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Sample records for norway spruce wood

  1. Assessment of Thermo-treated Bonded Wood Performance: Comparisons among Norway Spruce, Common Ash, and Turkey Oak

    OpenAIRE

    Angelo Rita; Nicola Moretti; Ignazia Cuccui,; Achille Pellerano; Luigi Todaro

    2014-01-01

    Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) exhibits fine adhesion qualities when bonded to wood. However, when using thermo-treated wood, a number of different unstudied factors (such as the water stress condition) influence the wood bonding effectiveness. The main goal of this study was to evaluate how different treatments affect the shear bonding strength for three cases of thermo-vacuum treated woods. Wood from both Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) and common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) was thermo-treated ...

  2. The effect of artificially induced drought on radial increment and wood properties of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyske, Tuula; Hölttä, Teemu; Mäkinen, Harri; Nöjd, Pekka; Lumme, Ilari; Spiecker, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    We studied experimentally the effects of water availability on height and radial increment as well as wood density and tracheid properties of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The study was carried out in two long-term N-fertilization experiments in Southern Finland (Heinola and Sahalahti). At each site, one fertilized and one control plot was covered with an under-canopy roof preventing rainwater from reaching the soil. Two uncovered plots were monitored at each site. The drought treatment was initiated in the beginning of growing season and lasted for 60-75 days each year. The treatment was repeated for four to five consecutive years depending on the site. Altogether, 40 sample trees were harvested and discs sampled at breast height. From the discs, ring width and wood density were measured by X-ray densitometry. Tracheid properties were analysed by reflected-light microscopy and image analysis. Reduced soil water potential during the growing season decreased annual radial and height increment and had a small influence on tracheid properties and wood density. No statistically significant differences were found in the average tracheid diameter between the drought-treated and control trees. The average cell wall thickness was somewhat higher (7-10%) for the drought treatment than for the control, but the difference was statistically significant only in Sahalahti. An increased cell wall thickness was found in both early- and latewood tracheids, but the increase was much greater in latewood. In drought-treated trees, cell wall proportion within an annual ring increased, consequently increasing wood density. No interaction between the N fertilization and drought treatment was found in wood density. After the termination of the drought treatment, trees rapidly recovered from the drought stress. According to our results, severe drought due to the predicted climate change may reduce Norway spruce growth but is unlikely to result in large changes in wood properties.

  3. Short-term impacts of energy wood harvesting on ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of Norway spruce saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusko, Karoliina; Tarvainen, Oili; Saravesi, Karita; Pennanen, Taina; Fritze, Hannu; Kubin, Eero; Markkola, Annamari

    2015-03-01

    The increased demand for harvesting energy wood raises questions about its effects on the functioning of the forest ecosystems, soil processes and biodiversity. Impacts of tree stump removal on ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) communities of Norway spruce saplings were studied with 454-pyrosequencing in a 3-year field experiment replicated in 3 geographical areas. This is possibly the most thorough investigation of EMF communities associated with saplings grown on sites subjected to energy wood harvesting. To separate impacts of tree stump and logging residue removal on EMF and plant variables, we used three harvesting treatments with increasing complexity from patch mounding alone (P) to patch mounding combined with logging residue removal (RP), and patch mounding combined with both logging residue and stump removal (SRP). Saplings grown in uncut forests (F) served as references for harvesting treatments. A majority of sequences (>92%) and operational taxonomic units (OTUs, 55%) were assigned as EMF. EMF OTU richness, fungal community composition or sapling growth did not differ between harvesting treatments (P, RP and SRP), while EMF OTU richness, diversity and evenness were highest and sapling growth lowest in the undisturbed reference forests (F). The short study period may partially explain the similarities in fungal and sapling variables in different harvesting treatments. In conclusion, our results indicate that neither stump removal nor logging residue removal have significant additional negative impacts on EMF communities or growth of Norway spruce saplings in the short-term compared with the impacts of more conventional harvesting methods, including clear cutting and patch mounding.

  4. Energy resources of low-grade wood, small wood and waste materials. [Scots Pine; Norway Spruce; Birch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, A.P.; Sviridyuk, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    An account is made of recent Finnish work on the potential of low-grade wood, small-dimension wood and waste material (of Scots pine, Norway spruce and birch) for power production, in the context of the current world energy crisis. The physical and economic aspects are considered, and the relevance of the Finnish research for the USSR is discussed. In 1978, wood accounted for only 1.4% of the energy balance of the USSR. Taking one t of 'standard fuel' as equal to 7000 kcal for the purposes of calculation, the energy potential of bark alone in the USSR is 13.6 million t/yr. (Refs. 6).

  5. Effects of thermal treatment on chemical, mechanical and colour traits in Norway spruce wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kačíková, Danica; Kačík, František; Cabalová, Iveta; Durkovič, Jaroslav

    2013-09-01

    In several different branches of the wood industry heat treatment is a growing application as it changes the chemical, mechanical, physical and biological properties of wood. Investigations using wet chemical analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and CIELab colour system have been conducted to study the changes in Norway spruce wood subjected to temperature up to 270°C over a 30 min time period. The results showed that mass loss (ML), total crystallinity index (TCI) of cellulose, total colour difference (ΔE*), and the content of lignin and extractives increased with the temperature, whereas degree of polymerization (DP) of cellulose, modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), lightness difference (ΔL*), and the content of holocellulose, cellulose and hemicelluloses all decreased with the thermal treatment. Relationships between temperature and the examined wood traits were all fitted by exponential curves. Power law relationships were found to fit the trends for DP of cellulose with ΔE*, ΔL*, and TCI of cellulose. Also found were power law regressions for the content of hemicelluloses with MOE, MOR, ΔL*, and ML. Temperatures ranging from 20 to 187°C formed a compact cluster, clearly separated from the higher examined temperatures in the multivariate wood trait space.

  6. Does compression wood affect the climatic signal in carbon and oxygen isotopes of Norway spruce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Karolina; Kaczka, Ryszard; Gärtner, Holger; Treydte, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Compression wood is a special tissue present in the trunk of mechanically stressed coniferous trees, more frequently occurring in branches and roots. The main role of the compression wood is to increase the mechanical strength and regain the vertical orientation of a leaning stem. The anatomical structure of compression wood is characterized by (i) rounded tracheids causing intercellular spaces, (ii) a thickened secondary wall (S2 layer) showing helical cavities and (iii) lack of a tertiary cell wall (S3 layer). The aim of our study was to test if and how the presence of compression wood of different intensity influences the climatic signal in stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ13C and δ18O) from tree-ring cellulose of Norway spruce trees (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Four trees growing in the montane zone of the Western Tatra Mountains were selected, and two radii per tree were taken, one with compression wood (CW) and one from the opposite side of a trunk (OW). Four reference trees (REF) without compression wood were sampled from the same valley, however, from a slightly different location. All analyses were performed for the period 1935-1954 with CW present in all trees. It was possible to establish the δ13C and δ18O CW, OW and REF chronologies, however, the EPS values for δ13C chronologies did not reach the established threshold (0.85). In general the comparison between δ13C and δ18O CW, OW and REF chronologies showed statistically significant (p<0.05) correlation values between CW and OW chronologies for both isotopes. The response patterns of δ13C in CW, OW and REF chronologies respectively to climate were quite similar with strongest correlations to temperature, cloud cover and precipitation during summer (Jul-Aug) and to SPEI during late summer - early autumn (Aug-Sep). The correlations between the same climate variables and δ18O of CW, and OW chronologies respectively revealed quite similar response patterns with strongest correlations to

  7. Tradeoffs between hydraulic and mechanical stress responses of mature Norway spruce trunk wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Sabine; Klein, Andrea; Müller, Ulrich; Karlsson, Bo

    2008-08-01

    We tested the effects of growth characteristics and basic density on hydraulic and mechanical properties of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) wood from six 24-year-old clones, grown on two sites in southern Sweden differing in water availability. Hydraulic parameters assessed were specific hydraulic conductivity at full saturation (ks100) and vulnerability to cavitation (Psi50), mechanical parameters included bending strength (sigma b), modulus of elasticity (MOE), compression strength (sigma a) and Young's modulus (E). Basic density, diameter at breast height, tree height, and hydraulic and mechanical parameters varied considerably among clones. Clonal means of hydraulic and mechanical properties were strongly related to basic density and to growth parameters across sites, especially to diameter at breast height. Compared with stem wood of slower growing clones, stem wood of rapidly growing clones had significantly lower basic density, lower sigma b, MOE, sigma a and E, was more vulnerable to cavitation, but had higher ks100. Basic density was negatively correlated to Psi50 and ks100. We therefore found a tradeoff between Psi50 and ks100. Clones with high basic density had significantly lower hydraulic vulnerability, but also lower hydraulic conductivity at full saturation and thus less rapid growth than clones with low basic density. This tradeoff involved a negative relationship between Psi50 and sigma b as well as MOE, and between ks100 and sigma b, MOE and sigma a. Basic density and Psi50 showed no site-specific differences, but tree height, diameter at breast height, ks100 and mechanical strength and stiffness were significantly lower at the drier site. Basic density had no influence on the site-dependent differences in hydraulic and mechanical properties, but was strongly negatively related to diameter at breast height. Selecting for growth may thus lead not only to a reduction in mechanical strength and stiffness but also to a reduction in

  8. Effects of wood chip ash fertilization on soil chemistry in a Norway spruce plantation on a nutrient-poor soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Morten; Hansen, Mette; Pedersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    Harvest of forest biomass for energy production may lead to export of nutrients from the forest. Recirculation of nutrients from wood chip combustion by ash spreading in forests has been proposed as a means for counteracting the nutrient export. This study was carried out to examine the effect...... of wood chip ash application on soil chemistry in a 44-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantation on a nutrient-poor soil in Denmark and to investigate the effect of applying different ash types and doses. Soil samples were collected and analyzed 2.5years (3 growing seasons) after ash application...

  9. Hydraulic and anatomical properties of light bands in Norway spruce compression wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Bardage, Stig; Brändström, Jonas

    2006-01-01

    Compression wood (CW), which is formed on the underside of conifer branches, exhibits a lower specific hydraulic conductivity (k(s)) compared with normal wood. However, the first-formed tracheids of an annual ring on the underside of a conifer branch often share several properties with normal tracheids, e.g., thin cell walls and angular cross sections. These first-formed tracheids appear bright when observed by the naked eye and are therefore called light bands (LB). In this study, hydraulic and related anatomical properties of LBs were characterized and compared with typical CW and opposite wood (OW). Measurements were made on branches of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Specific hydraulic conductivity was measured with fine cannulas connected to microlitre syringes. Micro- and ultrastructural analysis were performed on transverse and radial longitudinal sections by light and scanning electron microscopy. Xylem areas containing both typical CW and LBs had a k(s) 51.5% that of OW (7.95 +/- 0.97 m(2) s(-1) MPa(-1) x 10(-4)), whereas k(s) of pure CW was only 26.7% that of OW. The k(s) of LBs (6.38 +/- 0.97 m(2) s(-1) MPa(-1) x 10(-4); 80.3% of OW) was estimated from these k(s) values because the cannulas were too wide to measure the k(s) of LBs directly. Mean lumen area of first-formed tracheids on the underside of branches was 65.7% that of first-formed tracheids in OW and about three times that of CW. Light-band tracheids exhibited a bordered pit frequency of 42.7 +/- 1.3 pits mm(-1), which was three times that in CW and 1.6 times that in OW. Bordered pit apertures in LB tracheids (9.15 +/- 0.60 microm(2)) were 1.7 times wider than those in CW and similar in aperture to those in OW. The high k(s) of LBs was correlated with their wide tracheid lumina, high pit frequency and wide pit apertures. We therefore suggest that LBs have a primarily hydraulic function within the mechanically optimized CW region. This might be important for supplying water to living

  10. Influence of wood density in tree-ring based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouriaud, O.; Teodosiu, M.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Wirth, C.

    2015-04-01

    Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption of a constant wood density. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions on the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density has never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here were developed a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15%. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15%. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40%, with a full account of all the error sources.

  11. Influence of wood density in tree-ring-based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouriaud, O.; Teodosiu, M.; Kirdyanov, A. V.; Wirth, C.

    2015-10-01

    Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings' records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption that wood density is constant. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions about the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density have never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth were developed. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15 %. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15 %. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40 %, with a full account of all the error sources.

  12. Influence of wood density in tree-ring based annual productivity assessments and its errors in Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bouriaud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of tree annual biomass increments are used by a variety of studies related to forest productivity or carbon fluxes. Biomass increment estimations can be easily obtained from diameter surveys or historical diameter reconstructions based on tree rings records. However, the biomass models rely on the assumption of a constant wood density. Converting volume increment into biomass also requires assumptions on the wood density. Wood density has been largely reported to vary both in time and between trees. In Norway spruce, wood density is known to increase with decreasing ring width. This could lead to underestimating the biomass or carbon deposition in bad years. The variations between trees of wood density has never been discussed but could also contribute to deviations. A modelling approach could attenuate these effects but will also generate errors. Here were developed a model of wood density variations in Norway spruce, and an allometric model of volume growth. We accounted for variations in wood density both between years and between trees, based on specific measurements. We compared the effects of neglecting each variation source on the estimations of annual biomass increment. We also assessed the errors of the biomass increment predictions at tree level, and of the annual productivity at plot level. Our results showed a partial compensation of the decrease in ring width in bad years by the increase in wood density. The underestimation of the biomass increment in those years reached 15%. The errors related to the use of an allometric model of volume growth were modest, around ±15%. The errors related to variations in wood density were much larger, the biggest component being the inter-tree variability. The errors in plot-level annual biomass productivity reached up to 40%, with a full account of all the error sources.

  13. Assessment of Thermo-treated Bonded Wood Performance: Comparisons among Norway Spruce, Common Ash, and Turkey Oak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Rita

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl acetate (PVA exhibits fine adhesion qualities when bonded to wood. However, when using thermo-treated wood, a number of different unstudied factors (such as the water stress condition influence the wood bonding effectiveness. The main goal of this study was to evaluate how different treatments affect the shear bonding strength for three cases of thermo-vacuum treated woods. Wood from both Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. and common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L. was thermo-treated at 190 °C for two hours under vacuum conditions (250 mbar. Turkey oak (Quercus cerris L. logs were separately steamed at 110 °C for 24 h, then thermo-vacuum treated at 160 °C for three hours. The bonding shear strength between the PVA adhesive and treated wood was evaluated using water stress condition. The results were compared with the adhesive bond line properties of the untreated wood. The shear strength and wettability of the produced material were measured. Tests for the shear resistance, performed in accordance with the standard DIN EN 204, revealed dissimilar behavior as well as the influence of treatment schedules for the different wood species. Consequently, the tests performed allowed a detailed characterization of the effect of the thermo-vacuum process on the bonding quality of three common woods in different water stress conditions.

  14. Wood density variations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. under contrasting climate conditions in southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inter-annual variations in ring width and maximum wood density of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. at different altitudes in Baden-Württemberg, southwestern Germany, to determine the climate response of these parameters under contrasting climate conditions. In addition, we compared maximum, average and minimum wood density between sites. Bootstrapped correlation coefficients of ring width and maximum wood density with monthly temperature and precipitation, revealed a different climate sensitivity of both parameters. Ring width showed strong correlations with climate variables in the previous year and in the first half of the growing season. Further, a negative relationship with summer temperature was observed at the low-altitude sites. Maximum wood density correlated best with temperature during the growing season, whereby strongest correlations were found between September temperature and maximum wood density at the high-altitude sites. Observed differences in maximum, average and minimum wood density are suggested to relate to the local climate; with lower temperatures and higher water availability having a negative effect on wood density. 

  15. Loss of diversity in wood-inhabiting fungal communities affects decomposition activity in Norway spruce wood

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    Lara eValentin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of wood-inhabiting fungal species are now threatened, principally due to a lack of dead wood in intensively managed forests, but the consequences of reduced fungal diversity on ecosystem functioning are not known. Several experiments have shown that primary productivity is negatively affected by a loss of species, but the effects of microbial diversity on decomposition are less studied. We studied the relationship between fungal diversity and the in vitro decomposition rate of slightly, moderately and heavily decayed Picea abies wood with indigenous fungal communities that were diluted to examine the influence of diversity. Respiration rate, wood-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fungal community structure were assessed during a 16-week incubation. Respiration rate increased between early- and late-decay stages. Reduced fungal diversity was associated with lower respiration rates during intermediate stages of decay, but no effects were detected at later stages. The activity of hydrolytic enzymes varied among decay stages and fungal dilutions. Our results suggest that functioning of highly diverse communities of the late-decay stage were more resistant to the loss of diversity than less diverse communities of early decomposers. This indicates the accumulation of functional redundancy during the succession of the fungal community in decomposing substrates.

  16. Effects of nutrient optimization on intra-annual wood formation in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Mäkinen, Harri; Jyske, Tuula; Nöjd, Pekka; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    In the Nordic countries, growth of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) is generally limited by low availability of nutrients, especially nitrogen. Optimizing forest management requires better insight on how growth responds to the environmental conditions and their manipulation. The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of nutrient optimization on timing and the rate of tracheid formation of Norway spruce and to follow the differentiation of newly formed tracheids. The study was performed during two growing seasons in a long-term nutrient optimization experiment in northern Sweden, where all essential macro- and micronutrients were supplied in irrigation water every second day from mid-June to mid-August. The control plots were without additional nutrients and water. Tracheid formation in the stem was monitored throughout the growing season by weekly sampling of microcores at breast height. The onset of xylogenesis occurred in early June, but in early summer there were no significant between-treatment differences in the onset and relative rate of tracheid formation. In both treatments, the onset of secondary cell wall formation occurred in mid-June. The maximum rate of tracheid formation occurred close to the summer solstice and 50% of the tracheids had been accumulated in early July. Optimized nutrition resulted in the formation of ∼50% more tracheids and delayed the cessation of tracheid formation, which extended the tracheid formation period by 20-50%, compared with control trees. The increased growth was mainly an effect of enhanced tracheid formation rate during the mid- and later-part of the growing season. In the second year, the increased growth rate also resulted in 11% wider tracheids. We conclude that the onset and rate of tracheid formation and differentiation during summer is primarily controlled by photoperiod, temperature and availability of nutrients, rather than supply of carbohydrates.

  17. X-RAY DENSITOMETRY OF NORWAY SPRUCE SUBFOSSIL WOOD FROM THE AUSTRIAN ALPS

    OpenAIRE

    KŁUSEK, MARZENA; Grabner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The processing of subfossil wood poses some difficulties in densitometric research. Problems arise because of the physio-chemical changes of wood occurring in the sedimentation environment. Subfossil wood modification can result from the uptake of mineral and organic substances into the wood tissue. It can also occur as the effect of microbiological degradation of wood. The goal of this study was to identify the appropriate method of subfossil wood preparation for the densitometric research. ...

  18. Romanian legal management rules limit wood production in Norway spruce and beech forests

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    Olivier Bouriaud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quantitative impact of forest management on forests’ wood resource was evaluated for Picea and Fagus mixed forests. The effects on the productivity of tendering operations, thinnings and rotation length have seldom been directly quantified on landscape scale. Methods: Two sites of similar fertility but subject to contrasted forest management were studied with detailed inventories: one in Germany, the other in Romania, and compared with the respective national forest inventories. In Romania, regulations impose very long rotations, low thinnings and a period of no-cut before harvest. In contrast, tending and thinnings are frequent and intense in Germany. Harvests start much earlier and must avoid clear cutting but maintain a permanent forest cover with natural regeneration. While Germany has an average annual wood increment representative for Central Europe, Romania represents the average for Eastern Europe. Results: The lack of tending and thinning in the Romanian site resulted in twice as many trees per hectare as in the German site for the same age. The productivity in Romanian production forests was 20 % lower than in Germany despite a similar fertility. The results were supported by the data from the national forest inventory of each country, which confirmed that the same differential exists at country scale. Furthermore, provided the difference in rotation length, two crops are harvested in Germany when only one is harvested in Romania. The losses of production due to a lower level of management in Romania where estimated to reach 12.8 million m3.y-1 in regular mountain production forests, and to 15 million m3.y-1 if managed protection forest is included. Conclusions: The productivity of Picea and Fagus mountain forests in Romania is severely depressed by the lack of tending and thinning, by overly long rotations and the existence of a 25-years no-cut period prior to harvest. The average standing volume in Germany was 50

  19. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  20. Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree

  1. Effects of wood chip ash fertilization on soil chemistry in a Norway spruce plantation on a nutrient-poor soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Morten; Hansen, Mette; Pedersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    . This study shows that, regardless of ash formulation, preparation or dose, application of wood ash to forest soil has a liming effect in the O-horizon manifested as an increase in CECe, BS and pH. This effect was not seen in the mineral soil within the time frame of this study. At the same time, an increase...... in Cd was found in the O-horizon, corresponding to the amount added in the ashes. Generally, no other increase in soil contents of the heavy metals was seen. Hardening of the wood ash did not decrease the chemical impact on the soil chemistry as compared to non-treated ash whereas an increase in ash...

  2. Effects of liming and wood ash application on root biomass, root distribution and soil chemistry in a Norway spruce stand in southwest Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viebke, C.G.

    2001-07-01

    Effects of liming (CaPK) and wood ash application (A) on soil chemistry, root (< 2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter) biomass and distribution, root length density (RLD, cm/cm{sup 3} ) and specific root length (SRL, m/g) were investigated in a 60 year old Norway spruce stand in SW Sweden. Soil cores were taken from the litter fermented humus (LFH) and mineral soil layers to a depth of 30 cm, eight years after treatments. The pH values of the LM layer increased significantly (p< 0.05) in the lime and ash treatments compared to the control, while in the top 5 cm of the mineral soil, pH was increased only in the A treatment compared to CaPK. The P, K, Ca and Mg concentrations increased in the CaPK treatment in the LM layer, while K and Ca decreased significantly at 5-10 cm depth in CaPK treated plots compared to the control and A. The highest amounts of ammonium and nitrate were found in A treatment in all soil layers. The A treatment increased fine root (< 2 mm in diameter) biomass in the LFH layer compared to the control but decreased it in the top 10 cm of the mineral soil compared to CaPK. A shallower fine root system was found in the A treated plots compared to the control and CaPK. The coarser root (2-5 mm in diameter) biomass was higher in the mineral soil in the A treatment compared to the control and CaPK but the differences were not significant. RLD increased in both CaPK and A in the upper soil layers. SRL increased in almost all layers in the CaPK and A treatments compared to the control. The number of root tips were also higher in the treated plots compared to the control, except in the 10-20 cm layer. It was concluded that CaPK and A treatments resulted in improved root vitality with a higher capacity for nutrient uptake.

  3. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  4. Total OH reactivity emissions from Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölscher, Anke; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Kesselmeier, Jürgen; Lelieveld, Jos; Williams, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    Forest emissions represent a strong potential sink for the main tropospheric oxidant, the hydroxyl radical (OH). In forested environments, the comparison of the directly determined overall sink of OH radicals, the total OH reactivity, and the individually measured OH sink compounds often exposes a significant gap. This "missing" OH reactivity can be high and influenced by both direct biogenic emissions and secondary photo-oxidation products. To investigate the source of the missing OH sinks in forests, total OH reactivity emission rates were determined for the first time from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) throughout spring, summer and autumn 2011. The total OH reactivity was measured inside a branch enclosure using the Comparative Reactivity Method (CRM) with a Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) as the detector. In parallel, separate volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission rates were monitored by a second PTR-MS, including the signal of isoprene, acetaldehyde, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes. The comparison of known and PTR-MS detected OH sink compounds and the directly measured total OH reactivity emitted from Norway spruce revealed unmeasured and possibly unknown primary biogenic emissions. These were found to be highest in late summer during daytime coincident with highest temperatures and ozone levels.

  5. The diffusion of Norway spruce in the beechwoods of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreatta G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, in the previously coppiced beechwoods of "Dolomiti Bellunesi" National Park, an unprecedented diffusion of Norway spruce occurred; possible silvicultural options to cope with this new condition are outlined here.

  6. Applicability of the PROSPECT model for Norway spruce needles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malenovsky, Z.; Albrechtova, J.; Lhotakova, Z.; Zurita Milla, R.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Schaepman, M.E.; Cudlin, P.

    2006-01-01

    The potential applicability of the leaf radiative transfer model PROSPECT (version 3.01) was tested for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) needles collected from stress resistant and resilient trees. Direct comparison of the measured and simulated leaf optical properties between 450¿1000 nm

  7. Comparison of VOC emissions between air-dried and heat-treated Norway spruce ( Picea abies), Scots pine ( Pinus sylvesteris) and European aspen ( Populus tremula) wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyttinen, Marko; Masalin-Weijo, Marika; Kalliokoski, Pentti; Pasanen, Pertti

    2010-12-01

    Heat-treated wood is an increasingly popular decoration material. Heat-treatment improves dimensional stability of the wood and also prevents rot fungus growth. Although production of heat-treated wood has been rapidly increasing, there is only little information about the VOC emissions of heat-treated wood and its possible influences on indoor air quality. In the present study, VOC emissions from three untreated (air-dried) and heat-treated wood species were compared during a four weeks test period. It appeared that different wood species had clearly different VOC emission profiles. Heat-treatment was found to decrease VOC emissions significantly and change their composition. Especially, emissions of terpenes decreased from softwood samples and aldehydes from European aspen samples. Emissions of total aldehydes and organic acids were at the same level or slightly higher from heat treated than air-dried softwood samples. In agreement with another recent study, the emissions of furfural were found to increase and those of hexanal to decrease from all the wood species investigated. In contrast to air-dried wood samples, emissions of VOCs were almost in steady state from heat treated wood samples even in the beginning of the test.

  8. Chemical and transcriptional responses of Norway spruce genotypes with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion spp. infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielsson Marie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] is one of the most important conifer species in Europe. The wood is economically important and infections by wood-rotting fungi cause substantial losses to the industry. The first line of defence in a Norway spruce tree is the bark. It is a very efficient barrier against infection based on its mechanical and chemical properties. Once an injury or an infection is recognized by the tree, induced defences are activated. In this study we examined transcriptional response, using 454-sequencing, and chemical profiles in bark of Norway spruce trees with different susceptibility to Heterobasidion annosum s.l. infection. The aim was to find associations between the transcriptome and chemical profiles to the level of susceptibility to Heterobasidion spp. in Norway spruce genotypes. Results Both terpene and phenol compositions were analysed and at 28 days post inoculation (dpi high levels of 3-carene was produced in response to H. annosum. However, significant patterns relating to inoculation or to genotypes with higher or lower susceptibility could only be found in the phenol fraction. The levels of the flavonoid catechin, which is polymerized into proanthocyanidins (PA, showed a temporal variation; it accumulated between 5 and 15 dpi in response to H. annosum infection in the less susceptible genotypes. The transcriptome data suggested that the accumulation of free catechin was preceded by an induction of genes in the flavonoid and PA biosynthesis pathway such as leucoanthocyanidin reductase. Quantitative PCR analyses verified the induction of genes in the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathway. The qPCR data also highlighted genotype-dependent differences in the transcriptional regulation of these pathways. Conclusions The varying dynamics in transcriptional and chemical patterns displayed by the less susceptible genotypes suggest that there is a genotypic variation in successful spruce defence

  9. THERMO-VACUUM MODIFICATION OF SPRUCE (PICEA ABIES KARST. AND FIR (ABIES ALBA MILL. WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviano Allegretti,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study presents results of the characterization of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. and fir (Abies alba Mill. wood thermally modified by TERMOVUOTO® technology at temperatures in the range of 160 to 220°C in vacuum conditions. Sixteen thermo-vacuum treatment tests were carried out using a pilot laboratory unit on 30-mm-thick spruce and fir boards in various combinations of the process parameters, i.e. temperature (T, duration (t, and pressure (p. The treated material was characterized to reveal the changes of the physical-mechanical properties including color and durability. The treated wood showed an improved performance with relation to the dimensional stability and durability. The measured mechanical properties did not show any significant decrease. Analytical models, based on the existing correlations between wood properties and process parameters, were assessed, thus allowing the control of the process.

  10. Endophyte communities vary in the needles of Norway spruce clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Tiina; Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Tuomivirta, Tero; Haapanen, Matti; Müller, Michael; Pennanen, Taina

    2013-03-01

    Endophytic fungi show no symptoms of their presence but can influence the performance and vitality of host trees. The potential use of endophytes to indicate vitality has been previously realized, but a standard protocol has yet to be developed due to an incomplete understanding of the factors that regulate endophyte communities. Using a culture-free molecular approach, we examined the extent to which host genotype influences the abundance, species richness, and community composition of endophytic fungi in Norway spruce needles. Briefly, total DNA was extracted from the surface-sterilized needles of 30 clones grown in a nursery field and the copy number of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA was estimated by quantitative PCR. Fungal species richness and community composition were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. We found that community structure and ITS copy number varied among spruce clones, whereas species richness did not. Host traits interacting with endophyte communities included needle surface area and the location of cuttings in the experimental area. Although Lophodermium piceae is considered the dominant needle endophyte of Norway spruce, we detected this species in only 33% of samples. The most frequently observed fungus (66%) was the potentially pathogenic Phoma herbarum. Interestingly, ITS copy number of endophytic fungi correlated negatively with the richness of ectomycorrhizal fungi and thus potential interactions between fungal communities and their influence on the host tree are discussed. Our results suggest that in addition to environmental factors, endophyte communities of spruce needles are determined by host tree identity and needle surface area.

  11. Mechanical properties of timber from wind damaged Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2003-01-01

    . The paper reports on a investigation of the relation between degree of damage and mechanical proper-ties of sawn timber from wind damaged Norway spruce. The project included about 250 bolts from wind damaged trees. The majority of bolts were cut to deliver a full-diameter plank containing the pith...... taken to bending failure and the relations between compression damage and bending strength and stiffness were established. The results showed that significant reductions of bending strength of dry timber are only caused by such wind induced compression damages that are easily recognised at a planed...

  12. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Formation in Norway Spruce Stems Infected by White-Rot Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. Hietala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of tons of carbon sequestered in trees are annually recycled back to the atmosphere through wood decomposition by microbes. In Norway, every fifth Norway spruce shows at final harvest infection by pathogenic white-rot fungi in the genera Heterobasidion and Armillaria. As these fungi can mineralize all components of wood, we predicted that they have a significant carbon footprint. Gas samples taken from infected stems were analyzed for CO2 and CH4 concentrations, and wood samples from different parts of the decay columns were incubated under hypoxic (4% O2 and anoxic laboratory conditions. In spring and summer the stem concentrations of CO2 were generally two times higher in trees with heartwood decay than in healthy trees. For most of the healthy trees and trees with heartwood decay, mean stem concentrations of CH4 were comparable to ambient air, and only some Armillaria infected trees showed moderately elevated CH4. Consistently, low CH4 production potentials were recorded in the laboratory experiment. Up-scaling of CO2 efflux due to wood decay in living trees suggests that the balance between carbon sequestration and emission may be substantially influenced in stands with high frequency of advanced root and stem heartwood decay.

  13. Performance of different fire retardant products applied on Norway spruce tested in a Cone calorimeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kögl Josef

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available On the European market there are several fire retardant products available, which reach class B in the European classification system. The producers promise their fire retardants are effective in reducing different reaction to fire parameters of wood such as the time to ignition, the mass loss rate, the heat release rate, the total heat release, the charring rate and the flame spread. This paper discusses the performance of fire retardant products as pressure impregnated wood, non-intumescence surface coatings and intumescence coatings on Norway spruce (Picea abies. The investigations are performed by using a cone calo- rimeter test according to ISO 5660. The thermal exposures of the investigations are 50 kW/m2 and the standard IS0 834 test curve. As result information about the heat release rate, the mass loss rate and the total heat release for duration of 900 seconds will be presented in this paper.

  14. HEAT TREATMENTS OF HIGH TEMPERATURE DRIED NORWAY SPRUCE BOARDS: SACCHARIDES AND FURFURALS IN SAPWOOD SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Karlsson,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates that migrate to wood surfaces in sapwood during drying might influence properties such as mould susceptibility and colour. Sugars on the surface of Norway spruce boards during various heat treatments were studied. Samples (350mmx125mmx25mm were double-stacked, facing sapwood-side outwards, and dried at 110oC to a target moisture content (MC of 40%. Dried sub-samples (80 mm x 125 mm x 25 mm were stacked in a similar way and further heated at 110oC and at 130oC for 12, 24, and 36 hours, respectively. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose as well as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF and furfural in the sapwood surface layer of treated wood were analysed using HPLC (RI- and UV-detectors. Carbohydrates degraded to a lower extent at 110oC than at 130oC. Furfural and to a larger extent HMF increased with treatment period and temperature. Heat treatment led to a decrease in lightness and hue of the sapwood surface of sub-samples, while chroma increased somewhat. Furthermore, considerably faster degradation (within a few minutes of the carbohydrates on the surface of the dried spruce boards was observed when single sub-samples were conductively hot pressed at 200oC. Treatment period and initial MC influenced the presence of the carbohydrates in wood surface as well as colour change (Eab of the hot pressed sub-samples.

  15. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  16. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozica eGricar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. H. Karst. from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions.

  17. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gričar, Jožica; Prislan, Peter; de Luis, Martin; Gryc, Vladimír; Hacurová, Jana; Vavrčík, Hanuš; Čufar, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate-radial growth relationships of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.] from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932-2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009-2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions.

  18. Assessment of sanitary conditions in stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. damaged by spruce bud scale (Physokermes piceae Schrnk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miezite O

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Spruce bud scale (Physokermes piceae Schrnk. affects tree growth directly and indirectly. Direct injury appears in the form of tissue damage, as insects suck sap from tree phloem. Indirect injury appears as “honeydew”, which results in negative effects on tree growth. Plant sap is saturated with various carbohydrates called photosynthates that are difficult for scaly insects to digest. Therefore it is secreted in excrements, which are subsequently a food source for the black sooty mold (Apiosporium pinophilum Fuckel. The fungus covers needles blocking stomata, causing decreased transpiration and photosynthesis. An inexplicable wither of Norway spruce was reported in Latvia during 2010 due to black sooty mold. However, spruce bud scale was not evident. In 2011, mass propagation of spruce bud scale was observed following the 2010 Norway spruce loss. One objective of this research was to determine if Kraft tree growth classes could be applied to establish the factors responsible for tree foliage damage. Six 21 - 40 year old (second age class Norway spruce stands were evaluated. Two circular sample plots with a 7.98 m radius, and a 200-m2 area were randomly established per each forest stand hectare. Diameter at breast height (dbh, 1.3 m, and height of approximately 30 trees was measured to model a trend. For all trees, Kraft class, and foliage damage level caused by spruce bud scale and black sooty mold were determined. Significant differences were not observed in tree damage levels among stands, however significant differences among damage levels in different Kraft classes were detected (F = 3.45 > Fcrit. = 2.80, α = 0.05 > P = 0.02 found. Overall damage intensity was 29.3 %. Total forestry loss was 1153 LVL (1640 EUR for all surveyed stands (10 ha, and 115 LVL (164 EUR per hectare.

  19. METAL ION SORPTION TO BIRCH AND SPRUCE WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Su,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sorption of metal ions from aqueous solutions to birch wood and spruce heartwood and sapwood has been studied. Functional groups in wood were determined by acid-base titrations. The sorption of metal ions to wood of the different tree species was investigated by a column chromatographic technique. The mechanism of sorption is mainly ion exchange by complexation of metal ions to the functional groups, e.g. carboxyl groups and phenolic hydroxyl groups, in the wood phase. By combination of the sorption experiments with four different metal ion mixtures, the following affinity order was established for spruce sapwood particles: Fe3+>>Pb2+>>Cu2+>>Fe2+>Cd2+>Zn2+>Ni2+>Mn2+≥Ca2+≥Sr2+≥Ba2+>>Mg2+>>K+>Na+≈Li+. For all three types of stemwood studied, the affinity orders were almost the same. The ion exchange properties of wood were comparable to those of a weakly acid cation exchanger. The affinity order obtained for the synthetic resin was quite similar to the order given above for wood. The metal sorption properties of wood materials imply that they could be a potential material for removal of metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  20. Selection of Norway spruce somatic embryos by computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Jari J.; Jokinen, Kari J.

    1993-05-01

    A computer vision system was developed for the classification of plant somatic embryos. The embryos are in a Petri dish that is transferred with constant speed and they are recognized as they pass a line scan camera. A classification algorithm needs to be installed for every plant species. This paper describes an algorithm for the recognition of Norway spruce (Picea abies) embryos. A short review of conifer micropropagation by somatic embryogenesis is also given. The recognition algorithm is based on features calculated from the boundary of the object. Only part of the boundary corresponding to the developing cotyledons (2 - 15) and the straight sides of the embryo are used for recognition. An index of the length of the cotyledons describes the developmental stage of the embryo. The testing set for classifier performance consisted of 118 embryos and 478 nonembryos. With the classification tolerances chosen 69% of the objects classified as embryos by a human classifier were selected and 31$% rejected. Less than 1% of the nonembryos were classified as embryos. The basic features developed can probably be easily adapted for the recognition of other conifer somatic embryos.

  1. Primary succession and dynamics of Norway spruce coastal forests on land-uplift ground moraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, J.S.; Jeglum, J.K. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept of Forest Ecology

    2000-07-01

    This paper is an overview of primary succession on the rising coastlines of the Gulf of Bothnia, which emphasises Norway spruce succession and forest development and identifies topics for research. It is concluded that continuing postglacial rebound provides excellent successional sequences, and an exceptional opportunity to add new and important knowledge on original forest ecosystem development. First, long-term undisturbed forest seres, terminating in climax-like Norway spruce forest, exist. Secondly, a well-stocked, old growth spruce forest can develop on the (generally) fairly productive mesic ground-moraine sites in a short ecological time. Thirdly, undisturbed successional sequences, which go back to original soil formation, permit reconstruction of ecosystems' developmental history. Fourthly, the relationship between ground elevation and land-uplift rate facilitates estimates of ground age, and consequently permits a four-dimensional study approach. Fifthly, in view of extensive anthropogenic influence in boreal Fennoscandian forests, the few remaining natural spruce forests should be recognised and carefully documented. From our review of the literature, we conclude that present knowledge of the succession of Norway spruce on emerging shorelines, and the part played by land uplift and other factors, is fragmentary. Attention should be given to initial spruce seedling colonisation relative to factors such as sea-water level, exposure (winds, fetch), parent material, seedbed types, potential seed source (isolation), and island size. Possible multiple pathways of Norway spruce primary succession relative to temporal changes in exposure and other factors, have so far received little research effort. Attention also should be paid to the response of spruce populations to site maturation, i.e. to increasing ground age based on land-uplift rate and elevation above sea level. Finally, attention should be paid to autogenic processes in spruce-dominated stages

  2. Comparison of two stump-lifting heads in final felling Norway spruce stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karha, K.

    2012-07-01

    The use of stump and root wood chips has increased very rapidly in the 21st century in Finland: in the year 2000, the total consumption of stump wood chips for energy generation was 10 GWh, while in 2010 it was approximately 2 TWh. Metsaeteho Oy and TTS Research evaluated two stump-lifting devices for the lifting of Norway spruce (Picea abies) stumps. The productivity and costs of stump lifting were determined. There was one base machine with one operator in the time study. When lifting stumps with a diameter of 30 cm, the effective hour productivity of stump lifting was 11.2 m{sup 3} solid over bark (sob)/E0 (4.8 ton{sub D}/E{sub 0}) without site preparation using a Vaekevae Stump Processor, and when lifting spruce stumps with a diameter of 40 cm, the productivity was 14.9 m{sup 3} sob/E{sub 0} (6.5 tonD/E0). When the site preparation (mounding) was integrated into lifting work, the stump-lifting productivity decreased 21-27%. The stump-lifting productivity of the other lifting head (Jarvinen) was lower than that of the Vaekevae Stump Processor. Some development suggestions for the Jarvinen lifting head were presented and discussed. The cost calculations showed that stump-lifting costs are extremely high when stump diameter is less than 20 cm. Therefore, the study recommended a change in the current stump-harvesting guidelines of Finland: The study suggested that all the stumps with a diameter less than 20 cm should be left on the harvesting site. (orig.)

  3. Heat Resistance of Glued Finger Joints in Spruce Wood Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sviták

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The heat resistance of glued spruce wood was evaluated for different joint types and adhesives. Bending strength, modulus of elasticity, and also fracture evaluation were investigated on glued spruce samples made by the finger-jointed principle. Finger-jointed samples were glued with polyurethane (PUR and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF adhesives. Heat loading was realized at temperatures 60, 80, and 110 °C and compared with wood with 20 °C. A static bending test with four-point flexural test was used. Elevated temperature and adhesive type had an important influence on the bending strength. On the other hand, adhesive type had a significant influence on the modulus of elasticity, but elevated temperature had no substantial influence.

  4. Investigation of physiological responses in Norway spruce needles to natural and anthropogenic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnik, C.R.; Batic, F.; Grill, D. [Erico Velenje Institute of Ecology, Research and Industrial Cooperation, Velenje (Slovenia)

    1996-12-31

    Among the various stress indicators for early identification of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten) decline, sulphur content, photosynthetic pigment content, activity of the enzyme peroxidase, content of water-soluble thiols and ascorbic acid were analysed in four age classes of spruce needles sampled from five trees. Ten sampling sites were selected according to the degree of forest decline, site conditions and air pollution from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (Slovenia).

  5. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system. II. Distribution and degradation in the plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forczek, S T; Uhlírová, H; Gryndler, M; Albrechtová, J; Fuksová, K; Vágner, M; Schröder, P; Matucha, M

    2004-07-01

    Independently from its origin, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) as a phytotoxic substance affects coniferous trees. Its uptake, distribution and degradation were thus investigated in the Norway spruce/soil-system using 14C labeling. TCA is distributed in the tree mainly by the transpiration stream. As in soil, TCA seems to be degraded microbially, presumably by phyllosphere microorganisms in spruce needles. Indication of TCA biodegradation in trees is shown using both antibiotics and axenic plants.

  6. MICROSTRUCTURE MODIFICATIONS INDUCED IN SPRUCE WOOD BY FREEZING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadett SZMUTKU

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM is amodern, non-invasive method for objective andspecialized image analysis of anatomical materialfeatures at microscopic level. Referring to wood, itoffers the possibility to view in 3D a bunch ofneighboring cells, in all three grain directions.This allows the imaging of modifications thatmight appear in the structure of the wood cellmembrane (e.g. micro-fissures caused by differentfactors, including temperature variations. This paperpresents the results of the SEM analysis performedon European spruce (Picea abies samples, cut fromboards which were subjected to freezing and thawingunder different conditions of temperature variationand time of exposure.The main aim of this research was to reveal theconditions which determine the occurrence of microfissuresin the cell wall and consequently lead tostrength losses in wood.

  7. Organic matter characteristics in boreal forest soils under stands of silver birch, Norway spruce, and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolander, A.; Kitunen, V.

    2012-04-01

    The aim was to study how tree species and a tree species mixture affect microbial C and N transformations and two major plant secondary compound groups, terpenes and phenolic compounds in soil. The study site was a tree-species experiment in middle-eastern part of Finland containing plots of 43-year-old silver birch, Norway spruce and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch (22 and 37 % birch of the total stem number). Soil was podzol and humus type mor. Samples were taken from the organic layer. C and N in the microbial biomass, rates of C mineralization (CO2 evolution), net N mineralization and nitrification, and concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds, condensed tannins and different kind of terpenes were measured. Amounts of C and N in the microbial biomass and the rates of C mineralization and net N mineralization were all lower under spruce than birch, and particularly net N mineralization was stimulated by birch mixture. Concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds were on a similar level, irrespective of tree species. However, there were less low-molecular-weight phenolics and more high-molecular-weight phenolics under spruce than birch. Concentrations of condensed tannins and both sesqui- and diterpenes were all higher under spruce than birch but the concentrations of triterpenes were similar in all soils. The difference between tree species was greatest with monoterpenes which were measured from both organic layer and soil atmosphere: high concentrations under spruce and negligible under birch. Birch mixture tended to decrease the concentrations of condensed tannins and mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes.

  8. Measurement methods and variability assessment of the Norway spruce total leaf area: Implications for remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homolova, L.; Lukes, P.; Malenovsky, Z.; Lhotakova, Z.; Kaplan, V.; Hanus, J.

    2013-01-01

    Estimation of total leaf area (LAT) is important to express biochemical properties in plant ecology and remote sensing studies. A measurement of LAT is easy in broadleaf species, but it remains challenging in coniferous canopies. We proposed a new geometrical model to estimate Norway spruce LAT and

  9. Moisture in untreated, a cetylated, and furfurylated Norway spruce studied during drying using time domain NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth G. Thygesen; Thomas Elder

    2008-01-01

    Using time domain NMR, the moisture in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) sapwood subjected to four different treatments (never-dried, dried and remoistened, acetylated, and furfurylated) was studied during drying at 40°C, at sample average moisture contents above fiber saturation. Spin-spin relaxation time distributions were derived from CPMG...

  10. In situ autumn ozone fumigation of mature Norway spruce - Effects on net photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve cuvettes were installed on current year's twigs in the top of the canopy of a 35 years old Norway spruce stand in Denmark. From 10 to 16 hours, six of the cuvettes received 5-60 nl l(-1) ozone in addition to ambient air and six cuvettes received ambient air with a 40% reduced ozone concent...

  11. Tensile creep and recovery of Norway spruce influenced by temperature and moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Salmén, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    . In this study, the TDMB is examined via creep experiments on small specimens of Norway spruce latewood. The results of these are compared with results from numerical modelling. The experiments include results at two levels of moisture content and three levels of temperature, enabling an investigation...

  12. Characterization of variable EST SSR markers for Norway spruce (Picea abies L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiess Nadine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norway spruce is widely distributed across Europe and the predominant tree of the Alpine region. Fast growth and the fact that timber can be harvested cost-effectively in relatively young populations define its status as one of the economically most important tree species of Northern Europe. In this study, EST derived simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were developed for the assessment of putative functional diversity in Austrian Norway spruce stands. Results SSR sequences were identified by analyzing 14,022 publicly available EST sequences. Tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were most abundant in the data set followed by penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeats. Specific primer pairs were designed for sixty loci. Among these, 27 displayed polymorphism in a testing population of 16 P. abies individuals sampled across Austria and in an additional screening population of 96 P. abies individuals from two geographically distinct Austrian populations. Allele numbers per locus ranged from two to 17 with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.075 to 0.99. Conclusions We have characterized variable EST SSR markers for Norway spruce detected in expressed genes. Due to their moderate to high degree of variability in the two tested screening populations, these newly developed SSR markers are well suited for the analysis of stress related functional variation present in Norway spruce populations.

  13. Fuel quality of Norway spruce stumps - influence of harvesting technique and storage method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anerud, Erik; Jirjis, Raida (Dept. of Energy and Technology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    The interest in using stump biomass as a biofuel has recently increased in Sweden. The uneven consumption of wood fuel during the year creates a need for storage. This study examined the properties of stump biomass and how they vary at two sites in Sweden depending on harvesting technique, storage method and storage period. Norway spruce stumps, extracted using three different stump harvesting heads (Pallari, Rotary Cutter and Aalto), were stored in windrows or heaps. After 3 months, stumps stored in heaps were gathered into windrows. The fuel quality parameters moisture content (MC), ash content (AC) and calorific value (CV) were evaluated on five occasions in the period May 2008 - September 2009. After 16 months of storage, the MC in all treatments had decreased to <25% (wet basis). Average AC decreased from 3.8% to around 1% (dry basis), whereas CV marginally increased. Stumps split during harvesting dried better than those harvested in one piece. The influence of storage method was minimal, although initial storage in heaps allowed better drying in the stumps harvested in one piece. In general, fuel quality improved in all treatments after storage

  14. Fracture tolerance of reaction wood (yew and spruce wood in the TR crack propagation system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie E; Keunecke, Daniel; Tschegg, Elmar K

    2011-07-01

    The fracture properties of spruce and yew were studied by in-situ loading in an environmental scanning microscope (ESEM). Loading was performed with a micro-wedge splitting device in the TR-crack propagation direction. The emphasis was laid on investigating the main mechanisms responsible for a fracture tolerant behavior with a focus on the reaction wood. The fracture mechanical results were correlated with the features of the surface structure observed by the ESEM technique, which allows loading and observation in a humid environment. Some important differences between the reaction wood and normal wood were found for both investigated wood species (spruce and yew), including the formation of cracks before loading (ascribed to residual stresses) and the change of fracture mode during crack propagation in the reaction wood. The higher crack propagation resistance was attributed mainly to the different cell (i.e. fiber) geometries (shape, cell wall thickness) and fiber angle to the load axis of the reaction wood, as basic structural features are responsible for more pronounced crack deflection and branching, thus leading to crack growth retardation. Fiber bridging was recognized as another crack growth retarding mechanism, which is effective in both wood species and especially pronounced in yew wood.

  15. Development of a nested PCR detection procedure for Nectria fuckeliana direct from Norway spruce bark extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrell, Stephen R H

    2005-01-01

    A pair of primers specific for Nectria fuckeliana, a bark infecting pathogen predominantly of Norway spruce (Picea abies), were designed from comparisons of nucleotide sequences of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of nine isolates from Norway, Lithuania, Switzerland, Austria, Slovakia, Scotland (Larix sp.) and New Zealand (Pinus radiata), and other closely related nectriaceous species, including Neo. Neomacrospora, and 'N'. mammoidea, to which it exhibits taxonomic similarities. Complete ITS sequence homology was observed between each of the nine N. fuckeliana isolates, regardless of geographic provenance, including a previously published Danish strain. Primers Cct1 and Cct2 consistently amplified a single product of 360 bp from DNA prepared from 20 isolates covering the principle range of the disease from Central and Northern Europe, but not from other Neonectria, 'Nectria' or a range of species commonly encountered in forest ecosystems, as well as P. abies or P. radiata DNA. A quick, simple and efficient mechanical lysis procedure for the extraction of high quality total DNA from bark, coupled with post-extraction polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) chromatography purification, is described to facilitate successful PCR detection of N. fuckeliana direct from bark extracts. Detection of N. fuckeliana from bark preparations was only possible following nested PCR of PVPP purified extracts using universal primers ITS5 and 4 in first round amplification. The identity of products from bark tissues was confirmed by Southern hybridisation and sequencing. Using the above procedure, positive diagnosis of N. fuckeliana was achievable within 5 h and has the potential for full exploitation as both a forest management and ecological research tool. As the DNA extraction procedure described here has been successful in application against other tree species, it has potential for incorporation into other molecular diagnostic systems for other

  16. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF SOLID WOOD PANELS MADE FROM HEAT-TREATED SPRUCE AND LIME WOOD STRIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinela OLARESCU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an experimental research performed with spruce (Picea abies L. and lime (Tilia cordata wood originating from the Stroesti-Arges region in Romania. Solid wood panels were manufactured from heat-treated strips, and also from untreated strips, as controls. The thermal conductivity (λ of the panels was measured on a HFM 436/6/1 Lambda equipment at a temperature difference of 30°C between the cold and the hot plate. The results showed that the panels made from heat-treated wood strips had by 13% lower values of λ in case of spruce and by 6% lower values in case of lime and thus better heat-insulating properties than the panels made from untreated wood of the same species. With λ values around 0.07-0.08 W/m⋅K, 20mm thick solid wood panels made from heat-treated spruce and lime strips are comparable to wool from the viewpoint of the thermal insulating capacity.

  17. INFLUENCE OF CYCLIC FREEZING AND THAWING UPON SPRUCE WOOD PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadett SZMUTKU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results concerning the change of some physical and mechanical properties of spruce wood (Picea abies L., after repeated freezing and thawing, respectively after being subjected to temperature variation from positive valuea (+100C to negative values (-250C. Through this approach, the authors aimed at simulating normal temperature variations that occur in winter between night and daytime and which fresh cut timber has to stand if being stored in an open yard for one week before being kilndried. By comparing these results with the ones obtained after continuous freezing at -250C for one week, it was established that the temperature variation and the repeated changing phase of water inside wood increase dimensional instability and reduce the mechanical strengths much more than the simple exposure to theconstant negative temperature.

  18. The content of cytokinins in Norway spruce needles at the OTC site - preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doumas, P.; Daoudi, E.H.; Gautrat, M.P.; Schwartzenberg, K. v.; Bonnet-Massimbert, M. [Centre de Recherche d`Orleans, Station d`Amelioration des Arbres Forestiers, 45 - Ardon (France)

    1997-12-01

    The relationship of air pollution factors to observed forest decline can be investigated from different viewpoints incorporating physiological and biochemical changes. A hormone imbalance can be the result of growth disturbances, as a direct or indirect effect of air pollution. To prove this hypothesis, within an air pollution exclusion experiment in Open Top Chambers at the Edelmannshof site, the variations in the content of different cytokinins were analyzed in Norway spruce needles at various times during annual growth. The first approach adapted the cytokinin extraction and purification method, which is classically used in the laboratory. A second approach presented a one-year time course of the cytokinin content in one-year-old Norway spruce needles. (orig./MG)

  19. Changes in structural inequality in Norway spruce stands on peatland sites after water-level drawdown

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkkola, Sakari; Alenius, Virpi; HökkÀ, Hannu; Laiho, Raija; PÀivÀnen, Juhani; PenttilÀ, Timo

    2003-01-01

    Size-structural dynamics of naturally established Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands growing on peatlands drained for forestry were investigated. The study was based on modelling of diameter at breast height (DBH) distributions of repeatedly measured stands in southern Finland. The Weibull function was used to parameterize the DBH distributions and mixed linear models were constructed to characterize the impacts of different ecological factors on stand dynamics. Initially, the pos...

  20. Physiological responses of Norway spruce trees to elevated CO2 and SO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tausz, M.; De Kok, L.J.; Stulen, I.

    1996-01-01

    Young Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees were exposed to elevated CO2 (0.8 mL L(-1)), SO2 (0.06 mu L L(-1)), and elevated CO2 and SO2 (0.8 mL L(-1) and 0.06 mu L L(-1), respectively) for three months. Exposure to elevated CO2 resulted in an increased biomass production of the needles, whi

  1. Seasonal dynamics of phloem formation in Silver fir and Norway spruce as affected by drought

    OpenAIRE

    Gričar, Jožica; Čufar, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of phloem growth ring formation in silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) at different sites in Slovenia during the droughty growing season of 2003 was studied. We also determined the timing of cambial activity, xylem and phloem formation, and counted the number of cells in the completed phloem and xylem growth rings. Light microscopy of cross-sections revealed that cambial activity started on the phloem and xylem side simultaneously at all 3 plots. ...

  2. Stem and Crown Characteristics of Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst] Populations from Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius BUDEANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To establish the most important Norway spruce Romanian populations, open-pollinated progeny of ten plus trees originating from 33 seed stands mapped in the Romanian Carpathians have been evaluated for stem and crown characteristics at the age of 30 years, in two field trials: one established in their natural range (Breţcu trial, while the second was located outside of their natural range, in Subcarpathian lands (Avrig trial. Significant (p < 0.05 differences were found among the seed stands in both sites for most of the characteristics, suggesting an additive genetic control with different levels of significance depending on the evaluated trait and the testing site. Location analysis also revealed a highly significant population x locality interaction for all traits. The same populations behave differently to the change of the ecological conditions. In the Avrig trial higher values were recorded than in the Breţcu trial for the tree slenderness coefficient (19%, crown slenderness coefficient (13.6% and crown lateral area (9.4%. Although outside of their natural area, pruning height (m increased 6.4%, however pruning height ratio (% decreases by 1%, compared to the test established in their natural range. The populations from the Eastern Carpathians stand out by showing sustained growth and superior wood quality, while the populations from the Western Romanian Carpathians have generally smaller differences between the mean values of analysed traits in both field trials. Qualitative characteristics that influence the stability of stands to windthrow and snowbreak showed low levels of correlations to ecological gradients of the originating location of tested seed stands.

  3. Forest pasturing of livestock in Norway:effects on spruce regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olav Hjeljord; Trond Histøl; Hilde Karine Wam

    2014-01-01

    Forest pasturing of free-roaming livestock is a common prac-tice in many parts of the world, but knowledge on how it affects tree regeneration in boreal forests is lacking. We mapped tree density, live-stock site use and accumulated damage to young trees of commercial interest (Norway spruce, Picea abies L. Karst.) on 56 clearcuts inside and outside a fenced forest area used for livestock pasturing in Ringsaker, Norway. Inside the fence 56±1.8% of spruce trees were damaged com-pared to 37±3.4%outside. Proportion of damaged spruce trees was posi-tively related to cattle use of the clearcut, but not so for sheep. On the most intensively used clearcuts, four out of five trees were damaged. The density of deciduous trees was five times lower inside compared to out-side of the fence (varying with plant species). While livestock grazing may reduce resource competition in favour of spruce, the current animal density clearly is impeding forest regeneration in the study area.

  4. Ozone flux over a Norway spruce forest and correlation with net ecosystem production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapletal, Milos, E-mail: milos.zapletal@ekotoxa.cz [Ekotoxa s.r.o. - Centre for Environment and Land Assessment, Oticka 37, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic); Silesian University at Opava, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Masarykova 37, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic); Cudlin, Pavel [Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Sadkach 7, 37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Chroust, Petr [Ekotoxa s.r.o. - Centre for Environment and Land Assessment, Oticka 37, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic); Urban, Otmar; Pokorny, Radek [Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology of the AS CR, v.v.i., Porici 3b, 60300 Brno (Czech Republic); Edwards-Jonasova, Magda [Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Sadkach 7, 37005 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic); Czerny, Radek; Janous, Dalibor; Taufarova, Klara [Institute of Systems Biology and Ecology of the AS CR, v.v.i., Porici 3b, 60300 Brno (Czech Republic); Vecera, Zbynek; Mikuska, Pavel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the AS CR, v.v.i., Veveri 97, 60200 Brno (Czech Republic); Paoletti, Elena [Institute of Plant Protection, National Research Council of Italy, via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Daily ozone deposition flux to a Norway spruce forest in Czech Republic was measured using the gradient method in July and August 2008. Results were in good agreement with a deposition flux model. The mean daily stomatal uptake of ozone was around 47% of total deposition. Average deposition velocity was 0.39 cm s{sup -1} and 0.36 cm s{sup -1} by the gradient method and the deposition model, respectively. Measured and modelled non-stomatal uptake was around 0.2 cm s{sup -1}. In addition, net ecosystem production (NEP) was measured by using Eddy Covariance and correlations with O{sub 3} concentrations at 15 m a.g.l., total deposition and stomatal uptake were tested. Total deposition and stomatal uptake of ozone significantly decreased NEP, especially by high intensities of solar radiation. - Highlights: > We estimate ozone deposition flux to a Norway spruce forest using the gradient method and model. > The mean stomatal uptake of ozone is approximately 47% of the total deposition. > We measure net ecosystem production (NEP) using Eddy Covariance. > We test whether elevated total deposition and stomatal uptake of O{sub 3} imply a reduction of NEP. > Deposition and stomatal uptake of O{sub 3} decrease NEP, especially by high intensities of solar radiation. - Net ecosystem production of a Norway spruce forest decreases with increasing deposition and stomatal uptake of ozone.

