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Sample records for norway spruce photosynthetic

  1. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  2. Nutrient imbalance in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2000-11-01

    The studies presented in my thesis indicate that growing Norway spruce in monoculture does not constitute sustainable forest management in a high N and S deposition environment, such as in southern Sweden. The combination of N-induced high growth rates and leaching due to soil acidification causes soil reserves of nutrients to decrease. This will increase the risk of nutrient imbalance within the trees when nutrient demands are not met. The development of nutrient imbalance in Scania, southern Sweden, was shown as negative trends in needle and soil nutrient status from the mid-80s to the present in Norway spruce and Scots pine stands. This imbalance appears to be connected to high levels of N and S deposition. Clear negative effects on tree vitality were found when using a new branch development method. Today, growth and vitality seems to be limited by K, rather than N, in spruce stands older than 40 years. However, younger stands appear to be able to absorb the deposited N without negative effects on growth and vitality. When investigating effects of nutrient stress on tree vitality, indicators such as branch length and shoot multiplication rate, which include effects accumulated over several years, are suitable. Countermeasures are needed in order to maintain the forest production at a high level. Positive effects on tree nutrient status after vitality fertilization (N-free fertilization) was shown in two micronutrient deficient stands in south-central Sweden. In addition, tree vitality was positively affected after the application of a site-adapted fertilizer to the canopy. Site-adaption of fertilizers will most likely improve the possibilities of a positive response on tree growth and vitality in declining stands. In a survey of Norway spruce in mixtures with beech, birch, or oak compared to monocultures it was shown that spruce nutrient status was higher in mixtures with deciduous species than in monocultures. By using mixed-species stands the need for

  3. Investigation of physiological responses in Norway spruce needles to natural and anthropogenic factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasnik, C.R.; Batic, F.; Grill, D. [Erico Velenje Institute of Ecology, Research and Industrial Cooperation, Velenje (Slovenia)

    1996-12-31

    Among the various stress indicators for early identification of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten) decline, sulphur content, photosynthetic pigment content, activity of the enzyme peroxidase, content of water-soluble thiols and ascorbic acid were analysed in four age classes of spruce needles sampled from five trees. Ten sampling sites were selected according to the degree of forest decline, site conditions and air pollution from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (Slovenia).

  4. Gradients of the content of photosynthetic pigments and radiation as manifestations of the health condition of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemánek, T.; Martinková, M.; Štěrbová, D.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution and quantities of chlorophyll a + b and carotenoids were determined in a sample tree of Picea abies in order to evaluate its health condition. The content of photosynthetic pigments (PhP) was determined by spectrophotometric analysis. The sample tree was situated at the Rajec nad Svitavou locality, the Drahany Upland, Czech Republic (altitude 625 to 640 m). It was shown that the inner coordination of the content of PhP in the crown in relation to the age of needles and their insolation was sufficient. Thus, the tree did not show impaired health condition and its growth retardation resulted from the short crown. The extent of the photosynthetic apparatus and stability of the tree would be increased particularly after elongation of the lower part of a crown, the so-called compensating part

  5. Polyamines in embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Haarald Kvaalen; Subhash C. Minocha; Stephanie Long

    1993-01-01

    Embryogenic cultures of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) were initiated from dissected mature zygotic embryos. The tissues were grown on either proliferation medium or maturation medium. On proliferation medium, the embryogenic tissue continued to produce early stage somatic embryos (...

  6. Carbon sources in vertical profile of Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor; Urban, Otmar; Acosta, Manuel; Pokorný, Radek; Havránková, Kateřina; Formanek, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 30 (2003), s. 199-206 ISSN 1336-5266 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A141; GA ČR(CZ) GA526/03/1021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Carbon stock * respiration * Norway spruce Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  7. Mountain Norway spruce forests: Needle supply and its nutrient content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Marcela; Vacek, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 49, - (2003), s. 327-332 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114; GA ČR GA206/99/1416 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Šumava Mts. * Mountain Norway spruce forest * needle mass Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  8. Soil surface CO2 fluxes in a Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acosta, Manuel; Janouš, Dalibor; Marek, Michal V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 50 (2004), s. 573-578 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB3087301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Norway spruce * Soil CO2 efflux * Q10 Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  9. Isolation and Purity Assessment of Membranes from Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Enni; Takahashi, Junko; Jiménez Barboza, Luis A; Deng, Xianbao; Teeri, Teemu H; Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Lüthje, Sabine; Kärkönen, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Gaining membrane vesicles from different plant species and tissue types is crucial for membrane studies. Membrane vesicles can be used for further purification of individual membrane types, and, for example, in studies of membrane enzyme activities, transport assays, and in proteomic analysis. Membrane isolation from some species, such as conifers, has proved to be more difficult than that of angiosperm species. In this paper, we describe steps for isolating cellular membranes from developing xylem, phloem, and lignin-forming tissue-cultured cells of Norway spruce, followed by partial enrichment of plasma membranes by aqueous polymer two-phase partitioning and purity analyses. The methods used are partially similar to the ones used for mono- and dicotyledonous plants, but some steps require discreet optimization, probably due to a high content of phenolic compounds present in the tissues and cultured cells of Norway spruce.

  10. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  11. Determination of the terpene flux from orange species and Norway spruce by relaxed eddy accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.S.; Hummelshøj, P.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    Terpene fluxes from a Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest and an orange orchard (Citrus clementii and Citrus sinensis) were measured by relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) during summer 1997. alpha-pinene and beta-pinene were the most abundant terpenes emitted from Norway spruce and constituted...

  12. Endophyte communities vary in the needles of Norway spruce clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Tiina; Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Tuomivirta, Tero; Haapanen, Matti; Müller, Michael; Pennanen, Taina

    2013-03-01

    Endophytic fungi show no symptoms of their presence but can influence the performance and vitality of host trees. The potential use of endophytes to indicate vitality has been previously realized, but a standard protocol has yet to be developed due to an incomplete understanding of the factors that regulate endophyte communities. Using a culture-free molecular approach, we examined the extent to which host genotype influences the abundance, species richness, and community composition of endophytic fungi in Norway spruce needles. Briefly, total DNA was extracted from the surface-sterilized needles of 30 clones grown in a nursery field and the copy number of the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA was estimated by quantitative PCR. Fungal species richness and community composition were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and DNA sequencing. We found that community structure and ITS copy number varied among spruce clones, whereas species richness did not. Host traits interacting with endophyte communities included needle surface area and the location of cuttings in the experimental area. Although Lophodermium piceae is considered the dominant needle endophyte of Norway spruce, we detected this species in only 33% of samples. The most frequently observed fungus (66%) was the potentially pathogenic Phoma herbarum. Interestingly, ITS copy number of endophytic fungi correlated negatively with the richness of ectomycorrhizal fungi and thus potential interactions between fungal communities and their influence on the host tree are discussed. Our results suggest that in addition to environmental factors, endophyte communities of spruce needles are determined by host tree identity and needle surface area. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Profile Measurements of BVOC Emissions from a Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are known as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to their high reactivity with O3 and OH in the atmosphere [1, 2]. Norway spruce is one of the dominant boreal forest species in northern Europe, which has been considered to be high monoterpene (MT) emitters [3, 4]. BVOC emissions and compound composition vary considerably under different temperature and light conditions through growing season [5, 6]. Information of vertical profile emission patterns is indispensible for understanding chemical processes and oxidation sinks within canopy and for modelling evaluation. We characterize the in-canopy BVOC emissions from a 120 years old Norway spruce in Central Sweden (Norunda, 60°05'N, 17°29'E). Air samples were taken during the growing season (June to September 2013 & 2014) from transparent dynamic branch chambers set up in a vertical profile with 4 levels (20 m, 15 m, 11 m and 3 m agl.) on the spruce. Samples were collected every hour from the chamber with Tenax-TA adsorbent tubes and a pocket pump, and analyzed later by gas chromatography and a mass selective detector (GC-MS) to quantify each trapped terpenoid compound. The emission spectrum of Norway spruce at 20 m canopy height was found to be more complex than the emissions spectra at lower canopy levels, and included isoprene, MT and SQT from June to September, while MT was the dominating terpenoid species. The emission spectra of July and August (isoprene, 14 MT and 3 SQT) were much more complex compared to June and September at the 20 m canopy level, and mainly caused by an increase of MT species during peak season. Similarly, isoprene showed a distinctive seasonal pattern, and was detected at all the heights during noon time except the bottom 3 m level during peak summer, but only at the highest layer (20 m) during noon in early or late summer. O3 vertical profile data will be available for further chemical process analysis within canopy. References[1]M

  14. Norway spruce and spruce shoot aphid as indicators of traffic pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viskari, E-L.; Koessi, S. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Holopainen, J.K. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Agricultural Research Centre, Plant Production Research, Jokioinen (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    Two-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) seedlings were exposed to traffic emissions along roadsides with three different traffic densities and speed limits; highway, street and a quiet local road. The responses of the exposed seedlings as a host plant and those of spruce shoot aphid (Cinara pilicornis Hartig) were studied. The concentrations of soluble N and free amino acids, defence chemicals (total phenolics, monoterpenes) were analysed, and aphid growth and reproduction were studied. Along the highway, street and at the local road control site, the atmospheric concentrations of black carbon (BC) and oxides of N (NO{sub x}) were measured for 1 week during the experiment. The BC data indicate deposition of organic particulate compounds along the highway and street. The NO{sub x} concentrations along the highway and street showed great diurnal variation, but the average NO{sub x} concentrations were relatively low. Thus, no changes in N metabolism or growth of the exposed Norway spruce seedlings were found. Along the street, the concentrations of many individual free amino acids, such as proline, as well as total amino acid concentrations, were lower than at the associated control site. Correspondingly, there was also no increase in spruce shoot aphid mean relative growth rate. The aphid reproduction, however, increased along the highway and is suggested to be due to more conducive microclimatic conditions at the exposure site or lack of natural enemies. No changes in defence chemicals (total phenolics, monoterpenes) in relation to the traffic exposure were found. Instead, the microclimatic conditions (temperature, solar irradiation) seemed to affect the concentration of total phenolics. (Author)

  15. Characteristics of Norway spruce trees (Picea abies) surviving a spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakuš, R.; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda; Cudlín, Pavel; Blaženec, M.; Ježík, M.; Havlíček, František; Moravec, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 6 (2011), s. 965-973 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06068; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Keywords Norway spruce * Ips typographus * Host selection * Bark beetle attack * Crown geometry Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.685, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/p476l65x8hx72634/

  16. Tropospheric ozone fluxes in Norway spruce forest during the transition period from autumn to winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Zapletal, Miloš; Cudlín, Pavel; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Urban, Otmar

    2017-04-01

    Norway spruce exhibits seasonal variations in stomatal conductance and photosynthetic activity typical for overwintering plants, with a decline during autumn and a complete recovery during spring. We investigated ozone fluxes during this transient period (November 2016). Fluxes of tropospheric ozone, the major phytotoxic near-ground pollutant causing injuries to plant tissues, were measured at Bily Kriz experimental station in Beskydy Mountains, the Czech Republic. Dry chemiluminescence fast-response ozone sensor coupled with sonic anemometer was used to measure fast fluctuations in ozone concentration and three-dimensional wind speed, respectively. Apart from this eddy covariance technique, within-canopy ozone concentration gradient was simultaneously measured by UV-absorption based slow-response ozone analysers. Ozone fluxes were subsequently modelled by an Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model (ILTM). A comparison of measured and calculated fluxes is thus available. Moreover, stomatal ozone flux was calculated based on Evaporative/Resistive method assuming stomata are the most relevant sink in the spruce forest. The low NOx concentration throughout the year and low concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the transition period led to hypothesize that non-stomatal flux here estimated by difference between total ozone flux and stomatal ozone flux is represented mainly by dry soil deposition and wet deposition during the snow period. We discuss here the ILTM parameterisation with comparison to measured ozone fluxes. Correct estimation of stomatal ozone flux is essential, especially in transition periods, where main scientific emphasis is put rarely. In addition, this research should help to develop metrics for ozone-risk assessment and advance our knowledge in biosphere-atmosphere exchange over Norway spruce forest. Acknowledgement This work was supported by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports within the National Programme for Sustainability

  17. Mechanical properties of timber from wind damaged Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2003-01-01

    . The paper reports on a investigation of the relation between degree of damage and mechanical proper-ties of sawn timber from wind damaged Norway spruce. The project included about 250 bolts from wind damaged trees. The majority of bolts were cut to deliver a full-diameter plank containing the pith......A storm may subject a tree to such bending stresses that extensive compression damage develops in the lee side. The tree may survive the wind load or it may be thrown. However, the damage is inherent and it may be of a magnitude to influence the mechanical properties of boards sawn from the stem...... taken to bending failure and the relations between compression damage and bending strength and stiffness were established. The results showed that significant reductions of bending strength of dry timber are only caused by such wind induced compression damages that are easily recognised at a planed...

  18. Seasonal variation of BVOC emissions from Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Schurgers, Guy; Ekberg, Anna; Arneth, Almut; Holst, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are known as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to their high reactivity in the atmosphere [1, 2]. Dominant boreal forest species (pine, spruce and birch) have been considered to be high monoterpene (MT) emitters [3, 4], and BVOC emissions and compound composition vary considerably under different temperature and light conditions through growing season [5, 6]. We characterize the canopy BVOC emissions variation from a Norway spruce dominated boreal forest in Central Sweden (Norunda, 60°05'N, 17°29'E). Air samples were taken during growing season (June to September 2013) from transparent dynamic branch chambers set up on Norway spruce at 20m agl. using a scaffolding tower. Air samples were collected every hour from the chamber with Tenax-TA adsorbent tubes and a pocket pump, and analyzed later by gas chromatography and a mass selective detector (GC-MS) to quantify trapped terpenoid compounds. Total terpenoids emission rates in August were found to be highest even though the highest average air temperature was observed in July. Isoprene could not be detected in any sample in June and in most samples from September, but during peak season. Emissions of Isoprene, MT and sesquiterpenes (SQT) showed a clear diurnal pattern in July and August with highest emissions at noon time, however, the composition of terpenoids was slightly changing among different months. The most complex chemical composition with 13 different MT species occurred in late July, while 9 SQT species occurred in the middle of August. However, the fraction of dominant MT species (Limonene, α-Pinene, β-Pinene and Camphene) of the total terpenoids emission was almost constant throughout the whole season from June to September except for β-Pinene which showed a higher fraction in August. References [1]M.Ehn et al., 2014, Nature, 506(7489), 476-479. [2]M.Kulmala et al., 2004, Atmos. Environ., 4, 557-562. [3]J.Rinne et al., 2005, Boreal Environ

  19. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samar Al Sayegh Petkovsek; Franc Batic; Cvetka Ribaric Lasnik [ERICo Velenje, Velenje (Slovenia). Ecological Research and Industrial Cooperation Institute

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO{sub 2} from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO{sub 2}.

  20. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar [ERICo Velenje, Ecological Research and Industrial Cooperation Institute, Koroska 58, 3320 Velenje (Slovenia)], E-mail: samar.petkovsek@erico.si; Batic, Franc [Agronomy Department, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ribaric Lasnik, Cvetka [Institute of Environment and Spatial Planning, Ipavceva 18, 3000 Celje (Slovenia)

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO{sub 2} from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO{sub 2}. - Total sulphur content in needles is a well proved indicator of sulphur burden in the environment.

  1. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar; Batic, Franc; Ribaric Lasnik, Cvetka

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO(2) from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO(2).

  2. Ameliorating effect of UV-B radiation on the response of Norway spruce and Scots pine to ambient ozone concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnitzler, J.P.; Langebartels, C.; Heller, W.; Liu JinChen; Lippert, M.; Dohring, T.; Bahnweg, G.; Sandermann, H.

    1999-01-01

    Elevated levels of both ozone and UV-B radiation are typical for high-altitude sites. Few studies have investigated their possible interaction on plants. This study reports interactive effects of O 3 and UV-B radiation in four-year-old Norway spruce and Scots pine trees. The trees were cultivated in controlled environmental facilities under simulated climatic conditions recorded on Mt Wank, an Alpine mountain in Bavaria, and were exposed for one growing season to simulated ambient or twice-ambient ozone regimes at either near ambient or near zero UV-B radiation levels. Chlorotic mottling and yellowing of current year needles became obvious under twice-ambient O 3 in both species at the onset of a high ozone episode in July. Development of chlorotic mottling in relation to accumulated ozone concentrations over a threshold of 40 nL L –1 was more pronounced with near zero rather than ambient UV-B radiation levels. In Norway spruce, photosynthetic parameters at ambient CO 2 concentration, measured at the end of the experiment, were reduced in trees cultivated under twice-ambient O 3 , irrespective of the UV-B treatment. Effects on photosynthetic capacity and carboxylation efficiency were restricted to trees exposed to near zero levels of UV-B radiation, and twice-ambient O 3 . The data indicate that UV-B radiation, applied together with O 3 , ameliorates the detrimental effects of O 3 . The data also demonstrate that foliar symptoms develop more rapidly in Scots pine than in Norway spruce at higher accumulated ozone concentrations. (author)

  3. Pervasive growth reduction in Norway spruce forests following wind disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Seidl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent decades the frequency and severity of natural disturbances by e.g., strong winds and insect outbreaks has increased considerably in many forest ecosystems around the world. Future climate change is expected to further intensify disturbance regimes, which makes addressing disturbances in ecosystem management a top priority. As a prerequisite a broader understanding of disturbance impacts and ecosystem responses is needed. With regard to the effects of strong winds--the most detrimental disturbance agent in Europe--monitoring and management has focused on structural damage, i.e., tree mortality from uprooting and stem breakage. Effects on the functioning of trees surviving the storm (e.g., their productivity and allocation have been rarely accounted for to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that growth reduction was significant and pervasive in a 6.79 million hectare forest landscape in southern Sweden following the storm Gudrun (January 2005. Wind-related growth reduction in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. forests surviving the storm exceeded 10% in the worst hit regions, and was closely related to maximum gust wind speed (R(2 = 0.849 and structural wind damage (R(2 = 0.782. At the landscape scale, wind-related growth reduction amounted to 3.0 million m(3 in the three years following Gudrun. It thus exceeds secondary damage from bark beetles after Gudrun as well as the long-term average storm damage from uprooting and stem breakage in Sweden. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the impact of strong winds on forest ecosystems is not limited to the immediately visible area of structural damage, and call for a broader consideration of disturbance effects on ecosystem structure and functioning in the context of forest management and climate change mitigation.

  4. Characterization of variable EST SSR markers for Norway spruce (Picea abies L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiess Nadine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Norway spruce is widely distributed across Europe and the predominant tree of the Alpine region. Fast growth and the fact that timber can be harvested cost-effectively in relatively young populations define its status as one of the economically most important tree species of Northern Europe. In this study, EST derived simple sequence repeat (SSR markers were developed for the assessment of putative functional diversity in Austrian Norway spruce stands. Results SSR sequences were identified by analyzing 14,022 publicly available EST sequences. Tri-nucleotide repeat motifs were most abundant in the data set followed by penta- and hexa-nucleotide repeats. Specific primer pairs were designed for sixty loci. Among these, 27 displayed polymorphism in a testing population of 16 P. abies individuals sampled across Austria and in an additional screening population of 96 P. abies individuals from two geographically distinct Austrian populations. Allele numbers per locus ranged from two to 17 with observed heterozygosity ranging from 0.075 to 0.99. Conclusions We have characterized variable EST SSR markers for Norway spruce detected in expressed genes. Due to their moderate to high degree of variability in the two tested screening populations, these newly developed SSR markers are well suited for the analysis of stress related functional variation present in Norway spruce populations.

  5. Modelling long-term water yield effects of forest management in a Norway spruce forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, X.; Lamačová, A.; Duffy, Ch.; Krám, P.; Hruška, Jakub; White, T.; Bhatt, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 2 (2015), s. 174-191 ISSN 0262-6667 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Lysina critical zone observatory * PIHM * Norway spruce * forest management Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.182, year: 2015

  6. Soluble and cell wall-bound phenolics and lignin in Ascocalyx abietina infected Norway spruces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Malá, J.; Hrubcová, Marie; Eder, Josef

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 3 (2006), s. 563-570 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Ascocalyx abietina (Lagerberg) * Lignin * Norway spruce Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.631, year: 2006

  7. Juvenility and serial vegetative propagation of Norway spruce clones (Picea abies Karst.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.B. St. Clair; J. Kleinschmit; J. Svolba

    1985-01-01

    Effects associated with progressive maturation of clones are of greatest concern in clonal tree improvement programs. Serial propagation has been in use at the Lower Saxony Forest Research Institute since 1968 to arrest maturation in Norway spruce clones. By 1980 cuttings were established in the nursery that had been serially propagated from one to five cycles. This...

  8. Polyamines during somatic embryo development in Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L.))

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, J.; Cvikrová, Milena; Máchová, P.; Martincová, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2009), s. 75-80 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH82303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Norway spruce * somatic embryogenesis * putrescine Subject RIV: GK - Forestry www.agriculturejournals.cz/publishedArticle?journal=JFS&volume=55&firstPage=75

  9. Tolerance of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) embryogenic tissue to penicillin, carbapenem and aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malá, J.; Pavingerová, Daniela; Cvrčková, H.; Bříza, Jindřich; Dostál, J.; Šíma, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2009), s. 156-161 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * Norway spruce * penicillin antibiotics * Agrobacterium tumefaciens * carbapenem antibiotics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. In situ autumn ozone fumigation of mature Norway spruce - Effects on net photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve cuvettes were installed on current year's twigs in the top of the canopy of a 35 years old Norway spruce stand in Denmark. From 10 to 16 hours, six of the cuvettes received 5-60 nl l(-1) ozone in addition to ambient air and six cuvettes received ambient air with a 40% reduced ozone concent...

  11. Application of Raman spectroscopy to analyse lignin/cellulose ratio in Norway spruce tree rings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vítek, Petr; Klem, Karel; Urban, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 20, 1-2 (2017), s. 41-48 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : dendrochronology * vibrational spectroscopy * lignification * Norway spruce * abiotic stress Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany

  12. Defence responses induced in embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce by two fractions of Gremmeniella abietina mycelia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Malá, J.; Hrubcová, Marie; Martincová, Olga; Cvrčková, H.; Lipavská, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 6 (2010), s. 467-484 ISSN 1437-4781 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH82303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : defence response * Norway spruce * Gremmeniella abietina Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 0.948, year: 2010

  13. Interaction of soil filamentous fungi affects needle composition and nutrition of Norway spruce seedlings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrnka, Libor; Tokárová, H.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Matějka, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 5 (2009), s. 887-897 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/05/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : mycelial interaction s * norway spruce * nutrient cycling Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.603, year: 2009

  14. The variability of wood density and compression strength of Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáček, Petr; Fajstavr, Marek; Stojanović, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, 1-2 (2017), s. 17-26 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Norway spruce * wood density * compression strength * variability Subject RIV: GK - Forestry OBOR OECD: Forestry

  15. Isoprenoid emission variation of Norway spruce across a European latitudinal transect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Wang, Min; Karlsson, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is one of the dominant tree species in the European boreal zone with the capacity to grow over large areas within Europe. It is an important emitter of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which can act as precursors of photochemical smog and ozone and contribute...... to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Isoprenoid emissions were measured from Norway spruce trees at seven different sites, distributed from Ljubljana in Slovenia to Piikkiö in Finland. Four of the sites were part of a network of genetically identical spruce trees...... and contained two separate provenances. The remaining three sites were part of other networks which have been used to conduct studies in the European boreal zone. There were minimal differences in the standardized emission rates between sites and across latitudes. The emission profile differed between...

  16. Height increment of understorey Norway spruces under different tree canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olavi Laiho

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Stands having advance regeneration of spruce are logical places to start continuous cover forestry (CCF in fertile and mesic boreal forests. However, the development of advance regeneration is poorly known. Methods This study used regression analysis to model the height increment of spruce understorey as a function of seedling height, site characteristics and canopy structure. Results An admixture of pine and birch in the main canopy improves the height increment of understorey. When the stand basal area is 20 m2ha-1 height increment is twice as fast under pine and birch canopies, as compared to spruce. Height increment of understorey spruce increases with increasing seedling height. Between-stand and within-stand residual variation in the height increment of understorey spruces is high. The increment of 1/6 fastest-growing seedlings is at least 50% greater than the average. Conclusions The results of this study help forest managers to regulate the density and species composition of the stand, so as to obtain a sufficient height development of the understorey. In pure and almost pure spruce stands, the stand basal area should be low for a good height increment of the understorey.

  17. Combined fluorescence, reflectance, and ground measurements of a stressed Norway spruce forest for forest damage assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banninger, C.

    1991-01-01

    The detection and monitoring of stress and damage in forested areas is of utmost importance to forest managers for planning purposes. Remote sensing are the most suitable means to obtain this information. This requires that remote sensing data employed in a forest survey be properly chosen and utilized for their ability to measure canopy spectral features directly related to key tree and canopy properties that are indicators of forest health and vitality. Plant reflectance in the visible to short wave IR regions (400 to 2500 nm) provides information on its biochemical, biophysical, and morphological make up, whereas plant fluorescence in the 400 to 750 nm region is more indicative of the capacity and functioning of its photosynthetic apparatus. A measure of both these spectral properties can be used to provide an accurate assessment of stress and damage within the forest canopy. Foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen are essential biochemical constituents required for the proper functioning and maintenance of a plant's biological processes. Chlorophyll-a is the prime reactive center for photosynthesis, by which a plant converts CO2 and H2O into necessary plant products. Nitrogen forms an important component of the amino-acids, enzymes, proteins, alkaloids, and cyanogenic compounds that make up a plant, including its pigments. Both chlorophyll and nitrogen have characteristic absorption features in the visible to short wave IR region. By measuring the wavelength position and depth of these features and the fluorescence response of the foliage, the health and vitality of a canopy can be ascertained. Examples for a stressed Norway spruce forest in south-eastern Austria are presented.

  18. Seasonal courses of photosynthetic parameters in sun- and shade-acclimated spruce shoots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Otmar; Holub, Petr; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, 1-2 (2017), s. 49-56 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : CO2 assimilation * gas-exchange * Norway spruce * ontogeny * temperature * vapour pressure deficit * vertical canopy profile Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) https://beskydy.mendelu.cz/10/1/0049/

  19. Humus components and soil biogenic structures in Norway spruce ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Galvan, Paola; Ponge, Jean-François; Chersich, Silvia; Zanella, Augusto

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Whether the structure of Oa and A horizons varies according to animal activity is still a matter of conjecture, especially in amphi, a humus form with mixed features of mull and moder, which has been described in environments with strong seasonal contrasts. The Oa and A horizons of spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] coniferous forests of the Province of Trento (Italy) were sampled in six sites with a total of 134 humus profiles along transect lines, embracing the variety...

  20. Antibacterial effects of home-made resin salve from Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautio, M; Sipponen, A; Peltola, R; Lohi, J; Jokinen, J J; Papp, A; Carlson, P; Sipponen, P

    2007-04-01

    Resin salve made from Norway spruce (Picea abies) is traditionally used in folk medicine to heal skin ulcers and infected wounds. Its antimicrobial properties were studied against certain human bacteria important in infected skin wounds. The sensitivity of the resin against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was studied in vitro by methods that are routinely used in microbiology laboratories. The resin salve exhibited a bacteriostatic effect against all tested Gram-positive bacteria but only against Proteus vulgaris of the Gram-negative bacteria. Interestingly, the resin inhibited the growth of bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), both on agar plates and in culture media. The study demonstrated antimicrobial activity of the resin salve and provided objective evidence of its antimicrobial properties. It gives some explanations why the traditional use of home-made resin salve from Norway spruce is experienced as being effective in the treatment of infected skin ulcers.

  1. Root uptake of lead by Norway spruce grown on Pb-210 spiked soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmand, M.F.; Nielsen, Sven Poul; Johnsen, I.

    2009-01-01

    The root uptake of lead (Pb) by trees and the transfer of Pb by leaf litter deposition to the forest floor were investigated through a pot experiment with Norway spruce. Natural Pb and radio isotopic lead (210Pb) were determined in needles and twigs and in the pot soil spiked with 210Pb. Calculat......The root uptake of lead (Pb) by trees and the transfer of Pb by leaf litter deposition to the forest floor were investigated through a pot experiment with Norway spruce. Natural Pb and radio isotopic lead (210Pb) were determined in needles and twigs and in the pot soil spiked with 210Pb....... Calculations of the specific activity in plant material and in the supporting pot soil showed that less than 2% of the Pb content of needles and twigs originates from root uptake and approximately 98% are deposited from the atmosphere. Atmospheric Pb has declined by a factor of 7 from 1980 to 2007 but is still...

  2. Wintertime photosynthetic capacity of black spruce (Picea mariana) in boreal forests in interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, T.; Koyama, L. A.; Kielland, K.

    2015-12-01

    In boreal forests, the growing season is short, and winter temperature is low and fluctuates from considerably below freezing point to intermittent warm spells. Under such conditions, it is important for plants to retain their photosynthetic capacity throughout the winter. To understand the importance of wintertime photosynthetic activity for evergreen boreal coniferous species, the light response curve of black spruce (Picea mariana) was monitored in Fairbanks, interior Alaska (64°86'N, 147°84'W) throughout the winter, and compared with those in the summer. Cuttings of black spruce were collected, and gas exchange of their needles was measured in the incubator set to 0 °C using a gas analyzer (LI-6400, Li-Cor Inc.). A non-rectangular hyperbolic model was fitted to these data, and physiological parameters such as the maximum photosynthesis rate, dark respiration rate and quantum yield of photosynthesis were extracted. The apparent quantum yield of photosynthesis remained low throughout the winter for black spruce. The maximum photosynthesis rate was downregulated as air temperature fell in early winter, but did not increase in March when air temperature rose. This suggests that photoinhibition may occur more strongly in March than in early winter. The average maximum rates of photosynthesis in winter were almost 10% of the value measured in summer. On the other hand, the dark respiration rate did not considerably differ between seasons. These results provide new insights into winter photosynthetic activity and its role in boreal forest ecosystems.

  3. The influence of climate change on stomatal ozone flux to a mountain Norway spruce forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, M.; Pretel, J.; Chroust, P.; Cudlín, Pavel; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Czerný, Radek; Hůnová, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 169, OCT 2012 (2012), s. 267-273 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk OC10022; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Stomatal ozone flux * AOT40 * Phytotoxic Ozone Dose * Norway spruce * Net ecosystem production * Ozone * Climate change Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  4. Impact of elevated carbon dioxide concentration on carbohydrate content in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabálková, Jana; Chmelík, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 99, S (2005), s552-s553 ISSN 0009-2770. [Meeting on Chemistry and Life /3./. Brno, 20.09.2005-22.09.2005] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/1182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : Norway spruce * needles * carbohydrates Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.445, year: 2005

  5. Physiological responses of Norway spruce trees to elevated CO2 and SO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tausz, M.; De Kok, L.J.; Stulen, I.

    Young Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees were exposed to elevated CO2 (0.8 mL L(-1)), SO2 (0.06 mu L L(-1)), and elevated CO2 and SO2 (0.8 mL L(-1) and 0.06 mu L L(-1), respectively) for three months. Exposure to elevated CO2 resulted in an increased biomass production of the needles,

  6. Utilization of hyperspectral image optical indices to assess the Norway spruce forest health status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mišurec, J.; Kopáčková, V.; Lhotáková, Z.; Hanuš, Jan; Weyermann, J.; Entcheva-Campbel, P.; Albrechtová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, JUN 2012 (2012), 63545-1-63545-25 ISSN 1931-3195 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1989 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : chlorophyll * optical indices * Norway spruce * continuum removal * HyMap * actual physiological status * Sokolov basin * forest management Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.876, year: 2012

  7. Norway spruce crown structure changes under long-term multiple stress impact in Central European Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, Ivo; Cudlín, Pavel; Polák, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. 252-255 ISSN 1335-342X. [Long Term Air Pollution Effect on Forest Ecosystems (International Meeting for Specialists in Air Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems)/20./. Zvolen, 30.08.2002-01.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Norway spruce * crown transformation * tree status Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.100, year: 2003

  8. Do water-limiting conditions predispose Norway spruce to bark beetle attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherer, Sigrid; Matthews, Bradley; Katzensteiner, Klaus; Blackwell, Emma; Henschke, Patrick; Hietz, Peter; Pennerstorfer, Josef; Rosner, Sabine; Kikuta, Silvia; Schume, Helmut; Schopf, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Drought is considered to enhance susceptibility of Norway spruce (Picea abies) to infestations by the Eurasian spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Curculionidae), although empirical evidence is scarce. We studied the impact of experimentally induced drought on tree water status and constitutive resin flow, and how physiological stress affects host acceptance and resistance. We established rain-out shelters to induce both severe (two full-cover plots) and moderate (two semi-cover plots) drought stress. In total, 18 sample trees, which were divided equally between the above treatment plots and two control plots, were investigated. Infestation was controlled experimentally using a novel ‘attack box’ method. Treatments influenced the ratios of successful and defended attacks, but predisposition of trees to infestation appeared to be mainly driven by variations in stress status of the individual trees over time. With increasingly negative twig water potentials and decreasing resin exudation, the defence capability of the spruce trees decreased. We provide empirical evidence that water-limiting conditions impair Norway spruce resistance to bark beetle attack. Yet, at the same time our data point to reduced host acceptance byI. typographus with more extreme drought stress, indicated by strongly negative pre-dawn twig water potentials. PMID:25417785

  9. Inducibility of chemical defenses in Norway spruce bark is correlated with unsuccessful mass attacks by the spruce bark beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebe, Christian; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Birgersson, Göran; Witzell, Johanna; Brodelius, Peter E; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hansson, Bill S; Krokene, Paal; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2012-09-01

    Secondary attraction to aggregation pheromones plays a central role in the host colonization behavior of the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. However, it is largely unknown how the beetles pioneering an attack locate suitable host trees, and eventually accept or reject them. To find possible biomarkers for host choice by I. typographus, we analyzed the chemistry of 58 Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees that were subsequently either (1) successfully attacked and killed, (2) unsuccessfully attacked, or (3) left unattacked. The trees were sampled before the main beetle flight in a natural Norway spruce-dominated forest. No pheromones were used to attract beetles to the experimental trees. To test the trees' defense potential, each tree was treated in a local area with the defense hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJ), and treated and untreated bark were analyzed for 66 different compounds, including terpenes, phenolics and alkaloids. The chemistry of MeJ-treated bark correlated strongly with the success of I. typographus attack, revealing major chemical differences between killed trees and unsuccessfully attacked trees. Surviving trees produced significantly higher amounts of most of the 39 analyzed mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes and of 4 of 20 phenolics. Alkaloids showed no clear pattern. Differences in untreated bark were less pronounced, where only 1,8-cineole and (-)-limonene were significantly higher in unsuccessfully attacked trees. Our results show that the potential of individual P. abies trees for inducing defense compounds upon I. typographus attack may partly determine tree resistance to this bark beetle by inhibiting its mass attack.

  10. Distinct genecological patterns in seedlings of Norway spruce and silver fir from a mountainous landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Aline; Sperisen, Christoph; Howe, Glenn Thomas; Brang, Peter; Walthert, Lorenz; St Clair, John Bradley; Heiri, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the genecology of forest trees is critical for gene conservation, for predicting the effects of climate change and climate change adaptation, and for successful reforestation. Although common genecological patterns have emerged, species-specific details are also important. Which species are most vulnerable to climate change? Which are the most important adaptive traits and environmental drivers of natural selection? Even though species have been classified as adaptive specialists vs. adaptive generalists, large-scale studies comparing different species in the same experiment are rare. We studied the genecology of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and silver fir (Abies alba), two co-occurring but ecologically distinct European conifers in Central Europe. For each species, we collected seed from more than 90 populations across Switzerland, established a seedling common-garden test, and developed genecological models that associate population variation in seedling growth and phenology to climate, soil properties, and site water balance. Population differentiation and associations between seedling traits and environmental variables were much stronger for Norway spruce than for silver fir, and stronger for seedling height growth than for bud phenology. In Norway spruce, height growth and second flushing were strongly associated with temperature and elevation, with seedlings from the lowlands being taller and more prone to second flush than seedlings from the Alps. In silver fir, height growth was more weakly associated with temperature and elevation, but also associated with water availability. Soil characteristics explained little population variation in both species. We conclude that Norway spruce has become an adaptive specialist because trade-offs between rapid juvenile growth and frost avoidance have subjected it to strong diversifying natural selection based on temperature. In contrast, because silver fir has a more conservative growth habit, it has

  11. Diversity of endophytic fungi of single Norway spruce needles and their role as pioneer decomposers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M M; Valjakka, R; Suokko, A; Hantula, J

    2001-07-01

    The diversity of endophytic fungi within single symptomless Norway spruce needles is described and their possible role as pioneer decomposers after needle detachment is investigated. The majority (90%) of all 182 isolates from green intact needles were identified as Lophodermium piceae. Up to 34 isolates were obtained from single needles. Generally, all isolates within single needles had distinct randomly amplified microsatellite (RAMS) patterns. Single trees may thus contain a higher number of L. piceae individuals than the number of their needles. To investigate the ability of needle endophytes to act as pioneer decomposers, surface-sterilized needles were incubated on sterile sand inoculated with autoclaved or live spruce forest humus layer. The dry weight loss of 13-17% found in needles after a 20-week incubation did not significantly differ between the sterilized and live treatments. Hence, fungi surviving the surface sterilization of needles can act as pioneer decomposers. A considerable portion of the needles remained green during the incubation. Brown and black needles, in which the weight loss had presumably taken place, were invaded throughout by single haplotypes different from L. piceae. Instead, Tiarasporella parca, a less common needle endophyte, occurred among these invaders of brown needles. Needle endophytes of Norway spruce seem thus to have different abilities to decompose host tissues after needle cast. L. piceae is obviously not an important pioneer decomposer of Norway spruce needles. The diversity of fungal individuals drops sharply when needles start to decompose. Thus, in single needles the decomposing mycota is considerably less diverse than the endophytic mycota.

  12. Does the orientation of Norway spruce (Picea abies /L./ Karst.) branches within sunlit crown part influence the heterogeneity of biochemical, structural and spectral characteristics of needles?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lhotáková, Z.; Albrechtová, J.; Malenovsky, Z.; Rock, B.N.; Polák, T.; Cudlín, P.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if selected biochemical, structural and spectral properties of Norway spruce needles are influenced by the azimuth orientation of the branch. Three youngest needle age classes from 20 mature (100 years old or older) Norway spruce trees were sampled from upper

  13. Influence of road salting on the adjacent Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forczek, S.T.; Benada, O.; Kofronova, O.; Sigler, K.; Matucha, M.

    2011-01-01

    Winter deicing and traffic spreads salt to road-adjacent Norway spruce trees in the form of spraying and salt slops. Our use of Na36Cl revealed roots as the main pathway of salt uptake. One-shot application of a concentrated Na36Cl solution to spruce saplings by both irrigation and spraying causes macroscopic damage to the needles and affects the needle phyllosphere. Irrigation affects the trees more than spraying because Cl uptake through roots is faster and eventually leads to higher chloride content in the plant. Along with the root-needle route, spray-deposited chloride from the needles is re-transported back into the soil and again taken up by roots to needles

  14. Lophodermium piceae and Tryblidiopsis pinastri. Two latent colonizers of Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehtijaervi, A. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1998-12-31

    Among the endophytic microfungi colonizing Norway spruce, the non-pathogenic species Lophodermium piceae and Tryblidiopsis pinastri are ubiquitous. Most Norway spruce in Sweden are colonized by these fungi. L. piceae colonizes healthy needles of various ages, while T pinastri colonizes the bark of branches. New shoots become infected around the time of their emergence. Fruit bodies are formed after the needles and branches die. It was found that L. piceae colonized needles during the summer and early autumn, about six weeks after a prolonged period of intensive rain. The number of individual fungal mycelia per needle increased linearly with needle age. In experiments with trees, irrigation resulted in lower total colonization and delayed colonization of the current-year needles, regardless of whether fertilizer had been added. Colonization by L. piceae was lowest in the ammonium sulfate treatment, which simulated the deposition of air pollutants. Colonization was highest in the control and drought treatments, which did not differ significantly from each other. Only a few pathogenic fungi can damage Norway spruce needles. Needles damaged by the rust fungus Chrysomyxa abietis were investigated to study interactions between fungi. The frequency and intensity of L. piceae colonization were found to be similar for C. abietis infected and healthy needles. However, in needles partially infected with rust, L. piceae seemed to establish itself easier in the rust-infected part than in the green part. The genetic structures of populations of T. pinastri in southern Sweden and Finland were investigated using DNA markers produced by means of arbitrarily primed PCR. Single spore isolates from apothecia were used in the analysis. A considerable amount of variation was detected. No geographical differentiation was found among the populations studied

  15. Lophodermium piceae and Rhizosphaera kalkhoffi i in Norway spruce: correlations with host age and climatic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Scattolin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out in 4 similar Norway spruce stands and it demonstrated that the spreading structures produced by Lophodermium piceae and Rhizosphaera kalkhoffii are not correlated. The two fungi were always detected with opposite growth trends, probably due to different needle colonization and spreading strategies, and this was most likely also why they were able to co-exist, colonizing different parts of the needle. Independently of the year, site, sampling period and amount of precipitation, the two fungi were significantly less common in saplings and more common in mature trees, with frequencies also depending on both the minimum and the maximum temperatures.

  16. Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst. variability in progeny tests in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Branislav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Norway spruce is one of the most important economic species is Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is the species at the edge of its natural range; nevertheless it attains significant growth and yield results. The species is often used for afforestation purposes. In the previous period, 4 progeny tests of Norway spruce were established in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The offspring from 6 natural populations: Han Pijesak 1, Han Pijesak 2, Foča, Potoci, Olovo and Kneževo were build-in the progeny tests. In 2016, the samples of Norway spruce from 2 progeny tests: Srebrenica and Drinić were collected. In total, 360 samples were collected. DNA isolation was done according to Dumoline et al. (1990. For assessment of genetic differences among populations, co-dominant nSSR microsatellite system had been used. The number of effective alleles ranged from 7.78 in the population Potoci up to 15 in the population Kneževo, the average number of alleles was 13. The observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.61 for the population Han Pijesak 2 up to 0.68 for population Kneževo. The average observed heterozygosity was 0.65. Fixation index was in the range from -0.073 in the population Potoci, to 0.030 for the population Han Pijesak 2. The average value of Wright fixation index is -0.007. The average fixation index indicates the existence of a very small number of homozygotes. Concerning the variability among populations it has been concluded that the total level of genetic differentiation among populations was very low (FST= 0.026. The result of Nei’s genetic distance shows that the populations Olovo and Potoci are separated from other populations. The results obtained by genetic markers, in addition with other, morphological and physiological markers will be the basis for the further investigation of Norway spruce adaptability and possibility for the transfer of genetic material in light of climate changes.

  17. Site index curves for Norway spruce plantations on farmland with different soil types

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Tord

    1995-01-01

    Growth data were collected from 157 Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands planted on farmland in Sweden. The stands ranged in latitude from 55'N to 66'N. The mean age of the stands was 41 years (range, 25-91), and the mean stand density was 1640 stems ha-' (range, 400-3 722). The mean diameter at breast height (on bark) was 25 cm (range, 12-48). Classified soil types from northern Sweden were united into five groups: coarse sand (n= lo), the fine sand and silt group (14) till clay (1...

  18. Methyl Jasmonate Induces Traumatic Resin Ducts, Terpenoid Resin Biosynthesis, and Terpenoid Accumulation in Developing Xylem of Norway Spruce Stems1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane; Tholl, Dorothea; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2002-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) produces an oleoresin characterized by a diverse array of terpenoids, monoterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids, and diterpene resin acids that can protect conifers against potential herbivores and pathogens. Oleoresin accumulates constitutively in resin ducts in the cortex and phloem (bark) of Norway spruce stems. De novo formation of traumatic resin ducts (TDs) is observed in the developing secondary xylem (wood) after insect attack, fungal elicitation, and mechanical wounding. Here, we characterize the methyl jasmonate-induced formation of TDs in Norway spruce by microscopy, chemical analyses of resin composition, and assays of terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes. The response involves tissue-specific differentiation of TDs, terpenoid accumulation, and induction of enzyme activities of both prenyltransferases and terpene synthases in the developing xylem, a tissue that constitutively lacks axial resin ducts in spruce. The induction of a complex defense response in Norway spruce by methyl jasmonate application provides new avenues to evaluate the role of resin defenses for protection of conifers against destructive pests such as white pine weevils (Pissodes strobi), bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytidae), and insect-associated tree pathogens. PMID:12114556

  19. Phytosociological studies of the forests with sessile oak and Norway spruce from South-Eastern Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Indreica

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The forests with sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Norway spruce (Picea abies from south-eastern Transylvania represent a peculiar type of phytocenoses, rather unusual for the present-day vegetation of Romania’s territory. Aim of the study is to provide a detailed description of the vegetation and to identify the phytosociological and typological units to which it could belong. Beside this, stand structure and regeneration status of the main tree species are illustrated. The studied area is located around Carpathian intermountain depressions Braşov and Ciuc, where vegetation had a peculiar history and today sessile oak forests on high altitude exists, interfering with spruce forests. The hypothesis of the process naturalness is supported by vegetation history in the area, climate, stand structure and peculiarities of herb layer composition (the mixture of relic of both mountain-boreal origin and south-European origin, like Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Pyrola rotundifolia and respectively Potentilla micrantha, Lathyrus venetus respectively. Sintaxonomically, studied phytocenoses with sessile oak and spruce belong mainly to acidophilus oak forests (Luzulo luzuloidis-Quercetum petraeae, but some of them resemble oak-hornbeam forests (Carici pilosae-Carpinetum, indicating a more recent change in stand structure and suggesting that not the soil, but the climate is the driving force of succession. Regeneration of sessile oak is at least satisfactory, but the expansion of spruce in such stands could seriously restrict the survival of sessile oak. A new typological unit will be appropriate,for a better management of sessile oak forests with spruce admixture.

  20. Phytosociological studies of the forests with sessile oak and Norway spruce from South-Eastern Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Indreica

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The forests with sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Norway spruce (Picea abies from south-eastern Transylvania represent a peculiar type of phytocenoses, rather unusual for the present-day vegetation of Romania’s territory. Aim of the study is to provide a detailed description of the vegetation and to identify the phytosociological and typological units to which it could belong. Beside this, stand structure and regeneration status of the main tree species are illustrated. The studied area is located around Carpathian intermountain depressions Brasov and Ciuc, where vegetation had a peculiar history and today sessile oak forests on high altitude exists, interfering with spruce forests. The hypothesis of the process naturalness is supported by vegetation history in the area, climate, stand structure and peculiarities of herb layer composition (the mixture of relic of both mountain-boreal origin and south-European origin, like Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Pyrola rotundifolia and respectively Potentilla micrantha, Lathyrus venetus respectively. Sintaxonomically, studied phytocenoses with sessile oak and spruce belong mainly to acidophilus oak forests (Luzulo luzuloidis-Quercetum petraeae, but some of them resemble oak-hornbeam forests (Carici pilosae-Carpinetum, indicating a more recent change in stand structure and suggesting that not the soil, but the climate is the driving force of succession. Regeneration of sessile oak is at least satisfactory, but the expansion of spruce in such stands could seriously restrict the survival of sessile oak. A new typological unit will be appropriate, for a better management of sessile oak forests with spruce admixture.

  1. Evaluation of IRS-1C LISS-3 satellite data for Norway spruce defoliation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstroem, H.

    1999-02-01

    Satellite based remote sensing supported by air photo and field surveys, provide a means to area covering forest health assessment on a regional scale. Landsat TM data has been extensively used in studies of spruce and fir defoliation in Europe and North America. The temporal coverage of Landsat TM in combination with cloudiness however restrict the availability of data. In this study the LISS-3 sensor onboard the Indian Resource Satellite, IRS-1C, was evaluated for defoliation assessments in Norway spruce (Picea abies) in the central part of Sweden. The near infrared wavelength band proved to be best correlated with mean stand defoliation. After normalisation of satellite data for topographic conditions, the correlation coefficient increased from -0,19 to -0,83. Normalising satellite data for species composition did not improve the results though. The correction coefficients involved in the procedure were originally developed for Landsat TM, and proved to be inadequate for the LISS-3 data set. A thorough examination of the effects of species composition on LISS-3 data is needed to yield better results. The correlation between observed defoliation in the verification stands and predicted (based on the inverse regression function between corrected NIR values and defoliation in reference stands) was 0,70, despite a very limited range of defoliation in the verification set. IRS-1C LISS-3 is fully comparable to Landsat TM for spruce defoliation studies, although the results would probably not be significantly improved 49 refs, 7 figs, 10 tabs

  2. Impact of drought and stand edge on mycorrhizal density on the fine roots of Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítězslava Pešková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the mycorrhizal status and root system of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. with respect to trees’ position within the stand and artificially induced drought stress. Root systems were sampled during autumn of 2008, 2009 and 2013 from spruces exposed to varying conditions (totalling 18 trees, 47 samples. The experiment involved six groups of 3 spruces each. Three groups were growing within the stand and three groups at the stand’s edge. One tree from each group (total 6 was exposed to artificial drought using shelters deflecting rainfall away from the root system. For each sample, the number of active and non-active mycorrhizae on 20 root segments about 5 cm long was assessed. The densities of active and non-active mycorrhizae, proportion of active mycorrhizae, and root dry biomass weight were assessed. Factors’ significances were determined using ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test or the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests. Samples from outside the sheltered area were characterized by higher numbers of active mycorrhizae than were those sampled within the sheltered area. Induced drought stress significantly influenced active mycorrhizae density. Significantly higher root dry biomass (roots <1 mm in diameter was found at the stand’s interior versus its edge.

