2254 children hospitalized with radiographically-confirmed pneumonia from January 2010-June 2012 and tested nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs for Mp using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical and epidemiological features of Mp-PCR-positive and -negative children were compared using logistic regression. Macrolide susceptibility was assessed by genotyping isolates. In the EPIC study, 182(8%) children were Mp-PCR-positive (median age: 7 years); 12% required intensive care and 26% had pleural effusion. No in-hospital deaths occurred. Macrolide resistance was found in 6/169(4%) isolates. Of 178(98%) Mp-PCR-positive children tested for co-pathogens, 50(28%) had ≥1 co-pathogen detected. Variables significantly associated with higher odds of Mp detection included age {10-17 years [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 7.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-13.6)] and 5-9 years [aOR: 4.8 (CI: 2.9-7.8)] vs. 2-4 years}, outpatient antibiotics ≤5 days pre-admission [aOR: 2.3 (CI: 1.5-3.4)], and co-pathogen detection [aOR: 2.1 (CI: 1.3-3.1)]. Clinical characteristics often seen included hilar lymphadenopathy, rales, headache, sore throat, and decreased breath sounds. Usually considered as a mild respiratory infection, M. pneumoniae was the most commonly detected bacteria among children ≥5 years hospitalized with CAP; one-quarter of whom had co-detections. Although associated with clinically non-specific symptoms, there was a need for intensive care support in some cases. M. pneumoniae should be included in the differential diagnosis for school-aged children hospitalized with CAP.

  1. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  2. An evaluation of the emerging vaccines and immunotherapy against staphylococcal pneumonia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Craig

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of human skin and nares. It is also one of the leading nosocomial pathogens in both developed and developing countries and is responsible for a wide range of life threatening infections, especially in patients who are immunocompromised, post-surgery, undergoing haemodialysis and those who are treated with catheters and ventilators. Over the past two decades, the incidence of nosocomial staphylococcal infections has increased dramatically. Currently there are at least seven vaccine and immunotherapy candidates against S. aureus in the developmental phase targeting both active and passive immunization. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In Stage I, we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus relevant to several criteria of interest: answerability; cost of development, production and implementation; efficacy and effectiveness; deliverability, affordability and sustainability; maximum potential impact on disease burden reduction; acceptability to the end users and health workers; and effect on equity. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies to participate. The policy makers and industry representatives accepted our invitation on the condition of anonymity, due to sensitive nature of their involvement in such exercises. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results The panel of experts expressed low levels of optimism (score around or below 50% on the criteria of answerability, efficacy, maximum disease burden reduction potential, low cost of production, low cost

  3. An evaluation of the emerging vaccines and immunotherapy against staphylococcal pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Tanvir; Nair, Harish; Theodoratou, Evropi; Zgaga, Lina; Fattom, Ali; El Arifeen, Shams; Rubens, Craig; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor

    2011-04-13

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of human skin and nares. It is also one of the leading nosocomial pathogens in both developed and developing countries and is responsible for a wide range of life threatening infections, especially in patients who are immunocompromised, post-surgery, undergoing haemodialysis and those who are treated with catheters and ventilators. Over the past two decades, the incidence of nosocomial staphylococcal infections has increased dramatically. Currently there are at least seven vaccine and immunotherapy candidates against S. aureus in the developmental phase targeting both active and passive immunization. We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In Stage I, we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus relevant to several criteria of interest: answerability; cost of development, production and implementation; efficacy and effectiveness; deliverability, affordability and sustainability; maximum potential impact on disease burden reduction; acceptability to the end users and health workers; and effect on equity. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies) to participate. The policy makers and industry representatives accepted our invitation on the condition of anonymity, due to sensitive nature of their involvement in such exercises. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their "collective optimism" towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. The panel of experts expressed low levels of optimism (score around or below 50%) on the criteria of answerability, efficacy, maximum disease burden reduction potential, low cost of production, low cost of implementation and affordability; moderate levels of

  4. The Review Systematic and Meta Analysis of Prevalence and Causes of Nosocomial Infection in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Bagheri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The variation of reported nosocomial infection is very high respectively. It seems review systematic and Meta analysis of related documents gives precise estimate of this subject for correct politisize. So tha aim of this study the review systematic and meta analysis of prevalence and causes of nosocomial infection in iran. Materials and Methods: For this study all articles published in Iranian journals and international journals, Final Report of Research Projects, related papers presented at congresses and thesis were reviewed with using standard and sensitive keywords. Then, all articles published between 1997-2010 years that had eligibility Inclusion criteria after quality control, using random model, intered to process of meta-analysis. Results: The finding show that the best estimate of total prevalence of nosocomial infection in Iran is 30.43% and the most common infections of nosocomial infection are respiratory infection 39.4%%, urinary infection 23.88%, bacteremia 21.98% and the most common factors of nosocomial infection are Pseudomonas aeroginosa 26.78%, klebsiella 31.42%, Staphylococcus 23.6% and E.coli 30.93%. The research also found a substantial heterogeneity that using meta regression method the main cause of produce of this heterogeneity, participants people, sample size, average age of the samples, time of study and gender were introduced. Conclusions: The simple review of studied documents in this survey show that prevalence rate of different nosocomial infection in Iran is high relatively. Hence make appropriate and evidence-based educational and control programs to reduce nosocomial infections prevalence rate in Iran should be considered by policy makers.

  5. A review of Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Fasting, H; Henneberg, E W

    1999-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium that causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections. Its distribution is worldwide. Seroepidemiological studies have shown an association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, and the risk of acute myocardial...

  6. Chest radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Hye; Sung, Dong Wook; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    When tuberculous pneumonia appears as a segmental or loabr consolidation, its is difficult to differentiate tuberculous pneumonia from nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia radiologically. The object of this study was to define the typical radiographic findings of tuberculous pneumonia through comparative analysis of tuberculous and nontuberculous pneumonia. A review of chest radiolograph in 29 patients with tuberculous pneumonia and in 23 patients with nontuberculous bacterial pneumonia was made with regard to homogeneity, volume loss, air-fluid level within the cavities, air-bronchogram, pleural disease, and predilection sites. The characteristic findings of tuberculous pneumonia are a heterogeneous density of infiltration (66%), evidence of volume loss of infiltrative lesion (52%), and cavity formation (48%) without air - fluid level. An associated parameter of analysis is the relative absence of leukocytosis (76%)

  7. Imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Yanwei; Zhang Jingwen; Wu Jianlin; Zhou Yong; Li Mingwu; Lei Zhen; Shi Lifu

    2006-01-01

    Objection: To analyze the imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the X-ray and CT findings of 3 patients with cholesterol pneumonia confirmed pathologically and reviewed correlative literature. Results: Lesions similar to mass were found in X-ray and CT imaging of three cases. Two of them appeared cavity with fluid-level and one showed multiple ring enhancement after CT contrast. The course of disease was very. long and it had no respond to antibiotic therapy. Amounts of foam cells rich in cholesterol crystal were detected in pathological examination. Conclusions: Cholesterol pneumonia is a rare chronic pulmonary idiopathic disease, and the radiological findings can do some help to its diagnosis. (authors)

  8. Meningitis caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae: a retrospective clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Harder, Eva; Wandall, Johan

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the medical records of 26 patients (median age 62 years, range 5-76 years) admitted to our institution during 1978-98 with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) caused by streptococci other than Streptococcus pneumoniae (comprising 1.9% of all patients with ABM). 19 cases were community......-acquired and 7 were nosocomial. 73% had comorbid or predisposing conditions and 73% had an identifiable extracerebral focus; only in 2 patients no comorbid disease, primary focus or predisposing condition was present. Five patients had cerebral abscesses, and 5 had endocarditis. Beta-haemolytic streptococci were...... grown in 14 cases (serotype A: 4, B: 5, C: 1, G: 4) and were predominant among patients with endocarditis, whereas alpha- or non-haemolytic strains grew in 12 cases (S. mitis: 4, S. constellatus: 2, E. faecalis: 2, S. bovis: 1, unspecified: 3) and were predominant in patients with a brain abscess...