  5. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  6. Does the orientation of Norway spruce (Picea abies /L./ Karst.) branches within sunlit crown part influence the heterogeneity of biochemical, structural and spectral characteristics of needles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhotáková, Z.; Albrechtová, J.; Malenovsky, Z.; Rock, B.N.; Polák, T.; Cudlín, P.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if selected biochemical, structural and spectral properties of Norway spruce needles are influenced by the azimuth orientation of the branch. Three youngest needle age classes from 20 mature (100 years old or older) Norway spruce trees were sampled from upper

  7. Lophodermium piceae and Tryblidiopsis pinastri. Two latent colonizers of Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtijaervi, A. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1998-12-31

    Among the endophytic microfungi colonizing Norway spruce, the non-pathogenic species Lophodermium piceae and Tryblidiopsis pinastri are ubiquitous. Most Norway spruce in Sweden are colonized by these fungi. L. piceae colonizes healthy needles of various ages, while T pinastri colonizes the bark of branches. New shoots become infected around the time of their emergence. Fruit bodies are formed after the needles and branches die. It was found that L. piceae colonized needles during the summer and early autumn, about six weeks after a prolonged period of intensive rain. The number of individual fungal mycelia per needle increased linearly with needle age. In experiments with trees, irrigation resulted in lower total colonization and delayed colonization of the current-year needles, regardless of whether fertilizer had been added. Colonization by L. piceae was lowest in the ammonium sulfate treatment, which simulated the deposition of air pollutants. Colonization was highest in the control and drought treatments, which did not differ significantly from each other. Only a few pathogenic fungi can damage Norway spruce needles. Needles damaged by the rust fungus Chrysomyxa abietis were investigated to study interactions between fungi. The frequency and intensity of L. piceae colonization were found to be similar for C. abietis infected and healthy needles. However, in needles partially infected with rust, L. piceae seemed to establish itself easier in the rust-infected part than in the green part. The genetic structures of populations of T. pinastri in southern Sweden and Finland were investigated using DNA markers produced by means of arbitrarily primed PCR. Single spore isolates from apothecia were used in the analysis. A considerable amount of variation was detected. No geographical differentiation was found among the populations studied

  8. Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. variability in progeny tests in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Branislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Norway spruce is one of the most important economic species is Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is the species at the edge of its natural range; nevertheless it attains significant growth and yield results. The species is often used for afforestation purposes. In the previous period, 4 progeny tests of Norway spruce were established in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The offspring from 6 natural populations: Han Pijesak 1, Han Pijesak 2, Foča, Potoci, Olovo and Kneževo were build-in the progeny tests. In 2016, the samples of Norway spruce from 2 progeny tests: Srebrenica and Drinić were collected. In total, 360 samples were collected. DNA isolation was done according to Dumoline et al. (1990. For assessment of genetic differences among populations, co-dominant nSSR microsatellite system had been used. The number of effective alleles ranged from 7.78 in the population Potoci up to 15 in the population Kneževo, the average number of alleles was 13. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.61 for the population Han Pijesak 2 up to 0.68 for population Kneževo. The average observed heterozygosity was 0.65. Fixation index was in the range from -0.073 in the population Potoci, to 0.030 for the population Han Pijesak 2. The average value of Wright fixation index is -0.007. The average fixation index indicates the existence of a very small number of homozygotes. Concerning the variability among populations it has been concluded that the total level of genetic differentiation among populations was very low (FST= 0.026. The result of Nei’s genetic distance shows that the populations Olovo and Potoci are separated from other populations. The results obtained by genetic markers, in addition with other, morphological and physiological markers will be the basis for the further investigation of Norway spruce adaptability and possibility for the transfer of genetic material in light of climate changes.

  9. Frost sensitivity and nutrient status in a fertilized Norway spruce stand in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, A. M.; Ingerslev, M.; Raulund-Rasmussen, K.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the N, P and K status on frost sensitivity of Norway spruce needles in a fertilization experiment situated in a nutrient poor 29-year-old Picea abies stand in western Denmark. The relative difference in frost sensitivity among trees was assessed...... by an index of injury, based on conductivity measurements of ion leakage from needles. Despite fertilization, all trees indicated N, P and K deficiency. The foliage, collected in late winter, was generally not very frost sensitive, but foliage from trees with the lowest K and P status were more sensitive...

  10. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    how drying and saturation procedures influence the differences between the 1st and the 2nd desorption curves for Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) sapwood. The study establishes 1st and 2nd desorption isotherms for a variety of initial conditions and it covers the RH range from 60.1% to 99.......9%. The state of the water is not affected by oven-drying and rewetting as demonstrated by time domain low field NMR relaxometry. The results challenge the conclusions of earlier studies and indicate that in these studies the 2nd desorption was initiated at much too low EMC and therefore fails to describe...

  11. Phytosociological studies of the forests with sessile oak and Norway spruce from South-Eastern Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Indreica

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The forests with sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Norway spruce (Picea abies from south-eastern Transylvania represent a peculiar type of phytocenoses, rather unusual for the present-day vegetation of Romania’s territory. Aim of the study is to provide a detailed description of the vegetation and to identify the phytosociological and typological units to which it could belong. Beside this, stand structure and regeneration status of the main tree species are illustrated. The studied area is located around Carpathian intermountain depressions Braşov and Ciuc, where vegetation had a peculiar history and today sessile oak forests on high altitude exists, interfering with spruce forests. The hypothesis of the process naturalness is supported by vegetation history in the area, climate, stand structure and peculiarities of herb layer composition (the mixture of relic of both mountain-boreal origin and south-European origin, like Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Pyrola rotundifolia and respectively Potentilla micrantha, Lathyrus venetus respectively. Sintaxonomically, studied phytocenoses with sessile oak and spruce belong mainly to acidophilus oak forests (Luzulo luzuloidis-Quercetum petraeae, but some of them resemble oak-hornbeam forests (Carici pilosae-Carpinetum, indicating a more recent change in stand structure and suggesting that not the soil, but the climate is the driving force of succession. Regeneration of sessile oak is at least satisfactory, but the expansion of spruce in such stands could seriously restrict the survival of sessile oak. A new typological unit will be appropriate,for a better management of sessile oak forests with spruce admixture.

  12. Determination of the terpene flux from orange species and Norway spruce by relaxed eddy accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.S.; Hummelshøj, P.; Jensen, N.O.;

    2000-01-01

    Terpene fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest and an orange orchard (Citrus clementii and Citrus sinensis) were measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) during summer 1997. alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were the most abundant terpenes emitted from Norway spruce and constituted...... approximately 70% of the flux. A much lower flux was observed for myrcene, limonene and gamma-terpinene and both alpha-terpinene and camphor were only occasionally detected. The average terpene flux was 107.6 ng m(-2) s(-1) which corresponds to 0.73 mu g g(dw)(-1) h(-1) (30 degrees C) when calculated relatively...... the weight of the dry biomass. The five terpenes which were detected in all samples at the orange orchard were limonene, sabinene, alpha-pinene, trans-ocimene and beta-pinene with an average Aux of 126.3 ng m(-2) s(-1). Cis-ocimene, linalool and myrcene were occasionally detected but no systematic upward...

  13. Disturbance and climate signal in Norway spruce and European larch dendrochronological series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Střelcová, Katarína; Fleischer, Peter, Jr.; Fleischer, Peter, Sr.; Holeksa, Jan; Zelo, Tomas; Vido, Jaroslav

    2017-04-01

    Norway spruce and European larch, dominant natural tree species in the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia), might be seriously threatened by projected climate change and intensified disturbance regime. Regional climate change scenarios project +2 °C increases in the 2050-2070 period and relatively stable precipitation regime when compared to long term normal. Such a climate change might shift both species on the edge of their bioclimatological conditions. Tree ring width is a good indicator of climate and disturbance impact on tree growth. The aim of our study was to identify abrupt growth changes indicating climatological stress on spruce and larch. We analysed local historical meteorological data (1890-2016) to reveal occurrence of such events in past. We hypothesize that number of stress days is increasing as a consequence of changing climate. Using band dendrometers we identified growth changes on five mature spruce and five larch trees during the 2008-2016 period. Each specific growth period was characterized by set of climatological parameters and indexes. Standardized precipitation index (SPI) and rate of photosynthesis (GPP) coincided well with abrupt growth decline, indicating physiological stress. These stress stimulating conditions were identified in past along historical climate records and verified on two-hundred tree cross sections. We applied combined step and trend intervention detection (CSTID) method for minimizing the effects of disturbance in tree ring width chronologies and enhance the climate signals.

  14. Norway spruce (Picea abies) laccases: characterization of a laccase in a lignin-forming tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutaniemi, Sanna; Malmberg, Heli A; Simola, Liisa K; Teeri, Teemu H; Kärkönen, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Secondarily thickened cell walls of water-conducting vessels and tracheids and support-giving sclerenchyma cells contain lignin that makes the cell walls water impermeable and strong. To what extent laccases and peroxidases contribute to lignin biosynthesis in muro is under active evaluation. We performed an in silico study of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) laccases utilizing available genomic data. As many as 292 laccase encoding sequences (genes, gene fragments, and pseudogenes) were detected in the spruce genome. Out of the 112 genes annotated as laccases, 79 are expressed at some level. We isolated five full-length laccase cDNAs from developing xylem and an extracellular lignin-forming cell culture of spruce. In addition, we purified and biochemically characterized one culture medium laccase from the lignin-forming cell culture. This laccase has an acidic pH optimum (pH 3.8-4.2) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation. It has a high affinity to coniferyl alcohol with an apparent Km value of 3.5 μM; however, the laccase has a lower catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation compared with some purified culture medium peroxidases. The properties are discussed in the context of the information already known about laccases/coniferyl alcohol oxidases of coniferous plants.

  15. Tropospheric ozone fluxes in Norway spruce forest during the transition period from autumn to winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Zapletal, Miloš; Cudlín, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Urban, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Norway spruce exhibits seasonal variations in stomatal conductance and photosynthetic activity typical for overwintering plants, with a decline during autumn and a complete recovery during spring. We investigated ozone fluxes during this transient period (November 2016). Fluxes of tropospheric ozone, the major phytotoxic near-ground pollutant causing injuries to plant tissues, were measured at Bily Kriz experimental station in Beskydy Mountains, the Czech Republic. Dry chemiluminescence fast-response ozone sensor coupled with sonic anemometer was used to measure fast fluctuations in ozone concentration and three-dimensional wind speed, respectively. Apart from this eddy covariance technique, within-canopy ozone concentration gradient was simultaneously measured by UV-absorption based slow-response ozone analysers. Ozone fluxes were subsequently modelled by an Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model (ILTM). A comparison of measured and calculated fluxes is thus available. Moreover, stomatal ozone flux was calculated based on Evaporative/Resistive method assuming stomata are the most relevant sink in the spruce forest. The low NOx concentration throughout the year and low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the transition period led to hypothesize that non-stomatal flux here estimated by difference between total ozone flux and stomatal ozone flux is represented mainly by dry soil deposition and wet deposition during the snow period. We discuss here the ILTM parameterisation with comparison to measured ozone fluxes. Correct estimation of stomatal ozone flux is essential, especially in transition periods, where main scientific emphasis is put rarely. In addition, this research should help to develop metrics for ozone-risk assessment and advance our knowledge in biosphere-atmosphere exchange over Norway spruce forest. Acknowledgement This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports within the National Programme for Sustainability

  16. Genetic host-tree effects on the ectomycorrhizal community and root characteristics of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmala, S M; Rajala, T; Haapanen, M; Taylor, A F S; Pennanen, T

    2013-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was used to study the effects of host genotype on short root formation and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community structure in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Rooted cuttings representing 55 clones were inoculated with a mix of vegetative hyphae of five ECM fungal species (Laccaria sp., Amphinema byssoides, Piloderma sp., Cadophora finlandia, Paxillus involutus). After one growing season, the ECM fungal community structure was determined by amplifying the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA directly from ECM root tips. Restriction profiles of obtained amplicons were then compared to those of the inoculated strains. Spruce clones differed in their ECM fungal community composition; we found a statistically significant clone-specific effect on ECM fungal diversity and dominating fungal species. Nevertheless, the broad sense heritabilities of the levels of Laccaria sp., Piloderma sp. and A. byssoides colonisations as well as the ECM fungal community structure were low (H(2) = 0.04-0.11), owing to the high within-clone variation. As nitrogen concentration of needles correlated negatively with ECM fungal richness, our results imply that in the experimental conditions nutrient acquisition of young trees may benefit from colonisation with only one or two ECM fungal species. The heritability of short root density was moderate (H(2) = 0.41) and highest among all the measured shoot and root growth characteristics of Norway spruce cuttings. We suggest that the genetic component determining root growth and short root formation is significant for the performance of young trees in natural environments as these traits drive the formation of the below-ground symbiotic interactions.

  17. The drying of wood chips with surplus heat in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordhagen, E. [Norwegian Forest and Landscape Inst., As (Norway). Dept. of Forest Resources, Forest Operations and Economics

    2010-07-01

    The study evaluated a wood chip drying procedure that used surplus heat from 2 hydroelectric power plants in western Norway. The wood was chipped and then loaded into the dryer using a tractor-trailer and a container. Warm air from the plants was funnelled into the dryer from perforated floors in the plants and an electric fan. Trials of the procedure were conducted to determine the drying capacity of the trailer and container. The study showed that the temperature and the moisture content of the wood chips varied over the course of the drying period. The chips located at the bottom dried first. The moisture content in the chip ranged between 66.1 to 52.1 before drying and between 9.6 and 6.9 per cent after drying. No substantial difference in moisture content between wood chips located at the top and bottom of the piles was noted. The net calorific values of the wood chips ranged from 1340 to 2170 kWh per tonne before drying, and between 4710 to 4860 after drying. The study showed that the cheapest option for the production of wood chips is natural drying and chipping at the roadside.

  18. Damages and causes of death in plantations with containerised seedlings of Scots pine and Norway spruce in the central of Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumburg, Jan

    2000-07-01

    In 1972, 94 forest areas were planted with containerised seedlings, 83 with Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and 11 with Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), in the central of Sweden. In the first season after planting, 99% of the Scots pine and 98% of the Norway spruce seedlings survived. Three seasons after plantation, 67% of Scots pine and 62% of Norway spruce were alive. The most common type of known damages causing mortality were mammals and insects. Vegetation was registered as the cause of mortality at some occasions in Scots pine plantations, whereas vegetation never was considered as the cause of death in Norway spruce plantations. The average size of the scarification patches were 0.25 m{sup 2} and 0.4 m{sup 2} in Scots pine and Norway spruce respectively. In Scots pine plantations there were 1600 planted seedlings ha{sup -1} and in Norway spruce there were 1550 ha{sup -1}. After the third growing season, the numbers of main crop plants, including naturally regenerated hardwood and softwood plants, were 1500 ha{sup -1} for Scots pine and 1350 ha{sup -1} for Norway spruce. The studied plantings had been approved if the recommended number of seedlings had been planted. As there always is some mortality among planted seedlings, in the present study 35-40%, this phenomenon has to be taken into consideration when dimensioning the number of seedlings which are to be planted.

  19. Moisture in untreated, acetylated, and furfurylated Norway Spruce monitored during drying below fiber saturation using time domain NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisbeth G. Thygesen; Thomas Elder

    2009-01-01

    Using time domain–nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the moisture content (MC) in Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] sapwood, subjected to three different treatments (untreated, acetylated, and furfurylated), was studied during drying at 40oC at MCs below fiber saturation. Spin–spin relaxation time distributions were derived from Carr-Purcell-...

  20. Drought response of five conifer species under contrasting water availability suggests high vulnerability of Norway spruce and European larch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lévesque, M.; Saurer, M.; Siegwolf, R.; Eilmann, B.; Brang, P.; Bugmann, H.; Rigling, A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of tree species to cope with anticipated decrease in water availability is still poorly understood. We evaluated the potential of Norway spruce, Scots pine, European larch, black pine, and Douglas-fir to withstand drought in a drier future climate by analyzing their past growth and

  1. Testing Romanian seed sources of Norway spruce (Picea abies: results on growth traits and survival at age 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Budeanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits and survival rate were evaluated in two field trialsconsisting of 33 provenances (seed stands spread across the entire natural distribution range of Norway spruce in Romania. Total tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH and survival rate were measured at 30 years after planting. Both growth and adaptation traits show substantial genetic variation among the tested seed stands. The amplitude of variation depends markedly on trait and testing site. This fact suggests that the best performing seed stands for growth and adaptation traits at each testing site can be selected. Two groups of valuable populations from Romanian Carpathians - the Northern and Western part (Apuseni Mountains - were identified. Survival rate was negatively correlated with growth traits, the average values in the two field trials were 68% and 70%. By analyzing growth and adaptation traits together with stem and wood qualitative traits, the best performing populations will be considered as tested seed sourcesand the forest reproductive material they can provide will be recommended for use in the regions of provenance where the two field trials are located.

  2. Testing Romanian seed sources of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst: results on growth traits and survival at age 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Budeanu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits and survival rate were evaluated in two field trials consisting of 33 provenances (seed stands spread across the entire natural distribution range of Norway spruce in Romania. Total tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH and survival rate were measured at 30 years after planting. Both growth and adaptation traits show substantial genetic variation among the tested seed stands. The amplitude of variation depends markedly on trait and testing site. This fact suggests that the best performing seed stands for growth and adaptation traits at each testing site can be selected. Two groups of valuable populations, located in the North and East of Eastern Carpathians (Apuseni Mountains, were identified. Survival rate was negatively correlated with growth traits, the average values in the two field trials were 68% and 70%. By analyzing growth and adaptation traits together with stem and wood qualitative traits, the best performing populations will be considered as tested seed sources and the forest reproductive material they can provide will be recommended for use in the regions of provenance where the two field trials are located.

  3. Transcriptional Responses Associated with Virulence and Defence in the Interaction between Heterobasidion annosum s.s. and Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundén, Karl; Danielsson, Marie; Durling, Mikael Brandström; Ihrmark, Katarina; Nemesio Gorriz, Miguel; Stenlid, Jan; Asiegbu, Frederick O; Elfstrand, Malin

    2015-01-01

    Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato is a serious pathogen causing root and stem rot to conifers in the northern hemisphere and rendering the timber defective for sawing and pulping. In this study we applied next-generation sequencing to i) identify transcriptional responses unique to Heterobasidion-inoculated Norway spruce and ii) investigate the H. annosum transcripts to identify putative virulence factors. To address these objectives we wounded or inoculated 30-year-old Norway spruce clones with H. annosum and 454-sequenced the transcriptome of the interaction at 0, 5 and 15 days post inoculation. The 491,860 high-quality reads were de novo assembled and the relative expression was analysed. Overall, very few H. annosum transcripts were represented in our dataset. Three delta-12 fatty acid desaturase transcripts and one Clavaminate synthase-like transcript, both associated with virulence in other pathosystems, were found among the significantly induced transcripts. The analysis of the Norway spruce transcriptional responses produced a handful of differentially expressed transcripts. Most of these transcripts originated from genes known to respond to H. annosum. However, three genes that had not previously been reported to respond to H. annosum showed specific induction to inoculation: an oxophytodienoic acid-reductase (OPR), a beta-glucosidase and a germin-like protein (GLP2) gene. Even in a small data set like ours, five novel highly expressed Norway spruce transcripts without significant alignment to any previously annotated protein in Genbank but present in the P. abies (v1.0) gene catalogue were identified. Their expression pattern suggests a role in defence. Therefore a more complete survey of the transcriptional responses in the interactions between Norway spruce and its major pathogen H. annosum would probably provide a better understanding of gymnosperm defence than accumulated until now.

  4. Growth trends of beech and Norway spruce in Switzerland: The role of nitrogen deposition, ozone, mineral nutrition and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sabine; Schindler, Christian; Rihm, Beat

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the effects of nitrogen deposition, ozone and climate on tree growth is important for planning sustainable forest management also in the future. The complex interplay of all these factors cannot be covered by experiments. Here we use observational data of mature forests for studying associations of various biotic and abiotic factors with tree growth. A 30year time series on basal area increment of Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies Karst. in Switzerland was analyzed to evaluate the development in relation to a variety of predictors. Basal area increment of Fagus sylvatica has clearly decreased during the observation period. For Picea abies no trend was observed. N deposition of more than 26 (beech) or 20-22kgNha(-1)year(-1) (Norway spruce) was negatively related with basal area increment, in beech stronger than in Norway spruce. High N deposition loads and low foliar K concentrations in Fagus were correlated with increased drought sensitivity. High air temperatures in winter were negatively related with basal area increment in Norway spruce in general and in beech at high N:Mg ratio or high N deposition while on an average the relation was positive in beech. Fructification in beech was negatively related to basal area increment. The increase of fructification observed during the last decades contributed thus to the growth decrease. Ozone flux was significantly and negatively correlated with basal area increment both in beech and Norway spruce. The results show clear non-linear effects of N deposition on stem increment of European beech and Norway spruce as well as strong interactions with climate which have contributed to the growth decrease in beech and may get more important in future. The results not only give suggestions for ecological processes but also show the potential of an integral evaluation of observational data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The ''red'' decline of Norway spruce or ''røde rødgraner'' - is it ammonium overload or top-dying?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    In 1989 a new disease “røde rødgraner” or “red” decline of Norway spruce (Picea abies) became a serious problem in plantations in Jutland on poor, sandy soils. Some trees became red and lost their needles over a few years. The reddening started from theshoot tips. The only important pollutant in ....... There was no indication of nitrogen overload. The “red” Norway spruce maysuffer from “top-dying” a common disorder of Norway spruce in Great Britain, believed to be caused by several mild winters in a row. In that case the symptoms should diminish after the very cold winter 1995-96....

  6. Assessing the resilience of Norway spruce forests through a model-based reanalysis of thinning trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Rupert; Vigl, Friedrich; Rössler, Günter; Neumann, Markus; Rammer, Werner

    2017-03-15

    As a result of a rapidly changing climate the resilience of forests is an increasingly important property for ecosystem management. Recent efforts have improved the theoretical understanding of resilience, yet its operational quantification remains challenging. Furthermore, there is growing awareness that resilience is not only a means to addressing the consequences of climate change but is also affected by it, necessitating a better understanding of the climate sensitivity of resilience. Quantifying current and future resilience is thus an important step towards mainstreaming resilience thinking into ecosystem management. Here, we present a novel approach for quantifying forest resilience from thinning trials, and assess the climate sensitivity of resilience using process-based ecosystem modeling. We reinterpret the wide range of removal intensities and frequencies in thinning trials as an experimental gradient of perturbation, and estimate resilience as the recovery rate after perturbation. Our specific objectives were (i) to determine how resilience varies with stand and site conditions, (ii) to assess the climate sensitivity of resilience across a range of potential future climate scenarios, and (iii) to evaluate the robustness of resilience estimates to different focal indicators and assessment methodologies. We analyzed three long-term thinning trials in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) forests across an elevation gradient in Austria, evaluating and applying the individual-based process model iLand. The resilience of Norway spruce was highest at the montane site, and decreased at lower elevations. Resilience also decreased with increasing stand age and basal area. The effects of climate change were strongly context-dependent: At the montane site, where precipitation levels were ample even under climate change, warming increased resilience in all scenarios. At lower elevations, however, rising temperatures decreased resilience, particularly at

  7. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols from spruce wood bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghitescu, Roxana-Elena; Volf, Irina; Carausu, Constantin; Bühlmann, Ana-Maria; Gilca, Iulian Andrei; Popa, Valentin I

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the ultrasound-assisted extraction of the phenolic compounds from spruce wood bark and present a straight-forward experimental planning method, allowing the optimisation of the process. The effect of ethanol concentration, temperature and extraction time were evaluated through a 3(2)·2 experimental planning. The efficiency of the extraction process was appreciated based on factorial ANOVA results. The maximum extraction yield of total polyphenols (13.232mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g of spruce bark tested) was obtained using a process time of 60min, an extraction temperature of 54°C and a concentration of ethanol of 70% respectively. These results indicate that an important quantity of bioactive compounds can be extracted from spruce wood bark by ultrasound assisted extraction technology.

  8. Determination of ethylenic residues in wood and TMP of spruce by FT-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Sally A. Ralph

    2008-01-01

    A method based on FT-Raman spectroscopy is proposed for determining in situ concentrations of ethylenic residues in softwood lignin. Raman contributions at 1133 and 1654 cm-1, representing coniferaldehyde and coniferyl alcohol structures, respectively, were used in quantifying these units in spruce wood with subsequent conversion to concentrations in lignin. For...

  9. Effect of heat treatment on wettability and MOE of pine and spruce wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povilas Navickas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was performed in order to determine how the heating process affects the wettability and mechanical properties of spruce (Picea abies and pine (Pinus silvestris wood. Studies were carried out using wood heated in laboratory. The measurements of specimens were 315x20x20mm. Specimens were divided into the following four groups: specimens of one group were not exposed to heating, whereas specimens of three other groups were subjected to heating at the temperature of 190○C for 1 to 3 hours respectively, in the air under atmospheric pressure. Both heated and unheated specimens were moistened and dried in a climatic chamber. Before and after treatment the mechanical properties of specimens were assessed using the original method of transverse vibrations and contact angle measurements were carried out using the water drop method. The results showed a significant increase in wood hydrophobicity after treatment. Spruce contact angle after treatment increased from 1.3 to 1.45, pine from 1.4 to 2 times. MOE of pine wood decreased, while MOE of spruce slighty increased after heat treatment. Wood equilibrium moisture content after treatment is redused and it is known, that the drier the wood  - the better its mechanical properties. This factor may have the biggest influence to such result.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7304

  10. Five-year measurements of ozone fluxes to a Danish Norway spruce canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Hovmand, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    Ozone concentrations and fluxes have been measured continuously during 5 years (1996-2000) by the gradient method in a Norway spruce dominated forest stand in West Jutland, Denmark, planted in 1965. The method has been validated against other methodologies and a relatively good relationship...... was found. The data are analysed to quantify diurnal, seasonal and yearly fluxes, and non-stomatal and stomatal removal are estimated. Monthly means of climatic data are shown, and day and night values of the aerodynamic resistance, r(a), viscous sub-layer resistance, r(b), and the surface or canopy...... resistance, r(c), are presented. The yearly ozone deposition is approximately 126 kg ha(-1). The canopy ozone uptake is highest during the day and during the summer. This is interpreted as increased stomatal uptake and physical and chemical reactions. The daily means of ozone concentration and fluxes...

  11. In vitro fungistatic effects of natural coniferous resin from Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, M; Sipponen, A; Lohi, J; Lounatmaa, K; Koukila-Kähkölä, P; Laitinen, K

    2012-08-01

    Resins (rosin, pitch) are natural products of the coniferous trees and are antimicrobial against a wide range of microbes. The antifungal effectiveness of resin, purified from Norway spruce (Picea abies), was studied against human pathogenic fungi and yeasts with the agar plate diffusion tests and electron microscopy (EM). The fungistatic effect of these resin mixtures (resin salves) was tested against a set of Candida yeasts, dermatophytes, and opportunistic fungi. Transmission and scanning EM was done from samples of fungi (Trichophyton mentagrophytes). In agar diffusion tests, the resin was strongly antifungal against all dermatophytes tested, e.g., against all fungi of the genus Trichophyton, but it was not antifungal against the Candida yeasts or against the opportunistic fungi tested. According to EM, resin caused damages in the cell hyphae and cell wall structures. We conclude that, in the agar plate diffusion test, coniferous resins are strongly fungistatic against the dermatophytic fungi only.

  12. The community of needle endophytes reflects the current physiological state of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Tiina; Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Vesala, Risto; Smolander, Aino; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated fungal endophytes in the needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies) cuttings in relation to host tree growth. We also determined the prevalence of endophytes in needles incubated for six months. The cuttings originated from clonal origins showing slow- and fast-growth in long-term field trials but the heritable differences in growth rate were not yet detected among the studied cutting. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized needles with culture-free DNA techniques. No significant differences were observed between endophyte communities of slow- and fast-growing clonal origins. However, the endophyte community correlated with the current growth rate of cuttings suggesting that endophytes reflect short- rather than long-term performance of a host. The concentration of condensed tannins was similar in slow- and fast-growing clonal origins but it showed a negative relationship with endophyte species richness, implying that these secondary compounds may play an important role in spruce tolerance against fungal infections. More than a third of endophyte species were detected in both fresh and decomposing needles, indicating that many needle endophytes are facultative saprotrophs. Several potentially pathogenic fungal species were also found within the community of saprotrophic endophytes.

  13. Changes in soil nitrogen cycling under Norway spruce logging residues on a clear-cut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolander, Aino; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Kitunen, Veikko

    2016-04-01

    In Europe, forest biomass is increasingly being used as a source of energy to replace fossil fuels. In practice, this means that logging residues, consisting of green branches and stem tops, are more commonly harvested. In 2012 logging residues were harvested from about one third of clear-cuts in Finland. Our aim was to study how logging residues affect soil organic matter quality, in particular soil N cycling processes and composition of certain groups of plant secondary compounds, tannins and terpenes. Compounds in these groups were of interest because they are abundant in logging residues, and they have been shown to control soil N cycling. In connection with clear-cutting a Norway spruce stand in southern Finland, we established a controlled field experiment by building logging residue piles (40 kg/m2) on study plots. The piles consisted of fresh spruce branches and tops with green foliage. Control plots with no residues were included (0 kg/m2). Changes in soil organic matter properties have now been monitored for three growing seasons. Logging residues affected organic layer properties strongly. For example, they increased net nitrification and nitrate concentrations. There were also increases in the concentrations of certain terpenes and condensed tannins due to the residues. The significance of logging residues on soil processes and properties will be shown.

  14. Spruce forest bryophytes in central Norway and their relationship to environmental factors including modern forestry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisvoll, A.A. [Norwegian Inst. for Nature Research, Trondheim (Norway); Prestoe, T. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Museum of Natural History and Archaeology, Dept. of Botany, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-02-01

    In this study of bryophyte diversity in 110 patches of spruce forests of bilberry, small fern, low herb, tall fern and tall herb type in Soer-Troendelag, central Norway, each patch (from 0.24 to 9.33 ha) was classified as one main vegetation type and one successional stage or cutting class. The bryophytes in each patch were censured in randomly established squares of 10 x 10 m, supplemented by complete sampling in the rest of the patch. A number of environmental variables was sampled, and the data sets treated with DCA and CCA. Altogether 210 bryophytes (71 liverworts and 139 mosses) were found in the squares, and 285 (96 liverworts and 189 mosses) in the forest patches. The average number of liverworts, mosses and bryophytes in forest patches increased gradually from the dry and poor to the moist and rich forest types. Several red listed and other interesting spruce forest species had their only or main occurrence in the rich and humid forest, and in old cutting classes. (au) 45 refs.

  15. Antioxidants in Norway spruce needles at field plots in the vicinity of a thermal power plant in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribariclasnik, C.; Turk, B.; Batic, F.; Grill, D. [ERICo Velenje, Velenkje (Slovenia)

    1999-07-01

    Results of antioxidant analyses such as vitamin C and E, water soluble thiols and beta-carotene, in Norway spruce needles at sampling sites influenced by the Thermal Power Plant in Sostanj, Slovenia are presented. These antioxidants were analysed in current and one year old needles sampled in September 1997 at ten permanent sampling sites. The antioxidant response of Norway spruce needles is compared to the air pollution load, assessed by total sulphur content of needles, and general environmental stress factors connected with the sampling site. From the results it is possible to draw conclusions about the physiological role and behavior of the biochemical needle stress indicators analysed and to explain their status as a result of the air pollution load and environmental stresses.

  16. Epidihydropinidine, the main piperidine alkaloid compound of Norway spruce (Picea abies) shows promising antibacterial and anti-Candida activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhrquist, Pia; Virjamo, Virpi; Hiltunen, Eveliina; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2017-03-01

    This study reports for the first time promising antibacterial and antifungal effects of epidihydropinidine, the major piperidine alkaloid in the needles and bark of Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karsten. Epidihydropinidine was growth inhibitory against all bacterial and fungal strains used in our investigation, showing the lowest MIC value of 5.37μg/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida glabrata and C. albicans. Epidihydropinidine was nearly three times more active than tetracycline against P. aeruginosa and E. faecalis. Promising antibacterial effects were also recorded against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus (MIC 10.75μg/mL) as well as against Salmonella enterica (MIC and MBC 43μg/mL). Our preliminary results suggest that epidihydropinidine as well related alkaloids of Norway spruce could be powerful candidates for new antibiotics and for preventing food spoilage.

  17. Dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen leaching from Scots pine, Norway spruce and silver birch stands in southern Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Fröberg, Mats; Hansson, Karna; Kleja, Dan Berggren; Alavi, Ghasem

    2011-01-01

    The effects of three common tree species – Scots pine, Norway spruce and silver birch – on leaching of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved nitrogen were studied in an experimental forest with podzolised soils in southern Sweden. We analyzed soil water collected with lysimeters and modeled water fluxes to estimate dissolved C and N fluxes. Specific UV absorbance (SUVA) was analyzed to get information about the quality of dissolved organic matter leached from the different stands. Under the ...

  18. Levels of damage of Scots pine and Norway spruce caused by needle miners along a SO{sub 2} gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, J. [Univ. of Tromsoe, Dept. of Plant Ecology, IBG, Tromsoe (Norway); Holopainen, J.K.; Nerg, A.; Holopainen, T. [Univ. of Kuopio, Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science, Kuopio (Finland)

    1996-09-01

    Needle damages, caused by mining insects on Scots pine and Norway spruce were studied in the vicinity of a pulp mill. The abundance of needles mined by the pine bud moth Exoteleia dodecella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) on Scots pine Pinus sylvestris, and the spruce needle miner Epinotia tedella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) on Norway spruce Picea abies had a significantly peaked response curve on logarithmic distance scale. For pine bud moth, the maximum expected population density was estimated to be at the distance of 1.35 km from the factory. The maximum expected population density for the spruce needle miner was at the distance of 1.53 km from the factory. However, for both species the curves were significantly different among transects. Both species had a peaked and significant response to sulphur level in needles as well. The maximum expected density in pine was at 1270 ppm, and in spruce at 1070 ppm sulphur concentration in pine needles. The results are consistent with earlier reports demonstrating that these mining insects frequently attack trees suffering from air pollution. The nonlinear response of both species to distance from the pulp mill suggests that E. dodecella on pine and E. tedella on spruce are rather indicators of the zone of intermediate air pollution than of strongly polluted or nearly unpolluted sites. This also agrees with the plant stress-insect performance hypothesis indicating that insect response varies with the magnitude of stress, and at very high stress levels a tree no longer provides the insects with relevant food. (au) 49 refs.

  19. Effect of bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) attack on bark VOC emissions of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Rajendra P.; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Blomqvist, Minna; Holopainen, Toini; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2016-02-01

    Climate warming driven storms are evident causes for an outbreak of the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) resulting in the serious destruction of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests in northern Europe. Conifer species are major sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the boreal zone. Climate relevant BVOC emissions are expected to increase when conifer trees defend against bark beetle attack by monoterpene (MT)-rich resin flow. In this study, BVOC emission rates from the bark surface of beetle-attacked and non-attacked spruce trees were measured from two outbreak areas, Iitti and Lahti in southern Finland, and from one control site at Kuopio in central Finland. Beetle attack increased emissions of total MTs 20-fold at Iitti compared to Kuopio, but decreased the emissions of several sesquiterpenes (SQTs) at Iitti. At the Lahti site, the emission rate of α-pinene was positively correlated with mean trap catch of bark beetles. The responsive individual MTs were tricyclene, α-pinene, camphene, myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole and bornyl acetate in both of the outbreak areas. Our results suggest that bark beetle outbreaks affect local BVOC emissions from conifer forests dominated by Norway spruce. Therefore, the impacts of insect outbreaks are worth of consideration to global BVOC emission models.

  20. Genetic diversity of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] in Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Gheorghe Radu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Romanian most important coniferous tree species, the Norway spruce, was estimated by means of allozyme markers. A total of 695 adult trees sampled from eleven populations grouped in six mountainous areas in the Romanian Carpathians were analyzed. In three metapopulations (Maramureş, Postăvar and Parâng, to evaluate the influence of altitudinal gradient on genetic diversity, samples were collected from populations located at high and low altitude. At other location (ApuseniMountains we compared the narrow-crown biotype (Picea abies var. columnaris and the pyramidal crown biotype (Picea abies var. pyramidalis and explored the genetic structure of peat bog ecotype. By analyzing 7 enzyme systems and 12 enzyme coding loci, a total of 38 allelic variants have been detected. The mean value of polymorphic loci for the six sites was 86.1%, ranging between 83.3% and 91.7% and the mean expected heterozygosity was 0.115, resulting in a moderate level of genetic diversity. The highest genetic diversity (He = 0.134 was found in the narrow-crown spruce population. Apuseni metapopulation showed the highest genetic diversity (He = 0.125, being the most valuable for conservation of genetic resources. The small value of fixation index (FST = 0.009 indicates a low genetic differentiation between the six sites and AMOVA test revealed a very high level of genetic diversity within population (99%. Comparative analysis of genetic parameters showed small differences between high and low altitude populations at each site, probably due to the neutral character of the markers analyzed and the effect of gene flow between gradiental populations.

  1. Norway spruce embryogenesis: changes in carbohydrate profile, structural development and response to polyethylene glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, Lukáš; Konrádová, Hana; Hašková, Anna; Lipavská, Helena

    2016-05-01

    Two unrelated, geographically distinct, highly embryogenic lines of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were analysed to identify metabolic traits characteristic for lines with good yields of high-quality embryos. The results were compared with corresponding characteristics of a poorly productive line (low embryo yield, scarce high-quality embryos). The following carbohydrate profiles and spectra during maturation, desiccation and germination were identified as promising characteristics for line evaluation: a gradual decrease in total soluble carbohydrates with an increasing sucrose : hexose ratio during maturation; accumulation of raffinose family oligosaccharides resulting from desiccation and their rapid degradation at the start of germination; and a decrease in sucrose, increase in hexoses and the appearance of pinitol with proceeding germination. We propose that any deviation from this profile in an embryonic line is a symptom of inferior somatic embryo development. We further propose that a fatty acid spectrum dominated by linoleic acid (18 : 2) was a common feature of healthy spruce somatic embryos, although it was quite different from zygotic embryos mainly containing oleic acid (18 : 1). The responses of the lines to osmotic stress were evaluated based on comparison of control (without osmoticum) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-exposed (PEG 4000) variants. Although genetically distinct, both highly embryogenic lines responded in a very similar manner, with the only difference being sensitivity to high concentrations of PEG. At an optimum PEG concentration (3.75 and 5%), which was line specific, negative effects of PEG on embryo germination were compensated for by a higher maturation efficiency so that the application of PEG at an appropriate concentration improved the yield of healthy germinants per gram of initial embryonal mass and accelerated the process. Polyethylene glycol application, however, resulted in no improvement of the poorly

  2. Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds measured and modelled above a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juráň, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Savi, Flavia; Alivernini, Alessandro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Večeřová, Kristýna; Křůmal, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were investigated at Norway spruce forest at Bílý Kříž in Beskydy Mountains of the Czech Republic during the summer 2014. A proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, Ionicon Analytik, Austria) has been coupled with eddy-covariance system. Additionally, Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model has been used to derive fluxes from concentration gradient of various monoterpenes previously absorbed into n-heptane by wet effluent diffusion denuder with consequent quantification by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. Modelled data cover each one day of three years with different climatic conditions and previous precipitation patterns. Model MEGAN was run to cover all dataset with monoterpene fluxes and measured basal emission factor. Highest fluxes measured by eddy-covariance were recorded during the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes and isoprene. Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model suggests most abundant monoterpene fluxes being α- and β-pinene. Principal component analysis revealed dependencies of individual monoterpene fluxes on air temperature and particularly global radiation; however, these dependencies were monoterpene specific. Relationships of monoterpene fluxes with CO2 flux and relative air humidity were found to be negative. MEGAN model correlated to eddy-covariance PTR-TOF-MS measurement evince particular differences, which will be shown and discussed. Bi-directional fluxes of oxygenated short-chain volatiles (methanol, formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and methyl ethyl ketone) were recorded by PTR-TOF-MS. Volatiles of anthropogenic origin as benzene and toluene were likely transported from the most benzene polluted region in Europe - Ostrava city and adjacent part of Poland around Katowice, where metallurgical and coal mining industries are located. Those were accumulated during

  3. Spring photosynthetic recovery of boreal Norway spruce under conditions of elevated [CO(2)] and air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Göran; Hall, Marianne; Slaney, Michelle; Räntfors, Mats; Medhurst, Jane; Linder, Sune

    2013-11-01

    Accumulated carbon uptake, apparent quantum yield (AQY) and light-saturated net CO2 assimilation (Asat) were used to assess the responses of photosynthesis to environmental conditions during spring for three consecutive years. Whole-tree chambers were used to expose 40-year-old field-grown Norway spruce trees in northern Sweden to an elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration, [CO2], of 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1) (CE) and an air temperature (T) between 2.8 and 5.6 °C above ambient T (TE), during summer and winter. Net shoot CO2 exchange (Anet) was measured continuously on 1-year-old shoots and was used to calculate the accumulated carbon uptake and daily Asat and AQY. The accumulated carbon uptake, from 1 March to 30 June, was stimulated by 33, 44 and 61% when trees were exposed to CE, TE, and CE and TE combined, respectively. Air temperature strongly influenced the timing and extent of photosynthetic recovery expressed as AQY and Asat during the spring. Under elevated T (TE), the recovery of AQY and Asat commenced ∼10 days earlier and the activity of these parameters was significantly higher throughout the recovery period. In the absence of frost events, the photosynthetic recovery period was less than a week. However, frost events during spring slowed recovery so that full recovery could take up to 60 days to complete. Elevated [CO2] stimulated AQY and Asat on average by ∼10 and ∼50%, respectively, throughout the recovery period, but had minimal or no effect on the onset and length of the photosynthetic recovery period during the spring. However, AQY, Asat and Anet all recovered at significantly higher T (average +2.2 °C) in TE than in TA, possibly caused by acclimation or by shorter days and lower light levels during the early part of the recovery in TE compared with TA. The results suggest that predicted future climate changes will cause prominent stimulation of photosynthetic CO2 uptake in boreal Norway spruce forest during spring, mainly caused by elevated T

  4. Leaf physiological responses of mature Norway Spruce trees exposed to elevated carbon dioxide and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Shubhangi; Uddling, Johan; Räntfors, Mats; Hall, Marianne; Wallin, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Leaf photosynthesis, respiration and stomatal conductance exert strong control over the exchange of carbon, water and energy between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere. As such, leaf physiological responses to rising atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have important implications for the global carbon cycle and rate of ongoing global warming, as well as for local and regional hydrology and evaporative cooling. It is therefore critical to improve the understanding of plant physiological responses to elevated [CO2] and temperature, in particular for boreal and tropical ecosystems. In order to do so, we examined physiological responses of mature boreal Norway spruce trees (ca 40-years old) exposed to elevated [CO2] and temperature inside whole-tree chambers at Flakaliden research site, Northern Sweden. The trees were exposed to a factorial combination of two levels of [CO2] (ambient and doubled) and temperature (ambient and +2.8 degree C in summer and +5.6 degree C in winter). Three replicates in each of the four treatments were used. It was found that photosynthesis was increased considerably in elevated [CO2], but was not affected by the warming treatment. The maximum rate of photosynthetic carboxylation was reduced in the combined elevated [CO2] and elevated temperature treatment, but not in single factor treatments. Elevated [CO2] also strongly increased the base rate of respiration and to a lesser extent reduced the temperature sensitivity (Q10 value) of respiration; responses which may be important for the carbon balance of these trees which have a large proportion of shaded foliage. Stomatal conductance at a given VPD was reduced by elevated temperature treatment, to a degree that mostly offset the higher vapour pressure deficit in warmed air with respect to transpiration. Elevated [CO2] did not affect stomatal conductance, and thus increased the ratio of leaf internal to external [CO2]. These results indicate that the large elevated

  5. Experimental versus modelled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies exposed to elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLeuzinger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behaviour is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO2 concentration, which form the core of global dynamic vegetation models (DGVMs. Here, we provide first results from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m Picea abies (L. (Norway spruce and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO2-treated (550 ppm trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9 and 18 % (at concentrations of 550-700ppm atmospheric CO2, the combined evidence from various methods characterising water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO2 concentrations. The discrepancy between the modelled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could mitigate the first-order stomatal response.

  6. Conserved function of core clock proteins in the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlgren, Anna; Gyllenstrand, Niclas; Källman, Thomas; Lagercrantz, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    From studies of the circadian clock in the plant model species Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a number of important properties and components have emerged. These include the genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1), GIGANTEA (GI), ZEITLUPE (ZTL) and TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1 also known as PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (PRR1)) that via gene expression feedback loops participate in the circadian clock. Here, we present results from ectopic expression of four Norway spruce (Picea abies) putative homologs (PaCCA1, PaGI, PaZTL and PaPRR1) in Arabidopsis, their flowering time, circadian period length, red light response phenotypes and their effect on endogenous clock genes were assessed. For PaCCA1-ox and PaZTL-ox the results were consistent with Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the corresponding Arabidopsis genes. For PaGI consistent results were obtained when expressed in the gi2 mutant, while PaGI and PaPRR1 expressed in wild type did not display the expected phenotypes. These results suggest that protein function of PaCCA1, PaGI and PaZTL are at least partly conserved compared to Arabidopsis homologs, however further studies are needed to reveal the protein function of PaPRR1. Our data suggest that components of the three-loop network typical of the circadian clock in angiosperms were present before the split of gymnosperms and angiosperms.

  7. Variability of Norway spruce morphometric characteristics in progeny tests in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of an analysis of morphometric characteristics of Norway spruce seedlings in the progeny tests in Bosnia and Herzegovina, localities: Drinić and Srebrenica. Progeny tests were established by using seedlings originating from six natural populations from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Seedling height, root collar and whorl distance from the ground, which represents seedling heights in 2011, 2012 and 2013 were measured. The results indicate statistically significant differences between the analyzed characteristics of the observed population. Especially interesting are the populations Potoci and Olovo, which showed the highest growth during the observed period in both progeny tests. The impact of the drought in 2013 can be seen in the progeny test in Srebrenica where height growth in 2013 was lower by more than 50% in comparison to 2012. The impact of drought in the progeny test in Drinić was not observed. The research provides the baseline when selecting the starting population, where the rapid growth of seedlings is set as the main goal.

  8. Genetic diversity of naturally established ectomycorrhizal fungi on Norway spruce seedlings under nursery conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trocha, L K; Rudawska, M; Leski, T; Dabert, M

    2006-10-01

    We have assessed ectomycorrhizal fungi colonizing Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) seedlings in nine forest nurseries using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing analyses of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) amplicons. Restriction analysis of the amplified DNA fragments with HinfI, MboI, and TaqI enzymes allowed the definition of 17 RFLP genotypes; five of them could be unambiguously assigned to Thelephora terrestris, Hebeloma longicaudum, H. crustuliniforme, Tricharina ochroleuca, and Cenococcum geophilum species by comparison with the sporocarp RFLP-pattern database. The remaining genotypes have been sequenced and compared with sequences deposited in the GenBank database. The phylogenetic analysis of resulting sequences and their identified matches indicated that isolated genotypes have formed seven clades. The ascomycetes were predominant: we have determined eight species--Wilcoxina mikolae, Phialophora finlandia, Tuber sp., Cenococcum geophilum, Tricharina ochroleuca, Pulvinula constellatio, and two unidentified ascomycetes--whereas the basidiomycetes were less common (four species denoted: Amphinema byssoides, Hebeloma crustuliniforme, H. longicaudum, and Thelephora terrestris). Wilcoxina mikolae and Phialophora finlandia were the most frequent fungi. Analysis of variance revealed that ascomycetes abundance was higher in nurseries that used organic fertilizer.

  9. CO{sub 2} enrichment and development of freezing tolerance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalen, L.S.; Johnsen, Oe.; Ogner, G. [Norwegian Forest Research Inst., Aas (Norway)

    2001-07-01

    Plant growth and adaptation to cold and freezing temperatures in a CO{sub 2}-enriched atmosphere have received little attention despite their predicted effects on plant distribution and productivity. In this study we looked at the interaction between elevated CO{sub 2} and development of freezing tolerance in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). First-year seedlings were grown under controlled conditions in an atmosphere enriched in CO{sub 2} (70 Pa) for one simulated growth season. We measured shoot growth, registered the timing of growth cessation and bud set, measured needle net photosynthetic rate, and determined needle carbohydrate concentration (fructose + pinitol, glucose, sucrose, inositol, raffinose and starch). Freezing tolerance (LT{sub 50}) was determined after exposing whole seedlings to temperatures ranging from - 6.5 to - 36.0 deg. C and scoring for visual needle browning. Elevated CO{sub 2} did not affect height growth or the timing of growth cessation and bud set. The only statistically significant effects of CO2 treatment were on seedling dry weight, percent dry matter and starch content. During the three weeks after growth cessation and bud set, freezing tolerance increased from - 10 to - 35 deg. C, and there was a marked increase in all soluble sugars except inositol. However, neither freezing tolerance nor the concentration of soluble sugars was significantly influenced by elevated CO{sub 2}. (au)

  10. Pulp and paper production from Spruce wood with kraft and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-15

    Mar 15, 2010 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 9(11) ... 1Department of Forest Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Forestry, Kahramanmaras Sutcu Imam University (KSU) 46100, .... problem, easier recycling of chemicals and waste water ..... Finland. Hafızoglu H, Deniz I (2007). Wood Chemistry, KTU Faculty of Forestry.

  11. Effect of species composition on carbon and nitrogen stocks in forest floor and mineral soil in Norway spruce and European beech mixed forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andivia, Enrique; Rolo, Víctor; Jonard, Mathieu; Formánek, Pavel; Ponette, Quentin

    2015-04-01

    Management of existing forests has been identified as the main strategy to enhance carbon sequestration and to mitigate the impact of climate change on forest ecosystems. In this direction, the conversion of Norway spruce monospecific stands into mixed stands by intermingling individuals of European beech is an ongoing trend in adaptive forest management strategies, especially in Central Europe. However, studies assessing the effect of changes in tree species composition on soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen stocks are still scarce and there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting tree species selection as a feasible management option to mitigate the effects of predicted future climatic scenarios. We compared C and N stocks in the forest floor (litter and humus) and the top 10 cm of mineral soil in two monospecific stands of Norway spruce and European beech and in a mixed stand of both species. The effect of tree species composition on the C and N stocks and its spatial distribution was evaluated based on litterfall, root production, elevation and canopy opening, and by using a combination of modelling and geostatistical techniques. C stock was highest in the Norway spruce and the mixed stands, while N stock was highest in the mixed stand and lowest under European beech, with intermediate values in the Norway spruce stand. Each forest type showed differences in forest floor properties, suggesting that species composition is an important factor governing forest floor characteristics, including C and N stocks. The distribution of C and N stocks between forest soil layers was different for each forest type. C and N stocks were highest in the hummus layer under Norway spruce, whereas both stocks were lowest in the European beech stand. On the other hand, the mixed stand showed the highest C and N accumulation in the uppermost mineral soil layer, while the monospecific stands showed similar values. Litterfall was the main contribution to C and N stocks of the

  12. Tree and stand growth of mature Norway spruce and European beech under long-term ozone fumigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzsch, Hans, E-mail: h.pretzsch@lrz.tum.d [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Dieler, Jochen [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, Rainer [Chair for Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wipfler, Philip [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    In a 50- to 70-year-old mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Germany, tree cohorts have been exposed to double ambient ozone (2xO{sub 3}) from 2000 through 2007 and can be compared with trees in the same stand under the ambient ozone regime (1xO{sub 3}). Annual diameter growth, allocation pattern, stem form, and stem volume were quantified at the individual tree and stand level. Ozone fumigation induced a shift in the resource allocation into height growth at the expense of diameter growth. This change in allometry leads to rather cone-shaped stem forms and reduced stem stability in the case of spruce, and even neiloidal stem shapes in the case of beech. Neglect of such ozone-induced changes in stem shape may lead to a flawed estimation of volume growth. On the stand level, 2xO{sub 3} caused, on average, a decrease of 10.2 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in European beech. - Ozone effects on tree growth and stem shape were investigated for Norway spruce and European beech; the study reveals species-specific reaction patterns in growth rate and allometry under ozone exposure.

  13. Negative effects on survival and performance of Norway spruce seedlings colonized by dark septate root endophytes are primarily isolate-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellenbach, Christoph; Grünig, Christoph R; Sieber, Thomas N

    2011-09-01

    Root endophytes are common and genetically highly diverse suggesting important ecological roles. Yet, relative to above-ground endophytes, little is known about them. Dark septate endophytic fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are ubiquitous root colonizers of conifers and Ericaceae, but their ecological function is largely unknown. Responses of Norway spruce seedlings of two seed provenances to inoculations with isolates of four PAC species were studied in vitro. In addition, isolates of Phialocephala subalpina from two populations within and one outside the natural range of Norway spruce were also included to study the effect of the geographic origin of P. subalpina on host response. The interaction of PAC with Norway spruce ranged from neutral to highly virulent and was primarily isolate-dependent. Variation in virulence was much higher within than among species, nonetheless only isolates of P. subalpina were highly virulent. Disease caused by P. subalpina genotypes from the native range of Norway spruce was more severe than that induced by genotypes from outside the natural distribution of Norway spruce. Virulence was not correlated with the phylogenetic relatedness of the isolates but was positively correlated with the extent of fungal colonization as measured by quantitative real-time PCR.

  14. Biomass Conversion and Expansion Factors for Young Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. Trees Planted on Non-Forest Lands in Eastern Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan DUTCA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study biomass conversion and expansion factors (BCEFs were developed for young Norway spruce trees planted on non-forest lands, in order to support quantification of carbon stock changes in biomass pools of afforestation works. Regression models for stem volume and stem wood density were also developed. The data set included 250 trees collected from 25 plantations between 1 and 12 years old, located in the Eastern Carpathians of Romania. The study shows that BCEFs decreased with increasing tree dimensions, following an exponential trend. In all proposed models the highest prediction was reached when both variables considered (i.e. root-collar diameter and height were used together. However, used separately, height produced a slightly higher prediction compared to root-collar diameter. Stem volume was well predicted by both root-collar diameter and height. Anyway, a significant improvement in prediction resulted when both variables were used together. Stem wood density decreased sharply with the increase of the two tree dimensions used as variables.

  15. Growth and wood properties of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) in nursing mixtures established on nitrogen-deficient mineral soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, A.D.; Watson, B.A. [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Forestry

    2000-07-01

    Rate of growth and wood properties of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) were investigated in triplet mixtures with lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Loud.) (Alaskan provenance) and Japanese larch (Larix kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr.), established on nitrogen-deficient, iron pan soils. These 'nursing' mixtures were compared with pure stands of Sitka spruce that had been either regularly or periodically fertilized with nitrogen. Japanese larch promoted a growth rate in Sitka spruce greater than that achieved in the lodgepole pine-nursed spruce and equivalent to the two pure spruce treatments over the duration of the experiment (current age 28 yrs). Growth of regularly fertilized pure Sitka spruce was not significantly greater than that of periodically fertilized pure spruce. Alaskan lodgepole pine controlled branch size on the lower part of the spruce stems more effectively than the other treatments, although this may have been a function of tree size. Branch characteristics of Japanese larch-nursed spruce, however, were similar to those of the pure spruce treatments. Japanese larch caused an imbalance in crown development in the spruce, although it is unclear from the present study whether this will have an influence on stem and wood quality by the end of the rotation. Overall, the evidence from this study suggests that Japanese larch is an effective nurse of Sitka spruce on nitrogen-deficient iron pans, maintaining a rate of growth similar to that of pure Sitka spruce periodically fertilized with nitrogen and higher than that observed in spruce nursed by Alaskan lodgepole pine.

  16. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar; Batic, Franc; Ribaric Lasnik, Cvetka

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO(2) from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO(2).

  17. Vertical gradients and seasonal variation in stem CO2 efflux within a Norway spruce stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, Lasse; Räntfors, Mats; Wallin, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Stem CO2 efflux is known to vary seasonally and vertically along tree stems. However, annual tree- and stand-scale efflux estimates are commonly based on measurements made only a few times a year, during daytime and at breast height. In this study, the effect of these simplifying assumptions on annual efflux estimates and their influence on the estimates of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling are evaluated. In order to assess the strength of seasonal, diurnal and along-stem variability in CO2 efflux, half-hourly measurements were carried out at three heights on three mature Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees over a period of 3 years. Making the common assumption of breast height efflux rates being representative of the entire stem was found to result in underestimations of 10-17% in the annual tree-scale CO2 efflux. Upscaling using only daytime measurements from breast height increased the underestimation to 15-20%. Furthermore, the results show that the strength of the vertical gradient varies seasonally, being strongest in the early summer and non-existent during the cool months. The observed seasonality in the vertical CO2 efflux gradient could not be explained by variation in stem temperature, temperature response of the CO2 efflux (Q10), outer-bark permeability, CO2 transport in the xylem or CO2 release from the phloem. However, the estimated CO2 concentration immediately beneath the bark was considerably higher in the upper stem during the main period of diameter growth, coinciding with the strongest vertical efflux gradient. These results suggest that higher growth rates in the upper stem are the main cause for the observed vertical variation in the stem CO2 effluxes. Furthermore, the results indicate that accounting for the vertical efflux variation is essential for assessments of the importance of stems in stand-scale carbon cycling.

  18. Terpenoid and carbonyl emissions from Norway spruce in Finland during the growing season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakola, Hannele; Tarvainen, Virpi; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Jaars, Kerneels; Hemmilä, Marja; Kulmala, Markku; Bäck, Jaana; Hellén, Heidi

    2017-03-01

    We present spring and summer volatile organic compound (VOC) emission rate measurements from Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) growing in a boreal forest in southern Finland. The measurements were conducted using in situ gas chromatograph with 1 to 2 h time resolution to reveal quantitative and qualitative short-term and seasonal variability of the emissions. The measurements cover altogether 14 weeks in years 2011, 2014 and 2015. Monoterpene (MT) and sesquiterpene (SQT) emission rates were measured all the time, but isoprene only in 2014 and 2015 and acetone and C4-C10 aldehydes only in 2015. The emission rates of all the compounds were low in spring, but MT, acetone, and C4-C10 aldehyde emission rates increased as summer proceeded, reaching maximum emission rates in July. Late summer mean values (late July and August) were 29, 17, and 33 ng g(dw)-1 h-1 for MTs, acetone, and aldehydes respectively. SQT emission rates increased during the summer and highest emissions were measured in late summer (late summer mean value 84 ng g(dw)-1 h-1) concomitant with highest linalool emissions most likely due to stress effects. The between-tree variability of emission pattern was studied by measuring seven different trees during the same afternoon using adsorbent tubes. Especially the contributions of limonene, terpinolene, and camphene were found to vary between trees, whereas proportions of α-pinene (25 ± 5 %) and β-pinene (7 ± 3 %) were more stable. Our results show that it is important to measure emissions at canopy level due to irregular emission pattern, but reliable SQT emission data can be measured only from enclosures. SQT emissions contributed more than 90 % of the ozone reactivity most of the time, and about 70 % of the OH reactivity during late summer. The contribution of aldehydes to OH reactivity was comparable to that of MT during late summer, 10-30 % most of the time.

  19. Production of fuel chips in a 50-year old Norway spruce stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suadicani, K. [Danish Centre for Forest, Landscape and Planning, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The terrain-chipping system is widely used for thinning young stands in Denmark. The system is also relevant in older stands, but problems have occurred when handling larger trees in an upright position. The possibilities of harvesting roundwood and fuel-chips simultaneously (integrated harvesting) have been demonstrated. The felling operation is critical because it determines the chipping productivity and the damage to the remaining trees. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare three whole-tree chipping systems and one integrated harvesting system in a 50-year old stand of Norway spruce. The whole-tree systems had different felling operations: (1) Motor-manual felling, (2) felling and bunching at the striproads (feller-buncher), (3) felling in a herringbone pattern (single-grip harvester). Felling in the integrated harvesting system (4) was also in a herringbone pattern using a single-grip harvester, but the felling included production of a sawlog from the butt-end when possible. All chipping was performed in the stand. It was found that chipping productivity was strongly dependent on ease of feeding the trees into the chipper. Motor-manual felling was cheaper than mechanical felling and bunching, but the bunching improved the chipping productivity so much that it made up for the extra felling costs. Integrated harvesting improved the income, but the net income was lower than for whole-tree chipping with motormanual felling or felling and bunching. It was concluded that easy feeding is essential for chipping productivity and system economy. An alternative could be to use a combined harvester/forwarder for integrated harvesting. (Author)

  20. Growth response to a changing environment-Impacts of tropospheric ozone dose on photosynthesis of Norway spruce forests in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Pietsch, Stephan; Hasenauer, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant, although plants have active defense strategies (e.g. antioxidants), the cumulative ozone dose may lead to chronic damages to plant tissues. Ozone enters into plants through stomata and reacts with other chemicals to create toxic compounds. This affects plant photosynthesis and may reduce CO2 fixation, and consequently growth. Open top cambers (OTC) are usually used to study the effects of elevated ozone levels on photosynthesis; whereas field studies with on site occurring ozone levels are rare. A recent modelling study on Norway spruce stands in Austria exhibited trends in model errors indicating that an increase in ozone dose leads to a reduction in volume increment. This study aims to explore how different ozone doses affect photosynthesis under field conditions and may translate into growth response for 12 stands of Norway spruce, distributed along an ozone concentration gradient across Austria. A LI-6400xt photosynthesis system was utilized to collect physiological parameters including net photosynthesis, stomata conductance, internal CO2 concentration, transpiration, etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence data was collected by using a PEA chlorophyll fluorescence meter, and chlorophyll content was measured. Morphological characteristics and soil samples were also analyzed. Ozone dose to leaf tissue was calculated from external ozone concentration, the conductance of the stomata to ozone, the leaf area index and the time span of the day when ozone uptake takes place. Our results confirm that increasing cumulative ozone dose reduces maximum assimilation rate and carboxylation efficiency under field conditions. Our final goal is to quantify how far this ozone induced reduction in assimilation power ultimately translates into a growth reduction of Norway spruce in Austria.