  3. Norway spruce (Picea abies) laccases: characterization of a laccase in a lignin-forming tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutaniemi, Sanna; Malmberg, Heli A; Simola, Liisa K; Teeri, Teemu H; Kärkönen, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Secondarily thickened cell walls of water-conducting vessels and tracheids and support-giving sclerenchyma cells contain lignin that makes the cell walls water impermeable and strong. To what extent laccases and peroxidases contribute to lignin biosynthesis in muro is under active evaluation. We performed an in silico study of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) laccases utilizing available genomic data. As many as 292 laccase encoding sequences (genes, gene fragments, and pseudogenes) were detected in the spruce genome. Out of the 112 genes annotated as laccases, 79 are expressed at some level. We isolated five full-length laccase cDNAs from developing xylem and an extracellular lignin-forming cell culture of spruce. In addition, we purified and biochemically characterized one culture medium laccase from the lignin-forming cell culture. This laccase has an acidic pH optimum (pH 3.8-4.2) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation. It has a high affinity to coniferyl alcohol with an apparent Km value of 3.5 μM; however, the laccase has a lower catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) for coniferyl alcohol oxidation compared with some purified culture medium peroxidases. The properties are discussed in the context of the information already known about laccases/coniferyl alcohol oxidases of coniferous plants. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Pathogenicity of Neonectria fuckeliana on Norway Spruce Clones in Sweden and Potential Management Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pettersson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The fungus Neonectria fuckeliana has become an increasing problem on Norway spruce (Picea abies in the Nordic countries during recent years. Canker wounds caused by the pathogen reduce timber quality and top-dieback is a problem for the Christmas tree industry. In this study, four inoculation trials were conducted to examine the ability of N. fuckeliana to cause disease on young Norway spruce plants and determine how different wound types would affect the occurrence and severity of the disease. Symptom development after 8–11 months was mainly mild and lesion lengths under bark were generally minor. However, N. fuckeliana could still be reisolated and/or molecularly detected. Slow disease development is in line with older studies describing N. fuckeliana as a weak pathogen. However, the results do not explain the serious increased damage by N. fuckeliana registered in Nordic forests and Christmas tree plantations. Potential management implications, such as shearing Christmas trees during periods of low inoculum pressure, cleaning secateurs between trees, and removal and burning of diseased branches and trees to avoid inoculum transfer and to keep disease pressure low, are based on experiments presented here and experiences with related pathogens.

  5. Endogenous Nod-factor-like signal molecules promote early somatic embryo development in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia V; Wiweger, Malgorzata; Kenne, Lennart; von Arnold, Sara

    2002-02-01

    Embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce (Picea abies) are composed of pro-embryogenic masses (PEMs) and somatic embryos of various developmental stages. Auxin is important for PEM formation and proliferation. In this report we show that depletion of auxin blocks PEM development and causes large-scale cell death. Extracts of the media conditioned by embryogenic cultures stimulate development of PEM aggregates in auxin-deficient cultures. Partial characterization of the conditioning factor shows that it is a lipophilic, low-molecular-weight molecule, which is sensitive to chitinase and contains GlcNAc residues. On the basis of this information, we propose that the factor is a lipophilic chitin oligosaccharide (LCO). The amount of LCO correlates to the developmental stages of PEMs and embryos, with the highest level in the media conditioned by developmentally blocked cultures. LCO is not present in nonembryogenic cultures. Cell death, induced by withdrawal of auxin, is suppressed by extra supply of endogenous LCO or Nod factor from Rhizobium sp. NGR234. The effect can be mimicked by a chitotetraose or chitinase from Streptomyces griseus. Taken together, our data suggest that endogenous LCO acts as a signal molecule stimulating PEM and early embryo development in Norway spruce.

  6. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles induce embolism in drought stressed conifers (Norway spruce, stone pine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Gruber, Andreas; Bauer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    Freezing and thawing lead to xylem embolism when gas bubbles caused by ice formation expand during the thaw process. However, previous experimental studies indicated that conifers are resistant to freezing-induced embolism, unless xylem pressure becomes very negative during the freezing. In this study, we show that conifers experienced freezing-induced embolism when exposed to repeated freeze-thaw cycles and simultaneously to drought. Simulating conditions at the alpine timberline (128 days with freeze-thaw events and thawing rates of up to 9.5 K h(-1) in the xylem of exposed twigs during winter), young trees of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] and stone pine (Pinus cembra L.) were exposed to 50 and 100 freeze-thaw cycles. This treatment caused a significant increase in embolism rates in drought-stressed samples. Upon 100 freeze-thaw cycles, vulnerability thresholds (50% loss of conductivity) were shifted 1.8 MPa (Norway spruce) and 0.8 MPa (stone pine) towards less negative water potentials. The results demonstrate that freeze-thaw cycles are a possible reason for winter-embolism in conifers observed in several field studies. Freezing-induced embolism may contribute to the altitudinal limits of conifers.

  7. Complex Physiological Response of Norway Spruce to Atmospheric Pollution - Decreased Carbon Isotope Discrimination and Unchanged Tree Biomass Increment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čada, Vojtěch; Šantrůčková, Hana; Šantrůček, Jiří; Kubištová, Lenka; Seedre, Meelis; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pollution critically affects forest ecosystems around the world by directly impacting the assimilation apparatus of trees and indirectly by altering soil conditions, which subsequently also leads to changes in carbon cycling. To evaluate the extent of the physiological effect of moderate level sulfate and reactive nitrogen acidic deposition, we performed a retrospective dendrochronological analysis of several physiological parameters derived from periodic measurements of carbon stable isotope composition ((13)C discrimination, intercellular CO2 concentration and intrinsic water use efficiency) and annual diameter increments (tree biomass increment, its inter-annual variability and correlation with temperature, cloud cover, precipitation and Palmer drought severity index). The analysis was performed in two mountain Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands of the Bohemian Forest (Czech Republic, central Europe), where moderate levels of pollution peaked in the 1970s and 1980s and no evident impact on tree growth or link to mortality has been reported. The significant influence of pollution on trees was expressed most sensitively by a 1.88‰ reduction of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C). The effects of atmospheric pollution interacted with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature. As a result, we observed no change in intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), an abrupt increase in water use efficiency (iWUE) and no change in biomass increment, which could also partly result from changes in carbon partitioning (e.g., from below- to above-ground). The biomass increment was significantly related to Δ(13)C on an individual tree level, but the relationship was lost during the pollution period. We suggest that this was caused by a shift from the dominant influence of the photosynthetic rate to stomatal conductance on Δ(13)C during the pollution period. Using biomass increment-climate correlation analyses, we did not identify any clear pollution

  8. Genetic host-tree effects on the ectomycorrhizal community and root characteristics of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmala, S M; Rajala, T; Haapanen, M; Taylor, A F S; Pennanen, T

    2013-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was used to study the effects of host genotype on short root formation and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal community structure in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Rooted cuttings representing 55 clones were inoculated with a mix of vegetative hyphae of five ECM fungal species (Laccaria sp., Amphinema byssoides, Piloderma sp., Cadophora finlandia, Paxillus involutus). After one growing season, the ECM fungal community structure was determined by amplifying the fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of ribosomal DNA directly from ECM root tips. Restriction profiles of obtained amplicons were then compared to those of the inoculated strains. Spruce clones differed in their ECM fungal community composition; we found a statistically significant clone-specific effect on ECM fungal diversity and dominating fungal species. Nevertheless, the broad sense heritabilities of the levels of Laccaria sp., Piloderma sp. and A. byssoides colonisations as well as the ECM fungal community structure were low (H(2) = 0.04-0.11), owing to the high within-clone variation. As nitrogen concentration of needles correlated negatively with ECM fungal richness, our results imply that in the experimental conditions nutrient acquisition of young trees may benefit from colonisation with only one or two ECM fungal species. The heritability of short root density was moderate (H(2) = 0.41) and highest among all the measured shoot and root growth characteristics of Norway spruce cuttings. We suggest that the genetic component determining root growth and short root formation is significant for the performance of young trees in natural environments as these traits drive the formation of the below-ground symbiotic interactions.

  9. Isoprenoid emission variation of Norway spruce across a European latitudinal transect

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Wang, Min; Karlsson, Tomas; Seifert, Ana; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-12-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is one of the dominant tree species in the European boreal zone with the capacity to grow over large areas within Europe. It is an important emitter of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), which can act as precursors of photochemical smog and ozone and contribute to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere. Isoprenoid emissions were measured from Norway spruce trees at seven different sites, distributed from Ljubljana in Slovenia to Piikkiö in Finland. Four of the sites were part of a network of genetically identical spruce trees and contained two separate provenances. The remaining three sites were part of other networks which have been used to conduct studies in the European boreal zone. There were minimal differences in the standardized emission rates between sites and across latitudes. The emission profile differed between provenances and sites, but there were not any distinct patterns which could be connected to a change in latitude. By using genetically identical trees and comparing the emission rates between sites and with genetically different trees, it was observed that the emission patterns were mostly influenced by genetics. But in order to confirm this possible stability of the relative emission profile based on genetics, more studies need to be performed. The effects of branch height, season and variation between years on observed emission pattern variations were also investigated. There were indications of potential influences of all three factors. However, due to different experimental setups between measurement campaigns, it is difficult to draw any robust conclusions.

  10. Culturable bacterial populations associated with ectomycorrhizae of Norway spruce stands with different degrees of decline in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Avidano, L.; Rinaldi, M.; Gindro, R.; Cudlín, Pavel; Martinotti, M G.; Fracchia, L.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2010), s. 52-64 ISSN 0008-4166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Ectomycorrhizae * Norway spruce * forest decline Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.235, year: 2010

  11. Enhanced UV-B radiation may lead to the decrease of specific phenolic compounds in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Otmar; Vrchotová, Naděžda; Tříska, Jan; Marek, Michal V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 5 (2008), s. 564-567 ISSN 1018-4619 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : 4-hydroxyacetophenone * catechin * Norway spruce * picein * screening pigments * ultraviolet radiation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.463, year: 2008

  12. Genotype-environment interaction and stability in ten-year height growth of Norway spruce Clones (Picea abies Karst.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.B. St. Clair; J. Kleinschmit

    1986-01-01

    Norway spruce cuttings of 40 clones were tested on seven contrasting sites in northern Germany. Analysis of variance for ten-year height growth indicate a highly significant clone x site interaction. This interaction may be reduced by selection of stable clones. Several measures of stability were calculated and discussed. Characterization of sites by the method of...

  13. Complex analytical approach to characterization of the influence of carbon dioxide concentration on carbohydrate composition in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cabálková, Jana; Wahlund, K. G.; Chmelík, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1148, č. 2 (2007), s. 189-199 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/1182 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : non-structural carbohydrates * Norway spruce * needles Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.641, year: 2007

  14. Dynamics and composition of litterfall in an unmanaged Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest after bark-beetle outbreak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Jiří; Cudlín, Pavel; Fluksová, H.; Kaňa, Jiří; Picek, T.; Šantrůčková, H.; Svoboda, M.; Vaněk, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2015), s. 305-323 ISSN 1239-6095 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1218 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : bark beetle * litter * Norway spruce Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.476, year: 2015

  15. Long-term effects of CO2 enrichment on bud phenology and shoot growth patterns of Norway spruce juvenile trees

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, Ivana; Drápelová, I.; Kulhavý, J.; Marek, Michal V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2010), s. 251-257 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600870701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : bud * elevated CO2 * Norway spruce Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. Cryotolerance in Norway spruce and its association with growth rates, anatomical features and polyamines of embryogenic cultures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondráková, Zuzana; Cvikrová, Milena; Eliášová, Kateřina; Martincová, Olga; Vágner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 10 (2010), s. 1335-1348 ISSN 0829-318X R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 158; GA MŠk OC08013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cryopreservation * Norway spruce (Picea abies (L ) Karst) * somatic embryogenesis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 2.403, year: 2010

  17. Winter at the Alpine Timberline. Why Does Embolism Occur in Norway Spruce But Not in Stone Pine?1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Schwienbacher, Franziska; Bauer, Helmut

    2003-01-01

    Conifers growing at the alpine timberline are exposed to frost drought and freeze-thaw cycles during winter—stress factors known to induce embolism in tree xylem. The two dominant species of the European Central Alps timberline were studied: Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) and stone pine (Pinus cembra), which usually reaches higher altitudes. We hypothesized to find embolism only at the timberline and to observe less embolism in stone pine than in Norway spruce due to avoidance mechanisms. Seasonal courses of embolism and water potential were studied at 1,700 and 2,100 m during two winter seasons and correlated to vulnerability (to drought-induced embolism), leaf conductance, and micrometeorological data. Embolism was observed only at the timberline and only in Norway spruce (up to 49.2% loss of conductivity). Conductivity losses corresponded to low water potentials (down to −3.5 MPa) but also to the number of freeze-thaw events indicating both stress factors to contribute to embolism induction. Decreasing embolism rates—probably due to refilling—were observed already in winter. Stone pine did not exhibit an adapted vulnerability (50% loss of conductivity at −3.5 MPa) but avoided critical potentials (minimum −2.3 MPa): Cuticulare conductance was 3.5-fold lower than in Norway spruce, and angles between needles and axes were found to decrease in dehydrating branches. The extent of conductivity losses in Norway spruce and the spectrum of avoidance and recovery mechanisms in both species indicates winter embolism to be relevant for tree line formation. PMID:12586902

  18. Winter at the alpine timberline. Why does embolism occur in norway spruce but not in stone pine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Stefan; Schwienbacher, Franziska; Bauer, Helmut

    2003-02-01

    Conifers growing at the alpine timberline are exposed to frost drought and freeze-thaw cycles during winter-stress factors known to induce embolism in tree xylem. The two dominant species of the European Central Alps timberline were studied: Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) and stone pine (Pinus cembra), which usually reaches higher altitudes. We hypothesized to find embolism only at the timberline and to observe less embolism in stone pine than in Norway spruce due to avoidance mechanisms. Seasonal courses of embolism and water potential were studied at 1,700 and 2,100 m during two winter seasons and correlated to vulnerability (to drought-induced embolism), leaf conductance, and micrometeorological data. Embolism was observed only at the timberline and only in Norway spruce (up to 49.2% loss of conductivity). Conductivity losses corresponded to low water potentials (down to -3.5 MPa) but also to the number of freeze-thaw events indicating both stress factors to contribute to embolism induction. Decreasing embolism rates-probably due to refilling-were observed already in winter. Stone pine did not exhibit an adapted vulnerability (50% loss of conductivity at -3.5 MPa) but avoided critical potentials (minimum -2.3 MPa): Cuticulare conductance was 3.5-fold lower than in Norway spruce, and angles between needles and axes were found to decrease in dehydrating branches. The extent of conductivity losses in Norway spruce and the spectrum of avoidance and recovery mechanisms in both species indicates winter embolism to be relevant for tree line formation.

  19. Silver fir and Douglas fir are more tolerant to extreme droughts than Norway spruce in south-western Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Valentina; Büntgen, Ulf; Bauhus, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    Improving our understanding of the potential of forest adaptation is an urgent task in the light of predicted climate change. Long-term alternatives for susceptible yet economically important tree species such as Norway spruce (Picea abies) are required, if the frequency and intensity of summer droughts will continue to increase. Although Silver fir (Abies alba) and Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) have both been described as drought-tolerant species, our understanding of their growth responses to drought extremes is still limited. Here, we use a dendroecological approach to assess the resistance, resilience, and recovery of these important central Europe to conifer species the exceptional droughts in 1976 and 2003. A total of 270 trees per species were sampled in 18 managed mixed-species stands along an altitudinal gradient (400-1200 m a.s.l.) at the western slopes of the southern and central Black Forest in southwest Germany. While radial growth in all species responded similarly to the 1976 drought, Norway spruce was least resistant and resilient to the 2003 summer drought. Silver fir showed the overall highest resistance to drought, similarly to Douglas fir, which exhibited the widest growth rings. Silver fir trees from lower elevations were more drought prone than trees at higher elevations. Douglas fir and Norway spruce, however, revealed lower drought resilience at higher altitudes. Although the 1976 and 2003 drought extremes were quite different, Douglas fir maintained consistently the highest radial growth. Although our study did not examine population-level responses, it clearly indicates that Silver fir and Douglas fir are generally more resistant and resilient to previous drought extremes and are therefore suitable alternatives to Norway spruce; Silver fir more so at higher altitudes. Cultivating these species instead of Norway spruce will contribute to maintaining a high level of productivity across many Central European mountain forests under

  20. Frost sensivity and nutrient status  in a fertilized Norway spruce stand in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Anna Maria; Ingerslev, Morten; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the N, P and K status on frost sensitivity of Norway spruce needles in a fertilization experiment situated in a nutrient poor 29-year-old Picea abies stand in western Denmark. The relative difference in frost sensitivity among trees was assessed...... by an index of injury, based on conductivity measurements of ion leakage from needles. Despite fertilization, all trees indicated N, P and K deficiency. The foliage, collected in late winter, was generally not very frost sensitive, but foliage from trees with the lowest K and P status were more sensitive...... to frost, and the current year needles were more sensitive than the second and third year needles. The advancement of bud burst was assessed in May. Trees with a relatively high N concentration in the current year needles had a more advanced bud burst than trees with a lower N concentration, increasing...

  1. Resin-salve from Norway spruce--a potential method to treat infected chronic skin ulcers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipponen, Arno; Rautio, Merja; Jokinen, Janne J; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Lohi, Jouni

    2007-04-01

    The home-made resin salve from Norway spruce is traditionally and widely used in folk medicine to heal various skin infections and wounds in Northern Finland. We have performed laboratory studies to solve the mechanism of resin salve. The resin salve exhibited a bacteriostatic effect against all tested Gram-positive bacteria important in human medicine including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), but was not effective against Gram-negative bacteria. An exception among the Gram-negative bacteria was Proteus vulgaris against which resin salve was effective. High amounts of lipophilic extractives, like resin acids were dissolved into water from the resin salve. Also, a large proportion of lignans and cinnamic acid were found in the water extract.

  2. Antioxidant defences of Norway spruce bark against bark beetles and its associated blue-stain fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicijan Mateja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles and their fungal associates are integral parts of forest ecosystems, the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus Linnaeus, 1758 and the associated pathogenic blue stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica (SIEM. C. MOREAU, are the most devastating pests regarding Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. H. KARST.]. Bark beetles commonly inhabit weakened and felled trees as well as vital trees. They cause physiological disorders in trees by destroying a phloem and cambium or interrupt the transpiration -ow in the xylem. Conifers have a wide range of effective defence mechanisms that are based on the inner bark anatomy and physiological state of the tree. The basic function of bark defences is to protect the nutrient-and energy-rich phloem, the vital meristematic region of the vascular cambium, and the transpiration -ow in the sapwood. The main area of defence mechanisms is secondary phloem, which is physically and chemically protected by polyphenolic parenchyma (PP cells, sclerenchyma, calcium oxalate crystals and resin ducts. Conifer trunk pest resistance includes constitutive, inducible defences and acquired resistance. Both constitutive and inducible defences may deter beetle invasion, impede fungal growth and close entrance wounds. During a successful attack, systemic acquired resistance (SAR becomes effective and represents a third defence strategy. It gradually develops throughout the plant and provides a systemic change within the whole tree’s metabolism, which is maintained over a longer period of time. The broad range of defence mechanisms that contribute to the activation and utilisation of SAR, includes antioxidants and antioxidant enzymes, which are generally linked to the actions of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The presented review discusses the current knowledge on the antioxidant defence strategies of spruce inner bark against the bark beetle (Ips typographus and associated blue stain fungus (Ceratocystis polonica.

  3. The effect of artificially induced drought on radial increment and wood properties of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyske, Tuula; Hölttä, Teemu; Mäkinen, Harri; Nöjd, Pekka; Lumme, Ilari; Spiecker, Heinrich

    2010-01-01

    We studied experimentally the effects of water availability on height and radial increment as well as wood density and tracheid properties of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). The study was carried out in two long-term N-fertilization experiments in Southern Finland (Heinola and Sahalahti). At each site, one fertilized and one control plot was covered with an under-canopy roof preventing rainwater from reaching the soil. Two uncovered plots were monitored at each site. The drought treatment was initiated in the beginning of growing season and lasted for 60-75 days each year. The treatment was repeated for four to five consecutive years depending on the site. Altogether, 40 sample trees were harvested and discs sampled at breast height. From the discs, ring width and wood density were measured by X-ray densitometry. Tracheid properties were analysed by reflected-light microscopy and image analysis. Reduced soil water potential during the growing season decreased annual radial and height increment and had a small influence on tracheid properties and wood density. No statistically significant differences were found in the average tracheid diameter between the drought-treated and control trees. The average cell wall thickness was somewhat higher (7-10%) for the drought treatment than for the control, but the difference was statistically significant only in Sahalahti. An increased cell wall thickness was found in both early- and latewood tracheids, but the increase was much greater in latewood. In drought-treated trees, cell wall proportion within an annual ring increased, consequently increasing wood density. No interaction between the N fertilization and drought treatment was found in wood density. After the termination of the drought treatment, trees rapidly recovered from the drought stress. According to our results, severe drought due to the predicted climate change may reduce Norway spruce growth but is unlikely to result in large changes in wood properties.

  4. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka; Holst, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance on three common European tree species, namely English oak (Quercus robur), European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and two provenances of Norway spruce (Picea abies) in Taastrup, Denmark. Leaf scale measurements were performed on the lowest positioned branches of the tree in July 2015. Light intensity was increased in four steps (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 µmol m-2 s-1), whilst other chamber conditions such as temperature, humidity and CO2 levels were fixed. Whereas the emission rate differed between individuals of the same species, the relative contributions of compounds to the total isoprenoid emission remained similar. Whilst some compounds were species specific, the compounds α-pinene, camphene, 3-carene, limonene and eucalyptol were emitted by all of the measured tree species. Some compounds, like isoprene and sabinene, showed an increasing emission response with increasing light intensity, whereas other compounds, like camphene, had no significant emission response to light for most of the measured trees. English oak and European beech showed high light-dependent emission fractions from isoprene and sabinene, but other emitted compounds were light independent. For the two provenances of Norway spruce, the compounds α-pinene, 3-carene and eucalyptol showed high light-dependent fractions for many of the measured trees. This study highlights differences between compound emissions in their response to a change in light and a possible light independence for certain compounds, which might be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or

  5. Transcriptional Roadmap to Seasonal Variation in Wood Formation of Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii-Lukkari, Soile; Delhomme, Nicolas; Schiffthaler, Bastian; Mannapperuma, Chanaka; Prestele, Jakob; Nilsson, Ove; Street, Nathaniel R; Tuominen, Hannele

    2018-04-01

    Seasonal cues influence several aspects of the secondary growth of tree stems, including cambial activity, wood chemistry, and transition to latewood formation. We investigated seasonal changes in cambial activity, secondary cell wall formation, and tracheid cell death in woody tissues of Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) throughout one seasonal cycle. RNA sequencing was performed simultaneously in both the xylem and cambium/phloem tissues of the stem. Principal component analysis revealed gradual shifts in the transcriptomes that followed a chronological order throughout the season. A notable remodeling of the transcriptome was observed in the winter, with many genes having maximal expression during the coldest months of the year. A highly coexpressed set of monolignol biosynthesis genes showed high expression during the period of secondary cell wall formation as well as a second peak in midwinter. This midwinter peak in expression did not trigger lignin deposition, as determined by pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Coexpression consensus network analyses suggested the involvement of transcription factors belonging to the ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2/LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES and MYELOBLASTOSIS-HOMEOBOX families in the seasonal control of secondary cell wall formation of tracheids. Interestingly, the lifetime of the latewood tracheids stretched beyond the winter dormancy period, correlating with a lack of cell death-related gene expression. Our transcriptomic analyses combined with phylogenetic and microscopic analyses also identified the cellulose and lignin biosynthetic genes and putative regulators for latewood formation and tracheid cell death in Norway spruce, providing a toolbox for further physiological and functional assays of these important phase transitions. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Plasticity in variation of xylem and phloem cell characteristics of Norway spruce under different local conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozica eGricar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited information on intra-annual plasticity of secondary tissues of tree species growing under different environmental conditions. To increase the knowledge about the plasticity of secondary growth, which allows trees to adapt to specific local climatic regimes, we examined climate–radial growth relationships of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. H. Karst. from three contrasting locations in the temperate climatic zone by analyzing tree-ring widths for the period 1932–2010, and cell characteristics in xylem and phloem increments formed in the years 2009–2011. Variation in the structure of xylem and phloem increments clearly shows that plasticity in seasonal dynamics of cambial cell production and cell differentiation exists on xylem and phloem sides. Anatomical characteristics of xylem and phloem cells are predominantly site-specific characteristics, because they varied among sites but were fairly uniform among years in trees from the same site. Xylem and phloem tissues formed in the first part of the growing season seemed to be more stable in structure, indicating their priority over latewood and late phloem for tree performance. Long-term climate and radial growth analyses revealed that growth was in general less dependent on precipitation than on temperature; however, growth sensitivity to local conditions differed among the sites. Only partial dependence of radial growth of spruce on climatic factors on the selected sites confirms its strategy to adapt the structure of wood and phloem increments to function optimally in local conditions.

  7. The community of needle endophytes reflects the current physiological state of Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Tiina; Velmala, Sannakajsa M; Vesala, Risto; Smolander, Aino; Pennanen, Taina

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated fungal endophytes in the needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies) cuttings in relation to host tree growth. We also determined the prevalence of endophytes in needles incubated for six months. The cuttings originated from clonal origins showing slow- and fast-growth in long-term field trials but the heritable differences in growth rate were not yet detected among the studied cutting. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized needles with culture-free DNA techniques. No significant differences were observed between endophyte communities of slow- and fast-growing clonal origins. However, the endophyte community correlated with the current growth rate of cuttings suggesting that endophytes reflect short- rather than long-term performance of a host. The concentration of condensed tannins was similar in slow- and fast-growing clonal origins but it showed a negative relationship with endophyte species richness, implying that these secondary compounds may play an important role in spruce tolerance against fungal infections. More than a third of endophyte species were detected in both fresh and decomposing needles, indicating that many needle endophytes are facultative saprotrophs. Several potentially pathogenic fungal species were also found within the community of saprotrophic endophytes. Copyright © 2014 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Carbon Dioxide and Methane Formation in Norway Spruce Stems Infected by White-Rot Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari M. Hietala

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Globally, billions of tons of carbon sequestered in trees are annually recycled back to the atmosphere through wood decomposition by microbes. In Norway, every fifth Norway spruce shows at final harvest infection by pathogenic white-rot fungi in the genera Heterobasidion and Armillaria. As these fungi can mineralize all components of wood, we predicted that they have a significant carbon footprint. Gas samples taken from infected stems were analyzed for CO2 and CH4 concentrations, and wood samples from different parts of the decay columns were incubated under hypoxic (4% O2 and anoxic laboratory conditions. In spring and summer the stem concentrations of CO2 were generally two times higher in trees with heartwood decay than in healthy trees. For most of the healthy trees and trees with heartwood decay, mean stem concentrations of CH4 were comparable to ambient air, and only some Armillaria infected trees showed moderately elevated CH4. Consistently, low CH4 production potentials were recorded in the laboratory experiment. Up-scaling of CO2 efflux due to wood decay in living trees suggests that the balance between carbon sequestration and emission may be substantially influenced in stands with high frequency of advanced root and stem heartwood decay.

  9. Dynamic Gene-Resource Landscape Management of Norway Spruce: Combining Utilization and Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lstibůrek, Milan; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.; Skrøppa, Tore; Hodge, Gary R.; Sønstebø, Jørn H.; Steffenrem, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Traditional gene-resource management programs for forest trees are long-term endeavors requiring sustained organizational commitment covering extensive landscapes. While successful in maintaining adaptation, genetic diversity and capturing traditional growth attributes gains, these programs are dependent on rigid methods requiring elaborate mating schemes, thus making them slow in coping with climate change challenges. Here, we review the significance of Norway spruce in the boreal region and its current management practices. Next, we discuss opportunities offered by novel technologies and, with the use of computer simulations, we propose and evaluate a dynamic landscape gene-resource management in Norway. Our suggested long-term management approach capitalizes on: (1) existing afforestation activities, natural crosses, and DNA-based pedigree assembly to create structured pedigree for evaluation, thus traditional laborious control crosses are avoided and (2) landscape level genetic evaluation, rather than localized traditional progeny trials, allowing for screening of adapted individuals across multiple environmental gradients under changing climate. These advantages lead to greater genetic response to selection in adaptive traits without the traditional breeding and testing scheme, facilitating conservation of genetic resources within the breeding population of the most important forest tree species in Norway. The use of in situ selection from proven material exposed to realistic conditions over vast territories has not been conducted in forestry before. Our proposed approach is in contrast to worldwide current programs, where genetic evaluation is constrained by the range of environments where testing is conducted, which may be insufficient to capture the broad environmental variation necessary to tackle adaptation under changing climate. PMID:29093732

  10. Dynamic Gene-Resource Landscape Management of Norway Spruce: Combining Utilization and Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Lstibůrek

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditional gene-resource management programs for forest trees are long-term endeavors requiring sustained organizational commitment covering extensive landscapes. While successful in maintaining adaptation, genetic diversity and capturing traditional growth attributes gains, these programs are dependent on rigid methods requiring elaborate mating schemes, thus making them slow in coping with climate change challenges. Here, we review the significance of Norway spruce in the boreal region and its current management practices. Next, we discuss opportunities offered by novel technologies and, with the use of computer simulations, we propose and evaluate a dynamic landscape gene-resource management in Norway. Our suggested long-term management approach capitalizes on: (1 existing afforestation activities, natural crosses, and DNA-based pedigree assembly to create structured pedigree for evaluation, thus traditional laborious control crosses are avoided and (2 landscape level genetic evaluation, rather than localized traditional progeny trials, allowing for screening of adapted individuals across multiple environmental gradients under changing climate. These advantages lead to greater genetic response to selection in adaptive traits without the traditional breeding and testing scheme, facilitating conservation of genetic resources within the breeding population of the most important forest tree species in Norway. The use of in situ selection from proven material exposed to realistic conditions over vast territories has not been conducted in forestry before. Our proposed approach is in contrast to worldwide current programs, where genetic evaluation is constrained by the range of environments where testing is conducted, which may be insufficient to capture the broad environmental variation necessary to tackle adaptation under changing climate.

  11. Antioxidants in Norway spruce needles at field plots in the vicinity of a thermal power plant in Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribariclasnik, C.; Turk, B.; Batic, F.; Grill, D. [ERICo Velenje, Velenkje (Slovenia)

    1999-07-01

    Results of antioxidant analyses such as vitamin C and E, water soluble thiols and beta-carotene, in Norway spruce needles at sampling sites influenced by the Thermal Power Plant in Sostanj, Slovenia are presented. These antioxidants were analysed in current and one year old needles sampled in September 1997 at ten permanent sampling sites. The antioxidant response of Norway spruce needles is compared to the air pollution load, assessed by total sulphur content of needles, and general environmental stress factors connected with the sampling site. From the results it is possible to draw conclusions about the physiological role and behavior of the biochemical needle stress indicators analysed and to explain their status as a result of the air pollution load and environmental stresses.

  12. Spectral differences of the functional crown parts and status of Norway spruce trees studied using remote sensing information

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malenovský, Zbyněk; Clevers, J G P W.; Arkima, H.; Kuosmanen, V.; Cudlín, Pavel; Polák, T.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. 207-210 ISSN 1335-342X. [Long Term Air Pollution Effect on Forest Ecosystems (International Meeting for Specialists in Air Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems)/20./. Zvolen, 30.08.2002-01.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 389 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Norway spruce * stress response * remote sensing Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.100, year: 2003

  13. Spread of Heterobasidion annosum in European fir and Norway spruce after 4 years of treatment with pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raddi, P.; Mugnal, L.; Capretti, P.

    1993-01-01

    By means of a series of inoculations with S- and F-isolates of Heterobasidion annosum on plants treated with pollutants, it was observed that the treatments with ABS and H 2 SO 4 caused an increase in silver fir in the colonization by group F and decrease in the growth of the plants. In Norway spruce, both isolates were favoured by the pollutants. (orig.) [de

  14. Transformation of solar radiation in Norway spruce stands into produced biomass – the effect of stand density

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, I.; Pokorný, Radek; Marek, Michal V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 6 (2011), s. 233-241 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : biomass production * LAI * Norway Spruce * PAR absorption * solar energy conversion Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. Nitrogen availability in Norway spruce forest floor – the effect of forest defoliation induced by bark beetle infestation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tahovská, K.; Kopáček, Jiří; Šantrůčková, H.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2010), 553–564. ISSN 1239-6095 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/07/1200; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB600960907 Grant - others:FM EHS(CZ) CZ-0051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : nitrogen availability * Norway spruce * soil Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.296, year: 2010

  16. Shoot-level terpenoids emission in Norway spruce (Picea abies) under natural field and manipulated laboratory conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Esposito, R.; Lusini, I.; Večeřová, Kristýna; Holišová, Petra; Pallozzi, E.; Guidolotti, G.; Urban, Otmar; Calfapietra, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 108, nov (2016), s. 530-538 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13031; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015061 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Norway spruce * BVOC * Monoterpenes * Temperature * Ozone * Sun-shade * Stress Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.724, year: 2016

  17. Effect of bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) attack on bark VOC emissions of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Rajendra P.; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Blomqvist, Minna; Holopainen, Toini; Lyytikäinen-Saarenmaa, Päivi; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2016-02-01

    Climate warming driven storms are evident causes for an outbreak of the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) resulting in the serious destruction of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) forests in northern Europe. Conifer species are major sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) in the boreal zone. Climate relevant BVOC emissions are expected to increase when conifer trees defend against bark beetle attack by monoterpene (MT)-rich resin flow. In this study, BVOC emission rates from the bark surface of beetle-attacked and non-attacked spruce trees were measured from two outbreak areas, Iitti and Lahti in southern Finland, and from one control site at Kuopio in central Finland. Beetle attack increased emissions of total MTs 20-fold at Iitti compared to Kuopio, but decreased the emissions of several sesquiterpenes (SQTs) at Iitti. At the Lahti site, the emission rate of α-pinene was positively correlated with mean trap catch of bark beetles. The responsive individual MTs were tricyclene, α-pinene, camphene, myrcene, limonene, 1,8-cineole and bornyl acetate in both of the outbreak areas. Our results suggest that bark beetle outbreaks affect local BVOC emissions from conifer forests dominated by Norway spruce. Therefore, the impacts of insect outbreaks are worth of consideration to global BVOC emission models.

  18. Impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on abundance and species richness of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Elek

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of non-native Norway spruce plantation on the abundance and species richness of carabids were studied in the Bükk National Park in Hungary, central Europe. Pitfall catches from recently established (5 yr old, young (15 yr after planting, middle-aged (30 yr after planting, old Norway spruce Picea abies plantation (50 yr after planting, and a native submontane beech forest (Fagetum sylvaticae as a control stand were compared.

    Our results showed that deciduous forest species decreased significantly in abundance in the plantations, and appeared in high abundance only in the native beech forest. Furthermore, open habitat species increased remarkably in abundance in the recently established plantation. Carabids were significantly more abundant and species rich in the native forest than in the plantations, while differences were not significant among the plantations. Multiple regression between the abundance and species richness of carabids and twelve environmental measurements showed that pH of the soil, herb cover and density of the carabids’ prey had a significant effect in determining abundance and species richness.

    Our results showed that plantation of non-native Norway spruce species had a detrimental effect on the composition of carabid communities and no regeneration could be observed during the growth of plantations even 50 yr after the establishment. This emphasises the importance of an active nature management practice to facilitate the recolonization of the native species.

  19. Induced Terpene Accumulation in Norway Spruce Inhibits Bark Beetle Colonization in a Dose-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Krokene, Paal; Hu, Jiang; Christiansen, Erik; Björklund, Niklas; Långström, Bo; Solheim, Halvor; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2011-01-01

    Background Tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae) are among the most economically and ecologically important forest pests in the northern hemisphere. Induction of terpenoid-based oleoresin has long been considered important in conifer defense against bark beetles, but it has been difficult to demonstrate a direct correlation between terpene levels and resistance to bark beetle colonization. Methods To test for inhibitory effects of induced terpenes on colonization by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L.) we inoculated 20 mature Norway spruce Picea abies (L.) Karsten trees with a virulent fungus associated with the beetle, Ceratocystis polonica (Siem.) C. Moreau, and investigated induced terpene levels and beetle colonization in the bark. Results Fungal inoculation induced very strong and highly variable terpene accumulation 35 days after inoculation. Trees with high induced terpene levels (n = 7) had only 4.9% as many beetle attacks (5.1 vs. 103.5 attacks m−2) and 2.6% as much gallery length (0.029 m m−2 vs. 1.11 m m−2) as trees with low terpene levels (n = 6). There was a highly significant rank correlation between terpene levels at day 35 and beetle colonization in individual trees. The relationship between induced terpene levels and beetle colonization was not linear but thresholded: above a low threshold concentration of ∼100 mg terpene g−1 dry phloem trees suffered only moderate beetle colonization, and above a high threshold of ∼200 mg terpene g−1 dry phloem trees were virtually unattacked. Conclusion/Significance This is the first study demonstrating a dose-dependent relationship between induced terpenes and tree resistance to bark beetle colonization under field conditions, indicating that terpene induction may be instrumental in tree resistance. This knowledge could be useful for developing management strategies that decrease the impact of tree-killing bark beetles. PMID:22028932

  20. Genetic diversity of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] in Romanian Carpathians

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    Raul Gheorghe Radu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Romanian most important coniferous tree species, the Norway spruce, was estimated by means of allozyme markers. A total of 695 adult trees sampled from eleven populations grouped in six mountainous areas in the Romanian Carpathians were analyzed. In three metapopulations (Maramureş, Postăvar and Parâng, to evaluate the influence of altitudinal gradient on genetic diversity, samples were collected from populations located at high and low altitude. At other location (ApuseniMountains we compared the narrow-crown biotype (Picea abies var. columnaris and the pyramidal crown biotype (Picea abies var. pyramidalis and explored the genetic structure of peat bog ecotype. By analyzing 7 enzyme systems and 12 enzyme coding loci, a total of 38 allelic variants have been detected. The mean value of polymorphic loci for the six sites was 86.1%, ranging between 83.3% and 91.7% and the mean expected heterozygosity was 0.115, resulting in a moderate level of genetic diversity. The highest genetic diversity (He = 0.134 was found in the narrow-crown spruce population. Apuseni metapopulation showed the highest genetic diversity (He = 0.125, being the most valuable for conservation of genetic resources. The small value of fixation index (FST = 0.009 indicates a low genetic differentiation between the six sites and AMOVA test revealed a very high level of genetic diversity within population (99%. Comparative analysis of genetic parameters showed small differences between high and low altitude populations at each site, probably due to the neutral character of the markers analyzed and the effect of gene flow between gradiental populations.

  1. Induced terpene accumulation in Norway spruce inhibits bark beetle colonization in a dose-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhao

    Full Text Available Tree-killing bark beetles (Coleoptera, Scolytinae are among the most economically and ecologically important forest pests in the northern hemisphere. Induction of terpenoid-based oleoresin has long been considered important in conifer defense against bark beetles, but it has been difficult to demonstrate a direct correlation between terpene levels and resistance to bark beetle colonization.To test for inhibitory effects of induced terpenes on colonization by the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L. we inoculated 20 mature Norway spruce Picea abies (L. Karsten trees with a virulent fungus associated with the beetle, Ceratocystis polonica (Siem. C. Moreau, and investigated induced terpene levels and beetle colonization in the bark.Fungal inoculation induced very strong and highly variable terpene accumulation 35 days after inoculation. Trees with high induced terpene levels (n = 7 had only 4.9% as many beetle attacks (5.1 vs. 103.5 attacks m(-2 and 2.6% as much gallery length (0.029 m m(-2 vs. 1.11 m m(-2 as trees with low terpene levels (n = 6. There was a highly significant rank correlation between terpene levels at day 35 and beetle colonization in individual trees. The relationship between induced terpene levels and beetle colonization was not linear but thresholded: above a low threshold concentration of ∼100 mg terpene g(-1 dry phloem trees suffered only moderate beetle colonization, and above a high threshold of ∼200 mg terpene g(-1 dry phloem trees were virtually unattacked.This is the first study demonstrating a dose-dependent relationship between induced terpenes and tree resistance to bark beetle colonization under field conditions, indicating that terpene induction may be instrumental in tree resistance. This knowledge could be useful for developing management strategies that decrease the impact of tree-killing bark beetles.

  2. Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds measured and modelled above a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juráň, Stanislav; Fares, Silvano; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Savi, Flavia; Alivernini, Alessandro; Calfapietra, Carlo; Večeřová, Kristýna; Křůmal, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) were investigated at Norway spruce forest at Bílý Kříž in Beskydy Mountains of the Czech Republic during the summer 2014. A proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS, Ionicon Analytik, Austria) has been coupled with eddy-covariance system. Additionally, Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model has been used to derive fluxes from concentration gradient of various monoterpenes previously absorbed into n-heptane by wet effluent diffusion denuder with consequent quantification by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry detection. Modelled data cover each one day of three years with different climatic conditions and previous precipitation patterns. Model MEGAN was run to cover all dataset with monoterpene fluxes and measured basal emission factor. Highest fluxes measured by eddy-covariance were recorded during the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes and isoprene. Inverse Lagrangian Transport Model suggests most abundant monoterpene fluxes being α- and β-pinene. Principal component analysis revealed dependencies of individual monoterpene fluxes on air temperature and particularly global radiation; however, these dependencies were monoterpene specific. Relationships of monoterpene fluxes with CO2 flux and relative air humidity were found to be negative. MEGAN model correlated to eddy-covariance PTR-TOF-MS measurement evince particular differences, which will be shown and discussed. Bi-directional fluxes of oxygenated short-chain volatiles (methanol, formaldehyde, acetone, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid, methyl vinyl ketone, methacrolein, and methyl ethyl ketone) were recorded by PTR-TOF-MS. Volatiles of anthropogenic origin as benzene and toluene were likely transported from the most benzene polluted region in Europe - Ostrava city and adjacent part of Poland around Katowice, where metallurgical and coal mining industries are located. Those were accumulated during

  3. Effects of thermal treatment on chemical, mechanical and colour traits in Norway spruce wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kačíková, Danica; Kačík, František; Cabalová, Iveta; Durkovič, Jaroslav

    2013-09-01

    In several different branches of the wood industry heat treatment is a growing application as it changes the chemical, mechanical, physical and biological properties of wood. Investigations using wet chemical analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, and CIELab colour system have been conducted to study the changes in Norway spruce wood subjected to temperature up to 270°C over a 30 min time period. The results showed that mass loss (ML), total crystallinity index (TCI) of cellulose, total colour difference (ΔE*), and the content of lignin and extractives increased with the temperature, whereas degree of polymerization (DP) of cellulose, modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity (MOE), lightness difference (ΔL*), and the content of holocellulose, cellulose and hemicelluloses all decreased with the thermal treatment. Relationships between temperature and the examined wood traits were all fitted by exponential curves. Power law relationships were found to fit the trends for DP of cellulose with ΔE*, ΔL*, and TCI of cellulose. Also found were power law regressions for the content of hemicelluloses with MOE, MOR, ΔL*, and ML. Temperatures ranging from 20 to 187°C formed a compact cluster, clearly separated from the higher examined temperatures in the multivariate wood trait space. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thirst beats hunger - declining hydration during drought prevents carbon starvation in Norway spruce saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Kolle, Olaf; Trumbore, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality results from an interaction of several mechanisms. Plant water and carbon relations are interdependent and assessments of their individual contributions are difficult. Because drought always affects both plant hydration and carbon assimilation, it is challenging to disentangle their concomitant effects on carbon balance and carbon translocation. Here, we report results of a manipulation experiment specifically designed to separate drought effects on carbon and water relations from those on carbon translocation. In a glasshouse experiment, we manipulated the carbon balance of Norway spruce saplings exposed to either drought or carbon starvation (CO2 withdrawal), or both treatments, and compared the dynamics of carbon exchange, allocation and storage in different tissues. Drought killed trees much faster than did carbon starvation. Storage C pools were not depleted at death for droughted trees as they were for starved, well-watered trees. Hence drought has a significant detrimental effect on a plant's ability to utilize stored carbon. Unless they can be transported to where they are needed, sufficient carbon reserves alone will not assure survival of a drought except under specific conditions, such as moderate drought, or in species that maintain plant water relations required for carbon re-mobilization. © 2013 No claim to original German goverment works New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Experimental versus modelled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies exposed to elevated CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eLeuzinger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rising levels of atmospheric CO2 have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behaviour is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO2 concentration, which form the core of global dynamic vegetation models (DGVMs. Here, we provide first results from a free air CO2 enrichment (FACE experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m Picea abies (L. (Norway spruce and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO2-treated (550 ppm trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9 and 18 % (at concentrations of 550-700ppm atmospheric CO2, the combined evidence from various methods characterising water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO2 concentrations. The discrepancy between the modelled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could mitigate the first-order stomatal response.

  6. Foliar mineral composition, fertilization and dieback of Norway spruce in the Belgian Ardennes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, H J; Weissen, F

    1986-09-01

    Needles from healthy Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) at Willerzie in the West Ardennes and from trees with symptoms of dieback at Langesthal in the East Ardennes were analyzed by age class for mineral composition. Both stands were on acid oligotrophic soils. At Willerzie, needles were sampled from plots fertilized 12 to 17 years earlier (dolomitic lime plus N, P and K) as well as unfertilized plots. Effects of fertilization included increased levels of calcium, manganese, phosphorus, and copper and reduced levels of total sulfur, sulfate-S, sulfate-S:total S, potassium and aluminum. Levels of calcium, magnesium, copper and boron were low at both sites and, at Langesthal, calcium and magnesium may have been deficient. Sulfur level was normal at Willerzie, but at Langesthal, mean sulfur content for needles of all age classes was 198 mg 100 g(-1) dry weight, a level that may be toxic. In older needles, the N:S ratio at Langesthal was below the threshold value of eight reported to be necessary for healthy growth. Other symptoms of stress observed were high sulfate-S:total S and nitrate-N:total N ratios. At Langesthal, manganese level was probably adequate although only one-fifth the level at Willerzie. Levels of aluminum and iron were very high at both sites. Most of the iron and much of the aluminum occurred as a surface deposit that could be removed by washing the needles in chloroform.

  7. Disjunct eddy covariance measurements of monoterpene fluxes from a Norway spruce forest using PTR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabmer, W.; Graus, M.; Lindinger, C.; Wisthaler, A.; Rappenglück, B.; Steinbrecher, R.; Hansel, A.

    2004-12-01

    Interest in reliable quantification of organic trace compounds released from terrestrial ecosystems stems from their impact on oxidant levels such as ozone and hydroxyl radicals and on secondary organic aerosol formation. In an attempt to quantify these emissions, a disjunct sampler (DS) was coupled to a PTR-MS instrument. In the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) technique, an instantaneous grab sample is taken at intervals of tens of seconds and vertical wind speed is recorded at the instant of sample collection. The intermittent periods are used for sample analysis by a moderately fast chemical sensor, in this case a PTR-MS instrument, which allows for fast and sensitive detection of biogenic volatile organic compounds. The vertical turbulent transport of a trace compound is then calculated from the covariance of the fluctuations in vertical wind speed and compound mixing ratio. Fluxes of monoterpenes from a Norway spruce forest were measured during the 2002 summer intensive field campaign of BEWA2000 and results compared well with data obtained using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and the enclosure approach. In addition to this field experiment, a laboratory test was carried out to validate the disjunct sampling procedure.

  8. Autumn photosynthetic decline and growth cessation in seedlings of white spruce are decoupled under warming and photoperiod manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Way, Danielle A

    2017-08-01

    Climate warming is expected to increase the seasonal duration of photosynthetic carbon fixation and tree growth in high-latitude forests. However, photoperiod, a crucial cue for seasonality, will remain constant, which may constrain tree responses to warming. We investigated the effects of temperature and photoperiod on weekly changes in photosynthetic capacity, leaf biochemistry and growth in seedlings of a boreal evergreen conifer, white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss]. Warming delayed autumn declines in photosynthetic capacity, extending the period when seedlings had high carbon uptake. While photoperiod was correlated with photosynthetic capacity, short photoperiods did not constrain the maintenance of high photosynthetic capacity under warming. Rubisco concentration dynamics were affected by temperature but not photoperiod, while leaf pigment concentrations were unaffected by treatments. Respiration rates at 25 °C were stimulated by photoperiod, although respiration at the growth temperatures was increased in warming treatments. Seedling growth was stimulated by increased photoperiod and suppressed by warming. We demonstrate that temperature is a stronger control on the seasonal timing of photosynthetic down-regulation than is photoperiod. Thus, while warming can stimulate carbon uptake in boreal conifers, the extra carbon may be directed towards respiration rather than biomass, potentially limiting carbon sequestration under climate change. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of species composition on carbon and nitrogen stocks in forest floor and mineral soil in Norway spruce and European beech mixed forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andivia, Enrique; Rolo, Víctor; Jonard, Mathieu; Formánek, Pavel; Ponette, Quentin

    2015-04-01

    Management of existing forests has been identified as the main strategy to enhance carbon sequestration and to mitigate the impact of climate change on forest ecosystems. In this direction, the conversion of Norway spruce monospecific stands into mixed stands by intermingling individuals of European beech is an ongoing trend in adaptive forest management strategies, especially in Central Europe. However, studies assessing the effect of changes in tree species composition on soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen stocks are still scarce and there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting tree species selection as a feasible management option to mitigate the effects of predicted future climatic scenarios. We compared C and N stocks in the forest floor (litter and humus) and the top 10 cm of mineral soil in two monospecific stands of Norway spruce and European beech and in a mixed stand of both species. The effect of tree species composition on the C and N stocks and its spatial distribution was evaluated based on litterfall, root production, elevation and canopy opening, and by using a combination of modelling and geostatistical techniques. C stock was highest in the Norway spruce and the mixed stands, while N stock was highest in the mixed stand and lowest under European beech, with intermediate values in the Norway spruce stand. Each forest type showed differences in forest floor properties, suggesting that species composition is an important factor governing forest floor characteristics, including C and N stocks. The distribution of C and N stocks between forest soil layers was different for each forest type. C and N stocks were highest in the hummus layer under Norway spruce, whereas both stocks were lowest in the European beech stand. On the other hand, the mixed stand showed the highest C and N accumulation in the uppermost mineral soil layer, while the monospecific stands showed similar values. Litterfall was the main contribution to C and N stocks of the

  10. Tree and stand growth of mature Norway spruce and European beech under long-term ozone fumigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pretzsch, Hans; Dieler, Jochen; Matyssek, Rainer; Wipfler, Philip

    2010-01-01

    In a 50- to 70-year-old mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Germany, tree cohorts have been exposed to double ambient ozone (2xO 3 ) from 2000 through 2007 and can be compared with trees in the same stand under the ambient ozone regime (1xO 3 ). Annual diameter growth, allocation pattern, stem form, and stem volume were quantified at the individual tree and stand level. Ozone fumigation induced a shift in the resource allocation into height growth at the expense of diameter growth. This change in allometry leads to rather cone-shaped stem forms and reduced stem stability in the case of spruce, and even neiloidal stem shapes in the case of beech. Neglect of such ozone-induced changes in stem shape may lead to a flawed estimation of volume growth. On the stand level, 2xO 3 caused, on average, a decrease of 10.2 m 3 ha -1 yr -1 in European beech. - Ozone effects on tree growth and stem shape were investigated for Norway spruce and European beech; the study reveals species-specific reaction patterns in growth rate and allometry under ozone exposure.