  9. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Bordetella bronchiseptica Pneumonia in an Extremely-Low-Birth-Weight Neonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuk Joseph Ting

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica, a gram-negative coccobacillus, is a common veterinary pathogen. In both domestic and wild animals, this bacterium causes respiratory infections including infectious tracheobronchitis in dogs and atrophic rhinitis in swine. Human infections are rare and have been documented in immunocompromised hosts. Here, we describe an extremely-low-birth-weight infant with B. bronchiseptica pneumonia. This is the first report that describes the microorganism's responsibility in causing nosocomial infection in a preterm neonate. He recovered uneventfully after a course of meropenem. It is possible that the bacteria colonize the respiratory tracts of our health care workers or parents who may have had contact with pets and then transmitted the bacterium to our patient. Follow-up until 21 months of age showed normal growth and development. He did not suffer from any significant residual respiratory disease.

  11. Comparative analysis of diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Diana P; Huertas, Mónica G; Lozano, Marcela; Zárate, Lina; Zambrano, María Mercedes

    2012-07-09

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can be found in environmental habitats as well as in hospital settings where it is commonly associated with nosocomial infections. One of the factors that contribute to virulence is its capacity to form biofilms on diverse biotic and abiotic surfaces. The second messenger Bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is a ubiquitous signal in bacteria that controls biofilm formation as well as several other cellular processes. The cellular levels of this messenger are controlled by c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation catalyzed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and phophodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, respectively. Many bacteria contain multiple copies of these proteins with diverse organizational structure that highlight the complex regulatory mechanisms of this signaling network. This work was undertaken to identify DGCs and PDEs and analyze the domain structure of these proteins in K. pneumoniae. A search for conserved GGDEF and EAL domains in three sequenced K. pneumoniae genomes showed that there were multiple copies of GGDEF and EAL containing proteins. Both single domain and hybrid GGDEF proteins were identified: 21 in K. pneumoniae Kp342, 18 in K. pneumoniae MGH 78578 and 17 in K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044. The majority had only the GGDEF domain, most with the GGEEF motif, and hybrid proteins containing both GGDEF and EAL domains were also found. The I site for allosteric control was identified only in single GGDEF domain proteins and not in hybrid proteins. EAL-only proteins, containing either intact or degenerate domains, were also identified: 15 in Kp342, 15 in MGH 78578 and 10 in NTUH-K2044. Several input sensory domains and transmembrane segments were identified, which together indicate complex regulatory circuits that in many cases can be membrane associated. The comparative analysis of proteins containing GGDEF/EAL domains in K. pneumoniae showed that most copies were shared among the three strains and that some were unique to a particular strain

  12. Comparative analysis of diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase genes in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz Diana P

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae can be found in environmental habitats as well as in hospital settings where it is commonly associated with nosocomial infections. One of the factors that contribute to virulence is its capacity to form biofilms on diverse biotic and abiotic surfaces. The second messenger Bis-(3’-5’-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP is a ubiquitous signal in bacteria that controls biofilm formation as well as several other cellular processes. The cellular levels of this messenger are controlled by c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation catalyzed by diguanylate cyclase (DGC and phophodiesterase (PDE enzymes, respectively. Many bacteria contain multiple copies of these proteins with diverse organizational structure that highlight the complex regulatory mechanisms of this signaling network. This work was undertaken to identify DGCs and PDEs and analyze the domain structure of these proteins in K. pneumoniae. Results A search for conserved GGDEF and EAL domains in three sequenced K. pneumoniae genomes showed that there were multiple copies of GGDEF and EAL containing proteins. Both single domain and hybrid GGDEF proteins were identified: 21 in K. pneumoniae Kp342, 18 in K. pneumoniae MGH 78578 and 17 in K. pneumoniae NTUH-K2044. The majority had only the GGDEF domain, most with the GGEEF motif, and hybrid proteins containing both GGDEF and EAL domains were also found. The I site for allosteric control was identified only in single GGDEF domain proteins and not in hybrid proteins. EAL-only proteins, containing either intact or degenerate domains, were also identified: 15 in Kp342, 15 in MGH 78578 and 10 in NTUH-K2044. Several input sensory domains and transmembrane segments were identified, which together indicate complex regulatory circuits that in many cases can be membrane associated. Conclusions The comparative analysis of proteins containing GGDEF/EAL domains in K. pneumoniae showed that most copies were shared among the

  13. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  14. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  15. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Im, Jung Gi; Whang, Sung Il; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Jae Kyo; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia causes necrosis of pulmonary parenchyma and may lead to pulmonary gangrene. Prior to the antibiotic era, extensive pulmonary involvement was potentially fatal, but the incidence of necrotizing pneumoniais now less common. On contrast-enhanced CT scans, consolidation with contrast enhancement containing necrotic foci with low attenuation and cavities is characteristic. Radiologic findings do not differ according to the causative organism and in most of cases, specific diagnosis may be impossible. Clinical findings and certain characteristic radiologic findings may be helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis. We illustrate the clinical and radiologic characteristics of necrotizing pneumonia according to causative bacterial organisms

  16. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Ideguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

  17. Imaging of pneumocystic carinii pneumonia in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Dawei; Zhang Ke; Ma Daqing; Jia Cuiyu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the X-ray and CT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in AIDS. Methods: Five AIDS patients who had chest abnormalities were analyzed. Results: Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia appeared as diffuse infiltrative and interstitial fine nodules. Conclusion: If the diffuse and infiltrative interstitial fine nodule are the appearances in patients with AIDS, the pneumocystic carinii pneumonia should be considered

  18. Antibiotic Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Pneumonia Complicated by Clostridium Difficile Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zycinska, K; Chmielewska, M; Lenartowicz, B; Hadzik-Blaszczyk, M; Cieplak, M; Kur, Z; Krupa, R; Wardyn, K A

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the most common gastrointestinal complication after antimicrobial treatment. It is estimated that CDI after pneumonia treatment is connected with a higher mortality than other causes of hospitalization. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between the kind of antibiotic used for pneumonia treatment and mortality from post-pneumonia CDI. We addressed the issue by examining retrospectively the records of 217 patients who met the diagnostic criteria of CDI. Ninety four of those patients (43.3 %) came down with CDI infection after pneumonia treatment. Fifty of the 94 patients went through severe or severe and complicated CDI. The distribution of antecedent antibiotic treatment of pneumonia in these 50 patients was as follows: ceftriaxone in 14 (28 %) cases, amoxicillin with clavulanate in 9 (18 %), ciprofloxacin in 8 (16.0 %), clarithromycin in 7 (14 %), and cefuroxime and imipenem in 6 (12 %) each. The findings revealed a borderline enhancement in the proportion of deaths due to CDI in the ceftriaxone group compared with the ciprofloxacin, cefuroxime, and imipenem groups. The corollary is that ceftriaxone should be shunned in pneumonia treatment. The study demonstrates an association between the use of a specific antibiotic for pneumonia treatment and post-pneumonia mortality in patients who developed CDI.

  19. Predictors of Pseudomonas and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metersky, Mark L; Frei, Christopher R; Mortensen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) are at high risk of infection with multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens. Factors discriminating infection with MDR Gram-negative (MDR-GN) organism from infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are not well understood and patients are often treated for both organisms. This study was performed to determine risk factors predicting pneumonia due to Pseudomonas versus MRSA. Veterans age ≥65 hospitalized with HCAP between 2002 and 2012 were identified from the Veterans Affairs administrative databases. Patients were identified with Pseudomonas pneumonia, MRSA pneumonia or neither according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. We assessed unadjusted and adjusted associations of patient characteristics and HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. Of the 61,651 patients with HCAP, 1156 (1.9%) were diagnosed with Pseudomonas pneumonia, 641 (1.0%) with MRSA pneumonia and 59,854 (97.1%) with neither. MRSA pneumonia was positively associated with male gender, age >74, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recent nursing home or hospital stay, recent exposure to fluoroquinolone or antibiotics treating Gram-positive organisms, and severe pneumonia. MRSA pneumonia was negatively associated with complicated diabetes. Pseudomonas pneumonia was positively associated with recent hospital stay, immunocompromise, COPD, hemiplegia, recent exposure to inhaled corticosteroids, β-lactam/cephalosporin/carbapenem antibiotics, antibiotics against Gram-positive organisms, 'other antibiotics' and severe pneumonia. Pseudomonas pneumonia was negatively associated with age >84, higher socioeconomic status, drug abuse and diabetes. Patient characteristics may assist in identifying patients at risk for HCAP due to Pseudomonas or MRSA. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. The level of nurses’ knowledge of the prevention of nosocomial infections – a pilot study

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    Izabela Gąska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A basic element in preventing and combating nosocomial infections is the medical personnel knowledge. It is up to health care workers to determine whether the hospital environment will be safe for both patients and those employed in this sector. The aim of the study was to present the level of nursing staff knowledge of nosocomial infections. Materials and methods. The research was carried out in the Podkarpackie Center of Cardiovascular Interventions in Sanok. The study group consisted of all nurses working in the Hemodynamic Department - 20 people. The tests were carried out using the diagnostic survey method. The research tool was the author's questionnaire. Results. The nurses were aware that the scale of the problem of nosocomial infections was important. Almost all nurses rated their level of knowledge of hospital-acquired infections very well. However, the full definition of the term "nosocomial infections" was not given by about a quarter of respondents. In hospitals nurses did not always follow the rules of aseptic and antiseptic treatment. In addition, they did not see the need to educate patients and their families about the prevention of infections. Conclusions. Hospitals should carry out monitoring of nurses’ compliance with the procedures that are aimed at the elimination of ward infections and should consistently strive at their best to apply these procedures at their workplace. The ward staff should be involved in the education of patients and their families in the prevention of nosocomial infections.