  1. Measuring the concentration of carboxylic acid groups in torrefied spruce wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazraie Shoulaifar, Tooran; Demartini, Nikolai; Ivaska, Ari; Fardim, Pedro; Hupa, Mikko

    2012-11-01

    Torrefaction is moderate thermal treatment (∼200-300°C) to improve the energy density, handling and storage properties of biomass fuels. In biomass, carboxylic sites are partially responsible for its hygroscopic. These sites are degraded to varying extents during torrefaction. In this paper, we apply methylene blue sorption and potentiometric titration to measure the concentration of carboxylic acid groups in spruce wood torrefied for 30min at temperatures between 180 and 300°C. The results from both methods were applicable and the values agreed well. A decrease in the equilibrium moisture content at different humidity was also measured for the torrefied wood samples, which is in good agreement with the decrease in carboxylic acid sites. Thus both methods offer a means of directly measuring the decomposition of carboxylic groups in biomass during torrefaction as a valuable parameter in evaluating the extent of torrefaction which provides new information to the chemical changes occurring during torrefaction.

  2. Initial Fertilization Impact on Norway Spruce Nutrition and Growth in the Krušné Hory Mts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pecháček

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study consisted in verifying the hypothesis whether the application of tableted fertilizers Silvamix® Forte, Silvamix® R, Stromfolixyl® and calcareous dolomite affected significantly the nutrition and growth of Norway spruce. In order to carry out research investigation, the experimental Suchdol locality has been selected as it represents large‑scale reclaimed sites in the Krušné hory Mts. Ameliorating agents were applied using the initial spot fertilization of Norway spruce plantations. In the course of two years, activities as follows were carried out annually: (1 top shoots measurement, (2 sampling the latest needle year‑class. The applied fertilizers impact on the concentrations of nutrients in needle dry matter was not significant with minor exception. Fertilizers Silvamix® Forte and Silvamix® R can be recommended to support seedlings growth in the area of interest since there had been positive effect on annual height increment found out. Calcareous dolomite showed the most favourable effect on the shoot biomass growth. Stromfolixyl® fertilizer had no effect on the annual increment; its impact on the nutrition can be characterized as insignificant since fertilized individuals showed lower phosphorus concentration in needle dry matter.

  3. The role of phosphorus, magnesium and potassium availability in soil fungal exploration of mineral nutrient sources in Norway spruce forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstock, Nicholas P; Berner, Christoffer; Smits, Mark M; Krám, Pavel; Wallander, Håkan

    2016-07-01

    We investigated fungal growth and community composition in buried meshbags, amended with apatite, biotite or hornblende, in Norway spruce (Picea abies) forests of varying nutrient status. Norway spruce needles and soil collected from forests overlying serpentinite had low levels of potassium and phosphorus, those from granite had low levels of magnesium, whereas those from amphibolite had comparably high levels of these nutrients. We assayed the fungal colonization of meshbags by measuring ergosterol content and fungal community with 454 sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region. In addition, we measured fine root density. Fungal biomass was increased by apatite amendment across all plots and particularly on the K- and P-deficient serpentinite plots, whereas hornblende and biotite had no effect on fungal biomass on any plots. Fungal community (total fungal and ectomycorrhizal) composition was affected strongly by sampling location and soil depth, whereas mineral amendments had no effect on community composition. Fine root biomass was significantly correlated with fungal biomass. Ectomycorrhizal communities may respond to increased host-tree phosphorus demand by increased colonization of phosphorus-containing minerals, but this does not appear to translate to a shift in ectomycorrhizal community composition. This growth response to nutrient demand does not appear to exist for potassium or magnesium limitation.

  4. Effects of prolonged drought on the anatomy of sun and shade needles in young Norway spruce trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Roman; Volařík, Daniel; Urban, Josef; Børja, Isabella; Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Eldhuset, Toril Drabløs; Krokene, Paal

    2015-11-01

    Predicted increases in the frequency and duration of drought are expected to negatively affect tree vitality, but we know little about how water shortage will influence needle anatomy and thereby the trees' photosynthetic and hydraulic capacity. In this study, we evaluated anatomical changes in sun and shade needles of 20-year-old Norway spruce trees exposed to artificial drought stress. Canopy position was found to be important for needle structure, as sun needles had significantly higher values than shade needles for all anatomical traits (i.e., cross-sectional needle area, number of tracheids in needle, needle hydraulic conductivity, and tracheid lumen area), except proportion of xylem area per cross-sectional needle area. In sun needles, drought reduced all trait values by 10-40%, whereas in shade needles, only tracheid maximum diameter was reduced by drought. Due to the relatively weaker response of shade needles than sun needles in drought-stressed trees, the difference between the two needle types was reduced by 25% in the drought-stressed trees compared to the control trees. The observed changes in needle anatomy provide new understanding of how Norway spruce adapts to drought stress and may improve predictions of how forests will respond to global climate change.

  5. High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenck, A. R.; Quinn, M.; Whetten, R. W.; Pullman, G.; Sederoff, R.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is the method of choice for many plant biotechnology laboratories; however, large-scale use of this organism in conifer transformation has been limited by difficult propagation of explant material, selection efficiencies and low transformation frequency. We have analyzed co-cultivation conditions and different disarmed strains of Agrobacterium to improve transformation. Additional copies of virulence genes were added to three common disarmed strains. These extra virulence genes included either a constitutively active virG or extra copies of virG and virB, both from pTiBo542. In experiments with Norway spruce, we increased transformation efficiencies 1000-fold from initial experiments where little or no transient expression was detected. Over 100 transformed lines expressing the marker gene beta-glucuronidase (GUS) were generated from rapidly dividing embryogenic suspension-cultured cells co-cultivated with Agrobacterium. GUS activity was used to monitor transient expression and to further test lines selected on kanamycin-containing medium. In loblolly pine, transient expression increased 10-fold utilizing modified Agrobacterium strains. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is a useful technique for large-scale generation of transgenic Norway spruce and may prove useful for other conifer species.

  6. Norway spruce (Picea abies) laccases:Characterization of a laccase in a lignin-forming tissue culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanna Koutaniemi; Heli A Malmberg; Liisa K Simola; Teemu H Teeri; Anna Karkonen

    2015-01-01

    Secondarily thickened cel wal s of water-conducting vessels and tracheids and support-giving sclerenchyma cel s contain lignin that makes the cel wal s water impermeable and strong. To what extent laccases and peroxidases contribute to lignin biosynthesis in muro is under active evaluation. We performed an in silico study of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) laccases utilizing available genomic data. As many as 292 laccase encoding sequences (genes, gene fragments, and pseudogenes) were detected in the spruce genome. Out of the 112 genes annotated as laccases, 79 are expressed at some level. We isolated five ful-length laccase cDNAs from developing xylem and an extracel ular lignin-forming cel culture of spruce. In addition, we purified and biochemical y characterized one culture medium laccase from the lignin-forming cel culture. This laccase has an acidic pH optimum (pH 3.8–4.2) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation. It has a high affinity to coniferyl alcohol with an apparent Km value of 3.5 mM;however, the laccase has a lower catalytic efficiency (Vmax/Km) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation compared with some purified culture medium peroxidases. The properties are discussed in the context of the information already known about laccases/coniferyl alcohol oxidases of coniferous plants.

  7. Modeling Wood Fibre Length in Black Spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. BSP Based on Ecological Land Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisha Townshend

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective planning to optimize the forest value chain requires accurate and detailed information about the resource; however, estimates of the distribution of fibre properties on the landscape are largely unavailable prior to harvest. Our objective was to fit a model of the tree-level average fibre length related to ecosite classification and other forest inventory variables depicted at the landscape scale. A series of black spruce increment cores were collected at breast height from trees in nine different ecosite groups within the boreal forest of northeastern Ontario, and processed using standard techniques for maceration and fibre length measurement. Regression tree analysis and random forests were used to fit hierarchical classification models and find the most important predictor variables for the response variable area-weighted mean stem-level fibre length. Ecosite group was the best predictor in the regression tree. Longer mean fibre-length was associated with more productive ecosites that supported faster growth. The explanatory power of the model of fitted data was good; however, random forests simulations indicated poor generalizability. These results suggest the potential to develop localized models linking wood fibre length in black spruce to landscape-level attributes, and improve the sustainability of forest management by identifying ideal locations to harvest wood that has desirable fibre characteristics.

  8. Micro- and macro-geographic scale effect on the molecular imprint of selection and adaptation in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfi, Marta; Mosca, Elena; Di Pierro, Erica Adele; Troggio, Michela; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Sperisen, Christoph; La Porta, Nicola; Neale, David B

    2014-01-01

    Forest tree species of temperate and boreal regions have undergone a long history of demographic changes and evolutionary adaptations. The main objective of this study was to detect signals of selection in Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst), at different sampling-scales and to investigate, accounting for population structure, the effect of environment on species genetic diversity. A total of 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 290 genes were genotyped at two geographic scales: across 12 populations distributed along two altitudinal-transects in the Alps (micro-geographic scale), and across 27 populations belonging to the range of Norway spruce in central and south-east Europe (macro-geographic scale). At the macrogeographic scale, principal component analysis combined with Bayesian clustering revealed three major clusters, corresponding to the main areas of southern spruce occurrence, i.e. the Alps, Carpathians, and Hercynia. The populations along the altitudinal transects were not differentiated. To assess the role of selection in structuring genetic variation, we applied a Bayesian and coalescent-based F(ST)-outlier method and tested for correlations between allele frequencies and climatic variables using regression analyses. At the macro-geographic scale, the F(ST)-outlier methods detected together 11 F(ST)-outliers. Six outliers were detected when the same analyses were carried out taking into account the genetic structure. Regression analyses with population structure correction resulted in the identification of two (micro-geographic scale) and 38 SNPs (macro-geographic scale) significantly correlated with temperature and/or precipitation. Six of these loci overlapped with F(ST)-outliers, among them two loci encoding an enzyme involved in riboflavin biosynthesis and a sucrose synthase. The results of this study indicate a strong relationship between genetic and environmental variation at both geographic scales. It also suggests that an

  9. Micro- and macro-geographic scale effect on the molecular imprint of selection and adaptation in Norway spruce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Scalfi

    Full Text Available Forest tree species of temperate and boreal regions have undergone a long history of demographic changes and evolutionary adaptations. The main objective of this study was to detect signals of selection in Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst, at different sampling-scales and to investigate, accounting for population structure, the effect of environment on species genetic diversity. A total of 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs representing 290 genes were genotyped at two geographic scales: across 12 populations distributed along two altitudinal-transects in the Alps (micro-geographic scale, and across 27 populations belonging to the range of Norway spruce in central and south-east Europe (macro-geographic scale. At the macrogeographic scale, principal component analysis combined with Bayesian clustering revealed three major clusters, corresponding to the main areas of southern spruce occurrence, i.e. the Alps, Carpathians, and Hercynia. The populations along the altitudinal transects were not differentiated. To assess the role of selection in structuring genetic variation, we applied a Bayesian and coalescent-based F(ST-outlier method and tested for correlations between allele frequencies and climatic variables using regression analyses. At the macro-geographic scale, the F(ST-outlier methods detected together 11 F(ST-outliers. Six outliers were detected when the same analyses were carried out taking into account the genetic structure. Regression analyses with population structure correction resulted in the identification of two (micro-geographic scale and 38 SNPs (macro-geographic scale significantly correlated with temperature and/or precipitation. Six of these loci overlapped with F(ST-outliers, among them two loci encoding an enzyme involved in riboflavin biosynthesis and a sucrose synthase. The results of this study indicate a strong relationship between genetic and environmental variation at both geographic scales. It also

  10. Are Early Somatic Embryos of the Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. Organised?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Petrek

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis in conifer species has great potential for the forestry industry. Hence, a number of methods have been developed for their efficient and rapid propagation through somatic embryogenesis. Although information is available regarding the previous process-mediated generation of embryogenic cells to form somatic embryos, there is a dearth of information in the literature on the detailed structure of these clusters.The main aim of this study was to provide a more detailed structure of the embryogenic tissue clusters obtained through the in vitro propagation of the Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst.. We primarily focused on the growth of early somatic embryos (ESEs. The data on ESE growth suggested that there may be clear distinctions between their inner and outer regions. Therefore, we selected ESEs collected on the 56th day after sub-cultivation to dissect the homogeneity of the ESE clusters. Two colourimetric assays (acetocarmine and fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining and one metabolic assay based on the use of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride uncovered large differences in the metabolic activity inside the cluster. Next, we performed nuclear magnetic resonance measurements. The ESE cluster seemed to be compactly aggregated during the first four weeks of cultivation; thereafter, the difference between the 1H nuclei concentration in the inner and outer clusters was more evident. There were clear differences in the visual appearance of embryos from the outer and inner regions. Finally, a cluster was divided into six parts (three each from the inner and the outer regions of the embryo to determine their growth and viability. The innermost embryos (centripetally towards the cluster centre could grow after sub-cultivation but exhibited the slowest rate and required the longest time to reach the common growth rate. To confirm our hypothesis on the organisation of the ESE cluster, we investigated the effect of

  11. Ozone Impacts on forest Growth: A Sensitivity Analysis for Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, S. A.; Hasenauer, H.

    2009-04-01

    Ozone is one of the most important damaging air pollutants for forests in Austria. The mean atmospheric ozone concentration varies between 22.5 and 51.5 ppb (parts per billion) depending on altitude. Based on the emissions of the precursor substances (nitrous oxides and volatile hydrocarbons), the concentrations increase around 0.2 ppb per year and exceed the threshold for effects on plants. The light saturated rate of photosynthesis is sensible to ozone load. This corresponds to a reduction of the potentially possible CO2 fixation and can be regarded as a proof of the damage potential of ozone. The defence capacity vis-à-vis increased ozone increases with increasing elevation. At higher elevations the higher natural stress potential is accompanied by a higher defence potential against ozone damage. Based on these findings the following working hypotheses were formulated: (i) Under the acceptance that ozone uptake leads to a reduction of volume increment, model calculations on volume increment should exhibit a systematic bias versus the ozone dose. (ii) For locations unencumbered by ozone, the model should underestimate, for strongly burdened locations it should overestimate volume increment. (iii) Error patterns should change with increasing elevation, due to the increasing defence potential. Results demonstrated that at elevations above 800 m a.s.l. no ozone effect was detectable via trends in errors versus ozone dose. At elevations below 800 m, a significant trend in errors from plots with low ozone doses to plots with high ozone doses was evident. Although the model used in this study includes no explicit ozone reactions, we can be confident at the 95 % level that Norway spruce trees growing below 800 m a.s.l. react to an increase in ozone dose with a reduction in volume increment. It is, however, important to emphasize that the evidence for increment reduction is qualitative evidence but does not allow the quantification of the ozone induced reduction in

  12. Incorporating shape constraints in generalized additive modelling of the height-diameter relationship for Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Pya

    2016-02-01

    fitting. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the SCAM approach allows optimal regression modelling flexibility similar to the standard GAM but with the additional possibility of defining specific constraints for the model effects. The longitudinal character of the model allows for tree height imputation for the current status of forests but also for future tree height prediction. Keywords: Height-diameter curve, Norway spruce, Shape constrained additive models, Impact of climate change, Varying coefficient models

  13. Using isotopic patterns of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi to elucidate fungal sources of carbon and nitrogen in a Norway spruce stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Janet; Rinne-Garmston, Katja; Penttilä, Reijo; Hobbie, Erik; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    To predict effects of global change on fungal community structure and the consequential effects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, we first need to understand different fungal sources of C and N. We determined sources of C and N by measuring δ15N and δ13C of an extensive collection of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic sporocarps and their potential substrates from Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in southern Finland. The substrates included organic soil, roots in organic soil, mineral soil, roots in mineral soil, moss, needles, needles in litter, branches, twigs in litter, wood and decay wood from stages I-V. Notably, δ15N and δ13C analysis of wood in decay stages I-V was a novel measurement, as were our associations between wood decay fungi and the decay stage of trees. Decay stage of wood significantly correlated with the δ15N and δ13C of associated saprotrophic wood decay fungi species. Fungi were lower in δ15N by 0.3-0.7‰ when associated with decay wood in stages II and III compared to I and IV and higher in δ13C by 0.9-1.2‰ when associated with decay stage I compared to decay stages II-IV. The ectomycorrhizal fungi, Piloderma fallax, was significantly correlated with 15N enrichment of decay wood upon its introduction in decay stages III and IV that continued to the later decay stage V, with δ15N of decay stage V 1.5‰ higher than decay stage IV. These results indicate that wood decay fungi rely on C and N from various wood decay stages and influence C and N pools of wood as well. Litter decay fungi were lower in δ13C than wood decay fungi by 1.9‰ and higher in δ15N by 3‰ and isotopically tracked their C and N sources. Calocera viscosa, Gymnopus acervatus, and Leotia lubrica were highly 15N-enriched compared to other saprotrophic fungi and they had δ15N values similar to fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae indicating function more similar to ectomycorrhizal fungi or N sources similar to this functional group. Similar to other

  14. Liming effects on the chemical composition of the organic surface layer of a mature Norway spruce stand (Picea abies [L.] Karst.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, W.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Knicker, H.; Jager, de P.A.; Kreutzer, K.; Weiá, T.

    2003-01-01

    The application of lime in a mature Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) forest in southern Germany induced major changes in the activity of soil organisms and root growth. Since this may influence the chemical compostion of the soil organic matter (SOM) of the organic surface layer, its composit

  15. Galactoglucomannan-rich hemicellulose extract from Norway spruce (Picea abies) exerts beneficial effects on chronic prostatic inflammation and lower urinary tract symptoms in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkol, Yvonne; Vuorikoski, Heikki; Tuomela, Johanna; Holmbom, Bjarne; Bernoulli, Jenni

    2017-08-01

    Galactoglucomannan (GGM) is the main hemicellulose class in wood of coniferous trees and could be potentially utilized as a possible health-promoting substance for food and pharmaceutical industry. Our aim was to evaluate effects of orally administered GGM-rich extract from Norway spruce in a rat model of chronic prostatitis associated with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Prostatic inflammation and LUTS was induced in male rats using testosterone and 17β-estradiol exposure for 18 weeks. Rats were treated with 2% GGM dissolved in drinking water during weeks 13-18. Pelvic pain response, LUT function and histopathological evaluation of the prostate were assessed. The results show that hormonal exposure induced LUTS seen as decreased urine flow rate, increased bladder pressure, voiding times, bladder capacity and residual urine volumes. GGM had positive effects on urodynamical parameters by decreasing the basal bladder pressure, increasing the urine flow rate and volume, reducing the residual volume and increasing micturition intervals. GGM reduced the extent of the hormone exposure-induced prostatic inflammation. Increase of pelvic pain induced by hormone exposure was only slightly affected by GGM treatment. The results suggest that orally administered GGM may have potential usage for improving lower urinary tract function associated with chronic prostatic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of warming and drought on carbon balance related to wood formation in black spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Annie; Beaulieu, Marilène; Balducci, Lorena; Giovannelli, Alessio; Gagnon, Michel J.; Rossi, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Wood formation in trees represents a carbon sink that can be modified in the case of stress. The way carbon metabolism constrains growth during stress periods (high temperature and water deficit) is now under debate. In this study, the amounts of non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) for xylogenesis in black spruce, Picea mariana, saplings were assessed under high temperature and drought in order to determine the role of sugar mobilization for osmotic purposes and its consequences for secondary growth. Methods Four-year-old saplings of black spruce in a greenhouse were subjected to different thermal conditions with respect to the outside air temperature (T0) in 2010 (2 and 5 °C higher than T0) and 2011 (6 °C warmer than T0 during the day or night) with a dry period of about 1 month in June of each year. Wood formation together with starch, NSCs and leaf parameters (water potential and photosynthesis) were monitored from May to September. Key Results With the exception of raffinose, the amounts of soluble sugars were not modified in the cambium even if gas exchange and photosynthesis were greatly reduced during drought. Raffinose increased more than pinitol under a pre-dawn water potential of less than –1 Mpa, presumably because this compound is better suited than polyol for replacing water and capturing free radicals, and its degradation into simple sugar is easier. Warming decreased the starch storage in the xylem as well the available hexose pool in the cambium and the xylem, probably because of an increase in respiration. Conclusions Radial stem growth was reduced during drought due to the mobilization of NSCs for osmotic purposes and due to the lack of cell turgor. Thus plant water status during wood formation can influence the NSCs available for growth in the cambium and xylem. PMID:24950772

  17. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Linnakoski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes, exemplified by increased temperatures and CO2 concentration, pose a global threat to forest health. Of particular concern are pests and pathogens, with a warming climate altering their distributions and evolutionary capacity, while impairing the ability of some plants to respond to infections. Progress in understanding and mitigating such effects is currently hindered by a lack of empirical research. Norway spruce (Picea abies is one of the most economically important tree species in northern Europe, and is considered highly vulnerable to changes in climate. It is commonly infected by the fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, and we hypothesized that damage caused to trees will increase under future climate change predictions. To test this hypothesis an in vivo greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a changed growing environment on E. polonica infected Norway spruce seedlings, comparing ambient conditions to predicted temperatures and CO2 levels in Finland for the years 2030 and 2100. In total, 450 seedlings were randomized amongst the three treatments, with 25 seedlings from each allocated to inoculation with one of five different fungal strains or mock-inoculation. Seedlings were monitored throughout the thermal growing season for mortality, and lesion length and depth indices were measured at the experiment conclusion. Disease severity (mortality and lesions was consistently greater in fungal-inoculated than mock-inoculated seedlings. However, substantial differences were observed among fungal strains in response to climate scenarios. For example, although overall seedling mortality was highest under the most distant (and severe climate change expectations, of the two fungal strains with the highest mortality counts (referred to as F4 and F5, one produced greater mortality under the 2030 and 2100 scenarios than ambient conditions, whereas climate scenario had no effect on the other. This study contributes

  18. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqun OuYang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8% out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49% and hormone signal transduction (8.39%. With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1, AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have

  19. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnakoski, Riikka; Forbes, Kristian M; Wingfield, Michael J; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes, exemplified by increased temperatures and CO2 concentration, pose a global threat to forest health. Of particular concern are pests and pathogens, with a warming climate altering their distributions and evolutionary capacity, while impairing the ability of some plants to respond to infections. Progress in understanding and mitigating such effects is currently hindered by a lack of empirical research. Norway spruce (Picea abies) is one of the most economically important tree species in northern Europe, and is considered highly vulnerable to changes in climate. It is commonly infected by the fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, and we hypothesized that damage caused to trees will increase under future climate change predictions. To test this hypothesis an in vivo greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a changed growing environment on E. polonica infected Norway spruce seedlings, comparing ambient conditions to predicted temperatures and CO2 levels in Finland for the years 2030 and 2100. In total, 450 seedlings were randomized amongst the three treatments, with 25 seedlings from each allocated to inoculation with one of five different fungal strains or mock-inoculation. Seedlings were monitored throughout the thermal growing season for mortality, and lesion length and depth indices were measured at the experiment conclusion. Disease severity (mortality and lesions) was consistently greater in fungal-inoculated than mock-inoculated seedlings. However, substantial differences were observed among fungal strains in response to climate scenarios. For example, although overall seedling mortality was highest under the most distant (and severe) climate change expectations, of the two fungal strains with the highest mortality counts (referred to as F4 and F5), one produced greater mortality under the 2030 and 2100 scenarios than ambient conditions, whereas climate scenario had no effect on the other. This study contributes to a limited

  20. Carbon and Nitrogen Pools and Fluxes in Adjacent Mature Norway Spruce and European Beech Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Oulehle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We compared two adjacent mature forest ecosystem types (spruce vs. beech to unravel the fate of assimilated carbon (C and the cycling of organic and inorganic nitrogen (N without the risk of the confounding influences of climatic and site differences when comparing different sites. The stock of C in biomass was higher (258 t·ha−1 in the older (150 years beech stand compared to the younger (80 years planted spruce stand (192 t·ha−1, whereas N biomass pools were comparable (1450 kg·ha−1. Significantly higher C and N soil pools were measured in the beech stand, both in forest floor and mineral soil. Cumulative annual CO2 soil efflux was similar among stands, i.e., 9.87 t·ha−1·year−1 of C in the spruce stand and 9.01 t·ha−1·year−1 in the beech stand. Soil temperature explained 78% (Q10 = 3.7 and 72% (Q10 = 4.2 of variability in CO2 soil efflux in the spruce and beech stand, respectively. However, the rather tight N cycle in the spruce stand prevented inorganic N losses, whereas losses were higher in the beech stand and were dominated by nitrate in the mineral soil. Our results highlighted the long-term consequences of forest management on C and N cycling.

  1. Comparison of N and C dynamics in two Norway spruce stands using a process oriented simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, H.; Beier, C.

    1998-01-01

    ) was located in south-west Sweden (Skogaby) growing on a loamy sand soil. The old stand (70 years old) was growing on a sandy soil in western Denmark (Klosterhede). Differences in specific rates of processes between the two sites were estimated in terms of parameter values derived by calibration of the model......Nitrogen and carbon dynamics of two Norway spruce stands were compared using a dynamic soil-plant simulation model (SOILN). The objectives were to evaluate differences in properties between the two stands and to explore the consequences on C and N dynamics. The young stand (25 years old...... whereas growth was more similar. The soil carbon balance was positive and soil CIN ratio increased for the young stand. For the old stand the soil carbon balance was negative and the C/N ratio decreased. The soil mineral N levels were much lower in the younger stand which was explained by a higher plant...

  2. Tree water status and growth of saplings and mature Norway spruce (Picea abies at a dry distribution limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter eOberhuber

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the size effect on stem water status and growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. occurring at the edge of its natural range in a dry inner Alpine environment (750 m asl, Tyrol, Austria. Intra-annual dynamics of stem water deficit (ΔW, maximum daily shrinkage (MDS and radial growth (RG were compared among saplings (stem diameter/height: 2.2 cm/93 cm; n = 7 and mature adult trees (25 cm/12.7 m; n = 6 during 2014. ΔW, MDS and RG were extracted from stem diameter variations, which were continuously recorded by automatic dendrometers and the influence of environmental drivers was evaluated by applying moving correlation analysis (MCA. Additionally, we used Morlet wavelet analysis to assess the differences in cyclic radial stem variations between saplings and mature trees. Results indicate that saplings and mature trees were experiencing water limitation throughout the growing season. However, saplings exhibited a more strained stem water status and higher sensitivity to environmental conditions than mature trees. Hence, the significantly lower radial increments in saplings (0.16 ± 0.03 mm compared to mature trees (0.54 ± 0.14 mm is related to more constrained water status in the former, affecting the rate and duration of RG. The wavelet analysis consistently revealed more distinct diurnal stem variations in saplings compared to mature trees. Intra-annual RG was most closely related to climate variables that influence transpiration, i.e., vapor pressure deficit, relative air humidity, and air temperature. MCA, however, showed pronounced instability of climate-growth relationships, which masked missing temporal or significant correlations when the entire study period (April-October was considered. We conclude that an increase in evaporative demand will impair regeneration and long-term stability of drought-prone inner Alpine Norway spruce forests.

  3. Fine Spatial Scale Variation of Soil Microbial Communities under European Beech and Norway Spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacke, Heiko; Goldmann, Kezia; Schöning, Ingo; Pfeiffer, Birgit; Kaiser, Kristin; Castillo-Villamizar, Genis A.; Schrumpf, Marion; Buscot, François; Daniel, Rolf; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    The complex interactions between trees and soil microbes in forests as well as their inherent seasonal and spatial variations are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the effects of major European tree species (Fagus sylvatica L. and Picea abies (L.) Karst) on soil bacterial and fungal communities. Mineral soil samples were collected from different depths (0–10, 10–20 cm) and at different horizontal distances from beech or spruce trunks (0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 m) in early summer and autumn. We assessed the composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities based on 16S rRNA gene and ITS DNA sequences. Community composition of bacteria and fungi was most strongly affected by soil pH and tree species. Different ectomycorrhizal fungi (e.g., Tylospora) known to establish mutualistic associations with plant roots showed a tree species preference. Moreover, bacterial and fungal community composition showed spatial and seasonal shifts in soil surrounding beech and spruce. The relative abundance of saprotrophic fungi was higher at a depth of 0–10 vs. 10–20 cm depth. This was presumably a result of changes in nutrient availability, as litter input and organic carbon content decreased with soil depth. Overall bacterial community composition showed strong variations under spruce with increasing distance from the tree trunks, which might be attributed in part to higher fine root biomass near spruce trunks. Furthermore, overall bacterial community composition was strongly affected by season under deciduous trees. PMID:28066384

  4. Determination of the moisture content of Nordic spruce wood through cone heater experiments and an integral model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mindykowski, Pierrick Anthony; Jørgensen, M.; Svensson, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    The combination of cone heater experiments and an integral model was used to determine the moisture content of Nordic spruce with varying degree of drying. Nine specimens of Nordic spruce were pre-heated to 105°C in a convective oven for durations ranging from 0 days (no drying) and up to 63 days...... in increments of 7 days. The fuel moisture content was measured by weighting the specimens before and after the pre-heating. A mass loss cone was used to determine the time for piloted ignition of each specimen. A high-flux asymptotic solution from an integral model permitted to determine that the ignition...... is developed that can be used to determine the time to ignition of a piece of wet spruce, and it is suggested that this method can be used for establishing similar equations for other types of moist wood....

  5. Surface free radicals detection using molecular scavenging method on black spruce wood treated with cold, atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jean-Michel; Levasseur, Olivier; Vlad, Mirela; Stafford, Luc; Riedl, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Formation of surface free radicals on wood surfaces during plasma treatment could be an important factor when it comes to wood coating adhesion enhancement. In order to explore this aspect, freshly sanded black spruce (Picea mariana) wood samples were exposed to either plane-to-plane atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge (AP-DBD) or the flowing afterglow of an AP-DBD and then dipped in a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) solution. Wood veneers (extracted to eliminate small molecules prior to each plasma treatment) showed an increase of their reaction rate toward DPPH after treatment in the AP-DBD operated in nominally pure He; a feature ascribed to the plasma-assisted formation of free radicals on the wood surface. Addition of trace amounts (0.1%) of O2 in the He plasma produced a decrease in DPPH reactivity, suggesting that oxygen-spruce interaction during plasma treatment quenches free radicals formation. Similar experiments performed using the flowing afterglow of AP-DBD operated in either N2 or N2/O2 showed that both treatments do not generate significant amount of surface free radicals. This partially results from oxygen-wood interactions due to the open-air configuration of the afterglow reactor.

  6. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load; Charakteristik und Modellierung von Fichtenholz unter dynamischer Druckbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-28

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The

  7. Hyperspectral data for assessment of temporal changes in Norway spruce forest conditions in the mountainous region of the Czech Republic affected by long-term acidic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrechtova, J.; Lhotakova, Z.; Misurec, J.; Kopackova, V.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Edwards-Jonasova, M.; Kupkova, L.; Cervena, L.; Potuckova, M.; Cudlin, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Ore Mts. located in the western part of the Czech Republic suffered during 1950's-1990´s heavy atmospheric pollution due to the mining activities and brown coal combustion. Acidic deposition in combination with harsh climatic conditions led there to large-scale forest decline. Although the load of SO2 has significantly decreased since 1991, tree damage was still visible in 1998 in terms of high defoliation or dead trees. Nowadays Norway spruce trees do not exhibit visible symptoms of damage but the full recovery of Norway spruce forests is not complete yet due to persisting adverse soil conditions. The temporal changes in the physiological status of Norway spruce forests in the Krušné Hory Mts. were evaluated using two sets of spectral images acquired in 1998 (ASAS) and in 2013 (APEX) and ground truth data (LAI, tree crown status, photosynthetic pigment contents, leaf spectral properties measured by spectroradiometer, soil properties - pH, contents of basic cations, heavy metals, etc.). Ground truth data were evaluated by unconstrained and constrained multivariate analyses using Canoco 5. The high resolution spectral images (ASAS and APEX) enabled the identification of a gradient of forest conditions and their comparison. In 1998 the stands exhibited different physiological status corresponding to the pollution gradient with healthier trees at the western part of the mountains. Analysis of the foliar chemistry in 2013 show a slight improvement of the Norway spruce physiological status in the eastern part of the mountains while the status of the western-located stands slightly worsened. In 2013 we also studied the differences in soil geochemical conditions, which appeared to be less favorable in the western part of the mountains characterized by a low base cation contents in the top organic horizon and a very low pH (pH<3).

  8. Size-dependence of tree growth response to drought for Norway spruce and European beech individuals in monospecific and mixed-species stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, H; Pretzsch, H; Schütze, G; Rötzer, T

    2017-09-01

    Climate anomalies have resulted in changing forest productivity, increasing tree mortality in Central and Southern Europe. This has resulted in more severe and frequent ecological disturbances to forest stands. This study analysed the size-dependence of growth response to drought years based on 384 tree individuals of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and European beech [Fagus sylvatica ([L.)] in Bavaria, Germany. Samples were collected in both monospecific and mixed-species stands. To quantify the growth response to drought stress, indices for basal area increment, resistance, recovery and resilience were calculated from tree ring measurements of increment cores. Linear mixed models were developed to estimate the influence of drought periods. The results show that ageing-related growth decline is significant in drought years. Drought resilience and resistance decrease significantly with growth size among Norway spruce individuals. Evidence is also provided for robustness in the resilience capacity of European beech during drought stress. Spruce benefits from species mixing with deciduous beech, with over-yielding spruce in pure stands. The importance of the influence of size-dependence within tree growth studies during disturbances is highlighted and should be considered in future studies of disturbances, including drought. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  9. Impact of climate change, seedling type and provenance on the risk of damage to Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings in Sweden due to early summer frosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langvall, Ola (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Unit for Field-based Forest Research, Asa Forest Research Station, Lammhult (Sweden))

    2011-04-15

    A model including site-specific microclimate-affecting properties of a forest regeneration area together with seedling characteristics was used to evaluate the accumulated risk of frost damage to Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seedlings. Climate change in Sweden was simulated on the basis of the regional climate model RCA3. The daily average temperature, the driving factor for bud burst in the model, was adjusted using the difference between the mean of the climate model data for the years 1961-1990 and 2036-2065. The model was run for a highly frost prone, clear-cut site in which bare-rooted Norway spruce seedlings of mid-Swedish provenance were planted. Alternate runs were conducted with data for containerized seedlings and seedlings of Belarusian origin. The study showed that bud burst will occur at earlier dates throughout Sweden in the period 2036-2065 if the climate changes according to either of the climate scenarios examined, compared to the reference period 1961-1990. Furthermore, the risk of damage to Norway spruce seedlings as a result of frost events during summer will increase in southern Sweden and be unaffected or decrease in northern Sweden. The risk of frost damage was exacerbated in containerized seedlings, while the risk was lower for the seedlings of Belarusian provenance when compared with bare-rooted seedlings or seedlings of mid-Swedish origin

  10. Functions for biomass and basic density of stem, crown and root system of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovsgaard, Jens Peter (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre, Alnarp (Sweden)); Bald, Caroline (Danish Nature Agency, Koebenhavn Oe (Denmark)); Nord-Larsen, Thomas (Forest and Landscape, Univ. of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg (Denmark))

    2011-04-15

    Models for predicting the biomass of forest trees are becoming increasingly important for assessing forest resources and carbon sequestration in forests. We developed functions for predicting the biomass and basic density of above and below ground parts of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in Denmark. Separate models were developed for branches (including foliage), stem and the below-ground stump and root system as well as for the aggregate components of total above-ground biomass and total tree biomass. Trees were sampled in 14 forest stands, reflecting the range of growth conditions and thinning practises of Norway spruce in Denmark. Because of inclusion of experimental plots, data reflected a wider range of thinning practices than commonly used in forestry practice. The data included measurements of biomass and basic density from 114 trees, two of which were regarded as outliers and consequently excluded in the final model estimation. The final models reflected known properties of tree growth and allocation of biomass among different tree components of even-aged Norway spruce. The models were successful in predicting biomass, basic density and biomass expansion factors across a wide variety of tree sizes, stand treatments and growth conditions. The models are believed to substantially improve national estimates of carbon sequestration and biomass resources

  11. Response of green reflectance continuum removal index to the xanthophyll de-epoxidation cycle in Norway spruce needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovác, Daniel; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, Vladimír; Kalina, Jiří; Ač, Alexander; Kaplan, Veroslav; Hanuš, Jan

    2013-04-01

    A dedicated field experiment was conducted to investigate the response of a green reflectance continuum removal-based optical index, called area under the curve normalized to maximal band depth between 511 nm and 557 nm (ANMB511-557), to light-induced transformations in xanthophyll cycle pigments of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] needles. The performance of ANMB511-557 was compared with the photochemical reflectance index (PRI) computed from the same leaf reflectance measurements. Needles of four crown whorls (fifth, eighth, 10th, and 15th counted from the top) were sampled from a 27-year-old spruce tree throughout a cloudy and a sunny day. Needle optical properties were measured together with the composition of the photosynthetic pigments to investigate their influence on both optical indices. Analyses of pigments showed that the needles of the examined whorls varied significantly in chlorophyll content and also in related pigment characteristics, such as the chlorophyll/carotenoid ratio. The investigation of the ANMB511-557 diurnal behaviour revealed that the index is able to follow the dynamic changes in the xanthophyll cycle independently of the actual content of foliar pigments. Nevertheless, ANMB511-557 lost the ability to predict the xanthophyll cycle behaviour during noon on the sunny day, when the needles were exposed to irradiance exceeding 1000 µmol m(-2) s(-1). Despite this, ANMB511-557 rendered a better performance for tracking xanthophyll cycle reactions than PRI. Although declining PRI values generally responded to excessive solar irradiance, they were not able to predict the actual de-epoxidation state in the needles examined.

  12. Effects of physical blockage of axial phloem transport on growth of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings under drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Winkler, Andrea; Lethaus, Gina; Wieser, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Early culmination of maximum radial growth in late spring was found in several coniferous species in a dry inner Alpine environment (Oberhuber et al. 2014). We hypothesized that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. To test this hypothesis we manipulated tree carbon status by physical blockage of phloem transport and soil water availability of Norway spruce saplings (tree height c. 1.5 m) in a common garden experiment to investigate influence of carbon availability and drought on above- and belowground growth. Girdling occurred at different phenological stages during the growing season, i.e., before growth onset, and during earlywood and latewood formation. Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC, soluble sugars and starch) were determined before and after the growing season to evaluate change in tree carbon status. Tree ring analysis revealed that compared to non-girdled controls earlywood width above girdling strikingly increased by c. 170 and 440 %, while latewood width decreased by c. 85 and 55 % in watered and drought stressed trees, respectively. Below girdling no xylem formation was detected. Unexpectedly, preliminary analyses of carbon status revealed striking reduction (c. -80 %) of NSC above and below girdling. Most likely due to reductions in xylem hydraulic conductance, girdling before growth onset reduced leader shoot growth compared to non-girdled controls by c. 45 %, irrespective of water availability. Root dry mass of girdled trees was significantly reduced compared to non-girdled controls (c. 30 % in drought stressed and 45 % in watered trees; p < 0.001). Results suggest that in Norway spruce saplings (1) carbon availability affects radial stem growth, (2) higher basipetal carbon transport occurs under drought supporting our hypothesis of early switch of carbon allocation to belowground when drought stress prevails and (3) minor

  13. Fungal diversity of Norway spruce litter: effects of site conditions and premature leaf fall caused by bark beetle outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybył, K; Karolewski, P; Oleksyn, J; Labedzki, A; Reich, P B

    2008-08-01

    Fungi play an important role in leaf litter decomposition due to their ability to break down the lignocellulose matrix, which other organisms are unable to digest. However, little is known regarding the factors affecting components of fungal diversity. Here, we quantified richness of internal fungi in relation to litter nutrient and phenolic concentrations, sampling season (spring or fall), and premature leaf shedding due to low precipitation and infestation of bark beetles (mainly Ips typographus and Ips duplicatus). The study was conducted in 37-year-old Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stands, with three plots each in mixed forest (MF) and coniferous forest (CF) site conditions in south-central Poland. Fifty-four species of sporulating fungi were identified in 2,330 freshly fallen needles sampled during 2003-2005, including 45 species in MF and 31 in CF. The significantly higher number of species in MF was likely related to moister conditions at that site. Among isolated fungi, 22% (12 species) were identified as endophytes of Norway spruce in prior studies. During spring of 2005, we found less than half the number of isolates and fungal species at each forest site as compared to fall for the two prior years. This pattern was observed in typical soil fungi (e.g., Penicillium daleae, Penicillium purpurogenum) and endophytes/epiphytes (e.g., Aureobasidium pullulans, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium spp., and Lophodermium piceae). Premature shedding of needles was the most likely cause of this decline because it shortened the time period for fungi to infect green needles while on the tree. For all sites and sampling periods, richness of internal fungi was strongly and positively related to the age of freshly fallen litter (assessed using needle Ca concentration as a needle age tracer) and was also negatively related to litter phenolic concentration. Richness of internal fungi in freshly fallen litter may be adversely affected by low soil moisture status

  14. Seasonal variation of nitrogen oxides, ozone and biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations and fluxes at Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Stanislav; Vecerova, Kristyna; Holisova, Petra; Zapletal, Milos; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Calfapietra, Carlo; Vecera, Zbynek; Cudlin, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone concentration and their depositions were investigated on the Norway spruce forest at Bily Kriz experimental station at the Silesian Beskydy Mountains (north-eastern part of the Czech Republic). Both NOx and ozone concentration and fluxes were modelled for the whole season and covering thus different climate conditions. Data were recorded for three consecutive years and therefore deeper analyses were performed. During the summer 2014 BVOC field campaign was carried out using proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOF, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck, Austria) and volatile organic compound of biogenic origin (BVOC) were measured at the different levels of tree canopies. By the same time BVOC were trapped into the Tenax tubes (Markes International Ltd., UK) and put afterwards for thermal desorption (Markes Unity System 2, Markes International Ltd., UK) to GS-MS analysis (TSQ Quntum XLS triple Quadrupole, Thermo Scientific, USA). Thus data of different levels of canopies together with different spectra of monoterpenes were obtained. Interesting comparison of both methods will be shown. It was the first BVOC field campaign using PTR technique at any of the forest in the Czech Republic. Highest fluxes and concentrations were recorded around the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes, especially α-pinen and limonene. Other BVOCs than monoterpenes were negligible. Variation of fluxes between different canopies levels was observed, highlighting difference in shaded and sun exposed leaves. Sun leaves emitted up to 2.4 nmol m-2 s-1 of monoterpenes, while shaded leaves emitted only up to 0.6 nmol m-2 s-1 when measured under standard conditions (irradiance 1000 µmol m-2 s-1; temperature 30°C). We discuss here the importance of the most common Norway spruce tree forests in the Czech Republic in bi-directional exchanges of important secondary pollutant such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, their

  15. Throughfall deposition and canopy exchange processes along a vertical gradient within the canopy of beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaenssens, Sandy; Hansen, Karin; Staelens, Jeroen; Wuyts, Karen; De Schrijver, An; Baeten, Lander; Boeckx, Pascal; Samson, Roeland; Verheyen, Kris

    2012-03-15

    To assess the impact of air pollution on forest ecosystems, the canopy is usually considered as a constant single layer in interaction with the atmosphere and incident rain, which could influence the measurement accuracy. In this study the variation of througfall deposition and derived dry deposition and canopy exchange were studied along a vertical gradient in the canopy of one European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) tree and two Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) trees. Throughfall and net throughfall deposition of all ions other than H(+) increased significantly with canopy depth in the middle and lower canopy of the beech tree and in the whole canopy of the spruce trees. Moreover, throughfall and net throughfall of all ions in the spruce canopy decreased with increasing distance to the trunk. Dry deposition occurred mainly in the upper canopy and was highest during the growing season for H(+), NH(4)(+), NO(3)(-) and highest during the dormant season for Na(+), Cl(-), SO(4)(2-) (beech and spruce) and K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) (spruce only). Canopy leaching of K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) was observed at all canopy levels and was higher for the beech tree compared to the spruce trees. Canopy uptake of inorganic nitrogen and H(+) occurred mainly in the upper canopy, although significant canopy uptake was found in the middle canopy as well. Canopy exchange was always higher during the growing season compared to the dormant season. This spatial and temporal variation indicates that biogeochemical deposition models would benefit from a multilayer approach for shade-tolerant tree species such as beech and spruce.

  16. High methane emissions from restored Norway spruce swamps in southern Finland over one growing season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koskinen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Forestry-drained peatlands in the boreal region are currently undergoing restoration in order to bring these ecosystems closer to their natural (undrained state. Drainage affects the methane (CH4 dynamics of a peatland, often changing sites from CH4 sources to sinks. Successful restoration of a peatland would include restoration of not only the surface vegetation and hydrology, but also the microbial populations and thus CH4 dynamics. As a pilot study, CH4 emissions were measured on two pristine, two drained and three restored boreal spruce swamps in southern Finland for one growing season. Restoration was successful in the sense that the water table level in the restored sites was significantly higher than in the drained sites, but it was also slightly higher than in the pristine sites. The restored sites were surprisingly large sources of CH4 (mean emissions of 52.84 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, contrasting with both the pristine (1.51 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 and the drained sites (2.09 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. More research is needed to assess whether the high CH4 emissions observed in this study are representative of restored spruce mires in general.

  17. Impact of soil drainage to the radial stem growth of Norway spruce (Picea Abies L. Karst. in peatland forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klempířová Barbora

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Peatland Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. forests represent very valuable ecosystems with considerable importance for nature conservation. However, a lot of peatland forests have been drained or used for opencast mining of peat. Since dendrochronological and dendroecological studies on trees growing on peatlands in Europe are not many, this study aimed to reconstruct the impact of drainage to the growth of trees in forest stands older than 100 years in the moment of drainage. Dendrochronological analysis was performed on two 0.25-ha square sampling plots (50*50 m in two pre-selected stands (control site vs. drained site with similar natural conditions and age. The mean-value functions of the ring indices, comparing the drained site with the control site, in the period after 1940 revealed very similar radial-growth trends. After the year 1992, when one site was substantially drained, the radial-growth trends not showed any significant change. Likewise, the result of the independent two sample t-test for the period after 1992 has not revealed any substantial statistically important difference in the mean index between the control site and the drained site.

  18. Imaging of Norway spruce early somatic embryos with the ESEM, Cryo-SEM and laser scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neděla, Vilém; Hřib, Jiří; Havel, Ladislav; Hudec, Jiří; Runštuk, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the surface structure of Norway spruce early somatic embryos (ESEs) as a typical culture with asynchronous development. The microstructure of extracellular matrix covering ESEs were observed using the environmental scanning electron microscope as a primary tool and using the scanning electron microscope with cryo attachment and laser electron microscope as a complementary tool allowing our results to be proven independently. The fresh samples were observed in conditions of the air environment of the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with the pressure from 550Pa to 690Pa and the low temperature of the sample from -18°C to -22°C. The samples were studied using two different types of detector to allow studying either the thin surface structure or material composition. The scanning electron microscope with cryo attachment was used for imaging frozen extracellular matrix microstructure with higher resolution. The combination of both electron microscopy methods was suitable for observation of "native" plant samples, allowing correct evaluation of our results, free of error and artifacts.

  19. Trends in long-term carbon and water fluxes - a case study from a temperate Norway spruce site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Lüers, Johannes; Hübner, Jörg; Serafimovich, Andrei; Thomas, Christoph; Foken, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyse eddy-covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour from 18 years at Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen (DE-Bay), a Norway spruce forest site in the Fichtelgebirge, Germany. Standard flux partitioning algorithms have been applied for separation of net ecosystem exchange NEE into gross ecosystem uptake GEE and ecosystem respiration Reco, and gap-filling. The annual NEE shows a positive trend, which is related to a strong increase in GEE, while Reco enhances slightly. Annual evapotranspiration increases as well, while atmospheric demand, i.e. potential evapotranspiration, shows inter-annual variability, but no trend. Comparisons with studies from other warm temperate needle-leaved forests show, that NEE is at the upper range of the distribution, and evapotranspiration in Budyko space is in a similar range, but with a large inter-annual variability. While this trends are generally in agreement with findings from other locations and expectations to climate change, the specific history at this site clearly has a large impact on the results: The forest was in the first years very much affected due to forest decline and convalesced after a liming. In the last ten years the site was much affected by beetles and windthrow. Thus the more recent positive trends may be related to increased heterogeneity at the site. As FLUXNET stations, built 10-20 years ago, often started with "ideal forest sites", increasing heterogeneity might be a more general problem for trend analysis of long-term data sets.

  20. The Influence of Age, Location and Soil Conditions on the Allometry of Young Norway Spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan DUTCA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the influence of tree’s age, location (i.e. latitude and altitude and soil conditions (i.e. pH, humus content, carbon to nitrogen ratio, cation exchange capacity and percent base saturation on tree allometry was investigated. The data was collected from 22 Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst plantations located in Eastern Carpathians of Romania, aged between 4 and 15. From each plantation a soil sample and 10 trees were collected for soil chemical properties and biomass measurements, respectively. Root collar diameter (RCD and height (H based allometric equations were developed for total tree and vegetative organs of the tree (i.e. stem, branches, needles and roots. Furthermore, the interaction between the standardised residuals of these models and the tested factors was analysed. In order to account for the random effect of the clustered data, the mixed-effect modelling procedure was used. The results have shown no influence of these factors (age, location and soil conditions on RCD based models, except for branches biomass model which was linked to soil carbon/nitrogen ratio. The H based models, however, were significantly influenced by latitude and soil cation exchange capacity as a consequence of H/RCD ratio change with these factors. The trees were more likely to allocate more to height growth when growing in higher latitudes or on soils with higher values of cation exchange capacity.

  1. The effects of pelleted sewage sludge on Norway spruce establishment and nitrogen dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannesson, Anders

    1999-07-01

    In Sweden there is a big resource in unutilised sewage sludge. Studies have shown that application of municipal sewage sludge can improve forest productivity and planting environment. This study is examining the effects of two types of pelleted sewage sludge (pure sludge and a mixture of sludge and domestic wastes compost) on nitrogen turnover. Large differences were found in the fertilisation effect of the different treatments. The pure sewage sludge pellets treatment showed significant increases for NH{sub 4}-accumulation, nitrification and NO{sub 3}-leaching in the top 10 cm of the soil. Uptake of nitrogen was increased in spruce plants and vegetation. The mixed sludge/domestic waste pellets treatment showed indications of a minor initial release of nitrogen. This is seen as a small but significant initial increase in soil nitrification. These results suggest that the pure sewage sludge pellet is an adequate nitrogen fertiliser. The mixed sludge though is inadequate at least in the short run.

  2. THE EFFECT OF SOLVENT EXCHANGE ON THE PIT ASPIRATION IN ORIENTAL SPRUCE (Picea orientalis (L. Link. WOOD

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    Hamiyet Şahin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of solvent Exchange drying utilizing low surface tension force of organic solvents on pit aspiration in Oriental spruce wood. All trees used for experiments were obtained from Maçka-Karahava region. Investigations for pit aspiration was carried out on electron microscope. Prior to the experiments, samples dried with solvent Exchange method. The principle of this method was the replacement of free water in wood with an organic solvent, low in surface tension. The applied organic solvents were acetone, benzene and pentane. For comparison purposes, pit aspiration experiment also were conducted on oven-dried and air-dried wood samples. Result inticated that solvent Exchange drying was observed to be effective on pit aspiration, and the best result was obtained by acetone treatment.

  3. Mycorrhizal colonization and lead distribution in root tissues of Norway spruce seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentschke, G. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Forstbotanik]|[Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Bodenbiologie; Fritz, E.; Marschner, P.; Godbold, D.L. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Forstbotanik; Rapp, C. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Waldbau; Wolters, V. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine und Spezielle Zoologie

    1997-12-01

    Non-inoculated spruce seedlings (Picea abies Karst.) and spruce seedlings colonized with Lactarius rufus Fr., Pisolithus tinctorius Coker and Couch or Paxillus involutus Fr. were grown for 35 to 37 weeks in a microscosm system on two types of natural forest humus differing in Pb content. Using X-ray microanalysis, the distribution and content of Pb in the tissues of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal root tips were compared. No significant difference in the Pb contents of root cortex cell walls of non-mycorrhizal and seedlings colonized by Lactarius rufus, Pisolithus tinctorius, or indigenous mycorrhizal fungi (mainly Tylospora sp.) was found. However, in root tips of seedlings colonized by Paxillus involutus, due to a higher binding capacity for cations, the Pb content in cell walls of the root cortex were higher than in non-mycorrhizal roots. Pb contents in cell walls of the cortex of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots were 3 times higher in plants growing in humus with a high Pb content than in plants growing in humus with a low Pb content. It is concluded that increasing contents of Pb in the organic matter may lead to an increased loading of the apoplast with Pb. The mycobionts tested in this investigation did not exclude Pb from root tissues. (orig.) [Deutsch] Nichtmykorrhizierte und mit Lactarius rufus Fr., Pisolithus tinctorius Coker und Couch oder Paxillus involutus Fr. beimpfte Fichtenkeimlinge (Picea abies Karst.) wurden in Kuturgefaesse gepflanzt, die mit Humusmaterial aus zwei unterschiedlich mit Blei belasteten Waldoekosystemen gefuellt waren. Nach 35 bzw. 37 Wochen wurde mittels Roentgenmikroanalyse der Bleigehalt in den Geweben mykorrhizierter und nichtmykorrhizierter Wurzelspitzen gemessen. Die Bleitgehalte in den Cortexzellwaenden der Mykorrhizen von L. rufus, P. tinctorius oder Tylospora sp. (gebildet durch spontane Infektion) unterschieden sich nicht signifikant von denen nichtmykorrhizierter Wurzelspitzen. Aufgrund einer hoeheren

  4. Humus form variability at two experimental sites in the mountain Norway spruce forest, Trentino, Italy

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    Chersich S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Region Trentino Alto-Adige, 59 humus profiles were studied and classified in order to understand the variability of humus forms in alpine forest ecosystems. In particular, the evolution of humus forms was investigated in relation to the development of vegetation cover, with the aim of determining whether a humus form can be representative of a specific forest phase. For the study of humus profiles, transects were traced so as to cut across all 4 principal dynamic phases of forest evolution: open canopy, regeneration, intermediate and mature. Two sub-sites (of about 1000 m2 were selected at an altitude of 1700 m. a.s.l., on parent soil material of morenic sediments on acid substrate and with a vegetation cover of alpine spruce forest: the first, having a north exposition, is located within the Municipality of Pellizzano in Val di Sole, near Mount Nambino; the second, with a south exposition, is located near Madonna di Campiglio, in Val Rendena, near Mount Ritorto. The soil temperature regime is frigid, while the moisture regime is udic. Our investigation pointed out a wide evolutionary variability of forest humus in the studied sites, permitting to identify a probable association trend between different growing-phases of forest and specific humus forms.

  5. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution – Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition (13C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ13C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ13C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ13C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  6. Little evidence for niche partitioning among ectomycorrhizal fungi on spruce seedlings planted in decayed wood versus mineral soil microsites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jennifer K M; Jones, Melanie D

    2013-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) communities vary among microhabitats, supporting a dominant role for deterministic processes in EMF community assemblage. EMF communities also differ between forest and clearcut environments, responding to this disturbance in a directional manner over time by returning to the species composition of the original forest. Accordingly, we examined EMF community composition on roots of spruce seedlings planted in three different microhabitats in forest and clearcut plots: decayed wood, mineral soil adjacent to downed wood, or control mineral soil, to determine the effect of retained downed wood on EMF communities over the medium and long term. If downed and decayed wood provide refuge habitat distinct from that of mineral soil, we would expect EMF communities on seedlings in woody habitats in clearcuts to be similar to those on seedlings planted in the adjacent forest. As expected, we found EMF species richness to be higher in forests than clearcuts (P ≤ 0.01), even though soil nutrient status did not differ greatly between the two plot types (P ≥ 0.05). Communities on forest seedlings were dominated by Tylospora spp., whereas those in clearcuts were dominated by Amphinema byssoides and Thelephora terrestris. Surprisingly, while substrate conditions varied among microsites (P ≤ 0.03), especially between decayed wood and mineral soil, EMF communities were not distinctly different among microhabitats. Our data suggest that niche partitioning by substrate does not occur among EMF species on very young seedlings in high elevation spruce-fir forests. Further, dispersal limitations shape EMF community assembly in clearcuts in these forests.

  7. Statistical comparison of spectral and biochemical measurements on an example of Norway spruce stands in the Ore Mountains, Czech Republic

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    Markéta Potůčková

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The physiological status of vegetation and changes thereto can be monitored by means of biochemical analysis of collected samples as well as by means of spectroscopic measurements either on the leaf level, using field (or laboratory spectroradiometers or on the canopy level, applying hyperspectral airborne or spaceborne image data. The presented study focuses on the statistical comparison and ascertainment of relations between three datasets collected from selected Norway spruce forest stands in the Ore Mountains, Czechia. The data sets comprise i photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls, carotenoids and water content of 495 samples collected from 55 trees from three different vertical levels and the first three needle age classes, ii the spectral reflectance of the same samples measured with an ASD Field Spec 4 Wide-Res spectroradiometer equipped with a plant contact probe, iii an airborne hyperspecral image acquired with an Apex sensor. The datasets cover two localities in the Ore Mountains that were affected differently by acid deposits in the 1970s and 1980s. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s honest significance test, hot spot analysis and linear regression were applied either on the original measurements (the content of leaf compounds and reflectance spectra or derived values, i.e., selected spectral indices. The results revealed a generally low correlation between the photosynthetic pigments, water content and spectral measurement. The results of the ANOVA showed significant differences between sites (model areas only in the case of the leaf compound dataset. Differences between the stands on various levels of significance exist in all three datasets and are explained in detail. The study also proved that the vertical gradient of the biochemical and biophysical parameters in the canopy play a role when the optical properties of the forest stands are modelled.

  8. Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene emissions from European beech, Holm oak, Scots pine, and Norway spruce

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    C. Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Impacts of soil moisture on de-novo monoterpene (MT emissions from Holm oak, European beech, Scots pine, and Norway spruce were studied in laboratory experiments. The volumetric water content of the soil, Θ, was used as reference quantity to parameterize the dependency of MT emissions on soil moisture and to characterize the severity of the drought. When Θ dropped from 0.4 m3 m−3 to ~ 0.2 m3 m−3 slight increases of de-novo MT emissions were observed but with further progressing drought the emissions decreased to almost zero. The increases of MT emissions observed under conditions of mild drought were explainable by increases of leaf temperature due to lowered transpirational cooling. When Θ fell below certain thresholds, MT emissions decreased simultaneously with Θ and the relationship between Θ and MT emissions was approximately linear. The thresholds of Θ (0.044–0.19 m3 m−3 were determined as well other parameters required to describe the soil moisture dependence of de-novo MT emissions for application in the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature, MEGAN. A factorial approach was found appropriate to describe the impacts of Θ, temperature, and light. Temperature and Θ influenced the emissions largely independent from each other, and, in a similar manner, light intensity and Θ acted independently on de-novo MT emissions. The use of Θ as reference quantity in a factorial approach was tenable in predicting constitutive de-novo MT emissions when Θ changed on a time scale of days. Only when soil moisture changed suddenly empirical parameterization with Θ as a reference was unsuccessful.