  11. Tree and stand growth of mature Norway spruce and European beech under long-term ozone fumigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzsch, Hans, E-mail: h.pretzsch@lrz.tum.d [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Dieler, Jochen [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Matyssek, Rainer [Chair for Ecophysiology of Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany); Wipfler, Philip [Chair for Forest Growth and Yield Science, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, D-85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    In a 50- to 70-year-old mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Germany, tree cohorts have been exposed to double ambient ozone (2xO{sub 3}) from 2000 through 2007 and can be compared with trees in the same stand under the ambient ozone regime (1xO{sub 3}). Annual diameter growth, allocation pattern, stem form, and stem volume were quantified at the individual tree and stand level. Ozone fumigation induced a shift in the resource allocation into height growth at the expense of diameter growth. This change in allometry leads to rather cone-shaped stem forms and reduced stem stability in the case of spruce, and even neiloidal stem shapes in the case of beech. Neglect of such ozone-induced changes in stem shape may lead to a flawed estimation of volume growth. On the stand level, 2xO{sub 3} caused, on average, a decrease of 10.2 m{sup 3} ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} in European beech. - Ozone effects on tree growth and stem shape were investigated for Norway spruce and European beech; the study reveals species-specific reaction patterns in growth rate and allometry under ozone exposure.

  12. Functional characterization of nine Norway Spruce TPS genes and evolution of gymnosperm terpene synthases of the TPS-d subfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-08-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (-)-limonene synthase, (-)-alpha/beta-pinene synthase, and (-)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-alpha-farnesene synthase, and E-alpha-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed.

  13. Growth response to a changing environment-Impacts of tropospheric ozone dose on photosynthesis of Norway spruce forests in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaozhen; Pietsch, Stephan; Hasenauer, Hubert

    2010-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone is an important air pollutant, although plants have active defense strategies (e.g. antioxidants), the cumulative ozone dose may lead to chronic damages to plant tissues. Ozone enters into plants through stomata and reacts with other chemicals to create toxic compounds. This affects plant photosynthesis and may reduce CO2 fixation, and consequently growth. Open top cambers (OTC) are usually used to study the effects of elevated ozone levels on photosynthesis; whereas field studies with on site occurring ozone levels are rare. A recent modelling study on Norway spruce stands in Austria exhibited trends in model errors indicating that an increase in ozone dose leads to a reduction in volume increment. This study aims to explore how different ozone doses affect photosynthesis under field conditions and may translate into growth response for 12 stands of Norway spruce, distributed along an ozone concentration gradient across Austria. A LI-6400xt photosynthesis system was utilized to collect physiological parameters including net photosynthesis, stomata conductance, internal CO2 concentration, transpiration, etc. Chlorophyll fluorescence data was collected by using a PEA chlorophyll fluorescence meter, and chlorophyll content was measured. Morphological characteristics and soil samples were also analyzed. Ozone dose to leaf tissue was calculated from external ozone concentration, the conductance of the stomata to ozone, the leaf area index and the time span of the day when ozone uptake takes place. Our results confirm that increasing cumulative ozone dose reduces maximum assimilation rate and carboxylation efficiency under field conditions. Our final goal is to quantify how far this ozone induced reduction in assimilation power ultimately translates into a growth reduction of Norway spruce in Austria.

  14. Molecular and structural changes in vegetative buds of Norway spruce during dormancy in natural weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzicka, Marzenna; Pawlowski, Tomasz A; Staszak, Aleksandra; Rozkowski, Roman; Chmura, Daniel J

    2017-12-28

    The dormancy and the growth of trees in temperate climates are synchronized with seasons. Preparation for dormancy and its proper progression are key for survival and development in the next season. Using a unique approach that combined microscopy and proteomic methods, we investigated changes in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) H. Karst.) embryonic shoots during four distinct stages of dormancy in natural weather conditions. We identified 13 proteins that varied among dormancy stages, and were linked to regulation of protein level; functioning of chloroplasts and other plastids; DNA and RNA regulation; and oxidative stress. We also found a group of five proteins, related to cold hardiness, that did not differ in expression among stages of dormancy, but had the highest abundancy level. Ultrastructure of organelles is tightly linked to their metabolic activity, and hence may indicate dormancy status. The observed ultrastructure during endodormancy was stable, whereas during ecodormancy, the structural changes were dynamic and related mainly to nucleus, plastids and mitochondria. At the ultrastructural level, the lack of starch and the presence of callose in plasmodesmata in all regions of embryonic shoot were indicators of full endodormancy. At the initiation of ecodormancy, we noted an increase in metabolic activity of organelles, tissue-specific starch hyperaccumulation and degradation. However, in proteomic analysis, we did not find variation in expression of proteins related to starch degradation or to symplastic isolation of cells. The combination of ultrastructural and proteomic methods gave a more complete picture of vegetative bud dormancy than either of them applied separately. We found some changes at the structural level, but not their analogues in the proteome. Our study suggests a very important role of plastids' organization and metabolism, and their protection in the course of dormancy and during the shift from endo- to ecodormancy and the acquisition

  15. Hydraulic and mechanical properties of young Norway spruce clones related to growth and wood structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROSNER, SABINE; KLEIN, ANDREA; MÜLLER, ULRICH; KARLSSON, BO

    2011-01-01

    Summary Stem segments of eight five-year-old Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) clones differing in growth characteristics were tested for maximum specific hydraulic conductivity (ks100), vulnerability to cavitation and behavior under mechanical stress. The vulnerability of the clones to cavitation was assessed by measuring the applied air pressure required to cause 12 and 50% loss of conductivity (Ψ12, Ψ50) and the percent loss of conductivity at 4 MPa applied air pressure (PLC4MPa). The bending strength and stiffness and the axial compression strength and stiffness of the same stem segments were measured to characterize wood mechanical properties. Growth ring width, wood density, latewood percentage, lumen diameter, cell wall thickness, tracheid length and pit dimensions of earlywood cells, spiral grain and microfibril angles were examined to identify structure–function relationships. High ks100 was strongly and positively related to spiral grain angle, which corresponded positively to tracheid length and pit dimensions. Spiral grain may reduce flow resistance of the bordered pits of the first earlywood tracheids, which are characterized by rounded tips and an equal distribution of pits along the entire length. Wood density was unrelated to hydraulic vulnerability parameters. Traits associated with higher hydraulic vulnerability were long tracheids, high latewood percentage and thick earlywood cell walls. The positive relationship between earlywood cell wall thickness and vulnerability to cavitation suggest that air seeding through the margo of bordered pits may occur in earlywood. There was a positive phenotypic and genotypic relationship between ks100 and PLC4MPa, and both parameters were positively related to tree growth rate. Variability in mechanical properties depended mostly on wood density, but also on the amount of compression wood. Accordingly, hydraulic conductivity and mechanical strength or stiffness showed no tradeoff. PMID:17472942

  16. Estimating single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce by airborne laser scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglin, Marius; Dibdiakova, Janka; Gobakken, Terje; Næsset, Erik

    2013-05-01

    The use of forest biomass for bioenergy purposes, directly or through refinement processes, has increased in the last decade. One example of such use is the utilization of logging residues. Branch biomass constitutes typically a considerable part of the logging residues, and should be quantified and included in future forest inventories. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) is widely used when collecting data for forest inventories, and even methods to derive information at the single-tree level has been described. Procedures for estimation of single-tree branch biomass of Norway spruce using features derived from ALS data are proposed in the present study. As field reference data the dry weight branch biomass of 50 trees were obtained through destructive sampling. Variables were further derived from the ALS echoes from each tree, including crown volume calculated from an interpolated crown surface constructed with a radial basis function. Spatial information derived from the pulse vectors were also incorporated when calculating the crown volume. Regression models with branch biomass as response variable were fit to the data, and the prediction accuracy assessed through a cross-validation procedure. Random forest regression models were compared to stepwise and simple linear least squares models. In the present study branch biomass was estimated with a higher accuracy by the best ALS-based models than by existing allometric biomass equations based on field measurements. An improved prediction accuracy was observed when incorporating information from the laser pulse vectors into the calculation of the crown volume variable, and a linear model with the crown volume as a single predictor gave the best overall results with a root mean square error of 35% in the validation.

  17. Does carbon availability control temporal dynamics of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Swidrak, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation of coniferous species exposed to soil dryness revealed early culmination of maximum growth in late spring prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions, i.e., repeated high rainfall events during summer (Oberhuber et al. 2014). Because it is well known that plants can adjust carbon allocation patterns to optimize resource uptake under prevailing environmental constraints, we hypothesize that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. Physical blockage of carbon transport in the phloem through girdling causes accumulation and depletion of carbohydrates above and below the girdle, respectively, making this method quite appropriate to investigate carbon relationships in trees. Hence, in a common garden experiment we will manipulate the carbon status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by phloem blockage at different phenological stages during the growing season. We will present the methodological approach and first results of the study aiming to test the hypothesis that carbon status of the tree affects temporal dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation in conifers under drought. Acknowledgment The research is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P25643-B16 "Carbon allocation and growth of Scots pine". Reference Oberhuber W, A Gruber, W Kofler, I Swidrak (2014) Radial stem growth in response to microclimate and soil moisture in a drought-prone mixed coniferous forest at an inner Alpine site. Eur J For Res 133:467-479.

  18. Exposure of Norway spruce to ozone increases the sensitivity of current year needles to photoinhibition and desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Physiological effects of ozone exposure over three consecutive growing seasons on current year needles of Norway spruce were studied in open-top chambers, during daily Fumigation cycles in the summer, and after the termination of ozone fumigation in autumn 1990. The trees were exposed to two levels...... of ozone: charcoal filtered air and non-filtered air to which 30 nl I−1 of ozone was added in three consecutive years from 1988 to 1990, daily from May to September (8 hours a day). Photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration and chlorophyll fluorescence were studied on selected days. Significant...

  19. Assessing the impacts of climate change and nitrogen deposition on Norway spruce growth in Austria with BIOME-BGC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastaugh, Chris S.; Potzelsberger, Elisabeth; Hasenaueur, Hubert

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the climate change has had an apparent impact in Austrian forests. This research has been conducted on Norway spruce forests as this is the predominant species in Austria. Growth data between regions which have different temperature and precipitation trendsw was then compared, with results showing increased productivity in all regions thus implying that growth of the forest is driven by other factors than climate. This conclusion is consistent with previous studies supporting that forest growth is mainly driven by increasing nitrogen deposition.

  20. Effects of SO2-fumigation on the infection of Norway spruce by Armillaria ostoyae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, M.; Tesche, M.

    1993-01-01

    SO 2 fumigation (0.86 mg/m 3 ) reduced drastically the survival expectancy of spruce seedlings already after 1 month. Under such conditions, the infection of spruce by Armillaria ostoyae is known to increase. The present investigation has shown that mortality increased strongly by combining A. ostoyae infection and fumigation. However, mycorrhization of spruce (Paxillus involutus) increased the survival rate of seedlings and reduced infection by A. ostoyae remarkably (20%). (orig.) [de

  1. The ''red'' decline of Norway spruce or ''røde rødgraner'' - is it ammonium overload or top-dying?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    by nitrogen overload was investigated. A sensitive biochemical indicator of nitrogen status of conifer trees is the content of free amino acids of the urea cycle,arginine and ornithine. In pot experiments with four times overload of N as ammonium nitrate the free arginine content increased more than 100 times....... There was no indication of nitrogen overload. The “red” Norway spruce maysuffer from “top-dying” a common disorder of Norway spruce in Great Britain, believed to be caused by several mild winters in a row. In that case the symptoms should diminish after the very cold winter 1995-96....

  2. Functions for biomass and basic density of stem, crown and root system of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Jens Peter; Bald, Caroline; Nord-Larsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Models for predicting the biomass of forest trees are becoming increasingly important for assessing forest resources and carbon sequestration in forests. We developed functions for predicting the biomass and basic density of above- and below-ground parts of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst...... and thinning practises of Norway spruce in Denmark. Because of inclusion of experimental plots, data reflected a wider range of thinning practices than commonly used in forestry practice. The data included measurements of biomass and basic density from 114 trees, two of which were regarded as outliers...

  3. A comparison of structural characteristics and ecological factors between forest reserves and managed silver fir - Norway spruce forests in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinšek, A.; Diaci, J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to examine ecological, floristic and structural differences between the forest stands of managed and unmanaged silver fir - Norway spruce forests (Bazzanio trilobatae-Abietetum albae), twelve sample plots (25x25 m) were established in forest reserves and managed forests. Within the plots, subplots and microplots we conducted phytosociological and pedological surveys, analyses of the stand structure, natural regeneration and estimation of solar radiation. We determined that there are no significant differences in floristic composition and ecological factors between managed forest and forest reserve stands. The only variables that were significantly different were the solar radiation variables (ISF; TSF; DSF), vertical structure (cover indexes (CI)) and stand basal area. Small differences in the composition and the structure of the vegetation indicate that, as far as ecosystematic changes are concerned, managing these forests is not as significant as the soil conditions. Solar radiation had a major influence on natural regeneration. Indirect solar radiation seemed to be more important than direct solar radiation. We found a statistically significant positive correlation between silver fir and Norway spruce regeneration and indirect solar radiation and confirmed that the management of light is a significant factor in the management of regeneration. Another trend that was detected was an increase in the number of beech, which will have quite a large proportion in the upper tree layer of the next generation, especially in forest reserves

  4. High-efficiency Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenck, A. R.; Quinn, M.; Whetten, R. W.; Pullman, G.; Sederoff, R.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is the method of choice for many plant biotechnology laboratories; however, large-scale use of this organism in conifer transformation has been limited by difficult propagation of explant material, selection efficiencies and low transformation frequency. We have analyzed co-cultivation conditions and different disarmed strains of Agrobacterium to improve transformation. Additional copies of virulence genes were added to three common disarmed strains. These extra virulence genes included either a constitutively active virG or extra copies of virG and virB, both from pTiBo542. In experiments with Norway spruce, we increased transformation efficiencies 1000-fold from initial experiments where little or no transient expression was detected. Over 100 transformed lines expressing the marker gene beta-glucuronidase (GUS) were generated from rapidly dividing embryogenic suspension-cultured cells co-cultivated with Agrobacterium. GUS activity was used to monitor transient expression and to further test lines selected on kanamycin-containing medium. In loblolly pine, transient expression increased 10-fold utilizing modified Agrobacterium strains. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer is a useful technique for large-scale generation of transgenic Norway spruce and may prove useful for other conifer species.

  5. Micro- and macro-geographic scale effect on the molecular imprint of selection and adaptation in Norway spruce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Scalfi

    Full Text Available Forest tree species of temperate and boreal regions have undergone a long history of demographic changes and evolutionary adaptations. The main objective of this study was to detect signals of selection in Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst, at different sampling-scales and to investigate, accounting for population structure, the effect of environment on species genetic diversity. A total of 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs representing 290 genes were genotyped at two geographic scales: across 12 populations distributed along two altitudinal-transects in the Alps (micro-geographic scale, and across 27 populations belonging to the range of Norway spruce in central and south-east Europe (macro-geographic scale. At the macrogeographic scale, principal component analysis combined with Bayesian clustering revealed three major clusters, corresponding to the main areas of southern spruce occurrence, i.e. the Alps, Carpathians, and Hercynia. The populations along the altitudinal transects were not differentiated. To assess the role of selection in structuring genetic variation, we applied a Bayesian and coalescent-based F(ST-outlier method and tested for correlations between allele frequencies and climatic variables using regression analyses. At the macro-geographic scale, the F(ST-outlier methods detected together 11 F(ST-outliers. Six outliers were detected when the same analyses were carried out taking into account the genetic structure. Regression analyses with population structure correction resulted in the identification of two (micro-geographic scale and 38 SNPs (macro-geographic scale significantly correlated with temperature and/or precipitation. Six of these loci overlapped with F(ST-outliers, among them two loci encoding an enzyme involved in riboflavin biosynthesis and a sucrose synthase. The results of this study indicate a strong relationship between genetic and environmental variation at both geographic scales. It also

  6. Micro- and macro-geographic scale effect on the molecular imprint of selection and adaptation in Norway spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalfi, Marta; Mosca, Elena; Di Pierro, Erica Adele; Troggio, Michela; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Sperisen, Christoph; La Porta, Nicola; Neale, David B

    2014-01-01

    Forest tree species of temperate and boreal regions have undergone a long history of demographic changes and evolutionary adaptations. The main objective of this study was to detect signals of selection in Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst), at different sampling-scales and to investigate, accounting for population structure, the effect of environment on species genetic diversity. A total of 384 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 290 genes were genotyped at two geographic scales: across 12 populations distributed along two altitudinal-transects in the Alps (micro-geographic scale), and across 27 populations belonging to the range of Norway spruce in central and south-east Europe (macro-geographic scale). At the macrogeographic scale, principal component analysis combined with Bayesian clustering revealed three major clusters, corresponding to the main areas of southern spruce occurrence, i.e. the Alps, Carpathians, and Hercynia. The populations along the altitudinal transects were not differentiated. To assess the role of selection in structuring genetic variation, we applied a Bayesian and coalescent-based F(ST)-outlier method and tested for correlations between allele frequencies and climatic variables using regression analyses. At the macro-geographic scale, the F(ST)-outlier methods detected together 11 F(ST)-outliers. Six outliers were detected when the same analyses were carried out taking into account the genetic structure. Regression analyses with population structure correction resulted in the identification of two (micro-geographic scale) and 38 SNPs (macro-geographic scale) significantly correlated with temperature and/or precipitation. Six of these loci overlapped with F(ST)-outliers, among them two loci encoding an enzyme involved in riboflavin biosynthesis and a sucrose synthase. The results of this study indicate a strong relationship between genetic and environmental variation at both geographic scales. It also suggests that an

  7. Does compression wood affect the climatic signal in carbon and oxygen isotopes of Norway spruce?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecka, Karolina; Kaczka, Ryszard; Gärtner, Holger; Treydte, Kerstin

    2017-04-01

    Compression wood is a special tissue present in the trunk of mechanically stressed coniferous trees, more frequently occurring in branches and roots. The main role of the compression wood is to increase the mechanical strength and regain the vertical orientation of a leaning stem. The anatomical structure of compression wood is characterized by (i) rounded tracheids causing intercellular spaces, (ii) a thickened secondary wall (S2 layer) showing helical cavities and (iii) lack of a tertiary cell wall (S3 layer). The aim of our study was to test if and how the presence of compression wood of different intensity influences the climatic signal in stable carbon and oxygen isotopes (δ13C and δ18O) from tree-ring cellulose of Norway spruce trees (Picea abies (L.) Karst.). Four trees growing in the montane zone of the Western Tatra Mountains were selected, and two radii per tree were taken, one with compression wood (CW) and one from the opposite side of a trunk (OW). Four reference trees (REF) without compression wood were sampled from the same valley, however, from a slightly different location. All analyses were performed for the period 1935-1954 with CW present in all trees. It was possible to establish the δ13C and δ18O CW, OW and REF chronologies, however, the EPS values for δ13C chronologies did not reach the established threshold (0.85). In general the comparison between δ13C and δ18O CW, OW and REF chronologies showed statistically significant (p<0.05) correlation values between CW and OW chronologies for both isotopes. The response patterns of δ13C in CW, OW and REF chronologies respectively to climate were quite similar with strongest correlations to temperature, cloud cover and precipitation during summer (Jul-Aug) and to SPEI during late summer - early autumn (Aug-Sep). The correlations between the same climate variables and δ18O of CW, and OW chronologies respectively revealed quite similar response patterns with strongest correlations to

  8. Incorporating shape constraints in generalized additive modelling of the height-diameter relationship for Norway spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Pya

    2016-02-01

    fitting. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the SCAM approach allows optimal regression modelling flexibility similar to the standard GAM but with the additional possibility of defining specific constraints for the model effects. The longitudinal character of the model allows for tree height imputation for the current status of forests but also for future tree height prediction. Keywords: Height-diameter curve, Norway spruce, Shape constrained additive models, Impact of climate change, Varying coefficient models

  9. Decomposition and fungi of needle litter from slow- and fast-growing Norway spruce (Picea abies) clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkama-Rajala, Tiina; Müller, Michael M; Pennanen, Taina

    2008-07-01

    The fungal species involved in the decomposition of needle litter and their response to intraspecific genetic variation of trees are poorly known. First, we compared the needle decomposition and fungal decomposers underneath eight different Norway spruce clones in situ. This experiment revealed 60-70% loss of needle mass in two years. Although spruce clones differed considerably in growth (twofold height difference) and their needles differed in chemical composition, no significant difference was found for loss of needle mass under the spruce clones. Furthermore, the spruce clones did not affect the community structure of the fungal decomposers. Fungi inhabiting needle litter were identified by extracting ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and sequencing complementary DNA (cDNA) of internal trascribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region. The most frequent identifications were Lophodermium, Pezizales, Mycena, and Marasmius, suggesting that endophytic fungi were involved in the decomposition process. Second, we evaluated the potential of endophytes to decompose needle material in a microcosm experiment in which all other fungi than endophytes were excluded. Within 2 years, the endophytes had decomposed 35-45% of the needle mass. Sequences of Mollisia, Lophodermium, Lachnum, and Phialocephala were most frequently found in rRNA and rDNA extracted from the needles at the end of the microcosm experiment. The dominant needle endophyte in fresh, green needles was Lophodermium piceae, and this species was also found frequently in the needle material after 2 years of decay both in the field and laboratory experiments. Moreover, the relative abundance of Lophodermium-derived denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) bands correlated positively with the decomposition in the microcosm experiment. Hence, our results suggest a significant role of endophytic fungi, and particularly L. piceae, in the process of needle decomposition in boreal forests.

  10. Risk evaluation of the climatic change impact on secondary Norway spruce stands as exemplified by the Křtiny Training Forest Enterprise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, P.; Jankovský, L.; Cudlín, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2004), s. 256-262 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC E27.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : climatic change * Norway spruce * risk assessment Subject RIV: GK - Forest ry

  11. Is allometry for aboveground organ’s mass estimation in young Norway spruce stands aff ected by diff erent type of thinning?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejza, Jan; Pokorný, Radek; Marková, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2013), s. 1755-1761 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : allometry * mass * Norway spruce * thinning Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://dx.doi.org/10.11118/actaun201361061755

  12. Optimizing management regimes for carbon storage and other benefits in uneven-aged stands dominated by Norway spruce, with a derivation of the economic supply of carbon storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Buongiorno; Espen Andreas Halvorsen; Ole Martin Bollandsas; Terje Gobakken; Ole Hofstad

    2012-01-01

    This study sought optimal sustainable management regimes of uneven-aged Norway spruce-dominated stands with multiple objectives. The criteria were financial returns, CO2 sequestration and diversity of tree size and species. At prevailing timber prices, harvest and transport costs, and interest rates, uneven-aged management for timber alone was...

  13. Influence of woody elements of a Norway spruce canopy on nadir reflectance simulated by the DART model at very high spatial resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malenovský, Zbyněk; Martin, E.; Homolová, Lucie; Gastellu-Etchegory, J.P.; Zurita-Milla, R.; Schaepman, M.E.; Pokorný, Radek; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Cudlín, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, - (2008), s. 1-18 ISSN 0034-4257 Grant - others:-(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98029 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : woody elements * radiative transfer * DART * Norway spruce canopy * high spatial resolution * LAI * AISA Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.943, year: 2008

  14. Liming effects on the chemical composition of the organic surface layer of a mature Norway spruce stand (Picea abies [L.] Karst.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, W.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Knicker, H.; Jager, de P.A.; Kreutzer, K.; Weiá, T.

    2003-01-01

    The application of lime in a mature Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst.) forest in southern Germany induced major changes in the activity of soil organisms and root growth. Since this may influence the chemical compostion of the soil organic matter (SOM) of the organic surface layer, its

  15. Effects of air pollution and climatic factors on Norway spruce forests in the Orlicke hory Mts. (Czech Republic), 1979-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislav Vacek; Iva Hunova; Zdenek Vacek; Pavla Hejcmanova; Vilem Podrazsky; Jan Kral; Tereza Putalova; W. Keith Moser

    2015-01-01

    The area of the Orlicke hory Mts. has been characterised by decline and disturbances of Norway spruce (Picea abies/L./Karst.) stands since the 1980s. Currently, only three permanent research plots have been preserved from the original sixteen established plots in this region. In the present study, the health status, as indicated by defoliation, mortality, and...

  16. Effects of Cadmium(II) Ions on Early Somatic Embryos of Norway spruce Studied by Using Electrochemical Techniques and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Húska, D.; Zítka, O.; Kryštofová, O.; Adam, V.; Babula, P.; Zehnálek, J.; Bartušek, Karel; Beklová, M.; Havel, L.; Kizek, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 11 (2010), s. 1535-1549 ISSN 1452-3981 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : plant * Norway spruce * somatic embryos * water * thiol * nuclear magnetic resonance * voltammetry Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 2.808, year: 2010

  17. Does the azimuth orientation of Norway spruce (Picea abies/L./Karst.) branches within sunlit crown part influence the heterogeneity of biochemical, structural and spectral characteristics of needles?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lhotáková, Z.; Albrechtová, J.; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Rock, B. N.; Polák, T.; Cudlín, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 3 (2007), s. 283-297 ISSN 0098-8472 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 658 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : branch azimuth orientation * Norway spruce * chlorophyll * phenolic compounds * needle structure * spectral reflectance indices * remote sensing Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.810, year: 2007

  18. Modelling individual tree height to crown base of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram P Sharma

    Full Text Available Height to crown base (HCB of a tree is an important variable often included as a predictor in various forest models that serve as the fundamental tools for decision-making in forestry. We developed spatially explicit and spatially inexplicit mixed-effects HCB models using measurements from a total 19,404 trees of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on the permanent sample plots that are located across the Czech Republic. Variables describing site quality, stand density or competition, and species mixing effects were included into the HCB model with use of dominant height (HDOM, basal area of trees larger in diameters than a subject tree (BAL- spatially inexplicit measure or Hegyi's competition index (HCI-spatially explicit measure, and basal area proportion of a species of interest (BAPOR, respectively. The parameters describing sample plot-level random effects were included into the HCB model by applying the mixed-effects modelling approach. Among several functional forms evaluated, the logistic function was found most suited to our data. The HCB model for Norway spruce was tested against the data originated from different inventory designs, but model for European beech was tested using partitioned dataset (a part of the main dataset. The variance heteroscedasticity in the residuals was substantially reduced through inclusion of a power variance function into the HCB model. The results showed that spatially explicit model described significantly a larger part of the HCB variations [R2adj = 0.86 (spruce, 0.85 (beech] than its spatially inexplicit counterpart [R2adj = 0.84 (spruce, 0.83 (beech]. The HCB increased with increasing competitive interactions described by tree-centered competition measure: BAL or HCI, and species mixing effects described by BAPOR. A test of the mixed-effects HCB model with the random effects estimated using at least four trees per sample plot in the validation data confirmed

  19. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    OuYang, Fangqun; Mao, Jian-Feng; Wang, Junhui; Zhang, Shougong; Li, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED) light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA) levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA) level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA) or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8%) out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%), biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49%) and hormone signal transduction (8.39%). With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1), AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF) and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR)] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have yielded the

  20. Transcriptome Analysis Reveals that Red and Blue Light Regulate Growth and Phytohormone Metabolism in Norway Spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqun OuYang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which different light spectra regulate plant shoot elongation vary, and phytohormones respond differently to such spectrum-associated regulatory effects. Light supplementation can effectively control seedling growth in Norway spruce. However, knowledge of the effective spectrum for promoting growth and phytohormone metabolism in this species is lacking. In this study, 3-year-old Norway spruce clones were illuminated for 12 h after sunset under blue or red light-emitting diode (LED light for 90 d, and stem increments and other growth traits were determined. Endogenous hormone levels and transcriptome differences in the current needles were assessed to identify genes related to the red and blue light regulatory responses. The results showed that the stem increment and gibberellin (GA levels of the seedlings illuminated by red light were 8.6% and 29.0% higher, respectively, than those of the seedlings illuminated by blue light. The indoleacetic acid (IAA level of the seedlings illuminated by red light was 54.6% lower than that of the seedlings illuminated by blue light, and there were no significant differences in abscisic acid (ABA or zeatin riboside [ZR] between the two groups of seedlings. The transcriptome results revealed 58,736,166 and 60,555,192 clean reads for the blue-light- and red-light-illuminated samples, respectively. Illumina sequencing revealed 21,923 unigenes, and 2744 (approximately 93.8% out of 2926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were found to be upregulated under blue light. The main KEGG classifications of the DEGs were metabolic pathway (29%, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (20.49% and hormone signal transduction (8.39%. With regard to hormone signal transduction, AUXIN-RESISTANT1 (AUX1, AUX/IAA genes, auxin-inducible genes, and early auxin-responsive genes [(auxin response factor (ARF and small auxin-up RNA (SAUR] were all upregulated under blue light compared with red light, which might have

  1. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Linnakoski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Climate changes, exemplified by increased temperatures and CO2 concentration, pose a global threat to forest health. Of particular concern are pests and pathogens, with a warming climate altering their distributions and evolutionary capacity, while impairing the ability of some plants to respond to infections. Progress in understanding and mitigating such effects is currently hindered by a lack of empirical research. Norway spruce (Picea abies is one of the most economically important tree species in northern Europe, and is considered highly vulnerable to changes in climate. It is commonly infected by the fungus Endoconidiophora polonica, and we hypothesized that damage caused to trees will increase under future climate change predictions. To test this hypothesis an in vivo greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a changed growing environment on E. polonica infected Norway spruce seedlings, comparing ambient conditions to predicted temperatures and CO2 levels in Finland for the years 2030 and 2100. In total, 450 seedlings were randomized amongst the three treatments, with 25 seedlings from each allocated to inoculation with one of five different fungal strains or mock-inoculation. Seedlings were monitored throughout the thermal growing season for mortality, and lesion length and depth indices were measured at the experiment conclusion. Disease severity (mortality and lesions was consistently greater in fungal-inoculated than mock-inoculated seedlings. However, substantial differences were observed among fungal strains in response to climate scenarios. For example, although overall seedling mortality was highest under the most distant (and severe climate change expectations, of the two fungal strains with the highest mortality counts (referred to as F4 and F5, one produced greater mortality under the 2030 and 2100 scenarios than ambient conditions, whereas climate scenario had no effect on the other. This study contributes

  2. Testing Projected Climate Change Conditions on the Endoconidiophora polonica / Norway spruce Pathosystem Shows Fungal Strain Specific Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnakoski, Riikka; Forbes, Kristian M; Wingfield, Michael J; Pulkkinen, Pertti; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes, exemplified by increased temperatures and CO 2 concentration, pose a global threat to forest health. Of particular concern are pests and pathogens, with a warming climate altering their distributions and evolutionary capacity, while impairing the ability of some plants to respond to infections. Progress in understanding and mitigating such effects is currently hindered by a lack of empirical research. Norway spruce ( Picea abies ) is one of the most economically important tree species in northern Europe, and is considered highly vulnerable to changes in climate. It is commonly infected by the fungus Endoconidiophora polonica , and we hypothesized that damage caused to trees will increase under future climate change predictions. To test this hypothesis an in vivo greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of a changed growing environment on E. polonica infected Norway spruce seedlings, comparing ambient conditions to predicted temperatures and CO 2 levels in Finland for the years 2030 and 2100. In total, 450 seedlings were randomized amongst the three treatments, with 25 seedlings from each allocated to inoculation with one of five different fungal strains or mock-inoculation. Seedlings were monitored throughout the thermal growing season for mortality, and lesion length and depth indices were measured at the experiment conclusion. Disease severity (mortality and lesions) was consistently greater in fungal-inoculated than mock-inoculated seedlings. However, substantial differences were observed among fungal strains in response to climate scenarios. For example, although overall seedling mortality was highest under the most distant (and severe) climate change expectations, of the two fungal strains with the highest mortality counts (referred to as F4 and F5), one produced greater mortality under the 2030 and 2100 scenarios than ambient conditions, whereas climate scenario had no effect on the other. This study contributes to a

  3. Carbon and Nitrogen Pools and Fluxes in Adjacent Mature Norway Spruce and European Beech Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Oulehle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We compared two adjacent mature forest ecosystem types (spruce vs. beech to unravel the fate of assimilated carbon (C and the cycling of organic and inorganic nitrogen (N without the risk of the confounding influences of climatic and site differences when comparing different sites. The stock of C in biomass was higher (258 t·ha−1 in the older (150 years beech stand compared to the younger (80 years planted spruce stand (192 t·ha−1, whereas N biomass pools were comparable (1450 kg·ha−1. Significantly higher C and N soil pools were measured in the beech stand, both in forest floor and mineral soil. Cumulative annual CO2 soil efflux was similar among stands, i.e., 9.87 t·ha−1·year−1 of C in the spruce stand and 9.01 t·ha−1·year−1 in the beech stand. Soil temperature explained 78% (Q10 = 3.7 and 72% (Q10 = 4.2 of variability in CO2 soil efflux in the spruce and beech stand, respectively. However, the rather tight N cycle in the spruce stand prevented inorganic N losses, whereas losses were higher in the beech stand and were dominated by nitrate in the mineral soil. Our results highlighted the long-term consequences of forest management on C and N cycling.

  4. Nitrogenous gas emissions induced by abiotic nitrite reactions with soil organic matter of a Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jing; Vereecken, Harry; Schloter, Michael; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    As an important intermediate of the nitrogen cycle, nitrite is highly reactive to soil organic matter (SOM) in forest soils under acidic conditions. However, there is little knowledge about how much its abiotic reactions with SOM contribute to nitrogen (N) gas emissions of forest soils till now. In this study, we provide data on N gas (N2O, NO, NO2) emissions from abiotic nitrite reactions with different fractions of soil organic matter in spruce forest soil, as well as the mechanisms involved. Soil samples were taken from the Oh layer at the TERENO-Wüstebach catchment, Germany, where Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominates. SOM was fractionated into dissolved organic matter (DOM), fulvic acid (FA), humic acid (HA) and humin (HN) according to their solubility. The dynamics of simultaneous NOx and N2O emissions were analyzed with a dynamic flow-through chamber system, coupled to an infrared laser absorption analyzer for N2O and a chemo-luminescence analyzer for NOx (NO and NO2), which allowed emission measurements with high time resolution. The 15N labelling technique was used for tracing the fate of nitrite-N towards establishment of a total N balance. When nitrite was added to the soil fractions, a large amount of NOx was immediately emitted, mostly in the form of NO. N2O emission was delayed by approximately 0.5-1 h. The NO and N2O emission pattern could be almost perfectly fitted with the Hill equation. The N2O formation rates increased significantly in the following order: DOM, FA, HA and HN, while the total amounts of the gases emitted increased significantly in the opposite order. These results revealed that abiotic reactions of nitrite with SOM in spruce forest soil play an important role in N gas emissions, while the chemical nature of the different SOM fractions determines the rate and amount of N gas emissions.

  5. Impact of elevated carbon dioxide concentration and temperature on bud burst and shoot growth of boreal Norway spruce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaney, M.; Linder, S.

    2007-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations are predicted to double during the next century, and recent studies have suggested that temperature changes as a result of global warming will be pronounced over the mid and high latitudes of northern continents. The phenology of boreal forests is mainly driven by temperature, and is a reliable indicator of climate change. This article presented the results of a study investigating the effects of elevated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and temperature on bud and shoot phenology of mature Norway spruce trees grown in northern Sweden. The trees were grown in whole tree chambers over a period of 3 years and supplied with either ambient or elevated CO 2 at either ambient, or elevated temperatures, which were altered on a monthly time step based on simulations by the Swedish Regional Climate Modelling Program. Temperature elevation ranged between 2.8 and 5.6 degrees C above ambient temperatures, with a CO 2 elevation of 700 μmol per mol. Bud development and shoot extension were monitored from early spring until the termination of elongation growth. Results of the study showed that elevated air temperature hastened both bud development and the initiation and termination of shoot growth by 2 to 3 weeks in each of the study years. It was noted that elevated CO 2 had no significant effect on bud development patterns or on the length of the shoot growth period. Although there was a distinct correlation between temperature sum and shoot elongation, a precise timing of bud burst could not be obtained by using an accumulation of temperature sums. It was concluded that climate warming will results in earlier bud burst in boreal Norway spruce. 59 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  6. Differences in vole preference, secondary chemistry and nutrient levels between naturally regenerated and planted Norway spruce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virjamo, Virpi; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Henttonen, Heikki; Hiltunen, Eveliina; Karjalainen, Reijo; Korhonen, Juhani; Huitu, Otso

    2013-10-01

    Field voles (Microtus agrestis) cause severe damage to young Norway spruce (Picea abies) plantations during wintertime in Fennoscandia. We experimentally investigated vole preference for winter-dormant, naturally regenerated seedlings; spring-planted seedlings; or autumn-planted seedlings; and how preference corresponds with seedling chemistry. Voles showed the highest preference for autumn-planted seedlings and the second highest for spring-planted seedlings, while naturally regenerated seedlings were avoided. The stems of the autumn-planted seedlings contained higher concentrations of nitrogen and piperidine alkaloids and lower concentrations of stilbenes than did the other groups. In addition to differences between naturally regenerated and planted seedlings, we investigated seasonal differences in naturally regenerated P. abies needle and bark secondary chemistry. While piperidine alkaloid concentrations did not vary with season, the soluble non-tannin phenolics of needles and the condensed tannins of bark were lower in May than in November or January. At the time of planting, the concentration of bark piperidine alkaloids was higher in autumn-planted than in spring-planted seedlings. We detected two alkaloids not previously found in P. abies, 2-methyl-6-propyl-1,6-piperideine and a tentatively identified pinidine-isomer. Our results demonstrate that vole choice of spruce seedlings is promoted by high nitrogen and low stilbene content, both associated with seedlings planted late in the season. As vole damage is linked to seedling chemistry, damage potentially could be mitigated by advancing planting or by manipulating plant chemistry in nurseries.

  7. Butt rot occurrence in plus trees of Silver fir Abies alba Mill. and Norway spruce Picea abies (L. from the Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomicz-Zegar Elżbieta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to its hidden character, butt rot occurrence is not commonly included in the assessment of plus trees’ health status. Thus, the trees’ varied susceptibility to wood decay is not a target of breeding efforts. The aim of the study was to determine the extent of butt rot in fir and spruce plus trees from Carpathian seed stands. We employed the novel and non-invasive diagnostic method of sonic tomography to determine presence and severity of decay at the base of 110 plus trees of silver fir and 42 of Norway spruce.

  8. Transmittance of young Norway spruce stand canopy for photosynthetically active radiation during the growing season

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, I.; Kubásek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61 /16/, č. 1 (2013), s. 129-136 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : overcast and clear days * phonological phases Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  9. Acclimation of Norway spruce photosynthetic apparatus to the combined effect of high irradiance and temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štroch, M.; Vrábl, D.; Podolinská, J.; Kalina, J.; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 167, č. 8 (2010), s. 597-605 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : diurnal courses * picea abies * thermal acclimation * thermal energy dissipation * xanthophyll cycle Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.677, year: 2010

  10. Efflux of CO2 from soil in Norway Spruce stands of different ages: a case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dařenová, Eva; Fabiánek, Tomáš; Pavelka, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2016), s. 98-102 ISSN 1805-0174 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : spruce forest * Picea abies * soil temperatures * moisture * respiration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  11. Impact of traffic on δ15N, δ13C and δ18O of needles and annual tree rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrieri MR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase of nitrogen depositions, as oxidized (NOx and reduced (NHx compounds, has important implications on ecosystem nitrogen cycle. NOx comes predominantly from fossil fuel combustion in car engines and industrial processes, while agricultural activities (cattle farming, fertilizations are the main sources for NHx emissions. Such fertilisations could stimulate growth and, therefore, productivity of forests, especially in temperate forests, where nitrogen is a limiting factor. On the other hand an excess of nitrogen can lead to an acidification of the soil and have a negative impact on the microbial fauna and structure of plants. NOx and NHx depositions can be separated with the help of stable isotopes with different 15N-values reported for NOx originating from combustion sources. Consequently it was observed that the nitrogen isotopic composition of the vegetation reflects the isotopic signature of nitrogen sources. Our preliminary results on needles of Norway spruce trees exposed to NOx emissions along a transect perpendicular to a highway close to Faido and Brittnau show a clear isotopic enrichment in 15N in trees growing closer to traffic pollution, indicating an uptake of atmospheric nitrogen by stomatal pathway. Carbon and oxygen isotopic composition measured in tree rings reveals the physiological response in plants. Trees more exposed to air pollution from traffic show an increase in δ13C and δ18O in tree rings, since mid sixties next to Erstfeld. This could mean a higher photosynthetic activity, enhanced by NOx traffic emissions, under low or not changed stomatal conductance. Our results confirm that stable isotopes of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen measured in needles and tree rings represent an important tool to monitor the impact of NOx load on tree physiology.

  12. Fine root status element contents in three Norway spruce stands in the Krkonose Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goldbold, D.; Fritz, H.; Cudlín, Pavel; Bonifacio, E.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. 91-94 ISSN 1335-342X. [Long Term Air Pollution Effect on Forest Ecosystems (International Meeting for Specialists in Air Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems)/20./. Zvolen, 30.08.2002-01.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Ca:Al ratios, fine roots, spruce Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.100, year: 2003

  13. Actin distribution in mitotic apparatus of somatic embryo cells of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cenklová, Věra; Binarová, Pavla; Havel, L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 2 (2003), s. 167-174 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/99/D092; GA AV ČR IAA5020803; GA ČR GV522/96/K186 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : cytoskeleton * embryogenesis of spruce * mitosis Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.919, year: 2003

  14. Growth responses of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the climate in the south-eastern part of the Ceskomoravska Upland (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rybníček, M.; Čermák, P.; Kolář, Tomáš; Žid, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 2 (2012), s. 149-157 ISSN 1733-8387 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Ceskomoravska Upland * Norway spruce * precipitation * temperature * tree ring Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2012

  15. Functional identification and differential expression of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase in induced terpenoid resin formation of Norway spruce (Picea abies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael A; Walter, Michael H; Ralph, Steven G; Dabrowska, Paulina; Luck, Katrin; Urós, Eva Maria; Boland, Wilhelm; Strack, Dieter; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Bohlmann, Jörg; Gershenzon, Jonathan

    2007-10-01

    Conifers produce terpenoid-based oleoresins as constitutive and inducible defenses against herbivores and pathogens. Much information is available about the genes and enzymes of the late steps of oleoresin terpenoid biosynthesis in conifers, but almost nothing is known about the early steps which proceed via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the cDNA cloning and functional identification of three Norway spruce (Picea abies) genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), which catalyzes the first step of the MEP pathway, and their differential expression in the stems of young saplings. Among them are representatives of both types of plant DXS genes. A single type I DXS gene is constitutively expressed in bark tissue and not affected by wounding or fungal application. In contrast, two distinct type II DXS genes, PaDXS2A and PaDXS2B, showed increased transcript abundance after these treatments as did two other genes of the MEP pathway tested, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 4-hydroxyl 3-methylbutenyl diphosphate reductase (HDR). We also measured gene expression in a Norway spruce cell suspension culture system that, like intact trees, accumulates monoterpenes after treatment with methyl jasmonate. These cell cultures were characterized by an up-regulation of monoterpene synthase gene transcripts and enzyme activity after elicitor treatment, as well as induced formation of octadecanoids, including jasmonic acid and 12-oxophytodienoic acid. Among the Type II DXS genes in cell cultures, PaDXS2A was induced by treatment with chitosan, methyl salicylate, and Ceratocystis polonica (a bark beetle-associated, blue-staining fungal pathogen of Norway spruce). However, PaDXS2B was induced by treatment with methyl jasmonate and chitosan, but was not affected by methyl salicylate or C. polonica. Our results suggest distinct functions of the three DXS genes in primary and defensive terpenoid metabolism in Norway

  16. Characterization of the Embryogenic Tissue of the Norway Spruce Including a Transition Layer between the Tissue and the Culture Medium by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kořínek, Radim; Mikulka, J.; Hřib, J.; Hudec, Jiří; Havel, L.; Bartušek, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-26 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S; GA ČR GA13-09086S; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Norway spruce * ESEs * mucilage * transition layer * MRI relaxometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2016

  17. Different responses of Norway spruce needles from shaded and exposed crown layers to the prolonged exposure to elevated CO2 studied using various chlorophyll a fluorescence techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, J.; Urban, Otmar; Čajánek, M.; Kurasová, I.; Špunda, V.; Marek, Michal V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 3 (2001), s. 369-376 ISSN 0300-3604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/99/0085; GA ČR GA522/00/1381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : elevated CO2 * fluorescence * Norway spruce * photosynthesis Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.807, year: 2001

  18. Xylem defense wood of Norway spruce compromised by the pathogenic white-rot fungus Heterobasidion parviporum shows a prolonged period of selective decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Nina Elisabeth; Ballance, Simon; Kvaalen, Harald; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Solheim, Halvor; Hietala, Ari M

    2012-10-01

    Heterobasidion parviporum, a common pathogenic white-rot fungus in managed Norway spruce forests in northern and central Europe, causes extensive decay columns within stem heartwood of the host tree. Infected trees combat the lateral spread of decay by bordering the heartwood with a fungistatic reaction zone characterized by elevated pH and phenol content. To examine the mode of fungal feeding in the reaction zone of mature Norway spruce trees naturally infected by H. parviporum, we conducted spatial profiling of pectin and hemicellulose composition, and established transcript levels of candidate fungal genes encoding enzymes involved in degradation of the different cell wall components of wood. Colonized inner heartwood showed pectin and hemicellulose concentrations similar to those of healthy heartwood, whereas the carbohydrate profiles of compromised reaction zone, irrespective of the age of fungal activity in the tissue, indicated selective fungal utilization of galacturonic acid, arabinose, xylose and mannose. These data show that the rate of wood decay in the reaction zone is slow. While the up-regulation of genes encoding pectinases and hemicellulases preceded that of the endoglucanase gene during an early phase of fungal interaction with xylem defense, the manganese peroxidase gene showed similar transcript levels during different phases of wood colonization. It seems plausible that the reaction zone components of Norway spruce interfere with both lignin degradation and the associated co-hydrolysis of hemicelluloses and pectin, resulting in a prolonged phase of selective decay.

  19. Total Stem and Merchantable Volume Equations of Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. Growing on Former Farmland in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tord Johansson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An equation was constructed to estimate the stem volume of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. in 145 stands growing on former farmland in Sweden (Latitude 56–63° N. The mean total age was 40 ± 13 (range 17–91 years, the mean diameter at breast height (ob was 15 ± 4 (range 5–27 cm and the mean density was 1621 ± 902 (range 100–7600 stems ha−1. The equation which fits the data best used the diameter at breast height and total stem height as predictive variables. Merchantable volume equations for the estimation of commercial volume for any top diameter and bole length were developed. Soil types in the stands were sediments (coarse sand, fine sand and silt and heavy, medium and light clay, tills (sandy, fine sandy and silty and peat. The standing volume was calculated; the mean was 253 ± 103 (range 26–507 m3 ha−1 with a MAI (mean annual increment of 6.9±3.5 (range 1.3–16.7 m3 ha−1 year−1. There were statistically significant differences between MAI and coarse sand, sand and silt, light clay, peat and silty till soils. Spruce stands growing on silty tills had the lowest MAI (4.94 ± 2.27 m3 ha−1 year−1 and light clay, fine sand and silt and peat the highest (7.62 ± 4.24, 7.46 ± 3.33 and 8.67 ± 2.83 m3 ha−1 year−1.

  20. Fungal diversity of Norway spruce litter: effects of site conditions and premature leaf fall caused by bark beetle outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybył, K; Karolewski, P; Oleksyn, J; Labedzki, A; Reich, P B

    2008-08-01

    Fungi play an important role in leaf litter decomposition due to their ability to break down the lignocellulose matrix, which other organisms are unable to digest. However, little is known regarding the factors affecting components of fungal diversity. Here, we quantified richness of internal fungi in relation to litter nutrient and phenolic concentrations, sampling season (spring or fall), and premature leaf shedding due to low precipitation and infestation of bark beetles (mainly Ips typographus and Ips duplicatus). The study was conducted in 37-year-old Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stands, with three plots each in mixed forest (MF) and coniferous forest (CF) site conditions in south-central Poland. Fifty-four species of sporulating fungi were identified in 2,330 freshly fallen needles sampled during 2003-2005, including 45 species in MF and 31 in CF. The significantly higher number of species in MF was likely related to moister conditions at that site. Among isolated fungi, 22% (12 species) were identified as endophytes of Norway spruce in prior studies. During spring of 2005, we found less than half the number of isolates and fungal species at each forest site as compared to fall for the two prior years. This pattern was observed in typical soil fungi (e.g., Penicillium daleae, Penicillium purpurogenum) and endophytes/epiphytes (e.g., Aureobasidium pullulans, Alternaria alternata, Cladosporium spp., and Lophodermium piceae). Premature shedding of needles was the most likely cause of this decline because it shortened the time period for fungi to infect green needles while on the tree. For all sites and sampling periods, richness of internal fungi was strongly and positively related to the age of freshly fallen litter (assessed using needle Ca concentration as a needle age tracer) and was also negatively related to litter phenolic concentration. Richness of internal fungi in freshly fallen litter may be adversely affected by low soil moisture status

  1. Cryotolerance in Norway spruce and its association with growth rates, anatomical features and polyamines of embryogenic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondráková, Zuzana; Cvikrová, Milena; Eliásová, Katerina; Martincová, Olga; Vágner, Martin

    2010-10-01

    Our study focused on the possible association between the cryotolerance of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) embryogenic cultures and the anatomical structures of their embryogenic suspensor mass (ESM), their growth rate and their content of endogenous polyamines (PAs). The anatomical characteristics and PA content during cryopreservation and regrowth were studied in the ESMs of AFO 541 and C110 cultures, which have comparable ESM anatomy but diverse growth rates, PA content and regeneration abilities after cryopreservation. Different levels of tolerance to exogenous treatment were already apparent after transfer of the ESMs to liquid media. The endogenous free PAs were maintained at high levels, with spermidine being the predominant PA in the ESM of AFO 541, while in the ESM of C110 the content of putrescine and spermidine was almost identical and rather low, the content of spermidine being approximately one-third that in the ESM of AFO 541. Osmotic pretreatment, using a double application of sorbitol followed by an application of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in the continual disintegration of polyembryogenic centers and suspensors in both cell lines. A continual decrease in the level of PAs was observed during the cell osmotic pretreatment. The cells that retained their viability and regrowth ability after cryopreservation were the meristematic cells inside the embryonal heads and the cells in the intermediate area between suspensor and meristems. Restoration of AFO 541 growth after cryopreservation was almost immediate; however, the C110 ESM culture regrew with difficulty, often exhibiting callogenesis. High levels of PA-soluble conjugates and an increase in the amount of PAs bound to high-molecular-mass substances was observed in cells of AFO 541 on Day 6 after thawing and also to some extent on Day 11. On Day 21 after thawing, the amount of free putrescine and spermidine in the AFO 541 cells reached the level observed in the suspension culture

  2. Light Use Efficiency of Aboveground Biomass Production of Norway Spruce Stands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellan, Michal; Marková, I.; Zaika, A.; Krejza, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2017), s. 9-16 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : absorbed photosynthetically active radiation * aboveground biomass increment * allometric relation Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy OBOR OECD: Agronomy, plant breeding and plant protection

  3. High methane emissions from restored Norway spruce swamps in southern Finland over one growing season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Koskinen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Forestry-drained peatlands in the boreal region are currently undergoing restoration in order to bring these ecosystems closer to their natural (undrained state. Drainage affects the methane (CH4 dynamics of a peatland, often changing sites from CH4 sources to sinks. Successful restoration of a peatland would include restoration of not only the surface vegetation and hydrology, but also the microbial populations and thus CH4 dynamics. As a pilot study, CH4 emissions were measured on two pristine, two drained and three restored boreal spruce swamps in southern Finland for one growing season. Restoration was successful in the sense that the water table level in the restored sites was significantly higher than in the drained sites, but it was also slightly higher than in the pristine sites. The restored sites were surprisingly large sources of CH4 (mean emissions of 52.84 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, contrasting with both the pristine (1.51 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 and the drained sites (2.09 mg CH4 m-2 d-1. More research is needed to assess whether the high CH4 emissions observed in this study are representative of restored spruce mires in general.