  1. Nosocomial outbreak of hepatitis B virus infection involving two hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-02-01

    The routes of nosocomial hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission have changed over the years. Initiatives to prevent transfusion-associated HBV and healthcare worker-to-patient transmission have had a positive impact on these transmission routes. Recent reports of outbreaks of nosocomial HBV have implicated breaches in standard precautions as important causes of HBV transmission. This report describes a nosocomial outbreak of HBV infection in the Republic of Ireland, which occurred between January 2005 and March 2006. The outbreak was detected following identification of a case of acute HBV infection in a patient whose only risk factor was a recent surgical procedure. The extensive multi-agency investigation that followed revealed that the patient was one of five cases of acute HBV infection and that four separate transmission events between infectious cases had occurred in two different hospitals over a 15-month period. A definitive cause for each transmission event was not identified, although lapses in adherence to standard precautions, safe injection and phlebotomy practices could not be ruled out. Two secondary cases of acute HBV infection in community contacts of two of the nosocomial cases were identified. Phylogenetic analysis proved a useful tool in confirming infection with a pre-core HBV mutant and viral transmission between the seven patients. A patient notification exercise involving 1028 potentially exposed patients found no evidence of additional cases of nosocomial HBV infection. These findings highlight the importance of consistent application of standard precautions.

  2. Infecciones nosocomiales. Experiencia en un hospital pediátrico de tercer nivel Nosocomial infections. An experience in a high-specialty pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Delia Díaz-Ramos

    1999-01-01

    immunocompromised patients had more infections than immunocompetent ones, the difference was not significative. The three most common infections were: pneumonia, vascular line infections and upper respiratory tract infections. It is possible that upper respiratory tract infections are contributing to the elevation of global incidence rates of nosocomial infections. CONCLUSIONS. The change of infection epidemiology regarding previous experience has led to the implementation of programs to prevent the most frequent problems. It is necessary to intensify the different prevention programs and to increase their reach in order to cut down costs in a short term.

  3. Management of ventilator associated pneumonia with a new antibiotic adjuvant entity (ceftriaxone+sulbactam+disodium edetate) - A novel approach to spare carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathe, Prachee; Maddani, Sagar; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Munshi, Nita

    2017-10-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most serious nosocomial infections in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to evaluate a new approach to spare the carbapenems for the management of patients diagnosed with VAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii). This retrospective study was conducted on VAP patients presenting for treatment at tertiary care centre between May 2014 and March 2016. The case sheets of patients who have been treated for VAP with meropenem, antibiotic adjuvant entity (AAE) and colistin were analysed. Out of 113 patients analysed, 24 (21.3%) patients were having VAP due to MDR A. baumannii. Microbial sensitivity has shown that 87.5% of patients were sensitive to AAE and colistin whereas all of them were resistant to meropenem, imipenem and gentamycin. The mean treatment durations were 12.4±2.1, 13.2±2.4 and 14.3±2.1days for AAE, meropenem+colistin and AAE+colistin treatment groups. In AAE susceptible patients, the mean treatment duration and cost could be reduced by 23-24% and 43-53% if AAE is used empirically. In AAE-resistant patients, the mean treatment duration and cost could be reduced by 21% and 26% if AAE+colistin regime is used empirically instead of meropenem followed by AAE+colistin. Clinical assessment with microbial eradication and pharmaco-economic evaluation clearly shows benefits in using AAE empirically in the management of A. baumannii infected VAP cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. K. pneumoniae: ¿The new “superbacteria”? Pathogenicity, epidemiology and resistance mechanisms K. pneumoniae: ¿la nueva

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    Lina María Echeverri Toro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem of public health. Klebsiella pneumoniae has become one of the most important pathogens because it is a frequent cause of nosocomial and community acquired infections and it has pathogenicity mechanisms like capsules, adhesive properties mediated by specialized estructures (pillis and siderophores that are capable of taking up iron, an essential factor in bacterial growth. The increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics has evolved with the use of these in patients treatments, being increasingly wide the spectrum that they include, happening from the resistance to ampicillin by the production of betalactamase SHV-1 to carbapenems resistance by diverse mechanisms, from the production of extendedspectrum betalactamases (ESBL that are associated with hydrolysis of extended-spectrum cephalosporins and aztreonam. Microbiology laboratory should follow international recommendations to detect and confirm the presence of this resistance mechanism in bacteria and the clinicians should make a suitable interpretation of the results to make the better choice of the antibiotic therapy. ----- La resistencia de los microorganismos a los antibióticos es un problema cada vez creciente en salud pública. Entre estos, Klebsiella pneumoniae es un representante importante no sólo por su frecuencia como causa de infecciones asociadas al cuidado de la salud y de la comunidad, sino por los mecanismos patogénicos que posee, como la capacidad de producir cápsula, la presencia de estructuras especializadas que le permiten adherirse a las células del hospedero (pilis, y de sideróforos que le permiten obtener el hierro necesario para su desarrollo. La resistencia de Klebsiella pneumoniae a los antimicrobianos ha evolucionado de acuerdo con la aparición y uso de estas moléculas en el tratamiento de los pacientes, siendo cada vez más amplio el espectro que abarcan, el cual va desde la resistencia a la ampicilina

  5. C3b/iC3b deposition on Streptococcus pneumoniae is not affected by HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hyams

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infection in both HIV positive patients and those with complement deficiencies. We hypothesised that HIV positive individuals might exhibit reduced opsonisation of pneumococcus with complement due to reduced levels of S. pneumoniae specific IgG. We discovered no difference in C3 deposition on S. pneumoniae between HIV positive or negative individuals, and furthermore C3 deposition remained unchanged as HIV progressed towards AIDS. We found no correlation between C3 deposition on S. pneumoniae and CD4 cell count in HIV infected individuals. Hence we have demonstrated no failure of complement immunity in HIV positive patients.

  6. Organizing pneumonia: the many morphological faces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Hansell, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Organizing pneumonia is a non-specific response to various forms of lung injury and is the pathological hallmark of the distinct clinical entity termed cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. The typical imaging features of this syndrome have been widely documented and consist of patchy air-space consolidation, often subpleural, with or without ground-glass opacities. The purpose of this article is to highlight the less familiar imaging patterns of organizing pneumonia which include focal organizing pneumonia, a variety of nodular patterns, a bronchocentric distribution, band-like opacities, a perilobular pattern and a progressive fibrotic form of organizing pneumonia. (orig.)

  7. The clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fuzheng; Wang Mingzhi; Chen Jianjiang; Wang Zhongxiang; Mao Yongjie

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia, sum the experience and the basis of the radiation pneumonia for its prevention and treatment. Method: Twenty three cases with radiation pneumonia from 1991 to 1998 were retrospectively analysed. Its clinical manifestation, chest X-ray, thoracic CT and blood routine were evaluated. Result: The acute manifestation was fever, cough, dyspnea, and the chronic manifestation was cough and insufficiency of pulmonary function. Conclusion: The prevention of radiation pneumonia is more important, high dose cortical steroids and antibiotics were prescribed during the acute stage and the chronic radiation pneumonia is irreversible

  8. Molecular biology of the Chlamydia pneumoniae surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Østergaard, Lars; Birkelund, Svend

    1997-01-01

    surface differs from that of Chlamydia trachomatis. In order to study the surface of C. pneumoniae we generated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against C. pneumoniae strain VR-1310 and selected 14 MAbs that reacted with the surface of C. pneumoniae. All MAbs reacted in immunoelectron microscopy...... with the surface of both whole C. pneumoniae VR-1310 elementary bodies and with purified sarcosyl extracted outer membrane complexes. However, only 2 of the MAbs reacted in immunoblotting with C. pneumoniae proteins and only with antigen that had not been heat treated in SDS-sample buffer. This indicates...