  9. Assessing the Suitability of Future Multi- and Hyperspectral Satellite Systems for Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Norway Spruce Timber Volume

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    Sascha Nink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of accurate and timely information on timber volume is important for supporting operational forest management. One option is to combine statistical concepts (e.g., small area estimates with specifically designed terrestrial sampling strategies to provide estimations also on the level of administrative units such as forest districts. This may suffice for economic assessments, but still fails to provide spatially explicit information on the distribution of timber volume within these management units. This type of information, however, is needed for decision-makers to design and implement appropriate management operations. The German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate is currently implementing an object-oriented database that will also allow the direct integration of Earth observation data products. This work analyzes the suitability of forthcoming multi- and hyperspectral satellite imaging systems for producing local distribution maps for timber volume of Norway spruce, one of the most economically important tree species. In combination with site-specific inventory data, fully processed hyperspectral data sets (HyMap were used to simulate datasets of the forthcoming EnMAP and Sentinel-2 systems to establish adequate models for estimating timber volume maps. The analysis included PLS regression and the k-NN method. Root Mean Square Errors between 21.6% and 26.5% were obtained, where k-NN performed slightly better than PLSR. It was concluded that the datasets of both simulated sensor systems fulfill accuracy requirements to support local forest management operations and could be used in synergy. Sentinel-2 can provide meaningful volume distribution maps in higher geometric resolution, while EnMAP, due to its hyperspectral coverage, can contribute complementary information, e.g., on biophysical conditions.

  10. The contribution of hydroxylamine content to spatial variability of N2O formation in soil of a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shurong; Herbst, Michael; Bol, Roland; Gottselig, Nina; Pütz, Thomas; Weymann, Daniel; Wiekenkamp, Inge; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Hydroxylamine (NH2OH), a reactive intermediate of several microbial nitrogen turnover processes, is a potential precursor of nitrous oxide (N2O) formation in the soil. However, the contribution of soil NH2OH to soil N2O emission rates in natural ecosystems is unclear. Here, we determined the spatial variability of NH2OH content and potential N2O emission rates of organic (Oh) and mineral (Ah) soil layers of a Norway spruce forest, using a recently developed analytical method for the determination of soil NH2OH content, combined with a geostatistical Kriging approach. Potential soil N2O emission rates were determined by laboratory incubations under oxic conditions, followed by gas chromatographic analysis and complemented by ancillary measurements of soil characteristics. Stepwise multiple regressions demonstrated that the potential N2O emission rates, NH2OH and nitrate (NO3-) content were spatially highly correlated, with hotspots for all three parameters observed in the headwater of a small creek flowing through the sampling area. In contrast, soil ammonium (NH4+) was only weakly correlated with potential N2O emission rates, and was excluded from the multiple regression models. While soil NH2OH content explained the potential soil N2O emission rates best for both layers, also NO3- and Mn content turned out to be significant parameters explaining N2O formation in both soil layers. The Kriging approach was improved markedly by the addition of the co-variable information of soil NH2OH and NO3- content. The results indicate that determination of soil NH2OH content could provide crucial information for the prediction of the spatial variability of soil N2O emissions.

  11. The Dynamics and Variability of Radial Growth in Provenance Trials of Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. Within and Beyond the Hot Margins of its Natural Range

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    Neculae ŞOFLETEA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-site field trials provide valuable data for the investigation of possible effects of environmental changes on forest tree species. We analyze the descendants of plus trees from 33 Norway spruce seed sources of Romanian Carpathians, at age 30, in four comparative field trials: two established in the natural range of species and two outside of it. The dynamics and variation of radial growth, earlywood and latewood were analyzed. The influence of populations, site conditions and climatic factors were also quantified. The provenances response in the four comparative trials was asymmetric for mean radial growth, but its dynamics was less favourable outside of the natural range. Analysis of variance showed significant differences (P<0.001 between the testing sites, but non-significant (P<0.05 for the populations. Populations x localities interaction was high (P<0.001 in the first half of the testing period, but decreased over time, becoming not significant at the age of 30. At intra-populational level, the average coefficient of variation for radial growth was higher outside the natural range, whereas the proportion of latewood decreased. The temperature in the first half of the growing season negatively influenced (P<0.001 the radial increment, but in the latewood proportion significat effects (P˂0.05 were recorded only in trials located outside of the natural range. An increased variability of radial growth and a decrease of latewood proportion are expected in Norway spruce stands located at lower altitudes, towards the limits of the natural range. Our results may contribute to the sustainable management of Norway spruce forests within and outside its natural range.

  12. Variation in Trembling Aspen and White Spruce Wood Quality Grown in Mixed and Single Species Stands in the Boreal Mixedwood Forest

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    Francis De Araujo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian boreal forest is largely represented by mixed wood forests of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss and trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. In this study, a total of 300 trees originating from three sites composed of trembling aspen and white spruce with varying compositions were investigated for wood quality traits: one site was composed mainly of aspen, one mainly of spruce and a third was a mixed site. Four wood quality traits were examined: wood density, microfibril angle (MFA, fibre characteristics, and cell wall chemistry. Social classes were also determined for each site in an attempt to provide a more in-depth comparison. Wood density showed little variation among sites for both species, with only significant differences occurring between social classes. The aspen site showed statistically lower MFAs than the aspen from the mixed site, however, no differences were observed when comparing spruce. Fibre characteristics were higher in the pure species sites for both species. There were no differences in carbohydrate contents across sites, while lignin content varied. Overall, the use of social classes did not refine the characterization of sites.

  13. Variation in Mechanical Properties within Individual Annual Rings in the Resonance Spruce Wood (Picea abies (L. Karst.

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    Waldemar Moliński

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows results of specific elastic modulus and specific tensile strength in the resonance spruce wood [Picea abies (L. Karst.] in relation to its heterogeneity within individual annual rings. It also presents changes in the average values of microfibril angle in S2 layer measured in tangential walls of tracheids (MFA within individual annual rings. On the grounds of the results, it can be concluded that specific modulus of elasticity and specific tensile strength of wood are strongly influenced by the position of the sample in annual rings. Generally, the values of these parameters increase along the width of annual rings. It is also noted that the specific modulus of elasticity and specific tensile strength depend on MFA. As MFA decreases, the values of these parameters increase.

  14. Influence of Polyethylene and Oxidized Polyethylene Wax Emulsions on Leaching Dynamics of Boric Acid from Impregnated Spruce Wood

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    Boštjan Lesar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron biocides belong to the most frequently used ingredients of commercial wood preservatives. They are very effective fungicides and insecticides, but they do not react with wood and thus leach from it in wet applications. This fact signifi cantly limits use of boron compounds in the field of wood preservation. In order to reduce leaching of boric acid, the emulsion of polyethylene (WE1 and an emulsion of oxidized polyethylene (WE6 wax were combined with boric acid (cB = 0.1 % or 0.5 % of boron. Spruce wood specimens were vacuum impregnated and afterwards leached according to the prCEN/TS 15119-1, EN 1250-2 and EN 84 procedures. The results showed that the boron leaching is predominantly infl uenced by moisture content of wood during leaching, and furthermore by the concentration gradient (frequency of water replacement. The fact that the prCEN/TS 15119-1 leaching procedure is less severe than other two methods is also refl ected in the results. The results of the EN 84 and ENV 1250 test are comparable, while the results of the prCEN/TS 15119-1 testing are not in line with the other two methods. Considerable portions of boron are leached from wood in the first leaching cycles, already. WE6 wax emulsion (oxidized polyethylene wax emulsion in combination with heat treatment reduces boron leaching to a certain extent. On the other hand, impregnation of wood with WE1 (polyethylene wax emulsion does not reduce it and it even enhances it.

  15. The Effect of Wood Specimen Length on the Proportional Saturation of Preservative Fluid in Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.)Carr.) and Corsican Pine (Pinus nigravar.mantima)

    OpenAIRE

    USTA*, İlker; Arif GÜRAY

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the proportional saturation and the fluid uptake of preservative liquid (that was) applied under the same pressure was investigated comparatively on the various longitudinal length of wood specimens in the two softwood species. Wood specimens of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.)Carr.) and Corsican pine (Pinus nigra var.mantima) representative of two different permeability classifications, cut into five different lengths were treated with tanalith-C using the full-cell p...

  16. The Effect of Wood Specimen Length on the Proportional Saturation of Preservative Fluid in Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.)Carr.) and Corsican Pine (Pinus nigravar.mantima)

    OpenAIRE

    USTA*, İlker; Arif GÜRAY

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the proportional saturation and the fluid uptake of preservative liquid (that was) applied under the same pressure was investigated comparatively on the various longitudinal length of wood specimens in the two softwood species. Wood specimens of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.)Carr.) and Corsican pine (Pinus nigra var.mantima) representative of two different permeability classifications, cut into five different lengths were treated with tanalith-C using the full-cell p...

  17. Sequencing of the needle transcriptome from Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst L. reveals lower substitution rates, but similar selective constraints in gymnosperms and angiosperms

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    Chen Jun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed knowledge about spatial and temporal gene expression is important for understanding both the function of genes and their evolution. For the vast majority of species, transcriptomes are still largely uncharacterized and even in those where substantial information is available it is often in the form of partially sequenced transcriptomes. With the development of next generation sequencing, a single experiment can now simultaneously identify the transcribed part of a species genome and estimate levels of gene expression. Results mRNA from actively growing needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies was sequenced using next generation sequencing technology. In total, close to 70 million fragments with a length of 76 bp were sequenced resulting in 5 Gbp of raw data. A de novo assembly of these reads, together with publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST data from Norway spruce, was used to create a reference transcriptome. Of the 38,419 PUTs (putative unique transcripts longer than 150 bp in this reference assembly, 83.5% show similarity to ESTs from other spruce species and of the remaining PUTs, 3,704 show similarity to protein sequences from other plant species, leaving 4,167 PUTs with limited similarity to currently available plant proteins. By predicting coding frames and comparing not only the Norway spruce PUTs, but also PUTs from the close relatives Picea glauca and Picea sitchensis to both Pinus taeda and Taxus mairei, we obtained estimates of synonymous and non-synonymous divergence among conifer species. In addition, we detected close to 15,000 SNPs of high quality and estimated gene expression differences between samples collected under dark and light conditions. Conclusions Our study yielded a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as estimates of gene expression on transcriptome scale. In agreement with a recent study we find that the synonymous substitution rate per year (0.6 × 10

  18. See the forest for the trees: Whole-plant allocation patterns and regulatory mechanisms in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianbei; Behrendt, Thomas; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Weinhold, Alexander; Hellén, Heidi; Reichelt, Michael; Wisthaler, Armin; Dam, Nicole; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    For more than 40 years plant carbon (C) allocation have been of central interest to plant scientists. Most studies on C allocation focus on either biomass partitioning (e.g., root:shoot ratios), particular fluxes (e.g., non-structural carbohydrate, NSC; biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, VOCs) or short-term proportional allocation patterns (e.g., pulse-chase studies using isotopic tracers). However, a thorough understanding of C allocation priorities, especially at the whole-plant level, requires assessing all of these aspects together. We investigated C allocation trade-off in Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by assessing whole-plant fluxes (assimilation, respiration and VOCs) and biomass partitioning (structural biomass; NSC; secondary metabolites, SMs). The study was carried out over 8 weeks and allowed us, by modifying atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]), manipulating plant carbon (C) availability. Treatments included control (400 ppm), carbon compensation (down to 120 ppm) and starvation (down to 50 ppm) C availability levels. Reductions in [CO2] aimed to reveal plant allocation strategies assuming that pools receiving more C than others under C limitation have a high allocation priority. Respiration was less sensitive to declining [CO2] compared to assimilation, NSC and SMs. Strong declines in NSC at low [CO2] suggest that respiration was maintained by using stored NSC. Furthermore, reduced NSC and SMs concentrations also indicate preferential C allocation to growth over NSC and SMs at low C availability. SMs decreased to a lesser extent than NSC in old needles, and remained relatively constant in branches until death from starvation. These results suggest that pools of stored NSC may serve as a buffer for respiration or growth under C limitation but also that SMs remain largely inaccessible for metabolism once they are stored in tissues. VOCs emissions, however, showed contrasting responses to [CO2]; oxygenated VOCs (methanol and

  19. Adaptation of seedling growth to the altitude: a case of the Norway spruce from the polish Sudety mountains

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    Robakowski, Piotr

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of five Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] populations originating from different altitudes in the massif of Snieznik Klodzki in the Sudety Mountains (Poland were grown in the greenhouse. Height, root length, and weight of root, shoot, needles and bud, as well as biomass allocation were studied. A good correlation of seedling traits and the altitude of mother stands was found. This indicates a rather good ecological adaptation of these, probably introduced populations. Some ecological and silvicultural aspects of the results are discussed.

    [fr] Les plantes de cinq populations de l'épicéa commun [Picea abies (L. Karst.] provenant des différentes altitudes du massif de Snieznik Klodzki dans les Sudètes (une chaîne des montagnes en Pologne ont été cultivées dans la serre. Leurs paramètres suivants ont été analysés: la hauteur, la longueur des racines, le poids frais et le poids sec des racines, des tiges, des aiguilles, des bourgeons et l'allocation de la biomasse. La haute corrélation a été notée entre les paramètres des plantes et l'altitude des stations des arbres ayant été les semenciers des graines. Ce résultat montre une plutôt bonne adaptation écologique de ces populations, probablement introduites dans le massif de Snieznik Klodzki. Les aspects écologiques et les conséquences de l'adaptation de l'épicéa commun aux conditions montagneuses pour la sylviculture sont discutés.
    [es] Plántulas de cinco poblaciones de abeto rojo [Picea abies (L. Karst.] procedentes de diferente altitud en el macizo de Snieznik Klodzki, en los Montes Sudetes, (Polonia se cultivaron en invernadero. Se han analizado los parámetros siguientes: altura y longitud de las raíces, pesos fresco y seco de raíces, tallos, hojas y yemas, así como la distribución de la biomasa. Como resultado se obtuvo una correlación alta entre los parámetros de las plántidas y la altitud de las estaciones donde se colectaron las

  20. Tracing the allocation of recently assimilated C into key metabolites in Norway spruce (Picea abies) shortly after bud break

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Steffen; Dippold, Michaela; Werner, Christiane; Wiesenberg, Guido; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    Plants allocate carbon (C) to sink tissues depending on phenological, physiological or environmental factors. We still have little knowledge on C partitioning into various cellular compounds and metabolic pathways, especially during tree growth after bud break. Here we investigated C partitioning of freshly assimilated C in Norway spruce by in-situ 13C short-term pulse labeling 15 days after bud break. We quantified 13C incorporation into tree compartments (needles, branches, stem) and into water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) by elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). In addition, we determined 13C allocation into key metabolites of amino acids, hemicellulose sugars, fatty acids and alkanes by compound-specific 13C analysis via gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). The 13C allocation within the trees reflected the needles as major C sink accounting for 86% of the freshly assimilated C. After 6 h 13C was distributed over a broad spectrum of plant metabolites but not homogenously. Highest allocation was observed into structurally relevant compound classes of hemicellulose-derived sugars and proteinogenic amino acids (0.6% and 10% of needle 13C, respectively). However, needle growth also caused high C allocation into pathways not involved in formation of structural compounds like pathways in secondary metabolism, C-1 metabolism or amino acid synthesis from photorespiratory acitivity. C allocation into such pathways could be identified due to the high enrichment of key metabolites within the amino acids. In addition, high 13C allocation was found into the n-alkyl lipid biosynthesis (0.2 % of needle 13C) with 1) higher allocation into intracellular than cuticular fatty acids, presumably for thylakoide membrane formation and 2) decreasing 13C allocation along the lipid transformation and translocation pathways (precursor fatty acids (C16 & C18) > elongated long chain fatty acids > decarbonylated n

  1. Allocation of recent photoassimilates in mature European beech and Norway spruce - seasonal variability and responses to experimentally increased tropospheric O3 concentration and long-term drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution summarizes a series of C allocation studies in maturing European beech and Norway spruce trees at Kranzberg Forest, located in southern Germany. Study objects are 60 to 70 year old trees, readily accessible via scaffoldings and canopy crane. Allocation of recently fixed photoassimilates is assessed either by conventional branch-bag labelling with 99 atom% 13CO2 or whole-tree labeling using 13C-depleted CO2 (isoFACE system). While labeling in branch bags, employed for few hours only, focused on phloem functionality in particular under long-term drought, C labeling of whole tree canopies was employed for up to 20 days, studying allocation of recent photoassimilates from the canopy along branches and stems to roots and soils below ground. In all experiments, dynamics of C allocation were mostly pursued assessing carbon isotopic composition of CO2 efflux from woody tissues which typically reflected isotopic composition of phloem sugars. Effects of severe and long-term summer drought are assessed in an ongoing experiment with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (kroof.wzw.tum.de). Precipitation throughfall was completely excluded since early spring, resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce up to -2.2 MPa. The hypothesis was tested that long-term drought affects allocation of recently fixed C to branches and phloem functionality. In the annual course under unstressed conditions, phloem transport speed from the canopy to the stem (breast height) was double in beech compared to spruce, with highest transport velocities in early summer (about 0.51 and 0.26 m/h) and lowest in spring (0.26 and 0.12 m/h for beech and spruce, respectively). After leaf flush in spring, growth respiration of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photoassimilates supplied beech stem growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer, whereas seasonality was less pronounced in spruce. The hypothesis that growth

  2. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    100 years in larch CWD. Consequently, the decay of Picea abies and Larix decidua is very low. Several uncertainties, however, remain: 14C dating of CWD from decay classes 4 and 5 and having a pre-bomb age is often difficult (large age range due to methodological constraints) and fall rates of both European larch and Norway spruce are missing.

  3. Effect of Heat Treatment Upon the Compression Strength of Black Pine and Spruce – A Comparison Between Wood Originating From Mature Trees Vs. Thinnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina OLARESCU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of anexperimental study performed with black pine (Pinusnigra L. and spruce (Picea abies L. wood, originatingfrom mature trees and thinnings cut from the sameparcel from the Stroesti-Arges region in Romania.After air drying and conditioning, the defect-freetest boards were cut into standard 20x20x60mmsamples for the compression test. The compressionstrength was measured and the rupture mode incompression was analyzed.Therefore, the sampleswere first dried to oven-dry state, then heat-treated athigh temperatures (180 and 200ºC for 1, 2, 3 and 4hours. Sets of 10 samples from each wood species,wood assortment and treating regime were tested.The obtained results were comparativelyanalyzed for the two species (pine vs. spruce and forthe two wood assortments (mature wood vs, thinwood. Then they were also expressed relatively tothe mass loss, considered to be the main indiactor ofthe degradation suffered by wood during the heattreatment.A graph was drawn for each species andassortment in order to establish the optimum treatingregime, considering the correlated influence of theheat treatment conditions upon all three analyzedproperties (mass loss, dimensional stability andcompression strength.The results of the present research are to bevalorized at the manufacturing of solid wood panelsmade from heat-treated lamellas.

  4. Declining Bark Beetle Densities (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Scolytinae from Infested Norway Spruce Stands and Possible Implications for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Angst

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The eight-toothed spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus is the most serious insect pest in Central European forests. During the past two decades, extreme meteorological events and subsequent beetle infestations have killed millions of cubic meters of standing spruce trees. Not all the infested stands could be cleared in time, and priorities in management had to be set. Natural or man-made buffer zones of about 500 meters in width are frequently defined to separate differently managed stands in Central Europe. While the buffer zones seem to be effective in most of the cases, their impact has not been studied in detail. Beetle densities were therefore assessed in three case studies using pheromone traps along transects, leading from infested stands into spruce-free buffer zones. The results of the trap catches allow an estimation of the buffer zone influence on densities and the dispersal of Ips typographus. Beetle densities were found to decrease rapidly with increasing distance from the infested spruce stands. The trap catches were below high-risk thresholds within a few hundred meters of the infested stands. The decrease in catches was more pronounced in open land and in an urban area than in a broadleaf stand. Designed buffer zones of 500 m width without spruce can therefore very probably help to reduce densities of spreading beetles.

  5. Functions for biomass and basic density of stem, crown and root system of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Jens Peter; Bald, Caroline; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Models for predicting the biomass of forest trees are becoming increasingly important for assessing forest resources and carbon sequestration in forests. We developed functions for predicting the biomass and basic density of above- and below-ground parts of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst...... variety of tree sizes, stand treatments and growth conditions. The models are believed to substantially improve national estimates of carbon sequestration and biomass resources........) in Denmark. Separate models were developed for branches (including foliage), stem and the below-ground stump and root system as well as for the aggregate components of total above-ground biomass and total tree biomass. Trees were sampled in 14 forest stands, reflecting the range of growth conditions...

  6. Investigations of fine root and mycorrhizal development of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the upper soil layers of the open-top chambers at Edelmannshof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kottke, I.; Qian, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Botanisches Inst.

    1997-12-01

    Fine root density and mycorrhizal development of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karts.) were investigated after one sampling date in the OTC-experimental plots Edelmannshof. No disturbance of development by stress from soil or fumigation treatments could be found. Surprisingly, the mycorrhizas of two trees fumigated by ambient air revealed higher FDA-hydrolysing activity than the mycorrhizas of the four trees fumigated by filtered air. This finding correlates to the higher leaching rate in the unfiltered air and may have compensated the loss by higher uptake rate of cations. This may explain why no deficiency of nutrients was found in the ambient air chambers. The probing date in early spring, however, may also have influenced the actual activity of the mycorrhizas of the different trees. (orig.)

  7. Host Genetics and Environment Drive Divergent Responses of Two Resource Sharing Gall-Formers on Norway Spruce: A Common Garden Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Petter Axelsson

    Full Text Available A central issue in the field of community genetics is the expectation that trait variation among genotypes play a defining role in structuring associated species and in forming community phenotypes. Quantifying the existence of such community phenotypes in two common garden environments also has important consequences for our understanding of gene-by-environment interactions at the community level. The existence of community phenotypes has not been evaluated in the crowns of boreal forest trees. In this study we address the influence of tree genetics on needle chemistry and genetic x environment interactions on two gall-inducing adelgid aphids (Adelges spp. and Sacchiphantes spp. that share the same elongating bud/shoot niche. We examine the hypothesis that the canopies of different genotypes of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. support different community phenotypes. Three patterns emerged. First, the two gallers show clear differences in their response to host genetics and environment. Whereas genetics significantly affected the abundance of Adelges spp. galls, Sacchiphantes spp. was predominately affected by the environment suggesting that the genetic influence is stronger in Adelges spp. Second, the among family variation in genetically controlled resistance was large, i.e. fullsib families differed as much as 10 fold in susceptibility towards Adelges spp. (0.57 to 6.2 galls/branch. Also, the distribution of chemical profiles was continuous, showing both overlap as well as examples of significant differences among fullsib families. Third, despite the predicted effects of host chemistry on galls, principal component analyses using 31 different phenolic substances showed only limited association with galls and a similarity test showed that trees with similar phenolic chemical characteristics, did not host more similar communities of gallers. Nonetheless, the large genetic variation in trait expression and clear differences in how community members

  8. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkosalo, Tapio; Heikkinen, Juha; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 1-3 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013) before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only. We analyzed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence. The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 2013-2014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global climate models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration.

  9. Fluorescence measurements show stronger cold inhibition of photosynthetic light reactions in Scots pine compared to Norway spruce as well as during spring compared to autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapio eLinkosalo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the photosynthetic activity of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst in relation to air temperature changes from March 2013 to February 2014. We measured the chlorophyll fluorescence of approximately 50 trees of each species growing in southern Finland. Fluorescence was measured 13 times per week. We began by measuring shoots present in late winter (i.e., March 2013 before including new shoots once they started to elongate in spring. By July, when the spring shoots had achieved similar fluorescence levels to the older ones, we proceeded to measure the new shoots only.We analysed the data by fitting a sigmoidal model containing four parameters to link sliding averages of temperature and fluorescence. A parameter defining the temperature range over which predicted fluorescence increased most rapidly was the most informative with in describing temperature dependence of fluorescence.The model generated similar fluorescence patterns for both species, but differences were observed for critical temperature and needle age. Down regulation of the light reaction was stronger in spring than in autumn. Pine showed more conservative control of the photosynthetic light reactions, which were activated later in spring and more readily attenuated in autumn. Under the assumption of a close correlation of fluorescence and photosynthesis, spruce should therefore benefit more than pine from the increased photosynthetic potential during warmer springs, but be more likely to suffer frost damage with a sudden cooling following a warm period. The winter of 20132014 was unusually mild and similar to future conditions predicted by global warming models. During the mild winter, the activity of photosynthetic light reactions of both conifers, especially spruce, remained high. Because light levels during winter are too low for photosynthesis, this activity may translate to a net carbon loss due to respiration.

  10. Elevated CO{sub 2} and development of frost hardiness in Norway spruce (picea abies (L.) Karst.); Oekt CO{sub 2} og utvikling av frostherdighet i gran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalen, Lars Sandved

    1998-09-01

    This thesis discusses controlled laboratory experiments carried out to study the effects of CO{sub 2} pollution on Norwegian spruce. It was found that elevated CO{sub 2} increased height growth and biomass production. It slightly increased frost hardiness, but only at high nitrogen values. There was no evidence of adverse effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on the phenology of bud set and the development of frost hardiness. Although not statistically significant, there seemed to be a consistently higher concentration of soluble carbohydrates in one-season-old Norway spruce seedlings treated with elevated CO{sub 2}. This was not found in three-year-old seedlings grown in open top chambers, possibly indicating a down-regulation of photosynthesis or a transition from free to predetermined growth, and change in allocation of photosynthates with age. Treatment with high or low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilizer did not affect apoplastic chitinolytic activity during cold acclimation, nor were there any effects on antifreeze activity in these apoplastic extracts from cold acclimated needles. 149 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. Contrasting carbon allocation responses of juvenile European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) to competition and ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Wilma; Lehmeier, Christoph Andreas; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Matyssek, Rainer; Edgar Grams, Thorsten Erhard

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of recent photoassimilates of juvenile beech and spruce in response to twice-ambient ozone (2 × O(3)) and plant competition (i.e. intra vs. inter-specific) was examined in a phytotron study. To this end, we employed continuous (13)CO(2)/(12)CO(2) labeling during late summer and pursued tracer kinetics in CO(2) released from stems. In beech, allocation of recent photoassimilates to stems was significantly lowered under 2 × O(3) and increased in spruce when grown in mixed culture. As total tree biomass was not yet affected by the treatments, C allocation reflected incipient tree responses providing the mechanistic basis for biomass partitioning as observed in longer experiments. Compartmental modeling characterized functional properties of substrate pools supplying respiratory C demand. Respiration of spruce appeared to be exclusively supplied by recent photoassimilates. In beech, older C, putatively located in stem parenchyma cells, was a major source of respiratory substrate, reflecting the fundamental anatomical disparity between angiosperm beech and gymnosperm spruce.

  12. Ground-level ozone differentially affects nitrogen acquisition and allocation in mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, R B; Häberle, K H; Millard, P; Metzger, U; Ritter, W; Blaschke, H; Göttlein, A; Matyssek, R

    2012-10-01

    Impacts of elevated ground-level ozone (O(3)) on nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation were studied on mature European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) in a forest stand, hypothesizing that: (i) chronically elevated O(3) limits nutrient uptake, and (ii) beech responds more sensitively to elevated O(3) than spruce, as previously found for juvenile trees. Tree canopies were exposed to twice-ambient O(3) concentrations (2 × O(3)) by a free-air fumigation system, with trees under ambient O(3) serving as control. After 5 years of O(3) fumigation, (15)NH(4)(15)NO(3) was applied to soil, and concentrations of newly acquired N (N(labelled)) and total N (N(total)) in plant compartments and soil measured. Under 2 × O(3), N(labelled) and N(total) were increased in the bulk soil and tended to be lower in fine and coarse roots of both species across the soil horizons, supporting hypothesis (i). N(labelled) was reduced in beech foliage by up to 60%, and by up to 50% in buds under 2 × O(3). Similarly, N(labelled) in stem bark and phloem was reduced. No such reduction was observed in spruce, reflecting a stronger effect on N acquisition in beech in accordance with hypothesis (ii). In spruce, 2 × O(3) tended to favour allocation of new N to foliage. N(labelled) in beech foliage correlated with cumulative seasonal transpiration, indicating impaired N acquisition was probably caused by reduced stomatal conductance and, hence, water transport under elevated O(3). Stimulated fine root growth under 2 × O(3) with a possible increase of below-ground N sink strength may also have accounted for lowered N allocation to above-ground organs. Reduced N uptake and altered allocation may enhance the use of stored N for growth, possibly affecting long-term stand nutrition.

  13. Accumulation of logging residue in first thinnings of Scots pine and Norway spruce. Impact of top bucking diameter of roundwood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeisaenen, T.; Nurmi, J. (Finnish Forest Research Inst., Kannus (Finland)), e-mail: tommi.raisanen@metla.fi

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impacts of changes in the minimum top diameter of roundwood on the accumulation of logging residue. The aim was also to compare estimates of residue accumulation calculated by tree-specific biomass models with field measurements from thinnings. Felling experiments were performed in first thinnings of pine and spruce to evaluate the model calculations. In the felling, mean relative masses of the tree tops of spruce were nearly doubled with each increment of 2 cm in the top diameter. Respectively in pine, the mean relative tree top mass was increased by 50-60 % when the top diameter was increased by 2 cm. The mass of total residue (tree top and all delimbed branches) was similarly increased, but the differences were not as large. Compared to pine, a lesser variation in the crown mass of the spruce sample resulted in a more accurate model prediction of masses of tree tops and total residue. The results indicate that the residue accumulation from a small group of trees cannot be predicted very reliably, but when a larger tree population or area is considered, the model predictions are enhanced to a more practicable level. (orig.)

  14. Conifer R2R3-MYB transcription factors: sequence analyses and gene expression in wood-forming tissues of white spruce (Picea glauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grima-Pettenati Jacqueline

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several members of the R2R3-MYB family of transcription factors act as regulators of lignin and phenylpropanoid metabolism during wood formation in angiosperm and gymnosperm plants. The angiosperm Arabidopsis has over one hundred R2R3-MYBs genes; however, only a few members of this family have been discovered in gymnosperms. Results We isolated and characterised full-length cDNAs encoding R2R3-MYB genes from the gymnosperms white spruce, Picea glauca (13 sequences, and loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L. (five sequences. Sequence similarities and phylogenetic analyses placed the spruce and pine sequences in diverse subgroups of the large R2R3-MYB family, although several of the sequences clustered closely together. We searched the highly variable C-terminal region of diverse plant MYBs for conserved amino acid sequences and identified 20 motifs in the spruce MYBs, nine of which have not previously been reported and three of which are specific to conifers. The number and length of the introns in spruce MYB genes varied significantly, but their positions were well conserved relative to angiosperm MYB genes. Quantitative RTPCR of MYB genes transcript abundance in root and stem tissues revealed diverse expression patterns; three MYB genes were preferentially expressed in secondary xylem, whereas others were preferentially expressed in phloem or were ubiquitous. The MYB genes expressed in xylem, and three others, were up-regulated in the compression wood of leaning trees within 76 hours of induction. Conclusion Our survey of 18 conifer R2R3-MYB genes clearly showed a gene family structure similar to that of Arabidopsis. Three of the sequences are likely to play a role in lignin metabolism and/or wood formation in gymnosperm trees, including a close homolog of the loblolly pine PtMYB4, shown to regulate lignin biosynthesis in transgenic tobacco.

  15. Wood anatomy and classification of Henriquezia Spruce, Platycarpum Humb. et Bonpl. and Gleasonia Standl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koek-Noorman, Jifke

    1980-01-01

    Wood anatomical generic descriptions of Henriquezia, Platycarpum and Gleasonia are given and compared with data from Rubiaceae. An attempt is made to construct a cladogram according to Hennig’s principles. The resulting arrangement of the taxa concerned is discussed and compared with earlier conclus

  16. Defence reactions of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies before and after inoculation of the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica in a drought stress experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netherer Sigrid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed an inoculation experiment using the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica at the Rosalia Roof study site, which was set up to study drought effects on Norway spruce susceptibility to attacks by the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. Tree resistance parameters such as resin flow rate and extent of hypersensitive wound reaction in the phloem were investigated prior to and after fungal infection. Sample trees with different drought treatments (trees fully covered or semi-covered by roofs, control trees were inoculated with E. polonica in July 2014. In order to check for areas of phloem necrosis, the outer bark around the inoculation holes was scratched off 6 weeks later. We recorded the amount of resin exudation within 12 hours overnight in August and September 2013 and 2014. Although wound reaction zones did not differ in size between tree collectives of the various treatments, fully covered trees tended to exhibit larger necrotic areas compared to control trees. The least water supplied trees showed lowest resin flow rates prior to fungal inoculation, but were the only group to show significantly enhanced resin flow five weeks after the evaluation of defence reactions. Our results agree with earlier findings that wounding and few fungal inoculations can increase tree resistance in the medium term given not too severe water stress. Further investigations will clarify how water stress affects the availability of non-structural carbohydrates for secondary metabolism, when depletion of resources eventually occurs, and at which point trees are most susceptible to bark beetle attack.

  17. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N.; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W. M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect. PMID:27649315

  18. Penetration and Effectiveness of Micronized Copper in Refractory Wood Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Chiara; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Schubert, Mark; Michel, Elisabeth; Butron, Maria Isabel; Boone, Matthieu N; Dierick, Manuel; Van Acker, Joris; Wick, Peter; Schwarze, Francis W M R

    2016-01-01

    The North American wood decking market mostly relies on easily treatable Southern yellow pine (SYP), which is being impregnated with micronized copper (MC) wood preservatives since 2006. These formulations are composed of copper (Cu) carbonate particles (CuCO3·Cu(OH)2), with sizes ranging from 1 nm to 250 μm, according to manufacturers. MC-treated SYP wood is protected against decay by solubilized Cu2+ ions and unreacted CuCO3·Cu(OH)2 particles that successively release Cu2+ ions (reservoir effect). The wood species used for the European wood decking market differ from the North American SYP. One of the most common species is Norway spruce wood, which is poorly treatable i.e. refractory due to the anatomical properties, like pore size and structure, and chemical composition, like pit membrane components or presence of wood extractives. Therefore, MC formulations may not suitable for refractory wood species common in the European market, despite their good performance in SYP. We evaluated the penetration effectiveness of MC azole (MCA) in easily treatable Scots pine and in refractory Norway spruce wood. We assessed the effectiveness against the Cu-tolerant wood-destroying fungus Rhodonia placenta. Our findings show that MCA cannot easily penetrate refractory wood species and could not confirm the presence of a reservoir effect.

  19. Using simulation models to calculate economic effects of air pollutants on Norway spruce in a forest enterprise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keuffel, W.; Moehring, B.

    Economic effects of air pollutants will occur in different types: Direct losses in selling timber and increasing expenditure for harvesting, reafforestation and crop protection may be seen from the annual book-keeping results. Decrease of assets in standing timber, however, should be calculated by dynamic simulation models. The simulation model developed works with a spreadsheet of a Personal Computer. All types of financial effects in different situations of damage can be calculated. The given example of a 1700 ha Spruce management unit (Forstamt Lauterberg, Harz) shows within a decade losses between 1.3 and 2.7 million DM. (orig.).

  20. Detection of Spatio-Temporal Changes of Norway Spruce Forest Stands in Ore Mountains Using Landsat Time Series and Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mišurec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study focuses on spatio-temporal changes in the physiological status of the Norway spruce forests located at the central and western parts of the Ore Mountains (northwestern part of the Czech Republic, which suffered from severe environmental pollution from the 1970s to the 1990s. The situation started improving after the pollution loads decreased significantly at the end of the 1990s. The general trends in forest recovery were studied using the tasseled cap transformation and disturbance index (DI extracted from the 1985–2015 time series of Landsat data. In addition, 16 vegetation indices (VIs extracted from airborne hyperspectral (HS data acquired in 1998 using the Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS and in 2013 using the Airborne Prism Experiment (APEX were used to study changes in forest health. The forest health status analysis of HS image data was performed at two levels of spatial resolution; at a tree level (original 2.0 m spatial resolution, as well as at a forest stand level (generalized to 6.0 m spatial resolution. The temporal changes were studied primarily using the VOG1 vegetation index (VI as it was showing high and stable sensitivity to forest damage for both spatial resolutions considered. In 1998, significant differences between the moderately to heavily damaged (central Ore Mountains and initially damaged (western Ore Mountains stands were detected for all the VIs tested. In 2013, the stands in the central Ore Mountains exhibited VI values much closer to the global mean, indicating an improvement in their health status. This result fully confirms the finding of the Landsat time series analysis. The greatest difference in Disturbance Index (DI values between the central (1998: 0.37 and western Ore Mountains stands (1998: −1.21 could be seen at the end of the 1990s. Nonetheless, levelling of the physiological status of Norway spruce was observed for the central and western parts of the Ore Mountains in

  1. From emissions to ambient mixing ratios: on-line seasonal field measurements of volatile organic compounds over a Norway spruce dominated forest in central Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourtsoukidis, E.; Williams, J.; Kesselmeier, J.; Jacobi, S.; Bonn, B.

    2013-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) are substantial contributors to atmospheric chemistry and physics and demonstrate the close relationship between biosphere and atmosphere. Their emission rates are highly sensitive to meteorological and environmental changes with concomitant impacts on atmospheric chemistry. We have investigated seasonal isoprenoid and oxygenated VOC (oxVOC) fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) tree in Central Germany and explored the emission responses under various atmospheric conditions. Emission rates were quantified by using dynamic branch enclosure and Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) techniques. Additionally, ambient mixing ratios were derived through application of a new box model treatment on the dynamic chamber measurements. These are compared in terms of abundance and origin with the corresponding emissions. Isoprenoids govern the BVOC emissions from Norway spruce, with monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes accounting for 50.8 ± 7.2% and 19.8 ± 8.1% respectively of the total emissions. Normalizing the VOC emission rates, we have observed a trend of reduction of carbon containing emissions from April to November, with an enhancement of oxVOC. Highest emission rates were observed in June for all measured species, with the exception of sesquiterpenes that were emitted most strongly in April. We exploit the wide range of conditions experienced at the site to filter the dataset with a combination of temperature, ozone and absolute humidity values in order to derive the emission potential and temperature dependency development for the major chemical species investigated. A profound reduction of monoterpene emission potential (E30) and temperature dependency (β) was found under low temperature regimes, combined with low ozone levels (E30MT, LTLO3=56 ± 9.1 ng g(dw)-1 h-1, βMT,LTLO3=0.03±0.01 K-1) while a combination of both stresses was found to alter their emissions responses with respect to temperature

  2. Detection, quantification and modelling of small-scale lateral translocation of throughfall in tree crowns of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischbier, Nico; Wagner, Sven

    2015-03-01

    The redistribution of precipitation in forests depends on the amount of above-canopy precipitation and is characterised by high small-scale variability. Although higher and lower values of net forest precipitation at small scales are typically averaged at larger spatial scales, the small-scale variability of throughfall needs to be understood because subordinate ecological processes in the forest ecosystem, e.g., regeneration of tree species, often take place at the same small scale. High stemflow amounts and canopy driplines at the crown edge of particular tree species can only be explained by lateral flow processes within tree crowns. This study tests the hypothesis that lateral water translocation within the crown can be determined from simultaneous records of precipitation at defined measurement points below and above the canopy by taking single-tree characteristics such as species and crown width into account. Spatially explicit simultaneous measurements of gross precipitation (above-canopy reference) and throughfall were conducted repeatedly at 175 measurements points in a mixed European beech-Norway spruce stand for a total of 26 individual rain events. Subsequent analysis with a new regression approach resulted in an estimated average canopy storage capacity of 3.5 mm and 5.8 mm for beech (leaf-bearing period) and spruce stands, respectively. Values of calculated lateral flow showed considerable variability between individual measurement points. The highest discharge amounts were observed at positions below the inner beech crowns during the leaf-bearing period. For an exemplary rainfall event with a gross precipitation of 25 mm, the predicted discharge ranged from 5 mm underneath the inner beech crown to about zero near the crown edge. A comparison with the measured values indicated that the predicted amount of lateral flow, which could be translated into stemflow for single beech trees, was realistic. However, for the same rainfall event, lateral flow in

  3. Effect of Thermal Treatment on Fracture Properties and Adsorption Properties of Spruce Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takato Nakano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal treatment on spruce is examined by analyzing the fracture and hygroscopic properties. Specimens were heated at temperatures within the range 120–200 °C for 1 h. Fracture energy was measured using a single-edge notched bending test and the strain-softening index was estimated by dividing the fracture energy by the maximum load. Adsorption properties were estimated using adsorption isotherms. Fiber saturation points (FSPs were estimated by extrapolating the moisture adsorption isotherm curve. Langmuir’s adsorption coefficient and number of adsorption sites were obtained using Langmuir’s theory and the Hailwood-Horrobin theory, respectively. The fracture energy, FSPs, and specimen weights decreased at temperatures higher than 150 °C, but the critical point for the strain-softening index and the number of adsorption sites was shown to be 180 °C. We hypothesize that the fracture energy and FSP depend on the chemical structure of the cell wall, whereas the strain-softening behavior may be influenced by the number of adsorption sites, and in turn the number of hydrogen bonds in hemicellulose.

  4. Non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments are present in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karsch): insights from in silico analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; García-Gil, María Rosario; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-04-01

    Many genes have been lost from the prokaryote plastidial genome during the early events of endosymbiosis in eukaryotes. Some of them were definitively lost, but others were relocated and functionally integrated to the host nuclear genomes through serial events of gene transfer during plant evolution. In gymnosperms, plastid genome sequencing has revealed the loss of ndh genes from several species of Gnetales and Pinaceae, including Norway spruce (Picea abies). This study aims to trace the ndh genes in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes. The plastid genomes of higher plants contain 11 ndh genes which are homologues of mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of the proton-pumping NADH-dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase) or complex I (electron transport chain). Ndh genes encode 11 NDH polypeptides forming the Ndh complex (analogous to complex I) which seems to be primarily involved in chloro-respiration processes. We considered ndh genes from the plastidial genome of four gymnosperms (Cryptomeria japonica, Cycas revoluta, Ginkgo biloba, Podocarpus totara) and a single angiosperm species (Arabidopsis thaliana) to trace putative homologs in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes using tBLASTn to assess the evolutionary fate of ndh genes in Norway spruce and to address their genomic location(s), structure, integrity and functionality. The results obtained from tBLASTn were subsequently analyzed by performing homology search for finding ndh specific conserved domains using conserved domain search. We report the presence of non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments, excepting ndhE and ndhG genes, in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce. Regulatory transcriptional elements like promoters, TATA boxes and enhancers were detected in the upstream regions of some ndh fragments. We also found transposable elements in the flanking regions of few ndh fragments suggesting nuclear rearrangements in those regions. These evidences

  5. EXTRA SPINDLE POLES (Separase) controls anisotropic cell expansion in Norway spruce (Picea abies) embryos independently of its role in anaphase progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, Panagiotis N; Savenkov, Eugene I; Minina, Elena A; Fukada, Kazutake; Reza, Salim Hossain; Gutierrez-Beltran, Emilio; Sanchez-Vera, Victoria; Suarez, Maria F; Hussey, Patrick J; Smertenko, Andrei P; Bozhkov, Peter V

    2016-10-01

    The caspase-related protease separase (EXTRA SPINDLE POLES, ESP) plays a major role in chromatid disjunction and cell expansion in Arabidopsis thaliana. Whether the expansion phenotypes are linked to defects in cell division in Arabidopsis ESP mutants remains elusive. Here we present the identification, cloning and characterization of the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies, Pa) ESP. We used the P. abies somatic embryo system and a combination of reverse genetics and microscopy to explore the roles of Pa ESP during embryogenesis. Pa ESP was expressed in the proliferating embryonal mass, while it was absent in the suspensor cells. Pa ESP associated with kinetochore microtubules in metaphase and then with anaphase spindle midzone. During cytokinesis, it localized on the phragmoplast microtubules and on the cell plate. Pa ESP deficiency perturbed anisotropic expansion and reduced mitotic divisions in cotyledonary embryos. Furthermore, whilst Pa ESP can rescue the chromatid nondisjunction phenotype of Arabidopsis ESP mutants, it cannot rescue anisotropic cell expansion. Our data demonstrate that the roles of ESP in daughter chromatid separation and cell expansion are conserved between gymnosperms and angiosperms. However, the mechanisms of ESP-mediated regulation of cell expansion seem to be lineage-specific. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon Flux Measurements of Montanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

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    Alexander Ač

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored ability of reflectance vegetation indexes (VIs related to chlorophyll fluorescence emission (686/630, 740/800 and de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments (PRI, calculated as (531−570/(531−570 to track changes in the CO2 assimilation rate and Light Use Efficiency (LUE in montane grassland and Norway spruce forest ecosystems, both at leaf and also canopy level. VIs were measured at two research plots using a ground-based high spatial/spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy technique. No significant relationship between VIs and leaf light-saturated CO2 assimilation (MAX was detected in instantaneous measurements of grassland under steady-state irradiance conditions. Once the temporal dimension and daily irradiance variation were included into the experimental setup, statistically significant changes in VIs related to tested physiological parameters were revealed. ΔPRI and Δ(686/630 of grassland plant leaves under dark-to-full sunlight transition in the scale of minutes were significantly related to MAX (2=0.51. In the daily course, the variation of VIs measured in one-hour intervals correlated well with the variation of Gross Primary Production (GPP, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE, and LUE estimated via the eddy-covariance flux tower. Statistical results were weaker in the case of the grassland ecosystem, with the strongest statistical relation of the index 686/630 with NEE and GPP.

  7. Contamination of environment in the road surroudings – impact of road salting on Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegrová, Jitka; Steiner, Oliver; Goessler, Walter; Tanda, Stefan; Anděl, Petr

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive overview of the influence of transport on the environment is presented in this study. The complex analysis of soil and needle samples provides an extensive set of data, which presents elemental contamination of the environment near roads. Traffic pollution (including winter road treatment) has a significant negative influence on our environment. Besides sodium and chlorine from winter maintenance many other elements are emitted into the environment. Three possible sources of contamination are assumed for environmental contamination evaluation: car emission, winter maintenance and abrasion from breaks and clutches. The chemical analysis focused on the description of samples from inorganic point of view. The influence of the contamination potential on the sodium and chlorine content in the samples of 1st year-old and 2nd year-old needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is discussed. Additional soil samples were taken from each sampling site and analyzed to get insight in the sodium and chlorine distribution. Statistical evaluation was used for interpretation of complex interaction patterns between element concentrations in different aged needles based on localities character including distance from the road and element concentration in soils. This species of needles were chosen because of its heightened sensitivity towards salinization. The study was conducted in different parts of the Czech Republic. The resulting database is a source of valuable information about the influence of transport on the environment.

  8. Changes in fine root production and longevity in response to water and nutrient availability in a Norway spruce stand in northern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdi, Hooshang [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    2003-03-01

    Effects of nutritional availability and soil warming on carbon turnover via fine roots (<2 mm in diameter) were studied at a Norway spruce stand in north Sweden in the following treatments: liquid fertilization (IL), soil warming of treated plots (HIL) and control (C). Minirhizotrons were installed in October 1994 and recorded once a month during the growing season, in 1997. Fine root production increased significantly in I and IL treatments compared with C plots at 0-10 and 10-20 cm depths. Soil warming enhanced effects of IL. Root mortality was not increased significantly in IL. Soil warming showed almost the similar effect on root mortality at depth 10-20 cm as it was for depth 0-10 cm. The root longevity in IL plots was significantly lower compared with C plots at depth 0-20 cm. The effects of soil warming were more pronounced at depth 10-25 cm. Soil warming increased root biomass three times in HIL plots and this increase. It is concluded that an eventual increase in temperature followed by increased CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases, results in an increase in root production and mortality and consequently higher carbon allocation to the soil.

  9. Updating beliefs and combining evidence in adaptive forest management under climate change: a case study of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) in the Black Forest, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefpour, Rasoul; Temperli, Christian; Bugmann, Harald; Elkin, Che; Hanewinkel, Marc; Meilby, Henrik; Jacobsen, Jette Bredahl; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2013-06-15

    We study climate uncertainty and how managers' beliefs about climate change develop and influence their decisions. We develop an approach for updating knowledge and beliefs based on the observation of forest and climate variables and illustrate its application for the adaptive management of an even-aged Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) forest in the Black Forest, Germany. We simulated forest development under a range of climate change scenarios and forest management alternatives. Our analysis used Bayesian updating and Dempster's rule of combination to simulate how observations of climate and forest variables may influence a decision maker's beliefs about climate development and thereby management decisions. While forest managers may be inclined to rely on observed forest variables to infer climate change and impacts, we found that observation of climate state, e.g. temperature or precipitation is superior for updating beliefs and supporting decision-making. However, with little conflict among information sources, the strongest evidence would be offered by a combination of at least two informative variables, e.g., temperature and precipitation. The success of adaptive forest management depends on when managers switch to forward-looking management schemes. Thus, robust climate adaptation policies may depend crucially on a better understanding of what factors influence managers' belief in climate change.

  10. EFFECT OF HEAT TREATMENT UPON DIMENSIONAL STABILITY AND MASS LOSS OF BLACK PINE AND SPRUCE WOOD ORIGINATING FROM MATURE TREES VS. THINNINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela CAMPEAN

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of anexperimental study performed with black pine (Pinusnigra L. and spruce (Picea abies L. wood, originatingfrom mature trees and thinnings cut from the sameparcel from the Stroesti-Arges region in Romania.After air drying and conditioning, the defect-freeboards were cut into standard samples 30x20x20mm.These were first dried to oven-dry state, then heattreatedat high temperatures (180 and 200ºC for 1, 2,3 and 4 hours. Weightings before and after heattreatmentallowed establishing the mass loss. Thetotal linear and volumic swelling coefficients were alsodetermined both for the heat-treated and untreatedsamples, in order to establish the effect of the heattreatmentupon the dimensional stability. The resultswere comparatively analyzed for the two species (pineand spruce, for the two grades (mature and thinwood, in order to establish for each the optimumtreating conditions, namely the ones which allow forthe maximum improvement of the dimensionalstability, without affecting significantly the wood mass(and implicitely the mechanical strengths. The resultsof the present research are to be valorized at themanufacturing of solid wood panels made from heattreatedlamellas

  11. Diel cycles of isoprenoids in the emissions of Norway spruce, four Scots pine chemotypes, and in Boreal forest ambient air during HUMPPA-COPEC-2010

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    N. Yassaa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Branch enclosure based emission rates of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes from four Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris and one Norway spruce (Picea abies, as well as the ambient mixing ratios of monoterpenes were determined during the HUMPPA-COPEC 2010 summer campaign. Differences in chemical composition and in emission strength were observed between the different trees, which confirmed that they represented different chemotypes. The chemotypes of Scots pine can be classified according to species with high, no and intermediate content of Δ-3-carene. The "non-Δ-3-carene" chemotype was found to be the strongest emitter of monoterpenes. From this chemotype, β-myrcene, a very reactive monoterpene, was the dominant species accounting for more than 32 % of the total emission rates of isoprenoids followed by β-phellandrene (~27%. Myrcene fluxes ranged from 0.8 to 24 μg g−1 (dw h−1. α-Farnesene was the dominant sesquiterpene species, with average emission rates of 318 ng g−1 (dw h−1. In the high Δ-3-carene chemotype, more than 48% of the total monoterpene emission was Δ-3-carene. The average Δ-3-carene emission rate (from chemotype 3, circa 609 ng g−1 (dw h−1 reported here is consistent with the previously reported summer season value. Daily maximum temperatures varied between 20 and 35 °C during the measurements. The monoterpene emissions from spruce were dominated by limonene (35%, β-phellandrene (15%, α-pinene (14% and eucalyptol (9%. Total spruce monoterpene emissions ranged from 0.55 up to 12.2 μg g−1 (dw h−1. Overall the total terpene flux (monoterpenes + sesquiterpenes from all studied tree species varied from 230 ng g−1 (dw h−1 up to 66 μg g−1 (dw h−1. Total ambient monoterpenes (including α-pinene, Δ-3-carene, β-pinene and β-myrcene measured during the campaign

  12. Functional assays and metagenomic analyses reveals differences between the microbial communities inhabiting the soil horizons of a Norway spruce plantation.

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    Stéphane Uroz

    Full Text Available In temperate ecosystems, acidic forest soils are among the most nutrient-poor terrestrial environments. In this context, the long-term differentiation of the forest soils into horizons may impact the assembly and the functions of the soil microbial communities. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the ecology and functional potentials of these microbial communities, a suite of analyses including comparative metagenomics was applied on independent soil samples from a spruce plantation (Breuil-Chenue, France. The objectives were to assess whether the decreasing nutrient bioavailability and pH variations that naturally occurs between the organic and mineral horizons affects the soil microbial functional biodiversity. The 14 Gbp of pyrosequencing and Illumina sequences generated in this study revealed complex microbial communities dominated by bacteria. Detailed analyses showed that the organic soil horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Bacteria, Chordata, Arthropoda and Ascomycota. On the contrary the mineral horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Archaea. Our analyses also highlighted that the microbial communities inhabiting the two soil horizons differed significantly in their functional potentials according to functional assays and MG-RAST analyses, suggesting a functional specialisation of these microbial communities. Consistent with this specialisation, our shotgun metagenomic approach revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of sequences related glycoside hydrolases in the organic horizon compared to the mineral horizon that was significantly enriched in glycoside transferases. This functional stratification according to the soil horizon was also confirmed by a significant correlation between the functional assays performed in this study and the functional metagenomic analyses. Together, our results suggest that the soil stratification and particularly the soil resource

  13. Wood quality and value production in mixed fir-spruce-beech stands: long-term research in the Western Carpathians

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    Petráš Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem quality and damage was evaluated in mixed spruce-fir-beech stands. Moreover, an assortments structure was determined with their financial value. Results were compared with pure spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst., fir (Abies alba Mill. and beech (Fagus sylvatica L. stands. Repeated measurements on 31 long-term research plots, stand assortment models, assortment yield models and value yield models were used. Stem quality of fir and spruce was only slightly lower in mixed stands compared to pure stands but beech stem quality was considerably worse in mixed stands. Fir and spruce had slightly lower proportions of better IIIA quality logs and higher proportions of IIIB quality in mixed stands. Beech had worse assortment structure than spruce and fir, in general. Pure beech stands had higher proportions of better I–IIIA quality assortments than mixed stands by 1–7%. Fir and spruce average value production (€ m−3 culminated at about 56 and 62 cm mean diameters. Almost the same value production was found in pure stands. In these stands it culminated at the mean diameter of 58 and 60 cm. Beech produced substantially less value on the same sites. In mixed stands, its value production culminated at the mean diameter of 40 cm. In pure stands, it culminated at the mean diameter of 36 cm. Although the production was found to be similar in both mixed and pure forests, higher damage intensity and less stem quality in mixed forests suggest that the pure forests can be more profitable.

  14. Impact of traffic on δ15N, δ13C and δ18O of needles and annual tree rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.

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    Guerrieri MR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase of nitrogen depositions, as oxidized (NOx and reduced (NHx compounds, has important implications on ecosystem nitrogen cycle. NOx comes predominantly from fossil fuel combustion in car engines and industrial processes, while agricultural activities (cattle farming, fertilizations are the main sources for NHx emissions. Such fertilisations could stimulate growth and, therefore, productivity of forests, especially in temperate forests, where nitrogen is a limiting factor. On the other hand an excess of nitrogen can lead to an acidification of the soil and have a negative impact on the microbial fauna and structure of plants. NOx and NHx depositions can be separated with the help of stable isotopes with different 15N-values reported for NOx originating from combustion sources. Consequently it was observed that the nitrogen isotopic composition of the vegetation reflects the isotopic signature of nitrogen sources. Our preliminary results on needles of Norway spruce trees exposed to NOx emissions along a transect perpendicular to a highway close to Faido and Brittnau show a clear isotopic enrichment in 15N in trees growing closer to traffic pollution, indicating an uptake of atmospheric nitrogen by stomatal pathway. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition measured in tree rings reveals the physiological response in plants. Trees more exposed to air pollution from traffic show an increase in δ13C and δ18O in tree rings, since mid sixties next to Erstfeld. This could mean a higher photosynthetic activity, enhanced by NOx traffic emissions, under low or not changed stomatal conductance. Our results confirm that stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen measured in needles and tree rings represent an important tool to monitor the impact of NOx load on tree physiology.

  15. Number of chromosomes and chromosome rearrangement of Norway spruce Picea abies (L. H. Karst. in the forests of Rilo-Rhodope mountain in Bulgaria

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    A. N. Tashev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative investigations of chromosome numbers and chromosome rearrangements in populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. H. Karst. growing in the territory of State Forest Service «Garmen», «Eleshnitsa», «Yakoruda», «Dobrinishte» in Rila-Rhodope mountain region (Bulgaria. Populations are located at the southern border of species range, and protected according to Bern Convention and EC Habitat Directive 92/43. It was found that diploid set of seed progeny of P. abies from the 4 populations studied includes 24 chromosomes (2n = 2x = 24. Mixoploidy (2n = 24, 36; 2n = 24, 48; 2n = 24, 36, 48 was detected in some germinating seeds of all studied populations of P. abies. Metaphase cells of germinating seeds of P. abies from State Forest Service «Garmen» and «Eleshnitsa» contain supernumerary, or B-chromosomes, while the variability of their number and occurrence was observed. In cells of germinating seeds of P. abies from State Forest Service «Yakoruda», «Dobrinishte», B-chromosomes are not revealed. Some chromosome rearrangements such as fragments and ring chromosomes were revealed in metaphase cells of P. abies from populations of «Garmen», «Eleshnitsa» and «Dobrinishte». Probably occurrence of mixoploids, B chromosomes and chromosome rearrangements in P. abies populations growing in Rila-Rhodope mountain region is connected with adaptation of trees to the extreme environmental conditions and such a serious factor that presently forests in the studied region located in the zone of natural radioactivity and in the past, the region of study was subjected to substantial anthropogenic pressure due to uranium extraction industry.

  16. Heterobasidion annosum root and butt rot of Norway spruce, Picea abies: Colonization by the fungus and its impact on tree growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz-Hellgren, M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1997-12-31

    Diameter growth losses associated with decay were quantified on a nationwide scale, and volume growth losses were measured in two stands. Diameter growth losses were 8-10% during a 5-year period in the nationwide study and 23% in one of the stands, whereas in the other stand, no volume losses could be attributed to decay. The effects of stump moisture content, temperature and time elapsed between felling and inoculation on the establishment of H. annosum spore infections in stumps were investigated among stumps resulting from thinnings and clear-cuttings. Furthermore, inoculations with H. annosum conidia were made between 0 hours and 4 weeks after thinning. The incidence of stump infections was lower on clear-cut areas than in thinned stands, but high enough to warrant stump treatment on clear-cuttings. A positive relation was found between heartwood moisture content and the proportion of heartwood infected, whereas the opposite relation was found for sapwood. The establishment of new conidiospore infections decreased with time, and it appeared that stumps were no longer susceptible to infection after 3 weeks had elapsed since felling. Roots of stumps and trees on forest land or former arable land were inoculated with H. annosum treated sawdust. The growth rate of H. annosum in roots of stumps was 25 cm/year, corresponding to 2.5 to 3 times the growth rate in tree roots. Previous land use did not affect the fungal rate of spread. Also, the average initial spread rate of H. annosum in naturally infected Norway spruce stems was estimated at 30 cm/year 156 refs, 9 figs

  17. The mobility of nitrogen across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and the effect of extraction method on tree-ring δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, G; Siegwolf, R T W; Buchmann, N; Schleppi, P; Waldner, P; Weber, P

    2014-06-15

    The use of stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ(15)N values) in dendroecological studies is often preceded by an extraction procedure using organic solvents to remove mobile N compounds from tree-rings. Although these mobile N compounds may be capable of distorting potential environmental signals in the tree-ring δ(15)N values, recent investigations question the necessity of such an extraction. We used an on-going experiment with simulated elevated N deposition previously labelled with (15)N, in conjunction with control trees, to investigate the necessity of extracting mobile N compounds (using a rapid extraction procedure) for tree-ring δ(15)N and δ(13)C studies, as well as N and C concentration analyses. In addition, we examined the magnitude of radial redistribution of N across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies). The (15)N label, applied in 1995/96, was found in tree-rings as far back as 1951, although the increased N availability did not cause any significant relative increase in tree growth. The rapid extraction procedure had no significant effect on tree-ring δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in either labelled or control trees, or on N concentration. The C concentrations, however, were significantly higher after extraction in control samples, with the opposite effect observed in labelled samples. Our results indicate that the extraction of mobile N compounds through the rapid extraction procedure is not necessary prior to the determination of Norway spruce δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in dendrochemical studies. δ(15)N values, however, must be interpreted with great care, particularly when used as a proxy for the N status of trees, due to the very high mobility of N within the tree stem sapwood of Norway spruce over several decades. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Factors affecting the accuracy of genomic selection for growth and wood quality traits in an advanced-breeding population of black spruce (Picea mariana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Patrick R N; Beaulieu, Jean; Mansfield, Shawn D; Clément, Sébastien; Desponts, Mireille; Bousquet, Jean

    2017-04-28

    Genomic selection (GS) uses information from genomic signatures consisting of thousands of genetic markers to predict complex traits. As such, GS represents a promising approach to accelerate tree breeding, which is especially relevant for the genetic improvement of boreal conifers characterized by long breeding cycles. In the present study, we tested GS in an advanced-breeding population of the boreal black spruce (Picea mariana [Mill.] BSP) for growth and wood quality traits, and concurrently examined factors affecting GS model accuracy. The study relied on 734 25-year-old trees belonging to 34 full-sib families derived from 27 parents and that were established on two contrasting sites. Genomic profiles were obtained from 4993 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) representative of as many gene loci distributed among the 12 linkage groups common to spruce. GS models were obtained for four growth and wood traits. Validation using independent sets of trees showed that GS model accuracy was high, related to trait heritability and equivalent to that of conventional pedigree-based models. In forward selection, gains per unit of time were three times higher with the GS approach than with conventional selection. In addition, models were also accurate across sites, indicating little genotype-by-environment interaction in the area investigated. Using information from half-sibs instead of full-sibs led to a significant reduction in model accuracy, indicating that the inclusion of relatedness in the model contributed to its higher accuracies. About 500 to 1000 markers were sufficient to obtain GS model accuracy almost equivalent to that obtained with all markers, whether they were well spread across the genome or from a single linkage group, further confirming the implication of relatedness and potential long-range linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the high accuracy estimates obtained. Only slightly higher model accuracy was obtained when using marker subsets that were

  19. A study by non-isothermal thermal methods of spruce wood bark materialss after their application for dye removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIORICA DULMAN

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a study of some materials obtained from spruce bark (Picea abies, Romania, after retention of some dyes frequently used in dyeing processes in the textile industry and waste water treatment. These materials obtained by dye retention exhibit a particular thermal behavior which is different from that of the blank sample (spruce bark. The characteristic temperatures, weight losses, the residue remaining after thermo-oxidative degradation, as well as the activation energies of the significant thermo-destruction stages, estimated from non-isothermal thermogravimetric data, together with the thermal quantities calculated from DTAdata support the conclusion presented in a previous study on dye retention from aqueous solution. The obtained results made evident that, under optimal retention conditions, spruce bark shows the highest retention capacity for the Basic Blue dye, followed by Direct Brown 95 and Direct Brown 2.