  4. Specific impacts of beech and Norway spruce on the structure and diversity of the rhizosphere and soil microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, S; Oger, P; Tisserand, E; Cébron, A; Turpault, M-P; Buée, M; De Boer, W; Leveau, J H J; Frey-Klett, P

    2016-06-15

    The impacts of plant species on the microbial communities and physico-chemical characteristics of soil are well documented for many herbs, grasses and legumes but much less so for tree species. Here, we investigate by rRNA and ITS amplicon sequencing the diversity of microorganisms from the three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota:Fungi) in soil samples taken from the forest experimental site of Breuil-Chenue (France). We discovered significant differences in the abundance, composition and structure of the microbial communities associated with two phylogenetically distant tree species of the same age, deciduous European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and coniferous Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst), planted in the same soil. Our results suggest a significant effect of tree species on soil microbiota though in different ways for each of the three microbial groups. Fungal and archaeal community structures and compositions are mainly determined according to tree species, whereas bacterial communities differ to a great degree between rhizosphere and bulk soils, regardless of the tree species. These results were confirmed by quantitative PCR, which revealed significant enrichment of specific bacterial genera, such as Burkholderia and Collimonas, known for their ability to weather minerals within the tree root vicinity.

  5. Wood density variations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. under contrasting climate conditions in southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inter-annual variations in ring width and maximumwood density of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. at different altitudes in Baden-Württemberg, southwestern Germany, to determine the climate response of these parameters under contrasting climate conditions. In addition, we compared maximum, average and minimum wood density between sites. Bootstrapped correlation coefficients of ring width and maximum wood density with monthly temperature and precipitation, revealed a different climate sensitivity of both parameters. Ring width showed strong correlations with climate variables in the previous year and in the first half of the growingseason. Further, a negative relationship with summer temperature was observed at the low-altitude sites. Maximum wood density correlated best with temperature during the growing season, whereby strongest correlations were found between September temperature and maximum wood density at the high-altitude sites. Observed differences in maximum, average and minimum wood density are suggested to relate to the local climate; with lower temperature and higher water availability having a negative effect on wood density.

  6. Wood density variations of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. under contrasting climate conditions in southwestern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke van der Maaten-Theunissen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed inter-annual variations in ring width and maximum wood density of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. at different altitudes in Baden-Württemberg, southwestern Germany, to determine the climate response of these parameters under contrasting climate conditions. In addition, we compared maximum, average and minimum wood density between sites. Bootstrapped correlation coefficients of ring width and maximum wood density with monthly temperature and precipitation, revealed a different climate sensitivity of both parameters. Ring width showed strong correlations with climate variables in the previous year and in the first half of the growing season. Further, a negative relationship with summer temperature was observed at the low-altitude sites. Maximum wood density correlated best with temperature during the growing season, whereby strongest correlations were found between September temperature and maximum wood density at the high-altitude sites. Observed differences in maximum, average and minimum wood density are suggested to relate to the local climate; with lower temperatures and higher water availability having a negative effect on wood density. 

  7. Nitrogen uptake and assimilation in proliferating embryogenic cultures of Norway spruce-Investigating the specific role of glutamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Carlsson

    Full Text Available Somatic embryogenesis is an in vitro system employed for plant propagation and the study of embryo development. Nitrogen is essential for plant growth and development and, hence, the production of healthy embryos during somatic embryogenesis. Glutamine has been shown to increase plant biomass in many in vitro applications, including somatic embryogenesis. However, several aspects of nitrogen nutrition during somatic embryogenesis remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated the uptake and assimilation of nitrogen in Norway spruce pro-embryogenic masses to elucidate some of these aspects. In our study, addition of glutamine had a more positive effect on growth than inorganic nitrogen. The nitrogen uptake appeared to be regulated, with a strong preference for glutamine; 67% of the assimilated nitrogen in the free amino acid pool originated from glutamine-nitrogen. Glutamine addition also relieved the apparently limited metabolism (as evidenced by the low concentration of free amino acids of pro-embryogenic masses grown on inorganic nitrogen only. The unusually high alanine concentration in the presence of glutamine, suggests that alanine biosynthesis was involved in alleviating these constraints. These findings inspire further studies of nitrogen nutrition during the somatic embryogenesis process; identifying the mechanism(s that govern glutamine enhancement of pro-embryogenic masses growth is especially important in this regard.

  8. Testing Romanian seed sources of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst: results on growth traits and survival at age 30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Budeanu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth traits and survival rate were evaluated in two field trials consisting of 33 provenances (seed stands spread across the entire natural distribution range of Norway spruce in Romania. Total tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH and survival rate were measured at 30 years after planting. Both growth and adaptation traits show substantial genetic variation among the tested seed stands. The amplitude of variation depends markedly on trait and testing site. This fact suggests that the best performing seed stands for growth and adaptation traits at each testing site can be selected. Two groups of valuable populations, located in the North and East of Eastern Carpathians (Apuseni Mountains, were identified. Survival rate was negatively correlated with growth traits, the average values in the two field trials were 68% and 70%. By analyzing growth and adaptation traits together with stem and wood qualitative traits, the best performing populations will be considered as tested seed sources and the forest reproductive material they can provide will be recommended for use in the regions of provenance where the two field trials are located.

  9. Interactions between soil- and dead wood-inhabiting fungal communities during the decay of Norway spruce logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkipää, Raisa; Rajala, Tiina; Schigel, Dmitry; Rinne, Katja T; Pennanen, Taina; Abrego, Nerea; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the interaction between fungal communities of soil and dead wood substrates. For this, we applied molecular species identification and stable isotope tracking to both soil and decaying wood in an unmanaged boreal Norway spruce-dominated stand. Altogether, we recorded 1990 operational taxonomic units, out of which more than 600 were shared by both substrates and 589 were found to exclusively inhabit wood. On average the soil was more species-rich than the decaying wood, but the species richness in dead wood increased monotonically along the decay gradient, reaching the same species richness and community composition as soil in the late stages. Decaying logs at all decay stages locally influenced the fungal communities from soil, some fungal species occurring in soil only under decaying wood. Stable isotope analyses suggest that mycorrhizal species colonising dead wood in the late decay stages actively transfer nitrogen and carbon between soil and host plants. Most importantly, Piloderma sphaerosporum and Tylospora sp. mycorrhizal species were highly abundant in decayed wood. Soil- and wood-inhabiting fungal communities interact at all decay phases of wood that has important implications in fungal community dynamics and thus nutrient transportation.

  10. Effect of bud burst forcing on transcript expression of selected genes in needles of Norway spruce during autumn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asante, Daniel K A; Yakovlev, Igor A; Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Timmerhaus, Gerrit; Partanen, Jouni; Johnsen, Oystein

    2009-08-01

    Expression of selected genes in needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst) was investigated by following their transcription levels during late autumn. Transcription was assessed in mature needles which likely serve as sensor of environmental cues that enable trees in the temperate and boreal regions to change between stages of growth, frost tolerance and bud dormancy. Samples were collected from grafts kept under outdoor conditions and after bud burst forcing in greenhouse at 20 degrees C (12 h darkness) for one week. Transcription was assayed with real-time RT-PCR. During the sampling period, chilling requirement was partially fulfilled, and time to bud burst after forcing was decreased. Of the 27 transcripts studied, expression of 16 was significantly affected either by forcing, sampling time, or interaction between them. PaSAP, PaACP, PaSGS3, PaWRKY, PaDIR9, PaCCCH and dehydrin genes responded drastically to forcing temperatures at all sampling points, showing no correlation with readiness for bud burst. Expression patterns of some vernalization pathway gene homologs PaVIN3, and also of PaMDC, PaLOV1 and PaDAL3 had a clear opposite trends between forcing and outdoor conditions, which could imply their role in chilling accumulation and bud burst regulation/cold acclimation. These genes could constitute putative candidates for further detailed study, whose regulation in needles may be involved in preparation towards bud burst and chilling accumulation sensing.

  11. Imaging of Norway spruce early somatic embryos with the ESEM, Cryo-SEM and laser scanning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neděla, Vilém; Hřib, Jiří; Havel, Ladislav; Hudec, Jiří; Runštuk, Jiří

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the surface structure of Norway spruce early somatic embryos (ESEs) as a typical culture with asynchronous development. The microstructure of extracellular matrix covering ESEs were observed using the environmental scanning electron microscope as a primary tool and using the scanning electron microscope with cryo attachment and laser electron microscope as a complementary tool allowing our results to be proven independently. The fresh samples were observed in conditions of the air environment of the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with the pressure from 550Pa to 690Pa and the low temperature of the sample from -18°C to -22°C. The samples were studied using two different types of detector to allow studying either the thin surface structure or material composition. The scanning electron microscope with cryo attachment was used for imaging frozen extracellular matrix microstructure with higher resolution. The combination of both electron microscopy methods was suitable for observation of "native" plant samples, allowing correct evaluation of our results, free of error and artifacts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reflectance continuum removal spectral index tracking the xanthophyll cycle photoprotective reactions in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováč, Daniel; Navrátil, M.; Malenovský, Z.; Štroch, Michal; Špunda, Vladimír; Urban, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2012), s. 987-998 ISSN 1445-4408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : diurnal course * growth chambers * photosynthetic pigments composition * Picea abies * reflectance continuum removal * xanthophyll cycle Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.471, year: 2012

  13. The effects of pelleted sewage sludge on Norway spruce establishment and nitrogen dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannesson, Anders

    1999-01-01

    In Sweden there is a big resource in unutilised sewage sludge. Studies have shown that application of municipal sewage sludge can improve forest productivity and planting environment. This study is examining the effects of two types of pelleted sewage sludge (pure sludge and a mixture of sludge and domestic wastes compost) on nitrogen turnover. Large differences were found in the fertilisation effect of the different treatments. The pure sewage sludge pellets treatment showed significant increases for NH 4 -accumulation, nitrification and NO 3 -leaching in the top 10 cm of the soil. Uptake of nitrogen was increased in spruce plants and vegetation. The mixed sludge/domestic waste pellets treatment showed indications of a minor initial release of nitrogen. This is seen as a small but significant initial increase in soil nitrification. These results suggest that the pure sewage sludge pellet is an adequate nitrogen fertiliser. The mixed sludge though is inadequate at least in the short run

  14. Fungi associated with the beetles of Ips typographus on Norway spruce in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jankowiak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mycobiota of the beetles of the phloem-feeding spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus was studied. The most important group of fungi were the ophiostomatoid fungi. Among them O. penicillatum was very frequent ophiostomatoid species. Other common fungi were O. ainoae, O. bicolor, O. piceaperdum and O. piceae. The ophiostomatoid fungi were often more frequent in beetles collected in galleries than in the beetles caught With a trap. Generally the ophiostomatoid fungi were more ofien isolated from the beetle.s bathed in sterile water for 30 seconds. However C. polonica, O. ainoae, and O. minutum occurred most abundantly in the beetles disinfected in 96% ethyl alcohol for 15 and 30 seconds.

  15. Feedbacks of windthrow for Norway spruce and Scots pine stands under changing climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panferov, O; Rauch, E; Doering, C; Ahrends, B; Sogachev, A

    2009-01-01

    Wind damage is one of the major natural disturbances that can occur worldwide in most types of forests. Enhanced management using adequate decision support systems (DSS) can considerably reduce the risk of windthrow. The decision support system 'Forest and Climate Change' (DSS-WuK) which is currently being developed at Goettingen University aims at providing a tool for the quantitative assessment of biotic and abiotic risks for forest ecosystems under the conditions of changing climate. In order to assess the future risks of wind damage the system employs a coupled modelling approach combining the turbulence model SCAlar DIStribution (SCADIS) with the soil-vegetation-atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) model BROOK 90. The present study investigates projections of wind damage in Solling, Germany under climate scenarios A1B and B1, taking into account the windthrow feedbacks-changes of microclimate as a result of tree fall and consequent stabilization or destabilization of a forest stand. The results of the study indicate that in Solling the risk of windthrow for spruce and pine forest stands is likely to increase considerably during the 21st century. The general tendencies indicate that under A1B the probability of damage would be higher than under B1 and that under the same climate and soil conditions the risk for spruce stands would be higher than for pine stands of equal age. The degree of damage and feedback contribution as well as a sign of feedback in each particular case will strongly depend on the particular local or regional combination of climatic and soil factors with tree species, age and structure. For Solling the positive feedback to local climatic forcing is found. The feedback contributes considerably (up to 6% under given conditions) to the projected forest damage and cannot be neglected. Therefore, the adequate projection of future damage probabilities can be performed only with a process-based coupled soil-atmosphere model with corresponding high spatial

  16. Functional Characterization of Nine Norway Spruce TPS Genes and Evolution of Gymnosperm Terpene Synthases of the TPS-d Subfamily1[w

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diane M.; Fäldt, Jenny; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Constitutive and induced terpenoids are important defense compounds for many plants against potential herbivores and pathogens. In Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst), treatment with methyl jasmonate induces complex chemical and biochemical terpenoid defense responses associated with traumatic resin duct development in stems and volatile terpenoid emissions in needles. The cloning of (+)-3-carene synthase was the first step in characterizing this system at the molecular genetic level. Here we report the isolation and functional characterization of nine additional terpene synthase (TPS) cDNAs from Norway spruce. These cDNAs encode four monoterpene synthases, myrcene synthase, (−)-limonene synthase, (−)-α/β-pinene synthase, and (−)-linalool synthase; three sesquiterpene synthases, longifolene synthase, E,E-α-farnesene synthase, and E-α-bisabolene synthase; and two diterpene synthases, isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and levopimaradiene/abietadiene synthase, each with a unique product profile. To our knowledge, genes encoding isopimara-7,15-diene synthase and longifolene synthase have not been previously described, and this linalool synthase is the first described from a gymnosperm. These functionally diverse TPS account for much of the structural diversity of constitutive and methyl jasmonate-induced terpenoids in foliage, xylem, bark, and volatile emissions from needles of Norway spruce. Phylogenetic analyses based on the inclusion of these TPS into the TPS-d subfamily revealed that functional specialization of conifer TPS occurred before speciation of Pinaceae. Furthermore, based on TPS enclaves created by distinct branching patterns, the TPS-d subfamily is divided into three groups according to sequence similarities and functional assessment. Similarities of TPS evolution in angiosperms and modeling of TPS protein structures are discussed. PMID:15310829

  17. Streptomyces AcH 505 triggers production of a salicylic acid analogue in the fungal pathogen Heterobasidion abietinum that enhances infection of Norway spruce seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilhofer, Nadine; Nachtigall, Jonny; Kulik, Andreas; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger; Süssmuth, Roderich D; Fiedler, Hans-Peter; Schrey, Silvia D

    2018-01-19

    The necrotrophic fungus Heterobasidion spp. is the causal agent of 'annosum root rot' of Norway spruce. In the presence of the rhizosphere bacterium Streptomyces AcH 505, enhanced colonization of Norway spruce roots with Heterobasidion abietinum 331 has previously been observed. By analyzing dual cultures of H. abietinum 331 and Streptomyces AcH 505 with HPLC, a fungal metabolite was identified that was increased in the presence of Streptomyces AcH 505. Likewise, challenge of H. abietum 331 with common antifungals produced by soil streptomycetes rendered the same effect. The structure of the compound, 5-formylsalicylic acid (5-FSA), was elucidated by HPLC-HR-ESI-Orbitrap-mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Based on in vivo measurements of maximum photosystem II efficiency of Norway spruce seedlings, 5-FSA did not influence plant vitality. However, when challenged with H. abietinum 331, ergosterol amounts in infected roots increased significantly for 5-FSA pre-treated seedlings. The severity of the infection was comparable to that observed in the presence of Streptomyces AcH 505. 5-FSA is a structural analogue of salicylic acid, an important signalling molecule active in plant defence. Thus, the expression of two defence-response related marker genes (PR1, Hel) was analysed in 5-FSA treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings by Northern blot analysis. The transcription of both marker genes was altered, indicating that 5-FSA is perceived by Arabidopsis in a similar manner to salicylic acid and is able to interfere with Arabidopsis defence signalling. The role of 5-FSA as a potential virulence factor of H. abietinum 331 in the presence of Streptomyces AcH 505 is discussed.

  18. Effect of thawing time, cooling rate and boron nutrition on freezing point of the primordial shoot in norway spruce buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Mikko; Repo, Tapani; Lehto, Tarja

    2006-04-01

    Effects of cooling rates on bud frost hardiness have been studied but there is little information on bud responses to thawing. Since the cell wall pore size has been found to increase with boron (B) deficiency, B deficiency may affect the supercooling ability of buds in winter. The effects of duration of thawing time and rate of cooling on bud frost hardiness of Norway spruce (Picea abies) were studied in a B fertilization trial in February 2003 and March 2005. Frost hardiness of apical buds was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and visual scoring of damage. In 2003, the freezing point of primordial shoots of buds (T(f)), i.e. the low-temperature exotherm (LTE), was, on average, -39 degrees C when buds were thawed for less than 3 h and the T(f) increased to -21 degrees C after 18 h of thawing. During the first 4 h of thawing, the rate of dehardening was 6 degrees C h(-1). In 2005, buds dehardened linearly from -39 degrees C to -35 degrees C at a rate of 0.7 degrees C h(-1). In 2003, different cooling rates of 1-5 degrees C h(-1) had a minor effect on T(f) but in 2005 with slow cooling rates T(f) decreased. In both samplings, at cooling rates of 2 and 1 degrees C h(-1), T(f) was slightly higher in B-fertilized than in non-fertilized trees. By contrast, at very short thawing times in 2003, T(f) was somewhat lower in B-fertilized trees. There was little evidence of reduced frost hardiness in trees with low B status. This study showed that buds deharden rapidly when exposed to above-freezing temperatures in winter, but if cooled again they reharden more slowly. According to this study, rapid dehardening of buds has to be taken into account in assessments of frost hardiness.

  19. Assessing the Suitability of Future Multi- and Hyperspectral Satellite Systems for Mapping the Spatial Distribution of Norway Spruce Timber Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Nink

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The availability of accurate and timely information on timber volume is important for supporting operational forest management. One option is to combine statistical concepts (e.g., small area estimates with specifically designed terrestrial sampling strategies to provide estimations also on the level of administrative units such as forest districts. This may suffice for economic assessments, but still fails to provide spatially explicit information on the distribution of timber volume within these management units. This type of information, however, is needed for decision-makers to design and implement appropriate management operations. The German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate is currently implementing an object-oriented database that will also allow the direct integration of Earth observation data products. This work analyzes the suitability of forthcoming multi- and hyperspectral satellite imaging systems for producing local distribution maps for timber volume of Norway spruce, one of the most economically important tree species. In combination with site-specific inventory data, fully processed hyperspectral data sets (HyMap were used to simulate datasets of the forthcoming EnMAP and Sentinel-2 systems to establish adequate models for estimating timber volume maps. The analysis included PLS regression and the k-NN method. Root Mean Square Errors between 21.6% and 26.5% were obtained, where k-NN performed slightly better than PLSR. It was concluded that the datasets of both simulated sensor systems fulfill accuracy requirements to support local forest management operations and could be used in synergy. Sentinel-2 can provide meaningful volume distribution maps in higher geometric resolution, while EnMAP, due to its hyperspectral coverage, can contribute complementary information, e.g., on biophysical conditions.

  20. Peroxidases bound to the growing lignin polymer produce natural like extracellular lignin in a cell culture of Norway spruce

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    Tino Warinowski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin, an important component of plant cell walls, is a polymer of monolignols derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Monolignols are oxidized in the cell wall by oxidative enzymes (peroxidases and/or laccases to radicals, which then couple with the growing lignin polymer. We have investigated the characteristics of the polymerization reaction by producing lignin polymers in vitro using different oxidative enzymes and analyzing the structures formed with NMR. The ability of the enzymes to oxidize a high-molecular-weight compounds was tested using cytochrome c as a substrate. The results support an idea that lignin structure is largely determined by the concentration ratios of the monolignol (coniferyl alcohol and polymer radicals involved in the coupling reaction. High rate of the lignin polymer oxidation compared to monolignol oxidation leads to a natural-like structure. The high relative rate can be achieved by an open active site of the oxidative enzyme, close proximity of the enzyme with the polymeric substrate or simply by high enzymatic activity that consumes monolignols rapidly. Monolignols, which are oxidized efficiently, can be seen as competitive inhibitors of polymer oxidation. Our results indicate that, at least in a Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. cell culture, a group of apoplastic, polymer-oxidizing peroxidases bind to the lignin polymer and are responsible for production of natural-like lignin in cell suspension cultures in vivo, and also in vitro. The peroxidases bound to the extracellular lignin had the highest ability to bind to various cell wall polymers in vitro. Extracellular lignin contains pectin-type sugars, making them possible attachment points for these cationic peroxidases.

  1. Peroxidases Bound to the Growing Lignin Polymer Produce Natural Like Extracellular Lignin in a Cell Culture of Norway Spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warinowski, Tino; Koutaniemi, Sanna; Kärkönen, Anna; Sundberg, Ilari; Toikka, Merja; Simola, Liisa Kaarina; Kilpeläinen, Ilkka; Teeri, Teemu H

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an important component of plant cell walls, is a polymer of monolignols derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Monolignols are oxidized in the cell wall by oxidative enzymes (peroxidases and/or laccases) to radicals, which then couple with the growing lignin polymer. We have investigated the characteristics of the polymerization reaction by producing lignin polymers in vitro using different oxidative enzymes and analyzing the structures formed with NMR. The ability of the enzymes to oxidize high-molecular-weight compounds was tested using cytochrome c as a substrate. The results support an idea that lignin structure is largely determined by the concentration ratios of the monolignol (coniferyl alcohol) and polymer radicals involved in the coupling reaction. High rate of the lignin polymer oxidation compared to monolignol oxidation leads to a natural-like structure. The high relative rate can be achieved by an open active site of the oxidative enzyme, close proximity of the enzyme with the polymeric substrate or simply by high enzymatic activity that consumes monolignols rapidly. Monolignols, which are oxidized efficiently, can be seen as competitive inhibitors of polymer oxidation. Our results indicate that, at least in a Norway spruce ( Picea abies L. Karst.) cell culture, a group of apoplastic, polymer-oxidizing peroxidases bind to the lignin polymer and are responsible for production of natural-like lignin in cell suspension cultures in vivo , and also in vitro . The peroxidases bound to the extracellular lignin had the highest ability to bind to various cell wall polymers in vitro . Extracellular lignin contains pectin-type sugars, making them possible attachment points for these cationic peroxidases.

  2. Natural volatiles impair the response of Hylobius abietis adults to synthetic attractants in Norway spruce clear cut areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonard Duduman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years it has been known that mature adults of Hylobius abietis are attracted by the combination of alpha-pinene and ethanol. However, it is not clear to what extent weevil response to these stimuli is influenced when large quantities of similar volatile substances are present in the environment, and how the response depends on the release rate of volatile substances from traps. Nothing that, in fresh Norway spruce clear-cuttings, the mature weevils were equally attracted to the traps baited with dispencers having different release rates, we assumed that the experiment results were affected by the abundance of natural volatile substances issued from the fresh slash, which masked the differences between olfactory signals released from traps. To verify this hypothesis, the experiment conducted in fresh clear-cuttings was repeated in exactly the same place after almost a year, when the overground slash were old. For seven weeks, at the beginning of growing season 2008, in two experimental areas, 6 different combinations of alpha-pinen and ethanol were tested using the traps buried in the soil. In both experimental area was captured about the same number of weevils and catch dynamics were similar. In the first two weeks of experimentation, when there were the highest captures, but also for the entire period of experimentation, there were significant differences between the tested variants in what concerns the average number of captures, the traps baited with dispenser providing higher release rate of ethanol and alpha-pinene having higher catches. This shows that in the first season of vegetation the weevil response to the attractants was affected by the profusion of similar volatile substances issued from natural sources (fresh cutt stumps, branches, foliage, bark etc..

  3. Natural volatiles impair the response of Hylobius abietis adults to synthetic attractants in Norway spruce clear cut areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonard Duduman

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years it has been known that mature adults of Hylobius abietis are attracted by the combination of alpha-pinene and ethanol. However, it is not clear to what extent weevil response to these stimuli is influenced when large quantities of similar volatile substances are present in the environment, and how the response depends on the release rate of volatile substances from traps. Nothing that,in fresh Norway spruce clear-cuttings, the mature weevils were equally attracted to the traps baited with dispencers having different release rates, we assumed that the experiment results were affected by the abundance of natural volatile substancesissued from the fresh slash, which masked the differences between olfactory signals released from traps. To verify this hypothesis, the experiment conducted in fresh clear-cuttings was repeated in exactly the same place after almost a year, when the overground slash were old. For seven weeks, at the beginning of growing season 2008, in two experimental areas, 6 different combinations of alpha-pinen and ethanol were tested using the traps buried in the soil. In both experimental area was captured about the same number of weevils and catch dynamics were similar. In the first two weeks of experimentation, when there were the highest captures, but also for the entire period of experimentation, there were significant differences between the tested variants in what concerns the average number of captures, the traps baited with dispenser providing higher release rate of ethanol and alpha-pinene having higher catches. This shows that in the first season of vegetation the weevil response to the attractants was affected by the profusion of similar volatile substances issued from natural sources (fresh cutt stumps, branches, foliage, bark etc..

  4. Laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) of aluminum and lead in fine roots and their ectomycorrhizal mantles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeckhaoudt, S; Vandeputte, D; Van Praag, H; Van Grieken, R; Jacob, W

    1992-03-01

    Fine roots and ectomycorrhizal root tips were sampled in a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stand in the eastern part of the Belgian Ardennes. The cellular and partly subcellular localizations of aluminum and lead were identified by the micro-analytical laser microprobe mass analysis (LAMMA) technique. In fine roots with secondary structure, localization of aluminum was limited to the peripheral cell layers. Lead was found in the outer layers, and also in the primary phloem. Aluminum penetrated the mycorrhizal mantle, but lead was seldom detected in ectomycorrhizae.

  5. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon FluxMeasurements ofMontanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ač, Alexander; Malenovský, Z.; Urban, Otmar; Hanuš, Jan; Zitová, Martina; Navrátil, M.; Vráblová, M.; Olejníčková, Julie; Špunda, V.; Marek, Michal V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2012, č. 2012 (2012), s. 1-13 ISSN 1537-744X R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * carbon flux * forest ecosystems * Norway Spruce * temperate zone Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2012

  6. Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Norway with a territory of 386,000 sq. km or 150,000 sq. miles is slightly larger than New Mexico. In 1991 the population was estimated at 4.3 million with an annual growth rate of .5% and a literacy rate of 100%. The infant mortality rate is 7/1000 live births, and lie expectancy is 73 years for men and 80 years for women. Norway's government is a hereditary constitutional monarchy since independence n 1905. Ethnically, Norwegians are predominantly Germanic, but there are indigenous communities of Sami (Lapps) in the north, and in recent years almost 150,000 immigrants, foreign workers, and asylum-seekers have settled there. Norway's health system includes free hospital care, physicians compensation, cash benefits during illness and pregnancy, and other medical and dental plans. Until the 1981 election, Norway has been governed by Labor Party governments since 1935, except for 3 periods (1963, 1965-71, and 1972-73). Gro Harlem Brundtland is again the prime minister after forming her 3rd government in 10 years. Norway holds national elections in September 1993. Norway's large shipping fleet is modern; metals, pulp and paper products, chemicals, shipbuilding, and fishing are traditional industries, and major oil and gas discoveries in the mid-1970s transformed the economy. High oil prices in the 1983-85 period raised consumer spending, wages, and inflation. Norway is aspiring to restructure its nonoil economy in favor of efficient, nontraditional industry. The prime minister has indicated that Norway may apply for European Community (EC) membership before the end of 1992. Its main trading partners are the EC countries and its Scandinavian neighbors with the US in 5th place.

  7. A comparison of pine and spruce in recovery from winter stress; changes in recovery kinetics, and the abundance and phosphorylation status of photosynthetic proteins during winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, Ryan; Jerrard, Jacob; Frebault, Julia; Verhoeven, Amy

    2017-09-01

    During winter evergreens maintain a sustained form of thermal energy dissipation that results in reduced photochemical efficiency measured using the chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm. Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] have been shown to differ in their rate of recovery of Fv/Fm from winter stress. The goal of this study was to monitor changes in photosynthetic protein abundance and phosphorylation status during winter recovery that accompany these functional changes. An additional goal was to determine whether light-dependent changes in light harvesting complex II (LHCII) phosphorylation occur during winter conditions. We used a combination of field measurements and recovery experiments to monitor chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic protein content and phosphorylation status. We found that pine recovered three times more slowly than spruce, and that the kinetics of recovery in spruce included a rapid and slow component, while in pine there was only a rapid component to recovery. Both species retained relatively high amounts of the light harvesting protein Lhcb5 (CP26) and the PsbS protein during winter, suggesting a role for these proteins in sustained thermal dissipation. Both species maintained high phosphorylation of LHCII and the D1 protein in darkness during winter. Pine and spruce differed in the kinetics of the dephosphorylation of LHCII and D1 upon warming, suggesting the rate of dephosphorylation of LHCII and D1 may be important in the rapid component of recovery from winter stress. Finally, we demonstrated that light-dependent changes in LHII phosphorylation do not continue to occur on subzero winter days and that needles are maintained in a phosphorylation pattern consistent with the high light conditions to which those needles are exposed. Our results suggest a role for retained phosphorylation of both LHCII and D1 in maintenance of the photosynthetic machinery in a winter conformation

  8. Drought Stress Reaction of Growth and Δ13C in Tree Rings of European Beech and Norway Spruce in Monospecific Versus Mixed Stands Along a Precipitation Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Schäfer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree rings include retrospective information about the relationship between climate and growth, making it possible to predict growth reaction under changing climate. Previous studies examined species-specific reactions under different environmental conditions from the perspective of tree ring growth and 13C discrimination (Δ13C. This approach is extended to monospecific versus mixed stands in the present paper. We investigated the resistance and resilience of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karst and European beech (Fagus sylvatica [L.] in response to the drought event in 2003. The study was carried out along a precipitation gradient in southern Germany. Responses of basal area increment (BAI and Δ13C were correlated with a Climate-Vegetation-Productivity-Index (CVPI. The species showed different strategies for coping with drought stress. During the summer drought of 2003, the BAI of spruces reveal a lower resistance to drought on dry sites than those of beech. For beech, we found an increasing resistance in BAI and Δ13C from dry to moist sites. In mixture with spruce, beech had higher resistance and resilience for Δ13C with increasing site moisture. The combination of Δ13C and tree ring growth proxies improves our knowledge of species-specific and mixture-specific reactions to drought for sites with different moisture conditions.

  9. Pine weevil feeding on Norway spruce bark has a stronger impact on needle VOC emissions than enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blande, James D. [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: James.Blande@uku.fi; Turunen, Katariina [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: ksturune@hytti.uku.fi; Holopainen, Jarmo K. [Department of Environmental Science, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)], E-mail: Jarmo.Holopainen@uku.fi

    2009-01-15

    Plants can respond physiologically to damaging ultraviolet-B radiation by altering leaf chemistry, especially UV absorbing phenolic compounds. However, the effects on terpene emissions have received little attention. We conducted two field trials in plots with supplemented UV-B radiation and assessed the influence of feeding by pine weevils, Hylobius abietis L., on volatile emissions from 3-year old Norway spruce trees (Picea abies L. Karst.). We collected emissions from branch tips distal to the feeding weevils, and from whole branches including the damage sites. Weevil feeding clearly induced the emission of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, particularly linalool and (E)-{beta}-farnesene, from branch tips, and the sums of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes emitted by whole branches were substantially increased. We discovered little effect of UV-B radiation up to 30% above the ambient level on volatile emissions from branch tips distal to damage sites, but there was a possible effect on bark emissions from damage sites. - Chronic exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation has little effect on volatile emissions of Norway spruce.

  10. Pine weevil feeding on Norway spruce bark has a stronger impact on needle VOC emissions than enhanced ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blande, James D.; Turunen, Katariina; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    2009-01-01

    Plants can respond physiologically to damaging ultraviolet-B radiation by altering leaf chemistry, especially UV absorbing phenolic compounds. However, the effects on terpene emissions have received little attention. We conducted two field trials in plots with supplemented UV-B radiation and assessed the influence of feeding by pine weevils, Hylobius abietis L., on volatile emissions from 3-year old Norway spruce trees (Picea abies L. Karst.). We collected emissions from branch tips distal to the feeding weevils, and from whole branches including the damage sites. Weevil feeding clearly induced the emission of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, particularly linalool and (E)-β-farnesene, from branch tips, and the sums of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes emitted by whole branches were substantially increased. We discovered little effect of UV-B radiation up to 30% above the ambient level on volatile emissions from branch tips distal to damage sites, but there was a possible effect on bark emissions from damage sites. - Chronic exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation has little effect on volatile emissions of Norway spruce

  11. Sequencing of the needle transcriptome from Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst L. reveals lower substitution rates, but similar selective constraints in gymnosperms and angiosperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed knowledge about spatial and temporal gene expression is important for understanding both the function of genes and their evolution. For the vast majority of species, transcriptomes are still largely uncharacterized and even in those where substantial information is available it is often in the form of partially sequenced transcriptomes. With the development of next generation sequencing, a single experiment can now simultaneously identify the transcribed part of a species genome and estimate levels of gene expression. Results mRNA from actively growing needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies was sequenced using next generation sequencing technology. In total, close to 70 million fragments with a length of 76 bp were sequenced resulting in 5 Gbp of raw data. A de novo assembly of these reads, together with publicly available expressed sequence tag (EST data from Norway spruce, was used to create a reference transcriptome. Of the 38,419 PUTs (putative unique transcripts longer than 150 bp in this reference assembly, 83.5% show similarity to ESTs from other spruce species and of the remaining PUTs, 3,704 show similarity to protein sequences from other plant species, leaving 4,167 PUTs with limited similarity to currently available plant proteins. By predicting coding frames and comparing not only the Norway spruce PUTs, but also PUTs from the close relatives Picea glauca and Picea sitchensis to both Pinus taeda and Taxus mairei, we obtained estimates of synonymous and non-synonymous divergence among conifer species. In addition, we detected close to 15,000 SNPs of high quality and estimated gene expression differences between samples collected under dark and light conditions. Conclusions Our study yielded a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as estimates of gene expression on transcriptome scale. In agreement with a recent study we find that the synonymous substitution rate per year (0.6 × 10

  12. Using laser micro-dissection and qRT-PCR to analyze cell type-specific gene expression in Norway spruce phloem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina E. Nagy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The tangentially oriented polyphenolic parenchyma (PP and radially organized ray parenchyma in the phloem are central in the defense of conifer stems against insects and pathogens. Laser micro-dissection enables examination of cell-specific defense responses. To examine induced defense responses in Norway spruce stems inoculated with the necrotrophic blue-stain fungus Ceratocystis polonica, RNA extracted from laser micro-dissected phloem parenchyma and vascular cambium was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to profile transcript levels of selected resistance marker genes. The monitored transcripts included three pathogenesis-related proteins (class IV chitinase (CHI4, defensin (SPI1, peroxidase (PX3, two terpene synthesis related proteins (DXPS and LAS, one ethylene biosynthesis related protein (ACS, and a phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL. Three days following inoculation, four genes (CHI4, PAL, PX3, SPI1 were differentially induced in individual cell and tissue types, both close to the inoculation site (5 mm above and, to a lesser degree, further away (10 mm above. These resistance marker genes were all highly induced in ray parenchyma, supporting the important role of the rays in spruce defense propagation. CHI4 and PAL were also induced in PP cells and in conducting secondary phloem tissues. Our data suggests that different cell types in the secondary phloem of Norway spruce have overlapping but not fully redundant roles in active host defense. Furthermore, the study demonstrates the usefulness of laser micro-dissection coupled with qRT-PCR to characterize gene expression in different cell types of conifer bark.

  13. The state of the forest ecosystem in an area of oil shale mining and processing. 2. Morphological characteristics of Norway spruce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ots, K.; Rauk, J.; Mandre, M.

    2000-01-01

    Air pollutants (oil shale fly ash, gases, organic compounds) emitted by the oil shale industry in Kohtla-Jaerve, North-East Estonia, have caused changes in the soil (pH = 4.7-7.4), subsoil water (pH = 5.9-7.2), rainwater (pH = 7.0-7. 1) and snow melt (pH = 7.3-8.7) compared with an unpolluted control area in Lahemaa National Park (soil pH = 3.6, subsoil water pH = 5. 1, rainwater pH = 6.9 and snow melt pH = 6.8). Compared with the period before 1990 the pollution load on the area investigated has fallen drastically; however, this has not resulted in an essential improvement in growth conditions of trees. Morphological analysis of 80-year-old Norway spruces growing on sampling plots (six) in the polluted area and in the control area showed that air pollution has had temporally (1989-1990, 1994-1996) and spatially variable effect on the parameters characterising the state of trees: length growth, weight and dry matter content of needles and shoots, number and density of needles on shoots, radial increment of trees. The length growth of needles and shoots proved to be one of the most suitable parameters indicating the influence of air pollution, although not in all sample plots investigated. The results for fresh and dry weight of needles revealed great differences between sampling plots. The biomass of shoots was notably greater in the immediate vicinity of Kohtla-Jaerve than in the control area. The spruces whose shoots showed inhibited length growth had greater density of needles on shoots with difference from the control being up to 16 Olo. The effect on the radial increment of Norway spruces was especially strong in the immediate vicinity of pollution sources (<2 km) but it fell rapidly with distance from them. (author)

  14. Allocation of recent photoassimilates in mature European beech and Norway spruce - seasonal variability and responses to experimentally increased tropospheric O3 concentration and long-term drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    This contribution summarizes a series of C allocation studies in maturing European beech and Norway spruce trees at Kranzberg Forest, located in southern Germany. Study objects are 60 to 70 year old trees, readily accessible via scaffoldings and canopy crane. Allocation of recently fixed photoassimilates is assessed either by conventional branch-bag labelling with 99 atom% 13CO2 or whole-tree labeling using 13C-depleted CO2 (isoFACE system). While labeling in branch bags, employed for few hours only, focused on phloem functionality in particular under long-term drought, C labeling of whole tree canopies was employed for up to 20 days, studying allocation of recent photoassimilates from the canopy along branches and stems to roots and soils below ground. In all experiments, dynamics of C allocation were mostly pursued assessing carbon isotopic composition of CO2 efflux from woody tissues which typically reflected isotopic composition of phloem sugars. Effects of severe and long-term summer drought are assessed in an ongoing experiment with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (kroof.wzw.tum.de). Precipitation throughfall was completely excluded since early spring, resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce up to -2.2 MPa. The hypothesis was tested that long-term drought affects allocation of recently fixed C to branches and phloem functionality. In the annual course under unstressed conditions, phloem transport speed from the canopy to the stem (breast height) was double in beech compared to spruce, with highest transport velocities in early summer (about 0.51 and 0.26 m/h) and lowest in spring (0.26 and 0.12 m/h for beech and spruce, respectively). After leaf flush in spring, growth respiration of beech trunks was largely supplied by C stores. Recent photoassimilates supplied beech stem growth in early summer and refilled C stores in late summer, whereas seasonality was less pronounced in spruce. The hypothesis that growth

  15. Stand tending and root rot in Norway spruce stands - economical effects caused by root rot at different thinning regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Mats

    1997-01-01

    This report is divided into three parts: 1) a literature study describing the most common fungi causing rot in wood and descriptions of various strategies to reduce economic loss from root rot, 2) a check of a model describing the development of butt rot in pure Norway spruce plantations in southern Sweden, and 3) simulated economic effects of root rot in stands with various stand tending. The rot model was used to estimate future rot frequencies in the economic calculations. In order to avoid overestimations of rot frequencies, the calculations were also executed when assuming slower growth of rot than shown in the model. When analysing the economical effects of rot, the following three thinning programmes were used: Program 1: thinning at the ages of 30- and 45 years. Final felling at the ages 50-, 55-, 60-, 65-, and 70 years. Program 2: thinning at the ages of 40- and 60- years. Final felling at the ages 65 and 75 years. Program 3: thinning at the ages of 30-, 40-, 55-, and 70 years. Final felling at the ages 80 and 90 years. With an interest rate of 3%, programme 2 (final felling at the age of 65 years) had the highest value at present. This result was valid when presuming butt rot in the stand as well as when presuming no butt rot in the stand. There was a small difference between the value at present in programme 1 (final felling at the age of 60 years) and in programme 3 (final felling at the age of 80 years). When presuming butt rot in the stand, the value at present in programme 3 decreased somewhat more in comparison to the value at present in programme 1. Compared to no butt rot in the stand, the optimal final felling time appeared five to ten years earlier when assuming butt rot in the stand. Stand tending programme 1 and an interest rate of 3% were used. Interest rates 2 and 4% did not indicate shorter rotation. The calculated optimal time of final felling appeared at the same stand age whether assuming rot preset or not. The results in this study

  16. Adaptation of seedling growth to the altitude: a case of the Norway spruce from the polish Sudety mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robakowski, Piotr

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of five Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] populations originating from different altitudes in the massif of Snieznik Klodzki in the Sudety Mountains (Poland were grown in the greenhouse. Height, root length, and weight of root, shoot, needles and bud, as well as biomass allocation were studied. A good correlation of seedling traits and the altitude of mother stands was found. This indicates a rather good ecological adaptation of these, probably introduced populations. Some ecological and silvicultural aspects of the results are discussed.

    [fr] Les plantes de cinq populations de l'épicéa commun [Picea abies (L. Karst.] provenant des différentes altitudes du massif de Snieznik Klodzki dans les Sudètes (une chaîne des montagnes en Pologne ont été cultivées dans la serre. Leurs paramètres suivants ont été analysés: la hauteur, la longueur des racines, le poids frais et le poids sec des racines, des tiges, des aiguilles, des bourgeons et l'allocation de la biomasse. La haute corrélation a été notée entre les paramètres des plantes et l'altitude des stations des arbres ayant été les semenciers des graines. Ce résultat montre une plutôt bonne adaptation écologique de ces populations, probablement introduites dans le massif de Snieznik Klodzki. Les aspects écologiques et les conséquences de l'adaptation de l'épicéa commun aux conditions montagneuses pour la sylviculture sont discutés.
    [es] Plántulas de cinco poblaciones de abeto rojo [Picea abies (L. Karst.] procedentes de diferente altitud en el macizo de Snieznik Klodzki, en los Montes Sudetes, (Polonia se cultivaron en invernadero. Se han analizado los parámetros siguientes: altura y longitud de las raíces, pesos fresco y seco de raíces, tallos, hojas y yemas, así como la distribución de la biomasa. Como resultado se obtuvo una correlación alta entre los parámetros de las plántidas y la altitud de las estaciones donde se colectaron las

  17. Soil-surface CO2 flux and growth in a boreal Norway spruce stand: Effects of soil warming and nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroemgren, M.

    2001-01-01

    Global warming is predicted to affect the carbon balance of forests. A change in the carbon balance would give a positive or negative feedback to the greenhouse effect, which would affect global warming. The effects of long-term soil warming on growth, nutrient and soil-surface CO 2 flux (R) dynamics were studied in irrigated (I) and irrigated-fertilised (IL) stands of Norway spruce in northern Sweden. Soil temperature on heated plots (Ih and ILh) was maintained 5 deg C above that on unheated plots (Ic and ILc) from May to October, by heating cables. After six years' soil warming, stemwood production increased by 100% and 50% in the I and IL treatment, respectively. The main production increase occurred at the beginning of the season, probably as an effect of the earlier increase in soil temperature. In the 1h treatment, however, the growth increase was evident during the entire season. The effect of increased nitrogen (N) mineralisation on annual growth appeared to be stronger than the direct effect of warming. From 1995-2000, the total amount of N stored in aboveground tree parts increased by 100 and 475 kg N/ha on Ic and ILc plots, respectively. During the same period, 450 kg N fertiliser was added to the ILc plot. Soil warming increased the total amount of N stored in aboveground tree parts by 50 kg N/ha, independently of nutrient treatment. Soil warming did not significantly increase R, except in early spring, when R was 30-50% higher on heated compared to unheated plots. The extended growing season, however, increased annual respiration (RA) by 12-30% throughout. RA losses were estimated to be 0.6-0.7 kg C/ha/year. Use of relationships between R and soil temperature, derived from unheated plots, overestimated RA on heated plots by 50-80%. These results suggest that acclimation of root or microbial respiration or both to temperature had occurred, but the exact process(es) and their relative contribution are still unclear. In conclusion, the study showed that

  18. See the forest for the trees: Whole-plant allocation patterns and regulatory mechanisms in Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianbei; Behrendt, Thomas; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Weinhold, Alexander; Hellén, Heidi; Reichelt, Michael; Wisthaler, Armin; Dam, Nicole; Trumbore, Susan; Hartmann, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    For more than 40 years plant carbon (C) allocation have been of central interest to plant scientists. Most studies on C allocation focus on either biomass partitioning (e.g., root:shoot ratios), particular fluxes (e.g., non-structural carbohydrate, NSC; biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, VOCs) or short-term proportional allocation patterns (e.g., pulse-chase studies using isotopic tracers). However, a thorough understanding of C allocation priorities, especially at the whole-plant level, requires assessing all of these aspects together. We investigated C allocation trade-off in Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by assessing whole-plant fluxes (assimilation, respiration and VOCs) and biomass partitioning (structural biomass; NSC; secondary metabolites, SMs). The study was carried out over 8 weeks and allowed us, by modifying atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]), manipulating plant carbon (C) availability. Treatments included control (400 ppm), carbon compensation (down to 120 ppm) and starvation (down to 50 ppm) C availability levels. Reductions in [CO2] aimed to reveal plant allocation strategies assuming that pools receiving more C than others under C limitation have a high allocation priority. Respiration was less sensitive to declining [CO2] compared to assimilation, NSC and SMs. Strong declines in NSC at low [CO2] suggest that respiration was maintained by using stored NSC. Furthermore, reduced NSC and SMs concentrations also indicate preferential C allocation to growth over NSC and SMs at low C availability. SMs decreased to a lesser extent than NSC in old needles, and remained relatively constant in branches until death from starvation. These results suggest that pools of stored NSC may serve as a buffer for respiration or growth under C limitation but also that SMs remain largely inaccessible for metabolism once they are stored in tissues. VOCs emissions, however, showed contrasting responses to [CO2]; oxygenated VOCs (methanol and

  19. Impacts of changing climate on the productivity of Norway spruce dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine and birch in relation to water availability in southern and northern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhen-Ming; Kellomäki, Seppo; Peltola, Heli; Zhou, Xiao; Wang, Kai-Yun; Väisänen, Hannu

    2011-03-01

    A process-based ecosystem model was used to assess the impacts of changing climate on net photosynthesis and total stem wood growth in relation to water availability in two unmanaged Norway spruce (Picea abies) dominant stands with a mixture of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and birch (Betula sp.). The mixed stands were grown over a 100-year rotation (2000-99) in southern and northern Finland with initial species shares of 50, 25 and 25% for Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch, respectively. In addition, pure Norway spruce, Scots pine and birch stands were used as a comparison to identify whether species' response is different in mixed and pure stands. Soil type and moisture conditions (moderate drought) were expected to be the same at the beginning of the simulations irrespective of site location. Regardless of tree species, both annual net canopy photosynthesis (P(nc)) and total stem wood growth (V(s)) were, on average, lower on the southern site under the changing climate compared with the current climate (difference increasing toward the end of the rotation); the opposite was the case for the northern site. Regarding the stand water budget, evapotranspiration (E(T)) was higher under the changing climate regardless of site location. Transpiration and evaporation from the canopy affected water depletion the most. Norway spruce and birch accounted for most of the water depletion in mixed stands on both sites regardless of climatic condition. The annual soil water deficit (W(d)) was higher on the southern site under the changing climate. On the northern site, the situation was the opposite. According to our results, the growth of pure Norway spruce stands in southern Finland could be even lower than the growth of Norway spruce in mixed stands under the changing climate. The opposite was found for pure Scots pine and birch stands due to lower water depletion. This indicates that in the future the management should be properly adapted to climate change in order to

  20. Net radiation of mountain cultivated Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stand: evaluation of shortand long-wave radiation ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Marková, Irena; Marek, Michal V.

    2011-01-01

    The radiation exchange drives the plant ecosystems energy balance and provides the energy for photosynthesis, transpiration and plant growth. The investigation on net radiation and its component during vegetation season in relation to the clearness index and sun elevation in a cultivated 31-year-old mountain spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] stand is presented. Downward short-wave radiation – Sd (incident on the spruce stand was the main part of the short-wave radiation balance during th...

  1. Declining Bark Beetle Densities (Ips typographus, Coleoptera: Scolytinae from Infested Norway Spruce Stands and Possible Implications for Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Angst

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The eight-toothed spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus is the most serious insect pest in Central European forests. During the past two decades, extreme meteorological events and subsequent beetle infestations have killed millions of cubic meters of standing spruce trees. Not all the infested stands could be cleared in time, and priorities in management had to be set. Natural or man-made buffer zones of about 500 meters in width are frequently defined to separate differently managed stands in Central Europe. While the buffer zones seem to be effective in most of the cases, their impact has not been studied in detail. Beetle densities were therefore assessed in three case studies using pheromone traps along transects, leading from infested stands into spruce-free buffer zones. The results of the trap catches allow an estimation of the buffer zone influence on densities and the dispersal of Ips typographus. Beetle densities were found to decrease rapidly with increasing distance from the infested spruce stands. The trap catches were below high-risk thresholds within a few hundred meters of the infested stands. The decrease in catches was more pronounced in open land and in an urban area than in a broadleaf stand. Designed buffer zones of 500 m width without spruce can therefore very probably help to reduce densities of spreading beetles.