  9. Clusters of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, J; Tsolaki, A G; Miller, Raymonde

    1998-01-01

    Genotyping at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon was performed on isolates of P. carinii sp. f. hominis from three clusters of P. carinii pneumonia among eight patients with haematological malignancies and six with HIV infection. Nine different ITS sequence...

  10. Noninfectious differential diagnoses of pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wielandner, A.; Toelly, A.; Agarwal, P.; Bardach, C.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with a clinical suspicion of pneumonia, typical clinical and laboratory features along with the detection of infiltrates on chest X-ray are as a rule considered diagnostic and therapy is immediately initiated; however, studies have shown that in up to 5% of patients with an initial suspicion of pneumonia, another noninfectious pulmonary disease was the underlying cause. Early recognition and differentiation of diseases mimicking pneumonia are prerequisites for an adequate therapy. The aim of this review is to present the important noninfectious differential diagnoses of pneumonia and to provide the reader with tools for a systematic diagnostic approach. A literature search was carried out. As alterations in the lungs often result in similar imaging appearances and a differentiation between transudates, exsudates, blood and cells is not feasible by chest X-ray or CT, a systematic approach is essential to make an appropriate diagnosis. Hence, consideration of the temporal course, predominant pattern, distribution of findings, additional findings and clinical presentation are indispensable. (orig.) [de

  11. Childhood Pneumonia Screener: a concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Räsänen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood pneumonia continues to be the number one cause of death in children under five years of age in developing countries. In addition to mortality, pneumonia constitutes an enormous economic and social burden because late diagnosis is associated with high cost of treatment and often leads to chronic health problems. There are several bottlenecks in developing countries in the case flow of a child with lung infection: 1 recognising the symptoms as a reason to seek care, 2 getting the patient to a first-tier health facility, 3 scarcity of trained healthcare personnel who can diagnose the condition and its severity, 4 access to a second-tier facility in severe cases. These factors are commonly present in rural areas but even in more urban settings, access to a physician is often delayed. The Childhood Pneumonia Screener project aims at bridging the diagnostic gap using emerging technology. Mobile “smart” phone communication with several inexpensive dedicated sensors is proposed as a rapid data-collection and transmission unit that is connected to a central location where trained personnel assisted by sophisticated signal processing algorithms, evaluate the data and determine if the child is likely to have pneumonia and what the level and urgency of care should be.

  12. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  13. Knowledge and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection among Ward Nurses at Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oti A. Aja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted for estimating the knowledge and prevention of nosocomial infection among ward nurses at Federal Medical Centre (FMC, Umuahia Abia state. Four objectives were set, and four questions were formulated. A descriptive survey research method was used for the study. A sample size of one hundred and fifty (150 nurses was drawn from eight wards (medical and surgical, at FMC, Umuahia. A self-developed questionnaire with seventeen (17 structured questions was the instrument of data collection. Data were collected, analyzed, and presented in tables, pie chart, bar chart, histogram, and percentages. The results revealed that the nurses were well knowledgeable about nosocomial infection, although little deficiencies existed in the area of infection control practice and compliance, such as hand washing frequency. This study therefore recommends continuing education/seminar/workshop for all health care givers, to sensitize them with the knowledge and practice of nosocomial infection.

  14. Semmelweis revisited: hand hygiene and nosocomial disease transmission in the anesthesia workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Chuck

    2009-06-01

    Hospital-acquired infections occur at an alarmingly high frequency, possibly affecting as many as 1 in 10 patients, resulting in a staggering morbidity and an annual mortality of many tens of thousands of patients. Appropriate hand hygiene is highly effective and represents the simplest approach that we have to preventing nosocomial infections. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has targeted hand-washing compliance as a top research agenda item for patient safety. Recent research has identified inadequate hand washing and contaminated anesthesia workstation issues as likely contributors to nosocomial infections, finding aseptic practices highly variable among providers. It is vital that all healthcare providers, including anesthesia providers, appreciate the role of inadequate hand hygiene in nosocomial infection and meticulously follow the mandates of the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists and other professional healthcare organizations.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Estrada S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Ramírez-Estrada,1 Bárbara Borgatta,1,2 Jordi Rello3,4 1Critical Care Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, 2CRIPS, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Research (VHIR, 3Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB, Barcelona, 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedad Respiratoria – CIBERES, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. Keywords: multidrug-resistant, ICU, new-antibiotics, adjunctive-therapies, care-bundles

  16. Drug-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among Spanish middle aged and older adults with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raga-Luria Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Updated data on drug-resistance from different populations may be important to recognize changes in disease patterns. This study assessed current levels of penicilin resistance among Streptococcus Pneumoniae causing pneumonia in Spanish middle age and older adults. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 104 consecutive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients 50 years or older with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the region of Tarragona (Spain between 2002 and 2007. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration of tested antimicrobials (penicillin, erythromycin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin strains were classified as susceptible or resistant. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for early cases (2002–2004 and contemporary cases (2005–2007. Results Twenty-seven (25.9% were penicillin-resistant strains (19 strains with intermediate resistance and 8 strains with high resistance. Penicillin-resistance was higher in 2002–2004 than in 2005–2007 (39.5% vs 18.2%, p = 0.017. Of 27 penicillin-resistant strains, 10 (37% were resistant to erythromycin, 8 (29.6% to cefotaxime, 2 (7.4% to levofloxacin, and 4 (14.8% were identified as multidrug resistant. Case-fatality rate was higher among those patients who had an infection caused by any penicillin susceptible strain (16.9% than in those with infections due to penicillin-resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance to penicillin among Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high, but such resistance does not result in increased mortality in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

  17. Bacterial Pneumonia in Elderly Japanese Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Miyashita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pneumonia is one of the most important infectious diseases in terms of incidence, effect on quality of life, mortality, and impact on society. Pneumonia was the third leading cause of death in Japan in 2011. In 2016, 119 650 Japanese people died of pneumonia, 96% of whom were aged 65 years and above. The symptoms of pneumonia in elderly people are often atypical. Aspiration pneumonia is seen more frequently than in young people because of swallowing dysfunction in the elderly. The mortality rate is also higher in the elderly than in young people. In Japan, the population is aging at an unprecedented rate, and pneumonia in the elderly will be increasingly important in medicine and medical economics in the future. To manage pneumonia in the elderly, it is important to accurately evaluate its severity, administer appropriate antibiotic treatment, and implement effective preventive measures.

  18. Nosocomial oral myiasis in ICU patients: occurrence of three sequential cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is the infestation of living vertebrates or humans tissues by dipterous larvae. The oral cavity is rarely affected by this infestation and the circumstances which can lead to oral myiasis include persistent mouth opening together with poor hygiene. Such infestations have been reported mainly in developing countries such as in Asia. Although rare, nosocomial myiasis must be noted carefully, especially in case of hospitalized patients. This report describes three cases of nosocomial oral myiasis in hospitalized patients in ICU (intensive care unit in Tabriz, North West of Iran.