  20. Optimizing the Wood Value Chain in Northern Norway Taking Into Account National and Regional Economic Trade-Offs

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    Ulf Johansen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of past decades of extensive afforestation in Norway, mature forest volumes are increasing. National forestry politics call for sustainable and efficient resource usage and for increased regional processing. Regional policies seek to provide good conditions for such industries to be competitive and to improve regional value creation. We demonstrate how methods from operations research and regional macro-economics may complement each other to support decision makers in this process. The operations research perspective is concerned with finding an optimally designed wood value chain and an aggregated planning of its operations, taking a holistic perspective on strategic-tactical level. Using Input-Output analysis methods based on statistics and survey data, regional macro-economics helps to estimate each industry actor’s value creation and impact on society beyond immediate value chain activities. Combining these approaches in a common mathematical optimization model, a balance can be struck between industry/business and regional political interests. For a realistic case study from the northern part of coastal Norway, we explore this balance from several perspectives, investigating value chain profits, economic ripple effects and regional resource usage.

  1. Development and growth of primordial shoots in Norway spruce buds before visible bud burst in relation to time and temperature in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Sirkka; Partanen, Jouni; Viherä-Aarnio, Anneli; Häkkinen, Risto

    2012-08-01

    The timing of bud development in ecodormancy is critical for trees in boreal and temperate regions with seasonally alternating climates. The development of vegetative buds and the growth of primordial shoots (the primordial shoot ratio) in Norway spruce were followed by the naked eye and at stereo and light microscopic levels in fresh-cut and fixed buds obtained by regular field samplings during the spring of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Buds were collected from 15 randomly selected trees (all 16 years old in 2007) of one southern Finnish half-sib family. The air temperature was recorded hourly throughout the observation period. In 2008 and 2009, initial events in the buds, seen as accumulation of lipid droplets in the cortex area, started in mid-March and were depleted in late April, simultaneously with the early development of vascular tissue and primordial needles. In mid-April 2007, however, the development of the buds was at least 10 days ahead as a result of warm spells in March and early April. Variation in the timing of different developmental phases within and among the sample trees was negligible. There was no clear one-to-one correspondence between the externally visible and the internal development of the buds. The dependence of the primordial shoot ratio on different types of temperature sum was studied by means of regression analysis. High coefficients of determination (R(2) ≈ 95%) were attained with several combinations of the starting time (beginning of the year/vernal equinox), the threshold value (from -3 to +5 °C), and the time step (hour/day) used in the temperature summation, i.e., the prediction power of the primordial shoot ratio models turned out to be high, but the parameter estimate values were not unambiguous. According to our results, temperature sums describe the growth of the primordial shoot inside the bud before bud burst. Thus, the results provide a realistic interpretation for the present phenological models of bud development that

  2. Applicability of non-destructive substitutes for leaf area in different stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) focusing on traditional forest crown measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubhann, Daniel; Eckmüllner, Otto; Sterba, Hubert

    2010-09-30

    Since individual tree leaf area is an important measure for productivity as well as for site occupancy, it is of high interest in many studies about forest growth. The exact determination of leaf area is nearly impossible. Thus, a common way to get information about leaf area is to use substitutes. These substitutes are often variables which are collected in a destructive way which is not feasible for long term studies. Therefore, this study aimed at testing the applicability of using substitutes for leaf area which could be collected in a non-destructive way, namely crown surface area and crown projection area. In 8 stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.), divided into three age classes and two thinning treatments, a total of 156 trees were felled in order to test the relationship between leaf area and crown surface area and crown projection area, respectively. Individual tree leaf area of the felled sample trees was estimated by 3P-branch sampling with an accuracy of ±10%. Crown projection area and crown surface area were compared with other, more commonly used, but destructive predictors of leaf area, namely sapwood area at different heights on the bole. Our investigations confirmed findings of several studies that sapwood area is the most precise measure for leaf area because of the high correlation between sapwood area and the leaf area. But behind sapwood area at crown base and sapwood area at three tenth of the tree height the predictive ability of crown surface area was ranked third and even better than that of sapwood area at breast height (R(2) = 0.656 compared with 0.600). Within the stands leaf area is proportional to crown surface area. Using the pooled data of all stands a mixed model approach showed that additionally to crown surface area dominant height and diameter at breast height (dbh) improved the leaf area estimates. Thus, taking dominant height and dbh into account, crown surface area can be recommended for estimating the leaf area

  3. Digital soil classification and elemental mapping using imaging Vis-NIR spectroscopy: How to explicitly quantify stagnic properties of a Luvisol under Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegs, Stefanie; Buddenbaum, Henning; Rogge, Derek; Steffens, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Laboratory imaging Vis-NIR spectroscopy of soil profiles is a novel technique in soil science that can determine quantity and quality of various chemical soil properties with a hitherto unreached spatial resolution in undisturbed soil profiles. We have applied this technique to soil cores in order to get quantitative proof of redoximorphic processes under two different tree species and to proof tree-soil interactions at microscale. Due to the imaging capabilities of Vis-NIR spectroscopy a spatially explicit understanding of soil processes and properties can be achieved. Spatial heterogeneity of the soil profile can be taken into account. We took six 30 cm long rectangular soil columns of adjacent Luvisols derived from quaternary aeolian sediments (Loess) in a forest soil near Freising/Bavaria using stainless steel boxes (100×100×300 mm). Three profiles were sampled under Norway spruce and three under European beech. A hyperspectral camera (VNIR, 400-1000 nm in 160 spectral bands) with spatial resolution of 63×63 µm² per pixel was used for data acquisition. Reference samples were taken at representative spots and analysed for organic carbon (OC) quantity and quality with a CN elemental analyser and for iron oxides (Fe) content using dithionite extraction followed by ICP-OES measurement. We compared two supervised classification algorithms, Spectral Angle Mapper and Maximum Likelihood, using different sets of training areas and spectral libraries. As established in chemometrics we used multivariate analysis such as partial least-squares regression (PLSR) in addition to multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to correlate chemical data with Vis-NIR spectra. As a result elemental mapping of Fe and OC within the soil core at high spatial resolution has been achieved. The regression model was validated by a new set of reference samples for chemical analysis. Digital soil classification easily visualizes soil properties within the soil profiles. By combining

  4. The historical disturbance regime of mountain Norway spruce forests in the Western Carpathians and its influence on current forest structure and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Pavel; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Mikoláš, Martin; Bače, Radek; Nagel, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Seedre, Meelis; Morrissey, Robert C; Kucbel, Stanislav; Jaloviar, Peter; Jasík, Marián; Vysoký, Juraj; Šamonil, Pavel; Čada, Vojtěch; Mrhalová, Hana; Lábusová, Jana; Nováková, Markéta H; Rydval, Miloš; Matějů, Lenka; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2017-03-15

    In order to gauge ongoing and future changes to disturbance regimes, it is necessary to establish a solid baseline of historic disturbance patterns against which to evaluate these changes. Further, understanding how forest structure and composition respond to variation in past disturbances may provide insight into future resilience to climate-driven alterations of disturbance regimes. We established 184 plots (mostly 1000 m(2)) in 14 primary mountain Norway spruce forests in the Western Carpathians. On each plot we surveyed live and dead trees and regeneration, and cored around 25 canopy trees. Disturbance history was reconstructed by examining individual tree growth trends. The study plots were further aggregated into five groups based on disturbance history (severity and timing) to evaluate and explain its influence on forest structure. These ecosystems are characterized by a mixed severity disturbance regime with high spatiotemporal variability in severity and frequency. However, periods of synchrony in disturbance activity were also found. Specifically, a peak of canopy disturbance was found for the mid-19th century across the region (about 60% of trees established), with the most important periods of disturbance in the 1820s and from the 1840s to the 1870s. Current stand size and age structure were strongly influenced by past disturbance activity. In contrast, past disturbances did not have a significant effect on current tree density, the amount of coarse woody debris, and regeneration. High mean densities of regeneration with height >50 cm (about 1400 individuals per ha) were observed. Extensive high severity disturbances have recently affected Central European forests, spurring a discussion about the causes and consequences. We found some evidence that forests in the Western Carpathians were predisposed to recent severe disturbance events as a result of synchronized past disturbance activity, which partly homogenized size and age structure and made recent

  5. Predictive Modeling of Black Spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P. Wood Density Using Stand Structure Variables Derived from Airborne LiDAR Data in Boreal Forests of Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Pokharel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to model the average wood density in black spruce trees in representative stands across a boreal forest landscape based on relationships with predictor variables extracted from airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR point cloud data. Increment core samples were collected from dominant or co-dominant black spruce trees in a network of 400 m2 plots distributed among forest stands representing the full range of species composition and stand development across a 1,231,707 ha forest management unit in northeastern Ontario, Canada. Wood quality data were generated from optical microscopy, image analysis, X-ray densitometry and diffractometry as employed in SilviScan™. Each increment core was associated with a set of field measurements at the plot level as well as a suite of LiDAR-derived variables calculated on a 20 × 20 m raster from a wall-to-wall coverage at a resolution of ~1 point m−2. We used a multiple linear regression approach to identify important predictor variables and describe relationships between stand structure and wood density for average black spruce trees in the stands we observed. A hierarchical classification model was then fitted using random forests to make spatial predictions of mean wood density for average trees in black spruce stands. The model explained 39 percent of the variance in the response variable, with an estimated root mean square error of 38.8 (kg·m−3. Among the predictor variables, P20 (second decile LiDAR height in m and quadratic mean diameter were most important. Other predictors describing canopy depth and cover were of secondary importance and differed according to the modeling approach. LiDAR-derived variables appear to capture differences in stand structure that reflect different constraints on growth rates, determining the proportion of thin-walled earlywood cells in black spruce stems, and ultimately influencing the pattern of variation in important wood quality attributes

  6. Preservation of forest wood chips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, P.D.; Thomsen, I.M.; Ohlsson, C.; Leer, E.; Ravn Schmidt, E.; Soerensen, M.; Knudsen, P.

    1999-01-01

    As part of the Danish Energy Research Programme on biomass utilisation for energy production (EFP), this project concerns problems connected to the handling and storing of wood chips. In this project, the possibility of preserving wood chips of the Norway Spruce (Picea Abies) is addressed, and the potential improvements by anaerobic storage are tested. Preservation of wood chips aims at reducing dry matter losses from extensive heating during storage and to reduce production of fungal spores. Fungal spores pose a health hazards to workers handling the chips. Further the producers of wood chips are interested in such a method since it would enable them to give a guarantee for the delivery of homogeneous wood chips also during the winter period. Three different types of wood chips were stored airtight and further one of these was stored in accordance with normal practise and use as reference. The results showed that airtight storage had a beneficial impact on the quality of the chips: no redistribution of moisture, low dry matter losses, unfavourable conditions for microbial activity of most fungi, and the promotion of yeasts instead of fungi with airborne spores. Likewise the firing tests showed that no combustion problems, and no increased risk to the environment or to the health of staff is caused by anaerobic storage of wood chips. In all, the tests of the anaerobic storage method of forest wood chips were a success and a large-scale test of the method will be carried out in 1999. (au)

  7. Wood Anatomy and Insect Defoliator Systems: Is there an anatomical response to sustained feeding by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Jodi; Gärtner, Holger; Alfaro, René; Smith, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) is the most widespread and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in western North America, and has a long-term coexistence with its primary host tree, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco). Western spruce budworm (WSB) outbreaks usually last for several years, and cause reductions in annual growth, stem defects, and regeneration delays. In British Columbia, the WSB is the second most damaging insect after the mountain pine beetle, and sustained and/or severe defoliation can result in the mortality of host trees. Numerous studies have used tree rings to reconstruct WSB outbreaks across long temporal scales, to evaluate losses in stand productivity, and examine isotope ratios. Although some studies have looked at the impacts of artificial defoliation on balsam fir in eastern North America, there has been no prior research on how WSB outbreaks affect the anatomical structure of the stem as described by intra-annual wood density and potential cell size variations. The objective of this study was to anatomically examine the response of Douglas-fir to sustained WSB outbreaks in two regions of southern British Columbia. We hypothesize that the anatomical intra-annual characteristics of the tree rings, such as cell wall thickness, latewood cell size, and/or lumen area changes during sustained WSB outbreaks. To test this hypothesis we sampled four permanent sample plots in coastal and dry interior sites, which had annually resolved defoliation data collected over a 7-12 year period. At each site diameter-at-breast height (cm), height (m), and crown position were recorded and three increment cores were extracted from 25 trees. Increment cores were prepared to permit anatomical and x-ray density analyses. For each tree, a 15µm thick micro section was cut from the radial plane. Digital images of the micro sections were captured and processed. In each annual ring, features such as cell lumen area (µm2

  8. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD decay of Picea abies (L. Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1–3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr−1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr−1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  9. Growth effects after whole-tree harvest in final cut of Scots pine and Norway spruce forest. Final report; Tillvaexteffekternas storlek och uthaallighet efter skogsbraensleuttag i slutavverkning av tall och gran. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valinger, E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2001-12-01

    A great concern in forestry today is whether whole-tree harvesting influence site productivity and whether it is consistent with the principle of sustainable use of forest resources. To evaluate this a randomised field experiment established 24 years ago in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Southern Sweden was used. The field experiment was established in fall 1975 as a naturally regenerated mixed forest with Scots pine and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) with a growing stock of 305 m{sup 3}/ha was clear-cut near Kosta (56 deg 52' N, 15 deg 50' E, 240 m.a.s.l.). The site was a mesic dwarf-shrub type of medium fertility, with an average precipitation of 600 mm yr-1 and the soil was an orthic podzol. Treatments were conventional stem harvest (CH), whole-tree harvest (WTH), and branch and stem harvest (BSH). Scots pine seedlings of local provenance were planted in spring 1977 at the beginning of the second growing season following the harvest. The seedlings were planted in exposed mineral soil in manually scarified patches (40 x 40 cm) at 1.7 m spacing (144 seedlings per assessment plot, i.e. 3 600 seedlings/ha). Based on calliper data, the diameter for the mean basal area per tree (db) was calculated for each plot after 24 years using the formula: db = ({sigma} b{sup 3}/{sigma} b{sup 2}), where b is basal area at breast height for each tree. Three undamaged sample trees with a diameter equal or close to the diameter of the mean basal area per tree were selected on each plot giving 36 stems that were felled for destructive measurements in 2000. Total tree height ({+-} 0.01 m) was measured on every tree felled. Stem biomass was estimated by sampling of stem discs, 2 cm thick, at stump height (1 % of tree height), breast height (1.3 m), and at every meter along the bole. Crown biomass was estimated by sampling live and dead branches on the felled trees. From every whorl of branches one living branch was sampled and all branches were counted. Stem

  10. FT-Raman investigation of milled-wood lignins : softwood, hardwood, and chemically modified black spruce lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; James D. McSweeny; Sally A. Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being increasingly applied to study wood and other lignin-containing biomass/biomaterials. Lignin’s contribution to the Raman spectra of such materials needs to be understood in the context of various lignin structures, substructures, and functional groups so that lignin-specific features could be identified and the spectral information could be...

  11. Patterns of mast fruiting of common beech, sessile and common oak, Norway spruce and Scots pine in Central and Northern Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nussbaumer, Anita; Waldner, Peter; Etzold, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    and Scots pine in Central and Northern Europe over the last two to three decades. We analysed data from the International Co-operative Programme on Assessment and Monitoring of Air Pollution Effects on Forests (ICP Forests) and additional Danish, German, Flemish and Swiss datasets.Within-plot synchrony...... hypotheses, and beech and spruce supported the economy of scale, predator satiation and resource allocation hypotheses....

  12. Changes in mechanical and chemical wood properties by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.schnabel@fh-salzburg.ac.at [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Huber, Hermann [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); Grünewald, Tilman A. [BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Institute of Physics and Materials Science, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Petutschnigg, Alexander [Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Department of Forest Products Technology and Wood Constructions, Marktstraße 136a, 5431 Kuchl (Austria); BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenzstraße 24, 3430 Tulln (Austria)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Changes in wood due to electron beam irradiations (EBI) were evaluated. • Wood components undergo different altering mechanisms due to the irradiation. • Chemical reactions in wood lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood. - Abstract: This study deals with the influence of various electron beam irradiation (EBI) dosages on the Brinell hardness of Norway spruce. The results of the hardness measurements and the FT-IR spectroscopic analysis show different effects of the EBI at dosages of 25, 50, 100 and 200 kGy. It was assumed that the lignin and carbohydrates undergo different altering mechanisms due to the EBI treatment. New cleavage products and condensation reactions of lignin and carbohydrates lead to better surface hardness of low irradiated wood samples. These results provide a useful basis for further investigations on the changes in wood chemistry and material properties due to electron beam irradiations.

  13. Harvesting wood fuels from mixed stands of hard- and softwood on forest and agricultural land. Final report; Uttag av traedbraensle ur blandbestaand av loev- och barrtraed vaexande paa skogs- och aakermark. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Tord [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Management and Products

    2001-12-01

    The aim was to study the growth of birches (Betula pendula Roth and Betula pubescens Ehrh.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in mixed stands of birch and spruce, and in pure stands of Norway spruce. Data from nine localities have been analysed. The trials were spread between lat. 56 and 60 deg N. The experiment was established on eight localities in Sweden. Plots in mixed stands of 20-32-year-old birches and Norway spruces were established in 1983-84. Number of stems per hectare, height and diameter of the stems was registered. Then two treatments were made. On a locality all birches in a plot were cut to make pure spruce stands. In another plot 500 birches per hectare were left in the spruce stand for establishing mixed stands. The established stands were then measured. The stands were examined five years later. Stem number, height and diameter was registered. Small corrections in the stands were made eg. birch sprouts were cut and some spruces were cut. In 1996-1998 the stands were examined again. The birch shelter was cut and measured. On one shelter plot per locality 100 birches per hectare was left. The birch shelter was left for making timber production of good quality. The shelter should be cut when the birches are about 60 years old. By the results given in the study there is obvious that MAI for Norway spruce growing for 13-15 years under shelter is lower, 7.2 m{sup 3}/ha/year than for pure spruce stand, 7.9. However the total MAI including birch in the shelter was 11.5 compared with 7.9 m{sup 3}/ha/year in pure spruce stands. Corresponding MAI for biomass in shelter and pure spruce stands was 3.8 and 4.2 ton d.w./ha/year. Total MAI was 6.4 and 4.2 ton/ha/year. A practical implication of the study is that removal of birches when creating mixed stands has too small dimensions for harvesting pulp wood or fuel wood. In the end of the rotation period for mixed stands the birch stems were 16 cm at breast height. These birches could be used as pulp

  14. Protection of wood from microorganisms by laccase-catalyzed iodination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, M; Engel, J; Thöny-Meyer, L; Schwarze, F W M R; Ihssen, J

    2012-10-01

    In the present work, Norway spruce wood (Picea abies L.) was reacted with a commercial Trametes versicolor laccase in the presence of potassium iodide salt or the phenolic compounds thymol and isoeugenol to impart an antimicrobial property to the wood surface. In order to assess the efficacy of the wood treatment, a leaching of the iodinated and polymerized wood and two biotests including bacteria, a yeast, blue stain fungi, and wood decay fungi were performed. After laccase-catalyzed oxidation of the phenols, the antimicrobial effect was significantly reduced. In contrast, the enzymatic oxidation of iodide (I(-)) to iodine (I(2)) in the presence of wood led to an enhanced resistance of the wood surface against all microorganisms, even after exposure to leaching. The efficiency of the enzymatic wood iodination was comparable to that of a chemical wood preservative, VP 7/260a. The modification of the lignocellulose by the laccase-catalyzed iodination was assessed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) technique. The intensities of the selected lignin-associated bands and carbohydrate reference bands were analyzed, and the results indicated a structural change in the lignin matrix. The results suggest that the laccase-catalyzed iodination of the wood surface presents an efficient and ecofriendly method for wood protection.

  15. Schemele de împădurire dese şi stabilitatea monoculturilor de molid – este posibilă realizarea unui echilibru de durată? [Narrow spacing and stability of Norway spruce monocultures - is a long-term equilibrium possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolescu N.-V

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst - one of the most important forest species in both Europe (about 34 million ha and Romania (about 1.4 million ha - has been highly expanded in monocultures outside of its natural range since mid- 19th century. Unfortunately, despite their many advantages (easy establishment, quick growth, high production, multiple uses of timber etc., Norway spruce pure stands are facing many problems being especially subjected to wind and snow damages. Taking into account these facts, the article outlines the most important factors influencing Norway spruce stand stability such as initial spacing (stocking and early silvicultural interventions. It seems obvious that two solutions for a better stability to snow damages at early ages exists: low stocking (wide spacing at planting (maximum 2,000-2,500 plants per ha and high stocking (narrow spacing at planting (4,000-5,000 plants per ha but followed by high intensity cleaningrespacing started no later than end of saplingbeginning of thicket stage. Under present Romanian conditions, facing many economic constraints (e.g., high cost of planting and tending; lack of labour force, the solution of low stocking (wide spacing at planting as already stated at the beginning of 1980’s but never applied on a large scale seems more feasible and realistic

  16. Water sorption in wood and modified wood at high values of relative humidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Engelund, Emil Tang; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2010-01-01

    Desorption isotherms at 208C for untreated, acetylated, and furfurylated Norway spruce Picea abies (L.) Karst. sapwood were established in the 91.9–99.9% relative humidity (RH) range. Three methods were employed to secure various constant RH levels: saturated salt solutions, climate chambers......, and the pressure plate technique. The curve form for the untreated samples did not show an upward bend, except perhaps above 99.5% RH, indicating that – contrary to what has hitherto been assumed – capillary condensation does not play a significant role for water sorption in wood below fiber saturation. Three...

  17. Effects of forest management on sustainability of integrated timber and energy wood production. Scenario analysis based on ecosystem model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routa, J.

    2011-07-01

    The main aim of this thesis was to study the effects of forest management on the sustainability of integrated timber and energy wood production in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.), on fertile and medium fertile sites, and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), on medium fertile and less fertile sites. In this context, an ecosystem model was used in scenario analyses, which considered the effects of management on the total stem wood production, timber and energy wood production. Furthermore, the management implications for net present value (NPV) and net CO{sub 2} emissions of the use of energy wood was addressed. The management included varying pre-commercial stand density, timing, and intensity of energy wood thinning, N fertilization (Papers 2-4), and rotation length (Paper 4). In addition, the effects of the genetic entry on above-ground biomass production of Norway spruce were studied based on experimental data (Paper 1). In general, the management with higher pre-commercial stand density than that used in basic management and N fertilization clearly increased stem wood production (i.e. sawlogs, pulp and small-sized stem wood), energy wood production (logging residuals, small-sized stem wood, stump wood and roots) and also NPV over the rotation for both Norway spruce and Scots pine, regardless of site fertility type and rotation length used in the simulations (Papers 2-4). However, the total stem wood production and energy wood production were also affected by the timing of energy wood thinning. Fertilization had a positive effect, but the effects of number of applications and amount of N fertilization were negligible on the total stem wood and energy wood production. Additionally, in the case of net CO{sub 2} emissions, the increase of pre-commercial stand density and fertilization clearly decreased the net CO{sub 2} emission in energy production over the rotation regardless of tree species, site fertility type and rotation length used in simulations (Papers

  18. Wood in the Ban's house at Artiče, Slovenia, as a historical archive

    OpenAIRE

    Čufar, Katarina; Strgar, Dušan; Merela, Maks; Brus, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a survey of wood and performed dendrochronological dating of beams from the external walls of the old Ban’s House in the village of Artiče near Brežice. The logs were made of different wood species, with different oaks among them, i.e. sessile oak (Quercus petraea), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and Turkey oak (Quercus cerris), as well as sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Based on dendrochronological dating of the outermost tree-rings, the bea...

  19. Moderate effects of reforestation with Norway spruce (Picea abies) on carbon storage and turnover in a Swiss sub-alpine pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltbrunner, D.; Hagedorn, F.; Niklaus, P. A.; Zimmermann, S.; Schmidt, M. W. I.

    2012-04-01

    In alpine regions the forested area is strongly increasing through woody plant encroachment on abandoned pastures or by man-made afforestations. These natural or artificial reforestations, in fact, have several implications on the nutrient cycling between plants and soils and thus, are likely to affect carbon turnover. Although afforestations are to be accounted as a sink according to the Kyoto protocol, there are still uncertainties about their effects on the soil carbon storage. In the present study, we assessed soils under pasture, an adjacent chronosequence of spruce afforestations (25-45 years) and a mature spruce forest (older than 120 years) on a homogenous slope in a Swiss sub-alpine ecosystem. While the soil bulk densities were not affected by the land use change, carbon concentrations in the mineral soil decreased 25-45 years after tree establishment. However, no differences between pasture and the mature forest were apparent, indicating that the C-loss after land use conversion was only transient. Up to 2.5kg m-2 C was additionally stored in the organic layer of the oldest stands, resulting in a net C gain in the old forest soils. C:N-ratios of the soil organic matter (SOM) considerably increased with stand age in the uppermost soil layer, displaying the distinct chemical composition of the plant input. In accordance, a shift of the δ13C natural abundance of the SOM in the uppermost mineral layer towards a less negative signal was observed with tree development. The abundance of soil microorganisms, as identified by their phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), was only moderately affected by vegetation type in the mineral soils. In contrast, a strong alteration of the microbial community composition with a decreasing proportion of fungi from the organic layers to the uppermost mineral layer was observable. Our results show that afforestation with spruce trees on an extensively used sub-alpine pasture only led to a transient loss of C in the mineral soils. In

  20. Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    come from? How is it harvested? How is it manufactured and treated ? How are the buildings detailed and protected against weather during construction to keep them dry and make them long-life ? In a period of climate change, forests are the last lungs of the planet to sequestrate CO2. Their global size......Wood – a sustainable building material ? For thousands of years and all over the planet, wood has been used as a building material and exciting architecture has been created in wood. The fantastic structural, physical and aesthetic properties of the material as well as the fact that wood...

  1. INFLUENCE OF HEAT TRANSFERRING MEDIA ON DURABILITY OF THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Karlsson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the durability and dimensional stability of a series of hardwoods and softwoods after thermal modification in vegetable oils and in steam atmospheres have been performed. Mass loss after exposure to Coniophora puteana (BAM Ebw.15 for 16 weeks was very low for European birch, European aspen, Norway spruce, and Scots pine thermally modified in a linseed oil product with preservative (for 1 hour at 200 oC. Fairly low mass losses were obtained for wood thermally modified in linseed-, tung- and rapeseed oil, and losses were related to the wood species. Low mass loss during rot test was also found for Norway spruce and Scots pine modified in saturated steam at 180 oC. Water absorption of pine and aspen was reduced by the thermal treatments and the extent of reduction was dependent on wood species and thermal modification method. Thermally modified aspen was stable during cycling climate tests, whereas pine showed considerable cracking when modified under superheated steam conditions (Thermo D. At lower modification temperature (180 oC an increase in mass after modification in rapeseed oil of spruce, aspen and sapwood as well as heartwood of pine was observed, whereas at high temperature (240 oC a mass loss could be found. Oil absorption in room tempered oil after thermal modification in oil was high for the more permeable aspen and pine (sapwood.

  2. Effects of Wood Ash on Soil Fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz Paredes, Carla

    in agricultural and forest soils focusing on soil microbial communities’ composition and function, particularly mycorrhizal fungi. Two study sites were used for this study, one in an agricultural field where different biomass ashes were evaluated as replacements for P fertilizers in barley, and a second one...... in a Norway spruce forest where different amounts of wood ash were spread on the soil to study the effects on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, bioaccumulation of metals in sporocarps, and microbial communities. Laboratory microcosm experiments were run in parallel to the field studies, to compare the effects...... effects on barley or associated AM fungi. Furthermore, wood ash can also be re-distributed to the forest without representing any risks for ECM fungal communities, N leaching, Cd bioaccumulation in sporocarps or the general activity of the soil microbial community....

  3. Effects of twice-ambient carbon dioxide and nitrogen amendment on biomass, nutrient contents and carbon costs of Norway spruce seedlings as influenced by mycorrhization with Piloderma croceum and Tomentellopsis submollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigt, Rosemarie Barbara; Raidl, Stefan; Verma, Rita; Rodenkirchen, Hermann; Göttlein, Axel; Agerer, Reinhard

    2011-07-01

    Elevated tropospheric CO(2) concentrations may increase plant carbon fixation. In ectomycorrhizal trees, a considerable portion of the synthesized carbohydrates can be used to support the mutualistic fungal root partner which in turn can benefit the tree by increased nutrient supply. In this study, Norway spruce seedlings were inoculated with either Piloderma croceum (medium distance "fringe" exploration type) or Tomentellopsis submollis (medium distance "smooth" exploration type). We studied the impact of either species regarding fungal biomass production, seedling biomass, nutrient status and nutrient use efficiency in rhizotrons under ambient and twice-ambient CO(2) concentrations. A subset was amended with ammonium nitrate to prevent nitrogen imbalances expected under growth promotion by elevated CO(2). The two fungal species exhibited considerably different influences on growth, biomass allocation as well as nutrient uptake of spruce seedlings. P. croceum increased nutrient supply and promoted plant growth more strongly than T. submollis despite considerably higher carbon costs. In contrast, seedlings with T. submollis showed higher nutrient use efficiency, i.e. produced plant biomass per received unit of nutrient, particularly for P, K and Mg, thereby promoting shoot growth and reducing the root/shoot ratio. Under the given low soil nutrient availability, P. croceum proved to be a more favourable fungal partner for seedling development than T. submollis. Additionally, plant internal allocation of nutrients was differently influenced by the two ECM fungal species, particularly evident for P in shoots and for Ca in roots. Despite slightly increased ECM length and biomass production, neither of the two species had increased its capacity of nutrient uptake in proportion to the rise of CO(2). This lead to imbalances in nutritional status with reduced nutrient concentrations, particularly in seedlings with P. croceum. The beneficial effect of P. croceum thus

  4. Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Unterrainer, Walter

    2014-01-01

    has shrinked by 30% since the preindustrial times and in countries like China (with a historic tradition for wooden architecture) we could observe enormous desertification. What does this mean for the use of wood in modern architecture ? A critical reflection is needed. In too many cases...

  5. Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    David W. Green; Robert H. White; Antoni TenWolde; William Simpson; Joseph Murphy; Robert J. Ross; Roland Hernandez; Stan T. Lebow

    2006-01-01

    Wood is a naturally formed organic material consisting essentially of elongated tubular elements called cells arranged in a parallel manner for the most part. These cells vary in dimensions and wall thickness with position in the tree, age, conditions of growth, and kind of tree. The walls of the cells are formed principally of chain molecules of cellulose, polymerized...

  6. The Acoustic Properties of Water Submerged Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta and Spruce (Picea spp. Wood and Their Suitability for Use as Musical Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin Hilde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wood is a common material used for the manufacture of many products, and submerged wood, in particular, has been used in niche markets and musical instruments. In order to examine if submerged wood in British Columbia, Canada, would be appropriate for use as musical instruments, a study was performed in 2007 on submerged wood from Ootsa Lake, British Columbia, Canada. The results of that study showed the wood was not suitable for musical instruments. In this paper, the wood samples were allowed to age untouched in a laboratory setting and were then retested under the hypothesis that physical acoustic characteristics would improve. It was shown, however, that acoustic properties became less adequate after being left to dry over time. This article describes the density, speed of sound, acoustic constant and characteristic impedance properties for submerged wood and a comparison is made for different applications for musical instruments.

  7. Height Extraction and Stand Volume Estimation Based on Fusion Airborne LiDAR Data and Terrestrial Measurements for a Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] Test Site in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan APOSTOL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to analyze the efficiency of individual tree identification and stand volume estimation from LiDAR data. The study was located in Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] stands in southwestern Romania and linked airborne laser scanning (ALS with terrestrial measurements through empirical modelling. The proposed method uses the Canopy Maxima algorithm for individual tree detection together with biometric field measurements and individual trees positioning. Field data was collected using Field-Map real-time GIS-laser equipment, a high-accuracy GNSS receiver and a Vertex IV ultrasound inclinometer. ALS data were collected using a Riegl LMS-Q560 instrument and processed using LP360 and Fusion software to extract digital terrain, surface and canopy height models. For the estimation of tree heights, number of trees and tree crown widths from the ALS data, the Canopy Maxima algorithm was used together with local regression equations relating field-measured tree heights and crown widths at each plot. When compared to LiDAR detected trees, about 40-61% of the field-measured trees were correctly identified. Such trees represented, in general, predominant, dominant and co-dominant trees from the upper canopy. However, it should be noted that the volume of the correctly identified trees represented 60-78% of the total plot volume. The estimation of stand volume using the LiDAR data was achieved by empirical modelling, taking into account the individual tree heights (as identified from the ALS data and the corresponding ground reference stem volume. The root mean square error (RMSE between the individual tree heights measured in the field and the corresponding heights identified in the ALS data was 1.7-2.2 meters. Comparing the ground reference estimated stem volume (at trees level with the corresponding ALS estimated tree stem volume, an RMSE of 0.5-0.7 m3 was achieved. The RMSE was slightly lower when comparing the ground

  8. Clinal variation at phenology-related genes in spruce: parallel evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species.

  9. Fungal bio-treatment of spruce wood with Trametes versicolor for pitch control: Influence on extractive contents, pulping process parameters, paper quality and effluent toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van T.A.; Kuster, B.; Claassen, F.W.; Tienvieri, T.; Bertaud, F.; Lennon, G.; Petit-Concil, M.; Sierra-Alvarez, R.

    2007-01-01

    Lipophilic low molar-mass constituents in wood chips for the paper industry result in low quality pulp, pitch deposition, and effluent toxicity. New biotechnological solutions such as fungal pre-treatment of wood chips can reduce pitch problems. This laboratory-scale study focuses on the potential a

  10. Environment pollution with hexachlorbenzene and mercury in Goertschitztal/Carinthia surveyed with Norway spruce as bioindicators; Erfassung der Umweltbelastung mit Hexachlorbenzol und Quecksilber im Goertschitztal in Kaernten mit Fichten als Bioindikatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, Alfred [Bundesforschungszentrum fuer Wald (BFW), Wien (Austria); Hellig, Kurt; Heimburger, Gerhard; Wuggenig, Walter [Amt der Kaerntner Landesregierung, Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To identify the pollution source and for zoning the polluted area in Goertschitztal in Carinthia spruce needles were analyzed for hexachlorbenzene and mercury. Two contamination sources were identified: the cement plant in Wietersdorf and a slaked lime waste deposal site in Brueckl. At the end of 2014 or early 2015 measures against this pollution sites were set up from the local authority as well as from the cement plant. In autumn 2015 all hexachlorbenzene contents in spruce needles were below the quantification limit and nearly all mercury contents decreased despite the hot summer.

  11. 三种加载方向下云杉静动态力学性能研究%RESEARCH ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SPRUCE WOOD BY THREE LOADING DIRECTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟卫洲; 宋顺成; 黄西成; 郝志明; 谢若泽; 陈刚

    2011-01-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic compression experiments of spruce wood along axial, radial and tangential loading directions are implemented by INSTRON and Hopkinson pressure bar equipments. Average moisture content and density of the spruce specimens are 12.72 % and 413 kg/m3. Compression modulus and curves of quasi-static compression stress versus strain are gained by static compression experiment. And the relation of dynamic stress versus strain is obtained by dynamic compression experiments with three strain rates. The experiment results show that the failure modes of spruce specimens are fiber buckling and wrinkle when loading direction is along the grain. When loading direction is along radial or tangential across to the grain, the failure modes is wood fiber slippage and delamination. Axial compression modulus is about twenty-one times as that of radial across to the grain, and about thirty-two times as that of tangential across to the grain. Axial quasi-static compression yield strength is about nine times as that of radial and tangential across to the grain. The radial and tangential quasi-static compression yield strengths are almost equal. Dynamic compression yield strength of spruce wood is sensitive to strain rate. The axial, radial and tangential dynamic compression yield strengths increase greatly when strain rate is from 500 to 1000 s-1. In addition, theory analytic solution to single wood cell failure under different direction compression is carried out. The obtained expression shows that the mean limit loading is relative to yield stress, cell structure dimension and wrinkle length for complete wrinkle cases.%利用INSTRON和Hopkinson压杆对含水率为12.72%,密度为413kg/m3云杉木材试件沿顺纹、横纹径向和横纹弦向进行准静态和动态压缩实验,获得了云杉木材3个方向的抗压模量、准静态压缩应力应变曲线和3种应变率下的动态应力应变曲线.结果表明云杉木材沿顺纹方向加载

  12. Effects of wood-ash addition on nitrogen turnover in a highly nitrogen loaded spruce site. Final project report; Effekter av askaaterfoering paa kvaeveomsaettningen i ett kvaeverikt granbestaand i Halland. Slutrapport foer projektet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohrstedt, H.Oe.; Hoegbom, Lars; Nordlund, Sten [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    During two consecutive years, it was studied how a fertilization with 4.2 tonnes pelleted bark ash per ha, made six-seven years earlier, affected soil chemistry, nitrogen turnover and soil-water chemistry on a Norway spruce site in SW Sweden. The actual site has a very acidic soil. At the same time, the supply of inorganic N is rich. Measures against soil acidification, e. g. addition of ash or lime, may significantly influence the turnover of N with a subsequent risk for increased leaching. Thus, there is a potential conflict between two urgent environmental goals, i. e. to decrease acidification and to decrease the N load on aquatic ecosystems. In the humus layer and the upper 5 cm of the mineral soil, pH(H{sub 2}O) had increased with at the most 0.2 units because of the ash addition. The easily extractable amounts of Mg, P and nitrate were slightly increased. The potential nitrification in the humus layer was generally higher in the ash treatment, but the difference. was not statistically significant. The soil water at 50 cm depth was 0.1-0.2 pH-units more acidic where ash had been applied. Simultaneously, there were tendencies for higher concentrations of nitrate, Al and K. This is the first time in Sweden that ash fertilization of a closed forest has given clear indications of an increased N leaching. As expected, the ash fertilization decreased the acidity of the top soil. On the contrary, the runoff became more acidic and more rich in Al. Thus, the ash fertilization has counteracted one of its primary goals, i. e. to produce a runoff less toxic to aquatic life. The acidification of the runoff may partially be because of acid production during nitrification.

  13. Ash recycling to spruce and beech stands effects on nutrients, growth, nitrogen dynamics and carbon balance; Askaaterfoering till gran- och bokbestaand - effekter paa naering, tillvaext, kvaevedynamik och kolbalans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2006-03-15

    Ash recycling is an important part in a modern, sustainable forestry, especially in whole-tree harvest systems. Nutrients lost at harvest are returned to the forest with the wood-ash. In the project the effects of ash treatment on needle and leaf chemistry, tree growth, soil chemistry, soil water chemistry, and carbon and nitrogen dynamics were studied on 23 Norway spruce sites in south-western Sweden and in ten European beech sites in Scania, southern Sweden. On some of the sites there were previously established ash recycling experiments, but on a majority of the sites ash recycling was performed without experimental lay-out and ash and control plots were established afterwards. The most common dose was two tons of self hardened crushed wood-ash and two tons of Mg-lime. On average seven to eight years after ash recycling the results were 1. increased exchangeable stores of base cations in the soil in the beech and the spruce stands 2. increased base saturation in the beech and the spruce stands and increased BC/Al in the spruce stands 3. increased concentrations and ratios to N of P, Ca, Zn, and S in the needles, the increased P-values are especially important since P is close to or below deficiency levels in a majority of the spruce stands 4. decreased K-concentration in the beech leaves 5. increased tree growth with on average 14 % in the ash treated spruce stands compared to the control plots 6. increased carbon and nitrogen amounts in the biomass in the spruce stands 7. tendencies towards increased amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the soil in the beech stands and no effect in the soil in the spruce stands 8. increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, and SO{sub 4} and no effect on ANC in the soil water 9. no effect on potential net mineralization but increased potential nitrification rates 10. decreased concentration of nitrate in the soil water in the beech stands and no effect in the spruce stands 11. lower system N losses in the beech stands and possibly in the

  14. Physisporinus vitreus: a versatile white rot fungus for engineering value-added wood products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Francis W M R; Schubert, Mark

    2011-11-01

    The credo of every scientist working in the field of applied science is to transfer knowledge "from science to market," a process that combines (1) science (fundamental discoveries and basic research) with (2) technology development (performance assessment and optimization) and (3) technology transfer (industrial application). Over the past 7 years, we have intensively investigated the potential of the white rot fungus, Physisporinus vitreus, for engineering value-added wood products. Because of its exceptional wood degradation pattern, i.e., selective lignification without significant wood strength losses and a preferential degradation of bordered pit membranes, it is possible to use this fungus under controlled conditions to improve the acoustic properties of tonewood (i.e., "mycowood") as well as to enhance the uptake of preservatives and wood modification substances in refractory wood species (e.g., Norway spruce), a process known as "bioincising." This minireview summarizes the research that we have performed with P. vitreus and critically discusses the challenges encountered during the development of two distinct processes for engineering value-added wood products. Finally, we peep into the future potential of the bioincising and mycowood processes for additional applications in the forest and wood industry.

  15. Pulpability of beetle-killed spruce. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.M.; Bormett, D.W.; Sutherland, N.R.; Abubakr, S.; Lowell, E.

    1996-08-01

    Infestation of the Dendroctonus rufipennis beetle has resulted in large stands of dead and dying timber on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. Tests were conducted to evaluate the value of beetle-killed spruce as pulpwood. The results showed that live and dead spruce wood can be pulped effectively. The two least deteriorated classes and the most deteriorated class of logs had similar characteristics when pulped; the remaining class had somewhat poorer pulpability.

  16. Peroxidase activity, soluble proteins and chlorophyll content in spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) needles affected by cement dust

    OpenAIRE

    Cesar, Vera; Lepeduš, Hrvoje

    2001-01-01

    The correlation between the peroxidase activity, chlorophyll and soluble protein content as well as the changes in vascular bundle structure in Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) needles affected by cement dust were studied. In spite of the absence of any yellowing symptoms, a significantly lower chlorophyll content was measured in spruce needles affected by cement dust. Observed sieve cells distortions in needle samples indicated that spruce trees grown near the cement factory were Mg def...

  17. Evolution of temperature and moisture profiles of wood exposed to infrared radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erzsébet Cserta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we studied the mechanism of wood drying using infrared (IR heat transfer. Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. samples of 50 mm and 200 mm thickness were exposed to IR radiation, and the temperature and moisture profiles were recorded at the surface and at the core of the samples under controlled experimental conditions. It is proposed that the moisture transport in wood during drying is governed by osmotic effects. Based on such a hypothesis, the temperature stagnation was explained by a lower localized pressure at the core, which reduced the boiling point temperature of water. As moisture is drawn away due to osmosis from the central region, it cannot fill the empty lumens again; therefore, the pressure decreases locally. The evaporation of the internal moisture is brought about by a partial vacuum resulting in the disappearance of the liquid water.

  18. Predicting the strength of sawn wood by tracheid laser scattering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brännström, Mattias; Manninen, Janne; Oja, Johan

    2008-01-01

    An industrial laser light scattering scanner, designed to detect the spiral grain angle of logs by the light scattering along the grain, was used on two large samples of Norway spruce (Picea abies (var. Karst...

  19. Ion Beam Analyses Of Bark And Wood In Environmental Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, J.-O.; Saarela, K.-E.; Harju, L.; Rajander, J.; Lindroos, A.; Heselius, S.-J.

    2011-06-01

    A large number of wood and bark samples have been analysed utilizing particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) techniques. Samples of common tree species like Scots Pine, Norway Spruce and birch were collected from a large number of sites in Southern and Southwestern Finland. Some of the samples were from a heavily polluted area in the vicinity of a copper-nickel smelter. The samples were dry ashed at 550 °C for the removal of the organic matrix in order to increase the analytical sensitivity of the method. The sensitivity was enhanced by a factor of 50 for wood and slightly less for bark. The ashed samples were pressed into pellets and irradiated as thick targets with a millimetre-sized proton beam. By including the ashing procedure in the method, the statistical dispersion due to elemental heterogeneities in wood material could be reduced. As a by-product, information about the elemental composition of ashes was obtained. By comparing the concentration of an element in bark ash to the concentration in wood ash of the same tree useful information from environmental point of view was obtained. The obtained ratio of the ashes was used to distinguish between elemental contributions from anthropogenic atmospheric sources and natural geochemical sources, like soil and bedrock.

  20. Environmental consequences of recycling wood-ash to forests. Extended abstracts from the SNS Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoegbom, L.; Nohrstedt, H.Oe. (comps.)

    2001-10-01

    Brash from forest cuttings, together with bark and other by-products from forest industries, could be important energy sources. However, large-scale biomass extraction from forests could cause them to lose substantial amounts of nutrients. This has raised the possibility of recycling the wood-ash in order to compensate for the higher nutrient losses and to sustain future forest production. Addition of wood-ash is also proposed as a method to compensate for loss of lime potential caused by ongoing acidification due to N and S deposition. In this report, several aspects of wood-ash recycling are covered including the status and use of biofuel in the different countries represented at the meeting, as well as the environmental impact and consequences of its use. The report contains extended abstracts from a number of oral presentations given at an SNS funded workshop at Grimsoe. The presentations cover various aspects of recycling wood-ash to the forest and peatlands in the Nordic countries. The aims were to broaden knowledge of how issues concerning wood-ash are addressed, and to provide a basis for integrating wood-ash related research in Nordic countries. The titles of the presentations are: The need for and effects of wood-ash application in Danish forests; Bioenergy from forests in Norway - status and future research challenges; Effects of wood-ash fertilization on soil chemistry; Recycling wood-ash - effects on stem growth in Swedish coniferous stands on mineral soils; {sup 137}Cs in different conifer forest compartments following wood-ash addition; Ground- and field- vegetation after recycling crushed wood-ash to forest sites; Ash fertilization and leaching of nutrients from drained peatland; Ash fertilization as used on Finland's drained and forested mires; Wood-ash addition to an acid and highly N loaded Norway spruce site in SW Sweden; Wood-ash and ectomycorrhizal community structure; Effect of Cd-containing wood-ash on the microflora of coniferous

  1. Comparative study on the turnover of quinic- and shikimic acid and of its derivatives in needles of Norway spruce, Picea abies (L. ) Karst. , affected by 'Waldsterben' syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dittrich, P.; Senser, M.; Frielinghaus, J.

    1989-03-01

    A comparative study on the incorporation of /sup 14/C into quinic- and shikimic acid in spruce needles was carried out with four different syndroms of Picea abies (L.) Karst: a tree from high altitudes of the Bayerischer Wald with the syndrom of 'acute yellowing', a light-sensitive mutant with yellowish needles (Picea abies Karst. finedonensis), a tree exhibiting 'Lametta' syndrome with a translucent crown and twigs hanging down like tinsel, and a healthy tree for control. The needles of these trees were labelled via photosynthetic fixation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in June, and the fate of labelled compounds was monitored over 125 days. In the youngest needles incorporation rates of quinic and shikimic acid reached a dominating level of about 60% of the label of soluble metabolites, which underlines the decisive role of both acids during needle development. The yellow mutant 'finedonensis' and the tree with 'Lametta' syndrome, which exhibit rather identical turnover kinetics of quinate and shikimate, show lower rates and reach, in particular in one- and two-year-old needles, only about 50% of the incorporation rates of the control spruce. The tree with the syndrome of 'acute yellowing' exhibits a significant reduction of incorporation already in the youngest needles; the older needles of this tree virtually suspend metabolism of both acids all together, though apparently high but dormant pools of shikimate and quinate are present. The degree of label incorporation into shikimate and quinate may possibly serve as a measure of needle damage. Exclusively in the yellow mutant a novel spruce constituent, 3-0-p-coumaroylquinic acid, could be detected; a related compound, 3-0-p-caffeoylshikimic acid was identified in the needles of the 'acute yellowing' tree.

  2. Eastern Spruce Dwarf Mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Baker; Joseph O' Brien; R. Mathiasen; Mike Ostry

    2006-01-01

    Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) is a parasitic flowering plant that causes the most serious disease of black spruce (Picea mariana) throughout its range. The parasite occurs in the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland; in the Lake States of Minnesota,...

  3. Odor, gaseous and PM10 emissions from small scale combustion of wood types indigenous to Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, Magdalena; Schmidl, Christoph; Padouvas, Emmanuel; Giebl, Heinrich; Lohninger, Johann; Ellinger, Reinhard; Bauer, Heidi; Puxbaum, Hans

    2012-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the emissions, including odor, from log wood stoves, burning wood types indigenous to mid-European countries such as Austria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Switzerland, as well as Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria (Germany) and South Tyrol (Italy). The investigations were performed with a modern, certified, 8 kW, manually fired log wood stove, and the results were compared to emissions from a modern 9 kW pellet stove. The examined wood types were deciduous species: black locust, black poplar, European hornbeam, European beech, pedunculate oak (also known as “common oak”), sessile oak, turkey oak and conifers: Austrian black pine, European larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, silver fir, as well as hardwood briquettes. In addition, “garden biomass” such as pine cones, pine needles and dry leaves were burnt in the log wood stove. The pellet stove was fired with softwood pellets. The composite average emission rates for log wood and briquettes were 2030 mg MJ-1 for CO; 89 mg MJ-1 for NOx, 311 mg MJ-1 for CxHy, 67 mg MJ-1 for particulate matter PM10 and average odor concentration was at 2430 OU m-3. CO, CxHy and PM10 emissions from pellets combustion were lower by factors of 10, 13 and 3, while considering NOx - comparable to the log wood emissions. Odor from pellets combustion was not detectable. CxHy and PM10 emissions from garden biomass (needles and leaves) burning were 10 times higher than for log wood, while CO and NOx rise only slightly. Odor levels ranged from not detectable (pellets) to around 19,000 OU m-3 (dry leaves). The odor concentration correlated with CO, CxHy and PM10. For log wood combustion average odor ranged from 536 OU m-3 for hornbeam to 5217 OU m-3 for fir, indicating a considerable influence of the wood type on odor concentration.

  4. Microscopical investigations on Norway spruces needles from the air pollution exclusion experiment in open-top-chambers at Edelmannshof; Mikroskopische Untersuchungen an Fichtennadeln aus dem Schadgasausschlussversuch in Open-Top-Kammern am Edelmannshof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F.W.; Fink, S. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie

    1997-12-01

    Spruce needles from the trials with negative fumigation in the open-top-chambers at Edelmannshof were investigated microscopically. The collapsed mesophyll cells in needle cross-sections increased with age but showed no clear relation to the treatments. Within the chambers, a greater number of empty mesophyll cells indicated impact of sucking insects. The phloem structure showed no changes which could be related to the effects of any mineral deficiencies. Epiphytes were much more abundant upon the needle surfaces within the chambers, regardless of the treatments, in comparison to the field samples. This indicates a probable effect of higher moisture within the chambers. In epidermal cells, calcium oxalate was more frequent in the filtered chambers than in the unfiltered and the field samples, pointing to lower leaching losses under clean air. In the mesophyll, intercellular calcium oxalate crystals increased with age but showed no treatment effect; intracellular crystals were similar in all treatments and all age classes, so that this criterium does not show any hints for a decrease in membrane permeability due to ozone. (orig.)

  5. Increasing the permeability of spruce sapwood (Picea orientalis l. with enzymatic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Durmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The spruce is the one of the refractory wood species. In this study, the spruce sapwood samples were treated with enzymes to improve its permeability. The pit membranes play an important role for water transporting between the adjacent cells. The spruce wood pit membranes are prone to close under the fiber saturated point. As a result of the liquid transportation is blocked, the impregnation process is getting difficult. The wood pits compose of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, pectin, and phenolic components. The torus surface is covered with pectin. Bioprep 3000 L, Viscozyme L, Texazym BFE, Texazym DLG are commonly used in the textile industry to remove lignocellulosic materials. It was aimed to destroy the closed pits via enzymatic treatment. At the end of the study, the retention and penetration increments were obtained after the enzymatic treatment. The wood samples treated with enzymes which are composed of enzymes mixtures gave more penetration and retention values.

  6. Instream wood in a steep headwater channel: geomorphic significance of large and small wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galia, Tomáš; Šilhán, Karel; Ruiz-Villanueva, Virginia; Tichavský, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Besides the well-known significance of large wood (LW), also small woody pieces (SW; here defined as pieces with dimensions at least 0.5 m length and 0.05 m diameter), can play an important role in steep narrow headwaters. We inventoried instream wood in the 0.4 km long Mazák headwater channel, Moravskoslezské Beskydy Mts, Czech Republic (2Fagus sylvatica L.); only two pieces were Norway spruces (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). First results showed an increase in the number of LWs in channel-reaches confined by the steepest adjacent hillslopes (especially at 0.15-0.20 km). Increasing downstream amount of SW most likely reflected transport processes in the stream, and the later deposition of SWs on the lowest channel gradients. Also LWs and SWs in the downstream channel-reaches were more decayed than wood presented in the upper reaches. The orientation of instream wood was connected with its length and stability, and LWs longer than 5 m were usually attached to adjacent hillslopes. Pieces longer than 2 m, which were unattached or were somehow stabilized in the channel bed, had often orientation of 0° or 337°. LWs were mostly unattached in the upstream channel-reaches, while often stabilized by adjacent hillslopes in the middle part. At 0.05-0.10 km, there were also many logs stabilized by bed sediments. By contrast, SWs were mostly unattached in the whole longitudinal profile. We observed higher % of influenced channel width by SWs than LWs. Also, SWs were usually entirely located in the channel, which was significantly different when compared to LWs. Nine small steps (step height ~0.5 m) were created by instream wood; six of them were formed by SWs. Dendrogeomorphic cross dating supported the observed decay status for LW/SW within the longitudinal profile: at the lowest channel gradients with wider higher active channels, the potential for storage of instream wood increased. In these downstream reaches we observed older LW and SW, with pieces from the 1960s and 1970s

  7. INTER-TRACHEID AND CROSS-FIELD PITTING IN COMPRESSION AND OPPOSITE WOOD OF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Tarmian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Inter-tracheid and cross-filed pit pairs in compression and opposite wood of Norway spruce (Picea abies were examined. The size, appearance, and frequency of bordered pits on the radial side of axial tracheids and their aperture specification were studied. The type, size, and number of half-bordered pits between the axial tracheids and rays per cross-field were also studied. Several techniques were employed for the measurements: Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Light Microscope (LM, and the Frankling method (FM. The structure, size, and frequency of both types of the pits varied between compression and opposite wood. Fewer pits of a smaller size and a smaller aperture diameter were observed in compression wood. The uniseriate arrangement of bordered pit pairs, unpitted tracheid walls, circular- or often slit-like pit aperture, dominantly piceoid but sometimes cupressoid and occasionally taxodioid cross-field pitting, and a number of fissures on the tracheid walls and bordered pits were characteristics of compression wood.

  8. Seasonal and diurnal variation in the deposition velocity of ozone over a spruce forest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Jensen, N.O.; Hummelshøj, P.

    1995-01-01

    The flux of O-3 was measured by the eddy-correlation method over Norway spruce in periods when the trees had a very low activity, periods with optimum growth, and periods with water stress. The aerodynamic resistance (tau(a)), viscous sub-layer resistance (tau(b)) and surface resistance (tau...

  9. Retrieval of spruce leaf chlorophyll content from airborne image data using continuum removal and radiative transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malenovsky, Z.; Homolova, L.; Zurita-Milla, R.; Lukes, P.; Kaplan, V.; Hanus, J.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate combined continuum removal and radiative transfer (RT) modeling to retrieve leaf chlorophyll a & b content (Cab) from the AISA Eagle airborne imaging spectrometer data of sub-meter (0.4 m) spatial resolution. Based on coupled PROSPECT-DART RT simulations of a Norway spruce (Picea

  10. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, Andrei Gennady; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Heim, Alexander; Zheng, Chengyang; Shortle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  11. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, Andrei; Lawrence, Gregory; Buyantuev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  12. SPRUCE Mashup London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Corrado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available SPRUCE digital preservation mashups are a series of unique events that are being organized in the United Kingdom to bring together digital preservation practitioners and developers to work on real-world digital preservation challenges. During the 3-day event the digital preservation developers work to create practical solutions to real-world challenges the practitioners are having related to digital preservation. Meanwhile, the practitioners work to create compelling business cases for digital preservation at their institution. This article describes the SPRUCE Mashup London event held in September 2012.

  13. Occurrence of spruce bark beetles in forest stands at different levels of air pollution stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grodzki, Wojciech; McManus, Michael; Knizek, Milos; Meshkova, Valentina; Mihalciuc, Vasile; Novotny, Julius; Turcani, Marek; Slobodyan, Yaroslav

    2004-07-01

    The spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.) is the most serious pest of mature spruce stands, mainly Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karst. throughout Eurasia. A complex of weather-related events and other environmental stresses are reported to predispose spruce stands to bark beetle attack and subsequent tree mortality; however the possible role of industrial pollution as a predisposing factor to attack by this species is poorly understood. The abundance and dynamics of I. typographus populations was evaluated in 60-80 year old Norway spruce stands occurring on 10x50 ha sites in five countries within the Carpathian range that were selected in proximity to established ozone measurement sites. Data were recorded on several parameters including the volume of infested trees, captures of adult beetles in pheromone traps, number of attacks, and the presence and relative abundance of associated bark beetle species. In several cases, stands adjacent to sites with higher ozone values were associated with higher bark beetle populations. The volume of sanitary cuttings, a reflection of tree mortality, and the mean daily capture of beetles in pheromone traps were significantly higher at sites where the O{sub 3} level was higher. However, the mean infestation density on trees was higher in plots associated with lower O{sub 3} levels. Captures of beetles in pheromone traps and infestation densities were higher in the zone above 800 m. However, none of the relationships was conclusive, suggesting that spruce bark beetle dynamics are driven by a complex interaction of biotic and abiotic factors and not by a single parameter such as air pollution. - Air pollution (ozone) can be one of predisposing factors that increases the susceptibility of mountain Norway spruce stands to attack by Ips typographus and associated bark beetle species.