  2. Genetic variability and health of Norway spruce stands in the Regional Directorate of the State Forests in Krosno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutkowska Justyna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in 2015 in six spruce stands situated in different forest districts administratively belonging to the Regional Directorate of State Forests in Krosno. Each spruce population was represented by 30 trees and assessed in terms of their current health status. Genetic analyses were performed on shoot samples from each tree using nine nuclear DNA markers and one mitochondrial DNA marker (nad1. The health status of the trees was described according to the classification developed by Szczepkowski and Tarasiuk (2005 and the correlation between health classes and the level of genetic variability was computed with STATISTICA (α = 0.05.

  3. Elevated CO{sub 2} and development of frost hardiness in Norway spruce (picea abies (L.) Karst.); Oekt CO{sub 2} og utvikling av frostherdighet i gran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalen, Lars Sandved

    1998-09-01

    This thesis discusses controlled laboratory experiments carried out to study the effects of CO{sub 2} pollution on Norwegian spruce. It was found that elevated CO{sub 2} increased height growth and biomass production. It slightly increased frost hardiness, but only at high nitrogen values. There was no evidence of adverse effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on the phenology of bud set and the development of frost hardiness. Although not statistically significant, there seemed to be a consistently higher concentration of soluble carbohydrates in one-season-old Norway spruce seedlings treated with elevated CO{sub 2}. This was not found in three-year-old seedlings grown in open top chambers, possibly indicating a down-regulation of photosynthesis or a transition from free to predetermined growth, and change in allocation of photosynthates with age. Treatment with high or low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilizer did not affect apoplastic chitinolytic activity during cold acclimation, nor were there any effects on antifreeze activity in these apoplastic extracts from cold acclimated needles. 149 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  4. Comparative study on the turnover of quinic- and shikimic acid and of its derivatives in needles of Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karst., affected by 'Waldsterben' syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittrich, P.; Senser, M.; Frielinghaus, J.

    1989-01-01

    A comparative study on the incorporation of 14 C into quinic- and shikimic acid in spruce needles was carried out with four different syndroms of Picea abies (L.) Karst: a tree from high altitudes of the Bayerischer Wald with the syndrom of 'acute yellowing', a light-sensitive mutant with yellowish needles (Picea abies Karst. finedonensis), a tree exhibiting 'Lametta' syndrome with a translucent crown and twigs hanging down like tinsel, and a healthy tree for control. The needles of these trees were labelled via photosynthetic fixation of 14 CO 2 in June, and the fate of labelled compounds was monitored over 125 days. In the youngest needles incorporation rates of quinic and shikimic acid reached a dominating level of about 60% of the label of soluble metabolites, which underlines the decisive role of both acids during needle development. The yellow mutant 'finedonensis' and the tree with 'Lametta' syndrome, which exhibit rather identical turnover kinetics of quinate and shikimate, show lower rates and reach, in particular in one- and two-year-old needles, only about 50% of the incorporation rates of the control spruce. The tree with the syndrome of 'acute yellowing' exhibits a significant reduction of incorporation already in the youngest needles; the older needles of this tree virtually suspend metabolism of both acids all together, though apparently high but dormant pools of shikimate and quinate are present. The degree of label incorporation into shikimate and quinate may possibly serve as a measure of needle damage. Exclusively in the yellow mutant a novel spruce constituent, 3-0-p-coumaroylquinic acid, could be detected; a related compound, 3-0-p-caffeoylshikimic acid was identified in the needles of the 'acute yellowing' tree. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Carbon pools in a montane old-growth Norway spruce ecosystem in Bohemian Forest: Effects of stand age and elevation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seedre, M.; Kopáček, Jiří; Janda, P.; Bače, R.; Svoboda, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 346, June (2015), s. 106-113 ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/12/1218 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : carbon dynamics * soil carbon * spruce biomass C * dead root C * unmanaged ecosystem Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2015

  6. Defence reactions of mature Norway spruce (Picea abies before and after inoculation of the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica in a drought stress experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netherer Sigrid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed an inoculation experiment using the blue-stain fungus Endoconidiophora polonica at the Rosalia Roof study site, which was set up to study drought effects on Norway spruce susceptibility to attacks by the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. Tree resistance parameters such as resin flow rate and extent of hypersensitive wound reaction in the phloem were investigated prior to and after fungal infection. Sample trees with different drought treatments (trees fully covered or semi-covered by roofs, control trees were inoculated with E. polonica in July 2014. In order to check for areas of phloem necrosis, the outer bark around the inoculation holes was scratched off 6 weeks later. We recorded the amount of resin exudation within 12 hours overnight in August and September 2013 and 2014. Although wound reaction zones did not differ in size between tree collectives of the various treatments, fully covered trees tended to exhibit larger necrotic areas compared to control trees. The least water supplied trees showed lowest resin flow rates prior to fungal inoculation, but were the only group to show significantly enhanced resin flow five weeks after the evaluation of defence reactions. Our results agree with earlier findings that wounding and few fungal inoculations can increase tree resistance in the medium term given not too severe water stress. Further investigations will clarify how water stress affects the availability of non-structural carbohydrates for secondary metabolism, when depletion of resources eventually occurs, and at which point trees are most susceptible to bark beetle attack.

  7. Non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments are present in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karsch): insights from in silico analysis of nuclear and organellar genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade, Sonali Sachin; García-Gil, María Rosario; Rosselló, Josep A

    2016-04-01

    Many genes have been lost from the prokaryote plastidial genome during the early events of endosymbiosis in eukaryotes. Some of them were definitively lost, but others were relocated and functionally integrated to the host nuclear genomes through serial events of gene transfer during plant evolution. In gymnosperms, plastid genome sequencing has revealed the loss of ndh genes from several species of Gnetales and Pinaceae, including Norway spruce (Picea abies). This study aims to trace the ndh genes in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes. The plastid genomes of higher plants contain 11 ndh genes which are homologues of mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of the proton-pumping NADH-dehydrogenase (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase) or complex I (electron transport chain). Ndh genes encode 11 NDH polypeptides forming the Ndh complex (analogous to complex I) which seems to be primarily involved in chloro-respiration processes. We considered ndh genes from the plastidial genome of four gymnosperms (Cryptomeria japonica, Cycas revoluta, Ginkgo biloba, Podocarpus totara) and a single angiosperm species (Arabidopsis thaliana) to trace putative homologs in the nuclear and organellar Norway spruce genomes using tBLASTn to assess the evolutionary fate of ndh genes in Norway spruce and to address their genomic location(s), structure, integrity and functionality. The results obtained from tBLASTn were subsequently analyzed by performing homology search for finding ndh specific conserved domains using conserved domain search. We report the presence of non-functional plastid ndh gene fragments, excepting ndhE and ndhG genes, in the nuclear genome of Norway spruce. Regulatory transcriptional elements like promoters, TATA boxes and enhancers were detected in the upstream regions of some ndh fragments. We also found transposable elements in the flanking regions of few ndh fragments suggesting nuclear rearrangements in those regions. These evidences

  8. Modelling spruce bark beetle infestation probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulius Zolubas; Jose Negron; A. Steven Munson

    2009-01-01

    Spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) risk model, based on pure Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst.) stand characteristics in experimental and control plots was developed using classification and regression tree statistical technique under endemic pest population density. The most significant variable in spruce bark beetle...

  9. Relation of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Sensitive Reflectance Ratios to Carbon Flux Measurements of Montanne Grassland and Norway Spruce Forest Ecosystems in the Temperate Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Ač

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We explored ability of reflectance vegetation indexes (VIs related to chlorophyll fluorescence emission (686/630, 740/800 and de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments (PRI, calculated as (531−570/(531−570 to track changes in the CO2 assimilation rate and Light Use Efficiency (LUE in montane grassland and Norway spruce forest ecosystems, both at leaf and also canopy level. VIs were measured at two research plots using a ground-based high spatial/spectral resolution imaging spectroscopy technique. No significant relationship between VIs and leaf light-saturated CO2 assimilation (MAX was detected in instantaneous measurements of grassland under steady-state irradiance conditions. Once the temporal dimension and daily irradiance variation were included into the experimental setup, statistically significant changes in VIs related to tested physiological parameters were revealed. ΔPRI and Δ(686/630 of grassland plant leaves under dark-to-full sunlight transition in the scale of minutes were significantly related to MAX (2=0.51. In the daily course, the variation of VIs measured in one-hour intervals correlated well with the variation of Gross Primary Production (GPP, Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE, and LUE estimated via the eddy-covariance flux tower. Statistical results were weaker in the case of the grassland ecosystem, with the strongest statistical relation of the index 686/630 with NEE and GPP.

  10. Modelling Studies With a Coupled Canopy Atmospheric Chemistry Emission Model on Trace Gas Exchange and Gas Phase Chemistry in a Norway Spruce Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkel, R.; Klemm, O.; Graus, M.; Rappengl{Ü}Ck, B.; Stockwell, W. R.; Grabmer, W.; Held, A.; Hansel, A.; Steinbrecher, R.

    2006-12-01

    Within the joint project BEWA2000 modelling studies were performed in combination with field campaigns in a Norway spruce forest at the Waldstein site in NE Bavaria. Although located in a comparatively remote region the Waldstein site is still affected by a certain background of anthropogenic pollution which can influence BVOC degradation and product formation. The role of chemical degradation of biogenic volatile organic compounds and the effect of dynamical processes on BVOC and product mixing ratios within and above forest canopies have been investigated by applying the one-dimensional canopy-chemistry model CACHE. The simulations with CACHE permit the interpretation of observed features of the diurnal cycles of ozone and VOC mixing ratios by investigating the effect of turbulent exchange, chemical formation and degradation, emission, and deposition during the course of the day. For the conditions given at the Waldstein site chemical BVOC degradation within the canopy was found to reduce the BVOC fluxes into the atmosphere by 10 - 15 % as compared to the emission fluxes on branch basis. Furthermore, the simulations show that BVOC degradation by the NO3 can occur in the lower part of the canopy also during daytime and that this effect is strongly influenced by the presence of advected NOx and local NO emissions from the soil. The simulation results emphasize the role of deposition for the concentrations of BVOC oxidation products and indicate that further research is still necessary concerning the emission and deposition of aldehydes and ketones.

  11. Contamination of environment in the road surroudings - impact of road salting on Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegrová, Jitka; Steiner, Oliver; Goessler, Walter; Tanda, Stefan; Anděl, Petr

    2017-09-01

    A comprehensive overview of the influence of transport on the environment is presented in this study. The complex analysis of soil and needle samples provides an extensive set of data, which presents elemental contamination of the environment near roads. Traffic pollution (including winter road treatment) has a significant negative influence on our environment. Besides sodium and chlorine from winter maintenance many other elements are emitted into the environment. Three possible sources of contamination are assumed for environmental contamination evaluation: car emission, winter maintenance and abrasion from breaks and clutches. The chemical analysis focused on the description of samples from inorganic point of view. The influence of the contamination potential on the sodium and chlorine content in the samples of 1st year-old and 2nd year-old needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) is discussed. Additional soil samples were taken from each sampling site and analyzed to get insight in the sodium and chlorine distribution. Statistical evaluation was used for interpretation of complex interaction patterns between element concentrations in different aged needles based on localities character including distance from the road and element concentration in soils. This species of needles were chosen because of its heightened sensitivity towards salinization. The study was conducted in different parts of the Czech Republic. The resulting database is a source of valuable information about the influence of transport on the environment.

  12. Regeneration of Mature Norway Spruce Stands: Early Effects of Selective Cutting and Clear Cutting on Seepage Water Quality and Soil Fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendelin Weis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutting of trees influences element turnover in the forest ecosystem. The reduction of plant uptake, as well as an increased mineralization and nitrification due to higher soil temperature and soil moisture, can lead to considerable losses of nutrients from the main rooting zone. This may result in a reduced soil fertility and a decrease in drinking water quality due to high nitrate concentrations in the seepage water. In Bavaria (Germany selective cutting is preferred to clear cutting when initiating the regeneration of Norway spruce stands with European beech. This paper summarizes the early effects of both forest management practices on soil fertility and seepage water quality for three different sites. Shown are the concentrations of nitrogen and base cations in the seepage water as well as the water and ion fluxes during the first year after tree cut. Nutrient inputs decreased on thinned plots and even more at clear-cuts. Nitrate concentrations in the seepage water are hardly affected by moderate thinning; however, on clear-cuts, the nitrate concentration increases significantly, and base cations are lost from the upper mineral soil. This effect is less obvious at sites where a dense ground vegetation, which is able to take up excess nitrogen, exists.

  13. Changes in fine root production and longevity in response to water and nutrient availability in a Norway spruce stand in northern Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majdi, Hooshang [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research

    2003-03-01

    Effects of nutritional availability and soil warming on carbon turnover via fine roots (<2 mm in diameter) were studied at a Norway spruce stand in north Sweden in the following treatments: liquid fertilization (IL), soil warming of treated plots (HIL) and control (C). Minirhizotrons were installed in October 1994 and recorded once a month during the growing season, in 1997. Fine root production increased significantly in I and IL treatments compared with C plots at 0-10 and 10-20 cm depths. Soil warming enhanced effects of IL. Root mortality was not increased significantly in IL. Soil warming showed almost the similar effect on root mortality at depth 10-20 cm as it was for depth 0-10 cm. The root longevity in IL plots was significantly lower compared with C plots at depth 0-20 cm. The effects of soil warming were more pronounced at depth 10-25 cm. Soil warming increased root biomass three times in HIL plots and this increase. It is concluded that an eventual increase in temperature followed by increased CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases, results in an increase in root production and mortality and consequently higher carbon allocation to the soil.

  14. Carbon, nitrogen, C/N ratio and their stand heterogeneity in the soil of Norway spruce stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Vranová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is aimed to determine the effect of thinning of young spruce stands in Moravian-Silesian Beskids Mts. on concentrations and relative stand heterogeneity of Cox, Nt and C/N in soil. Concentrations of Cox and Nt were significantly higher in individual horizons of forest humus floor. The thinning did not influence significantly (P > 0.05 concentrations of Cox, Nt and C/N ratio in particular soil horizons, with the exception of C/N ration in E horizon. Relative stand heterogeneity of the studied soil properties was mostly higher in soil of dense forest stand. The values of relative stand heterogeneity for individual horizons ranged from 3.1 to 61.9 % in case of Cox, from 4.9 to 55.2 % for Nt and from 5.3 to 42.5 % for C/N ratio. Results of this work are useful to predict stand heterogeneity of soil biochemical properties which are known to correlate with especially Cox in soil on studied plots, especially soil respiration and enzymatic activities.

  15. Functional assays and metagenomic analyses reveals differences between the microbial communities inhabiting the soil horizons of a Norway spruce plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uroz, Stéphane; Ioannidis, Panos; Lengelle, Juliette; Cébron, Aurélie; Morin, Emmanuelle; Buée, Marc; Martin, Francis

    2013-01-01

    In temperate ecosystems, acidic forest soils are among the most nutrient-poor terrestrial environments. In this context, the long-term differentiation of the forest soils into horizons may impact the assembly and the functions of the soil microbial communities. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the ecology and functional potentials of these microbial communities, a suite of analyses including comparative metagenomics was applied on independent soil samples from a spruce plantation (Breuil-Chenue, France). The objectives were to assess whether the decreasing nutrient bioavailability and pH variations that naturally occurs between the organic and mineral horizons affects the soil microbial functional biodiversity. The 14 Gbp of pyrosequencing and Illumina sequences generated in this study revealed complex microbial communities dominated by bacteria. Detailed analyses showed that the organic soil horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Bacteria, Chordata, Arthropoda and Ascomycota. On the contrary the mineral horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Archaea. Our analyses also highlighted that the microbial communities inhabiting the two soil horizons differed significantly in their functional potentials according to functional assays and MG-RAST analyses, suggesting a functional specialisation of these microbial communities. Consistent with this specialisation, our shotgun metagenomic approach revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of sequences related glycoside hydrolases in the organic horizon compared to the mineral horizon that was significantly enriched in glycoside transferases. This functional stratification according to the soil horizon was also confirmed by a significant correlation between the functional assays performed in this study and the functional metagenomic analyses. Together, our results suggest that the soil stratification and particularly the soil resource availability impact the

  16. Functional assays and metagenomic analyses reveals differences between the microbial communities inhabiting the soil horizons of a Norway spruce plantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Uroz

    Full Text Available In temperate ecosystems, acidic forest soils are among the most nutrient-poor terrestrial environments. In this context, the long-term differentiation of the forest soils into horizons may impact the assembly and the functions of the soil microbial communities. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the ecology and functional potentials of these microbial communities, a suite of analyses including comparative metagenomics was applied on independent soil samples from a spruce plantation (Breuil-Chenue, France. The objectives were to assess whether the decreasing nutrient bioavailability and pH variations that naturally occurs between the organic and mineral horizons affects the soil microbial functional biodiversity. The 14 Gbp of pyrosequencing and Illumina sequences generated in this study revealed complex microbial communities dominated by bacteria. Detailed analyses showed that the organic soil horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Bacteria, Chordata, Arthropoda and Ascomycota. On the contrary the mineral horizon was significantly enriched in sequences related to Archaea. Our analyses also highlighted that the microbial communities inhabiting the two soil horizons differed significantly in their functional potentials according to functional assays and MG-RAST analyses, suggesting a functional specialisation of these microbial communities. Consistent with this specialisation, our shotgun metagenomic approach revealed a significant increase in the relative abundance of sequences related glycoside hydrolases in the organic horizon compared to the mineral horizon that was significantly enriched in glycoside transferases. This functional stratification according to the soil horizon was also confirmed by a significant correlation between the functional assays performed in this study and the functional metagenomic analyses. Together, our results suggest that the soil stratification and particularly the soil resource

  17. The mobility of nitrogen across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) and the effect of extraction method on tree-ring δ¹⁵N and δ¹³C values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, G; Siegwolf, R T W; Buchmann, N; Schleppi, P; Waldner, P; Weber, P

    2014-06-15

    The use of stable nitrogen (N) isotope ratios (δ(15)N values) in dendroecological studies is often preceded by an extraction procedure using organic solvents to remove mobile N compounds from tree-rings. Although these mobile N compounds may be capable of distorting potential environmental signals in the tree-ring δ(15)N values, recent investigations question the necessity of such an extraction. We used an on-going experiment with simulated elevated N deposition previously labelled with (15)N, in conjunction with control trees, to investigate the necessity of extracting mobile N compounds (using a rapid extraction procedure) for tree-ring δ(15)N and δ(13)C studies, as well as N and C concentration analyses. In addition, we examined the magnitude of radial redistribution of N across tree-rings of Norway spruce (Picea abies). The (15)N label, applied in 1995/96, was found in tree-rings as far back as 1951, although the increased N availability did not cause any significant relative increase in tree growth. The rapid extraction procedure had no significant effect on tree-ring δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in either labelled or control trees, or on N concentration. The C concentrations, however, were significantly higher after extraction in control samples, with the opposite effect observed in labelled samples. Our results indicate that the extraction of mobile N compounds through the rapid extraction procedure is not necessary prior to the determination of Norway spruce δ(15)N or δ(13)C values in dendrochemical studies. δ(15)N values, however, must be interpreted with great care, particularly when used as a proxy for the N status of trees, due to the very high mobility of N within the tree stem sapwood of Norway spruce over several decades. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Heterobasidion annosum root and butt rot of Norway spruce, Picea abies: Colonization by the fungus and its impact on tree growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz-Hellgren, M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1997-12-31

    Diameter growth losses associated with decay were quantified on a nationwide scale, and volume growth losses were measured in two stands. Diameter growth losses were 8-10% during a 5-year period in the nationwide study and 23% in one of the stands, whereas in the other stand, no volume losses could be attributed to decay. The effects of stump moisture content, temperature and time elapsed between felling and inoculation on the establishment of H. annosum spore infections in stumps were investigated among stumps resulting from thinnings and clear-cuttings. Furthermore, inoculations with H. annosum conidia were made between 0 hours and 4 weeks after thinning. The incidence of stump infections was lower on clear-cut areas than in thinned stands, but high enough to warrant stump treatment on clear-cuttings. A positive relation was found between heartwood moisture content and the proportion of heartwood infected, whereas the opposite relation was found for sapwood. The establishment of new conidiospore infections decreased with time, and it appeared that stumps were no longer susceptible to infection after 3 weeks had elapsed since felling. Roots of stumps and trees on forest land or former arable land were inoculated with H. annosum treated sawdust. The growth rate of H. annosum in roots of stumps was 25 cm/year, corresponding to 2.5 to 3 times the growth rate in tree roots. Previous land use did not affect the fungal rate of spread. Also, the average initial spread rate of H. annosum in naturally infected Norway spruce stems was estimated at 30 cm/year 156 refs, 9 figs

  19. Significant mean and extreme climate sensitivity of Norway spruce and silver fir at mid-elevation mesic sites in the Alps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carrer

    Full Text Available Climate forcing is the major abiotic driver for forest ecosystem functioning and thus significantly affects the role of forests within the global carbon cycle and related ecosystem services. Annual radial increments of trees are probably the most valuable source of information to link tree growth and climate at long-term time scales, and have been used in a wide variety of investigations worldwide. However, especially in mountainous areas, tree-ring studies have focused on extreme environments where the climate sensitivity is perhaps greatest but are necessarily a biased representation of the forests within a region. We used tree-ring analyses to study two of the most important tree species growing in the Alps: Norway spruce (Picea abies and silver fir (Abies alba. We developed tree-ring chronologies from 13 mesic mid-elevation sites (203 trees and then compared them to monthly temperature and precipitation data for the period 1846-1995. Correlation functions, principal component analysis and fuzzy C-means clustering were applied to 1 assess the climate/growth relationships and their stationarity and consistency over time, and 2 extract common modes of variability in the species responses to mean and extreme climate variability. Our results highlight a clear, time-stable, and species-specific response to mean climate conditions. However, during the previous-year's growing season, which shows the strongest correlations, the primary difference between species is in their response to extreme events, not mean conditions. Mesic sites at mid-altitude are commonly underrepresented in tree-ring research; we showed that strong climatic controls of growth may exist even in those areas. Extreme climatic events may play a key role in defining the species-specific responses on climatic sensitivity and, with a global change perspective, specific divergent responses are likely to occur even where current conditions are less limited.

  20. Significant mean and extreme climate sensitivity of Norway spruce and silver fir at mid-elevation mesic sites in the Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrer, Marco; Motta, Renzo; Nola, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Climate forcing is the major abiotic driver for forest ecosystem functioning and thus significantly affects the role of forests within the global carbon cycle and related ecosystem services. Annual radial increments of trees are probably the most valuable source of information to link tree growth and climate at long-term time scales, and have been used in a wide variety of investigations worldwide. However, especially in mountainous areas, tree-ring studies have focused on extreme environments where the climate sensitivity is perhaps greatest but are necessarily a biased representation of the forests within a region. We used tree-ring analyses to study two of the most important tree species growing in the Alps: Norway spruce (Picea abies) and silver fir (Abies alba). We developed tree-ring chronologies from 13 mesic mid-elevation sites (203 trees) and then compared them to monthly temperature and precipitation data for the period 1846-1995. Correlation functions, principal component analysis and fuzzy C-means clustering were applied to 1) assess the climate/growth relationships and their stationarity and consistency over time, and 2) extract common modes of variability in the species responses to mean and extreme climate variability. Our results highlight a clear, time-stable, and species-specific response to mean climate conditions. However, during the previous-year's growing season, which shows the strongest correlations, the primary difference between species is in their response to extreme events, not mean conditions. Mesic sites at mid-altitude are commonly underrepresented in tree-ring research; we showed that strong climatic controls of growth may exist even in those areas. Extreme climatic events may play a key role in defining the species-specific responses on climatic sensitivity and, with a global change perspective, specific divergent responses are likely to occur even where current conditions are less limited.

  1. Long-term exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation has no significant effects on growth or secondary compounds of outdoor-grown Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turtola, Satu; Sallas, Leena; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Kainulainen, Pirjo

    2006-01-01

    The effects of long-term enhanced UV-B radiation on growth and secondary compounds of two conifer species were studied in an outdoor experiment. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) seedlings were exposed for two growing seasons and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings for three growing seasons to supplemental UV-B radiation, corresponding to a 30% increase in ambient UV-B radiation. The experiment also included appropriate controls for ambient and increased UV-A radiation. Enhanced UV-B did not affect the growth of the conifer seedlings. In addition, neither the concentrations of terpenes and phenolics in the needles nor the concentrations of terpenes in the wood were affected. However, in the UV-A control treatment the concentrations of diterpenes in the wood of Scots pine decreased significantly compared to the ambient control. Apparently, a small increase in UV-B radiation has no significant effects on the secondary compounds and growth of Scots pine and Norway spruce seedlings. - Enhanced UV-B does not affect the growth and secondary compounds of boreal conifer seedlings

  2. The historical disturbance regime of mountain Norway spruce forests in the Western Carpathians and its influence on current forest structure and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Pavel; Trotsiuk, Volodymyr; Mikoláš, Martin; Bače, Radek; Nagel, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Seedre, Meelis; Morrissey, Robert C; Kucbel, Stanislav; Jaloviar, Peter; Jasík, Marián; Vysoký, Juraj; Šamonil, Pavel; Čada, Vojtěch; Mrhalová, Hana; Lábusová, Jana; Nováková, Markéta H; Rydval, Miloš; Matějů, Lenka; Svoboda, Miroslav

    2017-03-15

    In order to gauge ongoing and future changes to disturbance regimes, it is necessary to establish a solid baseline of historic disturbance patterns against which to evaluate these changes. Further, understanding how forest structure and composition respond to variation in past disturbances may provide insight into future resilience to climate-driven alterations of disturbance regimes. We established 184 plots (mostly 1000 m 2 ) in 14 primary mountain Norway spruce forests in the Western Carpathians. On each plot we surveyed live and dead trees and regeneration, and cored around 25 canopy trees. Disturbance history was reconstructed by examining individual tree growth trends. The study plots were further aggregated into five groups based on disturbance history (severity and timing) to evaluate and explain its influence on forest structure. These ecosystems are characterized by a mixed severity disturbance regime with high spatiotemporal variability in severity and frequency. However, periods of synchrony in disturbance activity were also found. Specifically, a peak of canopy disturbance was found for the mid-19th century across the region (about 60% of trees established), with the most important periods of disturbance in the 1820s and from the 1840s to the 1870s. Current stand size and age structure were strongly influenced by past disturbance activity. In contrast, past disturbances did not have a significant effect on current tree density, the amount of coarse woody debris, and regeneration. High mean densities of regeneration with height >50 cm (about 1400 individuals per ha) were observed. Extensive high severity disturbances have recently affected Central European forests, spurring a discussion about the causes and consequences. We found some evidence that forests in the Western Carpathians were predisposed to recent severe disturbance events as a result of synchronized past disturbance activity, which partly homogenized size and age structure and made recent

  3. Effects of liming and wood ash application on root biomass, root distribution and soil chemistry in a Norway spruce stand in southwest Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viebke, C.G.

    2001-07-01

    Effects of liming (CaPK) and wood ash application (A) on soil chemistry, root (< 2 mm and 2-5 mm in diameter) biomass and distribution, root length density (RLD, cm/cm{sup 3} ) and specific root length (SRL, m/g) were investigated in a 60 year old Norway spruce stand in SW Sweden. Soil cores were taken from the litter fermented humus (LFH) and mineral soil layers to a depth of 30 cm, eight years after treatments. The pH values of the LM layer increased significantly (p< 0.05) in the lime and ash treatments compared to the control, while in the top 5 cm of the mineral soil, pH was increased only in the A treatment compared to CaPK. The P, K, Ca and Mg concentrations increased in the CaPK treatment in the LM layer, while K and Ca decreased significantly at 5-10 cm depth in CaPK treated plots compared to the control and A. The highest amounts of ammonium and nitrate were found in A treatment in all soil layers. The A treatment increased fine root (< 2 mm in diameter) biomass in the LFH layer compared to the control but decreased it in the top 10 cm of the mineral soil compared to CaPK. A shallower fine root system was found in the A treated plots compared to the control and CaPK. The coarser root (2-5 mm in diameter) biomass was higher in the mineral soil in the A treatment compared to the control and CaPK but the differences were not significant. RLD increased in both CaPK and A in the upper soil layers. SRL increased in almost all layers in the CaPK and A treatments compared to the control. The number of root tips were also higher in the treated plots compared to the control, except in the 10-20 cm layer. It was concluded that CaPK and A treatments resulted in improved root vitality with a higher capacity for nutrient uptake.

  4. Stem girdling indicates prioritized carbon allocation to the root system at the expense of radial stem growth in Norway spruce under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Lethaus, Gina; Winkler, Andrea; Wieser, Gerhard

    2017-06-01

    The early culmination of maximum radial growth (RG) in late spring has been found in several coniferous species in a dry inner Alpine environment. We hypothesized that an early decrease in RG is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon (C) allocation to belowground organs. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally subjected six-year-old Norway spruce saplings (tree height: 1.35 m; n = 80 trees) to two levels of soil water availability (watered versus drought conditions) and manipulated tree C status by physically blocking phloem transport at three girdling dates (GD). The influence of C availability and drought on tree growth (radial and shoot growth; root biomass) in response to girdling was analyzed in both treatments. Non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs, soluble sugars and starch) were measured in the stem, root and current leader to evaluate changes in tree C status due to girdling. The main finding was a significant increase in RG of the girdled trees compared to the controls above the girdling zone (UZ). At all girdling dates the RG increase was significantly more intense in the drought-stressed compared with watered trees ( c . 3.3 and 1.9-fold higher compared with controls in the drought-stressed and watered trees, respectively), most likely indicating that an early switch of C allocation to belowground occurs as an adaptation to maintain tree water status under drought conditions. Reactivation of the cambium after the cessation of its regular activity was detected in UZ in drought-stressed trees, while below the girdling zone no xylem formation was found and the NSC content was strikingly reduced. Irrespective of water availability, girdling before growth onset significantly reduced the progression of bud break ( P < 0.05) and the length of the current leader shoot by -47% ( P < 0.01) indicating a reduction in xylem hydraulic conductance, which was corroborated by significantly reduced xylem sap flow ( P < 0

  5. Trichloracetic Acid and Norway Spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forczek, Sándor; Uhlířová, H.; Gryndler, Milan; Albrechtová, J.; Fuksová, K.; Vágner, Martin; Schröder, P.; Matucha, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2003), s. 15-27 ISSN 0862-6529 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874; GA ČR GA522/99/1465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : carbon-14 labeling * microbial degradation * phyllosphere Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  6. Norway spruce (Picea abies/L./Karst.) health status on various forest soil ecological series in Silesian Beskids obtained by grid or selective survey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samec, Pavel; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda; Cudlín, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 10, 1-2 (2017), s. 57-66 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD15044; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : spruce decline * survey design * defoliation * forest site ecological series Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) https://beskydy.mendelu.cz/10/1/0057/

  7. Schemele de împădurire dese şi stabilitatea monoculturilor de molid – este posibilă realizarea unui echilibru de durată? [Narrow spacing and stability of Norway spruce monocultures - is a long-term equilibrium possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolescu N.-V

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst - one of the most important forest species in both Europe (about 34 million ha and Romania (about 1.4 million ha - has been highly expanded in monocultures outside of its natural range since mid- 19th century. Unfortunately, despite their many advantages (easy establishment, quick growth, high production, multiple uses of timber etc., Norway spruce pure stands are facing many problems being especially subjected to wind and snow damages. Taking into account these facts, the article outlines the most important factors influencing Norway spruce stand stability such as initial spacing (stocking and early silvicultural interventions. It seems obvious that two solutions for a better stability to snow damages at early ages exists: low stocking (wide spacing at planting (maximum 2,000-2,500 plants per ha and high stocking (narrow spacing at planting (4,000-5,000 plants per ha but followed by high intensity cleaningrespacing started no later than end of saplingbeginning of thicket stage. Under present Romanian conditions, facing many economic constraints (e.g., high cost of planting and tending; lack of labour force, the solution of low stocking (wide spacing at planting as already stated at the beginning of 1980’s but never applied on a large scale seems more feasible and realistic

  8. Diurnal dynamics of photosynthetic parameters of Norway spruce trees cultivated under ambient and elevated CO2: the reasons of midday depression in CO2 assimilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špunda, V.; Kalina, J.; Urban, Otmar; Luis, V.C.; Sibisse, I.; Puértolas, J.; Šprtová, Miroslava; Marek, Michal V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2005), s. 1371-1381 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A141; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OCE21.001; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS6087005; GA MŽP SM/640/18/03 Grant - others:EU(CZ) HPRI-CT-2002-00197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : daily course of photosynthesis * elevated CO2 * dynamics of acclimation depression of photosynthesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2005

  9. The impact of long-term CO2 enrichment on sun and shade needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies): Photosynthetic performance, needle anatomy and phenolics accumulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lhotáková, Z.; Urban, Otmar; Dubánková, M.; Cvikrová, Milena; Tomášková, Ivana; Kubínová, Lucie; Zvára, K.; Marek, Michal V.; Albrechtová, J.

    188-189, JUN (2012), s. 60-70 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600110507; GA AV ČR IAA600870701; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H137 Program:GD Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Elevated CO2 * Mesophyll structure * Phenolic compounds * Photosynthesis * Picea abies * Stereological methods Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; ED - Physiology (FGU-C); EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 2.922, year: 2012

  10. Analiza comparativă a răspunsului dendroclimatologic al molidului (Picea abies (L. Karst. şi bradului (Abies alba Mill. din nordul Carpaţiilor Orientali [Comparative analysis of the dendrochronological response of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and Silver fir (Abies alba Mill., from the North of Eastern Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popa I

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper present an exemple of the applicability of dendroclimatological research methods in the study of forest ecosystems, using the dendrochronological series from Giumalau Secular Forest (GIUA - Norway spruce, Slatioara Secular Forest (SLAA -Norway spruce, SLAB - Silver fir and Demacusa Basin (DEMA - Silver fir. In the case of the Norway spruce, respectively the GIUA and SLAA dendrochronological series, one can notice a significant negative correlation with the temperatures from the end of the previous vegetation season (July, August, and September and positive with the rainfalls from that period. The same type of reaction concerning the previous vegetation season is also present in the case of the Silver fir, but the intensity is lower. As far as the current vegetation season is concerned, the Norway spruce has a significant positive reaction (GIUA - February, March, SLAA - April, July to the regime of rainfalls. The thermal regime at the end of the season of vegetative repose and at the beginning of the vegetation season, months January - June induces a positive response from the Norway spruce. The Norway spruce’s response to modification of the thermal regime in the vegetation season, months July-August, is negative, the high temperatures directly and indirectly determining a decrease of the growth in diameter rhythm. In case of the dendrochronological series from Giumalau Secular Forest - GIUA - the temperature in August is negative and significantly correlated with the growth index. The end of the vegetation season, namely September, has a positive influence on growth, as far as the thermal regime is concerned, the reaction being negative to pluviometric regime. In the case of the Silver fir, there is a positive reaction, even very strong and significant in the case of Slatioara-s series of growth indexes - SLAB, to temperatures from the cold season (December-March. The same positive response can be noticed in the case of the

  11. Moderate effects of reforestation with Norway spruce (Picea abies) on carbon storage and turnover in a Swiss sub-alpine pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltbrunner, D.; Hagedorn, F.; Niklaus, P. A.; Zimmermann, S.; Schmidt, M. W. I.

    2012-04-01

    In alpine regions the forested area is strongly increasing through woody plant encroachment on abandoned pastures or by man-made afforestations. These natural or artificial reforestations, in fact, have several implications on the nutrient cycling between plants and soils and thus, are likely to affect carbon turnover. Although afforestations are to be accounted as a sink according to the Kyoto protocol, there are still uncertainties about their effects on the soil carbon storage. In the present study, we assessed soils under pasture, an adjacent chronosequence of spruce afforestations (25-45 years) and a mature spruce forest (older than 120 years) on a homogenous slope in a Swiss sub-alpine ecosystem. While the soil bulk densities were not affected by the land use change, carbon concentrations in the mineral soil decreased 25-45 years after tree establishment. However, no differences between pasture and the mature forest were apparent, indicating that the C-loss after land use conversion was only transient. Up to 2.5kg m-2 C was additionally stored in the organic layer of the oldest stands, resulting in a net C gain in the old forest soils. C:N-ratios of the soil organic matter (SOM) considerably increased with stand age in the uppermost soil layer, displaying the distinct chemical composition of the plant input. In accordance, a shift of the δ13C natural abundance of the SOM in the uppermost mineral layer towards a less negative signal was observed with tree development. The abundance of soil microorganisms, as identified by their phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), was only moderately affected by vegetation type in the mineral soils. In contrast, a strong alteration of the microbial community composition with a decreasing proportion of fungi from the organic layers to the uppermost mineral layer was observable. Our results show that afforestation with spruce trees on an extensively used sub-alpine pasture only led to a transient loss of C in the mineral soils. In

  12. The DAL10 gene from Norway spruce (Picea abies) belongs to a potentially gymnosperm-specific subclass of MADS-box genes and is specifically active in seed cones and pollen cones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsbecker, Annelie; Sundström, Jens; Tandre, Karolina; Englund, Marie; Kvarnheden, Anders; Johanson, Urban; Engström, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Transcription factors encoded by different members of the MADS-box gene family have evolved central roles in the regulation of reproductive organ development in the flowering plants, the angiosperms. Development of the stamens and carpels, the pollen- and seed-bearing organs, involves the B- and C-organ-identity MADS-box genes. B- and C-type gene orthologs with activities specifically in developing pollen- and seed-bearing organs are also present in the distantly related gymnosperms: the conifers and the gnetophytes. We now report on the characterization of DAL10, a novel MADS-box gene from the conifer Norway spruce, which unlike the B- and C-type conifer genes shows no distinct orthology relationship to any angiosperm gene or clade in phylogenetic analyses. Like the B- and C-type genes, it is active specifically in developing pollen cones and seed cones. In situ RNA localization experiments show DAL10 to be expressed in the cone axis, which carry the microsporophylls of the young pollen cone. In contrast, in the seed cone it is expressed both in the cone axis and in the bracts, which subtend the ovuliferous scales. Expression data and the phenotype of transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing DAL10 suggest that the gene may act upstream to or in concert with the B- and C-type genes in the establishment of reproductive identity of developing cones.

  13. Monitoring of PAHs in the natural protected areas in non-heating season using Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borgulat Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the screening investigation of the environmental burden of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs in the natural protected areas in non-heating season. Current year spruce needles were used as a bioacummulative indicator. The total exposure at 15 PAHs (2-6 rings and carcinogenic potential of these compounds were taken as parameters describing the hazard level. Sampling, in a uniform way, was made in the Silesian Voivodeship landscape parks and the selected Polish national parks as well as in the reference sites with characteristic pattern of PAHs emission, namely in industrialized urban areas and near the expressway. The presence of PAHs, including carcinogenic ones, was shown in all the localities; their content in needles sampled in the natural protective areas was slightly diversified and ranged from 145 to 339 ng/g- (d. w.. Higher differences were observed for carcinogenic potential index (CP which varied from 2.2 to 18.2. The analysis of PAHs profiles has shown that despite the seasonal lack of intensive emissions from domestic heating, in the majority of natural protective areas pyrogenic sources have also been identified. Profiles of PAHs found in Karkonoski and Ojcowski NPs suggest their petrogenic origin probably due to the intensive tourism (emissions from car engines in those areas.

  14. Monitoring of PAHs in the natural protected areas in non-heating season using Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) needles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgulat, Jacek; Staszewski, Tomasz; Łukasik, Włodzimierz

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the screening investigation of the environmental burden of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the natural protected areas in non-heating season. Current year spruce needles were used as a bioacummulative indicator. The total exposure at 15 PAHs (2-6 rings) and carcinogenic potential of these compounds were taken as parameters describing the hazard level. Sampling, in a uniform way, was made in the Silesian Voivodeship landscape parks and the selected Polish national parks as well as in the reference sites with characteristic pattern of PAHs emission, namely in industrialized urban areas and near the expressway. The presence of PAHs, including carcinogenic ones, was shown in all the localities; their content in needles sampled in the natural protective areas was slightly diversified and ranged from 145 to 339 ng/g- (d. w.). Higher differences were observed for carcinogenic potential index (CP) which varied from 2.2 to 18.2. The analysis of PAHs profiles has shown that despite the seasonal lack of intensive emissions from domestic heating, in the majority of natural protective areas pyrogenic sources have also been identified. Profiles of PAHs found in Karkonoski and Ojcowski NPs suggest their petrogenic origin probably due to the intensive tourism (emissions from car engines) in those areas.

  15. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European silver fir (Abies alba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuli, Priyanka; Rohloff, Jens; Strimbeck, G Richard

    2014-01-01

    Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring) by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species) and Abies alba (temperate species) to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle) over a 9 weeks period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS-based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics, and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids) and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids). Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars, and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming.

  16. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies and European silver fir (Abies alba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eDhuli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species and Abies alba (temperate species to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle over a nine week period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS–based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids. Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming.

  17. Bowen ratio over the Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taufarová, Klára; Dvořáková, Marcela; Czerný, Radek; Pokorný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2007), s. 131-136 ISSN 1803-1013 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD526/03/H036; GA MŽP SM/640/18/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Bowen ratio * evapotranspiration * transpiration * eddy covariance technique Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  18. Effects of SO{sub 2}-fumigation on the infection of Norway spruce by Armillaria ostoyae; Einfluss von SO{sub 2} auf die Infektion von Fichtensaemlingen durch Armillaria ostoyae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horak, M. [Tuebingen Univ., Spezielle Botanik 1 (Germany); Tesche, M. [TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)

    1993-04-01

    SO{sub 2} fumigation (0.86 mg/m{sup 3}) reduced drastically the survival expectancy of spruce seedlings already after 1 month. Under such conditions, the infection of spruce by Armillaria ostoyae is known to increase. The present investigation has shown that mortality increased strongly by combining A. ostoyae infection and fumigation. However, mycorrhization of spruce (Paxillus involutus) increased the survival rate of seedlings and reduced infection by A. ostoyae remarkably (20%). (orig.) [Deutsch] Eine SO{sub 2}-Behandlung von 0,86 mg/m{sup 3} fuehrte bereits nach 1 Monat zu einer verminderten Ueberlebensrate der untersuchten Fichtensaemlinge. Unter diesen Bedingungen lag eine erhoehte Infektionsbereitschaft der Fichten gegenueber dem Schwaecheparasiten Armillaria ostoyae vor. Durch eine Mykorrhizierung der Saemlinge konnte die Infektion mit A. ostoyae in starkem Masse (um 20%) eingeschraenkt werden. (orig.)

  19. Environment pollution with hexachlorbenzene and mercury in Goertschitztal/Carinthia surveyed with Norway spruce as bioindicators; Erfassung der Umweltbelastung mit Hexachlorbenzol und Quecksilber im Goertschitztal in Kaernten mit Fichten als Bioindikatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerst, Alfred [Bundesforschungszentrum fuer Wald (BFW), Wien (Austria); Hellig, Kurt; Heimburger, Gerhard; Wuggenig, Walter [Amt der Kaerntner Landesregierung, Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    To identify the pollution source and for zoning the polluted area in Goertschitztal in Carinthia spruce needles were analyzed for hexachlorbenzene and mercury. Two contamination sources were identified: the cement plant in Wietersdorf and a slaked lime waste deposal site in Brueckl. At the end of 2014 or early 2015 measures against this pollution sites were set up from the local authority as well as from the cement plant. In autumn 2015 all hexachlorbenzene contents in spruce needles were below the quantification limit and nearly all mercury contents decreased despite the hot summer.

  20. Growth effects after whole-tree harvest in final cut of Scots pine and Norway spruce forest. Final report; Tillvaexteffekternas storlek och uthaallighet efter skogsbraensleuttag i slutavverkning av tall och gran. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valinger, E. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Silviculture

    2001-12-01

    A great concern in forestry today is whether whole-tree harvesting influence site productivity and whether it is consistent with the principle of sustainable use of forest resources. To evaluate this a randomised field experiment established 24 years ago in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in Southern Sweden was used. The field experiment was established in fall 1975 as a naturally regenerated mixed forest with Scots pine and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) with a growing stock of 305 m{sup 3}/ha was clear-cut near Kosta (56 deg 52' N, 15 deg 50' E, 240 m.a.s.l.). The site was a mesic dwarf-shrub type of medium fertility, with an average precipitation of 600 mm yr-1 and the soil was an orthic podzol. Treatments were conventional stem harvest (CH), whole-tree harvest (WTH), and branch and stem harvest (BSH). Scots pine seedlings of local provenance were planted in spring 1977 at the beginning of the second growing season following the harvest. The seedlings were planted in exposed mineral soil in manually scarified patches (40 x 40 cm) at 1.7 m spacing (144 seedlings per assessment plot, i.e. 3 600 seedlings/ha). Based on calliper data, the diameter for the mean basal area per tree (db) was calculated for each plot after 24 years using the formula: db = ({sigma} b{sup 3}/{sigma} b{sup 2}), where b is basal area at breast height for each tree. Three undamaged sample trees with a diameter equal or close to the diameter of the mean basal area per tree were selected on each plot giving 36 stems that were felled for destructive measurements in 2000. Total tree height ({+-} 0.01 m) was measured on every tree felled. Stem biomass was estimated by sampling of stem discs, 2 cm thick, at stump height (1 % of tree height), breast height (1.3 m), and at every meter along the bole. Crown biomass was estimated by sampling live and dead branches on the felled trees. From every whorl of branches one living branch was sampled and all branches were counted. Stem

  1. Clinal Variation at Phenology-Related Genes in Spruce: Parallel Evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L.; Vendramin, Giovanni G.; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species. PMID:24814465

  2. Eastern Spruce Dwarf Mistletoe

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Baker; Joseph O' Brien; R. Mathiasen; Mike Ostry

    2006-01-01

    Eastern spruce dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) is a parasitic flowering plant that causes the most serious disease of black spruce (Picea mariana) throughout its range. The parasite occurs in the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland; in the Lake States of Minnesota,...

  3. Effects of thinning on microclimate of a young spruce forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, F.; Janouš, Dalibor; Hurtalová, T.; Rožnovský, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 23 (2004), s. 30-38 ISSN 1335-342X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/99/1561 Grant - others:SGA VEGA(SK) 2/2093/22 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : Norway spruce * stand density * air temperature Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 0.078, year: 2004

  4. Calcium addition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest increases the capacity for stress tolerance and carbon capture in red spruce (Picea rubens) trees during the cold season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long; Joshua M. Halman; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher. Eagar

    2011-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) trees are uniquely vulnerable to foliar freezing injury during the cold season (fall and winter), but are also capable of photosynthetic activity if temperatures moderate. To evaluate the influence of calcium (Ca) addition on the physiology of red spruce during the cold season, we measured concentrations of foliar...

  5. Seasonal Changes of Coefficient Q10 in CO2 Flux from Soil Under Spruce Stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 15 (2002), s. 43-48. ISBN 80-7157-297-7 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/00/0485 Grant - others:EVK2(XE) CT-1999-00032 Keywords : soil CO2 efflux * Norway spruce * Q10 * respiration * soil Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  6. Natural regeneration and vegetation changes in wet spruce forests after natural and artificial disturbances

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jonášová, Magda; Matějková, I.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 10 (2007), s. 1907-1914 E-ISSN 1208-6037 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600870701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Norway spruce * natural regeneration * natural disturbances * bark beetle Subject RIV: GK - Forest ry

  7. Enhanced thermal stability of the thylakoid membranes from spruce. A comparison with selected angiosperms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Václav; Kurasová, Irena; Ptáčková, B.; Večeřová, Kristýna; Urban, Otmar; Špunda, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 130, 1-3 (2016), s. 357-371 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR GA13-28093S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Norway spruce * Thermal stability * Circular dichroism * Photosystem II organization * Thylakoid membrane Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.864, year: 2016

  8. Development of soil water regime under spruce stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tužinský Ladislav

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the water regime of soils under spruce ecosystems in relation to long-lasting humid and drought periods in the growing seasons 1991-2013. The dominant interval humidity in observing growing seasons is semiuvidic interval with soil moisture between hydro-limits maximal capillary capacity (MCC and point of diminished availability (PDA. Gravitationally seepage concentrated from accumulated winter season, water from melting snow and existing atmospheric precipitation occurs in the soil only at the beginning of the growing season. The supplies of soil water are significantly decreasing in the warm climate and precipitant deficient days. The greatest danger from drought threatens Norway spruce during the summer months and it depends on the duration of dry days, water supply at the beginning of the dry days, air temperature and the intensity of evapotranspiration. In the surface layers of the soil, with the maximum occurrence of active roots, the water in semiarid interval area between hydro-limits PDA and wilting point (WP decreases during the summer months. In the culminating phase occurs the drying to moisture state with capillary stationary and the insufficient supply of available water for the plants. Physiological weakening of Norway spruce caused by set of outlay components of the water balance is partially reduced by delivering of water by capillary action from deeper horizons. In extremely dry periods, soil moisture is decreasing also throughout the soil profile (0-100 cm into the bottom third of the variation margin hydro-limits MCC-PDA in the category of capillary less moving and for plants of low supply of usable water (60-90 mm. The issue of deteriorated health state of spruce ecosystems is considered to be actual. Changes and developments of hydropedological conditions which interfere the mountain forests represent the increasing danger of the drought for the spruce.

  9. Occurrence of spruce bark beetles in forest stands at different levels of air pollution stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grodzki, Wojciech; McManus, Michael; Knizek, Milos; Meshkova, Valentina; Mihalciuc, Vasile; Novotny, Julius; Turcani, Marek; Slobodyan, Yaroslav

    2004-01-01

    The spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.) is the most serious pest of mature spruce stands, mainly Norway spruce, Picea abies (L.) Karst. throughout Eurasia. A complex of weather-related events and other environmental stresses are reported to predispose spruce stands to bark beetle attack and subsequent tree mortality; however the possible role of industrial pollution as a predisposing factor to attack by this species is poorly understood. The abundance and dynamics of I. typographus populations was evaluated in 60-80 year old Norway spruce stands occurring on 10x50 ha sites in five countries within the Carpathian range that were selected in proximity to established ozone measurement sites. Data were recorded on several parameters including the volume of infested trees, captures of adult beetles in pheromone traps, number of attacks, and the presence and relative abundance of associated bark beetle species. In several cases, stands adjacent to sites with higher ozone values were associated with higher bark beetle populations. The volume of sanitary cuttings, a reflection of tree mortality, and the mean daily capture of beetles in pheromone traps were significantly higher at sites where the O 3 level was higher. However, the mean infestation density on trees was higher in plots associated with lower O 3 levels. Captures of beetles in pheromone traps and infestation densities were higher in the zone above 800 m. However, none of the relationships was conclusive, suggesting that spruce bark beetle dynamics are driven by a complex interaction of biotic and abiotic factors and not by a single parameter such as air pollution. - Air pollution (ozone) can be one of predisposing factors that increases the susceptibility of mountain Norway spruce stands to attack by Ips typographus and associated bark beetle species

  10. Winter photosynthesis in red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.): limitations, potential benefits, and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.G. Schaberg

    2000-01-01

    Numerous cold-induced changes in physiology limit the capacity of northern conifers to photosynthesize during winter. Studies of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) have shown that rates of field photosynthesis (Pfield) and laboratory measurements of photosynthetic capacity (Pmax) generally parallel seasonal...