  19. Bidirectional Relationship between Cognitive Function and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Faraaz Ali; Pike, Francis; Alvarez, Karina; Angus, Derek; Newman, Anne B.; Lopez, Oscar; Tate, Judith; Kapur, Vishesh; Wilsdon, Anthony; Krishnan, Jerry A.; Hansel, Nadia; Au, David; Avdalovic, Mark; Fan, Vincent S.; Barr, R. Graham

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Relationships between chronic health conditions and acute infections remain poorly understood. Preclinical studies suggest crosstalk between nervous and immune systems. Objectives: To determine bidirectional relationships between cognition and pneumonia. Methods: We conducted longitudinal analyses of a population-based cohort over 10 years. We determined whether changes in cognition increase risk of pneumonia hospitalization by trajectory analyses and joint modeling. We then determined whether pneumonia hospitalization increased risk of subsequent dementia using a Cox model with pneumonia as a time-varying covariate. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 5,888 participants, 639 (10.9%) were hospitalized with pneumonia at least once. Most participants had normal cognition before pneumonia. Three cognition trajectories were identified: no, minimal, and severe rapid decline. A greater proportion of participants hospitalized with pneumonia were on trajectories of minimal or severe decline before occurrence of pneumonia compared with those never hospitalized with pneumonia (proportion with no, minimal, and severe decline were 67.1%, 22.8%, and 10.0% vs. 76.0%, 19.3%, and 4.6% for participants with and without pneumonia, respectively; P pneumonia, even in those with normal cognition and physical function before pneumonia (β = −0.02; P pneumonia were subsequently at an increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio, 2.24 [95% confidence interval, 1.62–3.11]; P = 0.01). Associations were independent of demographics, health behaviors, other chronic conditions, and physical function. Bidirectional relationship did not vary based on severity of disease, and similar associations were noted for those with severe sepsis and other infections. Conclusions: A bidirectional relationship exists between pneumonia and cognition and may explain how a single episode of infection in well-appearing older individuals accelerates decline in chronic health conditions and loss of

  20. Unexplained Dyspnea in a Young Adult with Epstein–Barr Virus Infectious Mononucleosis: Pulmonary Involvement or Co-Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A.; Herrarte Fornos, Scarlet

    2017-01-01

    Clinically, in young immunocompetent adults, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually manifests as infectious mononucleosis (IM). Typical clinical findings of EBV IM include fever, profound fatigue, pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly. Respiratory involvement with EBV IM may occur, but is distinctly rare. We present a case of a 20 year old female who with classic EBV IM, but was inexplicably dyspneic and hypoxemic. Further diagnostic testing confirmed co-infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae. As a non-zoonotic atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), M. pneumoniae may rarely be accompanied by severe hypoxemia and even acute respiratory distress syndrome. She represented a diagnostic dilemma regarding the cause of her hypoxemia, i.e., due to EBV IM with pulmonary involvement or severe M. pneumoniae CAP. The patient slowly recovered with respiratory quinolone therapy. PMID:28869530

  1. Unexplained Dyspnea in a Young Adult with Epstein-Barr Virus Infectious Mononucleosis: Pulmonary Involvement or Co-Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Herrarte Fornos, Scarlet

    2017-09-04

    Clinically, in young immunocompetent adults, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually manifests as infectious mononucleosis (IM). Typical clinical findings of EBV IM include fever, profound fatigue, pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly. Respiratory involvement with EBV IM may occur, but is distinctly rare. We present a case of a 20 year old female who with classic EBV IM, but was inexplicably dyspneic and hypoxemic. Further diagnostic testing confirmed co-infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae . As a non-zoonotic atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), M. pneumoniae may rarely be accompanied by severe hypoxemia and even acute respiratory distress syndrome. She represented a diagnostic dilemma regarding the cause of her hypoxemia, i.e., due to EBV IM with pulmonary involvement or severe M. pneumoniae CAP. The patient slowly recovered with respiratory quinolone therapy.

  2. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and concomitant disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Min-Po

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis remains a major cause of death and long-term neurologic sequelae worldwide. We present a case of fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis and concomitant disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in a 72-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus (DM. Both blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae . Due to advanced age, newly recognized DM, K. pneumoniae bacteremia, and DIC, the prognosis of our patient was poor. Eight hours after arrival to the emergency department, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was necessary in this patient, but she died despite an early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  3. Measures to prevent nosocomial infections during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Paula; Bassi, Gianluigi L; Torres, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are lifesaving measures in critically ill patients. However, these interventions increase the risk of respiratory infections, particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). VAP constitutes a serious burden for the healthcare system and worsens the patient's outcomes; thus, several preventive strategies have been implemented. This communication reviews the current knowledge on VAP pathogenesis and the latest preventive measures. Pathogen-laden oropharyngeal secretions leak across the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff; thus, a continuous control of the internal cuff pressure and cuffs made of polyurethane improve sealing effectiveness and associated risks of infections. Subglottic secretions aspiration prevents VAP, and the latest evidence demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of late-onset VAP. The role of ETT biofilm in the pathogenesis of VAP is not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, antimicrobial-coated ETTs have showed beneficial effects in VAP incidence. Recent experimental evidence has challenged the benefits associated with the use of the semirecumbent position; yet, these findings need to be corroborated in clinical trials. The latest results from trials testing the effects of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) showed beneficial effects on patients' outcomes, but concerns remain regarding the emergence of bacterial resistance, specifically upon digestive tract re-colonization. The use of oropharyngeal decontamination with antiseptics and the use of probiotics are potential alternatives to SDD. There is consistent evidence that strategies affecting the primary mechanisms of VAP pathogenesis efficiently reduce the occurrence of the disease. Preventive measures should be implemented grouped into bundles to improve overall efficacy.

  4. ASUPAN SENG YANG RENDAH SEBAGAI FAKTOR RISIKO KEPARAHAN PNEUMONIA PADA ANAK USIA 12-59 BULAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiry Nasution

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Period prevalence of infant pneumonia in Indonesia is 18.5 per mile. The high mortality rate due to pneumonia of 62 percent was found in 10 countries and 5 countries was located in Asia. Zinc is one of micronutrients which is reported to prevent pneumonia as   an acute phase response to infection and help to boost the body immune response. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of zinc intake as risk factor of severe pneumonia in children. A case control study was conducted among children aged 12–59  months in 2 hospitals and 6 health centres, Yogyakarta city. Thirty four children were categorized as having severe pneumonia (cases and 102 children were categorized as having pneumonia (control.  All sample’s mothers completed a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire during March-April 2014. Data analysis was performed  using Mantel-Haenszel test and conditional logistic regression, α = 0,05. Results of the study showed that there were 41.2 percent cases and 56.9 percent control were exclusively breast-fed. The  proportion of cases who had inadequate zink intake was higher than control group. There was no difference between inadequate zinc intake and the severe pneumonia (OR 1,08 and  95% CI 0,5-2,3. There was a statistically significant correlation between low-zinc intake and severe pneumonia if second  disease exist (OR 3,8  and 95% CI 1,4 -10,8. As an conclusion, Inadequate zinc intake affected severe pneumonia when the secondary diseases exist in children with pneumonia.   ABSTRAK   Period prevalence pneumonia balita di Indonesia adalah 18,5 per mil. Angka kematian yang tinggi akibat pneumonia sebesar 62 persen terdapat di 10 negara dan 5 negara di antaranya merupakan negara di Asia. Defisiensi seng menyebabkan penurunan kekebalan sel sehingga meningkatkan kerentanan terhadap penyakit pneumonia. Tujuan penelitian ini menganalisis asupan seng yang kurang sebagai faktor risiko keparahan pneumonia pada anak

  5. Atypical Pneumonia: Updates on Legionella, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lokesh; Losier, Ashley; Tolbert, Thomas; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Marion, Chad R

    2017-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has multiple causes and is associated with illness that requires admission to the hospital and mortality. The causes of atypical CAP include Legionella species, Chlamydophila, and Mycoplasma. Atypical CAP remains a diagnostic challenge and, therefore, likely is undertreated. This article reviews the advancements in the evaluation and treatment of patients and discusses current conflicts and controversies of atypical CAP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Damas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A designação acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP foi proposta por Beasley et al para os casos em que as características histopatológicas das lesões não se enquadravam em outras situações clínicas (agu-das ou subagudas conhecidas. A presença de fibrina intra alveolar e de pneumonia organizativa, com distribuição difusa, é a principal alteração histológica associada a esta entidade.Os autores descrevem o caso de um doente do sexo masculino, com o diagnóstico de AFOP, por bióp-sia pulmonar cirúrgica. O doente teve uma apresentação subaguda, apresentando por queixas principais tosse, dor torácica e febre. TAC torácica mostrou infiltrados bilaterais, difusos. Após início de corticoterapia sistémica e ciclofosfamida, o doente apresentou melhoria clínica significativa. Ao elaborar este caso, os autores esperam acrescentar mais alguns dados sobre esta nova entidade.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Abstract: The term Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP has been proposed by Beasley et al for cases that not fit into the histopathologic criteria of the recognized entities described as acute or subacute clinical presentations. The presence of intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin ‘balls’ and organizing pneumonia with patchy distribution are the main histological features of this entity. We describe the case of a male patient with the diagnostic of AFOP made by surgical lung biopsy. He had a subacute presentation of symptoms consisting of productive cough, chest pain and fever. Bilateral infiltrates with patchy and diffuse distribution were the predominant features in his chest HRCT scan. The patient had a good clinical course after a treatment with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Our hope in reporting this case study is to add some more data to the discussion of this new entity.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Palavras