  14. ALKALINE PRETREATMENT OF SPRUCE AND BIRCH TO IMPROVE BIOETHANOL AND BIOGAS PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Jeihanipour

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline pretreatment with NaOH under mild operating conditions was used to improve ethanol and biogas production from softwood spruce and hardwood birch. The pretreatments were carried out at different temperatures between minus 15 and 100ºC with 7.0% w/w NaOH solution for 2 h. The pretreated materials were then enzymatically hydrolyzed and subsequently fermented to ethanol or anaerobically digested to biogas. In general, the pretreatment was more successful for both ethanol and biogas production from the hardwood birch than the softwood spruce. The pretreatment resulted in significant reduction of hemicellulose and the crystallinity of cellulose, which might be responsible for improved enzymatic hydrolyses of birch from 6.9% to 82.3% and spruce from 14.1% to 35.7%. These results were obtained with pretreatment at 100°C for birch and 5°C for spruce. Subsequently, the best ethanol yield obtained was 0.08 g/g of the spruce while pretreated at 100°C, and 0.17 g/g of the birch treated at 100°C. On the other hand, digestion of untreated birch and spruce resulted in methane yields of 250 and 30 l/kg VS of the wood species, respectively. The pretreatment of the wood species at the best conditions for enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in 83% and 74% improvement in methane production from birch and spruce.

  15. Transcriptome mining, functional characterization, and phylogeny of a large terpene synthase gene family in spruce (Picea spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dullat Harpreet K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In conifers, terpene synthases (TPSs of the gymnosperm-specific TPS-d subfamily form a diverse array of mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenoid compounds, which are components of the oleoresin secretions and volatile emissions. These compounds contribute to defence against herbivores and pathogens and perhaps also protect against abiotic stress. Results The availability of extensive transcriptome resources in the form of expressed sequence tags (ESTs and full-length cDNAs in several spruce (Picea species allowed us to estimate that a conifer genome contains at least 69 unique and transcriptionally active TPS genes. This number is comparable to the number of TPSs found in any of the sequenced and well-annotated angiosperm genomes. We functionally characterized a total of 21 spruce TPSs: 12 from Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis, 5 from white spruce (P. glauca, and 4 from hybrid white spruce (P. glauca × P. engelmannii, which included 15 monoterpene synthases, 4 sesquiterpene synthases, and 2 diterpene synthases. Conclusions The functional diversity of these characterized TPSs parallels the diversity of terpenoids found in the oleoresin and volatile emissions of Sitka spruce and provides a context for understanding this chemical diversity at the molecular and mechanistic levels. The comparative characterization of Sitka spruce and Norway spruce diterpene synthases revealed the natural occurrence of TPS sequence variants between closely related spruce species, confirming a previous prediction from site-directed mutagenesis and modelling.

  16. Swelling of acetylated wood in organic liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Obataya, E; Obataya, Eiichi; Gril, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the affinity of acetylated wood for organic liquids, Yezo spruce wood specimens were acetylated with acetic anhydride, and their swelling in various liquids were compared to those of untreated specimens. The acetylated wood was rapidly and remarkably swollen in aprotic organic liquids such as benzene and toluene in which the untreated wood was swollen only slightly and/or very slowly. On the other hand, the swelling of wood in water, ethylene glycol and alcohols remained unchanged or decreased by the acetylation. Consequently the maximum volume of wood swollen in organic liquids was always larger than that in water. The effect of acetylation on the maximum swollen volume of wood was greater in liquids having smaller solubility parameters. The easier penetration of aprotic organic liquids into the acetylated wood was considered to be due to the scission of hydrogen bonds among the amorphous wood constituents by the substitution of hydroxyl groups with hydrophobic acetyl groups.

  17. EFFICIENCY IN THE FORMATION OF STABLE EMBRYOGENIC LINES AND SOMATIC EMBRYO REGENERATION IN NORWAY SPRUCE AND HYBRID LARCH%挪威云杉及杂种落叶松稳定胚性细胞系及体胚再生系统的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DietrichEwald; 胡建军

    2003-01-01

    授粉袋)的相比较,发现人工授粉袋的使用延迟了合子胚的发育.我们的实验中成熟合子胚没有形成胚性细胞系,只有未成熟合子胚形成了胚性细胞系.1995年用落叶松未成熟合子胚建立的胚性细胞系没有形成体胚,而1996年建立的4个胚性细胞系得到了可以移栽到温室中的再生植株.1.5 a的连续继代培养以后,大多数的杂种落叶松和挪威云杉的胚性细胞系的再生能力都下降.导致这种现象可能有多种原因包括培养物的老化以及出现难以检测到的内生细菌.尽管一组实验从最初培养即用了抗生素,但没有收效.因此目前只得到少量的稳定胚性细胞系(<5%),长期继代后丧失再生能力及无法成功移栽到土壤都是植株再生的重要的限制因素,有待进一步研究克服这些困难.%The induction of embryogenic cultures from controlled pollinated seeds was tested for Norway Spruce and hybrid Larch in different years. The amount of established stable lines in both species was determined. A reduction in the regeneration potential of the lines was observed after a few years. In Norway Spruce, contrary to hybrid Larch, only some established lines were able to grow in suspension culture. Established embryogenic lines of both species not in all cases were able to regenerate somatic embryos. The use of polyethyleneglycoll and the mode of abscisic acid sterilisation were found to be factors responsible for the number of mature somatic embryos formed. The transfer of somatic embryos into germinating plants and later on to the soil was possible for hybrid Larch lines. Insufficient root formation in Norway Spruce somatic embryos influenced the transfer to the soil negatively. The low number of stable embryogenic lines (<5%) formed in both species confirmed that this step is the most limiting one within this plant regeneration method at present.

  18. Influence of fiber type, fiber mat orientation, and process time on the properties of a wood fiber/polymer composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Torgilsson, R.; Løgstrup Andersen, T.

    2002-01-01

    A rapid press consolidation technique was used to produce composites from two types of air-laid wood fiber mat, incorporating either mechanically refined or bleached chemi-thermomechanically refined Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst] and a bicomponent polymer fiber. The manufacturing technique...... involved pre-compression, contact heating to the process temperature under vacuum and then rapid transfer to the press for consolidation and cooling. Composites were tested to determine response to water or water vapor, porosity, fiber volume fraction and tensile properties. The composites absorbed water...... by the polymer matrix had been maximized within a five-minute heating time. Results also indicated that had been maximized within a five-minute heating time. Results also indicated that porosity was not the key determinant of tensile properties in the composites....

  19. Linking fungal communities to wood density loss after 12 years of log decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubartová, Ariana; Ottosson, Elisabet; Stenlid, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biodiversity might alter decomposition processes and, consequently, carbon and nutrient cycling. We examined fungal diversity and density loss in experimental Norway spruce logs after 12 years of decay in a hemiboreal forest. Between 28 and 50% of the original wood biomass remained, depending on the fungal community composition in the log, operational taxonomic unit (OTU) richness had only a minor effect on the log biomass. Although the communities were OTU rich (190-340 OTUs per log), the majority of OTUs were infrequent or rare; wood degradation therefore depended mostly on the most abundant OTUs and their decomposing abilities. The least decayed logs were characterized by continuous dominance of an earlier colonizer and by high within-log community diversity, which was significantly related to sample variables (position in log, density and moisture). In the most decayed logs, the earlier colonizers were generally replaced by white-rot species able to exploit the highly decomposed wood. The communities were relatively spatially uniform within whole logs, independent of the sample variables, whereas among-log diversity was high. Importance of fungal community composition in decomposition processes should be taken into account when studying and modeling carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems.

  20. Fatigue Damage in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Fatigue failure is found to depend both on the total time under load and on the number of cycles.Recent accelerated fatigue research on wood is reviewed, and a discrepancy between...... failure explanation under fatigue and static load conditions is observed. In the present study small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz...... to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation between stiffness reduction...

  1. Wood for sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2006-10-01

    The unique mechanical and acoustical properties of wood and its aesthetic appeal still make it the material of choice for musical instruments and the interior of concert halls. Worldwide, several hundred wood species are available for making wind, string, or percussion instruments. Over generations, first by trial and error and more recently by scientific approach, the most appropriate species were found for each instrument and application. Using material property charts on which acoustic properties such as the speed of sound, the characteristic impedance, the sound radiation coefficient, and the loss coefficient are plotted against one another for woods. We analyze and explain why spruce is the preferred choice for soundboards, why tropical species are favored for xylophone bars and woodwind instruments, why violinists still prefer pernambuco over other species as a bow material, and why hornbeam and birch are used in piano actions.

  2. Spruce beetle-induced changes to Engelmann spruce foliage flammability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesley G. Page; Michael J. Jenkins; Justin B. Runyon

    2014-01-01

    Intermountain Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm) stands affected by the spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) represent a unique and growing fuel complex. In this study, we quantified and compared the changes in moisture content, chemistry, and flammability of foliage from trees in three crown condition classes: unattacked (green [G]),...

  3. Belowground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L./Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolova, Petia S., E-mail: nikolova@wzw.tum.d [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Andersen, Christian P. [Western Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, United States Environmental Protection Agency, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Blaschke, Helmut; Matyssek, Rainer; Haeberle, Karl-Heinz [Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Weihenstephan Center of Life and Food Sciences, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The effects of experimentally elevated O{sub 3} on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and delta{sup 13}C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with contrasting rainfall patterns. During humid 2002, soil respiration rate was enhanced under elevated O{sub 3} under beech and spruce, and was related to O{sub 3}-stimulated fine-root production only in beech. During dry 2003, the stimulating effect of O{sub 3} on soil respiration rate vanished under spruce, which was correlated with decreased fine-root production in spruce under drought, irrespective of the O{sub 3} regime. delta{sup 13}C signature of newly formed fine-roots was consistent with the differing g{sub s} of beech and spruce, and indicated stomatal limitation by O{sub 3} in beech and by drought in spruce. Our study showed that drought can override the stimulating O{sub 3} effects on fine-root dynamics and soil respiration in mature beech and spruce forests. - Drought has the capacity to override the stimulating ozone effect on soil respiration in adult European beech/Norway spruce forest.

  4. Elemental analysis of wood materials by external millibeam thick target PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarela, K.-E.

    2009-07-01

    PIXE (Particle Induce X-ray Emission spectrometry) was used for analysing stem bark and stem wood of Scots pine, Norway spruce and Silver birch. Thick samples were irradiated, in laboratory atmosphere, with 3 MeV protons and the beam current was measured indirectly using a photo multiplicator (PM) tube. Both point scans and bulk analyses were performed with the 1 mm diameter proton beam. In bulk analyses, whole bark and sectors of discs of the stem wood were dry ashed at 550 deg C. The ashes were homogenised by shaking and prepared to target pellets for PIXE analyses. This procedure generated representative samples to be analysed, but the enrichment also enabled quantification of some additional trace elements. The ash contents obtained as a product of the sample preparation procedure also showed to be of great importance in the evaluation of results in environmental studies. Spot scans from the pith of pine wood outwards, showed clearly highest concentrations of manganese, calcium and zinc in the first spot irradiated, or 2-3 times higher than in the surrounding wood. For stem wood from the crown part of a pine this higher concentration level was found in the first four spots/mms, including the pith and the two following growth rings. Zinc showed increasing concentrations outwards in sapwood of the pine stem, with the over-all lowest concentrations in the inner half of the sapwood. This could indicate emigration of this element from sapwood being under transformation to heartwood. Point scans across sapwood of pine and spruce showed more distinct variations in concentrations relative to hearth wood. Higher concentrations of e.g. zinc, calcium and manganese were found in earlywood than in denser latewood. Very high concentrations of iron and copper were also seen for some earlywood increments. The ash content of stem bark is up to and order higher than for the stem wood. However, when the elemental concentration in ashes of bark and wood of the same disc were

  5. Mechanical properties of timber from wind damaged Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2003-01-01

    A storm may subject a tree to such bending stresses that extensive compression damage develops in the lee side. The tree may survive the wind load or it may be thrown. However, the damage is inherent and it may be of a magnitude to influence the mechanical properties of boards sawn from the stem...... taken to bending failure and the relations between compression damage and bending strength and stiffness were established. The results showed that significant reductions of bending strength of dry timber are only caused by such wind induced compression damages that are easily recognised at a planed...

  6. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T.; Riggs, J.; Nettles, W. R.; Hook, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data activities CDIAC performs are design and implementation of the data systems. One current example is the data system and network for SPRUCE experiment. The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. SPRUCE provides wide range continuous and discrete measurements. To successfully manage SPRUCE data flow

  7. Spruce galactoglucomannans inhibit the lipid oxidation in rapeseed oil-in-water emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oil-in-water emulsions are functional and industrially valuable systems, whose large interfacial area makes them prone to deterioration, due in part to as the oxidation and oligomerization of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Spruce galactoglucomannans (GGM), wood biomacromolecules abundantly available f...

  8. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben;

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...... is observed between stiffness reduction and accumulated creep. A failure model based on the total work during the fatigue life is rejected, and a modified work model based on elastic, viscous and non-recovered viscoelastic work is experimentally supported, and an explanation at a microstructural level...

  9. [Genetic control of isozymes in European spruces (Picea abies (L) Karst) of the Ukrainian Carpathian mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalikhin, S N; Korshikov, I I; Pirko, N N; Velikorid'ko, T I; Pirko, Ia V

    2006-01-01

    Genetical control of the enzymes GOT, GDH, DIA, MDH, SOD, FDH, ADH, ACP and LAP has been studied in nine natural Carpathian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) using polyacrylamide gel elecrophoresis and analysis of isozyme variability in 346 trees. Seventy one allel products of 20 gene loci have been clearly established. Segregation analysis of the revealed allele variants confirms their monogenic inheritance.

  10. Toxic components of motor vehicle emissions for the spruce Picea abies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerbauer, H; Selinger, H; Römmelt, R; Ziegler-Jöns, A; Knoppik, D; Hock, B

    1987-01-01

    Six-year-old Norway spruce trees were exposed for 30 min under standardised conditions to the exhaust from an Otto engine running on lead-free petrol. Gas-exchange measurements in an open system using an infrared gas analyser showed a sudden, severe drop in CO(2) assimilation and transpiration rates. By using filters which absorbed different fractions of the exhaust it could be demonstrated that the toxic effects can be attributed to the NO(x) fraction.

  11. PRESENCE OF WATER-SOLUBLE COMPOUNDS IN THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD: CARBOHYDRATES AND FURFURALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olov Karlsson,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With thermal modification, changes in properties of wood, such as the presence of VOC and water-soluble carbohydrates, may occur. Thermal modifications under saturated steam conditions (160 °C or 170 °C and superheated steam conditions (170, 185, and 212 °C were investigated by analysing the presence of water-soluble 5-(hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, furfural, and carbohydrates in heat-treated wood. The influence of thermal modifications on Scots pine, Norway spruce, and silver birch was also studied. Furfurals were analysed using HPLC at 280 nm, while monosaccharides and water-soluble carbohydrates were determined by GC-FID as their acetylated alditiols and, after methanolysis, as their trimethylsilylated methyl-glycosides, respectively. The amount of furfurals was larger in boards thermally modified under saturated steam conditions than those treated under superheated steam conditions. Generally, more of HMF than furfural was found in the thermally modified boards. In process water, in which saturated steam conditions had been used, furfural and only traces of HMF were found. Higher content of water-soluble carbohydrates was found in boards treated in saturated steam rather than in superheated steam. After modification in saturated steam, substantial parts of the water-soluble carbohydrates were due to monosaccharides, but only traces of monosaccharides were found in boards treated under superheated steam conditions.

  12. WOOD COLOR CHANGES BY AMMONIA FUMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Miklečić,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of ammonia gas on wood color changes in response to an increasing demand for dark colored wood specimens. The darker wood color in ammonia fuming is accomplished through chemical reactions between ammonia gas and wood compounds. We exposed oak, maple, spruce, and larch wood samples to ammonia gas for 16 days. During fuming, the color changes were studied using CIE L*a*b* parameters. After fuming, the changes in extractives content, tannin, and nitrogen content were analyzed. The chemical changes of wood and residues of wood extractives after fuming were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Oak wood reacted intensively with ammonia gas in a very short time, and the darkening was prominent for all the investigated wood species. It was established that tannin had no major influence on color changes of maple and larch wood in the ammonia-fuming process. The FTIR spectra of fumed wood indicated involvement of carbonyl groups, and the FTIR spectra of wood extractives indicated involvement of carbonyl, aromatic, and alcohol groups in reaction with ammonia gas.

  13. Interactions affect hyphal growth and enzyme profiles in combinations of coniferous wood-decaying fungi of Agaricomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Tuulia; Kuuskeri, Jaana; Shah, Firoz; Lundell, Taina Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Fomitopsis pinicola is a species of Polyporales frequently encountered in Nordic temperate and boreal forests. In nature, the fungus causes destructive brown rot in wood, colonizing tree trunks often occupied by other Basidiomycota species. We mimicked these species-species interactions by introducing F. pinicola to five white rot species, all common saprotrophs of Norway spruce. Hyphal interactions and mycelial growth in various combinations were recorded, while activities of lignocellulose-acting CAZymes and oxidoreductases were followed in co-cultures on two different carbon-source media. Of the species, Phlebia radiata and Trichaptum abietinum were the strongest producers of lignin-modifying oxidoreductases (laccase, manganese peroxidase) when evaluated alone, as well as in co-cultures, on the two different growth media (low-nitrogen liquid medium containing ground coniferous wood, and malt extract broth). F. pinicola was an outstanding producer of oxalic acid (up to 61 mM), whereas presence of P. radiata prevented acidification of the growth environment in the liquid malt-extract cultures. When enzyme profiles of the species combinations were clustered, time-dependent changes were observed on wood-supplemented medium during the eight weeks of growth. End-point acidity and production of mycelium, oxalic acid and oxidoreductase activities, in turn clustered the fungal combinations into three distinct functional groups, determined by the presence of F. pinicola and P. radiata, by principal component analysis. Our findings indicate that combinations of wood-decay fungi have dramatic dynamic effects on the production of lignocellulose-active enzymes, which may lead to divergent degradative processes of dead wood and forest litter.

  14. Shifts in spruce and beech flushing in the context of global climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Pokorný

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bud phenology and development of needle nitrogen content were monitored on Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst and European beech (Fagus sylvatica [L.] trees grown inside glass-domes for five years under ambient (385 µmol(CO2 mol−1 and elevated (700 µmol(CO2 mol−1 atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]. The spruce to beech ratio was 35:65 in both treatments. At the beginning of the experiment mean age of investigated trees was 5 years.Elevated [CO2] was responsible for premature growth of both spruce and beech buds in the E treatment (not significantly, by 3–7 days. Nevertheless the flushing of neither beech nor spruce was not significantly hastened in E treatment during the flushing within the 5 years. During the second half of flushing faster development of terminal beech buds comparing to spruce was found (Chi-square = 65, p 2] acts as growth stimulator but the nitrogen insufficiency eliminates a positive effect of [CO2]. As the global climate change express itself in many ways and relationship’s consequences among plants and/or animals are hard to forecast.

  15. Mice and voles prefer spruce seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschel G. Abbott; Arthur C. Hart

    1961-01-01

    When spruce-fir stands in the Northeast are cut, balsam fir seedlings often predominate in the regeneration that follows. Most landowners would prefer to have the spruce; but they do not get it, and they wonder why.

  16. Sprucing up the site

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    From the Globe to restaurants and meeting rooms, feverish activity is under way on both of the CERN sites to replace old equipment, carry out maitenance on existing facilities and buildings and increase their energy efficiency. Work being carried out on the Globe of Science and Innovation.The visual landmark of CERN, the Globe, has been undergoing maintenance work since July. The 40 m diameter sphere, made entirely of wood, is currently being sanded down and new treatments are being applied to the wood to protect the whole building. The work will continue until the beginning of October. Major work is also under way on some of the most emblematic rooms of the Lab, such as the Conference Room in Building 60 and the Council Chamber: while the first has been completely refurbished, with around 15 extra seats added and new audiovisual facilities installed, in the latter the air conditioning and the main electrical switchboards have been r...

  17. Below-ground effects of enhanced tropospheric ozone and drought in a beech/spruce forest (Fagus sylvatica L. / Picea abies [L.] Karst)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of experimentally elevated O3 on soil respiration rates, standing fine-root biomass, fine-root production and δ13C signature of newly produced fine roots were investigated in an adult European beech/Norway spruce forest in Germany during two subsequent years with cont...

  18. Effect of copper, nutrient nitrogen, and wood-supplement on the production of lignin-modifying enzymes by the white-rot fungus Phlebia radiata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Lundell, Taina; Hatakka, Annele; Hildén, Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Production of the oxidoreductive lignin-modifying enzymes - lignin and manganese peroxidases (MnPs), and laccase - of the white-rot basidiomycete Phlebia radiata was investigated in semi-solid cultures supplemented with milled grey alder or Norway spruce and charcoal. Concentrations of nutrient nitrogen and Cu-supplement varied also in the cultures. According to extracellular activities, production of both lignin peroxidase (LiP) and MnP was significantly promoted with wood as carbon source, with milled alder (MA) and low nitrogen (LN) resulting with the maximal LiP activities (550 nkat l(-1)) and noticeable levels of MnP (3 μkat l(-1)). Activities of LiP and MnP were also elevated on high nitrogen (HN) complex medium when supplemented with spruce and charcoal. Maximal laccase activities (22 and 29 μkat l(-1)) were obtained in extra high nitrogen (eHN) containing defined and complex media supplemented with 1.5 mM Cu(2+). However, the nitrogen source, either peptone or ammonium nitrate and asparagine, caused no stimulation on laccase production without Cu-supplement. This is also the first report to demonstrate a new, on high Cu(2+) amended medium produced extracellular laccase of P. radiata with pI value of 4.9, thereby complementing our previous findings on gene expression, and cloning of a second laccase of this fungus. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilization of non-merchantable wood in Steppe regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrovol' skil, E.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    A description, with diagram, is given of the design of a small mobile retort developed in the USSR for pyrolysis of unmerchantable wood in the steppe regions. The type of wood considered is the tree and shrub material in shelterbelts, e.g. Cornus sanguinea, Elaeagnus angustifolia, Ribes aureum, Cotinus coggygria (Rhus continus) and Caragana arborescens. Yields of charcoal, settled tar, alcohols, and volatile acids from each of these species are given in % of oven-dry wood for pyrolysis at 320/sup 0/C for 2 h. Comparative data are given for dry distillation of wood of birch, spruce, and pine (400/sup 0/C, 8 h).

  20. Biomass and nutrient cycle in fertilized and unfertilized pine, mixed birch and pine and spruce stands on a drained mire.

    OpenAIRE

    Finér, Leena

    1989-01-01

    Biomass, biomass increment and nutrient cycling were studied in (1) a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) stand, (2) a Norway spruce (Picea abies) stand and (3) a mixed birch (Betula pubescens)/pine stand on a drained mire at Ilomantsi, eastern Finland in 1979-85. In addition, the effect of NPK and micronutrient fertilizer treatment was studied. Above-ground and root measurements were taken. These data formed the basis of stand biomass and nutrient cycle simulations of fertilized and unfertilized s...

  1. THE STUDIES OF COLOR CHANGES IN WOOD AND CELLULOSE

    OpenAIRE

    ŞAHİN, H.Turgut

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the effects of two artificial conditions (UV and plasma) on four different woods (poplar,oak, douglas fir, spruce) and cellulose were studied and color changes determined. After the UV and VUV treatments, the affects of possible photochemical reactions on changes of natural colors as darkness/lightness were calculated and compared with untreated samples. It was observed that the behaviors of wood samples were different for each artificial condition. In UV experiments, gymnospe...

  2. Isolation and characterization of cellulose nanocrystals from spruce bark in a biorefinery perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Normand, Myriam; Moriana, Rosana; Ek, Monica

    2014-10-13

    The present study reports for the first time the isolation of cellulose fibers and cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) from the bark of Norway spruce. The upgrading of bark cellulose to value-added products, such as CNCs, is part of the "bark biorefinery" concept. The removal of non-cellulosic constituents was monitored throughout the isolation process by detailed chemical composition analyses. The morphological investigation of the CNCs was performed using AFM and showed the presence of nanocrystals with an average length of 175.3 nm and a diameter of 2.8 nm, giving an aspect ratio of around 63. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses showed that the crystallinity index increased with successive treatments to reach a final value greater than 80% for CNCs. The thermal degradation of the isolated bark CNCs started at 190 °C. Spruce bark appeared to be a new promising industrial source of cellulose fibers and CNCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A numerical and experimental study of stress and crack development in kiln-dried wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations were carried out on well defined log-disc samples of Norway spruce consisting of both heartwood and sapwood, with the aim of gaining more adequate knowledge of stress and fracture generation during the drying process. Use of thin discs enabled a well...

  4. A numerical and experimental study of stress and crack development in kiln-dried wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations were carried out on well defined log-disc samples of Norway spruce consisting of both heartwood and sapwood, with the aim of gaining more adequate knowledge of stress and fracture generation during the drying process. Use of thin discs of a log enabled...

  5. Soil Chemical and Microbial Properties in a Mixed Stand of Spruce and Birch in the Ore Mountains (Germany—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Schua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A major argument for incorporating deciduous tree species in coniferous forest stands is their role in the amelioration and stabilisation of biogeochemical cycles. Current forest management strategies in central Europe aim to increase the area of mixed stands. In order to formulate statements about the ecological effects of mixtures, studies at the stand level are necessary. In a mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth in the Ore Mountains (Saxony, Germany, the effects of these two tree species on chemical and microbial parameters in the topsoil were studied at one site in the form of a case study. Samples were taken from the O layer and A horizon in areas of the stand influenced by either birch, spruce or a mixture of birch and spruce. The microbial biomass, basal respiration, metabolic quotient, pH-value and the C and N contents and stocks were analysed in the horizons Of, Oh and A. Significantly higher contents of microbial N were observed in the Of and Oh horizons in the birch and in the spruce-birch strata than in the stratum containing only spruce. The same was found with respect to pH-values in the Of horizon and basal respiration in the Oh horizon. Compared to the spruce stratum, in the birch and spruce-birch strata, significantly lower values were found for the contents of organic C and total N in the A horizon. The findings of the case study indicated that single birch trees have significant effects on the chemical and microbial topsoil properties in spruce-dominated stands. Therefore, the admixture of birch in spruce stands may distinctly affect nutrient cycling and may also be relevant for soil carbon sequestration. Further studies of these functional aspects are recommended.

  6. Wood Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoke is made up of a complex mixture of gases and fine, microscopic particles produced when wood and other organic matter burn. The biggest health threat from wood smoke comes from fine particles (also called particulate matter).

  7. Pelletizing properties of torrefied spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.

    2011-01-01

    to moisture uptake, microbiological decay and easy to comminute into small particles. The present study focused on the pelletizing properties of spruce torrefied at 250, 275 and 300 °C. The changes in composition were characterized by infrared spectroscopy and chemical analysis. The pelletizing properties......, with hemicelluloses being most sensitive to thermal degradation. The chemical changes had a negative impact, both on the pelletizing process and the pellet properties. Torrefaction resulted in higher friction in the press channel of the pellet press and low compression strength of the pellets. Fracture surface...

  8. [Wood transformation in dead-standing trees in the forest-tundra of Central Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhortova, L V; Kirdianov, A V; Myglan, V S; Guggenberger, G

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the composition of wood organic matter in dead-standing spruce and larch trees depending on the period after their death have been studied in the north of Central Siberia. The period after tree death has been estimated by means of cross-dating. The results show that changes in the composition of wood organic matter in 63% of cases are contingent on tree species. Wood decomposition in dead-standing trees is accompanied by an increase in the contents of alkali-soluble organic compounds. Lignin oxidation in larch begins approximately 80 years after tree death, whereas its transformation in spruce begins not earlier than after 100 years. In the forest-tundra of Central Siberia, the rate of wood organic matter transformation in dead-standing trees is one to two orders of magnitude lower than in fallen wood, which accounts for their role as a long-term store of carbon and mineral elements in these ecosystems.

  9. Comparing growth and fine root distribution in monocultures and mixed plantations of hybrid poplar and spruce

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lahcen Benomar; Annie DesRochers; Guy R.Larocque

    2013-01-01

    Disease prevention,biodiversity,productivity improvement and ecological considerations are all factors that contribute to increasing interest in mixed plantations.The objective of this study was to evaluate early growth and productivity of two hybrid poplar clones,P.balsamifera x trichocarpa (PBT) and P.maximowiczii x balsamifera (PMB),one improved family of Norway spruce (Picea glauca (PA)) and one improved family of white spruce (Picea abies (PG)) growing under different spacings in monocultures and mixed plots.The plantations were established in 2003 in Abitibi-Témiscamingue,Quebec,Canada,in a split plot design with spacing as the whole plot factor (1 × 1 m,3 × 3 m and 5 × 5 m) and mixture treatments as subplot factor (pure:PBT,PMB,PA and PG,and 1:1 mixture PBT:PA,PBT:PG,PMB:PA and PMB:PG).Results showed a beneficial effect of the hybrid poplar-spruce mixture on diameter growth for hybrid poplar clones,but not for the 5 × 5 m spacing because of the relatively young age of the plantations.Diameter growth of the spruces decreased in mixed plantings in the 1 × 1 m,while their height growth increased,resulting in similar aboveground biomass per tree across treatments.Because of the large size differences between spruces and poplars,aboveground biomass in the mixed plantings was generally less than that in pure poplar plots.Leaf nitrogen concentration for the two spruce families and hybrid poplar clone PMB was greater in mixed plots than in monocultures,while leaf nitrogen concentration of clone PBT was similar among mixture treatments.Because of its faster growth rate and greater soil resources demands,clone PMB was the only one showing an increase in leaf N with increased spacing between trees.Fine roots density was greater for both hybrid poplars than spruces.The vertical distribution of fine roots was insensitive to mixture treatment.

  10. Energy consumption: energy consumption in mainland Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, Inger Helene; Killingland, Magnus; Spilde, Dag

    2012-07-25

    the most used energy products in Norway, covering more than 70 per cent of the energy consumption for stationary purposes in mainland Norway. Stationary purposes means consumption in households, commercial buildings, manufacturing industry and the energy sector, as opposed to transport, which is referred to as a mobile purpose. In addition to electricity, consumption of gas has also increased substantially since the mid-1970s. In mainland Norway, gas is used primarily in industry and the petroleum sector. The consumption of heating oil has however decreased heavily and has been replaced by electricity and district heating. NVE does not produce forecasts of energy consumption, but analyses carried out by other bodies point to a future trend in stationary energy consumption in mainland Norway that is comparable to recent trends. It is expected a continuing flat trend in energy consumption in households and manufacturing and a low growth in energy consumption in the service industries. In housing and commercial buildings, it is expected that energy efficiencies and strict new building regulations will bring about a significant future reduction in energy consumption per square metre. In manufacturing industries, it its expected that industries such as wood processing and ferroalloy production will find conditions more challenging, while industries such as silicon metal production will grow, resulting in a net flat trend in future energy consumption in the sector as a whole. In the petroleum sector, on the other hand, continued growth in electricity consumption is expected in the next few years, due to the electrification of new platforms and enlargement of existing shore side installations.(au)

  11. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, John I.; Cowie, Gregory L.; Ertel, John R.; James Barbour, R.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    1985-03-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p- hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > α-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source.

  12. Investigation of the large wood particles devolatilization process kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gvero, P.M. (University of Banja Luka, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina)); Radovanovic, M.R. (Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia)); Oka, S.N. (Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Laboratory for Thermal Engineering and Energy, Belgrade (Serbia)); Ilic, M.S. (Energy Saving Group, Belgrade (Serbia))

    2007-07-01

    This paper gives an analysis of the experimental and theoretical results of large wood particle devolatilization process investigation, as the most important one in combustion of high volatile fuel as wood is. For the purpose of these investigation wood samples of beach and spruce, having three variations of shapes (10, 15 and 15 mm) and various shapes were prepared (cylinder, cube, disc and sphere). The investigated types of wood were beech wood (a typical representative of hard wood) and spruce wood (a typical representative of softwood). Experiments were carried out in an isothermal conditions, where temperature in the reactor was changed in the range 400 - 900 deg C in a laboratory fluidized bed reactor, with 80 mm inner diameter. Inert material was silica sand with 0,235 mean particle diameter and bed was fluidized with nitrogen. There were two different types of the experiments; the experiments in which particles were immersed in the fluidized bed and the experiments with particle positioned in the freeboard. (orig.)

  13. Degradation of carbohydrates and lignins in buried woods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, J.I.; Cowie, G.L.; Ertel, J.R.; James, Barbour R.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    Spruce, alder, and oak woods deposited in coastal sediments were characterized versus their modern counterparts by quantification of individual neutral sugars and lignin-derived phenols as well as by scanning electron microscopy, 13C NMR, and elemental analysis. The buried spruce wood from a 2500 yr old deposit was unaltered whereas an alder wood from the same horizon and an oak wood from an open ocean sediment were profoundly degraded. Individual sugar and lignin phenol analyses indicate that at least 90 and 98 wt% of the initial total polysaccharides in the buried alder and oak woods, respectively, have been degraded along with 15-25 wt% of the lignin. At least 75% of the degraded biopolymer has been physically lost from these samples. This evidence is supported by the SEM, 13C NMR and elemental analyses, all of which indicate selective loss of the carbohydrate moiety. The following order of stability was observed for the major biochemical constituents of both buried hardwoods: vanillyl and p-hydroxyl lignin structural units > syringyl lignin structural units > pectin > ??-cellulose > hemicellulose. This sequence can be explained by selective preservation of the compound middle lamella regions of the wood cell walls. The magnitude and selectivity of the indicated diagenetic reactions are sufficient to cause major changes in the chemical compositions of wood-rich sedimentary organic mixtures and to provide a potentially large in situ nutrient source. ?? 1985.

  14. Malthus on norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M

    1966-11-01

    Abstract Malthus visited Norway in 1799 and his impression of the country's demographic experience was important in determining the character of the second edition of his Essay on the Principle of Population. He relied for the most part on non-statistical sources. This led him to exaggerate, e.g. the size of households, the number of unmarried farm servants and to miss important features, e.g. differences in marital age patterns, regional variations in fertility and nuptiality. The bias of his itinerary and of his main informants is also apparent. Statistical material not available to Malthus indicates that he was right to stress the late age at marriage in Norway but wrong to ignore the operation of the positive check. Mortality was frequently high in late eighteenth and early nineteenth-century Norway, much higher than Malthus ever realized. This destroys the symmetry, as well as the morality, of Malthus's exposition.

  15. Robotics Research in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Hølpødt

    1984-07-01

    Full Text Available Except for some districts and industries, the population of industrial robots in Norway is low. Trallfa AS is definitely the largest producer of robots in Norway. Jonas Oglænd A/S formerly produced handling manipulators, but they are now produced abroad. New companies such as NORKYB are developing. In addition to Trallfa and Oglænd, the development of robot systems is done by different research institutes such as the Center for Industrial Research (SI, SINTEF and the Rogaland Research Center (RF. These institutes do research work both for the robot manufacturers and directly for end users.

  16. A conifer genomics resource of 200,000 spruce (Picea spp.) ESTs and 6,464 high-quality, sequence-finished full-length cDNAs for Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Steven G; Chun, Hye Jung E; Kolosova, Natalia; Cooper, Dawn; Oddy, Claire; Ritland, Carol E; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Moore, Richard; Barber, Sarah; Holt, Robert A; Jones, Steven J M; Marra, Marco A; Douglas, Carl J; Ritland, Kermit; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2008-10-14

    Members of the pine family (Pinaceae), especially species of spruce (Picea spp.) and pine (Pinus spp.), dominate many of the world's temperate and boreal forests. These conifer forests are of critical importance for global ecosystem stability and biodiversity. They also provide the majority of the world's wood and fiber supply and serve as a renewable resource for other industrial biomaterials. In contrast to angiosperms, functional and comparative genomics research on conifers, or other gymnosperms, is limited by the lack of a relevant reference genome sequence. Sequence-finished full-length (FL)cDNAs and large collections of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are essential for gene discovery, functional genomics, and for future efforts of conifer genome annotation. As part of a conifer genomics program to characterize defense against insects and adaptation to local environments, and to discover genes for the production of biomaterials, we developed 20 standard, normalized or full-length enriched cDNA libraries from Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis), white spruce (P. glauca), and interior spruce (P. glauca-engelmannii complex). We sequenced and analyzed 206,875 3'- or 5'-end ESTs from these libraries, and developed a resource of 6,464 high-quality sequence-finished FLcDNAs from Sitka spruce. Clustering and assembly of 147,146 3'-end ESTs resulted in 19,941 contigs and 26,804 singletons, representing 46,745 putative unique transcripts (PUTs). The 6,464 FLcDNAs were all obtained from a single Sitka spruce genotype and represent 5,718 PUTs. This paper provides detailed annotation and quality assessment of a large EST and FLcDNA resource for spruce. The 6,464 Sitka spruce FLcDNAs represent the third largest sequence-verified FLcDNA resource for any plant species, behind only rice (Oryza sativa) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and the only substantial FLcDNA resource for a gymnosperm. Our emphasis on capturing FLcDNAs and ESTs from cDNA libraries representing herbivore

  17. A conifer genomics resource of 200,000 spruce (Picea spp. ESTs and 6,464 high-quality, sequence-finished full-length cDNAs for Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Robert A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the pine family (Pinaceae, especially species of spruce (Picea spp. and pine (Pinus spp., dominate many of the world's temperate and boreal forests. These conifer forests are of critical importance for global ecosystem stability and biodiversity. They also provide the majority of the world's wood and fiber supply and serve as a renewable resource for other industrial biomaterials. In contrast to angiosperms, functional and comparative genomics research on conifers, or other gymnosperms, is limited by the lack of a relevant reference genome sequence. Sequence-finished full-length (FLcDNAs and large collections of expressed sequence tags (ESTs are essential for gene discovery, functional genomics, and for future efforts of conifer genome annotation. Results As part of a conifer genomics program to characterize defense against insects and adaptation to local environments, and to discover genes for the production of biomaterials, we developed 20 standard, normalized or full-length enriched cDNA libraries from Sitka spruce (P. sitchensis, white spruce (P. glauca, and interior spruce (P. glauca-engelmannii complex. We sequenced and analyzed 206,875 3'- or 5'-end ESTs from these libraries, and developed a resource of 6,464 high-quality sequence-finished FLcDNAs from Sitka spruce. Clustering and assembly of 147,146 3'-end ESTs resulted in 19,941 contigs and 26,804 singletons, representing 46,745 putative unique transcripts (PUTs. The 6,464 FLcDNAs were all obtained from a single Sitka spruce genotype and represent 5,718 PUTs. Conclusion This paper provides detailed annotation and quality assessment of a large EST and FLcDNA resource for spruce. The 6,464 Sitka spruce FLcDNAs represent the third largest sequence-verified FLcDNA resource for any plant species, behind only rice (Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, and the only substantial FLcDNA resource for a gymnosperm. Our emphasis on capturing FLcDNAs and

  18. Tree plant organic matter stocks in spruce green moss Piceetum hylocomiosum and pine lichen Pinetum cladinosum forest communities after windfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Manov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of organic matter in spruce green moss Piceetum hylocomiosum and pine lichen Pinetum cladinosum forest communities after windfall was investigated. Phytomass of Piceetum hylocomiosum stand is 51.8 t • ha-1, and Pinetum cladinosum stand is 7.5 t • ha-1. Phytomass in the disturbed stands is 3.5 times less than in undisturbed spruce forest and 15 times less than in undisturbed pine forest. The undergrowth accumulates 2.8 t • ha-1 in spruce forest, and 0.9 t • ha-1 in pine forest after windfall. Number of trees, volume of wood, stock of organic matter was determined in coarse woody debris subject to decay class. Most of the dead trees (77–97 % belong to the second decay class. Reduced competition for light and mineral nutrients influences the intensity of organic matter accumulation by tree plants. We detected that increasing radial growth of spruce and fir began before windfall. This demonstrates the stand drying. However, maximal rate of annual ring increment (2.03–2.17 mm for spruce and 3.98–4.07 mm for fir was observed in 2009–2010 years. After windfall radial growth of undergrowth increased 2 times in Piceetum hylocomiosum and 7.7 times in Pinetum cladinosum. Height increment of spruce and fir understorey increased 2.2–2.6 times in spruce forest. As compared with undisturbed ecosystems height increment of pine understorey is 1.2–2.0 times higher on windbreak in Pinetum cladinosum.

  19. Climatic Sensitivity of a Mixed Forest Association of White Spruce and Trembling Aspen at Their Southern Range Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophan Chhin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Climatic sensitivity of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench Voss was examined growing in association with trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx. at their southern limit of distribution in a transitional ecotone between the southern boreal forest and northern prairie region. The study was carried out in the Spruce Woods Provincial Park (SWPP located in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. The dry regional climate restricted trembling aspen growth during the growing season via moisture deficiency and temperature induced drought stress. Warm, mild winters also negatively affected radial growth of trembling aspen. Growth of white spruce was moderated by conditions within the aspen stands as radial growth patterns showed low variability from year to year, a low common growth signal, and a stronger response to temperature than to precipitation. Nonetheless, the dry regional climate still restricted growth of white spruce during the growing season via temperature induced drought stress. The findings of the study for white spruce support the stress gradient hypothesis in which facilitative interactions between tree species are expected under harsher environmental conditions.

  20. Educational Assessment in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Norway has seen major changes in the field of educational assessment over the past decade, following the 2001 '"PISA shock" that stimulated reform of the entire primary and secondary education systems: new outcome-based curricula with cross-disciplinary basic skills were accompanied by major revision of assessment regulations,…

  1. Speed enforcement in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-01-01

    This paper probes the relationship between changes in the risk of apprehension for speeding in Norway and changes in the amount of speeding. The paper is based on a game-theoretic model of how the rate of violations and the amount of enforcement is determined by the interaction between drivers...

  2. Educational Assessment in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Norway has seen major changes in the field of educational assessment over the past decade, following the 2001 '"PISA shock" that stimulated reform of the entire primary and secondary education systems: new outcome-based curricula with cross-disciplinary basic skills were accompanied by major revision of assessment regulations,…

  3. Biological and Energy Productivity of Natural Spruce Forests in the Ukrainian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Vasilishyn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The modern practice of forestry production in Ukraine, which is in the process of implementing the conceptual changes in forest management and harmonization of its basic approaches to the basics of sustainable development, requires a significant expansion of the current regulatory and informational tools used to assess the ecological functions of forests. For this purpose, during the 2012–2014, as part of an international project GESAPU, models and tables of bioproductivity for forest tree species in Ukraine were completed. The article presents the results of modeling the dynamics of the conversion coefficients for the main components of phytomass of modal natural spruce forests of the Carpathian region of Ukraine based on information from 32 plots in the database of «Forest Phytomass of Ukraine». According to the state forest accounting of Ukraine as of January 1, 2011, the spruce forests in the Ukrainian Carpathians cover an area of 426.2 thousand ha, 45 % of which are spruce of natural origin. To evaluate the productivity of modal dynamics of pure and mixed spruce stands, the study developed models of the stock and overall productivity, derived by Bertalanffy growth function. On the basis of these models, normative reference tables of biological productivity of natural modal spruce forests of the Ukrainian Carpathians were developed. To successfully meet the challenges of evaluating the energy possibilities of forestry of Ukraine, the study used tables of energetic productivity of investigated stands. Built on the basis of the tables of bioproductivity, they reflect the dynamic processes of energy storage in the phytomass components and can be used in forest management to predict volumes of energetic woods.

  4. Assembly of the Complete Sitka Spruce Chloroplast Genome Using 10X Genomics’ GemCode Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, Lauren; Jackman, Shaun D.; Yang, Chen; Vandervalk, Benjamin P.; Moore, Richard A.; Pleasance, Stephen; Coope, Robin J.; Bohlmann, Joerg; Holt, Robert A.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Birol, Inanc

    2016-01-01

    The linked read sequencing library preparation platform by 10X Genomics produces barcoded sequencing libraries, which are subsequently sequenced using the Illumina short read sequencing technology. In this new approach, long fragments of DNA are partitioned into separate micro-reactions, where the same index sequence is incorporated into each of the sequencing fragment inserts derived from a given long fragment. In this study, we exploited this property by using reads from index sequences associated with a large number of reads, to assemble the chloroplast genome of the Sitka spruce tree (Picea sitchensis). Here we report on the first Sitka spruce chloroplast genome assembled exclusively from P. sitchensis genomic libraries prepared using the 10X Genomics protocol. We show that the resulting 124,049 base pair long genome shares high sequence similarity with the related white spruce and Norway spruce chloroplast genomes, but diverges substantially from a previously published P. sitchensis- P. thunbergii chimeric genome. The use of reads from high-frequency indices enabled separation of the nuclear genome reads from that of the chloroplast, which resulted in the simplification of the de Bruijn graphs used at the various stages of assembly. PMID:27632164

  5. Developmental Trends of Black Spruce Fibre Attributes in Maturing Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Newton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the temporal developmental patterns of commercially relevant fibre attributes (tracheid length and diameters, wall thickness, specific surface area, wood density, microfibril angle, fibre coarseness, and modulus of elasticity and their interrelationships within maturing black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P. plantations. A size-based stratified random sample procedure within 5 semimature plantations located in the Canadian Boreal Forest Region was used to select 50 trees from which radial cross-sectional xylem sequences at breast-height (1.3 m were cut and analyzed. Statistically, the graphical and linear correlation analyses indicated that the attributes exhibited significant (p≤0.05 relationships among themselves and with morphological tree characteristics. Relative variation of each annually measured attribute declined with increasing size class (basal area quintile. The transitional shifts in temporal correlation patterns occurring at the time of approximate crown closure where suggestive of intrinsic differences in juvenile and mature wood formation processes. The temporal cumulative development patterns of all 8 of the annually measured attributes varied systematically with tree size and exhibited the most rapid rates of change before the trees reached a cambial age of 20 years. At approximately 50 years after establishment, plantation mean attribute values were not dissimilar from those reported for more mature natural-origin stands.

  6. Norway: health system review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringard, Ånen; Sagan, Anna; Sperre Saunes, Ingrid; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2013-01-01

    Norways five million inhabitants are spread over nearly four hundred thousand square kilometres, making it one of the most sparsely populated countries in Europe. It has enjoyed several decades of high growth, following the start of oil production in early 1970s, and is now one of the richest countries per head in the world. Overall, Norways population enjoys good health status; life expectancy of 81.53 years is above the EU average of 80.14, and the gap between overall life expectancy and healthy life years is around half the of EU average. The health care system is semi decentralized. The responsibility for specialist care lies with the state (administered by four Regional Health Authorities) and the municipalities are responsible for primary care. Although health care expenditure is only 9.4% of Norways GDP (placing it on the 16th place in the WHO European region), given Norways very high value of GDP per capita, its health expenditure per head is higher than in most countries. Public sources account for over 85% of total health expenditure; the majority of private health financing comes from households out-of-pocket payments.The number of practitioners in most health personnel groups, including physicians and nurses, has been increasing in the last few decades and the number of health care personnel per 100 000 inhabitants is high compared to other EU countries. However, long waiting times for elective care continue to be a problem and are cause of dissatisfaction among the patients. The focus of health care reforms has seen shifts over the past four decades. During the 1970s the focus was on equality and increasing geographical access to health care services; during the 1980s reforms aimed at achieving cost containment and decentralizing health care services; during the 1990s the focus was on efficiency. Since the beginning of the millennium the emphasis has been given to structural changes in the delivery and organization of health care and to policies

  7. Stavanger Squash Centre, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostvik, H. [Sunlab/ABB, Stavanger (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    Although Stavanger is the technological and financial oil-capital of Norway, the Stavanger Squash Centre was until recently the largest solar building in Norway, with 120 m{sup 2} of collectors. The active, building-integrated, solar air collector in the 45 {sup o} roof facing 15 {sup o} east of due south, has now been delivering solar-heated hot water for the showers for 15 years. The solar system consists of several standard products put together in a new way. Monitoring has shown that the system produced 18,000 kWh/m{sup 2} a (150 kWh/m{sub coll} {sup 2}a). If operated as planned, it could have had a solar contribution of 45,000 kWh/a) (375 kWh/m{sub coll} {sup 2}a), resulting in a 19% solar fraction of total demand. (author)

  8. Occupational mobility in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Due, Jonas Røer

    2016-01-01

    This thesis investigates how yearly occupational mobility has developed in Norway between the years 1972 and 2015. It also analyses the characteristics of workers that experienced the most occupational switches, and control for demographic changes in the workforce of the population. To investigate this topic, this thesis uses quarterly panel data from the Norwegian Labor Force Survey, where several cleaning procedures have been conducted through the computer program STATA with additional calc...

  9. Rainfall interception and spatial variability of throughfall in spruce stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohnal Michal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The interception was recognized as an important part of the catchment water balance in temperate climate. The mountainous forest ecosystem at experimental headwater catchment Liz has been subject of long-term monitoring. Unique dataset in terms of time resolution serves to determine canopy storage capacity and free throughfall. Spatial variability of throughfall was studied using one weighing and five tipping bucket rain gauges. The basic characteristics of forest affecting interception process were determined for the Norway spruce stand at the experimental area - the leaf area index was 5.66 - 6.00 m2 m-2, the basal area was 55.7 m2 ha-1, and the crown closure above individual rain gauges was between 19 and 95%. The total interception loss in both growing seasons analyzed was 34.5%. The mean value of the interception capacity determined was about 2 mm. Throughfall exhibited high variability from place to place and it was strongly affected by character of rainfall. On the other hand, spatial pattern of throughfall in average showed low variability.

  10. Protection performance of some polyurethane surface systems on wood surface in outdoor conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özgenc

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different surface system applied oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L. were investigated resistance to the outdoor conditions of the test and control wood. Surface systems were compared as two different property polyurethane-based materials. Outdoor test has been implemented in Sürmene coastal, Uzungol and Hıdırnebi plateaus. Oriental spruce samples were compared based on the discoloration and reduction in fiber to parallel compressive strength in outdoor conditions. The weathering test in Hıdırnebi plateau was found at the lowest discoloration and reduction rate on compressive strength. According to the obtained results; polyester-based material, the oriental spruce wood against discoloration and reduction in compressive strength was determined at outdoor conditions is relatively well preserved

  11. Effects of ground hazelnut shell, wood, and tea waste on the mechanical properties of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A. [Black Sea Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Fatih Education Faculty; Aslan, A. [Celal Bayar Univ., Manisa (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-08-01

    In this study, the mechanical properties of Portland cement mixes with an admixture such as ground hazelnut shell, spruce and beech woods, and tea waste were studied. The compressive and bending strengths test results obtained from these mixes were investigated with comparing to the control mix. From results, it was obtained that especially ground hazelnut shell and beech wood can be used as additives or partial replacement for Portland cement.

  12. Impact of Wood Species, Dimensions and Drying Temperature on Sorption Behaviour of Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Albrektas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper examines the interdependence between wood sorption properties and its dimensions, species and drying temperature. The research was carried out on specimens of six species of wood (oak, ash, aspen, birch, spruce and pine which had different dimensions and were dried at temperatures ranging between 30 and 90 °C. Subsequently specimens underwent the moistening and air drying process, and the following parameters were recorded: moistening and drying rate, moisture content distribution, steady moisture content and sorption hysteresis. It was established that sorption hysteresis was most affected by the cross section dimensions of the specimen. It was determined that, when the thickness of wood specimens increases from 7 to 30 mm, sorption hysteresis grows up to 8 times. The steady moisture content depends on the density, measurements and drying temperature of the specimen.

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS OF THERMALLY MODIFIED WOOD AND THEIR REDUCTION BY CHEMICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Peters

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Thermal treatment is a suitable method for improving the quality of wood types like spruce, beech or poplar, and thus to open up new fields of application that used to be limited to tropical woods or woods treated with timber preservatives. These thermally treated woods are characterized by a typical odor caused by degradation products of miscellaneous wood components. The characterization and removal of those odorous substances were investigated using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Headspace gas chromatography (GC in combination with solid-phase microextraction (SPME was used for a qualitative analysis of volatile wood emissions, and the detectable volatiles were compared before and after solvent extraction. Wood solvent extractives were investigated by means of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and then evaluated in terms of changes in composition caused by the thermal treatment process.

  14. Wooded areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the management of wooded areas on Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge (formerly Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge) between 1992 and 2009.

  15. Anatomy of a field trial: Wood-based biochar and compost influences a Pacific Northwest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar land application research in elevated rainfall areas (980 millimeters of annual rainfall) of the U.S. Pacific Northwest is lacking. A proof-of-concept field study examined the effects of spruce-pine-fir wood chip biochar (slow pyrolysis; 450-500 degrees Celsius; 35 megagrams per hectare), d...

  16. Old lower stem bark lesions apparently caused by unsuccessful spruce beetle attacks still evident on live spruce trees years later

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Hard; Ken P. Zogas

    2010-01-01

    We examined old bark lesions on Lutz spruce in young stands on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, to determine their cause. Distribution of these lesions along lower stems was similar to the distribution of spruce beetle attacks during epidemics. These lesions apparently resulted from unsuccessful attacks by spruce beetles during the late 1980s and early 1990s and appear to...

  17. Arctic security and Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamnes, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious threats facing mankind. Many regions and countries will be affected, and there will be many losers. The earliest and most intense climatic changes are being experienced in the Arctic region. Arctic average temperature has risen at twice the rate of the global average in the past half century. These changes provide an early indication for the world of the environmental and societal significance of global warming. For that reason, the Arctic presents itself as an important scientific laboratory for improving our understanding of the causes and patterns of climate changes. The rapidly rising temperature threatens the Arctic ecosystem, but the human consequences seem to be far less dramatic there than in many other places in the world. According to the U.S. National Intelligence Council, Russia has the potential to gain the most from increasingly temperate weather, because its petroleum reserves become more accessible and because the opening of an Arctic waterway could provide economic and commercial advantages. Norway might also be fortunate. Some years ago, the Financial Times asked: #Left Double Quotation Mark#What should Norway do about the fact that global warming will make their climate more hospitable and enhance their financial situation, even as it inflicts damage on other parts of the world?#Right Double Quotation Mark#(Author)

  18. Agent-based modelling of heating system adoption in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopha, Bertha Maya; Kloeckner, Christian A.; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2010-07-01

    Full text: This paper introduces agent-based modelling as a methodological approach to understand the effect of decision making mechanism on the adoption of heating systems in Norway. The model is used as an experimental/learning tool to design possible interventions, not for prediction. The intended users of the model are therefore policy designers. Primary heating system adoptions of electric heating, heat pump and wood pellet heating were selected. Random topology was chosen to represent social network among households. Agents were households with certain location, number of peers, current adopted heating system, employed decision strategy, and degree of social influence in decision making. The overall framework of decision-making integrated theories from different disciplines; customer behavior theory, behavioral economics, theory of planned behavior, and diffusion of innovation, in order to capture possible decision making processes in households. A mail survey of 270 Norwegian households conducted in 2008 was designed specifically for acquiring data for the simulation. The model represents real geographic area of households and simulates the overall fraction of adopted heating system under study. The model was calibrated with historical data from Statistics Norway (SSB). Interventions with respects to total cost, norms, indoor air quality, reliability, supply security, required work, could be explored using the model. For instance, the model demonstrates that a considerable total cost (investment and operating cost) increase of electric heating and heat pump, rather than a reduction of wood pellet heating's total cost, are required to initiate and speed up wood pellet adoption. (Author)

  19. Changes of the spruce forest stand aerodynamic properties during ten growing seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtalova, T.; Matejka, F.; Janous, D.; Czerny, R.

    2009-04-01

    Objective of this study was to quantify the influence of a young spruce forest stand on airflow and its aerodynamic characteristics during ten growing seasons. With this aim the wind speed profiles measured in and above investigated spruce stand during growing seasons, from May to October, 1998-2007 were analysed. Experimental site is situated on a mild slope with SW orientation in the locality Bílý Kříž (49o30'17'' N, 18o32'28'' E, 898-908 m a.s.l.), which is in the highest part of the Moravian-Silesian Beskydy Mts, Czech Republic. The experimental site consisting of two plots Fd and Fs with different tree density is created by the monoculture of young Norway spruce stand (Picea abies L., Karst) with age of 17 years in 1998. Each of these plots has the area of 2500 m2, density of 2600 trees/ha in Fd plot and 2400 trees/ha in Fs plot in 1998, and gradually 1652 trees/ha (Fd) and 1428 trees/ha (Fs) in 2007. The aerodynamic characteristics can be described by the roughness length (z0) and the zero plane displacement (d). The presented study aims to analyse the changes in d and z0 values for a young spruce forest stand during ten consecutive growing seasons, and to relate the aerodynamic properties of an air layer affected by this stand to its growth parameters. It is known, that the local terrain and structure of forest stand influenced the direction and power of the airflow, as well as the structure of vertical wind speed profiles. From the wind speed profile analysis it follows, that the investigated spruce stand was in an aerodynamic unsteady state and then d and z0 values vary also with the wind speed. During investigated seasons the mean seasonal z0 values ranged between 0.48 m and 1.32 m in Fd and the corresponding values in Fs plot varied between 0.41 m and 1.36 m. The mean seasonal d values varied between 0.60h and 0.76h in Fd, and 61h and 0.76h in Fs, h is mean stand height.

  20. Spruce Beetle Biology, Ecology and Management in the Rocky Mountains: An Addendum to Spruce Beetle in the Rockies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Jenkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spruce beetle outbreaks have been reported in the Rocky Mountains of western North America since the late 1800s. In their classic paper, Spruce Beetle in the Rockies, Schmid and Frye reviewed the literature that emerged from the extensive outbreaks in Colorado in the 1940s. A new wave of outbreaks has affected Rocky Mountain subalpine spruce-fir forests beginning in the mid-1980s and continuing to the present. These outbreaks have spurred another surge of basic and applied research in the biology, ecology and management of spruce and spruce beetle populations. This paper is a review of literature on spruce beetle focusing on work published since the late 1970s and is intended as an addendum to Spruce Beetle in the Rockies.

  1. Hygrothermal Properties of Cross Laminated Timber and Moisture Response of Wood at High Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSayegh, George

    Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) is a new wood-based material composed of cross laminated wood boards that form a structural panel. This study focuses on identifying the appropriate methods to determine the hygrothermal properties of CLTs fabricated with Canadian and European Lumber. The laboratory tests carried out in this study will help establish heat, air and moisture response properties to be used for hygrothermal simulation to assess the durability of CLTs in building envelope construction. Measurement of water vapour permeability, liquid water absorption, sorption isotherms, thermal conductivity, and air permeability were performed on three Canadian CLT specimens composed of Hem-Fir, Eastern Spruce-Pine-Fir, and Western Spruce-Pine-Fir and one European specimen composed of Spruce. The hygrothermal properties of CLT, considered in this study, appear to be similar to commonly used wood specimens reported in the literature. However, liquid water absorption coefficients of CLT were found to be generally lower than common wood species, possibly due to the presence of glue between the wood layers which limits the moisture movement across the specimen. On the other hand, the air permeability across the CLT specimens varied due to the glue discontinuity within the specimen which led some CLTs to be permeable, however all the European specimens were found to be impermeable. This study also critically analyzed the significance of equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at high relative humidity, measured by means of a pressure plate apparatus and humidity chambers, on the moisture management performance of a wood-frame stucco wall, using the hygrothermal simulation tool hygIRC-2D. The simulation results indicate that the prediction of the moisture response of a wood-frame stucco wall assembly depends significantly on the method adopted to derive the EMC of wood at high RH.

  2. Performance of waterborne acrylic surface coatings on wood impregnated with Cu-ethanolamine preservatives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Humar; M Pavlič; D Žlindra; M Tomažič; M Petrič

    2011-02-01

    Two waterborne acrylic coatings were applied on spruce wood, impregnated with two copperethanolamine containing preservatives (CuE and CuEQ), one of them (CuEQ) containing a boron compound, octanoic acid and a quaternary ammonium compound as additives. Lower contact angles and deeper penetration of both coating types were observed on CuEQ treated, compared to untreated or CuE-treated wood. Improved adhesion of coatings on CuEQ impregnated wood was exhibited as well. In general, characteristics of surface finishes on copper-ethanolamine treated wood were comparable to untreated wood. It was also shown that copper leaching from the preserved wood was significantly reduced by application of the surface finishes.

  3. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T.; Voriskova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha(-1) to alkaline at 167 t ha......-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse...... and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha(-1). We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas...