  11. Drought as a modifier of interaction between adult beech and spruce - impacts on tree water use, C budgets and biotic interactions above- and belowground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Understanding biotic interactions among tree species with their microbial associates under drought will be crucial for silviculture in meeting ecological challenges of the future. This contribution gives an overview on a project integrating a throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE) on adult trees with a natural precipitation gradient (PGR) in central European forests. Focus is on drought affecting species interaction above and belowground, including associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities. Study objects are pure and mixed forests dominated by adult European beech and Norway spruce trees (c. 70-years old). At the throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE), trees are readily accessible via scaffolding and canopy crane (Kranzberg Forest, southern Germany). Effects of experimentally induced, repeated summer drought are assessed with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (Kranzberg forest ROOF experiment, kroof.wzw.tum.de). The summer drought treatment started in 2014 and was repeated in 2015 and 2106. The focus on species interaction is intensified by a parallel study along a natural precipitation gradient with plot triplets of monocultures and mixed cultures of European beech and Norway spruce at each of the five study sites. Complementary resource use, effects of competitive vs. facilitation and related changes in ECM communities are exemplified for the two tree species of contrasting foliage (i.e. deciduous vs. evergreen) and stomatal sensitivity to drought (i.e. an-isohydric vs. isohydric behavior). At the TEE site, precipitation throughfall was completely excluded from early spring to late fall (i.e. March to November), resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce as low as -2.5 MPa. Despite significant reductions in growth and rate of photosynthesis by up to 80% under drought, NSC budget of trees was hardly affected. Moreover, phloem functionality, tested as phloem transport velocity through 13C-labeling of recent

  12. Diapause and overwintering of two spruce bark beetle species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E. Matthew; Schopf, Axel; Ragland, Gregory J.; Stauffer, Christian; Bentz, Barbara J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Diapause, a strategy to endure unfavourable conditions (e.g. cold winters) is commonly found in ectothermic organisms and is characterized by an arrest of development and reproduction, a reduction of metabolic rate, and an increased resistance to adversity. Diapause, in addition to adaptations for surviving low winter temperatures, significantly influences phenology, voltinism and ultimately population growth. We review the literature on diapause and overwintering behaviour of two bark beetle species that affect spruce‐dominated forests in the northern hemisphere, and describe and compare how these strategies can influence population dynamics. The European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus (L.) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) is the most important forest pest of Norway spruce in Europe. It enters an adult reproductive diapause that might be either facultative or obligate. Obligate diapausing beetles are considered strictly univoltine, entering this dormancy type regardless of environmental cues. Facultative diapausing individuals enter diapause induced by photoperiod, modified by temperature, thus being potentially multivoltine. The spruce beetle Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infests all spruce species in its natural range in North America. A facultative prepupal diapause is averted by relatively warm temperatures, resulting in a univoltine life cycle, whereas cool temperatures induce prepupal diapause leading to a semivoltine cycle. An adult obligate diapause in D. rufipennis could limit bi‐ or multivoltinism. We discuss and compare the influence of diapause and overwinter survival on voltinism and population dynamics of these two species in a changing climate and provide an outlook on future research. PMID:28979060

  13. Applicability of the PROSPECT model for Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malenovský, Zbyněk; Albrechtová, J.; Lhotáková, Z.; Zurita-Milla, R.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Schaepman, M.E.; Cudlín, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 27, 23-24 (2006), s. 5315-5340 ISSN 0143-1161 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1K04121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : chlorophyll content estimation * canopy reflectance models * radiative-transfer models * remote-sensing data * leaf-area index * optical-properties * conifer needles * forest * vegetation * inversion Subject RIV: GK - Forest ry Impact factor: 0.980, year: 2006

  14. Forest litter insect community succession in clearcuts of Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arturas Gedminas

    2003-01-01

    Insects are subjected to stress in fresh clearcuts due to changes in microclimate, vegetation, and trophic links. The objective of this study was to investigate succession in litter insect communities (most abundant by number of species and individuals of all clearcut insects).

  15. Composite indicator for monitoring of Norway spruce stand decline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brovkina, Olga; Cienciala, E.; Zemek, František; Lukeš, Petr; Fabiánek, Tomáš; Russ, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2017), s. 550-563 ISSN 2279-7254 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : Picea abies * airborne hyperspectral * satellite multispectral data * exergy Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2016

  16. Spatially explicit basal area growth of Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejza, Jan; Světlík, J.; Pokorný, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2015), s. 1545-1558 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : competition * social area * Weighted Voronoi polygons * increment * Picea abies Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.706, year: 2015

  17. Ground vegetation dynamics in mountain spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten) forests recovering after air pollution stress impact

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávrová, Eva; Cudlín, O.; Vavříček, D.; Cudlín, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 205, č. 2 (2009), s. 305-321 ISSN 1385-0237 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC 141 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : forest decline * norway spruce * microsite conditions * recovery * understorey layer Subject RIV: GK - Forest ry Impact factor: 1.567, year: 2009

  18. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T.; Riggs, J.; Nettles, W. R.; Hook, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data activities CDIAC performs are design and implementation of the data systems. One current example is the data system and network for SPRUCE experiment. The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. SPRUCE provides wide range continuous and discrete measurements. To successfully manage SPRUCE data flow

  19. Manganese in the litter fall-forest floor continuum of boreal and temperate pine and spruce forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Björn; Erhagen, Björn; Johansson, Maj-Britt

    2015-01-01

    pine needle litter significantly faster (p litter of Norway spruce. Over Northern Europe concentrations of total Mn in mor humus as well as extractable Mn in the mineral soil increase with decreasing MAT and over a climatic gradient the Mn concentrations in Norway......We have reviewed the literature on the role of manganese (Mn) in the litter fall-to-humus subsystem. Available data gives a focus on North European coniferous forests. Manganese concentrations in pine (Pinus spp.) foliar litter are highly variable both spatially and temporally within the same...... litter species and for the genus Pinus we found a range from 0.03 to 3.7 mg g−1. Concentrations were related negatively to site mean annual temperature (MAT) and annual actual evapotranspiration (AET) for pine species litter but not for that of Norway spruce (Picea abies) as a single species. Combined...

  20. Spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L.) infestation and Norway spruce status: is there a causal relationship?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moravec, Ivo; Cudlín, Pavel; Polák, T.; Havlíček, František

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2002), s. 255-264 ISSN 1211-7420 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 389 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : bark beetle infestation * crown status * Picea abies Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  1. Retrieval of spruce leaf chlorophyll content from airborne image data using continuum removal and radiative transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malenovský, Z.; Homolová, L.; Zurita-Milla, R.; Lukeš, Petr; Kaplan, Věroslav; Hanuš, Jan; Gastellu-Etchegory, J.P.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 131, APR (2013), s. 85-102 ISSN 0034-4257 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Chlorophyll retrieval * Imaging spectroscopy * Continuum removal * Radiative transfer * PROSPECT * DART * Optical indices * Norway spruce * High spatial resolution * AISA Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.769, year: 2013

  2. Estimation of Spruce Needle-Leaf Chlorophyll Content Based on DART and PARAS Canopy Reflectance Models

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yáñez-Rausell, L.; Malenovský, Z.; Rautiainen, M.; Clevers, J G P W.; Lukeš, Petr; Hanuš, Jan; Schaepman, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2015), s. 1534-1544 ISSN 1939-1404 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Chlorophyll a plus b estimation * CHRIS-PROBA * coniferous forest * continuum removal * discrete anisotropic radiative transfer model (DART) * needle-leaf * Norway spruce * optical indices * PARAS * PROSPECT * radiative transfer * recollision probability Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.145, year: 2015

  3. Impact of climate change on growth dynamics of Norway spruce in south-eastern Norway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, P.; Rybníček, Michal; Žid, T.; Andreassen, K.; Borja, I.; Kolář, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 1781. ISSN 0037-5330 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR GA13-04291S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : crown condition * decline * Picea abies * tree-ring width * precipitation * Oslofjord Subject RIV: GK - Forestry OBOR OECD: Forestry Impact factor: 1.495, year: 2016

  4. Mice and voles prefer spruce seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschel G. Abbott; Arthur C. Hart

    1961-01-01

    When spruce-fir stands in the Northeast are cut, balsam fir seedlings often predominate in the regeneration that follows. Most landowners would prefer to have the spruce; but they do not get it, and they wonder why.

  5. Photosynthetic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  6. Analysis of the Soil Organic Matter Stability in Spruce Forests of Krkonose in Czechia on the Basis of the ROMUL Mathematical Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nadporozhskaya, M.A.; Cudlín, Pavel; Novák, František; Bykhovets, S.S.; Chertov, O.G.; Komarov, A.S.; Mikhailov, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 6 (2009), s. 657-667 ISSN 1064-2293 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : Norway spruce * model ROMUL * soil organic matter Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 0.222, year: 2009

  7. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Capacity and Foliage Nitrogen Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. This data set describes the spatial and temporal relationship between foliage nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity in the canopies of black spruce, jack pine, and aspen located within the Northern Study Area (NSA). The data were collected from June to September 1994 and are useful for modeling the vertical distribution of carbon fixation for different forest types in the boreal forest. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Responses of spruce seedlings (Picea abies) to exhaust gas under laboratory conditions. 1. plant-insect interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viskari, E.-L.; Koessi, S. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Surakka, J.; Pasanen, P.; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Mirme, A. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia). Int. of Environmental Physics; Holopainen, J.K. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Agricultural Research Centre, Plant Production research, Jokioinen (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    The effects of motor vehicle exhaust gas on Norway spruce seedlings (Picea abies (L) Karst) and plant-insect interaction of spruce shoot aphid (Cinara pilicornis Hartig) was studied. The exhaust gas concentrations in the fumigation chambers were monitored and controlled by measuring the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) with a computer aided feedback system. The concentrations of major exhaust gas components (black carbon (BC), fine particles, VOCs and carbonyl compounds) in the chamber air were also measured. Responses of Norway spruce seedlings to a 2 and 3 week exhaust gas exposure and subsequent performance of spruce shoot aphid were studied using realistic exposure regimes; 50, 100 and 200 ppb NO{sub x}. The feedback control system based on NO{sub x} concentrations proved an adequate and practical means for controlling the concentration of exhaust gases and studying plant responses in controlled environment chambers. The exhaust exposure resulted in increased concentrations of proline, glutamine, threonine, aspartic acid, glycine and phenylalanine and decreased concentration of arginine, serine, alanine and glycine in young needles. No changes in soluble N concentrations were observed. The results are interpreted as a stress response rather than use of NO{sub x} as a nitrogen source. No changes in total phenolics and only transient changes in some individual terpene concentrations were detected. The exhaust gas exposure stressed the exposed seedlings, but had no significant effect on N metabolism or the production of defence chemicals. Aphid performance was not significantly affected. Soluble N, secondary metabolism and aphid performance were not sensitive to exhaust gas exposure during shoot elongation in Norway spruce. (author)

  9. Tensile strength of glulam laminations of Nordic spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Bräuner, Lise; Boström, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Design of glulam according to the European timber code Eurocode 5 is based on the standard document prEN1194 , according to which glulam beam strength is to be established either by full scale testing or by calculation. The calculation must be based on a knowledge of lamination tensile strength....... This knowledge may be obtained either by adopting a general rule that the characteristic tensile strength is sixty percent of the characteristic bending strength, or by performing tensile tests on an adequate number of laminations representative of the whole population. The present paper presents...... an investigation aimed at establishing such an adequate experimental background for the assignment of strength classes for glulam made of visually strength graded laminations from Nordic sawmills. The investigation includes more than 1800 boards (laminations) of Norway spruce (Picea abies) sampled from eight...

  10. Energy policy in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauen, Edvard; Bjoerndalen, Joergen

    2003-01-01

    The authors argue that the current energy policy in Norway will inevitably lead to higher and more varying electricity prices in the Nordic countries than in the rest of Europe. The Energy Act works well, but politicians have not realized that Norway is now an integral part of the power market in Europe. The EU Commission considers that the Nordic model with regional prices in order to utilize the capacity of international (market splitting) is the best

  11. Birch mixture in spruce forest - a method to reduce the effects of acidification?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartensson, Kristina.

    1996-01-01

    Acidification has lately been focus of increased attention in the business, industrial and public sectors. One measure that can prevent further acidification is the liming of forest soils. Another strategy would be to increase the admixture of deciduous tree species in conifer forest. This paper deals with the latter problem. From ecological and economical standpoints, the tree species offering the most advantageous admixture in Sweden would be birch, Betula pendula, and Norway spruce, Picea abies. Birch trees help to increase soil pH, while decreasing atmospheric deposition and protecting young spruce seedling from frost. The use of birch admixture need to be 50% or more to get required effect. This will lead to a reduction in spruce wood production. This need not to be a problem, however, since birch pulp will probably become more valuable in the future. The admixed forests have a higher biological diversity and are of greater value for recreation. Although spruce production on acidified sited is still high, further atmospheric deposition could lead to declines in production. Forest soils will eventually sustain serious damage if acid deposition continues to increase, which will require new alternatives for wood production be found. A high admixture of birch can offer a temporary respite if emission and deposition continue, but cannot completely compensate for the acidifying effects of present deposition levels. 26 refs, 2 figs

  12. Soil Chemical and Microbial Properties in a Mixed Stand of Spruce and Birch in the Ore Mountains (Germany—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline Schua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A major argument for incorporating deciduous tree species in coniferous forest stands is their role in the amelioration and stabilisation of biogeochemical cycles. Current forest management strategies in central Europe aim to increase the area of mixed stands. In order to formulate statements about the ecological effects of mixtures, studies at the stand level are necessary. In a mixed stand of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst. and silver birch (Betula pendula Roth in the Ore Mountains (Saxony, Germany, the effects of these two tree species on chemical and microbial parameters in the topsoil were studied at one site in the form of a case study. Samples were taken from the O layer and A horizon in areas of the stand influenced by either birch, spruce or a mixture of birch and spruce. The microbial biomass, basal respiration, metabolic quotient, pH-value and the C and N contents and stocks were analysed in the horizons Of, Oh and A. Significantly higher contents of microbial N were observed in the Of and Oh horizons in the birch and in the spruce-birch strata than in the stratum containing only spruce. The same was found with respect to pH-values in the Of horizon and basal respiration in the Oh horizon. Compared to the spruce stratum, in the birch and spruce-birch strata, significantly lower values were found for the contents of organic C and total N in the A horizon. The findings of the case study indicated that single birch trees have significant effects on the chemical and microbial topsoil properties in spruce-dominated stands. Therefore, the admixture of birch in spruce stands may distinctly affect nutrient cycling and may also be relevant for soil carbon sequestration. Further studies of these functional aspects are recommended.

  13. Tidal power in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The world's first tidal power station is scheduled for stat-up in the spring of 2003. It is located in Kvalsundet, off Hammerfest, Norway. This is a pilot installation of a 300 kW tidal turbine at a depth of 50 metres. When fully developed in 2007, the tidal power plant will deliver 32 GWh per year. Hammerfest Stroem has patented the energy and the company hopes to be able to install similar power stations both in Norway and abroad. The potential worldwide is claimed to be more than 450 TWh per year

  14. Sports Diplomacy of Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobierecki Michał Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Norway is perceived as a country with a clear international identity. The aim of the article is to investigate the sports diplomacy of Norway and to examine its influence on the international brand of this country. The author will define the term “sports diplomacy” and attempt to outline the strategy of Norway’s public diplomacy; an analysis of the methods used in Norwegian sports diplomacy will follow. The main hypothesis of this paper is that sports diplomacy only plays a subsidiary role in Norwegian nation branding.

  15. Lepidoptera associated with western spruce budworm: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Stevens; V. M. Carolin; George P. Markin

    1984-01-01

    Field workers doing surveys, control operations, and research on western spruce bud worm often encounter other kinds of foliage-feeding larvae, some of which closely resemble western spruce bud worm , Workers must be able to distinguish between the different species and groups.

  16. Silvical characteristics of red spruce (Picea rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur C. Hart

    1959-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) is not only the most important of the spruces; it is also one of the most important of all the conifers in northeastern North America. It is a tree of many uses. The paper industry relies heavily on it for pulpwood; in the variety of its other uses it rivals white pine.

  17. Spruce aphid (Elatobium abietinum Walker) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) [Chapter XXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Elatobium abietinum Walker is a spruce-feeding aphid that in Europe is referred to as the green spruce aphid (Day et al., 1998a) (Fig. 1). However, in North America E. abietinum is known simply as the spruce aphid, while the common name "green spruce aphid" refers to a different species, Cinara fornacula Hottes (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (http://www.entsoc.org/...

  18. National report from Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugset, K.

    1995-01-01

    Review of activities and objectives in the area of creating operator support systems in nuclear power plants in Norway is presented. Development of a computerised alarm system for HAMMLAB (CASH) is described. A measure of situation awareness for use in the evaluation of nuclear power plant control room systems providing information about the current process state is discussed

  19. Educational Assessment in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tveit, Sverre

    2014-01-01

    Norway has seen major changes in the field of educational assessment over the past decade, following the 2001 '"PISA shock" that stimulated reform of the entire primary and secondary education systems: new outcome-based curricula with cross-disciplinary basic skills were accompanied by major revision of assessment regulations,…

  20. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvestin...

  1. Photosynthetic Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-21

    Immobilization of Proteins on a Carbon Electrode Surface - Oriented Immobilization of Photosynthetic Reaction Centers. Journal of Electroanalytical ...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) B. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY REPORT...no longer must absorb all the light. Thus, its quantum efficiency can approach 100% potentially doubling the performance of organic solar cells. 15

  2. Afforestation, seasalt episodes and acidification - A paired catchment study in western Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larssen, Thorjorn; Holme, Jorun

    2006-01-01

    As acid deposition has declined during the past 15-20 years in western Norway, afforestation and episodic seasalt deposition have become factors of increasing importance in explaining the mobilization of toxic aluminum (Al n+ ) to rivers and lakes. We conducted a paired catchment at four sites in western Norway across a gradient in acid deposition to evaluate the importance of afforestation and seasalt episodes. Streamwater was sampled intensively before, during and after seasalt episodes over a three-year period. A seasalt episode in January 2003 caused considerable impact on the streamwater chemistry. pH dropped and concentrations of Al n+ increased due to cation exchange of Na + ions for H + and Al n+ in the soil. The response was larger in streams draining the catchments which receive high acid deposition and in those afforested with spruce as compared with adjacent catchments in native birch. The results indicate that acid pulses induced by episodic inputs of seasalts are exacerbated by land use change from native birch to planted spruce. - Seasalt episodes cause higher mobilization of toxic aluminum in sites afforested with spruce

  3. LNG imports from Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is organized as follows: The first section outlines Norway's petroleum reserves and relates reserves of natural gas to potential markets. Then the paper focuses on specific fields or areas that could be devoted partly or mainly to service the US natural gas market. Finally, some indications are given of costs involved in field development, liquefaction and transportation and some very preliminary conclusions are arrived upon

  4. Assembly of the Complete Sitka Spruce Chloroplast Genome Using 10X Genomics' GemCode Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Coombe

    Full Text Available The linked read sequencing library preparation platform by 10X Genomics produces barcoded sequencing libraries, which are subsequently sequenced using the Illumina short read sequencing technology. In this new approach, long fragments of DNA are partitioned into separate micro-reactions, where the same index sequence is incorporated into each of the sequencing fragment inserts derived from a given long fragment. In this study, we exploited this property by using reads from index sequences associated with a large number of reads, to assemble the chloroplast genome of the Sitka spruce tree (Picea sitchensis. Here we report on the first Sitka spruce chloroplast genome assembled exclusively from P. sitchensis genomic libraries prepared using the 10X Genomics protocol. We show that the resulting 124,049 base pair long genome shares high sequence similarity with the related white spruce and Norway spruce chloroplast genomes, but diverges substantially from a previously published P. sitchensis- P. thunbergii chimeric genome. The use of reads from high-frequency indices enabled separation of the nuclear genome reads from that of the chloroplast, which resulted in the simplification of the de Bruijn graphs used at the various stages of assembly.

  5. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Kuczynska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  6. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  7. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  8. Biomass of Sacrificed Spruce/Aspen (SNF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dimension analysis (diameter at breast high, tree height, depth of crown), estimated leaf area, and total aboveground biomass for sacrificed spruce and aspens in...

  9. Biomass of Sacrificed Spruce/Aspen (SNF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Dimension analysis (diameter at breast high, tree height, depth of crown), estimated leaf area, and total aboveground biomass for sacrificed spruce and...

  10. Spectral evidence of early-stage spruce beetle infestation in Engelmann spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrianna C. Foster; Jonathan A. Walter; Herman H. Shugart; Jason Sibold; Jose Negron

    2017-01-01

    Spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) outbreaks cause widespread mortality of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii (Parry ex Engelm)) within the subalpine forests of the western United States. Early detection of infestations could allow forest managers to mitigate outbreaks or anticipate a response to tree mortality and the potential effects on ecosystem...

  11. Cytophotometric differentiation of high elevation spruces: physiological and ecological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlyn, G.P.; Royte, J.L.; Anoruo, A.O.

    1990-01-01

    Red and black spruce and their hybrids can be determined by morphological indices; however, the criteria are somewhat subjective and increasingly difficult to use at higher elevations. Although the chromosome number is identical (2n = 24), red spruce has twice as much nuclear DNA (48 pg) than black spruce (24 pg) and thus the species and their hybrids can also be separated by cytophotometry. This is relevant to spruce decline studies because black spruce is much more resistant to high elevation environmental stresses, both natural and anthropogenic. It also has implications for the effect of climatic changes on the composition of high elevation spruce-fir forests because red spruce can outcompete black spruce under more mesic conditions. Four elevation transects sampling spruce on the east and west sides of Mount Washington (New Hampshire) and Camels Hump (Vermont) and a single transect on the southwest side of Whiteface Mountain (New York) were made to investigate the degree of hybridization and introgression between these two species. A positive correlation was found between increased elevation and increased black spruce genes on Mount Washington and Camels Hump. Pure black spruce was found on Mount Washington from 1356 m to 1582 m. No pure black or red spruce was found on Camels Hump although the proportion of red spruce alleles was significantly greater on Camels Hump. All trees sampled at all elevations on Whiteface Mountain were pure red spruce. Thus the proportion of black spruce alleles in high elevation spruce populations decreases from east to west. This closely parallels the increase in spruce decline which increases from east to west. (author)

  12. Energy taxation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg, E.

    1991-01-01

    A rough survey is given of the most important areas of Norwegian taxation and tariff policy within the energy sector. Planning is still in progress for regulations on taxing and duties on electric power and fossil fuels. This comprises part of the work on improving the economy and resource consumption, partly through giving higher priority to environmental issues. It is suggested that it could take some time before national goals for the development of an energy taxation system can be reached. There must be a balance between short and long-time issues. Norway will look to experiences gained in other countries. (AB)

  13. Mass-loss rates from decomposition of plant residues in spruce forests near the northern tree line subject to strong air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Natalia V; Orlova, Maria A; Steinnes, Eiliv; Artemkina, Natalia A; Gorbacheva, Tamara T; Smirnov, Vadim E; Belova, Elena A

    2017-08-01

    Mass-loss rates during the early phase of decomposition of plant residues were studied for a period of 3 years in Norway spruce forests subjected to air pollution by Cu-Ni smelters on the Kola Peninsula, northwest Russia. Litterbags were deployed in two main patches of forests at the northern tree line, between and below the crowns of spruce trees older than 100 years. The study results demonstrated the dependence of the decomposition rates on the initial concentrations of nutrients and the C/N and lignin/N ratios in plant residues. Lower rates of mass loss in forests subject to air pollution may be related to low quality of plant residues, i.e. high concentrations of heavy metals, low concentrations of nutrients, and high lignin/N and C/N ratios. The increased losses of Ca, Mg, K, and Mn from plant residues in these forests compared to the reference were, probably, related to leaching of their compounds from the residues. The relatively high rates of heavy metal accumulation in the residues were most likely related to uptake of pollutants from the atmosphere, as well as to the lower mass-loss rates. The present study results demonstrate that the forest patchiness should be taken into account in assessment and predictions of decomposition rates in Norway spruce forests. Mass-loss rates of plant residues below the crowns of old spruce trees were significantly lower than those in the patches between the crowns. This was explained by the high C/N and lignin/N ratios in the residues of evergreens which contribute significantly to litterfall below the crowns and by lower soil temperature during winter and spring below the crowns. In addition, a lower amount of precipitation reaching the forest floor below the dense, long crowns of old Norway spruce trees may result in considerably lower washing out of the organic compounds from the residues. Lower mass-loss rates below the crowns of old spruce trees may be part of the evidence that the old-growth spruce forests can

  14. Emissions of Sesquiterpenes from Spruce Sawdust During Drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granstroem, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Large amounts of sawdust are dried for production of particleboard and Pellets. During processing of wood (i.e. drying, densification), volatile organic compounds are emitted. These contribute in the presence of nitrogen oxides and sunlight to the formation of ground level ozone and other harmful photo-oxidants. In this study sesquiterpene emissions from the drying of fresh Norway Spruce (Picea abies) sawdust in a continuous spouted bed steam dryer at 140-200 deg C have been investigated, and patterns of covariation between sesquiterpene emissions and drying parameters elucidated. Sesquiterpene emissions was about 20% of the monoterpene emissions. Drying in 200 deg C caused markedly larger sesquiterpene emissions than in 140 deg C or 170 deg C. Whereas a change in moisture content had no notable effect on the amount of sesquiterpenes emitted at high wood moisture contents (25-40%), the sesquiterpene emissions increased considerably as drying proceeded at low wood moisture contents (5-15%). While it has long been known that monoterpenes are a dominant VOC emitted during processing of wood, this study shows that sesquiterpenes are of considerable importance

  15. Rainfall interception and spatial variability of throughfall in spruce stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohnal Michal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The interception was recognized as an important part of the catchment water balance in temperate climate. The mountainous forest ecosystem at experimental headwater catchment Liz has been subject of long-term monitoring. Unique dataset in terms of time resolution serves to determine canopy storage capacity and free throughfall. Spatial variability of throughfall was studied using one weighing and five tipping bucket rain gauges. The basic characteristics of forest affecting interception process were determined for the Norway spruce stand at the experimental area - the leaf area index was 5.66 - 6.00 m2 m-2, the basal area was 55.7 m2 ha-1, and the crown closure above individual rain gauges was between 19 and 95%. The total interception loss in both growing seasons analyzed was 34.5%. The mean value of the interception capacity determined was about 2 mm. Throughfall exhibited high variability from place to place and it was strongly affected by character of rainfall. On the other hand, spatial pattern of throughfall in average showed low variability.

  16. Arctic security and Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamnes, Rolf

    2013-03-01

    Global warming is one of the most serious threats facing mankind. Many regions and countries will be affected, and there will be many losers. The earliest and most intense climatic changes are being experienced in the Arctic region. Arctic average temperature has risen at twice the rate of the global average in the past half century. These changes provide an early indication for the world of the environmental and societal significance of global warming. For that reason, the Arctic presents itself as an important scientific laboratory for improving our understanding of the causes and patterns of climate changes. The rapidly rising temperature threatens the Arctic ecosystem, but the human consequences seem to be far less dramatic there than in many other places in the world. According to the U.S. National Intelligence Council, Russia has the potential to gain the most from increasingly temperate weather, because its petroleum reserves become more accessible and because the opening of an Arctic waterway could provide economic and commercial advantages. Norway might also be fortunate. Some years ago, the Financial Times asked: #Left Double Quotation Mark#What should Norway do about the fact that global warming will make their climate more hospitable and enhance their financial situation, even as it inflicts damage on other parts of the world?#Right Double Quotation Mark#(Author)

  17. Pollution control enhanced spruce growth in the “Black Triangle” near the Czech–Polish border

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Tomáš; Čermák, P.; Oulehle, Filip; Trnka, Miroslav; Štěpánek, Petr; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruška, Jakub; Büntgen, Ulf; Rybníček, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 538, 15 Dec (2015), s. 703-711 ISSN 0048-9697 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0265; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248; GA ČR GA13-04291S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-08124S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : air pollution * Central Europe * dendroecology * forest growth * Norway spruce Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 3.976, year: 2015

  18. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward H. Holsten; Richard A. Werner

    1993-01-01

    Covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of this study, we do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central...

  19. Spruce aphid, Elatobium abietinum (Walker): Life history and damage to Engelmann spruce in the Pinaleno Mountains, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2009-01-01

    Spruce aphid is an exotic insect recently introduced to the Pinaleno Mountains. It feeds on dormant Engelmann spruce, and possible effects include tree-growth suppression, tree mortality, and reduction in seed and cone production. Potential longer-term effects include changes in forest structure and species composition - primarily through reduction in Engelmann spruce...

  20. Old lower stem bark lesions apparently caused by unsuccessful spruce beetle attacks still evident on live spruce trees years later

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Hard; Ken P. Zogas

    2010-01-01

    We examined old bark lesions on Lutz spruce in young stands on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, to determine their cause. Distribution of these lesions along lower stems was similar to the distribution of spruce beetle attacks during epidemics. These lesions apparently resulted from unsuccessful attacks by spruce beetles during the late 1980s and early 1990s and appear to...

  1. National report from Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugset, K.

    1993-01-01

    The only activity in Norway that is directly relevant for the present CRP is performed by Institutt for energiteknikk, the Norwegian Energy Research Institute. This institute is responsible for conducting the OECD Halden Reactor Project. This research project has as one of its main items a programme on ''Man-Machine Systems Research (MMSR)''. The main objective with this programme is to improve operational safety and efficiency of nuclear plants through introduction of new technology in the control room. This activity is divided into four main chapters; Development of computerised operator support systems; development of advanced control rooms; human factors activities related to introduction of new technology in the control room; software verification and validation. All these activities are relevant to the present CRP. A short description of each item is therefore given. 1 fig

  2. Bio energy in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamnaberg, Haavard; Sidelnikova, Maria

    2011-01-01

    The main conclusion in this report is that it is possible to make available about 14 TWh bio energy in Norway than what is used today to a charge that is located less than ca. 30 oere / kWh. Almost all this potential come from the forest and requires an increase in output up to the net sustained yield. Further 5 TWh may be available in the form of biogas at a cost that is both higher and have greater uncertainty than the fixed bio energy. It is set up a cost curve based on this work, which is quoted here. This reflects only the technical costs, and does not regard wages, commissions, taxes or fees. The value of alternative uses of biomass are not considered. The cost curve must therefore not be mixed with a supply curve. (eb)

  3. Sustainable Development Discourse in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruud, Audun

    2009-01-01

    Norway represents the case of an early-mover transforming into a recalcitrant average player. There is currently no active public SD debate, and if any, the environmental dimension remains the most prevalent. Climate change is the core issue. In spite of this political focus and new, ambitious objectives (i.e. that Norway is to be carbon neutral by 2030), and despite the fact that Norway has huge potentials for renewable energy production and export to Europe, there are few indications of any more substantial policy changes at a sectoral level

  4. NORWAY: a nuclear demonstration project?

    CERN Multimedia

    Clery, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    "Egil Lillestøl is a man with a rather unusual mission: he wants his homeland of Norway to take the lead in developement of of a new form of nuclear power. Norway is Europe's largest petroleum exporter, from its North Sea oil and gas fields, and Lillestøl, a physicist at the University of Bergen, believes the country needs to do something about its carbon emissions.

  5. Seasonal and diurnal variation in the deposition velocity of ozone over a spruce forest in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Jensen, N.O.; Hummelshøj, P.

    1995-01-01

    The flux of O-3 was measured by the eddy-correlation method over Norway spruce in periods when the trees had a very low activity, periods with optimum growth, and periods with water stress. The aerodynamic resistance (tau(a)), viscous sub-layer resistance (tau(b)) and surface resistance (tau...... the activity of the trees was low. The surface resistance increased when the trees were subject to water stress. It is concluded that stomatal uptake is an important parameter for the deposition of O-3. However, other processes such as destruction of O-3 at surfaces, reaction with NO emitted from the soil......, and reactions with radicals produced from VOC's emitted from the forest, should also be taken into consideration....

  6. Helicopter Propwash Dislodges Few Spruce Budworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel T. Jennings; Mark W. Houseweart; Mark W. Houseweart

    1986-01-01

    Propwash treatments from a low-flying Bell 47-G2 helicopter dislodged few spruce budworm larvae and pupae from host balsam-fir trees. After propwash treatments, both larval-pupal densities on branch samples and in drop-tray collections near the ground were not significantly different between treated and control plots. Significantly more larvae were found in the lower...

  7. Passive houses in Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halse, Andreas

    2008-12-15

    The paper analyzes the introduction of passive houses in the Norwegian house market. Passive houses are houses with extremely low levels of energy consumption for heating, and have not yet been built in Norway, but have started to enter the market in Germany and some other countries. The construction sector is analyzed as a sectoral innovation system. The different elements of the innovation system are studied. This includes government agencies, producers, consumers, finance and education. The analysis shows that passive and low-energy houses are on the verge of market breakthrough. This can partly be explained by economic calculations, and partly by processes of learning and change in the institutional set-up of the sector. The construction sector is a sector characterized by low innovative intensity and little interaction between different agents. Those working to promote passive houses have to some extent managed to cope with these challenges. This has happened by breaking away from the traditional focus of Norwegian energy efficiency policies on technology and the economically rational agents, by instead focusing on knowledge and institutional change at the level of the producers. (Author)

  8. Fungal Symbionts of the Spruce Bark Beetle Synthesize the Beetle Aggregation Pheromone 2-Methyl-3-buten-2-ol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tao; Axelsson, Karolin; Krokene, Paal; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin

    2015-09-01

    Tree-killing bark beetles depend on aggregation pheromones to mass-attack their host trees and overwhelm their resistance. The beetles are always associated with phytopathogenic ophiostomatoid fungi that probably assist in breaking down tree resistance, but little is known about if or how much these fungal symbionts contribute to the beetles' aggregation behavior. In this study, we determined the ability of four major fungal symbionts of the spruce bark beetle Ips typographus to produce beetle aggregation pheromones. The fungi were incubated on Norway spruce Picea abies bark, malt agar, or malt agar amended with 0.5% (13)C glucose. Volatiles present in the headspace of each fungus were analyzed for 7 days after incubation using a SPME autosampler coupled to a GC/MS. Two Grosmannia species (G. penicillata and G. europhioides) produced large amounts of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MB), the major component in the beetles' aggregation pheromone blend, when growing on spruce bark or malt agar. Grosmannia europhioides also incorporated (13)C glucose into MB, demonstrating that the fungi can synthesize MB de novo using glucose as a carbon source. This is the first clear evidence that fungal symbionts of bark beetles can produce components in the aggregation pheromone blend of their beetle vectors. This provides new insight into the possible ecological roles of fungal symbionts in bark beetle systems and may deepen our understanding of species interactions and coevolution in these important biological systems.

  9. [Occasional smoking in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaavik, Elisabeth; Scheffels, Janne; Lund, Marianne

    2014-01-28

    In recent decades, daily smoking has become less common, while occasional smoking has stayed at the same level. The purpose of the study is to describe occasional smokers on the basis of their smoking behaviour and socio-demographic characteristics. Data from Statistics Norway's quarterly surveys of tobacco use in 2010 and 2011 were used. Information on smoking habits, smoking-related behaviour and the respondents' attitudes to their own smoking was collected in telephone interviews. Of the 8,700 men and women aged 16-74 (response rate 57%) who were included, altogether 1,583 were daily smokers and 907 occasional smokers. The occasional smokers were younger, more frequently lived in large cities and had a higher level of education and income than the daily smokers. Twenty-nine of 174 (17%) occasional smokers used snus on a daily basis, compared to 10 of 394 (3%) of the daily smokers. The occasional smokers had great confidence in their ability to quit: 95% responded that they would be smoke-free in five years, compared to 55% of the daily smokers (n = 2,158). Fifty-five (35%) of the occasional smokers lit up several times weekly (16 cigarettes per week on average), while the remaining (65%) smoked only once per week as a maximum (five cigarettes per week on average). Those who smoked several times each week had attitudes to their own smoking and usage pattern for tobacco that were similar to those of the daily smokers. Nearly half of the occasional smokers defined themselves as non-smokers. Norwegian occasional smokers are a heterogeneous group in terms of their smoking pattern and frequency, and many define themselves as non-smokers.

  10. Does long-term cultivation of saplings under elevated CO2 concentration influence their photosynthetic response to temperature?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šigut, Ladislav; Holišová, Petra; Klem, Karel; Šprtová, Miroslava; Calfapietra, Carlo; Marek, Michal V.; Špunda, Vladimír; Urban, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 6 (2015), s. 929-939 ISSN 0305-7364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340; GA ČR GA13-28093S; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0246; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : CO2 assimilation * climate change * CO2 assimilation * elevated CO2 * acclimation * European beech * Fagus sylvatica * Norway spruce * photorespiration * photosystem II photochemistry * thermotolerance Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2015

  11. [The black death in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeding, P

    1990-06-30

    The old Icelandic annals tell that the Black Death came to Bergen, Norway, in 1349 with a ship from England. This was probably at the beginning of September. From Bergen the plague spread rapidly northwards and southwards along the coast and over land to Eastern Norway. The Black Death remained in Norway for approximately six months. The epidemic must have been started by infected black rats and rat fleas in the grain cargo of the ship. The account in the annals, and experiences from other countries, indicate that pneumonic plague was dominant in Bergen at the start of the epidemic. After that the Black Death must have spread partly as pneumonic plague but mainly probably as bubonic plague, transmitted via human fleas from person to person. The rats cannot have played a part except in the initial phase. The annals say that 2/3 of Norway's population died. This is probably a big exaggeration. The mortality in Norway can hardly have been more than 40-50%. Even this is high compared with an estimated mortality of approximately 33% in England and on the continent.

  12. Corporatism in Denmark and Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Mikkel Mailand

    2009-01-01

    The literature of corporatism tends to bypass most Scandinavian countries and ignore state-social partner relations not related to wage bargaining and income policy. This contribution attempts to overcome both these shortcomings. It concludes that corporatism is alive in Denmark and Norway......, in Norway ‘peak-level' corporatism on wage setting remains stronger than in Denmark, whereas ‘meso-level' corporatism (corporatism in specific policy area) is stronger in Denmark than in Norway........ The social partners have, as general rule, been involved in formulating and implementing changes in welfare state policies, and corporatist arrangements are also seen in relation to some industrial relations issues. The two countries share a number of contextual features important for corporatism. However...

  13. Change of mechanical properties of Norway Spruce wood due to degradation caused by fire retardants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kloiber, Michal; Frankl, Jiří; Drdácký, Miloš; Kučerová, I.; Tippner, J.; Bryscejn, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2010), s. 23-38 ISSN 1336-4561 Grant - others:GAČR(CZ) GA103/07/1091 Program:GA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : wood degradation * fire retardant * mechanical properties * tensile strength * hardness Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 0.284, year: 2010

  14. Increasing Water Use Efficiency Comes at a Cost for Norway Spruce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja G M Sanders

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic water use efficiency (WUEi in trees is an indication of the ratio of carbon assimilation to the rate of transpiration. It is generally assumed that it is a response to water availability. In agricultural research, the question of drought tolerance by increased WUEi has been well studied. In general, the increase is a trade-off for productivity and is therefore not desired. For forest trees, this question is less clearly understood. Using stable carbon isotopes derived from tree rings combined with productivity as the product of the annual growth increment and annual density measurements, we compared the change in WUEi over a 15 year period. While WUEi increased over this period, the productivity decreased, causing an opposing trend. The gradient of the correlation between WUEi and productivity varies between provenances and sites. Counterintuitively, the populations at the drier site showed low WUEi values at the beginning of the investigation. Slopes vary with the provenance from Poland showing the least decline in productivity. In general, we found that a decline in productivity aligned with an increase in WUEi.

  15. Oxidative biodegradation of tetrachloroethene in needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weissflog, L.; Krüger, G.H.J.; Forczek, Sándor; Lange, Ch.A.; Kotte, K.; Pfennigsdorff, A.; Rohlenová, Jana; Fuksová, Květoslava; Uhlířová, H.; Matucha, Miroslav; Schröder, P.; Krueger, G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 1 (2007), s. 89-96 ISSN 0254-6299 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Biodegradation * Chloroplasts * Drought stress Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.444, year: 2007

  16. In situ autumn ozone fumigation of mature Norway spruce - Effects on net photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2002-01-01

    concentration. The experiment was conducted during 70 days during the autumn. Our system could not detect any ozone effects on dark respiration, but eventually effects on dark respiration could be masked in signal noise. An inhibition of daily net photosynthesis in ozone treated shoots was apparent......, and it is was found that a mean increase in ozone concentration of 10 nl l(-1) reduced net photosynthesis with 7.4 %. This effect should be related to a pre-exposure during the season of AOT40 12.5 mul l(-1) h....

  17. Shoot growth processes, assessed by bud development types, reflect Norway spruce vitality and sink prioritization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polák, T.; Rock, B. N.; Campbell, P.E.; Soukupová, J.; Šolcová, Blanka; Zvára, K.; Albrechtová, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 225, 1-3 (2006), s. 337-348 ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 658 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova v Praze / Přírodovědecká fakulta(CZ) KJB6111307 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : tree vitality * buds * carbon allocation * sink/source concept Subject RIV: GK - Forest ry Impact factor: 1.839, year: 2006 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2006.01.027

  18. Extraction of p-hydroxyacetophenon and catechin from Norway spruce needles. Comparison of different extraction solvents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vosmanská, M.; Sýkora, D.; Fähnrich, J.; Kovářová, Marcela; Volka, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 382, - (2005), s. 1135-1140 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/05/0269 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Picea abies * phenolic compounds * extraction Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.695, year: 2005

  19. Equilibrium moisture content (EMC) in Norway spruce during the first and second desorptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben; Engelund, Emil Tang; Thygesen, Lisbeth G.

    2011-01-01

    It is a commonly accepted notion that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood at a given relative humidity (RH) is highest during initial desorption of green wood due to an irreversible loss of hygroscopicity during the 1st desorption. The basis for this notion is investigated by assessing...

  20. Effect of early to late wood proportion on Norway Spruce biomass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Rajsnerová, Petra; Kubásek, Jiří; Marková, I.; Tomášková, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2012), s. 287-292 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : allometric relationship * climate * tree ring analysis * wood density Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. Restoration of Central-European mountain Norway spruce forest 15 years after natural and anthropogenic disturbance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, M. H.; Edwards-Jonášová, Magda

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 144, 15 May (2015), s. 120-130 ISSN 0378-1127 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Picea abies forest * disturbance * bark beetle * salvage logging * natural regeneration * Herb-layer vegetation Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2015

  2. Climate drivers of bark beetle outbreak dynamics in Norway spruce forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marini, Lorenzo; Økland, Bjørn; Jönsson, Anna Maria

    2017-01-01

    Bark beetles are among the most devastating biotic agents affecting forests globally and several species are expected to be favored by climate change. Given the potential interactions of insect outbreaks with other biotic and abiotic disturbances, and the potentially strong impact of changing....... typographus that may provide a mechanism for population decline after population eruptions. Generality in the effects of complex climatic events across different geographical areas suggests that the large-scale drivers can be used as early warning indicators of increasing local outbreak probability....

  3. Modelling of stomatal conductance and ozone deposition flux of Norway Spruce using deposition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, M.; Chroust, P.; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Cudlín, Pavel; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Czerný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor; Taufarová, Klára

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 12, 2-3 (2009), s. 75-81 ISSN 1335-339X R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1B7/189/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : ozone concentration * ozone deposition * stomatal conductance * deposition velocity * resistance model * tropo-spheric ozone Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  4. Ozone flux over a Norway spruce forest and correlation with net ecosystem production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zapletal, M.; Cudlín, Pavel; Chroust, P.; Urban, Otmar; Pokorný, Radek; Edwards, Magda; Czerný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor; Taufarová, Klára; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Mikuška, Pavel; Paoletti, E.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 5 (2011), s. 1024-1034 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SP/1B7/189/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : ozone deposition * stomatal conductance * deposition velocity * friction velocity * gradient method * tropospheric ozone * net ecosystem production Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.746, year: 2011

  5. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system. II. Distribution and degradation in the plant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forczek, Sándor; Uhlířová, H.; Gryndler, Milan; Albrechtová, J.; Fuksová, K.; Vágner, Martin; Schröder, P.; Matucha, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2004), s. 327-333 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874; GA ČR GA522/99/1465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : C-14 labeling * microbial degradation * phyllosphere Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.359, year: 2004

  6. Uptake, translocation and fate of trichloroacetic acid in a Norway spruce/soil system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schröder, P.; Matucha, Miroslav; Forczek, Sándor; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, K.; Albrechtová, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 2 (2003), s. 437-442 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/99/1465 Grant - others:German-Czech Future Fund(DE) 3/01/270 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Coniferous forest injury * Chlorinated solvents * Secondary air pollutants Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.904, year: 2003

  7. Trichloroacetic acid of different origin in Norway spruce needles and chloroplasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forczek, Sándor; Schröder, P.; Weissflog, L.; Krüger, G.; Rohlenová, Jana; Matucha, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 1 (2008), s. 177-180 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : 14C-14 labelling * subcellular level * tetrachloroethene Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.426, year: 2008

  8. Comparing carbohydrate status during norway spruce seed development and somatic embryo formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gösslová, M.; Svobodová, H.; Lipavská, H.; Albrechtová, J.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2001-01-01

    The carbohydrate status of developing seeds of Picea abies was examined in order to provide a frame of reference for the evaluation of changes in carbohydrate content in maturing somatic embryos of the same species. Samples were taken at weekly intervals from 12 May 1998 (estimated time of

  9. Feeding with aminolevulinic acid increased chlorophyll content in Norway spruce (Picea abies) in the dark

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlovič, A.; Demko, V.; Durchan, Milan; Hudák, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 4 (2009), s. 631-634 ISSN 0300-3604 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Aminolevulinic acid * Ginkgo biloba * light-independent chlorophyll biosynthesis Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.072, year: 2009

  10. Influence of road salting on the adjacent Norway spruce (Picea abies) forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Forczek, Sándor; Benada, Oldřich; Kofroňová, Olga; Sigler, Karel; Matucha, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 7 (2011), s. 344-350 ISSN 1214-1178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636; GA ČR GP522/09/P394 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : deicing * radiotracer methods * salinity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.078, year: 2011 http://www.agriculturejournals.cz/publicFiles/43290.pdf

  11. Norway spruce (Picea abies) genetic transformation with modified Cry3A gene of Bacillus thuringiensis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, Jindřich; Pavingerová, Daniela; Vlasák, Josef; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2013), s. 395-400 ISSN 0001-527X R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290; GA ČR(CZ) GAP502/11/1471 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cry3A gene modification * Picea abies * Agrobacterium tumefaciens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.389, year: 2013

  12. Are Early Somatic Embryos of the Norway Spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) Organised?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petřek, J.; Zítka, O.; Adam, V.; Bartušek, Karel; Anjum, N. A.; Pereira, E.; Havel, L.; Kizek, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 12 (2015), e0144093:1-16 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : somatic embryogenesis * biochemical parameters Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  13. Stable Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Norway spruce embryogenic tissues using somatic embryo explants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavingerová, Daniela; Bříza, Jindřich; Niedermeierová, Hana; Vlasák, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 7 (2011), s. 277-280 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MZe QH71290 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Agrobacterium tumefaciens * genetic engineering * GUS activity * Picea abies (L.) Karst Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology

  14. Anatomical and Histochemical Changes of Norway Spruce Buds Induced by Simulated Acid Rain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukupová, J.; Albrechtová, J.; Svobodová, H.; Opatrná, Jana

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (2002), s. 77-84 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK5020115 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : histochemistry * image analysis * non specific esterase Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.583, year: 2002

  15. Carbon isotope in tree rings of Norway spruce exposed to atmospheric pollution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, H.; Šantrůček, Jiří; Svoboda, M.; Kopáček, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 16 (2007), s. 5778-5782 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/1200; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA601410505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : atmospheric pollution * bohemian forests Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.363, year: 2007

  16. Temporal variation and efficiency of leaf area index in young mountain Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, Ivana; Havránková, Kateřina

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 127, č. 5 (2008), s. 359-367 ISSN 1612-4669 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk 2B06068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : biomass * leaf area duration * Picea abies * thinning Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.556, year: 2008

  17. Leaf area index of Norway spruce stands in relation to age and defoliation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Stojnič, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 2 (2012), s. 173-180 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : health status * LAI * needle * Picea abies Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  18. Response of Norway spruce root system to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, I.; Marek, Michal V.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 6 (2013), s. 1807-1816 ISSN 0137-5881 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : biomass * elevated CO2 * Picea abies * root structure * secondary root s Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.524, year: 2013

  19. Impact of cold temperatures on the shear strength of Norway spruce joints glued with different adhesives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hagman, Olle; Sundqvist, Bror

    2015-01-01

    × 20 mm × 10 mm) were bonded with seven commercially available adhesives: polyurethane (PUR), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), emulsion-polymer-isocyanate (EPI), melamine-formaldehyde (MF), phenol-resorcinol-formaldehyde (PRF), melamine-urea-formaldehyde1 (MUF1), and melamine-urea-formaldehyde2 (MUF2). Each...

  20. The effects of elevated atmospheric [CO2] on Norway spruce needle parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, Ivana; Marek, Michal V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 6 (2011), s. 2269-2277 ISSN 0137-5881 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA AV ČR IAA600870701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : carbon dioxide * morphology * long-term experiment * Pieca abies Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.639, year: 2011

  1. Feedbacks of windthrow for Norway spruce and Scots pine stands under changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panferov, O.; Döring, C.; Rauch, E.

    2009-01-01

    the turbulence model SCAlar DIStribution (SCADIS) with the soil–vegetation–atmosphere-transfer (SVAT) model BROOK 90. The present study investigates projections of wind damage in Solling, Germany under climate scenarios A1B and B1, taking into account the windthrow feedbacks—changes of microclimate as a result...

  2. Five-year measurements of ozone fluxes to a Danish Norway spruce canopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.; Hovmand, M.F.