  7. Cost-Analysis of Seven Nosocomial Outbreaks in an Academic Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H; Dinkelacker, Ariane G; Vemer, Pepijn; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Lokate, Mariëtte; Sinha, Bhanu; Friedrich, Alex W; Postma, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-)resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study sets out to provide a comparable overview of the costs of multiple outbreaks in a single academic hospital in the Netherlands. Based on interviews with the involved staff, multiple databases and stored records from the Infection Prevention Division all actions undertaken, extra staff employment, use of resources, bed-occupancy rates, and other miscellaneous cost drivers during different outbreaks were scored and quantified into Euros. This led to total costs per outbreak and an estimated average cost per positive patient per outbreak day. Seven outbreaks that occurred between 2012 and 2014 in the hospital were evaluated. Total costs for the hospital ranged between €10,778 and €356,754. Costs per positive patient per outbreak day, ranged between €10 and €1,369 (95% CI: €49-€1,042), with a mean of €546 and a median of €519. Majority of the costs (50%) were made because of closed beds. This analysis is the first to give a comparable overview of various outbreaks, caused by different microorganisms, in the same hospital and all analyzed with the same method. It shows a large variation within the average costs due to different factors (e.g. closure of wards, type of ward). All outbreaks however cost considerable amounts of efforts and money (up to €356,754), including missed revenue and control measures.

  8. Cost-Analysis of Seven Nosocomial Outbreaks in an Academic Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Willem H Dik

    Full Text Available Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study sets out to provide a comparable overview of the costs of multiple outbreaks in a single academic hospital in the Netherlands.Based on interviews with the involved staff, multiple databases and stored records from the Infection Prevention Division all actions undertaken, extra staff employment, use of resources, bed-occupancy rates, and other miscellaneous cost drivers during different outbreaks were scored and quantified into Euros. This led to total costs per outbreak and an estimated average cost per positive patient per outbreak day.Seven outbreaks that occurred between 2012 and 2014 in the hospital were evaluated. Total costs for the hospital ranged between €10,778 and €356,754. Costs per positive patient per outbreak day, ranged between €10 and €1,369 (95% CI: €49-€1,042, with a mean of €546 and a median of €519. Majority of the costs (50% were made because of closed beds.This analysis is the first to give a comparable overview of various outbreaks, caused by different microorganisms, in the same hospital and all analyzed with the same method. It shows a large variation within the average costs due to different factors (e.g. closure of wards, type of ward. All outbreaks however cost considerable amounts of efforts and money (up to €356,754, including missed revenue and control measures.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Drugs Resistance in Acute Rhinosinusitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jie Hao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute rhinosinusitis that usually caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes the reason why patients seek for medical care. Drugs resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae is increasing worldwide. This study was conducted to determine drugs resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia from acute rhinosinusitis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital. Methods: A descriptive laboratory study was conducted in June–October 2014 at the Laboratory of Microbiology Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran. The sample was taken using nasopharyngeal swabbing from 100 acute rhinosinusitis patients in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital and planted on tryptic soy agar containing 5% sheep blood and 5 μg/ml of gentamicin sulphate and then incubated in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C for 24 hours. The identification of Streptococcus pneumonia was performed by optochin test. The susceptibility test against Streptococcus pneumoniae was done using disk diffusion method.The antibiotic disks were trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, oxacillin, levofloxacin, azithromycin, and doxycycline. Results: Out of 100 samples, 8 of them were tested positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. Three of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates died with unknown reason after it were stored at -80 .The drugs resistance test showed the resistance of Streptococcus pneumonia to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim were 6, whereas levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumonia drugs resistance in acute rhinosinusitis shows the resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to oxacillin, azithromycin and trimethoprim are 6, whereas the resistance to levofloxacin and doxycycline are 4.

  10. Bortezomib-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vandeix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor indicated for the treatment of multiple myeloma patients. The most frequent side effects are gastrointestinal and neurological. Serious pulmonary complications have been described rarely. Observation. This case involves a 74-year-old man suffering from IgG Kappa myeloma treated with bortezomib, melphalan, and dexamethasone. After administering chemotherapy, the patient developed an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. A surgical pulmonary biopsy proved the existence of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP lesions. Systemic corticotherapy led to a rapid improvement in the patient’s condition. Conclusion. This is the first reported histologically confirmed case of bortezomid-induced BOOP. Faced with severe respiratory symptoms in the absence of other etiologies, complications due to bortezomid treatment should be evoked and corticotherapy considered.

  11. Determination of the Antimicrobial Effects of Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Cannabis Sativa on Multiple Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sarmadyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The science of identification and employment of medicinal plants dates back to the early days of man on earth. Cannabis (hashish is the most common illegal substance used in the United States and was subjected to extensive research as a powerful local disinfecting agent for mouth cavity and skin and an anti-tubercular agent in 1950. Methods: Clinical strains were isolated from hospitalized patients in Vali-e-Asr Hospital of Arak. The hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis (5 g was prepared following liquid-liquid method and drying in 45˚C. The antimicrobial properties of the extract were determined through disk diffusion and determination of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration. Results: First, the sensitivity of bacteria was detected based on disk diffusion method and the zone of inhibition was obtained for MRSA (12 mm, S.aureus 25923 (14 mm, E. coli ESBL+: (10 mm, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 mm. Disk diffusion for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter demonstrated no inhibitory zones. Through Broth dilution method, MIC of cannabis extract on the bacteria was determined: E.coli 25922: 50µg/ml, E.coli ESBL+:100 µg/ml, S.aureus 25923:25 µg/ml, MRSA: 50 µg/ml, Pseudomona aeroginosaESBL+> 100 µg/ml, Pseudomonas: 100 µg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae: 100 µg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii> 1000. Conclusion: The maximum anti-microbial effect of the hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis was seen for gram positive cocci, especially S. aureus, whereas non-fermentative gram negatives presented resistance to the extract. This extract had intermediate effect on Enterobacteriacae family. Cannabis components extracted through chemical analysis can perhaps be effective in treatment of nosocomial infections.

  12. Miliary pattern in neonatal pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, J.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    We have seen 10 newborn babies who developed respiratory distress and whose chest radiographs showed a miliary nodular pattern of disease. Of these infants only 3 had blood cultures that were positive for staphylococcus aureus. Of the remaining 7, 2 had conjunctivitis from which staphylococcus aureus was cultured, 4 had negative cultures and 1 did not have a blood culture done. All patients were diagnosed as having bacterial pneumonia and appeared to respond favourably to antibiotic therapy. The pulmonary abnormalities resolved. The children were clinically well in less than 3 weeks. The author suggests that the miliary pattern is one of the radiological patterns of neonatal pneumonia possibly produced by hematogenous bacterial dissemination. (orig.)

  13. [Aspects of the antimicrobial resistence profile in infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovici, Cristina G; Dorobăţ, Carmen; Matei, Mioara; Teodor, Andra; Luca, V; Miftode, Egidia

    2011-01-01

    Infections in diabetic patient remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality, triggering and maintaining a prolonged metabolic imbalance. Emergence of extented spectrum beta-lactmase (ESBL) in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major concern, because of the atypical manner infection acts in this group of imunodepressed patients and also for the limited therapeutic solutions. For this reason we have evaluated the profile of antimicrobial resistance of these pathogens in both diabetic and non diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in a retrospective case control study, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern in isolates of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. from different biological products in 49 diabetics and 150 non-diabetics admitted in The Clinical Hospital of Infectious Diseases Iaşi over a period of two years. Most of strains of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. ESBL positive were found in uroculture. Significant differences in E. coli resistance rate between diabetics and nondiabetics were noted for amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin (31,4% vs.13,98%, p=0,04, respectively 52,9% vs. 24,46%, p=0,004). More isolates of ESBL positive K. pneumoniae were found in diabetic patients (50% vs. 24%). Ciprofloxacin resistance of K. pneumoniae was significantly higher in diabetics (75% vs 39%; p=0,05). There was no resistance in E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates to imipenem in the diabetic group. The high resistance rate to quinolones and 3rd generation cefalosporins limits their use for the treatment of Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae infections. Other alternatives for empiric therapy in community and nosocomial-acquired infections in diabetic patient remains carbapenems, aminoglycosides and colimycin.

