WorldWideScience

Sample records for north-east atlantic ocean

  1. The environmental impact of Lagrangian transport routes in the north east atlantic ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria Sala

    2014-06-01

    After 10-year climatic simulation, four depth ranges showed different Lagrangian transport pathways, 0–10 m, 20–200 m, 300–500m, and 600–2000 m, being these routes consistent with the known ocean circulation patterns. These routes were partially confirmed by results from previous oceanic water mass distribution, biological studies on marine organisms and observations of the rafting of crude oil spilled during the Prestige oil tanker accident (in Galicia, north of Spain. This preliminary yet provocative study should help guide future observational campaigns, as well as the interpretation of open-ocean transport patterns and the distribution of marine organisms and chemical tracers in the northeast Atlantic region.

  2. In situ observation of chimaerid species in the Gorringe Bank: new distribution records for the north-east Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R P; Cunha, M R

    2014-09-01

    In the framework of the R.V. Nautilus exploration programme, remotely operated vehicle (ROV) surveys were conducted at bathyal depths in the Gorringe Bank. Video transects revealed the presence of the chimaerids Chimaera opalescens and Hydrolagus affinis in the region. An identification key for the north-east Atlantic species of the family Chimaeridae is proposed.

  3. Coastal and open ocean aerosol characteristics: investigating the representativeness of coastal aerosol sampling over the North-East Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rinaldi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve a better understanding of the modifications of the physical and chemical properties of marine aerosol particles during transport from offshore to the coast, size distribution and chemical composition were measured concurrently in clean air masses over the open North Atlantic Ocean and at an Irish coastal site. Open ocean sampling was performed on board the oceanographic vessel Celtic Explorer sailing 100–300 km off the Irish west coast, while coastal measurements were performed at the Mace Head GAW station. The experiment took place between 11 June and 6 July 2006, during the period of phytoplankton bloom.

    The number size distribution and size-resolved chemical composition of coastal and open ocean samples were very similar, indicating homogeneous physical and chemical aerosol properties over a wide region in the marine boundary layer. The results also show that submicron chemical and physical aerosol properties measured at the coastal Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station were not unduly influenced by coastal artefacts and are thus representative of open water properties. Greater differences between the coastal site and the open ocean were observed for the aerosol supermicron sea spray components; this could be due to a variety of reasons, ranging from higher local wind speeds at the coastal site over the comparison period, to differences in sampling heights and increased local surf-zone production.

    Evidence of ageing processes was observed: at the costal site the ratio between non-sea-salt sulphate and methanesulphonic acid was higher, and the aerosol water soluble organic compounds were more oxidized than in the open ocean.

  4. Seamount physiography and biology in North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Morato, T.; K. Ø. Kvile; Taranto, G. H.; F. Tempera; Narayanaswamy, B.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Menezes, G.; Wienberg, C.; SANTOS, R. S.; T. J. Pitcher

    2012-01-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in-situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (North-East Atlantic) and in Mediterran...

  5. Seamount physiography and biology in the north-east Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Morato, T.; K. Ø. Kvile; Taranto, G. H.; F. Tempera; Narayanaswamy, B.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Menezes, G. M.; Wienberg, C.; SANTOS, R. S.; T. J. Pitcher

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (north-east Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (north-east Atlantic)...

  6. Multi-decadal range changes vs. thermal adaptation for north east Atlantic oceanic copepods in the face of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinder, Stephanie L; Gravenor, Mike B; Edwards, Martin; Ostle, Clare; Bodger, Owen G; Lee, Patricia L M; Walne, Antony W; Hays, Graeme C

    2014-01-01

    Populations may potentially respond to climate change in various ways including moving to new areas or alternatively staying where they are and adapting as conditions shift. Traditional laboratory and mesocosm experiments last days to weeks and thus only give a limited picture of thermal adaptation, whereas ocean warming occurring over decades allows the potential for selection of new strains better adapted to warmer conditions. Evidence for adaptation in natural systems is equivocal. We used a 50-year time series comprising of 117 056 samples in the NE Atlantic, to quantify the abundance and distribution of two particularly important and abundant members of the ocean plankton (copepods of the genus Calanus) that play a key trophic role for fisheries. Abundance of C. finmarchicus, a cold-water species, and C. helgolandicus, a warm-water species, were negatively and positively related to sea surface temperature (SST) respectively. However, the abundance vs. SST relationships for neither species changed over time in a manner consistent with thermal adaptation. Accompanying the lack of evidence for thermal adaptation there has been an unabated range contraction for C. finmarchicus and range expansion for C. helgolandicus. Our evidence suggests that thermal adaptation has not mitigated the impacts of ocean warming for dramatic range changes of these key species and points to continued dramatic climate induced changes in the biology of the oceans.

  7. Surface signature of Mediterranean water eddies in the North-East Atlantic: effect of the upper ocean stratification

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    I. Bashmachnikov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Meddies, intra-thermocline eddies of Mediterranean water, are often visible at the sea surface as positive sea-level anomalies. Here we study the surface signature of several meddies tracked with RAFOS floats and AVISO altimetry. Then, theoretical estimates of the surface signature of a meddy are derived, based on geostrophy and potential vorticity balance. The intensity of the surface signature is proportional to the meddy core radius and to the Coriolis parameter, and inversely proportional to the core depth and buoyancy frequency. This indicates that surface signature of a meddy may be strongly reduced by the upper ocean stratification. Estimates suggest that the southernmost limit for detection in altimetry of small meddies (with radii on the order of 15 km should lie in the northern subtropics, while large meddies (with radii of 25–30 km could be detected as far south as the northern tropics. During the initial period of meddy acceleration after meddy formation or a stagnation stage, a cyclonic signal also is generated at the sea-surface, but mostly the anticyclonic surface signal follows the meddy.