    2004-01-01

    was found. The data are analysed to quantify diurnal, seasonal and yearly fluxes, and non-stomatal and stomatal removal are estimated. Monthly means of climatic data are shown, and day and night values of the aerodynamic resistance, r(a), viscous sub-layer resistance, r(b), and the surface or canopy...... resistance, r(c), are presented. The yearly ozone deposition is approximately 126 kg ha(-1). The canopy ozone uptake is highest during the day and during the summer. This is interpreted as increased stomatal uptake and physical and chemical reactions. The daily means of ozone concentration and fluxes......-emissions. (2) The same factors have a strong influence on the stomatal opening, e.g. midday and night closure. Thus, looking at diurnal variations, the diurnal ozone concentration and ozone flux do not correlate at all during the growing season. The maximum diurnal difference for the ozone concentration...

  3. Trichloroacetic acid in Norway spruce/soil-system I. Biodegradation in soil

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matucha, Miroslav; Forczek, Sándor; Gryndler, Milan; Uhlířová, H.; Fuksová, K.; Schröder, P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2003), s. 303-309 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/99/1465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903; CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Microbial degradation * Trichloroacetic acid * Forest soil Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.904, year: 2003

  4. Dynamics of temperature normalized stem CO2 efflux in Norway Spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dařenová, Eva; Pavelka, Marian; Janouš, Dalibor

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2011), s. 121-125 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA AV ČR IAA300420803; GA MŠk 2B06068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : soil CO2 efflux * R10 * Picea abies * precipitations * stem growth Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  5. Growth trends and climate responses of Norway spruce along elevational gradients in East-Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponočná, T.; Spyt, B.; Kaczka, R. J.; Büntgen, Ulf; Treml, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2016), s. 1633-1646 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : abies l. karst. * tree-ring chronologies * basal area increment * radial growth * forest growth * altitudinal gradient * sudetes mountains * northern europe * tatra mountains * alps * climate change * mountain forests * picea abies * radial growth * rree rings * trend preservation Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2016

  6. Comparison of different approaches of radiation use efficiency of biomass formation estimation in Mountain Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupková, Lenka; Marková, I.; Havránková, Kateřina; Pokorný, Radek; Urban, Otmar; Šigut, Ladislav; Pavelka, Marian; Cienciala, E.; Marek, Michal V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 1 (2017), s. 325-337 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015061 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Solar radiation * Biomass increment * Carbon flux * light use efficiency Subject RIV: GK - Forestry OBOR OECD: Forestry Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2016

  7. Stem respiration of Norway spruce trees under elevated CO2 concetration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acosta, Manuel; Pokorný, Radek; Janouš, Dalibor; Marek, Michal V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2010), s. 773-776 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA AV ČR IAA600870701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : glass lamellas domes * tree growth * R10 Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.582, year: 2010

  8. Branch CO(2) efflux in vertical profile of Norway spruce tree

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acosta, Manuel; Pavelka, Marian; Tomášková, Ivana; Janouš, Dalibor

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 130, č. 4 (2011), s. 649-656 ISSN 1612-4669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06068 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : branch CO2 efflux * branch diameter increment * sap flow * temperature * Q10 value * woody tissue Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 1.982, year: 2011

  9. Water relations in Norway spruce trees growing at ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kupper, P.; Sellin, A.; Klimánková, Zdeňka; Pokorný, Radek; Puértolas, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 4 (2006), s. 603-609 ISSN 0006-3134 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : global change * sap flux * shoot water potential Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.198, year: 2006

  10. Growth and transpiration of Norway spruce trees under atmosphere with elevated CO2 concentration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Šalanská, Petra; Janouš, Dalibor

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2001), s. 14-28 ISSN 1335-342X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/99/0085; GA ČR GA205/99/1561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.192, year: 2001

  11. Water availability effect on transpiration of the Norway spruce forest stand: a case study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bužková, Romana; Pokorný, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2013), s. 67-74 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : sap flow * tree dominance classes * volumetric soil moisture content * specific sap flux Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  12. Conditions of natural regeneration of Norway spruce ecosystems in the Krkonose Mountains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cudlín, Pavel; Goldbold, L D.; Bonifacio, E.; Egli, S.; Fritz, W H.; Gonthier, P.; Chmelíková, Ewa; Kowalik, P.; Martinotti, M G.; Moravec, Ivo; Nicolotti, G.; Varese, C.; Peter, M.; Zanini, E.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, Suppl. 1 (2003), s. 66-79 ISSN 1335-342X. [Long Term Air Pollution Effect on Forest Ecosystems (International Meeting for Specialists in Air Pollution Effects on Forest Ecosystems)/20./. Zvolen, 30.08.2002-01.09.2002] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : forest decline * acid precipitation * natural regeneration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.100, year: 2003

  13. Ecosystem water use efficiency of norway spruce monoculture from eddy-covariance and ecophysiological measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Slípková, Romana; Havránková, Kateřina; Pavelka, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 951, č. 1 (2012), s. 301-308 ISSN 0567-7572. [International Workshop On Sap Flow /8./. Volterra, 08.05.2011-12.05.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : eddy-covariance * evaporation * Picea abies * sap flow * transpiration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  14. Tensile creep and recovery of Norway spruce influenced by temperature and moisture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang; Salmén, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    of these two climatic factors on TDMB of wood. It was found that the mechanical response of wood tissue is the sum of responses from both tracheids and middle lamella, with only the previous being reversible. The effect of moisture and temperature differed in that the latter affected the elastic and time...

  15. Allometric relationships for surface area and dry mass of young Norway spruce aboveground organs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, Ivana

    53 2007, č. 12 (2007), s. 548-554 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : allometry * biomass, * Picea abies * sapwood * surface area Subject RIV: GK - Forestry

  16. Fluxes of biogenic volatile organic compounds above temperate Norway spruce forest of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juráň, Stanislav; Pallozi, E.; Guidolotti, G.; Fares, S.; Šigut, Ladislav; Calfapietra, Carlo; Alivernini, A.; Savi, F.; Večeřová, Kristýna; Křůmal, Kamil; Večeřa, Zbyněk; Urban, Otmar

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 232, JAN (2017), s. 500-513 ISSN 0168-1923 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13031; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015061; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-28093S Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:68081715 Keywords : Monoterpenes * Isoprene * Proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF-MS) * Fluxes * Lagrangian model * MEGAN Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation (UIACH-O) OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Analytical chemistry (UIACH-O) Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  17. Carbon and Nitrogen Pools and Fluxes in Adjacent Mature Norway Spruce and European Beech Forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oulehle, Filip; Růžek, M.; Tahovská, K.; Bárta, J.; Myška, O.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 282. ISSN 1999-4907 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Fagus sylvatica * Picea abies * carbon * nitrogen * budget * respiration * productivity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.951, year: 2016

  18. Histological and biochemical response of Norway spruce somatic embryos to UV-B irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eliášová, Kateřina; Vondráková, Zuzana; Malbeck, Jiří; Trávníčková, Alena; Pešek, Bedřich; Vágner, Martin; Cvikrová, Milena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2017), s. 1279-1293 ISSN 0931-1890 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13050; GA MŠk(CZ) LD13051 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Oxidative stress * Phenolic acids * Phenylpropanoids * Picea abies (L.) Karst * Polyamines * Somatic embryogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Forestry Impact factor: 1.842, year: 2016

  19. Soil properties associated with net nitrification following watershed conversion with Appalachian hardwoods to Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlene N. Kelly; Stephen H. Schoenholtz; Mary Beth. Adams

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-N) in soil solution and streamwater can be an important vector of nitrogen (N) loss from forested watersheds, and nitrification is associated with negative consequences of soil acidification and eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to identify vegetation-mediated soil properties that may control...

  20. Isoprenoid emission response to changing light conditions of English oak, European beech and Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Meeningen, Ylva; Schurgers, Guy; Rinnan, Riikka

    2017-01-01

    Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard to separate from other influential factors such as temperature. We studied the light response of foliar BVOC emissions, photosynthesis...... be valid for a wider range of tree species. This information could be of importance when improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or temperature dependencies for individual compounds across species. Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic...... improving emission models and to further emphasize the discussion regarding light or temperature dependencies for individual compounds across species. Light is an important environmental factor controlling biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, but in natural conditions its impact is hard...

  1. The role of actin isoforms in somatic embryogenesis in Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schwarzerová, K.; Vondráková, Zuzana; Fischer, L.; Boříková, P.; Bellinvia, E.; Eliášová, Kateřina; Havelková, L.; Fišerová, J.; Vágner, Martin; Opatrný, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 89 (2010), s. 1-13 ISSN 1471-2229 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06034; GA MŠk OC 158; GA MŠk ME 668 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : PROGRAMMED CELL-DEATH * GENE FAMILY * F-ACTIN Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.085, year: 2010

  2. The effect of air elevated [CO2] on crown architecture and aboveground biomass in Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, Radek; Tomášková, Ivana; Slípková, Romana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2012), s. 2-11 ISSN 1392-1355 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA AV ČR IAA600870701; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : thinning * secondary shoots * biomass allocation * long-term experiment * dendrometry Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.379, year: 2012

  3. Effects of agitation on particle-size distribution and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated spruce and giant reed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixing is an energy demanding process which has been previously shown to affect enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrated biomass slurries are associated with high and non-Newtonian viscosities and mixing in these systems is a complex task. Poor mixing can lead to mass and/or heat transfer problems as well as inhomogeneous enzyme distribution, both of which can cause possible yield reduction. Furthermore the stirring energy dissipation may impact the particle size which in turn may affect the enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of the current work was to specifically quantify the effects of mixing on particle-size distribution (PSD) and relate this to changes in the enzymatic hydrolysis. Two rather different materials were investigated, namely pretreated Norway spruce and giant reed. Results Changes in glucan hydrolysis and PSD were measured as a function of agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis at fiber loadings of 7 or 13% water-insoluble solids (WIS). Enzymatic conversion of pretreated spruce was strongly affected by agitation rates at the higher WIS content. However, at low WIS content the agitation had almost no effect on hydrolysis. There was some effect of agitation on the hydrolysis of giant reed at high WIS loading, but it was smaller than that for spruce, and there was no measurable effect at low WIS loading. In the case of spruce, intense agitation clearly affected the PSD and resulted in a reduced mean particle size, whereas for giant reed the decrease in particle size was mainly driven by enzymatic action. However, the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was not increased after size reduction by agitation. Conclusions The impact of agitation on the enzymatic hydrolysis clearly depends not only on feedstock but also on the solids loading. Agitation was found to affect the PSD differently for the examined pretreated materials spruce and giant reed. The fact that the reduced mean particle diameter could not explain the enhanced hydrolysis rates found for

  4. European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus, L.) green attack affects foliar reflectance and biochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Haidi; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Groen, Thomas A.; Heurich, Marco

    2018-02-01

    The European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus, L. (hereafter bark beetle), causes major economic loss to the forest industry in Europe, especially in Norway Spruce (Picea abies). To minimise economic loss and preclude a mass outbreak, early detection of bark beetle infestation (so-called ;green attack; stage - a period at which trees are yet to show visual signs of infestation stress) is, therefore, a crucial step in the management of Norway spruce stands. It is expected that a bark beetle infestation at the green attack stage affects a tree's physiological and chemical status. However, the concurrent effect on key foliar biochemical such as foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll as well as spectral responses are not well documented in the literature. Therefore, in this study, the early detection of bark beetle green attacks is investigated by examining foliar biochemical and spectral properties (400-2000 nm). We also assessed whether bark beetle infestation affects the estimation accuracy of foliar biochemicals. An extensive field survey was conducted in the Bavarian Forest National Park (BFNP), Germany, in the early summer of 2015 to collect leaf samples from 120 healthy and green attacked trees. The spectra of the leaf samples were measured using an ASD FieldSpec3 equipped with an integrating sphere. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between healthy and infested needle samples were found in the mean reflectance spectra, with the most pronounced differences being observed in the NIR and SWIR regions between 730 and 1370 nm. Furthermore, significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in the biochemical compositions (chlorophyll and nitrogen concentration) of healthy versus green attacked samples. Our results further demonstrate that the estimation accuracy of foliar chlorophyll and nitrogen concentrations, utilising partial least square regression model, was lower for the infested compared to the healthy trees. We show that early stage of infestation reduces not only

  5. Nuclear emergency planning in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baarli, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nuclear emergency planning in Norway is forming a part of the Search and Rescue Service of the country. Due to the fact that Norway do not have any nucleat power reactor, the nuclear emergency planning has not been given high priority. The problems however are a part of the activity of the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene, and the emergency preparedness is at the present time to a large extent based on the availability of professional health physicists and their knowledge, rather than established practices

  6. Norway between tradition and opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This book is a general presentation of Norway: natural and human framework, history, institutions and political life, economy, economic policy and means, foreign relations, and social life. In the chapter devoted to Norway's economy, the energy sources and policies of the country are described: hydro-power, coal, hydrocarbons (petroleum, natural gas and condensates, proven, discovered and undiscovered resources). The production, imports, exports, retail prices and national consumption are given for each energy sources and each economic sector. The chapter focusses on the deterministic role of energy in the Swedish economy: investments, contract management, balance of trade, public finances, employment etc.. (N.K.)

  7. Photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea and monthly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The leaf photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea, the monthly dynamics in lycorine and galantamine contents in its bulb and the correlation among the photosynthetic characteristics and the lycorine and galantamine during the annual growth period were studied by using LI-6400 portable photosynthetic measurement ...

  8. The chiropractic profession in Norway 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvammen, O. C.; Leboeuf-Yde, C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The chiropractic profession in Norway has increased five-fold in the last two decades. As there is no academic graduate program in Norway, all chiropractors have been trained outside of Norway, in either Europe, America or Australia. This might have given Norwegian chiropractors heter...

  9. Taxonomy Icon Data: Sitka spruce [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sitka spruce Picea sitchensis Picea_sitchensis_L.png Picea_sitchensis_NL.png Picea_sitchen...sis_S.png Picea_sitchensis_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t...=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_i...con/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Picea+sitchensis&t=NS ...

  10. Sleipner mishap jolts booming Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Norway's buoyant offshore industry that was stunned when the concrete substructure for Sleipner natural gas field's main production platform sank in the Grandsfjord off Stavanger late last month. The accident, a blow to Norway's gas sales program in Europe, came with offshore activity in the Norwegian North Sea moving into a new boom period. Currently, 10 oil and gas fields are under development, and several projects are on the drawing board. Aker Oil and Gas, a leading offshore firm, says the country's construction industry will be working at capacity for the next 4 years. Norwegian oil production has been hovering just below 2 million b/d since the beginning of this year, making Norway the North Sea's largest producer, a position formerly held by the U.K. Gas production averages about 3 bcfd. With European gas demand sharply increasing, Norway is under pressure to increase output from new fields in the mid to late 1990s. The Sleipner setback forces state owned Den norske stats oljeselskap AS (Statoil) to cast around for supplies. Sleipner was to have begun deliveries to a consortium of continental gas companies in October 1993. Statoil believes it can fill the gap from existing fields in Norwegian waters

  11. Sex Education in Multicultural Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Tiffany

    2007-01-01

    Scandinavia has long been admired by American liberals and sex education advocates who cite comparable rates of adolescent sexuality, yet lower rates of teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases and abortion in Scandinavia. The United States has, however, two variables with which Scandinavia in general, and Norway in particular, has not…

  12. Future climate developments in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerland, Eirik J.; Nordeng, Thor Erik

    1999-01-01

    The article presents the first results in the project RegClim which seeks to develop detailed scenarios for climatic change in Norway due to global warming. The modeling methods are described and they are based on results from the large global climatic models: Dynamic and empirical down scaling. Preliminary results on the temperature and precipitation alterations are presented

  13. Photosynthetic gene expression in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, James O; Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Zielinski, Amy M; Mure, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Within the chloroplasts of higher plants and algae, photosynthesis converts light into biological energy, fueling the assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide into biologically useful molecules. Two major steps, photosynthetic electron transport and the Calvin-Benson cycle, require many gene products encoded from chloroplast as well as nuclear genomes. The expression of genes in both cellular compartments is highly dynamic and influenced by a diverse range of factors. Light is the primary environmental determinant of photosynthetic gene expression. Working through photoreceptors such as phytochrome, light regulates photosynthetic genes at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Other processes that affect photosynthetic gene expression include photosynthetic activity, development, and biotic and abiotic stress. Anterograde (from nucleus to chloroplast) and retrograde (from chloroplast to nucleus) signaling insures the highly coordinated expression of the many photosynthetic genes between these different compartments. Anterograde signaling incorporates nuclear-encoded transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators, such as sigma factors and RNA-binding proteins, respectively. Retrograde signaling utilizes photosynthetic processes such as photosynthetic electron transport and redox signaling to influence the expression of photosynthetic genes in the nucleus. The basic C3 photosynthetic pathway serves as the default form used by most of the plant species on earth. High temperature and water stress associated with arid environments have led to the development of specialized C4 and CAM photosynthesis, which evolved as modifications of the basic default expression program. The goal of this article is to explain and summarize the many gene expression and regulatory processes that work together to support photosynthetic function in plants.

  14. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo

    2017-01-01

    Plants, cyanobacteria, and algae generate a surplus of redox power through photosynthesis, which makes them attractive for biotechnological exploitations. While central metabolism consumes most of the energy, pathways introduced through metabolic engineering can also tap into this source of reduc......Plants, cyanobacteria, and algae generate a surplus of redox power through photosynthesis, which makes them attractive for biotechnological exploitations. While central metabolism consumes most of the energy, pathways introduced through metabolic engineering can also tap into this source...... on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However......, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic...

  15. Computer simulation for integrated pest management of spruce budworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll B. Williams; Patrick J. Shea

    1982-01-01

    Some field studies of the effects of various insecticides on the spruce budworm (Choristoneura sp.) and their parasites have shown severe suppression of host (budworm) populations and increased parasitism after treatment. Computer simulation using hypothetical models of spruce budworm-parasite systems based on these field data revealed that (1)...

  16. Fertilization of black spruce or poor site peatland in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David H. Alban; Richard F. Watt

    1981-01-01

    Fertilization of poor site black spruce on organic soil with various rates of nitrogen and phosphorus increased height and diameter growth from 2 to 4 times. The growth response declined with time but was still apparent 16 years after fertilization. Shrub biomass and coverage, and nutrient levels of spruce foliage were strongly affected by fertilization.

  17. The isolated red spruce communities of Virginia and West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold S. Adams; Steven Stephenson; Adam W. Rollins; Mary Beth. Adams

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative data on the composition and structure of coniferous forests containing red spruce in the mountains of central and southwestern Virginia and eastern central West Virginia, based on sampling carried out in 67 stands during the 1982 to 1984 field seasons, are provided. The average importance value ([relative basal area + relative density/2]) of red spruce was...

  18. Impacts of site effects on losses of oriental spruce during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-18

    Aug 18, 2009 ... In this way they offset the ecosystem balance by affecting stand ... D. micans was first discovered in oriental spruce forests in the re- public of Georgia in 1957 and infested over 100,000 ha of oriental spruce stands in 1963 (Benz, 1984; Fielding et al., 1991 ..... Prepared for Forestry Innovation Investment Ltd.,.

  19. "Super" Spruce Seedlings Continue Superior Growth for 18 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt

    1981-01-01

    White spruce seedlings--20, 19, 18, and 17 inches tall--were selected among 2-2 transplants; controls from the same beds averaged 7.7 inches tall. After 18 years in the field, the selected seedlings continued to have a 30 percent height growth advantage over the controls. This note discusses how to incorporate super spruce seedlings into a tree breeding program....

  20. Relationships between forest structure, composition, site, and spruce beetle occurrence in the Intermountain West

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; James N. Long; John D. Shaw

    2009-01-01

    Engelmann spruce forests are structurally and compositionally diverse, occur across a wide range of physiographic conditions, and are the result of varying disturbance histories such as fire, wind and spruce beetle. The spruce beetle is a natural disturbance agent of spruce forests and has population levels that fluctuate from endemic to epidemic. Conceptually,...

  1. Climate Change Communication in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Ryghaug, Marianne; Skjølsvold, Tomas Moe

    2016-01-01

    Climate change research, activities, and initiatives in Norway started relatively late, by international comparison. From the beginnings in the early 2000s, research has mainly followed two paths: First, media studies, typically focusing on traditional newspaper representations of climate change and the surrounding debate, and second, research on public perceptions of climate change. Initially, the research field was dominated by media studies and science and technology studies (STS). As clim...

  2. Interfaith Dialogue in Christian Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebmann, Louise Lund

    2017-01-01

    processes, the article conducts a case study of public interfaith meetings held by a local interfaith forum in Kristiansand in Norway. Analyzing the meetings as organized cultural encounters, the study explores the transformative aspects of the events and it points to how the enactment of civilized forms...... of cross-cultural religiosity created within and by these public interfaith meetings is interlinked with formations of citizenship....

  3. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, T.C.

    1990-08-01

    A nation-wide network of 11 monitoring stations for continous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network, collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and experiences in connection with its operation are described. Results from measurements in 1989 are presented. 18 figs

  4. Philosophy of education in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Aakre, Bjørn Magne

    2009-01-01

    In Japan as well as Norway we experience growing interests and discussions about education. The main reason seems to be the fact that education has become more important than ever before. At the same time, most educational systems seem to face problems adapting to the rapid changes caused by globalization of values and cultures. Therefore, discussions about education not only involve new technology or alternative teaching methods, but also fundamental issues related to philosophy of education...

  5. Measurement of radioactivity in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, T.C.

    1988-05-01

    A nation-wide network of seven monitoring stations for continuous registration of radioactivity in the air has been established in Norway. Via the telecommunication network, collected data are dayly automatically transmitted to the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). High radiation levels will trigger an alarm for immediate transmission. The monitoring system and field experiences in connection with its operation are described. NILU's directions in the event of radiation alarm are specified and radiation measurements for 1987 are presented

  6. Ash recycling to spruce and beech stands effects on nutrients, growth, nitrogen dynamics and carbon balance; Askaaterfoering till gran- och bokbestaand - effekter paa naering, tillvaext, kvaevedynamik och kolbalans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelin, Gunnar

    2006-03-15

    Ash recycling is an important part in a modern, sustainable forestry, especially in whole-tree harvest systems. Nutrients lost at harvest are returned to the forest with the wood-ash. In the project the effects of ash treatment on needle and leaf chemistry, tree growth, soil chemistry, soil water chemistry, and carbon and nitrogen dynamics were studied on 23 Norway spruce sites in south-western Sweden and in ten European beech sites in Scania, southern Sweden. On some of the sites there were previously established ash recycling experiments, but on a majority of the sites ash recycling was performed without experimental lay-out and ash and control plots were established afterwards. The most common dose was two tons of self hardened crushed wood-ash and two tons of Mg-lime. On average seven to eight years after ash recycling the results were 1. increased exchangeable stores of base cations in the soil in the beech and the spruce stands 2. increased base saturation in the beech and the spruce stands and increased BC/Al in the spruce stands 3. increased concentrations and ratios to N of P, Ca, Zn, and S in the needles, the increased P-values are especially important since P is close to or below deficiency levels in a majority of the spruce stands 4. decreased K-concentration in the beech leaves 5. increased tree growth with on average 14 % in the ash treated spruce stands compared to the control plots 6. increased carbon and nitrogen amounts in the biomass in the spruce stands 7. tendencies towards increased amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the soil in the beech stands and no effect in the soil in the spruce stands 8. increased concentrations of Ca, Mg, and SO{sub 4} and no effect on ANC in the soil water 9. no effect on potential net mineralization but increased potential nitrification rates 10. decreased concentration of nitrate in the soil water in the beech stands and no effect in the spruce stands 11. lower system N losses in the beech stands and possibly in the

  7. Tourists' perceptions and intention to revisit Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Lazar, Ana Florina; Komolikova-Blindheim, Galyna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose - The overall purpose of this study is to explore tourists' perceptions and their intention to revisit Norway. The aim is to find out what are the factors that drive the overall satisfaction, the willingness to recommend and the revisit intention of international tourists that spend their holiday in Norway. Design-Method-Approach - the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen 1991), is used as a framework to investigate tourists' intention and behavior towards Norway as destination. The o...

  8. Biological control of the spruce coneworm Dioryctria abietella: Spraying with Bacillus thuringiensis reduced damage in a seed orchard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weslien, Jan [Forestry Research Inst. of Sweden, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1999-08-01

    Spraying of cones with Bacillus thuringiensis var. Kurstaki x Aizawa in a Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) seed orchard reduced damage by Dioryctria abietella Den. et Schiff. (Lepidoptera, Pyralidae). The incidence of D. abietella attacks was about 80% among unsprayed cones, but less than 15% showed attacks among cones that had been sprayed three times at 9-day intervals with a 0.2% suspension (weight/weight) of the B. thuringiensis preparation in water (Turex 50 WP, 25 000 IU/mg). Attacked, sprayed cones had fewer D. abietella larvae per cone than attacked, unsprayed cones. Spraying did not reduce the damage by Cydia strobilella (L.) (Lepidoptera, Tortricidae) or by Strobilomyia anthracina Czerny (Diptera, Anthomyiidae) 13 refs, 3 tabs

  9. Photosynthetic light reactions at the gold interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamran, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    In the project described in this thesis we studied a simple bio-electronic device for solar energy conversion by surface-assembly of photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes on a bare gold-electrode. Optical excitation of the photosynthetic pigments gives rise to charge separation in the so-called

  10. Photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea and monthly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... The leaf photosynthetic characteristics of Lycoris aurea, the monthly dynamics in lycorine and galantamine contents in its bulb and the correlation among the photosynthetic characteristics and the lycorine and galantamine during the annual growth period were studied by using LI-6400 portable.

  11. Height-Diameter Models for Mixed-Species Forests Consisting of Spruce, Fir, and Beech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petráš Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Height-diameter models define the general relationship between the tree height and diameter at each growth stage of the forest stand. This paper presents generalized height-diameter models for mixed-species forest stands consisting of Norway spruce (Picea abies Karst., Silver fir (Abies alba L., and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. from Slovakia. The models were derived using two growth functions from the exponential family: the two-parameter Michailoff and three-parameter Korf functions. Generalized height-diameter functions must normally be constrained to pass through the mean stand diameter and height, and then the final growth model has only one or two parameters to be estimated. These “free” parameters are then expressed over the quadratic mean diameter, height and stand age and the final mathematical form of the model is obtained. The study material included 50 long-term experimental plots located in the Western Carpathians. The plots were established 40-50 years ago and have been repeatedly measured at 5 to 10-year intervals. The dataset includes 7,950 height measurements of spruce, 21,661 of fir and 5,794 of beech. As many as 9 regression models were derived for each species. Although the “goodness of fit” of all models showed that they were generally well suited for the data, the best results were obtained for silver fir. The coefficient of determination ranged from 0.946 to 0.948, RMSE (m was in the interval 1.94-1.97 and the bias (m was -0.031 to 0.063. Although slightly imprecise parameter estimation was established for spruce, the estimations of the regression parameters obtained for beech were quite less precise. The coefficient of determination for beech was 0.854-0.860, RMSE (m 2.67-2.72, and the bias (m ranged from -0.144 to -0.056. The majority of models using Korf’s formula produced slightly better estimations than Michailoff’s, and it proved immaterial which estimated parameter was fixed and which parameters

  12. National Inventory Report 2006 - Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-07-01

    The report presents an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in Norway from 1990 to 2004. Trends in total greenhouse gas emissions by UNFCCC's sources and gases are described for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}), hexafluoroethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}), sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and HFCs. Methodology used in the calculation of emissions from key sources in the Norwegian Emission Inventory are presented. Emissions are reported according to UNFCCC/IPCC common reporting format (CRF)

  13. National Inventory Report 2006 - Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The report presents an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in Norway from 1990 to 2004. Trends in total greenhouse gas emissions by UNFCCC's sources and gases are described for carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), methane (CH 4 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O), tetrafluoromethane (CF 4 ), hexafluoroethane (C 2 F 6 ), sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6 ) and HFCs. Methodology used in the calculation of emissions from key sources in the Norwegian Emission Inventory are presented. Emissions are reported according to UNFCCC/IPCC common reporting format (CRF)

  14. National Inventory Report 2005 Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-07-01

    The report presents an inventory of greenhouse gas emissions and sinks in Norway from 1990 to 2003. Trends in total greenhouse gas emissions by UNFCCC's sources and gases are described for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}), hexafluoroethane (C{sub 2}F{sub 6}), sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) and HFCs. Methodology used in the calculation of emissions from key sources in the Norwegian Emission Inventory are presented. Emissions are reported according to UNFCCC/IPCC common reporting format (CRF)

  15. Fire severity unaffected by spruce beetle outbreak in spruce-fir forests in southwestern Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, Robert A; Veblen, Thomas T; Harvey, Brian J; Hart, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, but few studies, particularly field studies, have addressed the effects of the severity of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) infestation on subsequent fire severity in subalpine Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forests. In Colorado, the annual area infested by spruce beetle outbreaks is rapidly rising, while MPB outbreaks are subsiding; therefore understanding this relationship is of growing importance. We collected extensive field data in subalpine forests in the eastern San Juan Mountains, southwestern Colorado, USA, to investigate whether a gray-stage (forests will alter fire severity, a result that has important implications for management and policy decisions.

  16. Spruce needles used as radioecological biotracers; Fichtennadeln als radiooekologische Bioindikatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, C.; Gruber, V.; Baumgartner, A. [BOKU - Univ. fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria). LLC-Labor Arsenal; Idinger, J. [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.; Fuerst, A. [BFW - Bundesforschungs- und Ausbildungszentrum fuer Wald, Naturgefahren und Landschaft, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Waldschutz, Pflanzenanalyse; Maringer, F.J. [BOKU - Univ. fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria). LLC-Labor Arsenal; BEV - Bundesamt fuer Eich- und Vermessungswesen, Wien (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    In a two years project spruce needle samples of the Austrian Bioindicator Grid were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in spruce needles of the last 25 years with the main focus on the radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl fallout 1986. More than 600 spruce needle samples at selected locations of the Bioindicator Grid were analysed for different natural and anthropogenic radionuclides: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 210}Pb, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 238}U. Additionally, soil samples were taken at selected sites to study the soil-to-plant transfer. This radioecological evaluation is an important part of an existing environmental surveillance programme in Upper Austria in order to gain basic information on the impact of environmental changes on the radioecological behaviour of spruce trees. (orig.)

  17. Animal vectors of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael E. Ostry; Thomas H. Nicholls; D.W. French

    1983-01-01

    Describes a study to determine the importance of animals in the spread of eastern dwarf mistletoe of black spruce. Radio telemetry, banding, and color-marking techniques were used to study vectors of this forest pathogen.

  18. Yellowheaded spruce sawfly--its ecology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven A. Katovich; Deborah G. McCullough; Robert A. Haack

    1995-01-01

    Presents the biology and ecology of the yellowheaded spruce sawfly, and provides survey techniques and management strategies. In addition, it provides information on identification, classification, host range, and the historical records of outbreaks in the Lake States.

  19. Mammography activity in Norway 1983 to 2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Braaten, Tonje; Njor, Sisse H

    2011-01-01

    In Norway, an organized screening mammography program, the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) started in four counties in 1996 and became nationwide in 2004. We collected data on pre-program screening activity, and in view of this activity we evaluated the potential impact...... of the program on breast cancer mortality in Norway....

  20. Alternative Education and Home Schooling in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Christian W.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the issue of balance between community rules and personal freedom as it relates to who should control the education of children in Norway. Reviews the historical development of alternative education in Norway, including the growth of private schools and home schooling. Comments on future educational needs and the provision of good…

  1. Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    The Statistical Yearbook of Norway 2012 contains statistics on Norway and main figures for the Nordic countries and other countries selected from international statistics. The international over-views are integrated with the other tables and figures. The selection of tables in this edition is mostly the same as in the 2011 edition. The yearbook's 480 tables and figures present the main trends in official statistics in most areas of society. The list of tables and figures and an index at the back of the book provide easy access to relevant information. In addition, source information and Internet addresses below the tables make the yearbook a good starting point for those who are looking for more detailed statistics. The statistics are based on data gathered in statistical surveys and from administrative data, which, in cooperation with other public institutions, have been made available for statistical purposes. Some tables have been prepared in their entirety by other public institutions. The statistics follow approved principles, standards and classifications that are in line with international recommendations and guidelines. Content: 00. General subjects; 01. Environment; 02. Population; 03. Health and social conditions; 04. Education; 05. Personal economy and housing conditions; 06. Labour market; 07. Recreational, cultural and sporting activities; 08. Prices and indices; 09. National Economy and external trade; 10. Industrial activities; 11. Financial markets; 12. Public finances; Geographical survey.(eb)

  2. Labeling Feral Spruce Budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Populations With Rubidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Wayne; Eveleigh, Eldon; Silk, Peter; Forbes, Glen

    2016-04-01

    Rubidium (Rb) is a trace element that occurs naturally in low concentrations and is easily absorbed by plants, making it a useful tool for labeling insect defoliators, such as spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens). Balsam fir trees (Abies balsamea (L.) Miller) injected with either 8 or 16 g per tree of rubidium chloride (RbCl) showed quick uptake and distribution throughout the crown, with no negative effects on tree shoot growth or spruce budworm survival and development. Adult spruce budworm that fed as larvae on trees injected with RbCl were clearly labeled, with significantly higher Rb concentrations than the background levels found in adults that fed as larvae on control trees. Rb concentrations in feral spruce budworm adults for both the 8 g (9 µg/g) and 16 g (25 µg/g) per tree treatments were at least five times lower than those in laboratory-reared adults on 1,000 µg/g RbCl diet (125 µg/g); survival, development, pupal weight, sex ratio, and mating status of spruce budworm were not adversely affected by Rb treatment. Egg masses laid by feral females that fed as larvae on Rb-labeled trees were also labeled with Rb. Injecting trees with RbCl is a viable technique for labeling feral spruce budworm populations to help distinguish local populations from immigrants to better evaluate the success of early intervention strategies such as mating disruption. © Crown copyright 2016.

  3. Photosynthetic system as a biological functional element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, E.A.; Zakhidova, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Kurbanov, S.S.; Nematov, Sh.K.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic apparatus of high plants and photosynthetic bacteria is essentially autonomic system in terms of genetics and structural -functional properties located in specific medium, a bio-membrane. Processes of light absorption and exciton migration in light harvesting antenna, separation and further transfer of charges in reaction centers have specific features, which may be used for application of these objects as key elements in construction of future biological functional elements. Progress in study and genetic modification of photosynthetic membranes achieved during the last decade opens great prospects in development biological functional elements and systems. The main characteristics of photosynthetic system for these purposes are: (i) energy conversion processes in the first light phase of the photosynthesis have very short periods, up to picoseconds, which indicates possibility of creation of ultrafast functional elements on their basis; (ii) characteristics sizes of photosynthetic units, 10-100 nm, and possibility to arrange regularly disposed elements in relevant membranes could be prospective point for creation of nano structures and on their basis relevant biologic functional elements; (iii) elements based on modified photosynthetic apparatus and bio-membranes might be efficiently created by methods of gene engineering and manipulation, that open huge opportunities for development of read biological functional systems. In the paper structural-functional properties and characteristics of high plants and purple photosynthetic bacteria, which may be useful for creation of future biological functional elements are considered. (author)

  4. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, Andrei Gennady; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Heim, Alexander; Zheng, Chengyang; Shortle, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  5. Climate warming shifts carbon allocation from stemwood to roots in calcium-depleted spruce forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenis, Andrei; Lawrence, Gregory; Buyantuev, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Increased greening of northern forests, measured by the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), has been presented as evidence that a warmer climate has increased both net primary productivity (NPP) and the carbon sink in boreal forests. However, higher production and greener canopies may accompany changes in carbon allocation that favor foliage or fine roots over less decomposable woody biomass. Furthermore, tree core data throughout mid- and northern latitudes have revealed a divergence problem (DP), a weakening in tree ring responses to warming over the past half century that is receiving increasing attention, but remains poorly understood. Often, the same sites exhibit trend inconsistency phenomenon (TIP), namely positive, or no trends in growing season NDVI where negative trends in tree ring indexes are observed. Here we studied growth of two Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in western Russia that exhibited both the DP and TIP but were subject to soil acidification and calcium depletion of differing timing and severity. Our results link the decline in radial growth starting in 1980 to a shift in carbon allocation from wood to roots driven by a combination of two factors: (a) soil acidification that depleted calcium and impaired root function and (b) earlier onset of the growing season that further taxed the root system. The latter change in phenology appears to act as a trigger at both sites to push trees into nutrient limitation as the demand for Ca increased with the longer growing season, thereby causing the shift in carbon allocation.

  6. Evaluation of Research in Engineering Science in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Brussel, Hendrik Van Brussel; Lindberg, Bengt; Cederwall, Klas

    This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway .......This report presents the conclusions of Panel 1: Construction engineering, Production and Operation. The Research Council of Norway (NFR) appointed three expert panels to evaluate Research in Engineering Science in Norway ....

  7. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  8. Separation, identification and quantification of photosynthetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty one photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls, carotenoids and degradation products) from the seaweeds, Codium dwarkense, (Chlorophyta), , Laurencia obtusa , (Rhodophyta) and , Lobophora variegata, (Phaeophyta), were separated in a single-step procedure by reversed phase high-performance liquid ...

  9. The joint influence of photoperiod and temperature during growth cessation and development of dormancy in white spruce (Picea glauca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jill A; El Kayal, Walid; Hart, Ashley T; Runcie, Daniel E; Arango-Velez, Adriana; Cooke, Janice E K

    2016-11-01

    Timely responses to environmental cues enable the synchronization of phenological life-history transitions essential for the health and survival of north-temperate and boreal tree species. While photoperiodic cues will remain persistent under climate change, temperature cues may vary, contributing to possible asynchrony in signals influencing developmental and physiological transitions essential to forest health. Understanding the relative contribution of photoperiod and temperature as determinants of the transition from active growth to dormancy is important for informing adaptive forest management decisions that consider future climates. Using a combination of photoperiod (long = 20 h or short = 8 h day lengths) and temperature (warm = 22 °C/16 °C and cool = 8 °C/4 °C day/night, respectively) treatments, we used microscopy, physiology and modeling to comprehensively examine hallmark traits of the growth-dormancy transition-including bud formation, growth cessation, cold hardiness and gas exchange-within two provenances of white spruce [Picea glauca (Moench) Voss] spanning a broad latitude in Alberta, Canada. Following exposure to experimental treatments, seedlings were transferred to favorable conditions, and the depth of dormancy was assessed by determining the timing and ability of spruce seedlings to resume growth. Short photoperiods promoted bud development and growth cessation, whereas longer photoperiods extended the growing season through the induction of lammas growth. In contrast, cool temperatures under both photoperiodic conditions delayed bud development. Photoperiod strongly predicted the development of cold hardiness, whereas temperature predicted photosynthetic rates associated with active growth. White spruce was capable of attaining endodormancy, but its release was environmentally determined. Dormancy depth varied substantially across experimental treatments suggesting that environmental cues experienced within one season could affect growth

  10. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  11. Integrated permanent plot and aerial monitoring for the spruce budworm decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    David A. MacLean

    2000-01-01

    Spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clem.) outbreaks cause severe mortality and growth loss of spruce and fir forest over ranch of eastern North America. The Spruce Budworm Decision Support System (DSS) links prediction and interpretation models to the ARC/1NFO GIS, under an ArcView graphical user interface. It helps forest managers predict...

  12. Release of Suppressed Red Spruce Using Canopy Gap Creation--Ecological Restoration in the Central Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.S. Rentch; W.M. Ford; Thomas Schuler; Jeff Palmer; C.A. Diggins

    2016-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens) and red spruce-northern hardwood mixed stands once covered as much as 300,000 ha in the Central Appalachians, but now comprise no more than 21,000 ha. Recently, interest in restoration of this forest type has increased because red spruce forests provide habitat for a number of rare animal species. Our study reports the...

  13. The current distribution, predictive modeling, and restoration potential of red spruce in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory Nowacki; Dan. Wendt

    2010-01-01

    The environmental relationships of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) were assessed in east-central West Virginia. Although many significant relationships existed, red spruce was most strongly associated with elevation, climate, and soil moisture factors. Specifically, red spruce was positively associated with elevation, number of frost days, mean...

  14. Radio-sensitivity of spruce population progeny in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, A.

    1976-01-01

    The radio-sensitivity of Picea abies (L.) Karst populations was investigated by comparing the effect of acute irradiation with different Co-60 rates on seed germination and the survival of the seedlings obtained from them. Spruce stands in the Rila, Pirin and Rhodopes, the Balkan, Vitosha and Ossogovo mountains have been studied at 1000 to 2000 m alt. into 200-300 m intervals. The seed material collected from them by individual trees, altitude belts and mountains has been irradiated with 200 krad, 500 krad, 1000 krad, 1500 krad and 7500 krad. The germination capacity of the seeds was calculated in technical germination, absolute germination, germination energy and seed dormancy, while the post-irradiation effect was established in accordance with the survival rate of the seedlings for one- and two-year periods in greenhouses on a sand substrate. Radio-sensitivity of every spruce population depended on its vitality and Vigour. The spruce population in the Rhodope Mountains exhibits highest radio-hardiness, followed by those in the Rila, Central Balkan, Pirin, Vitosha and Ossogovo mountains. Irradiation with 200 krad, and in certain cases with 500 krad, showed a stimulation effect on germination of spruce seeds and the survival rate of the seedlings. LD-50 for spruce seeds, taking into account one- and two-year-old seedlings, was within the 500 to 1000 krad range. (author)

  15. Warming and neighbor removal affect white spruce seedling growth differently above and below treeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Kyoko; Bret-Harte, M Syndonia

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to be pronounced towards higher latitudes and altitudes. Warming triggers treeline and vegetation shifts, which may aggravate interspecific competition and affect biodiversity. This research tested the effects of a warming climate, habitat type, and neighboring plant competition on the establishment and growth of white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) seedlings in a subarctic mountain region. P. glauca seedlings were planted in June 2010 under 4 different treatments (high/control temperatures, with/without competition) in 3 habitats (alpine ridge above treeline/tundra near treeline /forest below treeline habitats). After two growing seasons in 2011, growth, photosynthesis and foliar C and N data were obtained from a total of 156, one-and-a-half year old seedlings that had survived. Elevated temperatures increased growth and photosynthetic rates above and near treeline, but decreased them below treeline. Competition was increased by elevated temperatures in all habitat types. Our results suggest that increasing temperatures will have positive effects on the growth of P. glauca seedlings at the locations where P. glauca is expected to expand its habitat, but increasing temperatures may have negative effects on seedlings growing in mature forests. Due to interspecific competition, possibly belowground competition, the upslope expansion of treelines may not be as fast in the future as it was the last fifty years.

  16. The flux of carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide between the atmosphere and a spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent fluxes of carbonyl sulfide (COS and carbon disulfide (CS2 were measured over a spruce forest in Central Germany using the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA technique. A REA sampler was developed and validated using simultaneous measurements of CO2 fluxes by REA and by eddy correlation. REA measurements were conducted during six campaigns covering spring, summer, and fall between 1997 and 1999. Both uptake and emission of COS and CS2 by the forest were observed, with deposition occurring mainly during the sunlit period and emission mainly during the dark period. On the average, however, the forest acts as a sink for both gases. The average fluxes for COS and CS2 are  -93 ± 11.7 pmol m-2 s-1 and  -18 ± 7.6 pmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The fluxes of both gases appear to be correlated to photosynthetically active radiation and to the CO2 and chem{H_2O} fluxes, supporting the idea that the air-vegetation exchange of both gases is controlled by stomata. An uptake ratio COS/CO2 of 10 ± 1.7 pmol m mol-1 has been derived from the regression line for the correlation between the COS and CO2 fluxes. This uptake ratio, if representative for the global terrestrial net primary production, would correspond to a sink of 2.3 ± 0.5 Tg COS yr-1.

  17. Second year effects of clouds and ozone on red spruce seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, P.A.; Thornton, F.C.; McDuffie, C. Jr. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Muscle Shoals, AL (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Potted native and phyton-grown red spruce seedlings were exposed for a second growing season to ozone and/or acid deposition in open-top field chambers on Whitetop Mountain, VA (elevation 1,680 m). Chamber treatments were (1) exclusion of clouds and 50% reduction in ambient ozone (COE), (2) ozone with clouds excluded (CE), and (3) exposure to clouds and ozone, as control chambers (CO), and (4) open plots (AA). No differences were detected among treatments for biomass accumulation or for chlorophyll and carotenoid concentrations. Phyton seedlings in AA and CO treatments maintained high photosynthetic rates through October, whereas rates in CE and COE decreased, suggesting that dormancy and winter hardiness were delayed in AA and CO, possibly making seedlings susceptible to early frosts. Respiration of both seedling types was higher for AA and CO throughout most of the growing season, which could lead to depletion of carbohydrates, and eventually to a reduction in growth and vigor of the seedlings over time due to air pollution.

  18. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phenology is considered one of the most robust indicators of the biological impacts of global change. In temperate and boreal regions, long-term data show that rising temperatures are advancing spring onset (e.g. budburst and flowering) and delaying autumn senescence (e.g. leaf coloration and leaf fall) in a wide range of ecosystems. While warm and cold temperatures, day length and insolation, precipitation and water availability, and other factors, have all been shown to influence plant phenology, the future response of phenology to rising temperatures and elevated CO2 still remains highly uncertain because of the challenges associated with conducting realistic manipulative experiments to simulate future environmental conditions. At the SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) experiment in the north-central United States, experimental temperature (0 to +9° C above ambient) and CO2 (ambient and elevated) treatments are being applied to mature, and intact, Picea mariana-Sphagnum spp. bog communities in their native habitat through the use of ten large (approximately 12 m wide, 10 m high) open-topped enclosures. We are tracking vegetation green-up and senescence in these chambers, at both the individual and whole-community level, using repeat digital photography. Within each chamber, digital camera images are recorded every 30 minutes and uploaded to the PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) project web page, where they are displayed in near-real-time. Image processing is conducted nightly to extract quantitative measures of canopy color, which we characterize using Gcc, the green chromatic coordinate. Data from a camera mounted outside the chambers (since November 2014) indicate strong seasonal variation in Gcc for both evergreen shrubs and trees. Shrub Gcc rises steeply in May and June, and declines steeply in September and October. By comparison, tree Gcc rises gradually from March through June, and declines gradually from

  19. Canopy uptake of atmospheric N deposition at a conifer forest: part I -canopy N budget, photosynthetic efficiency and net ecosystem exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sievering, H.; Tomaszewski, T.; Torizzo, J.

    2007-01-01

    Global carbon cycle assessments of anthropogenic nitrogen (N) deposition influences on carbon sequestration often assume enhanced sequestration results. This assumption was evaluated at a Rocky Mountains spruce-fir forest. Forest canopy N uptake (CNU) of atmospheric N deposition was estimated by combining event wet and throughfall N fluxes with gradient measured HNO 3 and NH 3 as well as inferred (NO x and particulate N) dry fluxes. Approximately 80% of the growing-season 3 kg N/ha total deposition is retained in canopy foliage and branches. This CNU constitutes ∼1/3 of canopy growing season new N supply at this conifer forest site. Daytime net ecosystem exchange (NEE) significantly (P = 0.006) and negatively (CO 2 uptake) correlated with CNU. Multiple regression indicates ∼20% of daytime NEE may be attributed to CNU (P < 0.02); more than soil water content. A wet deposition N-amendment study (Tomaszewski and Sievering), at canopy spruce branches, increased their growing-season CNU by 40-50% above ambient. Fluorometry and gas exchange results show N-amended spruce branches had greater photosynthetic efficiency and higher carboxylation rates than control and untreated branches. N-amended branches had 25% less photoinhibition, with a 5-9% greater proportion of foliar-N-in-Rubisco. The combined results provide, partly, a mechanistic explanation for the NEE dependence on CNU

  20. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles ( coleoptera: scolytidae') in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holsten, E.H.; Werner, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of the study, the authors do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central Alaska.

  1. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Aurel Schöttler

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf ageing. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed.

  2. Fungal bio-treatment of spruce wood with Trametes versicolor for pitch control: influence on extractive contents, pulping process parameters, paper quality and effluent toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, Teris A; Kuster, Bram; Claassen, Frank W; Tienvieri, Taisto; Bertaud, Frédérique; Lenon, Gilles; Petit-Conil, Michel; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2007-01-01

    Lipophilic low molar-mass constituents in wood chips for the paper industry result in low quality pulp, pitch deposition, and effluent toxicity. New biotechnological solutions such as fungal pre-treatment of wood chips can reduce pitch problems. This laboratory-scale study focuses on the potential and limitations of a fungal bio-treatment of Norway spruce chips with the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor. Different fungal treatment conditions were compared. A 4-week fungal treatment reduced the concentration of resin acids and triglycerides by 40% and 100%, respectively, but neither lowered the energy requirements of the TMP process nor significantly affected the morphological fiber characteristics and the physical pulp properties. The pre-treatment led to slightly poorer optical properties. The Trametes versicolor fungal treatment contributed to a less toxic effluent and improved the biodegradability. A treatment of 2-3 weeks appears optimal.

  3. Photosynthetic traits of Sphagnum and feather moss species in undrained, drained and rewetted boreal spruce swamp forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kangas, L.; Maanavilja, L.; Hájek, Tomáš; Juurola, E.; Chimner, R. A.; Mehtätalo, L.; Tuittila, E. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2014), s. 381-396 ISSN 2045-7758 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : bryophyte * ecophysiology * peatland Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.320, year: 2014

  4. Impact of clear and cloudy sky conditions on the vertical distribution of photosynthetic CO2 uptake within a spruce canopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Ač, Alexander; Havránková, Kateřina; Holišová, Petra; Navrátil, M.; Zitová, Martina; Kozlová, Klára; Pokorný, Radek; Šprtová, Miroslava; Tomášková, Ivana; Špunda, Vladimír; Grace, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 1 (2012), s. 46-55 ISSN 0269-8463 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06068; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA AV ČR IAA600870701; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : afternoon depression of photosynthesis * daily course * diffuse/direct radiation * eddy covariance * light response curve * light use efficiency * light response curve * light use efficiency * net ecosystem production * photorespiration * stomatal conductance Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 4.861, year: 2012

  5. Conservation of element concentration in xylem sap of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the chemistry of xylem sap as a marker of red spruce metabolism and soil chemistry at three locations in northern New England. A Scholander pressure chamber was used to extract xylem sap from roots and branches cut from mature trees in early June and September. Root sap contained significantly greater concentrations of K, Ca, Mg, Mn, and A1 than branch...

  6. Physiological and environmental causes of freezing injury in red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; Donald H. DeHayes

    2000-01-01

    For many, concerns about the implications of "environmental change" conjure up scenarios of forest responses to global warming, enrichment of greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, and the northward migration of maladapted forests. From that perspective, the primary focus of this chapter, that is, causes of freezing injury to red spruce (

  7. Animal damage to young spruce and fir in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton M. Blum

    1977-01-01

    The loss of terminal buds on small balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.) and spruce (Picea spp.) trees because of nipping by mammals or birds has increased on the Penobscot Experimental Forest in recent years. The cut stem is smooth and slightly angled; there is no sign of tearing. Unnipped trees grew about 13 percent more than...