  14. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetem, David J; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit

    2012-01-01

    exposure. Despite obvious epidemiological differences, it is unknown whether differences in nosocomial transmissibility exist. We have, therefore, quantified the transmissibility, expressed by the single admission reproduction number (R(A)), of CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA in hospital settings in Denmark....

  15. Endemic nosocomial infections and misuse of antibiotics in a maternity hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Naser Eldin; Gedebou, Messele; Al-Ghamdi, Saleh

    2002-02-01

    Patients admitted during a 6-month period to a maternity hospital in Saudi Arabia were studied for nosocomial infections and misuse of antibiotics. Patient history and diagnosis on admission and subsequent clinical and laboratory data were analysed. Infection developing from 72 h after admission was considered nosocomial. Therapeutic and prophylactic data as recorded on the patients' charts were assessed for possible misuse of antibiotics. Of 3439 patients, 136 (4.0%) developed nosocomial infection: 2.0%, 8.9% and 37.7% in obstetric, gynaecologic and nursery patients, respectively. Infections among adults were mostly found in the urinary (44.4%) and lower genital (33.3%) tracts. Among newborns, over 70% of cases were eye and ear (29.8%), skin (26.2%) and blood (19.0%) infections. Gram-negative bacteria caused 65.7% of the infections. Over 90% of the bacterial isolates were multidrug-resistant. About 24% of patients received single or multiple antibiotics; 57.2% were misused. The minimal hospital cost estimate for both nosocomial infections and misused antibiotics was US $318,705. The findings of this study, the first of its type in this region, should prompt improved infection control measures as well as educational and antibiotic restriction interventions.

  16. A NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION MANIFESTED AS ERYSIPELAS IN PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS PATIENT UNDER INTRAVENOUS DEXAMETHASONE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Yudha Pranata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Puncture wound in diagnostic interventions permits the entry of bacteria into the skin or soft tissue, thus precipitating nosocomial infection, such as erysipelas. There are other risk factors of nosocomial infections including old age, immunosuppressive drugs, and underlying diseases. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF is an autoimmune disease with corticosteroid treatment as the mainstay therapy, which could cause immunosuppression and predispose patients to infection. The objective of this paper was to report erysipelas as one of the manifestations of nosocomial infection in patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Case: A case of erysipelas acquired on the 9th day of hospitalization in a PF patient underwent intravenous dexamethasone injection, with history of puncture wounds on the previous day on the site of erysipelas was reported. The clinical findings of erysipelas were well defined, painful erythema and edema that felt firm and warm on palpation, with blisters and pustules on top. Gram staining from the pustules and blisters fluid revealed Gram (+ cocci. Patient was given 2 grams intravenous ceftriaxone for 7 days and saline wet compress. Improvement on the erysipelas was seen the day after ceftriaxone injection. The patient was discharged after 12 days of hospitalization with improvement both on the PF and the erysipelas. On the next visit 7 days later, the erysipelas lesion disappeared. Conclusion: Puncture wound and immunosuppresive treatment are the factors that could cause erysipelas as a nosocomial infection, and an appropriate treatment of the infection would decrease the functional disability of the patient.

  17. Pattern of nosocomial infections in the special care baby unit of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-27

    Sep 27, 2013 ... -risk infants delivered in the maternity unit of the hospi- tal as well as infants referred ..... In the present study, the risk of nosocomial infection was not significantly higher ... German surveillance system for very low birth weight ...

  18. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  19. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Norovirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial norovirus infections among inpatients tested...

  20. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty-five nosocomial infections (23%) among the HIV-infected children, but only ... candidiasis in seven and zero, urinary tract infection in four and one and .... tant or multidrug-resistant TB received ... bacterial infections, 96 hours in the case.

  1. Cost-analysis of seven nosocomial outbreaks in an academic hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Dinkelacker, Ariane D.; Vemer, Pepijn; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Lokate, Mariette; Sinha, Bhanu; Friedrich, Alex W.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-)resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study

  2. Field inversion gel electrophoretic analysis of Legionella pneumophila strains associated with nosocomial legionellosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M; Wald, E R; Dashefsky, B; Barbadora, K; Wadowsky, R M

    1996-01-01

    Two nosocomial cases of Legionnaires' disease occurred in children. Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from both patients and 30 of 39 plumbing system sites in the hospital. The patient and hospital environmental isolates yielded identical field inversion gel electrophoretic patterns which differed from patterns observed with epidemiologically unrelated strains.

  3. Nosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : time course and causative pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laban, Kamil G.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.

    BackgroundNosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are associated with prolonged length of stay and poor functional outcome. It remains unclear if infections result in prolonged length of stay or, vice versa, if prolonged length of stay results in more infections. Before

  4. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between tuberculosis and HIV-infected infection is well known and is responsible for the increase in the incidence of tuberculosis ... This retrospective case-control study evaluated the occurrence of nosocomial infections in (HIV)-infected children and age- and time of ... complicated disease, or whose social.

  5. Shear Stress Enhances Chemokine Secretion from Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J; Dallo, Shatha F; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Ramasubramanian, Anand K

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae is a common respiratory pathogen that is considered a highly likely risk factor for atherosclerosis. C. pneumoniae is disseminated from the lung into systemic circulation via infected monocytes and lodges at the atherosclerotic sites. During transit, C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes in circulation are subjected to shear stress due to blood flow. The effect of mechanical stimuli on infected monocytes is largely understudied in the context of C. pneumoniae infection and inflammation. We hypothesized that fluid shear stress alters the inflammatory response of C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes and contributes to immune cell recruitment to the site of tissue damage. Using an in vitro model of blood flow, we determined that a physiological shear stress of 7.5 dyn/cm 2 for 1 h on C. pneumoniae -infected monocytes enhances the production of several chemokines, which in turn is correlated with the recruitment of significantly large number of monocytes. Taken together, these results suggest synergistic interaction between mechanical and chemical factors in C. pneumoniae infection and associated inflammation.

  6. Danger Signs of Childhood Pneumonia: Caregiver Awareness and Care Seeking Behavior in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikenna K. Ndu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Efforts to reduce child mortality especially in Africa must as a necessity aim to decrease mortality due to pneumonia. To achieve this, preventive strategies such as expanding vaccination coverage are key. However once a child develops pneumonia prompt treatment which is essential to survival is dependent on mothers and caregiver recognition of the symptoms and danger signs of pneumonia. Methods. This community based cross-sectional study enrolled four hundred and sixty-six caregivers in Enugu state. It aimed to determine knowledge of caregivers about danger signs of pneumonia and the sociodemographic factors that influence knowledge and care seeking behaviour of caregivers. Results. There is poor knowledge of the aetiology and danger signs of pneumonia among caregivers. Higher maternal educational attainment and residence in semiurban area were significantly associated with knowledge of aetiology, danger signs, and vaccination of their children against pneumonia. Fast breathing and difficulty in breathing were the commonest known and experienced WHO recognized danger signs while fever was the commonest perceived danger sign among caregivers. Conclusion. Knowledge of danger signs and health seeking behaviour among caregivers is inadequate. There is need for intensified public and hospital based interventions targeted at mothers to improve their knowledge about pneumonia.