  4. Ant-mediated effects on spruce litter decomposition, solution chemistry, and microbial activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, B.; Schramm, Andreas; Kalbitz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Forest management practices often generate clear-cut patches, which may be colonized by ants not present in the same densities in mature forests. In addition to the associated changes in abiotic conditions ants can initiate processes, which do not occur in old-growth stands. Here, we analyse...... the effects of ants and aphid honeydew on litter solution of Norway spruce, microbial enzyme activities, and needle decomposition in a field and greenhouse experiment during summer 2003. In the field, low ant densities had relatively little effects on litter solution 30 cm away from a tree trunk....... The presence of ants resulted in a changed composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with more aromatic and complex compounds, and microbial enzyme activity was significantly higher in litter extracts from the ant treatment compared to the honeydew and control treatment. However, mass loss, litter %C...

  5. Aluminum dynamics in forest soil waters in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Holger; Solberg, Svein; Clarke, Nicholas

    2006-08-31

    We report on weekly aluminum (Al) concentration measurements in soil water from forested catchments monitored throughout Norway since 1986. Originating in acidification research, and thus accompanied by many other chemical variables, they constitute a comprehensive data set suited for analysis of short- as well as long-term variations in a geographic perspective. The Al time series at 21 sites are characterized by high temporal variability, seasonal behavior, and episodic events with peak values in the range 200-800 micromol/l, mostly caused by sea salts blown inland in storms, with a subsequent release of Al after cation exchange. Despite a clear south-north gradient in possible acidification over Norway, we found no indication of such south-north trends in Al chemistry, neither in mean values, maximum values, nor time trends. We identified two main drivers for variation in Al concentrations. The first one was sea salts, where Al was released to the soil solution after cation exchange. The second driver was high production of DOC, where Al was driven into the soil solution by complexation with DOC. There appears to be little risk for aluminum toxicity to trees in Norwegian forests. Except during occasional episodes, aluminum concentrations generally lay far below the supposed threshold values for toxic effects on Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch. Much dissolved aluminum was non-labile, and thus relatively non-toxic. Although the Ca2+/labile Al ratio was often below 1.0, considerable doubt exists as to the applicability of this variable in the field.

  6. On-line field measurements of VOC emissions from a spruce tree at SMEAR Estonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Bonn, Boris; Noe, Steffen

    2013-04-01

    We have investigated VOC emissions from a Norway spruce tree (Picea abies) in a hemi-boreal mixed forest in September and October 2012, using Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry techniques, applied in a dynamic branch enclosure system that was automatically operated with an electrical compressor. Parallel to BVOC measurements a vast amount of atmospheric (CO2, CH4, H2O, CO, particles) and meteorological (temperature, relative humidity, photosynthetic active radiation, wind speed and direction, precipitation) parameters were measured in the ambient atmosphere and inside the cuvette enclosure (temperature, relative humidity, O3). Prior to the measuring period, an innovatory experimental setup was built at Järvselja forest station, in order to accomplish the detection of BVOC and minimize sampling losses. Therefore, a new inlet line, consisting of 19.4m of heated and isolated glass tube was constructed. The new inlet system applied, allowed the on-line detection and calculation of sesquiterpene (SQT) emission rates for the first time in a hemi-boreal forest site. It total, 12 atmospheric relevant BVOCs were continuously monitored for a three week period and the emission rates were derived. Along with diurnal profiles and continuous timeless, some interesting observations showed the possibility of ozone effect on SQT emissions, the possibility of radiation effect on MT emissions, the higher induced emissions due to mechanical stress and the possibility for a valid intercomparison between different spruce trees located in mountain Kleiner Feldberg (Germany) and in Järvseja forest station (Estonia).

  7. Steam pretreatment of spruce forest residues: optimal conditions for biogas production and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzon, Ron; Schütt, Fokko; Oldenburg, Saskia; Fischer, Elmar; Körner, Ina; Saake, Bodo

    2014-01-16

    Steam refining of non-debarked spruce forest residues was investigated as pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis as well as for biogas production. Pretreatment conditions were varied in the range of 190-220 °C, 5-10 min and 0-3.7% SO₂ according to a statistical design. For both applications highest product yields were predicted at 220 °C and 2.4% SO₂, whereas the reaction time had only a minor influence. The conformity of the model results allows the conclusion that enzymatic hydrolysis is a suitable test method to evaluate the degradability of lignocellulosic biomass in the biogas process. In control experiments under optimal conditions the results of the model were verified. The yield of total monomeric carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis was equivalent to 55% of all theoretically available polysaccharides. The corresponding biogas yield from the pretreated wood amounted to 304 mL/gODM. Furthermore, furans produced under optimal process conditions showed no inhibitory effect on biogas production. It can be concluded that steam refining opens the structure of wood, thus improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides to fermentable monomeric sugars and subsequently enabling a higher and faster production of biogas. Anaerobic fermentation of pretreated wood is a serious alternative to alcoholic fermentation especially when low quality wood grades and residues are used. Anaerobic digestion should be further investigated in order to diversify the biorefinery options for lignocellulosic materials.

  8. Below-ground carbon allocation in mature beech and spruce trees following long-term, experimentally enhanced O{sub 3} exposure in Southern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Christian P., E-mail: Andersen.christian@epa.go [US Environmental Protection Agency, Western Ecology Division, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Ritter, Wilma [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Gregg, Jillian [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates, 200 SW 35th St., Corvallis, OR 97333 (United States); Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E.E. [Ecophysiology of Plants, Department of Ecology and Ecosystem Management, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Canopies of adult European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) were labeled with CO{sub 2} depleted in {sup 13}C to evaluate carbon allocation belowground. One-half the trees were exposed to elevated O{sub 3} for 6 yrs prior to and during the experiment. Soil-gas sampling wells were placed at 8 and 15 cm and soil CO{sub 2} was sampled during labeling in mid-late August, 2006. In beech, {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} at both depths decreased approximately 50 h after labeling, reflecting rapid translocation of fixed C to roots and release through respiration. In spruce, label was detected in fine-root tissue, but there was no evidence of label in {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2}. The results show that C fixed in the canopy rapidly reaches respiratory pools in beech roots, and suggest that spruce may allocate very little of recently-fixed carbon into root respiration during late summer. A change in carbon allocation belowground due to long-term O{sub 3} exposure was not observed. - Below-ground carbon allocation in mature beech and spruce exposed to ozone.

  9. NORWAY: a nuclear demonstration project?

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    "Egil Lillestøl is a man with a rather unusual mission: he wants his homeland of Norway to take the lead in developement of of a new form of nuclear power. Norway is Europe's largest petroleum exporter, from its North Sea oil and gas fields, and Lillestøl, a physicist at the University of Bergen, believes the country needs to do something about its carbon emissions.

  10. Finishes for Wood Decks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Wood decks have become an important part of residential construction. Wood decks can add versatile living space to a home and, with minimal maintenance, provide decades of use. However, wood decks are exposed to high levels of stress from severe weather conditions that shrink and swell the wood. Without proper maintenance, wood decks can develop problems such as checks...

  11. TORREFACTION OF BEECH AND SPRUCE SAWDUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana GRÎU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to apply a thermal treatment of beech and spruce sawdust dried to 10% moisture in order to determine the mass loss and to obtain pellet sets. This paper considers the colour change of the treated material during the treatment, as function of time and temperature increase. It also highlights the changes in the chemical composition of sawdust connected with the mass loss. The paper also studies the physical integrity of the obtained pellets, using the method of free fall, with the results showing that spruce sawdust pellets appear to be more stable. The optimal temperature of thermal treatment proves to be 2600C and the duration of treatments are 5 and 10 minutes, when the sawdust has dimensions between 0.4-1mm. Regarding the pellets formed at the temperature above 2600C, it should be noted that their stability is low, in particular that one of beech, which is difficult to compress and compact

  12. Organic halogens in spruce forest throughfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öberg, G.; Johansen, C.; Grøn, C.

    1998-01-01

    . No relationship between the position of the collectors and the forest edge or dominating wind-direction was found, suggesting that dry deposition was not a major source. The concentration of organic halogens was related to that of organic carbon and decreased from the tree-trunk and outwards. In addition......Deposition of dissolved organic halogens by throughfall was determined in a small spruce forest site in Denmark (56 degrees 28'N, 8 degrees 24'E). The mean annual deposition of dissolved organic halogens was 377 g ha(-1)yr(-1), and larger than the general deposition by precipitation......, the concentrations were higher during the growing season than during the dormant season. This indicates that the major part of the organic carbon and organic halogens in spruce forest throughfall originates from canopy leachates or other internal sources. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  13. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sitka spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Picea_sitchensis_L.png Picea_sitchensis_NL.png Picea_sitchensi...s_S.png Picea_sitchensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+si...tchensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NS ...

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: white spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available white spruce Picea glauca Picea_glauca_L.png Picea_glauca_NL.png Picea_glauca_S.png Pic...ea_glauca_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=L http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+glauca&t=NS ...

  15. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  16. Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Longyearbyen is the administrative center of Svalbard and is located on Spitsbergen, the largest island of the Svalbard archipelago, part of the Kingdom of Norway. It is the world's northernmost town with over 1000 people. The settlement was founded in 1906 by John Longyear, owner of the Arctic Coal Company. Until the early 1990s the coal mining industry was the major employer of Longyearbyen. Near Longyearbyen, the Global Crop Diversity Trust administers the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, an Arctic safe capable of storing millions of crop seeds as a safeguard against natural and human disasters. Last week, the first deposit of 250,000 different species of crop seeds was made into the repository. The perspective view was created by draping a simulated natural color image over an ASTER-derived digital elevation model. The image was acquired July 12, 2003, and is located at 78.2 degrees north latitude, 15.6 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  17. In situ autumn ozone fumigation of mature Norway spruce - Effects on net photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2002-01-01

    concentration. The experiment was conducted during 70 days during the autumn. Our system could not detect any ozone effects on dark respiration, but eventually effects on dark respiration could be masked in signal noise. An inhibition of daily net photosynthesis in ozone treated shoots was apparent......, and it is was found that a mean increase in ozone concentration of 10 nl l(-1) reduced net photosynthesis with 7.4 %. This effect should be related to a pre-exposure during the season of AOT40 12.5 mul l(-1) h....

  18. Root uptake of lead by Norway spruce grown on Pb-210 spiked soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmand, M.F.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Johnsen, I.

    2009-01-01

    . Calculations of the specific activity in plant material and in the supporting pot soil showed that less than 2% of the Pb content of needles and twigs originates from root uptake and approximately 98% are deposited from the atmosphere. Atmospheric Pb has declined by a factor of 7 from 1980 to 2007 but is still...... a major pathway of Pb to vegetation and topsoils. The conclusion from the experiment is that the internal circulation of Pb through root uptake, translocation and litterfall, gives an insignificant input of Pb to the forest floor compared to atmospheric deposition....

  19. Impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Norway spruce joints glued with different adhesives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2015-01-01

    × 20 mm × 10 mm) were bonded with seven commercially available adhesives: polyurethane (PUR), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), emulsion-polymer-isocyanate (EPI), melamine-formaldehyde (MF), phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF), melamine-urea-formaldehyde1 (MUF1), and melamine-urea-formaldehyde2 (MUF2). Each...

  20. Regeneration development 4-5 years after a storm in Norway spruce dominated forests, Estonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilisson, T.; Köster, K.; Vodde, F.; Jogiste, K.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The regeneration patterns in wind-damaged areas are largely influenced by damage severity and varied microrelief. Regeneration was studied in Picea abies dominated stands with total and partial canopy destruction and in harvested areas in Myrtillus and Filipendula site types in Estonia 4¿5

  1. Feedbacks of windthrow for Norway spruce and Scots pine stands under changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panferov, O.; Döring, C.; Rauch, E.;

    2009-01-01

    the turbulence model SCAlar DIStribution (SCADIS) with the soil–vegetation–atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) model BROOK 90. The present study investigates projections of wind damage in Solling, Germany under climate scenarios A1B and B1, taking into account the windthrow feedbacks—changes of microclimate as a result......Wind damage is one of the major natural disturbances that can occur worldwide in most types of forests. Enhanced management using adequate decision support systems (DSS) can considerably reduce the risk of windthrow. The decision support system 'Forest and Climate Change' (DSS-WuK) which...... is currently being developed at Göttingen University aims at providing a tool for the quantitative assessment of biotic and abiotic risks for forest ecosystems under the conditions of changing climate. In order to assess the future risks of wind damage the system employs a coupled modelling approach combining...

  2. Increasing Water Use Efficiency Comes at a Cost for Norway Spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja G M Sanders

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi in trees is an indication of the ratio of carbon assimilation to the rate of transpiration. It is generally assumed that it is a response to water availability. In agricultural research, the question of drought tolerance by increased WUEi has been well studied. In general, the increase is a trade-off for productivity and is therefore not desired. For forest trees, this question is less clearly understood. Using stable carbon isotopes derived from tree rings combined with productivity as the product of the annual growth increment and annual density measurements, we compared the change in WUEi over a 15 year period. While WUEi increased over this period, the productivity decreased, causing an opposing trend. The gradient of the correlation between WUEi and productivity varies between provenances and sites. Counterintuitively, the populations at the drier site showed low WUEi values at the beginning of the investigation. Slopes vary with the provenance from Poland showing the least decline in productivity. In general, we found that a decline in productivity aligned with an increase in WUEi.

  3. Allocation to carbon storage pools in Norway spruce saplings under drought and low CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; McDowell, Nate G; Trumbore, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) are critical to maintain plant metabolism under stressful environmental conditions, but we do not fully understand how NSC allocation and utilization from storage varies with stress. While it has become established that storage allocation is unlikely to be a mere overflow process, very little empirical evidence has been produced to support this view, at least not for trees. Here we present the results of an intensively monitored experimental manipulation of whole-tree carbon (C) balance (young Picea abies (L.) H Karst.) using reduced atmospheric [CO2] and drought to reduce C sources. We measured specific C storage pools (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch) over 21 weeks and converted concentration measurement into fluxes into and out of the storage pool. Continuous labeling ((13)C) allowed us to track C allocation to biomass and non-structural C pools. Net C fluxes into the storage pool occurred mainly when the C balance was positive. Storage pools increased during periods of positive C gain and were reduced under negative C gain. (13)C data showed that C was allocated to storage pools independent of the net flux and even under severe C limitation. Allocation to below-ground tissues was strongest in control trees followed by trees experiencing drought followed by those grown under low [CO2]. Our data suggest that NSC storage has, under the conditions of our experimental manipulation (e.g., strong progressive drought, no above-ground growth), a high allocation priority and cannot be considered an overflow process. While these results also suggest active storage allocation, definitive proof of active plant control of storage in woody plants requires studies involving molecular tools.

  4. Comparing carbohydrate status during norway spruce seed development and somatic embryo formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gösslová, M.; Svobodová, H.; Lipavská, H.; Albrechtová, J.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2001-01-01

    The carbohydrate status of developing seeds of Picea abies was examined in order to provide a frame of reference for the evaluation of changes in carbohydrate content in maturing somatic embryos of the same species. Samples were taken at weekly intervals from 12 May 1998 (estimated time of pollinati

  5. Overstory Tree Mortality in Ponderosa Pine and Spruce-Fir Ecosystems Following a Drought in Northern New Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Brian P. Oswald; Sean C. Dugan; Balice, Randy G.; Daniel R. Unger

    2016-01-01

    Drought-caused tree dieback is an issue around the world as climates change and many areas become dryer and hotter. A drought from 1998–2004 resulted in a significant tree dieback event in many of the wooded areas in portions of the Jemez Mountains and the adjacent Pajarito Plateau in northern New Mexico. The objectives of this study were to evaluate and quantify the differences in tree mortality before and after a recent drought in ponderosa pine and spruce-fir ecosystems, and to assess the ...

  6. SEI SPRUCE Project: Curating Recommended Practices for Software Producibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    adjustments to the website design , for the most part, we needed to work within the website’s existing style libraries and operational models for web page...contributing to the SPRUCE website, the SEI worked within the constraints of an existing website design . SPRUCE had developed around the central idea of

  7. How does wind-throw disturbance affect the carbon budget of an upland spruce forest ecosystem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindauer, Matthias; Schmid, Hans Peter; Grote, Rüdiger; Mauder, Matthias; Wolpert, Benjamin; Steinbrecher, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Forests, especially in mid-latitudes are generally designated as large carbon sinks. However, stand-replacing disturbance events like fires, insect-infestations, or severe wind-storms can shift an ecosystem from carbon sink to carbon source within short time and keep it as this for a long time. In Addition, extreme weather situations which promote the occurrence of ecosystem disturbances are likely to increase in the future due to climate change. The development and competition of different vegetation types (spruce vs. grass) as well as soil organic matter (SOM), and their contribution to the net ecosystem exchange (NEE), in such disturbed forest ecosystems are largely unknown. In a large wind-throw area (ca. 600 m diameter, due to cyclone Kyrill in January 2007) within a mature upland spruce forest, where dead-wood has not been removed, in the Bavarian Forest National Park (Lackenberg, 1308 m a.s.l., Bavaria, Germany), fluxes of CO2, water vapor and energy have been measured with the Eddy Covariance (EC) method since 2009. Model simulations (MoBiLE) were used to estimate the GPP components from trees and grassland as well as to differentiate between soil and plant respiration, and to get an idea about the long term behavior of the ecosystems carbon exchange. For 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 estimates of annual Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) showed that the wind-throw was a marked carbon source. However, the few remaining trees and newly emerging vegetation (grass, sparse young spruce, etc.) lead to an already strong Gross Ecosystem Production (GEP). Model simulations conformed well with the measurements. To our knowledge, we present the worldwide first long-term measurements of NEE within a non-cleared wind-throw-disturbed forest ecosystem.

  8. Wood Decay Fungi Restore Essential Calcium to Acidic Soils in Northern New England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Shortle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of root-available calcium in northern forests soils exposed to decades of increased acid deposition adversely affects forest health and productivity. Laboratory studies indicated the potential of wood-decay fungi to restore lost calcium to the rooting zone of trees. This study reports changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K during decay of sapwood of spruce, maple, hemlock, and birch at two locations in northern New England, USA. Concentrations of exchangeable Ca, Mg, and Al in decayed wood residues after 10 and 12 years of ground contact were also compared. Significant loss of mass indicated by decreasing wood density occurred after two to eight years in conifers and after only two years in hardwoods. A significant gain in wood K was observed at two years, but the gain was not sustained. A significant gain in Ca concentration occurred by six years and that gain was sustained for 12 years. Concentrations of Mg varied. No significant difference in exchangeable Ca concentration was observed between decayed wood residue of spruce and maple and the forest floor. However, decayed wood residue had a much lower molar Al/Ca ratio, a conditional characteristic of sites with high root-available Ca.

  9. Radial Growth Response of Black Spruce Stands Ten Years after Experimental Shelterwoods and Seed-Tree Cuttings in Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Montoro Girona

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial cutting is thought to be an alternative to achieve sustainable management in boreal forests. However, the effects of intermediate harvest intensity (45%–80% on growth remain unknown in black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P. stands, one of the most widely distributed boreal species with great commercial interest. In this study, we analysed the effect of three experimental shelterwood and one seed-tree treatments on tree radial growth in even-aged black spruce stands, 10 years after intervention. Our results show that radial growth response 8–10 years after cutting was 41% to 62% higher than in untreated plots, with stand structure, treatment, tree position relative to skidding trails, growth before cutting and time having significant interactions. The stand structure conditioned tree growth after cutting, being doubled in younger and denser stands. Tree spatial position had a pronounced effect on radial growth; trees at the edge of the skidding trails showed twice the increase in growth compared to interior trees. Dominant trees before cutting located close to the skidding trails manifested the highest growth response after cutting. This research suggests that the studied treatments are effective to enhance radial wood production of black spruce especially in younger stands, and that the edge effect must be considered in silvicultural management planning.

  10. 77 FR 58592 - Modified Norway Post Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... Modified Norway Post Agreement AGENCY: Postal Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Commission is noticing a recently-filed Postal Service request to include a modified Norway Post Agreement... existing bilateral agreement for inbound competitive services with Posten Norge AS (Modified Norway...

  11. Extraction of hemicellulosic oligosaccharides from spruce using microwave oven or steam treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Magnus; Zacchi, Guido

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the extraction of hemicellulosic oligosaccharides from spruce, using microwave or steam treatment that can be used for the production of polymers, replacing fossil-based polymers, e.g., hydrogels. The highest yield of oligosaccharides, measured as mannan, was 70% obtained with treatment in the microwave oven at 200 degrees C for 5 min. The amount of oligosaccharides extracted was 12.5 g per 100 g of dry wood. The molecular weights of some selected samples were analyzed using fast protein liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography and time-of-flight matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. Recovered oligosaccharides following steam treatment at 200 degrees C for 2 min had a mean molecular weight of 3400 g/mol with a maximum weight of 12000 g/mol. Higher severity, i.e., increased temperature (>200 degrees C) and residence time, resulted in lower mean molecular weights and yield. Oligosaccharides with higher mean molecular weights were obtained at lower severity, but the yield was considerably lower. The feasibility of using the extracted hemicellulosic oligosaccharides from spruce for the synthesis of hydrogels was demonstrated.

  12. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  13. Monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddmund Søvika

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review data on monogenic diabetes mellitus in Norway based on the Norwegian MODY Registry at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen. This registry comprises established or suspected cases of maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY referred to our laboratory for genetic testing. We also present data on neonatal diabetes, another group of monogenic diabetes. To date, we have genetically diagnosed nearly 500 MODY cases in Norway. Mutations in the HNF1A gene (MODY3 were detected in about 50% of families with clinical MODY. GCK-MODY (MODY2 was the second most prevalent type, but may be underreported. We have also found mutations in the monogenic genes ABCC8, CEL, HNF1B, HNF4A, INS, KCNJ11 and NEUROD1. Based on genetic screening in the Norwegian MODY Registry and HUNT2, we estimate the number of MODY cases in Norway to be at least 2500-5000. Founder effects may determine the geographical distribution of MODY mutations in Norway. The molecular genetic testing of MODY and neonatal diabetes is mandatory for correct diagnosis and prognosis as well as choice of therapy

  14. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  15. A Retrospective Isotopic Study of Spruce Decline in the Vosges Mountains (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poszwa, Anne [INRA Nancy, Unite Cycles Biogeochimiques (France); Wickman, Tonie [Royal Institute of Technology, Land and water resources (Sweden); Dambrine, Etienne [INRA Nancy, Unite Cycles Biogeochimiques (France)], E-mail: dambrine@nancy.inra.fr; Ferry, Bruno [ENGREF, Laboratoire d' Etude des Ressources Foret-Bois (France); Dupouey, Jean-Luc [INRA Nancy, Equipe Phytoecologie Forestiere (France); Helle, Gerdhard; Schleser, Gerdhard [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere, Juelich (Germany); Breda, Nathalie [INRA Nancy, Equipe Phytoecologie Forestiere (France)

    2003-01-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the time variation of mineral and water stress levels across the life of a declining, Mg-deficient, spruce stand, in order to clarify the factors that caused the decline. Since 1985, strong soil acidification linked to a large leaching of nitrate and base cations was measured at the study site. In 1994, 5 trees were felled and tree rings were measured and analysed for Ca, Mg, K, Sr, {sup 13}C{sup 12}C and {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotopic ratios. Strontium pools and fluxes as well as root Sr isotope ratio in relation to depth were also measured. Wood chemical concentrations and isotope ratios were strongly related to the dominance status of each tree. On average during the study period, the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio of spruce wood decreased. Using a mechanistic model computing long term variations of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio in trees and soils, we reproduced the observed trend by simulating soil acidification - increasing Sr drainage from the whole profile, and particularly from the organic horizon -, and root uptake becoming more superficial with time. Between 1952 and 1976, tree ring {delta} {sup 13}C decreased strongly and continuously, which, in addition to other factors, might be related to an increase in water stress. Thus, a decrease in rooting depth, possibly related to soil acidification, appeared as a possible cause for the long term increase in water stress. The extreme drought event of 1976 appears to have revealed and triggered the decline.

  16. Electron paramagnetic resonance and quantitative color investigations of various vacuum heat treated wood species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.I. Kondratyeva, K.R. Safiullin, I.G. Motygullin, A.V. Klochkov, M.S. Tagirov, V.V. Kuzmin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the heat treatment duration on the electron paramagnetic resonance signal amplitude of free radicals for various wood species was observed. It was found that the amplitude of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal grows linearly with the vacuum heat treatment duration. The quantitative measurements of color changes for various wood species (pine, spruce, larch, birch and small-leaved lime were performed. It is found that results of EPR experiments and color measurements of heat treated samples correlate with each other.

  17. Afforestation effects on SOC in former cropland: oak and spruce chronosequences resampled after 13 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena, Teresa G; Gundersen, Per; Vesterdal, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Chronosequences are commonly used to assess soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration after land-use change, but SOC dynamics predicted by this space-for-time substitution approach have rarely been validated by resampling. We conducted a combined chronosequence/resampling study in a former cropland area (Vestskoven) afforested with oak (Quercus robur) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) over the past 40 years. The aims of this study were (i) to compare present and previous chronosequence trends in forest floor and top mineral soil (0-25 cm) C stocks; (ii) to compare chronosequence estimates with current rates of C stock change based on resampling at the stand level; (iii) to estimate SOC changes in the subsoil (25-50 cm); and (iv) to assess the influence of two tree species on SOC dynamics. The two chronosequence trajectories for forest floor C stocks revealed consistently higher rates of C sequestration in spruce than oak. The chronosequence trajectory was validated by resampling and current rates of forest floor C sequestration decreased with stand age. Chronosequence trends in topsoil SOC in 2011 did not differ significantly from those reported in 1998, however, there was a shift from a negative rate (1998: -0.3 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) ) to no change in 2011. In contrast SOC stocks in the subsoil increased with stand age, however, not significantly (P = 0.1), suggesting different C dynamics in and below the former plough layer. Current rates of C change estimated by repeated sampling decreased with stand age in forest floors but increased in the topsoil. The contrasting temporal change in forest floor and mineral soil C sequestration rates indicate a shift in C source-sink strength after approximately 40 years. We conclude that afforestation of former cropland within the temperate region may induce soil C loss during the first decades followed by a recovery phase of yet unknown duration.

  18. Biological control of the spruce coneworm Dioryctria abietella: Spraying with Bacillus thuringiensis reduced damage in a seed orchard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weslien, Jan [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    Spraying of cones with Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki x Aizawa in a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seed orchard reduced damage by Dioryctria abietella Den. et Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae). The incidence of D. abietella attacks was about 80% among unsprayed cones, but less than 15% showed attacks among cones that had been sprayed three times at 9-day intervals with a 0.2% suspension (weight/weight) of the B. thuringiensis preparation in water (Turex 50 WP, 25 000 IU/mg). Attacked, sprayed cones had fewer D. abietella larvae per cone than attacked, unsprayed cones. Spraying did not reduce the damage by Cydia strobilella (L.) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) or by Strobilomyia anthracina Czerny (Diptera, Anthomyiidae) 13 refs, 3 tabs

  19. Fire severity unaffected by spruce beetle outbreak in spruce-fir forests in southwestern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, Robert A; Veblen, Thomas T; Harvey, Brian J; Hart, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, but few studies, particularly field studies, have addressed the effects of the severity of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) infestation on subsequent fire severity in subalpine Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forests. In Colorado, the annual area infested by spruce beetle outbreaks is rapidly rising, while MPB outbreaks are subsiding; therefore understanding this relationship is of growing importance. We collected extensive field data in subalpine forests in the eastern San Juan Mountains, southwestern Colorado, USA, to investigate whether a gray-stage (beetle infestation affected fire severity. Contrary to the expectation that bark beetle infestation alters subsequent fire severity, correlation and multivariate generalized linear regression analysis revealed no influence of pre-fire spruce beetle severity on nearly all field or remotely sensed measurements of fire severity. Findings were consistent across moderate and extreme burning conditions. In comparison to severity of the pre-fire beetle outbreak, we found that topography, pre-outbreak basal area, and weather conditions exerted a stronger effect on fire severity. Our finding that beetle infestation did not alter fire severity is consistent with previous retrospective studies examining fire activity following other bark beetle outbreaks and reiterates the overriding influence of climate that creates conditions conducive to large, high-severity fires in the subalpine zone of Colorado. Both bark beetle outbreaks and wildfires

  20. Height-Diameter Models for Mixed-Species Forests Consisting of Spruce, Fir, and Beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petráš Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Height-diameter models define the general relationship between the tree height and diameter at each growth stage of the forest stand. This paper presents generalized height-diameter models for mixed-species forest stands consisting of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst., Silver fir (Abies alba L., and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Slovakia. The models were derived using two growth functions from the exponential family: the two-parameter Michailoff and three-parameter Korf functions. Generalized height-diameter functions must normally be constrained to pass through the mean stand diameter and height, and then the final growth model has only one or two parameters to be estimated. These “free” parameters are then expressed over the quadratic mean diameter, height and stand age and the final mathematical form of the model is obtained. The study material included 50 long-term experimental plots located in the Western Carpathians. The plots were established 40-50 years ago and have been repeatedly measured at 5 to 10-year intervals. The dataset includes 7,950 height measurements of spruce, 21,661 of fir and 5,794 of beech. As many as 9 regression models were derived for each species. Although the “goodness of fit” of all models showed that they were generally well suited for the data, the best results were obtained for silver fir. The coefficient of determination ranged from 0.946 to 0.948, RMSE (m was in the interval 1.94-1.97 and the bias (m was -0.031 to 0.063. Although slightly imprecise parameter estimation was established for spruce, the estimations of the regression parameters obtained for beech were quite less precise. The coefficient of determination for beech was 0.854-0.860, RMSE (m 2.67-2.72, and the bias (m ranged from -0.144 to -0.056. The majority of models using Korf’s formula produced slightly better estimations than Michailoff’s, and it proved immaterial which estimated parameter was fixed and which parameters

  1. Wood Pyrolysis Using Aspen Plus Simulation and Industrially Applicable Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestinsky Pavel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, a great deal of experimental work has been carried out on the development of pyrolysis processes for wood and waste materials. Pyrolysis is an important phenomenon in thermal treatment of wood, therefore, the successful modelling of pyrolysis to predict the rate of volatile evolution is also of great importance. Pyrolysis experiments of waste spruce sawdust were carried out. During the experiment, gaseous products were analysed to determine a change in the gas composition with increasing temperature. Furthermore, the model of pyrolysis was created using Aspen Plus software. Aspects of pyrolysis are discussed with a description of how various temperatures affect the overall reaction rate and the yield of volatile components. The pyrolysis Aspen plus model was compared with the experimental data. It was discovered that the Aspen Plus model, being used by several authors, is not good enough for pyrolysis process description, but it can be used for gasification modelling.

  2. Animal vectors of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Ostry; Thomas H. Nicholls; D.W. French

    1983-01-01

    Describes a study to determine the importance of animals in the spread of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce. Radio telemetry, banding, and color-marking techniques were used to study vectors of this forest pathogen.

  3. The vegetation of spruce forests in the Pinega State Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Yu. Popov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Pinega Natural State Reserve is located in the Arkhangelsk Province in the northern taiga subzone. Spruce forests represent the dominant vegetation formation of its territory. The vegetation of this forest is classified, based on 192 phytosociological descriptions. It reveals 12 associations, which represent 7 groups of associations. Detailed characteristics of these syntaxa, including analysis of their biodiversity, are provided. The revealed syntaxa differ both in species composition and environmental conditions: moisture, nutrition, nitrogen availability and acidity. Most poor conditions in terms of mineral nutrition occupy sphagnous spruce forests and bilberry-dominated spruce forests, while under the richest conditions varioherbaceous, humidoherbaceous and nemoral-herbaceous spruce forests occur. The Pinega Reserve is the only locality, where the Piceetum rubo saxatilis-vacciniosum association occurs in the northern taiga subzone.

  4. The chiropractic profession in Norway 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvammen, O. C.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors...... in Norway. METHOD: Two surveys were distributed to all 530 registered chiropractors in Norway in 2011. One survey was for all chiropractors (Survey 1) and the other for clinic owners (Survey 2). Results have been reported as tables and as approximate percentages in the text for ease of reading. RESULT......: Response rates were 61% (Survey 1, N = 320) and 71% (Survey 2, N = 217). More than two-thirds of the chiropractors in Norway had been in practice for under a decade. Only one in four chiropractors worked in solo practice and the majority shared premises with at least one colleague, typically at least one...

  5. Mechanics of Wood Machining

    CERN Document Server

    Csanády, Etele

    2013-01-01

    Wood is one of the most valuable materials for mankind, and since our earliest days wood materials have been widely used. Today we have modern woodworking machine and tools; however, the raw wood materials available are continuously declining. Therefore we are forced to use this precious material more economically, reducing waste wherever possible. This new textbook on the “Mechanics of Wood Machining” combines the quantitative, mathematical analysis of the mechanisms of wood processing with practical recommendations and solutions. Bringing together materials from many sources, the book contains new theoretical and experimental approaches and offers a clear and systematic overview of the theory of wood cutting, thermal loading in wood-cutting tools, dynamic behaviour of tool and work piece, optimum choice of operational parameters and energy consumption, the wear process of the tools, and the general regularities of wood surface roughness. Diagrams are provided for the quick estimation of various process ...

  6. Fire retardants for wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatka Jirouš-Rajković

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with many advantages, wood as traditional building material also has some disadvantages. One of them is the flammability. The most usual way to improve the fire performance of wood is by treating it with fire retardants that can be applied to wood composite products during manufacture, pressure impregnated into solid wood or wood products or added as a paint or surface coating. Fire retardants are formulated to control ignition, flame spread on the wood surface and to reduce the amount of heat released from wood. Fire retardants cannot make wood non combustible. According to the European reaction-to-fire “Euroclasses”classification system for construction products, wood treated with fire retardant can meet the requirements of Euroclass B, whereas ordinary wood products typically fall into class D. This article attempts to bring together information related to the burning of wood, fire performance of wood, types of fire retardants and mechanism of fire retardancy. Fire retardant coatings and chemical impregnation by pressure-treating are described separately.

  7. Request for wood samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1977-01-01

    In recent years the wood collection at the Rijksherbarium was greatly expanded following a renewed interest in wood anatomy as an aid for solving classification problems. Staff members of the Rijksherbarium added to the collection by taking interesting wood samples with them from their expeditions (

  8. Corporatism in Denmark and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Mikkel Mailand

    2009-01-01

    The literature of corporatism tends to bypass most Scandinavian countries and ignore state-social partner relations not related to wage bargaining and income policy. This contribution attempts to overcome both these shortcomings. It concludes that corporatism is alive in Denmark and Norway....... The social partners have, as general rule, been involved in formulating and implementing changes in welfare state policies, and corporatist arrangements are also seen in relation to some industrial relations issues. The two countries share a number of contextual features important for corporatism. However...

  9. Dynamics of the 'acute yellowing' of spruce. Epidemiological and physiological evidences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandler, O.; Miller, W.; Ostner, R.

    1987-07-11

    Among the numerous different pathological conditions summarised under the popular slogan 'Waldsterben', the 'acute yellowing' of Norway spruce is the best defined syndrom. It is characterised by the yellowing of the older needle seasons, while the youngest shoots remain green until flushing in the following spring. The syndrom is restricted to soils with low Mg supply originating from silicate rocks. In this study, the dynamics of the disease was investigated over a period of 3 years by following the course of the disease in individual about 40 years old trees and by mapping more than thousand young trees in two plots with natural regeneration (Bavarian Forest; Spiegelhuette I and II) which exhibited the onset of the disease followed by a distinct spontaneous recovery of part of the population. The following results were obtained: Yellowing of the needles is accompanied by a decrease in Mg and pigment content. During pigment reduction the normal chlorphyll: carotene ratio remains almost unchanged, thus resembling the metabolically regulated pigment reduction in sun leaves rather than the direct photooxidative pigment destruction involving ozone. The latter would lead to a predominant decrease in carotene. 'Acute yellowing' causes a reduction of annual increment by about 30%, while mortality is low. All phases of 'acute yellowing' - onset, progression, stagnation, regreening - occurred in the same stands at the same time. In some cases, even neighbouring trees with overlapping root systems showed a contrary development of the disease.

  10. Morphogenetic Litter Types of Bog Spruce Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Efremova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For the first time the representation of moss litter morphogenetic structure of valley-riverside and streamside spruce forests was determined for the wetland intermountain area of Kuznetsk Alatau. In general, the litter of (green moss-hypnum spruce forest can be characterized as medium thickness (9–17 cm with high storage of organic matter (77–99 t/ha, which differs in neutral environmental conditions pH 6.8–7.0 and high percentage of ash 11–28 %. Formation litter types were identified, which depend on the content of mineral inclusions in organogenic substrate and the degree of its drainage. The differentiation of litter subhorizons was performed, visual diagnostic indicators of fermentative layers were characterized, and additional (indexes to indicate their specificity were developed. Peat- and peaty-fermentative, humified-fermentative and (black mold humus-fermentative layers were selected. Peat- and peaty-fermentative layers are characterized by content of platy peat macroaggregates of coarse vegetable composition, the presence of abundant fungal mycelium and soil animals are the primary decomposers – myriopoda, gastropoda mollusks. Humified-fermentative layers are identified by including the newly formed amorphous humus-like substances, nutty-granular structural parts of humus nature and soil animals’ humificators – enchytraeids and earthworms. (Black mold humus-fermentative layers are diagnosed by indicators with similar humified-fermentative, but differ from them in clay-humus composition of nutty-granular blue-grey parts. The nomenclature and classification of moss litter were developed on the basis of their diagnostic characteristics of fermentative layers – peat, peaty, reduced peaty, (black mold humus-peaty, reduced (black mold humus-peaty. Using the method of discriminant analysis, we revealed that the physical-chemical properties, mainly percentage of ash and decomposition degree of plant substrate, objectively

  11. INOPS Survey data report for Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Holt, Steffen

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Norway. The statistics relies on data collected in the period from April 2015 to October 2015 through an online...... survey send to managers in all 428 municipalities in Norway....

  12. Notes from Visit to Norway and Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DuanXiumin; ChangJiuqing

    2004-01-01

    At the invitation of Norway Moral Rearmament (MRA) and German Friedrich-Ebert Foundation (FES), CAFIU delegation headed by Mr. Zhu Dacheng, Vice-President of CAFIU visited Norway and Germany in the middle of May. As a member ofthe delegation,

  13. Influence of microwaves on the rate of the distillation and yield of etheric oil from the wooded greenery of conifers

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    It is known that many plants represent valuable raw materials for technological processing and that there has been an increase in the use of medicinal, aromatic and spice plants as raw materials in industry. Our research was directed toward studying the rate of the distillation and yield of etheric oils from the wooded greenery of conifers (fir, spruce, pine juniper and Douglas fir) by using a new procedure. These conifers represent an important raw material basis in this area, which could be...

  14. Severe human Babesia divergens infection in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mørch, K; Holmaas, G; Frolander, P S; Kristoffersen, E K

    2015-04-01

    Human babesiosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by ixodid ticks, and has not previously been reported in Norway. We report a case of severe babesiosis that occurred in Norway in 2007. The patient had previously undergone a splenectomy. He was frequently exposed to tick bites in an area endemic for bovine babesiosis in the west of Norway. The patient presented with severe haemolysis and multiorgan failure. Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed 30% parasitaemia with Babesia spp. He was treated with quinine in combination with clindamycin, apheresis, and supportive treatment with ventilatory support and haemofiltration, and made a complete recovery. This is the first case reported in Norway; however Babesia divergens seroprevalence in cattle in Norway is high, as is the risk of Ixodes ricinus tick bite in the general population. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained febrile haemolytic disease.

  15. Severe human Babesia divergens infection in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mørch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human babesiosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by ixodid ticks, and has not previously been reported in Norway. We report a case of severe babesiosis that occurred in Norway in 2007. The patient had previously undergone a splenectomy. He was frequently exposed to tick bites in an area endemic for bovine babesiosis in the west of Norway. The patient presented with severe haemolysis and multiorgan failure. Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed 30% parasitaemia with Babesia spp. He was treated with quinine in combination with clindamycin, apheresis, and supportive treatment with ventilatory support and haemofiltration, and made a complete recovery. This is the first case reported in Norway; however Babesia divergens seroprevalence in cattle in Norway is high, as is the risk of Ixodes ricinus tick bite in the general population. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained febrile haemolytic disease.

  16. Ethanol from wood. Cellulase enzyme production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szengyel, Zsolt

    2000-03-01

    Conversion of biomass to liquid fuels, such as ethanol, has been investigated during the past decades. First due to the oil crisis of the 1970s and lately because of concerns about greenhouse effect, ethanol has been found to be a suitable substitute for gasoline in transportation. Although ethanol is produced in large quantities from corn starch, the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol is rather problematic. However, cellulosic raw materials are important as they are available in large quantities from agriculture and forestry. One of the most extensively investigated processes is the enzymatic process, in which fungal cellulolytic enzymes are used to convert the cellulose content of the biomass to glucose, which is then fermented to ethanol. In order to make the raw material accessible to biological attack, it has to be pretreated first. The most successful method, which has been evaluated for various lignocellulosic materials, is the steam pretreatment. In this thesis the utilization of steam pretreated willow (hardwood) and spruce (softwood) was examined for enzyme production using a filamentous fungus T. reesei RUT C30. Various carbon sources originating from the steam pretreated materials have been investigated. The replacement of the solid carbon source with a liquid carbon source, as well as the effect of pH, was studied. The effect of toxic compounds generated during pretreatment was also examined. Comparative study of softwood and hardwood showed that steam pretreated hardwood is a better carbon source than softwood. The hydrolytic potential of enzyme solutions produced on wood derived carbon sources was better compared to commercial cellulases. Also enzyme solutions produced on steam pretreated spruce showed less sensitivity towards toxic compounds formed during steam pretreatment.

  17. Development of local and regional forest based bioenergy in Norway – supply networks, financial support and political commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Forbord, Magnar; Vik, Jostein; Hillring, Bengt Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores reasons of growth of new bioenergy firms in Norway. Norwegian authorities have a stated goal of doubling the use of bioenergy by 2020, as a way of developing the renewable energy sector and providing opportunities for rural employment. However studies shows that there are difficulties concerning the profitability in the sector. We approach the question from a supply chain perspective using a comparative case method. Five cases of local and regional forest based (wood chips...

  18. Measuring spectral effects of calcium fertilization in the red spruce foliage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, W. R.; Rock, B. N.; Hallett, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Acidic precipitation has altered biogeochemical cycles in the forests of the Northeastern U.S., and has lead to an interest in the decline symptomology of tree species affected as a result of these changes. For instance, in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) stands, leaching losses of calcium (Ca) may hamper root uptake capacities, wood structural properties, and tolerance of low temperature. The Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) is currently the site of a long-term Ca investigation, where an entire watershed was fertilized with wollastonite (CaSiO3) at the rate of 0.12 kg ha-1 in 1999. Preliminary data confirm that Ca-treated spruce foliage is higher in total foliar Ca as compared to foliage from trees in a reference watershed. Total foliar Ca concentration, as well as that of a bound Ca-oxalate pool, increase with needle age class. In order to test the utility of hyperspectral instruments for differentiating conifer stands of varying Ca availability, we used a Visible/Infrared Intelligent Spectrometer to measure reflectance spectra of fresh red spruce needles from trees at both Ca-amended and reference sites. Needles from Ca-amended sites were characterized by higher percent reflectance of incident radiation. Differences in spectral indices of needle health were apparent mostly in mixed-needle-year boughs (MNY), as opposed to current-year (CY), or third-year (3Y) needle classes. The Ca-amended spectra of MNY boughs had an average green peak of 7.32 ± 0.29 percent, while reference samples had a green peak of 6.37 ± 0.20 percent. The Red-edge Inflection Point (REIP) of MNY boughs was lower in Ca-amended than in reference treatments, occurring at 725.7 ± 0.7 nm and 727.3 ± 0.6 nm, respectively. The ratio of simulated Landsat band measurements (TM 5/4) of Ca-treated MNY needles was 0.440 ± 0.007, while that of reference was 0.421 ± 0.008.

  19. Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012 contains statistics on Norway and main figures for the Nordic countries and other countries selected from international statistics. The international over-views are integrated with the other tables and figures. The selection of tables in this edition is mostly the same as in the 2011 edition. The yearbook's 480 tables and figures present the main trends in official statistics in most areas of society. The list of tables and figures and an index at the back of the book provide easy access to relevant information. In addition, source information and Internet addresses below the tables make the yearbook a good starting point for those who are looking for more detailed statistics. The statistics are based on data gathered in statistical surveys and from administrative data, which, in cooperation with other public institutions, have been made available for statistical purposes. Some tables have been prepared in their entirety by other public institutions. The statistics follow approved principles, standards and classifications that are in line with international recommendations and guidelines. Content: 00. General subjects; 01. Environment; 02. Population; 03. Health and social conditions; 04. Education; 05. Personal economy and housing conditions; 06. Labour market; 07. Recreational, cultural and sporting activities; 08. Prices and indices; 09. National Economy and external trade; 10. Industrial activities; 11. Financial markets; 12. Public finances; Geographical survey.(eb)

  20. Excess growing-season water limits lowland black spruce productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, S.; Kolka, R. K.; Bolstad, P. V.; Gill, K.; Curzon, M.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The annual growth of many tree species is limited by water availability, with growth increasing as water becomes less scarce. In lowland bogs of northern Minnesota, however, black spruce (Picea mariana) is often exposed to excess water via high water table elevations. These trees grow in thick deposits of organic mucky peat and often have shallow rooting systems to avoid the complete submersion of roots in water. While it is generally believed that black spruce decrease growth rates with rising water table elevations, this hypothesis has not been tested in situ. We used a unique, 50-year record of daily bog water table elevations at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) in northern Minnesota to investigate the relationship between climate and black spruce productivity. Nine 1/20th ha circular plots were established in five different bogs and tree height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), and crown class were recorded. Additionally, two perpendicular cores were collected on all trees greater than 10 cm diameter-at-breast-height. Tree cores were sanded, mounted, cross-dated, and de-trended according to standard dendrochronological procedures. Ring width measurements were correlated with precipitation, temperature, and water table elevation using package BootRes in R to determine the climatic variables most associated with stand level productivity. Across the different plots, we found that early growing season water table elevation (May and June) was negatively correlated with both individual and stand-level black spruce growth (p productivity of black spruce.

  1. An Investigation of Consolidants Penetration in Wood. Part 2: FTIR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina TIMAR

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available FTIR spectroscopy was used in this work for studying the penetration of some consolidants frequentlyused in old wood conservation into test pieces of sound spruce wood (Picea abies wood. Thin microsections(30-60 μm of control and treated wood were analysed in reflectance mode using an ATR system. Theconsolidation products investigated were Paraloid B72, bee wax, a mixture of bee wax / linseed oil and twotypes of paraffins. These products presented FTIR spectra with characteristic common and specific bands,allowing their identification in the treated wood with no impediments coming from their colour, transparencyor the percent of cell lumena filling. The treatment of wood with these products brought about alterations ofthe spectra aspect by the appearance or intensification of some characteristic bands and the modification ofthe ratio between the areas of some characteristic absorption bands so that a qualitative and semiquantitativeevaluation of the presence and penetration depth and distribution of these consolidationproducts in wood was possible, proving the adopted method as valuable and useful for further research inthis field.

  2. COLOR CHANGE — MASS LOSS CORRELATION FOR HEAT-TREATED WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinela Olarescu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat treatment is renowned as the most environmentally friendly process of dimensional stabilization that can be applied to wood, in order to make it suitable for outdoor uses. It also darkens wood color and improves wood durability. The intensity of heat treatment can be appreciated by means of two parameters: the color change occured in wood due to the high temperature, and the mass loss, which is a measure of the degree of thermal degradation. In order to find a mathematical correlation between these two parameters, an experimental study was conducted with four European wood species, which were heat-treated at 180°C and 200ºC, for 1-3 hours, under atmosheric pressure.The paper presents the results concerning the color changes and mass losses recorded for the heat-treated wood samples compared to untreated wood.  For all four species, the dependency between the color change and the mass loss was found to be best described by a logarithmic regression equation with R2 of 0.93 to 0.99 for the soft species (spruce, pine and lime, and R2 of 0.77 for beech. The results of this study envisage to simplify the assessment procedure of the heat treatment efficiency, by only measuring the color – a feature that is both convenient and cost-effective. 

  3. Whole-cell biosensor of cellobiose and application to wood decay detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Maxime; Bontemps, Cyril; Besserer, Arnaud; Hotel, Laurence; Gérardin, Philippe; Leblond, Pierre

    2016-12-10

    Fungal biodegradation of wood is one of the main threats regarding its use as a material. So far, the detection of this decaying process is empirically assessed by loss of mass, when the fungal attack is advanced and woody structure already damaged. Being able to detect fungal attack on wood in earlier steps is thus of special interest for the wood economy. In this aim, we designed here a new diagnostic tool for wood degradation detection based on the bacterial whole-cell biosensor technology. It was designed in diverting the soil bacteria Streptomyces CebR sensor system devoted to cellobiose detection, a cellulolytic degradation by-product emitted by lignolytic fungi since the onset of wood decaying process. The conserved regulation scheme of the CebR system among Streptomyces allowed constructing a molecular tool easily transferable in different strains or species and enabling the screen for optimal host strains for cellobiose detection. Assays are performed in microplates using one-day culture lysates. Diagnostic is performed within one hour by a spectrophotometric measuring of the cathecol deshydrogenase activity. The selected biosensor was able to detect specifically cellobiose at concentrations similar to those measured in decaying wood and in a spruce leachate attacked by a lignolytic fungus, indicating a high potential of applicability to detect ongoing wood decay process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Importance of Measuring Mercury in Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y.; Yanai, R. D.; Driscoll, C. T.; Montesdeoca, M.

    2014-12-01

    Forests are important receptors of Hg deposition, and biological Hg hotspots occur mainly in forested regions, but few efforts have been made to determine the Hg content of trees. Mercury concentrations in stem tissue are lower than the foliage and bark, so low that they have often been below detection limits, especially in hardwood species. However, because wood is the largest component of forest biomass, it can be a larger Hg pool than the foliage, and thus quantifying concentrations in wood is important to Hg budgets in forests. The objective of our study was to determine the methods necessary to detect Hg in bole wood of four tree species, including two hardwoods and two conifers. We also evaluated the effect of air-drying and oven-drying samples on Hg recovery, compared to freeze-drying samples prior to analysis, which is the standard procedure. Many archived wood samples that were air-dried or oven-dried could be appropriate for Hg analysis if these methods could be validated; few are freeze-dried. We analyzed samples for total Hg using thermal decomposition, catalytic conversion, amalgamation, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Method 7473, USEPA 1998). The result of the method detection limit study was 1.27 ng g-1, based on apple leaf standards (NIST 1515, 44 ± 4 ng/g). Concentrations in the hardwood species were 1.48 ± 0.23 ng g-1 for sugar maple and 1.75 ± 0.14 ng g-1 for American beech. Concentrations were higher in red spruce and balsam fir. Samples that were analyzed fresh, freeze-dried, or oven-dried at 65 ˚C were in close agreement, after correcting for moisture content. However, Hg concentrations were 34 to 45% too high in the air-dry samples, presumably reflecting absorption from the atmosphere, and they were 44 to 66% too low in the samples oven-dried at 103 ˚C, presumably due to volatilization. We recommend that samples be freeze-dried or oven-dried at 65 ˚C for analysis of Hg in wood; archived samples that have been oven-dried at

  5. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phenology is considered one of the most robust indicators of the biological impacts of global change. In temperate and boreal regions, long-term data show that rising temperatures are advancing spring onset (e.g. budburst and flowering) and delaying autumn senescence (e.g. leaf coloration and leaf fall) in a wide range of ecosystems. While warm and cold temperatures, day length and insolation, precipitation and water availability, and other factors, have all been shown to influence plant phenology, the future response of phenology to rising temperatures and elevated CO2 still remains highly uncertain because of the challenges associated with conducting realistic manipulative experiments to simulate future environmental conditions. At the SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) experiment in the north-central United States, experimental temperature (0 to +9° C above ambient) and CO2 (ambient and elevated) treatments are being applied to mature, and intact, Picea mariana-Sphagnum spp. bog communities in their native habitat through the use of ten large (approximately 12 m wide, 10 m high) open-topped enclosures. We are tracking vegetation green-up and senescence in these chambers, at both the individual and whole-community level, using repeat digital photography. Within each chamber, digital camera images are recorded every 30 minutes and uploaded to the PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) project web page, where they are displayed in near-real-time. Image processing is conducted nightly to extract quantitative measures of canopy color, which we characterize using Gcc, the green chromatic coordinate. Data from a camera mounted outside the chambers (since November 2014) indicate strong seasonal variation in Gcc for both evergreen shrubs and trees. Shrub Gcc rises steeply in May and June, and declines steeply in September and October. By comparison, tree Gcc rises gradually from March through June, and declines gradually from

  6. Psychological factors in the diffusion of sustainable technology: a study of Norwegian households' adoption of wood pellet heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopha, Bertha Maya; Kloeckner, Christian A.

    2010-07-01

    Full text: This paper aims to understand the determinants of the adoption of wood pellet technology for home heating to identify possible strategies towards the slow diffusion of wood pellet in Norway. A mail survey of 737 Norwegian households was conducted in 2008, involving wood pellet adopters and non wood pellet adopters as respondents. An integrated model combining psychological factors (such as intentions, attitudes, perceived behavioral control, habits and norms), perceived wood pellet heating characteristics, and ecological and basic values is applied to predict the installation of a wood pellet stove retrospectively. Results from a path analysis gain empirical support for the proposed integrated model. Wood pellet heating adoption is mainly predicted by a deliberate decision process starting with the evaluation of heating system characteristics, mediated by attitudes and intentions. Perceived behavioural control and habits pose relevant barriers to the adoption process. The influence of norms and values are indirect and only minor in the given market conditions. The most important heating system characteristics in the analysis were perceived functional reliability and perceived installation and maintenance costs. Possible intervention strategies to speed up wood pellet adoption in Norway are discussed in the last part of the paper. (Author)

  7. The structure of spruce-fir tree stands mortality under impact of the Middle Ural copper smelter emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Bergman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of industrial pollution on mortality values (dead fallen wood and dead standing trees and its distribution by degrees of decomposition were investigated in spruce-fir forest stands in the vicinity of the Middle Ural copper smelter (the city of Revda, Sverdlovsk region. The total mortality and mortality in each size category did not depend on the distance to the source of pollution. At the same time, the amount of dead fallen wood was significantly greater (1.9 times in the polluted area (2 and 4 km from the smelter as compared with the background territory (30 km from the smelter. Mortality proportion out of the total number of the trees (both live and dead did not differ significantly between the sites, although this parameter tended to increase nearer the smelter. The distribution of mortality by size categories revealed significant differences between background territory and site with average level of contamination, as well as background territory and highly contaminated site. Observed differences are associated with an increased proportion of lesser mortality near the smelter (by 15 % and 12 % as compared with areas of background and middle levels of contamination, respectively, as well as because of double-declining of medium- and large-sized mortality near the smelter. The distribution of the living tree stands by size categories also has a connection with level of contamination. The average diameters of the living tree stand and the elements of coarse woody debris (dead fallen wood and dead standing trees do not differ significantly between sites with different levels of contamination. For the small-sized dead fallen wood, the proportion of weakly decomposed stems increased with the level of pollution, while proportion of strongly decomposed stems decreased. The distribution of medium- and large-sized dead fallen wood on the stages of decomposition does not vary between sites with different levels of pollution.

  8. Particulate emissions from the combustion of birch, beech, and spruce logs cause different cytotoxic responses in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasurinen, Stefanie; Jalava, Pasi I; Happo, Mikko S; Sippula, Olli; Uski, Oskari; Koponen, Hanna; Orasche, Jürgen; Zimmermann, Ralf; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta

    2017-05-01

    According to the World Health Organization particulate emissions from the combustion of solid fuels caused more than 110,000 premature deaths worldwide in 2010. Log wood combustion is the most prevalent form of residential biomass heating in developed countries, but it is unknown how the type of wood logs used in furnaces influences the chemical composition of the particulate emissions and their toxicological potential. We burned logs of birch, beech and spruce, which are used commonly as firewood in Central and Northern Europe in a modern masonry heater, and compared them to the particulate emissions from an automated pellet boiler fired with softwood pellets. We determined the chemical composition (elements, ions, and carbonaceous compounds) of the particulate emissions with a diameter of less than 1 µm and tested their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, inflammatory potential, and ability to induce oxidative stress in a human lung epithelial cell line. The chemical composition of the samples differed significantly, especially with regard to the carbonaceous and metal contents. Also the toxic effects in our tested endpoints varied considerably between each of the three log wood combustion samples, as well as between the log wood combustion samples and the pellet combustion sample. The difference in the toxicological potential of the samples in the various endpoints indicates the involvement of different pathways of toxicity depending on the chemical composition. All three emission samples from the log wood combustions were considerably more toxic in all endpoints than the emissions from the pellet combustion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1487-1499, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Lignification and tension wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilate, Gilles; Chabbert, Brigitte; Cathala, Bernard; Yoshinaga, Arata; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Laurans, Françoise; Lapierre, Catherine; Ruel, Katia

    2004-01-01

    Hardwood trees are able to reorient their axes owing to tension wood differentiation. Tension wood is characterised by important ultrastructural modifications, such as the occurrence in a number of species, of an extra secondary wall layer, named gelatinous layer or G-layer, mainly constituted of cellulose microfibrils oriented nearly parallel to the fibre axis. This G-layer appears directly involved in the definition of tension wood mechanical properties. This review gathers the data available in the literature about lignification during tension wood formation. Potential roles for lignin in tension wood formation are inferred from biochemical, anatomical and mechanical studies, from the hypotheses proposed to describe tension wood function and from data coming from new research areas such as functional genomics.

  10. Evaluation of energy efficient techniques in the wood working and wood processing industry. Final report THERMIE - Action no. DIS-0059-95-DE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhammer, W.; Digutsch, O.; Frey, G. v. [and others

    1997-05-01

    With the entrance of Austria, Finland and Sweden in the European Union beginning of 1995 the pattern of industrial energy consumption has changed considerably in some branches which are large energy consumers in the Northern countries. The wood working and wood processing industry is one of those branches. It comprises the preparation of wood from primary processing in sawmills up to the production of finished products, and is highly energy-intensive although to a somewhat smaller extent than the large energy consumers such as the iron and steel production or glass manufacturing. It can further be assumed that official statistics underestimate the real importance of the energy consumption in the wood sector because most official statistics do not indicate waste wood as a fuel. Waste wood is a renewable fuel and has as such not the same impact in terms of CO{sub 2}-emissions as fossil fuels. Nevertheless, renewable energy sources should be also used efficiently because they can replace fossil fuels for other purposes. The objective of this study on the wood sector were to analyse and summarise the present status of energy consumption in the fifteen countries of the EU and the two EFTA countries Norway and Switzerland, to evaluate present day energy technology in the wood industry, and to investigate existing application barriers to these techniques in order to inform, support and to motivate small and medium-sized companies in particular, thus simulating the wide spread use of such techniques. (orig./SR)

  11. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust parame...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  12. Determination of material properties of violin tone wood using electronic holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgela, Stanislav; Saldner, Henrik O.

    1994-11-01

    Four pieces of halved blank for violin making, two cut from tone spruce wood and two from maple wood, have been investigated. The method used for determination of the elasticity constants of the wooden plates is based on the knowledge of eigenfrequencies and shapes of the first few vibration modes. The electronic holography system visualizes the time-average interferograms in real-time. The electro-optical measurements are supported by the separation of eigenmodes electroacoustically. The frequencies are compared with the results of the Chladni method and a measurement of frequency responses. The obtained knowledge can be helpful for the selection of wood plates before they are used in a production process.

  13. Monitoring of hydroxyl groups in wood during heat treatment using NIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Katsuya; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of thermally treated wood by near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. In the NIR second derivative spectrum, the absorption band at 6913 cm(-1) appeared with the procession of heat treatment, which conclusively assigned to the phenolic hydroxyl groups due to the lignin in comparison with the spectrum of acetylated spruce wood. As a result of the changes in the ratio of the areal integral calculated from spectral separation in the region of hydroxyl groups (7200-6100 cm(-1)) by the Gauss-Newton method, it was clear that the degradation of hydroxyl group in the cellulose started predominantly from the amorphous region and followed to semicrystalline and crystalline region. There was an obvious correlation between the weight decrement of wood and the decrement of hydroxyl groups in the cellulose by heat treatment.