  8. Controls on moss evaporation in a boreal black spruce forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.M.P.D.; Arp, W.J.; Chapin, F.S.

    2004-01-01

    [1] Mosses are an important component of the boreal forest, but little is known about their contribution to ecosystem carbon, water, and energy exchange. We studied the role of mosses in boreal forest evapotranspiration by conducting two experiments in a black spruce forest in Fairbanks, Alaska.

  9. Putrescine: a marker of stress in red spruce trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesk Minocha; Walter C. Shortle; Gregory B. Lawrence; Mark B. David; Subhash C. Minocha

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) has been suggested to be an important stress factor in forest decline due to its mobilization in soil following atmospheric deposition of acidic pollutants. A major goal of our research is to develop physiological and biochemical markers of stress in trees using cell cultures and whole plants. Needles of red spruce (Picea rubens)...

  10. FT–Raman investigation of bleaching of spruce thermomechanical pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.P. Agarwal; L.L. Landucci

    2004-01-01

    Spruce thermomechanical pulp was bleached initially by alkaline hydrogen peroxide and then by sodium dithionite and sodium borohydride. Near-infrared Fourier-transform–Raman spectroscopy revealed that spectral differences were due primarily to coniferaldehyde and p-quinone structures in lignin, new direct evidence that bleaching removes p-quinone structures. In...

  11. Fungistatic efficiency of phenolic compounds in spruce (Picea abies L. Karst. ) and influence of SO[sub 2]. Fungistatische Wirksamkeit phenolischer Inhaltsstoffe der Fichte Picea abies (L. ) Karst. und Einfluss von SO[sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, U. (TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)); Tesche, M. (TU Dresden, Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Forstzoologie, Tharandt (Germany)); Heller, W. (GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemische Pflanzenpathologie); Sandermann, H. (GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemische Pflanzenpathologie)

    1993-08-01

    The paper deals with fungistatic phenols in Norway spruce (Picea abies). Phenolic substances were isolated from several tissues and chromatographed by TLC. Detected by bioassay using Cladosporium cucumerinum, the most fungistatic compound was isolated and identified by UV-, mass- and NMT-spectra as the stilbenglucoside isorhapontin. The highest amounts of isorhapontin were found in a 15-year-old spruce in the bark of root (1.3%) and stem (0.4%), and also in fine roots (0.3%). Sapwood contained between 0.001 and 0.01% of this stilbene (all values related to green weight). The brown-rot fungi Phaeolus schweinitzii and Fomitopsis pinicola showed a depression of growth related to the concentration of isorhapontin on malt agar. Growth reduction of 50% was reached at a concentration of 1.25 mM (F. pinicola) and 3 mM (P. schweinitzii). The white-rot fungi Trametes versicolor, Heterobasidion annosum, and Armillaria ostoyae were not inhibited. First investigation results 6 months after long-term SO[sub 2]-treatment (0.28-0.34 ppm) of cloned spruces showed a reduction of fungistatic stilbenes in fine roots and bark compared with untreated controls (indirect effect). (orig.)

  12. Language Policy and Corporate Law in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper explores the relationship between national language policies and corporate law in Norwegian business. By adopting a legal perspective on the national language policy of Norway as it has been stipulated by the Norwegian Ministry of Church and Culture (2008) and The Language Council...... of Norway (2005) the paper investigates how the 500 largest companies in Norway comply with the language requirement of the Norwegian Accounting Act for the financial year of 2015. The results show that 44.9 % of the companies presented their financial statements in one or more foreign language in addition...... to the Norwegian language version, 36.2 % of the companies presented their financial statements in Norwegian only, while 18.9 % of the companies had been granted dispensation from the Norwegian Directorate of Taxes to deviate from the language requirement of the Accounting Act and presented their financial...

  13. BOREAS TE-09 Photosynthetic Capacity and Foliage Nitrogen Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains TE-09 data on the response of photosynthetic capacity to foliage nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity in the canopies of Norther Study Area...

  14. BOREAS TE-09 Photosynthetic Capacity and Foliage Nitrogen Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Contains TE-09 data on the response of photosynthetic capacity to foliage nitrogen concentration and photosynthetic capacity in the canopies of Norther...

  15. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these

  16. Growth, Photosynthetic Efficiency, Rate of Transpiration, Lodging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth, Photosynthetic Efficiency, Rate of Transpiration, Lodging, and Grain Yield of Tef ( Eragrostis Tef (Zucc) Trotter ) as Influenced by Stage and Rate of Paclobutrazol ... Paclobutrazol treatment had reduced plant height and total leaf area there by reduced excessive vegetative growth and lodging percentage.

  17. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in freshwater phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groeger, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    Photosynthetic carbon metabolism of natural assemblages of freshwater phytoplankton was measured by following the flow of inorganic 14 C into the photosynthetic end products polysaccharide protein, lipid, and soluble metabolites. Data were collected from a wide range of physical, chemical, and trophic conditions in six southern United States reservoirs, with the primary environmental variables of interest being light intensity and nutrient supply. Polysaccharide and protein were consistently the primary products of photosynthetic carbon metabolism, comprising an average of 70% of the total carbon fixation over a wide range of light intensities. Polysaccharide was quantitatively more important at higher light intensities, and protein at lower light intensities, as light intensity varied both with depth within the water column and over diurnal cycles. Polysaccharide synthesis was more variable over the diurnal period than was protein synthesis. Phytoplankton in the downlake epilimnion of Normandy Lake, a central Tennessee reservoir, responded to summer nitrogen (N) deficiency by increasing relative rates of lipid synthesis from 10-15% to 20-25% of the total photosynthetic carbon fixation. Phytoplankton in more nitrogen-sufficient areas of the reservoir maintained lower rates of lipid synthesis throughout the summer. These results document the occurrence in nature of a relationship between N-deficiency and increased lipid synthesis previously observed only in laboratory algal culture studies

  18. Difference in photosynthetic performance among three peach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of low photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) on greenhouse grown peach trees ('Qingfeng': Prunus persica L. Batsch, 'NJN76': Prunus persica L. Batsch and 'Maixiang': P. persica var. nectarine) were investigated. Difference in photosynthesis rate (Pn) and stoma morphology among cultivars were studied.

  19. Photosynthetic differences between Microcystis aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1991 Oscillatoria simplicissima replaced Microcystis aeruginosa in the Vaal River, South Africa. This study explored the reason for this succession by looking at the photosynthetic performance of these two cyanoprokaryotes at different temperatures, light intensities and N:P ratios. Microcystis aeruginosa showed higher ...

  20. American Studies in Norway: Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole O. Moen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Norwegian “studies” of America started really more than a thousand years ago, when Leif Ericsson landed in Vinland, his name for that part of New Foundland where his party made quarters around the year A.D. 1000. However, it was not until 1825 that modern mass emigration from Norway to America started in earnest, when a small sailing vessel, the sloop Restaurationen, left the little village of Tysvær on the west coast of Norway, near Stavanger, for New York, carrying a load of 52 Quaker emigr...

  1. Norway: the traps of the petroleum wealth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastien, D.

    2006-01-01

    Thanks to petroleum, the Norwegian population is the richness in the world. The petroleum profits have been always carefully managed and stored in a special fund. However, this richness has now a disastrous impact on the Norwegian society which is progressively falling asleep in its comfort while the economy shows signs of overheating. Oil production has started its decline and will accelerate by 2010. The strategy of Norway is now to massively invest in gas exportation and to saturate the gas pipelines towards Europe. In the future Norway has planned to export LNG to the US and Spain. (J.S.)

  2. Lessons from native spruce forests in Alaska: managing Sitka spruce plantations worldwide to benefit biodiversity and ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert L. Deal; Paul Hennon; Richard O' Hanlon; David D' Amore

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest worldwide in managing forests to maintain or improve biodiversity, enhance ecosystem services and assure long-term sustainability of forest resources. An important goal of forest management is to increase stand diversity, provide wildlife habitat and improve forest species diversity. We synthesize results from natural spruce forests in...

  3. Performance of the Forest Vegetation Simulator in managed white spruce plantations influenced by eastern spruce budworm in northern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Russell; Anthony W. D' Amato; Michael A. Albers; Christopher W. Woodall; Klaus J. Puettmann; Michael R. Saunders; Curtis L. VanderSchaaf

    2015-01-01

    Silvicultural strategies such as thinning may minimize productivity losses from a variety of forest disturbances, including forest insects. This study analyzed the 10-year postthinning response of stands and individual trees in thinned white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench] Voss) plantations in northern Minnesota, USA, with light to moderate defoliation...

  4. Imaging of Norway spruce early somatic embryos with the ESEM, Cryo-SEM and laser scanning microscope

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neděla, Vilém; Hřib, Jiří; Havel, L.; Hudec, Jiří; Runštuk, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, May 2016 (2016), s. 67-71 ISSN 0968-4328 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22777S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ESEM * Cryo-SEM * bright field/dark field microscopy * extracellular matrix * Picea abies * somatic embryogenesis Subject RIV: JA - Electron ics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.980, year: 2016

  5. Effects of wood chip ash fertilization on soil chemistry in a Norway spruce plantation on a nutrient-poor soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Morten; Hansen, Mette; Pedersen, Lars Bo

    2014-01-01

    . This study shows that, regardless of ash formulation, preparation or dose, application of wood ash to forest soil has a liming effect in the O-horizon manifested as an increase in CECe, BS and pH. This effect was not seen in the mineral soil within the time frame of this study. At the same time, an increase...... application dose increases the liming effect....

  6. Analysis of Coniferous Forest Damage: Effects of Trichloroacetic Acid, Sulphur, Fluorine and Chlorine on Needle Loss of Norway Spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufal, David; Matucha, P.; Uhlířová, H.; Lomský, B.; Forczek, Sándor; Matucha, Miroslav

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 1 (2003), s. 89-102 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/99/1465; GA MŠk OC 274.001 Grant - others:COST(XE) Action 274 TARSKI Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : forest decline * polyfactorial problem * monitoring * stress factors * dose/response-relationship Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  7. Belowground ectomycorrhizal communities in three Norway spruce stands with different degrees of decline in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cudlín, Pavel; Peter, M.; Ayer, F.; Egli, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2008), s. 157-169 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC E38.001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Ectomycorrhizal community * Forest decline * Inoculum potential * Forest regeneration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.205, year: 2008

  8. Estimating the absorptive root area in Norway spruce by using the common direct and indirect earth impedance methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, J.; Cudlín, Pavel; Gebauer, R.; Borja, I.; Martinková, M.; Staněk, Z.; Koller, J.; Neruda, J.; Nadezhdina, N.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 372, 1-2 (2013), s. 401-415 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk OC10023 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Active absorptive fine root area index * Fine root surface * Modified earth impedance * Picea abies * Root research methods Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.235, year: 2013

  9. Diurnal regulation of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity and its content in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrstka, M.; Urban, Otmar; Petrů, E.; Babák, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2007), s. 334-339 ISSN 0300-3604 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/06/0930 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : CA1P * daily inhibitors * midday depression * Picea Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 0.976, year: 2007

  10. Growth of Norway spruce seedlings after transplanting into silty soil amended with biochar: A bioassay in a growth chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Heiskanen; P. Tammeorg; R. K. Dumroese

    2013-01-01

    Biochar (BC), the carbon-rich by-product resulting from pyrolysis of biomass, is used for bioenergy and increasingly as a soil additive for carbon sequestration and soil improvement. However, information about the effects of BC on forest productivity and reforestation success, especially on boreal and temperate forest soils, is scant. We examined the effects of two BC...

  11. Composition of Norway spruce litter and foliage in atmospherically acidified and nitrogen-saturated Bohemian Forest stands, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopáček, Jiří; Cudlín, Pavel; Svoboda, M.; Chmelíková, Ewa; Kaňa, Jiří; Picek, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2010), s. 413-426 ISSN 1239-6095 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/07/1200; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS600170504 Grant - others:EHS/NO(CZ) CZ-0051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : litter * acidification * nitrogen-saturation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.296, year: 2010

  12. The cultivable endophytic community of Norway spruce ectomycorrhizas from microhabitats lacking ericaceous hosts is dominated by ericoid mycorrhizal Meliniomyces variabilis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Mrnka, Libor; Lukešová, Tereza; Bruzone, M. C.; Kohout, Petr; Fehrer, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2013), s. 281-292 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P340 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : ectomycorrhiza * endophytes * Meliniomyces variabilis Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2013

  13. Soil CO2 efflux in young Norway spruce stands with different silviculture practices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosík, J.; Fabiánek, Tomáš; Marková, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 6 (2013), s. 1845-1851 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.4.31.0056 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : seasonal changes in soil respiration * growing season * thinning Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy

  14. Analysis of Coniferous Forest Damage: Effects of Trichloroacetic Acid, Sulphur, Fluorine and Chlorine on Needle Loss of Norway Spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coufal, D.; Matucha, Miroslav; Uhlířová, H.; Lomský, B.; Forczek, Sándor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 13, - (2003), s. 89-102 ISSN 1210-0552 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/02/0874 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : Forest decline * polyfactorial problem * dose/response relationship Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  15. Silver fir and Douglas fir are more tolerant to extreme droughts than Norway spruce in south-western Germany

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vitali, V.; Büntgen, Ulf; Bauhus, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 12 (2017), s. 5108-5119 ISSN 1354-1013 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : temperate forest trees * picea-abies karst. * climate-change * water relations * vosges mountains * growth-patterns * species stands * scots pine * alba * productivity * Abies alba * Central Europe * climate change * dendroecology * drought tolerance * forest management * Picea abies * Pseudotsuga menziesii Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 8.502, year: 2016

  16. Polyamine profiles and biosynthesis in somatic embryo development and comparison of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos of Norway spruce

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemperlová, Lenka; Fischerová, Lucie; Cvikrová, Milena; Malá, J.; Vondráková, Zuzana; Martincová, Olga; Vágner, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2009), s. 1287-1298 ISSN 0829-318X R&D Projects: GA MZe QH82303 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : ADC * ODC * Picea abies Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 2.292, year: 2009

  17. Incidence of root and butt rot in consecutive rotations, with emphasis on Heterobasidion annosum in Norway spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennberg, J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp (Sweden). Southern Swedish Forest Research Centre

    1999-06-01

    The incidence of root and butt rot in consecutive rotations was evaluated in five separate studies. The susceptibility to infections by Heterobasidion annosum was examined in a 28-year-old tree species experiment in northern Jutland, Denmark, established after a heavily infected mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) stand. Pseudotsuga menziesii and Abies nobilis showed greatest mortality due to H. annosum within five years of planting. The highest incidences of butt rot at first thinning, mainly caused by H. annosum of the P-group, were recorded in A. nobilis, Larix leptolepis and Picea sitchensis, with 44 %, 43 % and 36 % of the thinned trees infected respectively. Abies alba and A. nordmanniana were almost free from infections. The incidence of H. annosum was examined in three young hybrid larch (Larix x eurolepis) plantations in southern Sweden established after heavily infected Picea abies stands. The incidence of H. annosum was 7 %, 33 %, and 70 % respectively, in the 2-, 3-, and 5-year-old plantations. Transfer of H. annosum from infected old P. abies stumps to hybrid larch occurs early after planting. The incidence of butt rot in two consecutive rotations in 28 permanent sample plots of P. abies at four different sites in Denmark and at six plots in southwestern Sweden was evaluated. No correlation between the incidence of butt rot at final felling of the previous rotation of P. abies and the incidence of butt rot at first thinning of the subsequent rotation of P. abies was found. In two studies the effects of clear felling operations on stump root damage to P. abies were examined. Numerous cases of damage on stumps and roots were found. However, few cases of damage get infected by spores of H. annosum, and treatment of clear felled P. abies stumps may be a way of reducing the possible infection source transferring the infection of H. annosum to the subsequent rotation 173 refs, 1 fig

  18. Induced changes in phenolic acids and stilbenes in embryogenic cell cultures of Norway spruce by culture filtrate of Ascocalyx abietina

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvikrová, Milena; Malá, J.; Hrubcová, Marie; Eder, Josef; Foretová, Soňa

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 2 (2008), s. 57-62 ISSN 1861-3829 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/0999 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : astringin * isorhapontin * Picea abies Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 0.566, year: 2008 www.jpdp-online.com/QUlEPTYwMjI0NSZNSUQ9NTE4MDImVElYPTAmQVJPT1Q9NjUwMjMmVEVNUF9NQUlOPUpQRFBfUG9ydHJhaXQuaHRt.html?UID=466CB39FC0B29D76D720FE29DE06FB0322678558FE1AD824

  19. Robust carbohydrate dynamics based on sucrose resynthesis in developing Norway spruce somatic embryos at variable sugar supply

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubeš, Martin; Drážná, N.; Konrádová, H.; Lipavská, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2014), s. 45-57 ISSN 1054-5476 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Sucrose * Raffinose family oligosaccharides * Picea abies Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.981, year: 2014

  20. Estimation of tree biomass of Norway spruce forest in the Plešné Lake catchment, the Bohemian Forest

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, M.; Matějka, K.; Kopáček, Jiří; Žaloudík, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl. 20 (2006), S523-S532 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/03/1583 Grant - others:MA(CZ) QG50105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : Picea abies * aerial photos Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.213, year: 2006

  1. Differences in top-soil features between beech-mixture and Norway spruce forests of the Šumava Mts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějka, K.; Starý, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 12 (2009), s. 540-555 ISSN 1212-4834 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : ash content * Bohemia Forest * element content (P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Al) Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  2. Allometric relationships for the estimation of dry mass of aboveground organs in young highland Norway spruce stand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marková, I.; Pokorný, Radek

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2011), s. 217-223 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/70/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : allometry * biomass expansions factors * biomass * Picea abies Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  3. Temporal changes in the climate sensitivity of Norway spruce andEuropean beech along an elevation gradient in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Tomáš; Čermák, P.; Trnka, Miroslav; Žid, T.; Rybníček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 239 (2017), s. 24-33 ISSN 0168-1923 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA ČR GA13-04291S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) EHP-CZ02-0V-1-066-01-2014 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : czech republic * drought * fagus sylvatica * picea abies * temperature * tree-ring width chronology Subject RIV: GK - Forestry OBOR OECD: Forestry Impact factor: 3.887, year: 2016

  4. The impact of Norway spruce planting on herb vegetation in the mountain beech forests on two bedrock types

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Máliš, František; Ujházy, K.; Vodálová, A.; Barka, I.; Čaboun, V.; Sitková, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 131, č. 5 (2012), s. 1551-1569 ISSN 1612-4669 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : boreal forests * Bavarian Alps * temperate forests * soil * biodiversity * nitrogen mineralizaton Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.959, year: 2012

  5. Climate sensitivity of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) under different CO2 concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aysan Badraghi, Naghimeg; Pokorný, Radek; Novosadová, Kateřina; Pietras, Justyna; Marek, Michal V.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 1 (2017), s. 43-56 ISSN 1736-8723 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : ambient CO2 * elevated CO2 * wood formation * radial increment * carbon relations * conifers Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  6. Comparison of N and C dynamics in two Norway spruce stands using a process oriented simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersten, H.; Beier, C.

    1998-01-01

    . Differences in daily flow rates and pathways of N and C were examined and budget components were simulated over a six year period. Simulations showed that the different stands had different specific rates for growth, allocation, litter fall and N uptake resulting in higher N uptake in the younger trees...... whereas growth was more similar. The soil carbon balance was positive and soil CIN ratio increased for the young stand. For the old stand the soil carbon balance was negative and the C/N ratio decreased. The soil mineral N levels were much lower in the younger stand which was explained by a higher plant...

  7. Effective Concentration of Elements in Root Zone of Norway Spruce Stand 16 Years After Fertilization Probed with DGT

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakl, M.; Jaklová Dytrtová, Jana; Kuneš, I.; Baláš, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 226, č. 10 (2015), 339/1-339/8 ISSN 0049-6979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-21409P Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : amendment * forest soil * disturbed stand * hazardous elements * DGT * effective concentration * root zone Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 1.551, year: 2015

  8. Effects of long-term temperature and nutrient manipulation on Norway spruce fine roots and mycelia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leppälammi-Kujansuu, J.; Ostonen, I.; Strömgren, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims and methods The effects of changing climate on ectomycorrhizal (EcM) fine roots were studied in northern Sweden by manipulating soil temperature for 14 years and/or by fertilizing for 22 years. Fine root biomass, necromass, EcM root tip biomass, morphology and number as well as mycelia...... production were determined from soil cores and mesh bags. Results and conclusions The fine root biomass and necromass were highest in the fertilized plots, following similar trends in the above-ground biomass, whereas the EcM root tip biomass per basal area decreased by 22 % in the fertilized plots compared...... to the control. Warming increased the fine root biomass, live/dead-ratio and the number of EcM root tips in the mineral soil and tended to increase the production of EcM mycelia. Greater fine root biomass meant more EcM root tips, although the tip frequency was not affected by fertilization or warming...

  9. Amounts of carbon mineralised and leached as DOC during decomposition of Norway spruce needles and fine roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansson, K.; Berggren Kleja, D.; Kalbitz, K.; Larsson, H.

    2010-01-01

    Changes in climate or forest management practices leading to increased litter production will most likely cause increased leaching rates of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from the O horizon. The rhizosphere is often assumed to have a large carbon flux associated with root turnover and exudation.

  10. Response of green reflectance continuum removal index to the xanthophyll de-epoxidation cycle in Norway spruce needles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováč, Daniel; Malenovský, Z.; Urban, O.; Špunda, Vladimír; Kalina, J.; Ač, Alexander; Kaplan, Věroslav; Hanuš, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 7 (2013), s. 1-11 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LD12042; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : chlorophyll to carotenoid ratio * continuum removal * excessive irradiance * excessive irradiance * spectral index * xanthophyll cycle pigments Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.794, year: 2013

  11. Quantitative remote sensing of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.): spectroscopy from needles to crowns to canopies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malenovsky, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Mountain ecosystems represent nearly one fourth of the Earth's land surface, and provide (ecosystem) services to a significant part of the world's human population. As was noted in the 1992 United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in

  12. Introducing Intensively Managed Spruce Plantations in Swedish Forest Landscapes will Impair Biodiversity Decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Gustafsson

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to pressure to raise forest productivity in Sweden, there are proposals to apply more intensive forestry methods, but they could have potentially large effects on biodiversity. Here we report a compilation and evaluation of the extent and significance of such effects. We evaluated potential effects on biodiversity by introducing intensively fertilized Norway spruce plantations as a management option in Swedish forests with low conservation values on insects, vascular plants, lichens, bryophytes, and red-listed species. Due to a lack of specific studies addressing this question, we based the evaluation on a combination of available and appropriate empiric and anecdotic knowledge; literature data, and expert judgments largely available in species data bases. Our evaluations suggest that such forests will only harbor species that are common and widespread in conventionally managed stands and that species of conservation interest will be lacking, due to the low heterogeneity and light intensity of even-aged monocultures with dense canopies, short rotation times and low availability of coarse woody debris. Effects at the landscape scale are more difficult to evaluate, but will be dependent on the area utilized and the conservation value of sites used. We conclude that negative effects on biodiversity can be reduced if: (1 only land with the lowest conservational value is utilized; (2 plantations are spatially arranged to minimize fragmentation of the landscape; (3 the quality and quantity of key structural elements (e.g., coarse woody debris, old living trees and snags are maintained at the landscape level; and (4 management intensity is relaxed on other land. For effective implementation of these measures, legislative frameworks and policy instruments need to be adjusted and new models for planning and monitoring need to be developed.

  13. Windstorms as mediator of soil nematode community changes: Evidence from European spruce forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renčo M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nematode communities in a Norway spruce forest in High Tatra National Park, Slovakia were monitored for the period of several years (2006 and 2013. Unfortunately, in May 2014 natural windstorm damaged the forest. This disastrous event, together with preliminary obtained results allowed us to compare the direct impact of windstorm damage of forest habitat on soil nematode assemblages. The forest destruction by windstorm had a significant effect on the total nematode abundance, the abundance of omnivores and herbivores, as well as the nematode species diversity. The most dominant species, representing 55 % of the total nematode fauna, in the plot studied were Acrobeloides nanus followed by Malenchus exiguus, Filenchus vulgaris, Plectus communis, Plectus parvus and Tylencholaimus mirabilis. The abundance of bacterivorous signifi cantly increased after the windstorm, meanwhile the abundance of omnivores, fungivores, and herbivores ectoparasites and epidermal/root hair feeders showed an opposite trend. Of the evaluative indicators, Shannon species diversity (H’spp, maturity index (MI, maturity index 2-5 (MI2-5, sigma maturity index (ΣMI, enrichment index (EI and structure index (SI decreased significantly after windstorm. The EI and SI indexes characterized soil ecosystems before windstorm (2006 - 2013 as maturing with low or moderate disturbance, but soil ecosystems shortly after the windstorm (2014 were degraded and nutrient depleted. This also corresponded with graphical display of metabolic footprints characteristics of soil food web. Overall, the nematode communities differed significantly before and after forest damage. These results suggest the role of nematode communities as indicators of environment condition quality or its disruption.

  14. Tipping a SPRUCE tree over - how extreme heat and desiccation may push southern boreal species beyond their capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, J.; Childs, J.; Ward, E. J.; Wullschleger, S.; Hanson, P. J.

    2016-12-01

    Since August 2015, the Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) climate change experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/) in Northern Minnesota, USA, has exposed 13 m diameter plots of an ombrotrophic Picea mariana - Ericaceous shrub - Sphagnum bog ecosystem to long-term temperature (T) (0 to +9 °C) and since June 2016, elevated CO2 treatments (ambient or + 500 ppm). In addition to their direct impacts, the T and CO2 treatments have dramatically impacted soil water availability, vapor pressure deficit and # days dew point is reached. We examined plant water relations of Picea mariana (black spruce), Larix laricina (tamarack), and several Ericaceous shrubs including seasonal patterns of water potential (ψ), in addition to sap flow in the in trees. Granier-style thermal dissipation sensors were calibrated in situ (outside plots) by cutting instrumented trees and measuring their actual water uptake. Maximum summer T in N Minnesota reaches 35 °C, and optimal photosynthetic activity for P. mariana at the site peaks between 35-38°C. Treatments have resulted in air T reaching 45°C in the warmest plots resulting in substantial physiological stress. Pretreatment sap flow typically began by late May and was fairly constant over the season until declining in mid-September and ceasing as temperatures dropped below zero. Once the T treatments began, sap flow began earlier in the spring and continued later in the fall indicating an expanded physiological season that can result in plant vulnerability to extreme cold events. Indeed, foliar damage was evident in warmer plots following a spring freeze event in 2016. In addition, the drying heat has resulted in additional foliar damage, indicated by large reductions in predawn water potentials (even in the spring), quicker drying following rain events, and water stress reached earlier in the day. Midday mean summer ψ was -1.5 MPa for P. mariana foliage, higher than the co-occurring L. laricina

  15. Mid-Norway power study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-06-15

    This report documents the results of a four months study by Shell in relation to the request from the Petroleum and Energy Minister to evaluate the viability of developing a gas fired power plant in the Nyhamna area. The power plant sizes studied are 50, 200, 430 and 860 MW nominal output, both with and without a Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) facilities and with an earliest start up of 2014. The power supply and demand balance is evaluated to investigate the case for building a power plant depending on demand development in the mid-Norway region. The report concludes that there is a deficit in the region which will probably be addressed through a combination of planned measures, including the planned 400 MW capacity transmission line (Oerskog to Fardal) and temporary power plants at Tjebegodden and Nyhamna together with an assumed new 2 TWh/yr capacity small hydro and wind power projects. However, a commercial sized power plant (400 MW or larger) could provide a more robust means of supply as well as provide the potential for further demand growth. The study has evaluated technical and commercial concepts for the different sized power plants with considerable experience drawn from Shell's earlier involvement in the Halten CO{sub 2} project. Order of magnitude cost estimates have been developed based on the current market outlook, for the power plant cases and the associated carbon capture facilities, including CO{sub 2} transportation pipeline and disposal wells. The carbon capture design has been based on state of the art amine technology. An economic model was developed specifically for this study for a power plant using a range of assumptions for gas, electricity and carbon credit prices. The model includes optimisation of income based on positive 'sparkspread'. The conclusion from the evaluations shows that there is a substantial gap between the likely economics and the economics that would be required for a commercial company to make an

  16. Effects of artificial defoliation of pines on the structure and physiology of the soil fungal community of a mixed pine-spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, Ken; Raleigh, Christopher; New, Michael H.; Henson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Loss of photosynthetic area can affect soil microbial communities by altering the availability of fixed carbon. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Biolog filamentous-fungus plates to determine the effects of artificial defoliation of pines in a mixed pine-spruce forest on the composition of the fungal community in a forest soil. As measured by DGGE, two fungal species were affected significantly by the defoliation of pines (P soil fungus increased. The decrease in the amount of Cenococcum organisms may have occurred because of the formation of extensive hyphal networks by species of this genus, which require more of the carbon fixed by their host, or because this fungus is dependent upon quantitative differences in spruce root exudates. The defoliation of pines did not affect the overall composition of the soil fungal community or fungal-species richness (number of species per core). Biolog filamentous-fungus plate assays indicated a significant increase (P soil fungi and the rate at which these substrates were used, which could indicate an increase in fungal-species richness. Thus, either small changes in the soil fungal community give rise to significant increases in physiological capabilities or PCR bias limits the reliability of the DGGE results. These data indicate that combined genetic and physiological assessments of the soil fungal community are needed to accurately assess the effect of disturbance on indigenous microbial systems.

  17. Effects of artificial defoliation of pines on the structure and physiology of the soil fungal community of a mixed pine-spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullings, Ken; Raleigh, Christopher; New, Michael H.; Henson, Joan

    2005-01-01

    Loss of photosynthetic area can affect soil microbial communities by altering the availability of fixed carbon. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and Biolog filamentous-fungus plates to determine the effects of artificial defoliation of pines in a mixed pine-spruce forest on the composition of the fungal community in a forest soil. As measured by DGGE, two fungal species were affected significantly by the defoliation of pines (P genus Cenococcum decreased significantly, while the frequency of organisms of an unidentified soil fungus increased. The decrease in the amount of Cenococcum organisms may have occurred because of the formation of extensive hyphal networks by species of this genus, which require more of the carbon fixed by their host, or because this fungus is dependent upon quantitative differences in spruce root exudates. The defoliation of pines did not affect the overall composition of the soil fungal community or fungal-species richness (number of species per core). Biolog filamentous-fungus plate assays indicated a significant increase (P indigenous microbial systems.

  18. Estimating Volume, Biomass, and Carbon in Hedmark County, Norway Using a Profiling LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ross; Naesset, Erik; Gobakken, T.; Gregoire, T.; Stahl, G.

    2009-01-01

    A profiling airborne LiDAR is used to estimate the forest resources of Hedmark County, Norway, a 27390 square kilometer area in southeastern Norway on the Swedish border. One hundred five profiling flight lines totaling 9166 km were flown over the entire county; east-west. The lines, spaced 3 km apart north-south, duplicate the systematic pattern of the Norwegian Forest Inventory (NFI) ground plot arrangement, enabling the profiler to transit 1290 circular, 250 square meter fixed-area NFI ground plots while collecting the systematic LiDAR sample. Seven hundred sixty-three plots of the 1290 plots were overflown within 17.8 m of plot center. Laser measurements of canopy height and crown density are extracted along fixed-length, 17.8 m segments closest to the center of the ground plot and related to basal area, timber volume and above- and belowground dry biomass. Linear, nonstratified equations that estimate ground-measured total aboveground dry biomass report an R(sup 2) = 0.63, with an regression RMSE = 35.2 t/ha. Nonstratified model results for the other biomass components, volume, and basal area are similar, with R(sup 2) values for all models ranging from 0.58 (belowground biomass, RMSE = 8.6 t/ha) to 0.63. Consistently, the most useful single profiling LiDAR variable is quadratic mean canopy height, h (sup bar)(sub qa). Two-variable models typically include h (sup bar)(sub qa) or mean canopy height, h(sup bar)(sub a), with a canopy density or a canopy height standard deviation measure. Stratification by productivity class did not improve the nonstratified models, nor did stratification by pine/spruce/hardwood. County-wide profiling LiDAR estimates are reported, by land cover type, and compared to NFI estimates.

  19. Chinese in Norway- Motivations of transnational Chinese students to study abroad in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Yujing

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the thesis is to examine how and why Chinese students decide to study in Norway. By exploring the decision making process of Chinese students, it sheds light on which aspects of Norway s educational institutions attract international students and which parts deter them. It also examines the levels of self-determination of transnational Chinese students motivations, and the relationship between this level and their academic performance.

  20. INOPS Survey data report for Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Holt, Steffen

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Norway. The statistics relies on data collected in the period from April 2015 to October 2015 through an online...

  1. Sunbed use and cutaneous melanoma in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moan, Johan E; Baturaite, Zivile; Grigalavicius, Mantas; Juzeniene, Asta

    2013-12-01

    Incidence rates of cutaneous melanoma (CM) in light skinned people in Norway are among the highest in the world. Sunbed use has increased in Norway since 1980. We will try to elucidate whether there is any correlation between the increase in sunbed use and the CM incidence rates, whether the increase in CM risk is similar for all age groups, and whether the possible difference between young and old persons can inform future healthcare strategies. The frequency of sunbed use by different age groups in the time period 1980-2011 and incidence rates (1980-2009) of CM at different age groups in Norway were studied. Time in minutes per day spent in front of screen of computers or TVs for boys and girls was also analysed. The number of sunbed sessions per year in Norway increased throughout the entire period. The number of men and women diagnosed with CM per year, all ages combined, also increased. Sunbed use increased at a similar rate for three age groups (0-19, 20-50, and >50 years old), while the age-adjusted CM incidence rate increased only for the oldest group. Time spent in front of the screen of computers or TVs increased from 1985 to 2005 and is still increasing. CM incidence is decreasing while sunbed use is increasing in younger age groups. The present data indicate that more work needs to be done before one can know whether the overall health effects of sunbed exposure are positive or negative.

  2. Stable ozone layer in Norway and USSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, K.; Svenoe, T.; Terez, E. I.; Terez, G. A.; Roldugin, V.; Larsen, S. H. H.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term column ozone density measurements have been carried out in Norway and USSR. Data from Tromso and two meridional chains in USSR are analyzed, and most of the stations show that no significant decreasing trend in ozone has occurred during the last two decades.

  3. Viral hepatitis among prisoners in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlen, B; Siebke, J C; Stensland, A

    1980-12-01

    The present survey reveals high frequencies of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody in criminals committed to prison in Norway compared to the general population. The high rate of antigen carriers and the intramural supply of illicit drugs constitute a threat to fellow prisoners regarding viral hepatitis as well as drug addiction.

  4. New Moho map of southern Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stratford, Wanda Rose; Thybo, Hans; Faleide, J.-I.

    2009-01-01

    A recent seismic refraction study across southern Norway has revealed that the up to 2469 m high Southern Scandes Mountains are not isostatically compensated by a thick crust. Rather, the Moho depths are close to average for continental crust with elevations of ~1 km. Evidence from new seismic da...

  5. The cost of multiple sclerosis in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, B; Myhr, K-M; Nyland, H; Aarseth, J H

    2012-02-01

    Health economic aspects have been increasingly important during introduction of new treatments for multiple sclerosis. As a partial response for Norway, a cost-of-illness study was carried out to estimate the yearly cost of the illness to society and relate costs and patients' quality of life to illness severity. Estimated cost to society was Euro 439 million in 2002 exclusive of the cost of reduced quality of life. The cost per patient was close to Euro 65,000. Account taken of methodological differences, the results compare to results for Sweden, Norway's closest neighboring country. The illness reduced patients' quality of life with 0.26. More patients were early retired because of their MS in Norway than in any of nine other European countries comprised by a recent European study, illustrating a liberal practice in Norway. The Norwegian cost of unpaid assistance was almost identical to the Swedish cost that was the lowest found across the countries in the European study. When related to illness severity, the cost per patient increased, and the patients' experienced quality of life decreased with increasing EDSS levels in line with what has been found for other countries. Cost-of-MS studies have been carried out for a number of countries. Together they contribute to our understanding of the economic consequences of multiple sclerosis and, if their results are related to illness severity, also provide valuable information for further economic analyses of treatment and medication. Our study adds to this.

  6. Energy consumption: energy consumption in mainland Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnussen, Inger Helene; Killingland, Magnus; Spilde, Dag

    2012-07-25

    The purpose of this report is to describe trends in energy consumption in mainland Norway, with an emphasis on key trends within the largest consumer groups. We also explain common terms and concepts in the field of energy consumption. Finally, we look at forecasts for future energy consumption, produced by bodies outside NVE. Total final energy consumption in mainland Norway in 2009 was 207 TWh. The most important end-user groups are households, service industries, manufacturing industry and transport. In addition, the energy sector in mainland Norway consumed 15 TWh. Energy consumed in the energy sector is not considered as final consumption, as the energy is used to produce new energy products. The long-term trend in energy consumption in mainland Norway is that fuel in the transport sector and electricity for the energy sector increases, while energy consumption in other sectors flattens out. The main reason for an increased use of fuel in the transport sector is the rise in the number of motorised machinery and vehicles in mainland Norway. This has caused a rise in gasoline and diesel consumption of 75 per cent since 1976. The petroleum sector is the largest consumer of energy within the energy sector in mainland Norway, and electricity from onshore to platforms in the North Sea and to new shore side installations has led to a rise in electricity consumption from 1 TWh in 1995 to 5 TWh in 2009. The energy consumption in households showed flat trend from 1996 to 2009, after many years of growth. The main reasons are a warmer climate, higher energy prices, the use of heats pumps and more energy-efficient buildings. In the service industries, the growth in energy consumptions has slightly decreased since the late 1990s, for much the same reasons as for households. In manufacturing industries the energy consumption have flatten out mainly due to the closure of energy-intensive businesses and the establishment of new more energy-efficient businesses. Electricity is

  7. Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej Elkamil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Ataxia with vitamin E deficiency (AVED is a rare autosomal recessive neurological disorder which usually starts in childhood. The clinical presentation is very similar to Friedreich ataxia, most patients have progressive truncal and extremity ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski sign, dysarthria and sensory neuropathy. Methods We made an inquiry to our colleagues in Norway, we included information from a prevalence study published southern Norway and added data from our own known case. Results A newly published prevalence study of hereditary ataxias (total of 171 subjects found only one subject with AVED in Southeast Norway. We describe two more patients, one from the Central part and one from the Northern part of Norway. All 3 cases had age of onset in early childhood (age of 4–5 years and all experienced gait ataxia and dysarthria. The genetic testing confirmed that they had pathogenic mutations in the α-tocopherol transfer protein gene (TTPA. All were carriers of the non-sense c.400C > T mutation, one was homozygous for that mutation and the others were compound heterozygous, either with c.358G > A or c.513_514insTT. The homozygous carrier was by far the most severely affected case. Conclusions We estimate the occurrence of AVED in Norway to be at least 0.6 per million inhabitants. We emphasize that all patients who develop ataxia in childhood should be routinely tested for AVED to make an early diagnosis for initiating treatment with high dose vitamin E to avoid severe neurological deficits.

  8. Highly Informative Single-Copy Nuclear Microsatellite DNA Markers Developed Using an AFLP-SSR Approach in Black Spruce (Picea mariana) and Red Spruce (P. rubens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong-Zhong; Forneris, Natascha; Rajora, Om P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are highly informative molecular markers for various biological studies in plants. In spruce (Picea) and other conifers, the development of single-copy polymorphic genomic microsatellite markers is quite difficult, owing primarily to the large genome size and predominance of repetitive DNA sequences throughout the genome. We have developed highly informative single-locus genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce (Picea mariana) and red spruce (Picea rubens) using a simple but efficient method based on a combination of AFLP and microsatellite technologies. Principal Findings A microsatellite-enriched library was constructed from genomic AFLP DNA fragments of black spruce. Sequencing of the 108 putative SSR-containing clones provided 94 unique sequences with microsatellites. Twenty-two of the designed 34 primer pairs yielded scorable amplicons, with single-locus patterns. Fourteen of these microsatellite markers were characterized in 30 black spruce and 30 red spruce individuals drawn from many populations. The number of alleles at a polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 18, with a mean of 9.3 in black spruce, and from 3 to 15, with a mean of 6.2 alleles in red spruce. The polymorphic information content or expected heterozygosity ranged from 0.340 to 0.909 (mean = 0.67) in black spruce and from 0.161 to 0.851 (mean = 0.62) in red spruce. Ten SSR markers showing inter-parental polymorphism inherited in a single-locus Mendelian mode, with two cases of distorted segregation. Primer pairs for almost all polymorphic SSR loci resolved microsatellites of comparable size in Picea glauca, P. engelmannii, P. sitchensis, and P. abies. Significance The AFLP-based microsatellite-enriched library appears to be a rapid, cost-effective approach for isolating and developing single-locus informative genomic microsatellite markers in black spruce. The markers developed should be useful in black spruce, red spruce

  9. Photosynthetic Rates of Citronella and Lemongrass 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H. M. Walter; Ormrod, Douglas P.

    1979-01-01

    Ten selections of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus [L.] Rendle) were grown at 32/27, 27/21, or 15/10 C day/night temperatures, and plants from three populations of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [D.C.] Stapf from Japan or Sri Lanka and Cymbopogon flexuosus [D.C.] Stapf from India) were grown at 8- or 15-hour photoperiods. Net photosynthetic rates of mature leaves were measured in a controlled environment at 25 C and 260 microeinsteins per meter2 per second. Rates declined with increasing leaf age, and from the tip to the base of the leaf blade. Rates for citronella leaves grown at 15/10 C were extremely low for all selections. Highest rates of net photosynthesis were recorded for four selections grown at 27/21 C and for two selections grown at 32/27 C. Lemongrass grown at 8-hour photoperiod had higher photosynthetic rates than that grown at 15-hour photoperiod. PMID:16660737

  10. Photosynthetic reaction center protein in nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajdu, Kata; Szabo, Tibor; Magyar, Melinda; Nagy, Laszlo [Department of Medical Physics and Informatics, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Bencsik, Gabor [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nemeth, Zoltan; Hernadi, Klara [Department of Applied and Environmental Chemistry, University of Szeged, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Nagy, Krisztina; Varo, Gyoergy [Institute of Biophysics, BRC, Szeged, 6726 Szeged (Hungary); Magrez, Arnaud; Forro, Laszlo [Institute of Physics of Complex Matter, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    Photosynthetic reaction center (RC) is one of the most important proteins, because it is Nature's solar battery converting light energy into chemical potential in the photosynthetic membrane assuring conditions for carbon reduction in cells. Although it is developed in nanometer scale, and is working in nanoscopic power, this is the protein that assures the energy input practically for the whole biosphere on Earth. The extremely large quantum yield of the primary charge separation (close to 100%) in the RC offers a big challenge to use it in nanodevices. Results of structural (AFM, EM), optical, and electro chemical investigations on RC bio-nanocomposite materials based on different carrier matrices (e.g., CNTs, ITO) will be presented. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Nonclassical energy transfer in photosynthetic FMO complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramavicius Vytautas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Excitation energy transfer in a photosynthetic FMO complex has been simulated using the stochastic Schrödinger equation. Fluctuating chromophore transition energies are simulated from the quantum correlation function which allows to properly include the finite temperature. The resulting excitation dynamics shows fast thermalization of chromophore occupations into proper thermal equilibrium. The relaxation process is characterized by entropy dynamics, which shows nonclassical behavior.

  12. 137Cs content in spruce wood in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rulik, P.; Pfeiferova, V.

    2008-01-01

    The results of a survey of spruce wood contamination in the Czech Republic are presented. Fifty-one samples covering the country were taken during 2003-2004. The mean activity concentration in the dry wood is 4 Bq/kg, the maximum is 50 Bq/kg. The estimated effective dose to a person living in a flat with wooden furniture/boarding is negligible (not exceeding tenths of μSv/year). (orig.)

  13. Lumber yield from sitka spruce in southeastern Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul H. Lane; Richard O. Jr. Woodfin; John W. Henley; Marlin E. Plank

    1972-01-01

    A representative sample of 400 mature, Sitka spruce, sawtimber trees from throughout southeastern Alaska produced 1,009 commercial saw logs that were sawn at Wrangell, Alaska. The distribution of these saw logs by log grade was: 3 percent Select, 7 percent No. 1, 43 percent No. 2, and 47 percent No. 3. The total net log scale (Scribner) was 774,000 board feet. A total...

  14. Spruce monoculture establishment affects functional traits of soil microarthropod communities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farská, Jitka; Prejzková, Kristýna; Rusek, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 3 (2013), s. 479-486 ISSN 0006-3088 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/1259; GA MŠk LC06066 Grant - others:SGA BF JU(CZ) 30-0004; GAJU(CZ) 143/2010/P Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Oribatida * Collembola * spruce * beech Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.696, year: 2013

  15. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  16. Energy Efficiency in Norway 1990-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Eva

    2003-06-01

    This is the national report for Norway in the EU/SAVE project ''Indicators for Energy Efficiency Monitoring and Target setting (ODYSSEE)''. The report deals with energy use and energy efficiency in Norway 1990-2000 (2001 for overall energy use). Final energy use per Gross Domestic Product (GDP) was reduced by approximately 1.9% pr year in the period 1990 to 2001. The energy efficiency improvement has been calculated to 0.6% pr year, while the role of structural changes has been 1.3% pr year. A detailed sector analysis has been done, applying Laspeyres indices to attribute changes in energy use to activity, structure or intensity (efficiency). Aggregating sectors, we have found a total efficiency improvement of approximately 11 TWh from 1990 to 2000. (author)

  17. The best energy recovery project in Norway?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melaasen, Erik

    2001-01-01

    Norway is one of the world's leading producers of ferro-alloys and silicon metals. The high temperature required in the production process is obtained by using electric energy. The temperature of the waste gases varies between 200 and 900 o C. To recover the energy of hot dust-holding gases from ferro-alloy plants the waste gases are cooled by means of steam production. The ferro-alloy plant Globe Norge AS Hafslund Metall and the energy supply company Birka Energi have signed an agreement to build Norway's largest energy recovery plant. The plant will recover 260 GWh per year. The oil consumption will be reduced by 26000 tonne per year and the annual emission of carbon dioxide by 80000 tonne. Steam from the plant will be supplied to the two companies Borregaard and Glomma Papp. The article describes the plant in some detail

  18. Mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of the Norway rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Song

    Full Text Available Central Eastern Asia, foremost the area bordering northern China and Mongolia, has been thought to be the geographic region where Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus have originated. However recent fossil analyses pointed to their origin in southern China. Moreover, whereas analyses of fossils dated the species' origin as ∼ 1.2-1.6 million years ago (Mya, molecular analyses yielded ∼ 0.5-2.9 Mya. Here, to study the geographic origin of the Norway rat and its spread across the globe we analyzed new and all published mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-b (cyt-b; N = 156 and D-loop (N = 212 sequences representing wild rats from four continents and select inbred strains. Our results are consistent with an origin of the Norway rat in southern China ∼ 1.3 Mya, subsequent prehistoric differentiation and spread in China and Asia from an initially weakly structured ancestral population, followed by further spread and differentiation across the globe during historic times. The recent spreading occurred mostly from derived European populations rather than from archaic Asian populations. We trace laboratory strains to wild lineages from Europe and North America and these represent a subset of the diversity of the rat; leaving Asian lineages largely untapped as a resource for biomedical models. By studying rats from Europe we made the observation that mtDNA diversity cannot be interpreted without consideration of pest control and, possibly, the evolution of rodenticide resistance. However, demographic models explored by forward-time simulations cannot fully explain the low mtDNA diversity of European rats and lack of haplotype sharing with their source from Asia. Comprehensive nuclear marker analyses of a larger sample of Norway rats representing the world are needed to better resolve the evolutionary history of wild rats and of laboratory rats, as well as to better understand the evolution of anticoagulant resistance.

  19. Characteristics and modeling of spruce wood under dynamic compression load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenacher, Germar

    2014-01-01

    Spruce wood is frequently used as an energy absorbing material in impact limiters of packages for the transportation of radioactive material. A 9m drop test onto an unyielding target is mandatory for the packages. The impact results in a dynamic compression load of the spruce wood inside the impact limiter. The lateral dilation of the wood is restrained thereby due to encasing steel sheets. This work's objective was to provide a material model for spruce wood based on experimental investigations to enable the calculation of such loading conditions. About 600 crush tests with cubical spruce wood specimens were performed to characterize the material. The compression was up to 70% and the material was assumed to be transversely isotropic. Particularly the lateral constraint showed to have an important effect: the material develops a high lateral dilation without lateral constraint. The force-displacement characteristics show a comparably low force level and no or only slight hardening. Distinctive softening occurs after the linear-elastic region when loaded parallel to the fiber. On the other hand, using a lateral constraint results in significantly higher general force levels, distinctive hardening and lateral forces. The softening effect when loaded parallel to the fiber is less distinctive. Strain rate and temperature raise or lower the strength level, which was quantified for the applicable ranges of impact limiters. The hypothesis of an uncoupled evolution of the yield surface was proposed based on the experimental findings. It postulates an independent strength evolution with deviatoric and volumetric deformation. The hypothesis could be established using the first modeling approach, the modified LS-DYNA material model MAT075. A transversely isotropic material model was developed based thereupon and implemented in LS-DYNA. The material characteristics of spruce wood were considered using a multi-surface yield criterion and a non-associated flow rule. The yield

  20. [Water-borne disease outbreaks in Norway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygård, Karin; Gondrosen, Bjørn; Lund, Vidar

    2003-12-04

    The drinking water in Norway has traditionally been considered being of good quality. However, outbreaks related to drinking water are reported every year. We review waterborne outbreaks in Norway over the last 15 years, and describe the aetiology of and contributory factors in these outbreaks. We compiled data on waterborne outbreaks reported to the Norwegian Institute of Public Health and Norwegian Food Control Authority during 1988-2002. We included all events in which two or more people fell ill and water was the suspected source of infection. Over the 15-year period. 72 outbreaks were reported, affecting a total of 10 616 persons. Campylobacter was the cause in 26% (19/72) of the outbreaks, norovirus in 18% (13/72). The causative organism was unknown in 46% (33/72). The water came from public waterworks in 32 of the 54 outbreaks for which this information was available (59%); from a private supply in the remaining 22. For 62% (16/26) of the outbreaks related to waterworks, the water was not disinfected before distribution. None of the private water supplies were disinfected. Over the last five years, there were more outbreaks related to private supplies. The most important contributory factor to waterborne outbreaks in Norway is contamination of the raw water combined with missing or faulty disinfecting procedures. To prevent future outbreaks, a continuous upgrading of small and private water supplies is needed. Reporting of outbreaks is important for the implementation of targeted and effective preventive measures.