  7. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, João Rocha; Marques, Ricardo; Serra, Paula; Cardoso, Leila

    2017-09-07

    Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia (AFOP) is a rare histological pattern of interstitial lung disease. The authors describe a 60-year-old woman admitted to the hospital for sustained fever, presenting with an alveolar opacity on chest X-ray, with the presumed diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia and the onset of antibiotics. Since serological results suggested that Legionella pneumophila was the infectious agent, she was discharged on levofloxacin. A week later, she was again admitted with fever. CT scan showed opacities with crescentic morphology and a central ground-glass area suggestive of cryptogenic organising pneumonia. Microbiological, serological and autoimmunity tests were negative. She underwent surgical lung biopsy that revealed inflammatory infiltrate, macrophage desquamation, fibroblasts proliferation and fibrin deposition in the alveolar spaces, consistent with AFOP. She started corticotherapy with good response. Disease relapsed after prednisolone discontinuation, 10 months later. Currently, the patient is on prednisolone 5 mg/day without clinical and radiological recurrence. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. A retrospective study of risk factors for carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae acquisition among ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yangmin; Ping, Yanting; Li, Leiqing; Xu, Huimin; Yan, Xiaofeng; Dai, Haibin

    2016-03-31

    Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CRKP) is rapidly emerging as a life-threatening nosocomial infection. In this study, we aim to identify risk factors, especially antibiotic use, for CRKP infection among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. This was a matched case-control study of a 67-bed ICU in a tertiary care teaching hospital from 1 January 2011 through 30 June 2013. The control cases were selected among the patients with carbapenem-susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae (CSKP) and were matched with CRKP cases for year of ICU admission and site of infection. The clinical outcomes and antibiotic treatments were analyzed. One hundred and thirty patients were included in the study (65 cases and 65 controls). Bivariable analysis showed that age of patients (p = 0.044), number of antibiotic groups (p = 0.001), and exposure to carbapenems (p carbapenems, previous carbapenem exposure (p carbapenems is an independent risk factor for CRKP infection. Patients with this clinical factor should be targeted for interventions to reduce the subsequent risk of infection.

  9. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan; Mohammed Abukhattab; Mohammed AbuKamar; Deshmukh Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation, underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients. Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admitted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012. Results: A total of ten cases were identified (nine males and one female). Their mean age was (43.3±12.8) years. Eight patients (80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition. Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom. Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels. Gram stain showed Gram-negative rods in 50%of cases, while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients. Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases, and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments. The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was (19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device, while in-hospital mortality was 50%. Conclusions: The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions. Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  10. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi; Yousef; Khan; Mohammed; Abukhattab; Mohanuned; Abukamar; Deshmukh; Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To describe the clinical presentation,underlying diseases,antimicrobial susceptibility,treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients.Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admit ted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1,2007 to December 31,2012.Results:A total of ten cases were identified mine males and one female).Their mean age was i43.3±12.8) years.Eight patients(80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition.Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom.Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels.Oram slain showed Gram—negative rods in 50%of cases,while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients.Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases,and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments.The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was(19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device,while in—hospital mortality was 50%.Conclusions:The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions.Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  11. Glutamine Supplemented Parenteral Nutrition to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in the Intensive Care Unit

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    Meltem Türkay Aydoğmuş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN. We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU. Material and Methods: With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20, and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20 while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20. C-reactive protein (CRP, sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. Results: No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622. Conclusion: Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  12. Oral hygiene is an important factor for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

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    Par, Matej; Badovinac, Ana; Plancak, Darije

    2014-03-01

    Inadequate oral hygiene in intensive care units (ICUs) has been recognized as a critical issue, for it is an important risk factor for ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). VAP is an aspiration pneumonia that occurs in mechanically ventilated patients, mostly caused by bacteria colonizing the oral cavity and dental plaque. It is the second most common nosocomial infection and the leading cause of complications and death in mechanically ventilated patients. It has been suggested that improvement of oral hygiene in ICU patients could lead to a reduced incidence of VAP. Although diverse oral care measures for ICU patients have been proposed in the literature, there is no evidence that could identify the most efficient ones. Although there are several evidence-based protocols, oral care measures are still performed inconsistently and differ greatly between individual ICUs. This paper lists the oral care measures most commonly performed in ICUs, indicating their advantages and disadvantages. Brushing with regular toothbrush and rinsing with chlorhexidine are considered optimal measures of oral hygiene in critically ill patients. To date, there is no definitive agreement about the most effective oral care protocol, but evidence demonstrates that consistent performance of oral care may lower the incidence of VAP in critically ill patients.

  13. Glutamine supplemented parenteral nutrition to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

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    Aydoğmuş, Meltem Türkay; Tomak, Yakup; Tekin, Murat; Katı, Ismail; Hüseyinoğlu, Urfettin

    2012-12-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a form of nosocomial pneumonia that increases patient morbidity and mortality, length of hospital stay, and healthcare costs. Glutamine preserves the intestinal mucosal structure, increases immune function, and reduces harmful changes in gut permeability in patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We hypothesized that TPN supplemented by glutamine might prevent the development of VAP in patients on mechanical ventilator support in the intensive care unit (ICU). With the approval of the ethics committee and informed consent from relatives, 60 patients who were followed in the ICU with mechanical ventilator support were included in our study. Patients were divided into three groups. The first group received enteral nutrition (n=20), and the second was prescribed TPN (n=20) while the third group was given glutamine-supplemented TPN (n=20). C-reactive protein (CRP), sedimentation rate, body temperature, development of purulent secretions, increase in the amount of secretions, changes in the characteristics of secretions and an increase in requirement of deep tracheal aspiration were monitored for seven days by daily examination and radiographs. No statistically significant difference was found among groups in terms of development of VAP (p=0.622). Although VAP developed at a lower rate in the glutamine-supplemented TPN group, no statistically significant difference was found among any of the groups. Glutamine-supplemented TPN may have no superiority over unsupplemented enteral and TPN in preventing VAP.

  14. Incidence and risk factors of ventilator associated pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Mv Pravin; Easow, Joshy M; Joseph, Noyal M; Ravishankar, M; Kumar, Shailesh; Umadevi, Sivaraman

    2013-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is a type of nosocomial pneumonia associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Knowledge about the incidence and risk factors is necessary to implement preventive measures to reduce mortality in these patients. A prospective study was conducted at a tertiary care teaching hospital for a period of 20 months from November 2009 to July 2011. Patients who were on mechanical ventilation (MV) for more than 48 hours were monitored at frequent intervals for development of VAP using clinical and microbiological criteria until discharge or death. Of the 76 patients, 18 (23.7%) developed VAP during their ICU stay. The incidence of VAP was 53.25 per 1,000 ventilator days. About 94% of VAP cases occurred within the first week of MV. Early-onset and late-onset VAP was observed in 72.2% and 27.8%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed chronic lung failure, H2 blockers usage, and supine head position were significant risk factors for VAP. Logistic regression revealed supine head position as an independent risk factor for VAP. VAP occurred in a sizeable number of patients on MV. Chronic lung failure, H2 blockers usage, and supine head position were the risk factors associated with VAP. Awareness about these risk factors can be used to inform simple and effective preventive measures.

  15. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

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    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  16. Clinical features of measles pneumonia in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Honma, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Masahiko; Honda, Yasuhito; Abe, Shosaku; Igarashi, Tomofumi; Sekine, Kyuichiro.

    1993-01-01

    The clinical features, chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images were evaluated in 11 cases of serologically proved adult measles complicated with pneumonia (10 were previously healthy and one had sarcoidosis). Pneumonia appeared during the rash period in all cases. Respiratory symptoms were cough (9/11), dyspnea (3/11), and hypoxemia (10/11). Pneumonia manifestations were detected in only 4 cases by chest radiograph; on the other hand, they were seen in all cases by CT scan and consisted of ground-glass opacities (73%), nodular opacities (64%) and consolidation (27%). CT seems to be useful method to detect measles pneumonia if it is suspected. Measles pneumonia in previously healthy patients had a good prognosis, as the hypoxemia disappeared within 6 days in all cases. The sarcoidosis patient showed prolonged pneumonic shadows and period of hypoxemia. Measles pneumonia occurring in a host with cellular immunodeficiency may have a severe clinical course. (author)

  17. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

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    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  18. Development and validation of a single-tube multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis for Klebsiella pneumoniae.

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    Antoinette A T P Brink

    Full Text Available Genotyping of Klebsiella pneumoniae is indispensable for management of nosocomial infections, monitoring of emerging strains--including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producers-, and general epidemiology. Such objectives require a high-resolution genotyping method with a fixed scheme that allows (1 long-term retrospective and prospective assessment, (2 objective result readout and (3 library storage for database development and exchangeable results. We have developed a multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA using a single-tube fluorescently primed multiplex PCR for 8 Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs and automated fragment size analysis. The type allocation scheme was optimized using 224 K. pneumoniae clinical isolates, which yielded 101 MLVA types. The method was compared to the gold standard multilocus sequence typing (MLST using a subset of these clinical isolates (n = 95 and found to be highly concordant, with at least as high a resolution but with considerably less hands-on time. Our results position this MLVA scheme as an appropriate, high-throughput and relatively low-cost tool for K. pneumoniae epidemiology.

  19. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

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    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Punit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

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    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.