  14. Overstory Tree Mortality in Ponderosa Pine and Spruce-Fir Ecosystems Following a Drought in Northern New Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P. Oswald

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought-caused tree dieback is an issue around the world as climates change and many areas become dryer and hotter. A drought from 1998–2004 resulted in a significant tree dieback event in many of the wooded areas in portions of the Jemez Mountains and the adjacent Pajarito Plateau in northern New Mexico. The objectives of this study were to evaluate and quantify the differences in tree mortality before and after a recent drought in ponderosa pine and spruce-fir ecosystems, and to assess the effect of mechanical thinning on ponderosa pine mortality. Significant increases in mortality were observed in the unthinned ponderosa pine ecosystem. Mortality varied significantly between species and within size classes. Mechanical thinning of ponderosa pines reduced overstory mortality to non-significant levels. A lack of rainfall, snowfall, and increases in daily minimum temperature contributed most to the mortality. Adaptive management, including the use of thinning activities, appear to moderate the impact of climate change on ponderosa pine forests in this region, increasing the long-term health of the ecosystem. The impact of climate change on the spruce-fir ecosystems may accelerate successional changes.

  15. Research of the effect of saw blade set dullness on the dimensions of longitudinally cut fir and spruce slats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svrzić Uroš

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the problem of choosing the best way of operating and maintaining a set of circular saws intended for longitudinal processing. The study objective was the analysis of current procedures of tools usage and recommendations for their improvement, in order to achieve better quality and longer operating life of tools. The tested set (24+5 blades was mounted on multisaw blade machine which produces slats from fir or spruce planks for three-layer parquet. Changes in thickness of sawed slats, operation time between two sharpenings and blade size changes after removing saw blades from machine and aftesharpening, were monitored. Control x-charts were used for stability evaluation. Work quality of saw blade set for longitudinal cut of fir and spruce planks was presented by cost-effectiveness ratio, ratio of total costs (for purchase of set and its servicing and volume of sawed timber. The saw blade set did not reach the targeted coefficient based on the previous tests. After each sharpening, the set had a different persistence presented in time, and we could not determine the work dynamics. The persistence of saw blade set was affected by wood resin that accumulates on the saw blade surface, the method and angles of sharpening, work dynamics and the continuity of cutting.

  16. Response of Lutz, Sitka, and white spruce to attack by Dendroctonus rufipennis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) and blue stain fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Werner; Barbara L. Illman

    1994-01-01

    Mechanical wounding and wounding plus inoculation with a blue-stain fungus, Leptographium abietinum (Peck), associated with the spruce beetle, Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby), caused an induced reaction zone or lesion around the wound sites in Lutz spruce, Picea lutzii Little, Sitka spruce, P. sitchensis (Bong.) Carr., and white spruce, P. glauca (Moench) Voss, in...

  17. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  18. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.;

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  19. Evaluation of Research in Engineering Science in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Brussel, Hendrik Van Brussel; Lindberg, Bengt; Cederwall, Klas

    This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway .......This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway ....

  20. Determination of chemical changes in heat-treated wood using ATR-FTIR and FT Raman spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgenç, Özlem; Durmaz, Sefa; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki; Eksi-Kocak, Haslet

    2017-01-01

    In this study, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Fourier-transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy techniques were used to determine changes in the chemical structure of heat-treated woods. For this purpose, scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), oriental beech (Fagus orientalis L.), and oriental spruce (Picea orientalis L.) wood species were heat-treated at different temperatures. The effect of chemical changes on the FT-Raman and ATR-FTIR bands or ratios of heat-treated wood was related with the OH association of cellulose, functional groups, and the aromatic system of lignin. The effects of heat treatment on the carbohydrate and lignin peaks varied depending on the wood species. The spectral changes that occurred after heat treatment reflected the progress of the condensation reaction of lignin. Degradation of hemicelluloses led to a decrease in free hydroxyl groups. High temperature caused crystalline cellulose to increase due to the degradation of amorphous cellulose.

  1. Climate-induced mortality of spruce stands in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  2. Climate-Induced Mortality of Spruce Stands in Belarus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  3. Thermal degradations of wood biofuels, coals and hydrolysis lignin from the Russian Federation: Experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Evgeniya; Chernov, Aleksandr; Maryandyshev, Pavel; Brillard, Alain; Kehrli, Damaris; Trouvé, Gwenaëlle; Lyubov, Viktor; Brilhac, Jean-François

    2016-10-01

    The thermal degradation of wood biofuels (spruce, pine), of coals from different fields of the Russian Federation and of hydrolysis lignin is investigated using a thermogravimetric analyzer under different heating conditions and under non-oxidative or oxidative atmospheres. The samples are indeed submitted to a linear temperature ramp of 10K/min or to a temperature ramp of 200K/min up to a residence temperature between 250 and 450°C where they are maintained during 4h (isothermal conditions). The values of the kinetic parameters are determined for these different samples in both thermal conditions, either using the differential isoconversional method or by means of an Extended Independent Parallel Reaction (EIPR) model. The values of the kinetic parameters obtained with this EIPR model for spruce trunk are also compared with that of its main constituents (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mammography activity in Norway 1983 to 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Braaten, Tonje; Njor, Sisse H

    2011-01-01

    In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact of the p......In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact...... of the program on breast cancer mortality in Norway....

  5. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles ( coleoptera: scolytidae') in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsten, E.H.; Werner, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of the study, the authors do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central Alaska.

  6. Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-16

    This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

  7. Mineralization of fossil wood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, P.

    1972-01-01

    Several pieces of fossil wood have been analyzed with X-ray diffraction and were grouped on the basis of mineralogical composition. Various mineralizations were studied in thin sections and by means of the scanning electron microscope. Wood-opals appear to show a structure preservation that points t

  8. Wood supply and demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter J. Ince; David B. McKeever

    2011-01-01

    At times in history, there have been concerns that demand for wood (timber) would be greater than the ability to supply it, but that concern has recently dissipated. The wood supply and demand situation has changed because of market transitions, economic downturns, and continued forest growth. This article provides a concise overview of this change as it relates to the...

  9. Heat sterilization of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang

    2010-01-01

    Two important questions should be considered in heat sterilizing solid wood materials: First, what temperature–time regime is required to kill a particular pest? Second, how much time is required to heat the center of any wood configuration to the kill temperature? The entomology research on the first question has facilitated the development of international standards...

  10. Energy Norway 2011; Energi Norge 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Whereas in the beginning of 2011 was directed much attention to the record low rainfall and record high energy prices, the end of the year was characterized by quite different disturbances. Powerful storms in many parts of the country led to much debate about the security of supply. The whole year has Energy Norway worked to highlight the need for further network expansion both in Norway and to Norway. Renewable energy can only be used when it is transported to where it is needed. In 2011, the new players in the energy debate in partnership with the industry pointed to the significant challenges that slow licensing procedures for network and production facilities represent for society. Through the launch of A green thread Energy Norway sat focus on electricity as clean energy carrier and its unique role in a low carbon society. Read more about our work in the annual report.(eb)

  11. Saproxylic and non-saproxylic beetle assemblages in boreal spruce forests of different age and forestry intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim; Hilszczański, Jacek; Dynesius, Mats

    2010-12-01

    Current clear-cutting forestry practices affect many boreal organisms negatively, and those dependent on dead wood (saproxylics) are considered as particularly vulnerable. The succession of species assemblages in managed forest habitats regenerating after clear-cutting is, however, poorly known. We compared beetle assemblages in three successional stages of managed boreal spruce forests established after clear-cutting and two types of older spruce forests that had not been clear-cut. We also assessed whether saproxylic and non-saproxylic beetle assemblages show similar biodiversity patterns among these forest types. Beetles were collected in window traps in nine study areas, each encompassing a protected old-growth forest (mean forest age approximately 160 years, mean dead wood volume 34 m3/ha), an unprotected mature forest (approximately 120 years old, 15 m3/ha), a middle-aged commercially thinned forest (53 years old, 3 m3/ha), a young unthinned forest (30 years old, 4 m3/ha), and a clearcut (5-7 years after harvest, 11 m3/ha). Saproxylic beetles, in particular red-listed species, were more abundant and more species rich in older forest types, whereas no significant differences among forest types in these variables were detected for non-saproxylics. The saproxylic assemblages were clearly differentiated; with increasing forest age, assemblage compositions gradually became more similar to those of protected old-growth forests, but the assemblage composition in thinned forests could not be statistically distinguished from those of the two oldest forest types. Many saproxylic beetles adapted to late-successional stages were present in thinned middle-aged forests but absent from younger unthinned forests. In contrast, non-saproxylics were generally more evenly distributed among the five forest types, and the assemblages were mainly differentiated between clearcuts and forested habitats. The saproxylic beetle assemblages of unprotected mature forests were very similar

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopic monitoring of the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in wood. Part II: hardwood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchikawa, Satoru; Siesler, H W

    2003-06-01

    Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) transmission spectroscopy was applied to monitor the diffusion process of deuterium-labeled molecules in hardwood (Beech). The results are compared with previous data obtained on softwood (Sitka spruce) in order to consistently understand the state of order in cellulose of wood. The saturation accessibility and diffusion rate varied characteristically with the OH groups in different states of order in the wood substance, the diffusants, and the wood species, respectively. The variation of saturation accessibility should be associated with the fundamental difference of the fine structure such as the microfibrils in the wood substance. The effect of the anatomical cellular structure on the accessibility was reflected in the variation of the diffusion rate with the wood species. The size effect of the diffusants also played an important role for the diffusion process in wood. Since the volumetric percentage of wood fibers and wood rays is relatively similar, the dichroic effects due to the anisotropy of the cellulose chains were apparently diminished. Finally, we proposed a new interpretation of the fine structure of the microfibrils in the cell wall by comparing a series of results from hardwood and softwood. Each elementary fibril in the hardwood has a more homogeneous arrangement in the microfibrils compared to that in the softwood.

  13. Structure, development and health status of spruce forests affected by air pollution in the western Krkonoše Mts. in 1979–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Král Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure and health status of waterlogged or peaty spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst. forests in the summit parts of the Krkonoše Mts. in the Czech Republic were studied in 1979–2014. The objective was to evaluate the stand structure, dead wood, trend of the health status and productivity on four permanent research plots (PRP in relation to air pollution (SO2 and NOx concentrations and climatic conditions (temperatures and precipitation amounts. Stand structure was evaluated on the base of the measured parameters of individual trees on PRP. The health status of trees was evaluated according to foliage, and their vitality was assessed according to their radial growth documented by dendrochronological analyses. The radial growth was negatively correlated with SO2 and NOx concentrations. Stand dynamics during the observation period was characterised by increased tree mortality, the presence of dead wood and reduction of stand density from 1983 to 1992, while the most severe impairment of health status and stand stability occurred in 1982–1987. The foliage mass of living trees has been gradually increasing since 1988, but no pronounced improvement of tree vitality was documented after the decrease in SO2 concentration. However, particularly physiologically weakened spruce trees were attacked by the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus. The process of forest damage is manifested not only by foliage reduction but also by symptoms of various necroses on the assimilatory organs. In terms of climatic data, the weather in April had the most important effect on radial growth. Diameter increment showed positive statistically significant correlation with temperature in growing season, but the precipitation effect was low.

  14. Animal damage to young spruce and fir in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton M. Blum

    1977-01-01

    The loss of terminal buds on small balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) and spruce (Picea spp.) trees because of nipping by mammals or birds has increased on the Penobscot Experimental Forest in recent years. The cut stem is smooth and slightly angled; there is no sign of tearing. Unnipped trees grew about 13 percent more than...

  15. The New England Spruce-Fir Seed Orchard Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter B. Gibbs; James B. Carlaw

    1973-01-01

    I once heard it said that if you want to know how something was organized, ask a man who had nothing to do with it. I suspect this may be one of the reasons I was asked to collaborate on this report of the development of the New England Spruce-Fir Seed Orchard Program.

  16. On mycorrhiza development of spruces and firs in damaged stands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, T.; Weber, G.; Kottke, I.; Oberwinkler, F.

    1989-02-01

    The authors studied the very fine roots of sick spruces and firs and established the following: 1. a surprising stability of mycorrhiza development, 2. differences in the dynamism of development and 3. modifications in the composition of the accompanying microfungi. The results suggest connections in the chain of causes of forest disease which have received little attention so far.

  17. Yield model for unthinned Sitka spruce plantations in Ireland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omiyale, O.; Joyce, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Over the past few decades the construction of yield models, has progressed from the graphical through mathematical and biomathematic approach. The development of a biomathematical growth model for Sitka spruce plantations is described. It is suggested that this technique can serve as a basis for general yield model construction of plantation species in Ireland. (Refs. 15).

  18. Drought induces spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreaks across northwestern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sarah J; Veblen, Thomas T; Eisenhart, Karen S; Jarvis, Daniel; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2014-04-01

    This study examines influences of climate variability on spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) outbreak across northwestern Colorado during the period 1650 2011 CE. Periods of broad-scale outbreak reconstructed using documentary records and tree rings were dated to 1843-1860, 1882-1889, 1931-1957, and 2004-2010. Periods of outbreak were compared with seasonal temperature, precipitation, vapor pressure deficit (VPD), the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), and indices of ocean-atmosphere oscillation that include the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). Classification trees showed that outbreaks can be predicted most successfully from above average annual AMO values and above average summer VPD values, indicators of drought across Colorado. Notably, we find that spruce beetle outbreaks appear to be predicted best by interannual to multidecadal variability in drought, not by temperature alone. This finding may imply that spruce beetle outbreaks are triggered by decreases in host tree defenses, which are hypothesized to occur with drought stress. Given the persistence of the AMO, the shift to a positive AMO phase in the late 1990s is likely to promote continued spruce beetle disturbance.

  19. Physiological and environmental causes of freezing injury in red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Donald H. DeHayes

    2000-01-01

    For many, concerns about the implications of "environmental change" conjure up scenarios of forest responses to global warming, enrichment of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and the northward migration of maladapted forests. From that perspective, the primary focus of this chapter, that is, causes of freezing injury to red spruce (

  20. Energy use in Norway: An international perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unander, F.F.; Alm, L.K.; Schipper, L.

    1997-06-01

    The report examines the evolution of the structure and intensity of energy use in the main sectors of the Norwegian economy such as manufacturing, residential sector, services, and transport. The development in Norway is contrasted and compared to that in nine other countries such as Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Germany, U.K., France, Italy, United States, and Japan. The results show that Norway per capita energy use (excluding energy use in petroleum production) in 1992, after USA and Finland, was the highest of the 10 OECD countries being studied. Together with Finland, Norway showed the strongest growth in energy use per capita from 1973 to 1992. Some of the increased energy use in Norway can be attributed to more energy intensive structure and higher activity levels in the Norwegian economy. If the effect from changes in these two factors is excluded by holding the activity and structure in each sector constant at its 1973-level and only vary sub-sectorial energy intensities, Norway is still the country with the least reduction in energy intensities over the period from 1973 to 1992. Important underlying reasons in the same period are caused by increased indoor comfort level and the availability of both low-cost hydro power and biomass resources partly sheltering Norway from the impact of higher oil prices. 12 refs., 47 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Laser Treatment of Wood Surfaces for Ski Cores: An Experimental Parameter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Petutschnigg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the production of skis with wooden cores has increased due to changes in customer awareness concerning ecological issues and rising raw material costs for mineral oil resources. The preparation of ski surfaces is one of the main expense factors in the production of skis. Thus, one perspective of the AMER SPORTS CORPORATION is to treat wood surfaces with laser beams to develop new aesthetic possibilities in ski design. This study deals with different laser treatments for samples from various wood species: beech, ash, lime, and spruce. The parameters investigated are laser beam intensity and number of laser points on the surface. To evaluate the aesthetic changes, the CIELab color measurements were applied. Changes in the main wood components were observed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR using an ATR (attenuated total reflectance unit. The results show that the laser treatments on wood surfaces have an influence on wood color and the chemical composition. Especially the intensity of laser beams affects the color changes in different patterns for the parameters observed. These findings will be useful to develop innovative design possibilities of wood surfaces for ski cores as well as for further product design applications (e.g., mass customization.

  2. Carbonaceous aerosols at urban influenced sites in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Yttri

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known regarding levels and source strength of carbonaceous aerosols in Scandinavia. In the present study, ambient aerosol (PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations of elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, water-insoluble organic carbon (WINSOC, and water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC are reported for a curbside site, an urban background site, and a suburban site in Norway in order to investigate their spatial and seasonal variations. Aerosol filter samples were collected using tandem filter sampling to correct for the positive sampling artefact introduced by semi volatile OC. Analyses were performed using the thermal optical transmission (TOT instrument from Sunset Lab Inc., which corrects for charring during analysis. Finally, we estimated the relative contribution of OC from wood burning based on the samples content of levoglucosan.

    Levels of EC varied by more than one order of magnitude between sites, likely due to the higher impact of vehicular traffic at the curbside and the urban background sites. In winter, the level of particulate organic carbon (OCp at the suburban site was equal to (for PM10 or even higher (for PM2.5 than the levels observed at the curbside and the urban background sites. This finding was attributed to the impact of residential wood burning at the suburban site in winter, which was confirmed by a high mean concentration of levoglucosan (407 ng m−3. This finding indicates that exposure to primary combustion derived OCp could be equally high in residential areas as in a city center. It is demonstrated that OCp from wood burning (OCwood accounted for almost all OCp at the suburban site in winter, allowing a new estimate of the ratio TCp/levoglucosan for both PM10 and PM2.5. Particulate carbonaceous material (PCM = Organic matter + Elemental matter accounted for 46–83

  3. Modelling soil temperature and moisture and corresponding seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal spruce ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of photosynthesis and transpiration is strongly restricted by low temperatures in air and/or soil during the transition period from winter to spring in boreal zones. The extent to which air temperature (Ta and soil temperature (Ts influence the seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal spruce ecosystem was investigated using a process-based ecosystem model (CoupModel together with eddy covariance (EC data from one eddy flux tower and nearby soil measurements at Knottåsen, Sweden. A Monte Carlo-based uncertainty method (GLUE provided prior and posterior distributions of simulations representing a wide range of soil conditions and performance indicators. The simulated results showed sufficient flexibility to predict the measured cold and warm Ts in the moist and dry plots around the eddy flux tower. Moreover, the model presented a general ability to describe both biotic and abiotic processes for the Norway spruce stand. The dynamics of sensible heat fluxes were well described by the corresponding latent heat fluxes and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. The parameter ranges obtained are probably valid to represent regional characteristics of boreal conifer forests, but were not easy to constrain to a smaller range than that produced by the assumed prior distributions. Finally, neglecting the soil temperature response function resulted in fewer behavioural models and probably more compensatory errors in other response functions for regulating the seasonality of ecosystem fluxes.

  4. Modelling soil temperature and moisture and corresponding seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration in a boreal spruce ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Wu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of photosynthesis and transpiration is strongly restricted by low temperatures in air and/or soil during the transition period from winter to spring in boreal zones. The extent to which air temperature (Ta and soil temperature (Ts influence the seasonality of photosynthesis and transpiration of a boreal spruce ecosystem was investigated using a process-based ecosystem model (CoupModel together with eddy covariance (EC data from one eddy flux tower and nearby soil measurements at Knottåsen, Sweden. A Monte Carlo based uncertainty method (GLUE provided prior and posterior distributions of simulations representing a wide range of soil conditions and performance indicators. The simulated results showed sufficient flexibility to predict the measured cold and warm Ts in the moist and dry plots around the eddy flux tower. Moreover, the model presented a general ability to describe both biotic and abiotic processes for the Norway spruce stand. The dynamics of sensible heat fluxes were well described the corresponding latent heat fluxes and net ecosystem exchange of CO2. The parameter ranges obtained are probably valid to represent regional characteristics of boreal conifer forests, but were not easy to constrain to a smaller range than that produced by the assumed prior distributions. Finally, neglecting the soil temperature response function resulted in fewer behavioural models and probably more compensatory errors in other response functions for regulating the seasonality of ecosystem fluxes.

  5. Drought as a modifier of interaction between adult beech and spruce - impacts on tree water use, C budgets and biotic interactions above- and belowground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Understanding biotic interactions among tree species with their microbial associates under drought will be crucial for silviculture in meeting ecological challenges of the future. This contribution gives an overview on a project integrating a throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE) on adult trees with a natural precipitation gradient (PGR) in central European forests. Focus is on drought affecting species interaction above and belowground, including associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities. Study objects are pure and mixed forests dominated by adult European beech and Norway spruce trees (c. 70-years old). At the throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE), trees are readily accessible via scaffolding and canopy crane (Kranzberg Forest, southern Germany). Effects of experimentally induced, repeated summer drought are assessed with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (Kranzberg forest ROOF experiment, kroof.wzw.tum.de). The summer drought treatment started in 2014 and was repeated in 2015 and 2106. The focus on species interaction is intensified by a parallel study along a natural precipitation gradient with plot triplets of monocultures and mixed cultures of European beech and Norway spruce at each of the five study sites. Complementary resource use, effects of competitive vs. facilitation and related changes in ECM communities are exemplified for the two tree species of contrasting foliage (i.e. deciduous vs. evergreen) and stomatal sensitivity to drought (i.e. an-isohydric vs. isohydric behavior). At the TEE site, precipitation throughfall was completely excluded from early spring to late fall (i.e. March to November), resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce as low as -2.5 MPa. Despite significant reductions in growth and rate of photosynthesis by up to 80% under drought, NSC budget of trees was hardly affected. Moreover, phloem functionality, tested as phloem transport velocity through 13C-labeling of recent

  6. Atmospheric nitrous oxide uptake in boreal spruce forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siljanen, Henri; Welti, Nina; Heikkinen, Juha; Biasi, Christina; Martikainen, Pertti

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) uptake from the atmosphere has been found in forest soils but environmental factors controlling the uptake and its atmospheric impact are poorly known. We measured N2O fluxes over growing season in a boreal spruce forest having control plots and plots with long nitrogen fertilization history. Also methane (CH4) fluxes were measured to compare the atmospheric impact of N2O and CH4fluxes. Soil chemical and physical characteristics and climatic conditions were measured as background data. Nitrous oxide consumption and uptake mechanisms were measured in complementary laboratory incubation experiments using stable isotope approaches. Gene transcript numbers of nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ) I and II genes were quantified along the incubation with elevated N2O atmosphere. The spruce forests without fertilization history showed highest N2O uptake rates whereas pine forest had low emissions. Nitrous oxide uptake correlated positively with soil moisture, high soil silt content, and low temperature. Nitrous oxide uptake varied seasonally, being highest in spring and autumn when temperature was low and water content was high. The spruce forest was sink for CH4.Methane fluxes were decoupled from the N2O fluxes (i.e. when the N2O uptake was high the CH4 uptake was low). By using GWP approach, the cooling effect of N2O uptake was on average 30% of the cooling effect of CH4 uptake in spruce forest without fertilization. Anoxic conditions promoted higher N2O consumption rates in all soils. Gene transcription of nosZ-I genes were activated at beginning of the incubation. However, atypical/clade-II nosZ was not detected. These results suggests, that also N2O uptake rates have to be considered when accounting for the GHG budget of spruce forests.

  7. Cord Wood Testing in a Non-Catalytic Wood Stove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trojanowski, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wei, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-06-30

    EPA Method 28 and the current wood stove regulations have been in-place since 1988. Recently, EPA proposed an update to the existing NSPS for wood stove regulations which includes a plan to transition from the current crib wood fuel to cord wood fuel for certification testing. Cord wood is seen as generally more representative of field conditions while the crib wood is seen as more repeatable. In any change of certification test fuel, there are questions about the impact on measured results and the correlation between tests with the two different fuels. The purpose of the work reported here is to provide data on the performance of a noncatalytic stove with cord wood. The stove selected has previously been certified with crib wood which provides a basis for comparison with cord wood. Overall, particulate emissions were found to be considerably higher with cord wood.

  8. Continuous acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation using SO2-ethanol-water spent liquor from spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Survase, Shrikant A; Sklavounos, Evangelos; Jurgens, German; van Heiningen, Adriaan; Granström, Tom

    2011-12-01

    SO2-ethanol-water (SEW) spent liquor from spruce chips was successfully used for batch and continuous production of acetone, butanol and ethanol (ABE). Initially, batch experiments were performed using spent liquor to check the suitability for production of ABE. Maximum concentration of total ABE was found to be 8.79 g/l using 4-fold diluted SEW liquor supplemented with 35 g/l of glucose. The effect of dilution rate on solvent production, productivity and yield was studied in column reactor consisting of immobilized Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM 792 on wood pulp. Total solvent concentration of 12 g/l was obtained at a dilution rate of 0.21 h(-1). The maximum solvent productivity (4.86 g/l h) with yield of 0.27 g/g was obtained at dilution rate of 0.64 h(-1). Further, to increase the solvent yield, the unutilized sugars were subjected to batch fermentation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dilute acid pretreatment of black spruce using continuous steam explosion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Haixia; Deng, James; Zhang, Tony

    2011-02-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials prior to the enzymatic hydrolysis is essential to the sugar yield and bioethanol production. Dilute acid hydrolysis of black spruce softwood chip was performed in a continuous high temperature reactor followed with steam explosion and mechanical refining. The acid-soaked wood chips were pretreated under different feeding rates (60 and 92 kg/h), cooking screw rotation speeds (7.2 and 14.4 rpm), and steam pressures (12 and 15 bar). The enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out on the acid-insoluble fraction of pretreated material. At lower feeding rate, the pretreatment at low steam pressure and short retention time favored the recovery of hemicellulose. The pretreatment at high steam pressure and longer retention time recovered less hemicellulose but improved the enzymatic accessibility. As a result, the overall sugar yields became similar no matter what levels of the retention time or steam pressure. Comparing with lower feeding rate, higher feeding rate resulted in consistently higher glucose yield in both liquid fraction after pretreatment and that released after enzymatic hydrolysis.

  10. Integrated production method for wood fuel and pulp wood in Northern Finland; Polttojakeen hankinta puun yhdistelmaekorjuussa ja integroitu energiapuun tuotantomenetelmae Pohjois-Suomessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooli, A. [Hooli Oy, Kemi (Finland); Kuitto, P.J. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Ranta, T. [Finntech Ltd. Oy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Chip production company Hooli Ltd. has built an innovative mobile chain-flail delimbing-debarking-unit which includes also a hammer crusher for wood fuel. This integrated production method for wood fuel and pulp wood based on that unit has been planned especially for the circumstances where the power or heating plants are near and the pulp mills more remote from the wood processing sites. The trees are felt into bunches and transported as whole trees or tree-sections to the roadside. The Hooli-unit delimbs and debarks the trees using multi-tree processing. The optimal bark content of Scot pine bolts after processing is under 1 %. All green branches, stops and bark are directly crushed into wood fuel in the same unit. Fuel chips are carried to the nearest power plant. The debarked bolts are transported to the pulpmills in the form of roundwood or pulpchips, thus giving better economy for the whole method. Based on first field experiments in 1995 this method has operated well. However, there are still development work ahead: e.g. good debarking quality of birch and spruce in the winter conditions. To attain the targets of the project looks promising. The project is carried out as joint project between Hooli Ltd, Finntech Ltd. Oy, the Finnish Forest Research Institute, Veitsiluoto Ltd and VTT Energy. The chain-flail delimbing-debarking-crushing unit was built at Tervolan Konepaja Ky

  11. Lessons from native spruce forests in Alaska: managing Sitka spruce plantations worldwide to benefit biodiversity and ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Deal; Paul Hennon; Richard O' Hanlon; David D' Amore

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest worldwide in managing forests to maintain or improve biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services and assure long-term sustainability of forest resources. An important goal of forest management is to increase stand diversity, provide wildlife habitat and improve forest species diversity. We synthesize results from natural spruce forests in...

  12. Fungistatic efficiency of phenolic compounds in spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. ) and influence of SO[sub 2]. Fungistatische Wirksamkeit phenolischer Inhaltsstoffe der Fichte Picea abies (L. ) Karst. und Einfluss von SO[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, U. (TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)); Tesche, M. (TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)); Heller, W. (GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemische Pflanzenpathologie); Sandermann, H. (GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemische Pflanzenpathologie)

    1993-08-01

    The paper deals with fungistatic phenols in Norway spruce (Picea abies). Phenolic substances were isolated from several tissues and chromatographed by TLC. Detected by bioassay using Cladosporium cucumerinum, the most fungistatic compound was isolated and identified by UV-, mass- and NMT-spectra as the stilbenglucoside isorhapontin. The highest amounts of isorhapontin were found in a 15-year-old spruce in the bark of root (1.3%) and stem (0.4%), and also in fine roots (0.3%). Sapwood contained between 0.001 and 0.01% of this stilbene (all values related to green weight). The brown-rot fungi Phaeolus schweinitzii and Fomitopsis pinicola showed a depression of growth related to the concentration of isorhapontin on malt agar. Growth reduction of 50% was reached at a concentration of 1.25 mM (F. pinicola) and 3 mM (P. schweinitzii). The white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor, Heterobasidion annosum, and Armillaria ostoyae were not inhibited. First investigation results 6 months after long-term SO[sub 2]-treatment (0.28-0.34 ppm) of cloned spruces showed a reduction of fungistatic stilbenes in fine roots and bark compared with untreated controls (indirect effect). (orig.)

  13. Direct contribution of nitrogen deposition to nitrous oxide emissions in a temperate beech and spruce forest – a 15N tracer study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Veldkamp

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of atmospheric nitrogen (N deposition on nitrous oxide (N2O emissions in forest ecosystems is still unclear. Our study assessed the direct contribution of N deposition to N2O emissions in temperate forests exposed to chronic high N depositions using a 15N labelling technique. In a Norway spruce stand (Picea abies and in a beech stand (Fagus sylvatica at the Solling, Germany, we used a low concentrated 15N-labelled ammonium-nitrate solution to simulate N deposition. Nitrous oxide fluxes and 15N isotope abundances in N2O were measured using the closed chamber method combined with 15N isotope analyses. Emissions of N2O were higher in the beech stand (2.6 ± 0.6 kg N ha−1 yr−1 than in the spruce stand (0.3 ± 0.1 kg N ha−1 yr−1. We observed a direct effect of N input on 15N-N2O emissions, which lasted for less than three weeks and was mainly caused by denitrification. No further increase in 15N enrichment of N2O occurred during a one-year experiment, which was probably due to immobilisation of deposited N. The annual emission factor for N2O from deposited N was 0.1% for the spruce stand and 0.6% for the beech stand. Standard methods used in the literature applied to the same stands grossly overestimated emission factors with values of up to 25%. Only 6–13% of the total N2O emissions were derived from direct N depositions. Whether the remaining emissions resulted from accumulated anthropogenic N depositions or native soil N, could not be distinguished with the applied methods. The 15N tracer technique is a useful tool, which may improve estimates of the current contribution of N deposition to N2O emissions.

  14. Ecosystem disturbances in Central European spruce forests: a multi-proxy integration of dendroecology and sedimentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clear, Jennifer; Chiverrell, Richard; Kunes, Petr; Svoboda, Miroslav; Boyle, John

    2016-04-01

    Disturbance dynamics in forest ecosystems shows signs of perturbation in the light of changing climate regimes with the frequency and intensity of events (e.g. pathogens in North America and Central Europe) amplified, becoming more frequent and severe. The montane Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominated forests of Central Europe are a niche habitat and environment; situated outside their natural boreal distribution (e.g. Fenno-Scandinavia). These communities are at or near their ecological limits and are vulnerable to both short term disturbances (e.g. fire, windstorm and pathogens) and longer-term environmental change (e.g. climate induced stress and changing disturbance patterns). Researches have linked negative impacts on spruce forest with both wind disturbance (wind-throw) and outbreaks of spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus), and there is growing evidence for co-association with wind damage enhancing pathogenic outbreaks. Examples include: in the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic) the mid-1990s spruce bark beetle outbreak and the 2007 windstorm and subsequent bark beetle outbreak. In the High Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) there is a further co-association of forest disturbance with windstorms (2004 and 2014) and an ongoing bark beetle outbreak. The scale and severity of these recent outbreaks of spruce bark beetle are unprecedented in the historical forest records. Here, findings from ongoing research developing and integrating data from dendroecological, sedimentary palaeoecological and geochemical time series to develop a longer-term perspective on forest dynamics in these regions. Tree-ring series from plots or forest stands (>500) are used alongside lake (5) and forest hollow (3) sediments from the Czech and Slovak Republics to explore the local, regional and biogeographical scale of forest disturbances. Dendroecological data showing tree-ring gap recruitment and post-suppression growth release highlight frequent disturbance events focused on tree or forest

  15. Particulate hydroxy-PAH emissions from a residential wood log stove using different fuels and burning conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Rozanna; Nyström, Robin; Lindgren, Robert; Boman, Christoffer; Westerholm, Roger

    2016-09-01

    Hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidation products of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, but have not been studied as extensively as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Several studies have however shown that hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have toxic and carcinogenic properties. They have been detected in air samples in semi urban areas and combustion is assumed to be the primary source of those compounds. To better understand the formation and occurrence of particulate hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from residential wood log stove combustion, 9 hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 2 hydroxy biphenyls were quantified in particles generated from four different types of wood logs (birch, spruce, pine, aspen) and two different combustion conditions (nominal and high burn rate). A previously developed method utilizing liquid chromatography - photo ionization tandem mass spectrometry and pressurized liquid extraction was used. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were analyzed along with hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions varied significantly across different wood types and burning conditions; the highest emissions for nominal burn rate were from spruce and for high burn rate from pine burning. Emissions from nominal burn rate corresponded on average to 15% of the emissions from high burn rate, with average emissions of 218 μg/MJfuel and 32.5 μg/MJfuel for high burn rate and nominal burn rate, respectively. Emissions of the measured hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons corresponded on average to 28% of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons emissions. This study shows that wood combustion is a large emission source of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and that not only combustion conditions, but also wood type influences the emissions of hydroxylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. There are

  16. Introducing Intensively Managed Spruce Plantations in Swedish Forest Landscapes will Impair Biodiversity Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Gustafsson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to pressure to raise forest productivity in Sweden, there are proposals to apply more intensive forestry methods, but they could have potentially large effects on biodiversity. Here we report a compilation and evaluation of the extent and significance of such effects. We evaluated potential effects on biodiversity by introducing intensively fertilized Norway spruce plantations as a management option in Swedish forests with low conservation values on insects, vascular plants, lichens, bryophytes, and red-listed species. Due to a lack of specific studies addressing this question, we based the evaluation on a combination of available and appropriate empiric and anecdotic knowledge; literature data, and expert judgments largely available in species data bases. Our evaluations suggest that such forests will only harbor species that are common and widespread in conventionally managed stands and that species of conservation interest will be lacking, due to the low heterogeneity and light intensity of even-aged monocultures with dense canopies, short rotation times and low availability of coarse woody debris. Effects at the landscape scale are more difficult to evaluate, but will be dependent on the area utilized and the conservation value of sites used. We conclude that negative effects on biodiversity can be reduced if: (1 only land with the lowest conservational value is utilized; (2 plantations are spatially arranged to minimize fragmentation of the landscape; (3 the quality and quantity of key structural elements (e.g., coarse woody debris, old living trees and snags are maintained at the landscape level; and (4 management intensity is relaxed on other land. For effective implementation of these measures, legislative frameworks and policy instruments need to be adjusted and new models for planning and monitoring need to be developed.

  17. Dry deposition profile of small particles within a model spruce canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ould-Dada, Zitouni [Centre for Analytical Research in the Environment, (now EAS T.H. Huxley School), Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL57TE Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-08

    Data on dry deposition of 0.82 {mu}m MMAD uranium particles to a small scale, 'model' Norway spruce (Picea abies) canopy have been determined by means of wind tunnel experiments. These are presented for both the total canopy and for five horizontal layers within the canopy. The results show a complex pattern of deposition within the canopy. The highest deposition velocity V{sub g} (0.19 cm s{sup -1}) was recorded for the topmost layer within the canopy (i.e. the layer in direct contact with the boundary layer) whereas the lowest V{sub g} (0.02 cm s{sup -1}) occurred at the soil surface. Vertical penetration of depositing aerosol through the canopy was influenced by variations in biomass, wind velocity and turbulence within the canopy. A total canopy V{sub g} of 0.5 cm s{sup -1} was obtained and this is in line with field measurements of V{sub g} reported in literature for both anthropogenic and radionuclide aerosols of similar size ranges. Extrapolation of wind tunnel data to 'real' forest canopies is discussed. The information presented here is of importance in predicting the likely contribution of dry deposition of aerosols to pollutant inputs to forest ecosystems, particularly in the context of radioactive aerosol releases from nuclear installations. The application of the present data may also be appropriate for other pollutant aerosols such as SO{sub 4}, NO{sub 3} and NH{sub 4}, which are characterised by particle sizes in the range used in this study.

  18. Windstorms as mediator of soil nematode community changes: Evidence from European spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renčo M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nematode communities in a Norway spruce forest in High Tatra National Park, Slovakia were monitored for the period of several years (2006 and 2013. Unfortunately, in May 2014 natural windstorm damaged the forest. This disastrous event, together with preliminary obtained results allowed us to compare the direct impact of windstorm damage of forest habitat on soil nematode assemblages. The forest destruction by windstorm had a significant effect on the total nematode abundance, the abundance of omnivores and herbivores, as well as the nematode species diversity. The most dominant species, representing 55 % of the total nematode fauna, in the plot studied were Acrobeloides nanus followed by Malenchus exiguus, Filenchus vulgaris, Plectus communis, Plectus parvus and Tylencholaimus mirabilis. The abundance of bacterivorous signifi cantly increased after the windstorm, meanwhile the abundance of omnivores, fungivores, and herbivores ectoparasites and epidermal/root hair feeders showed an opposite trend. Of the evaluative indicators, Shannon species diversity (H’spp, maturity index (MI, maturity index 2-5 (MI2-5, sigma maturity index (ΣMI, enrichment index (EI and structure index (SI decreased significantly after windstorm. The EI and SI indexes characterized soil ecosystems before windstorm (2006 - 2013 as maturing with low or moderate disturbance, but soil ecosystems shortly after the windstorm (2014 were degraded and nutrient depleted. This also corresponded with graphical display of metabolic footprints characteristics of soil food web. Overall, the nematode communities differed significantly before and after forest damage. These results suggest the role of nematode communities as indicators of environment condition quality or its disruption.

  19. Welding of solid wood

    OpenAIRE

    Ivica Župčić; Goran Mihulja; Andrija Bogner; Ivica Grbac; Ivica @up~i}, Goran Mihulja, Andrija Bogner, Ivica Grbac,; Božidar Hrovat

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the up-to-date knowledge and results of the application of wood welding techniques at the Faculty of Forestry University of Zagreb. Wood welding technologies have been developed as a new way of bonding timber by using high temperature generatedby friction and pressure. Timber is assembled without any adhesives. During the process the surface layer of timber (lignin), which is in direct contact with its counterpart, melts due to high pressure and temperature, which is usual...

  20. Effect of compression combined with steam treatment on the porosity, chemical compositon and cellulose crystalline structure of wood cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiangping; Yuan, Tongqi; Lu, Yun; Song, Kunlin; Li, Hanyin; Zhao, Guangjie; Yin, Yafang

    2017-01-02

    The changes of porosity, chemical composition and cellulose crystalline structure of Spruce (Picea abies Karst.) wood cell walls due to compression combined with steam treatment (CS-treatment) were investigated by nitrogen adsorption, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. A number of slit-shaped mesopores with a diameter of 3.7nm was formed for the CS-treated wood, and more mesopores were found in the steam-treated wood. CRM results revealed cellulose structure was affected by treatment and β-aryl-ether links associated to guaiacyl units of lignin was depolymerized followed by re-condensation reactions. The crystallinity index (CrI) and crystallite thickness (D200) of cellulose for CS-treated wood were largely increased due to crystallization in the semicrystalline region. Higher degree of increase in both CrI and D200 was observed in both the earlywood and latewood of steam-treated wood, ascribing to the greater amount of mesopores in steam-treated wood than CS-treated wood.

  1. RECYCLING RECOVERED WOOD-BASED MATERIALS. FLATNESS, MOR AND MOE OF PANELS MADE FROM RECOVERED WOODEN BASED MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea DEÁK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study the mechanical properties of recovered solid wood and wood-based materials, to create new panels made of strips of recovered oak and spruce wood, particleboards and blockboards and to study their mechanical properties, feasibility and use. Flatness, MOR and MOE were determined for the solid wood and wood-based materials recovered from construction and demolition sites. Four types of experimental panels (PL1, PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 were manufactured from solid wood strips alternating with either particleboard or blockboard strips glued edge to edge. Some of their physical and mechanical properties were investigated. All new panels made from recovered materials fell within allowable limits specified in European standard requirements for panel flatness. Panels type PL2, PALL1 and PALL2 show better values for MoR and MoE parallel to the grain when compared to the respective values for the recovered wood-based materials of which they are made, but panels type PL1 show no change. Panels type PALL2 are preferable to panels type PALL1 due to better mechanical properties. Panels type PL1 and PL2 show no such differences in their structure. The results also show that these new panels can be used successfully in furniture production, provided panels type PL1, PL2 ad PALL1 do not bear loads perpendicular to the grain or receive reinforcing elements.

  2. Modelling height to diameter ratio – an opportunity to increase Norway spruce stand stability in the Western Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bošeľa Michal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Smrek je jednou z najrozšírenejších a ekonomicky najdôležitejších ihličnatých drevín v Európe. Taktiež je drevinou veľmi často poškodzovanou vetrovými kalamitami. Štíhlostný kvocient (pomer výšky a hrúbky stromu sa považuje za vhodný indikátor statickej stability jednotlivých stromov a porastov. Preto cieľom práce bola identifikácia hlavných faktorov, ktoré majú významný vplyv na hodnoty kvocientu. Jednoduchý model bol vytvorený ako pomôcka pre lesníka pri rozhodovaní o intenzite prebierok v smrekových porastoch s cieľom potenciálneho zvýšenia statickej stability a zachovania optimálnej produkcie. Využili sa údaje Národnej inventarizácie a monitoringu lesov SR (260 plôch a taktiež údaje z predchádzajúcich výskumných projektov (48 plôch tak aby reprezentovali čo najširšie rozpätie ekologických podmienok, v ktorých smrek v súčasnosti rastie. Výsledky ukázali, že najvýznamnejšími ekologickými faktormi boli: nadmorská výška a bonita stanovišťa. Taktiež niektoré porastové charakteristiky sa významne podieľali na variabilite kvocientu: podiel koruny z výšky stromu, hustota porastu a stredná porastová výška reprezentujúca rastovú fázu porastu. Výsledky ďalej preukázali, že ekologické podmienky sú významnejšie ako porastové charakteristiky, a preto tieto treba brať do úvahy pri rozhodovacom procese. To znamená, že ak sa porast nachádza na pre smrek veľmi bonitnom stanovišti, sú potrebné silnejšie prebierky od mladých rastových fáz, aby sa ovplyvňovaním hrúbkového prírastku vyrovnal vplyv rýchleho výškového rastu. Zároveň je dôležitá rozdielna intenzita výškového a hrúbkového rastu počas vývoja porastu

  3. Quantitative remote sensing of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.): spectroscopy from needles to crowns to canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malenovsky, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mountain ecosystems represent nearly one fourth of the Earth's land surface, and provide (ecosystem) services to a significant part of the world's human population. As was noted in the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in

  4. Regulation of somatic embryo development in Norway spruce (Picea abies). A molecular approach to the characterization of specific developmental stages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabala, I. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics

    1998-12-31

    Embryo development is a complex process involving a set of strictly regulated events. The regulation of these events is poorly understood especially during the early stages of embryo development. Somatic embryos go through the same developmental stages as zygotic embryos making them an ideal model system for studying the regulation of embryo development. We have used embryogenic cultures of Picea abies to study some aspects of the regulation of embryo development in gymnosperms. The bottle neck during somatic embryogenesis is the switch from the proliferation stage to the maturation stage. This switch is initiated by giving somatic embryos a maturation treatment i.e. the embryos are treated with abscisic acid (ABA). Somatic embryos which respond to ABA by forming mature somatic embryos were stimulated to secret a 70 kDa protein, AF70. The af70 gene was isolated and characterised. The expression of the af70 gene was constitutive in embryos but was highly ABA-induced in seedlings. Moreover, expression of this gene was stimulated during cold acclimation of Picea abies seedlings. A full length Picea abies cDNA clone Pa18, encoding a protein with the characteristics of plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs), was isolated and characterised. The Pa18 gene is constitutively expressed in embryogenic cultures of Picea abies representing different stages of development as well as in nonembryogenic callus and seedlings. In situ hybridization showed that Pa18 gene is expressed in all embryonic cells of proliferating somatic embryos but the expression of the gene in mature somatic and zygotic embryos is restricted to the outer cell layer. Southern blot analysis at different stringencies was consistent with a single gene. An alteration in expression of Pa18 causes disturbance in the formation of the proper outer cell layer in the maturing somatic embryos. In addition to its influence on embryo development the Pa18 gene product also inhibits growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens 195 refs, 1 fig, 4 tabs

  5. Effects of long-term temperature and nutrient manipulation on Norway spruce fine roots and mycelia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppälammi-Kujansuu, J.; Ostonen, I.; Strömgren, M.;

    2013-01-01

    production were determined from soil cores and mesh bags. Results and conclusions The fine root biomass and necromass were highest in the fertilized plots, following similar trends in the above-ground biomass, whereas the EcM root tip biomass per basal area decreased by 22 % in the fertilized plots compared......Aims and methods The effects of changing climate on ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fine roots were studied in northern Sweden by manipulating soil temperature for 14 years and/or by fertilizing for 22 years. Fine root biomass, necromass, EcM root tip biomass, morphology and number as well as mycelia...... to the control. Warming increased the fine root biomass, live/dead-ratio and the number of EcM root tips in the mineral soil and tended to increase the production of EcM mycelia. Greater fine root biomass meant more EcM root tips, although the tip frequency was not affected by fertilization or warming...

  6. Long-term fertilization of a boreal Norway spruce forest increases the temperature sensitivity of soil organic carbon mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coucheney, Elsa; Strömgren, Monika; Lerch, Thomas Z; Herrmann, Anke M

    2013-12-01

    Boreal ecosystems store one-third of global soil organic carbon (SOC) and are particularly sensitive to climate warming and higher nutrient inputs. Thus, a better description of how forest managements such as nutrient fertilization impact soil carbon (C) and its temperature sensitivity is needed to better predict feedbacks between C cycling and climate. The temperature sensitivity of in situ soil C respiration was investigated in a boreal forest, which has received long-term nutrient fertilization (22 years), and compared with the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory. We found that the fertilization treatment increased both the response of soil in situ CO2 effluxes to a warming treatment and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization measured in the laboratory (Q10). These results suggested that soil C may be more sensitive to an increase in temperature in long-term fertilized in comparison with nutrient poor boreal ecosystems. Furthermore, the fertilization treatment modified the SOC content and the microbial community composition, but we found no direct relationship between either SOC or microbial changes and the temperature sensitivity of C mineralization. However, the relation between the soil C:N ratio and the fungal/bacterial ratio was changed in the combined warmed and fertilized treatment compared with the other treatments, which suggest that strong interaction mechanisms may occur between nutrient input and warming in boreal soils. Further research is needed to unravel into more details in how far soil organic matter and microbial community composition changes are responsible for the change in the temperature sensitivity of soil C under increasing mineral N inputs. Such research would help to take into account the effect of fertilization managements on soil C storage in C cycling numerical models.

  7. Amounts of carbon mineralised and leached as DOC during decomposition of Norway spruce needles and fine roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansson, K.; Berggren Kleja, D.; Kalbitz, K.; Larsson, H.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in climate or forest management practices leading to increased litter production will most likely cause increased leaching rates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the O horizon. The rhizosphere is often assumed to have a large carbon flux associated with root turnover and exudation. How

  8. Water balance in afforestation chronosequences of common oak and Norway spruce on former arable land in Denmark and southern Sweden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenqvist, L.; Hansen, K.; Vesterdal, L.; Salm, van der C.

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation, throughfall and soil moisture were measured, and interception, transpiration and water recharge were estimated in four afforestation chronosequences on former arable land at two Danish locations (Vestskoven and Gejlvang) and at one southern Swedish location (Tonnersjoheden).

  9. Quantitative remote sensing of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.): spectroscopy from needles to crowns to canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malenovsky, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mountain ecosystems represent nearly one fourth of the Earth's land surface, and provide (ecosystem) services to a significant part of the world's human population. As was noted in the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) inRi

  10. Growth of Norway spruce seedlings after transplanting into silty soil amended with biochar: A bioassay in a growth chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Heiskanen; P. Tammeorg; R. K. Dumroese

    2013-01-01

    Biochar (BC), the carbon-rich by-product resulting from pyrolysis of biomass, is used for bioenergy and increasingly as a soil additive for carbon sequestration and soil improvement. However, information about the effects of BC on forest productivity and reforestation success, especially on boreal and temperate forest soils, is scant. We examined the effects of two BC...

  11. Current status of toxoplasmosis in pregnancy in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stray-Pedersen, B; Jenum, P

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports previous epidemiologic data obtained in Norway and describes briefly the design of a prospective study of primary toxoplasma infection which will be carried out among pregnant women in Norway in the period 1992-1994.

  12. Mitigating environmental impacts through the energetic use of wood: Regional displacement factors generated by means of substituting non-wood heating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Christian; Klein, Daniel; Richter, Klaus; Weber-Blaschke, Gabriele

    2016-11-01

    Wood biomass, especially when applied for heating, plays an important role for mitigating environmental impacts such as climate change and the transition towards higher shares of renewable energy in today's energy mix. However, the magnitude of mitigation benefits and burdens associated with wood use can vary greatly depending on regional parameters such as the displaced fossil reference or heating mix. Therefore, regionalized displacement factors, considering region-specific production conditions and substituted products are required when assessing the precise contribution of wood biomass towards the mitigation of environmental impacts. We carried out Life Cycle Assessments of wood heating systems for typical Bavarian conditions and substitute energy carriers with a focus on climate change and particulate matter emissions. In order to showcase regional effects, we created weighted displacement factors for the region of Bavaria, based on installed capacities of individual wood heating systems and the harvested tree species distribution. The study reveals that GHG displacements between -57gCO2-eq.∗MJ(-1) of useful energy through the substitution of natural gas with a 15kW spruce pellets heating system and -165gCO2-eq.∗MJ(-1) through the substitution of power utilized for heating with a modern 6kW beech split log heating system can be achieved. It was shown that the GHG mitigation potentials of wood utilization are overestimated through the common use of light fuel oil as the only reference system. We further propose a methodology for the calculation of displacement factors which is adaptable to other regions worldwide. Based on our approach it is possible to generate displacement factors for wood heating systems which enable accurate decision-making for project planning in households, heating plants, communities and also for entire regions.

  13. Highly informative single-copy nuclear microsatellite DNA markers developed using an AFLP-SSR approach in black spruce (Picea mariana and red spruce (P. rubens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhong Shi

    Full Text Available Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana and red spruce (Picea rubens using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies.A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67 in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62 in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies.The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce and other Picea species for

  14. Analysis of Selected Properties of Fibreboard Panels Manufactured from Wood and Leather Using the Near Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Wagner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the characterization of the properties of wood fibres leather shavings composite board by using the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS and multivariate data analysis. In this study fibreboards were manufactured with different leather amounts by using spruce fibres, as well as vegetable and mineral tanned leather shavings (wet white and wet blue. The NIR spectroscopy was used to analyse the raw materials as well as the wood leather fibreboards. Moreover, the physical and mechanical features of the wood leather composite fibreboards were determined to characterize their properties for the further data analysis. The NIR spectra were analysed by univariate and multivariate methods using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA and the Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR method. These results demonstrate the potential of FT-NIR spectroscopy to estimate the physical and mechanical properties (e.g., bending strength. This phenomenon provides a possibility for quality assurance systems by using the NIRS.

  15. Wood for the trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Garbutt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Our paper focuses on the materiality, cultural history and cultural relations of selected artworks in the exhibition Wood for the trees (Lismore Regional Gallery, New South Wales, Australia, 10 June – 17 July 2011. The title of the exhibition, intentionally misreading the aphorism “Can’t see the wood for the trees”, by reading the wood for the resource rather than the collective wood[s], implies conservation, preservation, and the need for sustaining the originating resource. These ideas have particular resonance on the NSW far north coast, a region once rich in rainforest. While the Indigenous population had sustainable practices of forest and land management, the colonists deployed felling and harvesting in order to convert the value of the local, abundant rainforest trees into high-value timber. By the late twentieth century, however, a new wave of settlers launched a protest movements against the proposed logging of remnant rainforest at Terania Creek and elsewhere in the region. Wood for the trees, curated by Gallery Director Brett Adlington, plays on this dynamic relationship between wood, trees and people. We discuss the way selected artworks give expression to the themes or concepts of productive labour, nature and culture, conservation and sustainability, and memory. The artworks include Watjinbuy Marrawilil’s (1980 Carved ancestral figure ceremonial pole, Elizabeth Stops’ (2009/10 Explorations into colonisation, Hossein Valamanesh’s (2008 Memory stick, and AñA Wojak’s (2008 Unread book (in a forgotten language. Our art writing on the works, a practice informed by Bal (2002, Muecke (2008 and Papastergiadis (2004, becomes a conversation between the works and the themes or concepts. As a form of material excess of the most productive kind (Grosz, 2008, p. 7, art seeds a response to that which is in the air waiting to be said of the past, present and future.

  16. The presence of hydrocarbons in southeast Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanken, Niels Martin; Hansen, Malene Dolberg; Kresten Nielsen, Jesper

    Hydrocarbons, mostly found as solid pyrobitumen, are known from more than 30 localities in southeast Norway. They occur as inclusions in a wide range of "reservoir rocks" spanning from Permo-Carboniferous breccias to veins (vein quartz and calcite veins) in Precambrian granites, gneisses and amph......Hydrocarbons, mostly found as solid pyrobitumen, are known from more than 30 localities in southeast Norway. They occur as inclusions in a wide range of "reservoir rocks" spanning from Permo-Carboniferous breccias to veins (vein quartz and calcite veins) in Precambrian granites, gneisses...

  17. Fern rhizomes as fodder in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Alm, Torbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Background Although ferns are often known under collective names in Norway, e.g. blom, a substantial number of vernacular names for individual fern species are known, in particular for useful or poisonous taxa. In the past, the rhizomes (Norwegian: moldfôr) of selected species were collected for fodder. Only scattered records of such use are available from southern Norway, and the tradition’s core area is found in the two North Norwegian counties of Nordland and Troms, in accordance with the ...

  18. American Studies in Norway: Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole O. Moen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Norwegian “studies” of America started really more than a thousand years ago, when Leif Ericsson landed in Vinland, his name for that part of New Foundland where his party made quarters around the year A.D. 1000. However, it was not until 1825 that modern mass emigration from Norway to America started in earnest, when a small sailing vessel, the sloop Restaurationen, left the little village of Tysvær on the west coast of Norway, near Stavanger, for New York, carrying a load of 52 Quaker emigr...

  19. Biotechnological Wood Modification with Selective White-Rot Fungi and Its Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gradinger

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial mechanisms of lignin degradation may be utilised for solid-state fermentations other than biopulping, during which the selective conversion of lignin is required. The current paper reviews current work into selective lignin conversion, with emphasis on the contributions made by our research group, which consists of researchers from five different laboratories. Three of them cooperate within Wood K plus. The recent research of this group has focussed on fermentations utilising the unique metabolism of selective white-rot fungi to modify wood surfaces during relatively short fermentation times of less than one week and on research into the molecular mechanisms causing these modifications. Lignin degradation by selective fungi (e.g. Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and species of the genus Phlebia on the wood surfaces was significant after three days. After seven days the overall lignin content of spruce wood shavings was reduced by more than 3.5 %. Lignin loss was accompanied by an increase of extractable substances. To evaluate small changes and to trace the fungal modification processes, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR techniques and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy were applied and adapted. The spectra recorded in the near infrared region (FT-NIR turned out to be very useful for kinetic studies of the biopulping/biomodification processes and a good method to evaluate the capabilities of fungi to modify wood surfaces within this short period.

  20. Pre-treatment and recirculation of wood ashes; Forbehandling og recirkulering af flisaske

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov, S.; Ingerslev, M.

    2011-07-01

    can to some extent be counteracted by hardening and pre-treating the ash before spreading in the forest. In this project, several hardening techniques were examined and tested. The results show that the connection between different hardening techniques and the results concerning solubility and reactivity, are not easily established and that simple techniques such as self-hardening may be as god as much more sophisticated pelletizing techniques. Experiments were carried out in a Norway spruce stand, where different ash types and doses were included. The results show that ash application affects the chemical composition of the O-horizon, while it has had a limited impact on the mineral soil, and that it is only the upper part of the mineral soil which may be affected. The experiments in the forest stand show that increased dosage led to larger changes of the chemical soil conditions and that these effects reach deeper in the soil and include the upper mineral soil. Ash application has generally not affected the concentration of N, P, Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Al and Mn in the soil water notably, while the concentration of K and SO{sub 4} was increased by all treatments except bottom ash. Experiments were carried out in a Christmas tree stand to examine if a mixture of ash, manure and ammonium nitrate and limestone applied in two of a ten year rotation period could provide the trees with sufficient fertilizer effect to obtain god quality Christmas trees. The experiments showed some of the same chemical trends as were observe in the forest stand. However, the dosages used in the Christmas tree stand were much smaller and thereby also the effect. The treatments only have very limited effects on the soil chemistry. The effects are limited to the O-horizon and the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. The project also included examination of different spreading technique and machinery. The conclusion of this work was that wet ash can be spread evenly and precisely dosed with modern disc

  1. Pre-treatment and recirculation of wood ashes; Forbehandling og recirkulering af flisaske

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skov, S.; Ingerslev, M.

    2011-07-01

    can to some extent be counteracted by hardening and pre-treating the ash before spreading in the forest. In this project, several hardening techniques were examined and tested. The results show that the connection between different hardening techniques and the results concerning solubility and reactivity, are not easily established and that simple techniques such as self-hardening may be as god as much more sophisticated pelletizing techniques. Experiments were carried out in a Norway spruce stand, where different ash types and doses were included. The results show that ash application affects the chemical composition of the O-horizon, while it has had a limited impact on the mineral soil, and that it is only the upper part of the mineral soil which may be affected. The experiments in the forest stand show that increased dosage led to larger changes of the chemical soil conditions and that these effects reach deeper in the soil and include the upper mineral soil. Ash application has generally not affected the concentration of N, P, Ca, Mg, Na, Cl, Al and Mn in the soil water notably, while the concentration of K and SO{sub 4} was increased by all treatments except bottom ash. Experiments were carried out in a Christmas tree stand to examine if a mixture of ash, manure and ammonium nitrate and limestone applied in two of a ten year rotation period could provide the trees with sufficient fertilizer effect to obtain god quality Christmas trees. The experiments showed some of the same chemical trends as were observe in the forest stand. However, the dosages used in the Christmas tree stand were much smaller and thereby also the effect. The treatments only have very limited effects on the soil chemistry. The effects are limited to the O-horizon and the upper 10 cm of the mineral soil. The project also included examination of different spreading technique and machinery. The conclusion of this work was that wet ash can be spread evenly and precisely dosed with modern disc

  2. 76 FR 166 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it... and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  3. 77 FR 10772 - Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... COMMISSION Fresh and Chilled Atlantic Salmon From Norway Determination On the basis of the record \\1... countervailing duty order and antidumping duty order on fresh and chilled Atlantic salmon from Norway would not... from Norway: Investigation Nos. 701-TA-302 and 731-TA-454 (Third Review). Issued: February 17, 2012....

  4. Surfactant-free carnauba wax dispersion and its use for layer-by-layer assembled protective surface coatings on wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozhechnikova, Alina; Bellanger, Hervé; Michen, Benjamin; Burgert, Ingo; Österberg, Monika

    2017-02-01

    Protection from liquid water and UV radiation are equally important, and a sophisticated approach is needed when developing surface coatings that preserve the natural and well-appreciated aesthetic appearance of wood. In order to prevent degradation and prolong the service life of timber, a protective coating was assembled using carnauba wax particles and zinc oxide