  8. Seamount physiography and biology in the north-east Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Morato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (north-east Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (north-east Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea is large with around 557 and 101 seamount-like features, respectively. Similarly, seamounts occupy large areas of about 616 000 km2 in the OSPAR region and of about 89 500 km2 in the Mediterranean Sea. The presence of seamounts in the north-east Atlantic has been known since the late 19th century, but overall knowledge regarding seamount ecology and geology is still relatively poor. Only 37 seamounts in the OSPAR area (3.5% of all seamounts in the region, 22 in the Mediterranean Sea (9.2% of all seamounts in the region and 25 in the north-east Atlantic south of the OSPAR area have in situ information. Seamounts mapped in both areas are in general very heterogeneous, showing diverse geophysical characteristics. These differences will likely affect the biological diversity and production of resident and associated organisms.

  9. Wave Extremes in the North East Atlantic from Ensemble Forecasts

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Carrasco, Ana; Saetra, Øyvind; 10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00738.1

    2013-01-01

    A method for estimating return values from ensembles of forecasts at advanced lead times is presented. Return values of significant wave height in the North-East Atlantic, the Norwegian Sea and the North Sea are computed from archived +240-h forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) from 1999 to 2009. We make three assumptions: First, each forecast is representative of a six-hour interval and collectively the data set is then comparable to a time period of 226 years. Second, the model climate matches the observed distribution, which we confirm by comparing with buoy data. Third, the ensemble members are sufficiently uncorrelated to be considered independent realizations of the model climate. We find anomaly correlations of 0.20, but peak events (>P97) are entirely uncorrelated. By comparing return values from individual members with return values of subsamples of the data set we also find that the estimates follow the same distribution and appear unaffected by correlations in the ensemble. The a...

  10. North East Atlantic Tsunamis Related with Gloria Fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Miranda, J. M.; Batllo, J.; Macia, R.

    2011-12-01

    Gloria fault is one segment of the Eurasia-Nubia plate boundary. It is a large strike slip fault, located between 24W and 19W, with scarce seismic activity but which was the location of several large events during the XX Century, in particular the 25 November 1941 earthquake, a submarine strike-slip event of magnitude 8.3-8.4 and the 26 May 1975 with magnitude 7.9. Since the installation of the tide-gauge networks in several countries of the North East Atlantic area a significant amount of mareograms were obtained, concerning these events, in a number of coastal stations located along the European coasts. The most impacted areas were the north coast of Portugal where the sea overtopped some beaches, in November 1941, and the harbors of Azores, in 1975, where it was observed the fast withdraw of the sea followed by a strong influx over the highest water mark. We present here a systematic view of the tsunami potential of the Gloria Fault and using results of hydrodynamic simulations we compare model results against observations and tide records and we discuss the corresponding implications in the design of the NEAMTWS decision matrix. To properly constrain the source characteristics of the tsunamigenic earthquakes, relocation and scalar moment calculation of the 1941 earthquake from digitized seismograms have been performed. This work is a funded by project s TAGUSDELTA. Ref. PTDC/MAR/113888/2009 and PTDC/CTE-GIX/110205/2009

  11. Distribution, abundance and habitat use of deep diving cetaceans in the North-East Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Emer; Cañadas, Ana; Macleod, Kelly; Santos, M. Begoña; Mikkelsen, Bjarni; Uriarte, Ainhize; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Vázquez, José Antonio; Hammond, Philip S.

    2017-07-01

    In spite of their oceanic habitat, deep diving cetacean species have been found to be affected by anthropogenic activities, with potential population impacts of high intensity sounds generated by naval research and oil prospecting receiving the most attention. Improving the knowledge of the distribution and abundance of this poorly known group is an essential prerequisite to inform mitigation strategies seeking to minimize their spatial and temporal overlap with human activities. We provide for the first time abundance estimates for five deep diving cetacean species (sperm whale, long-finned pilot whale, northern bottlenose whale, Cuvier's beaked whale and Sowerby's beaked whale) using data from three dedicated cetacean sighting surveys that covered the oceanic and shelf waters of the North-East Atlantic. Density surface modelling was used to obtain model-based estimates of abundance and to explore the physical and biological characteristics of the habitat used by these species. Distribution of all species was found to be significantly related to depth, distance from the 2000m depth contour, the contour index (a measure of variability in the seabed) and sea surface temperature. Predicted distribution maps also suggest that there is little spatial overlap between these species. Our results represent the best abundance estimates for deep-diving whales in the North-East Atlantic, predict areas of high density during summer and constitute important baseline information to guide future risk assessments of human activities on these species, evaluate potential spatial and temporal trends and inform EU Directives and future conservation efforts.

  12. Putative fishery-induced changes in biomass and population size structures of demersal deep-sea fishes in ICES Sub-area VII, North East Atlantic Ocean

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    J. A. Godbold

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A time series from 1977–1989 and 2000–2002 of scientific trawl surveys in the Porcupine Seabight and adjacent Abyssal Plain of the NE Atlantic was analysed to assess changes in demersal fish biomass and length frequency. These two periods coincide with the on-set of the commercial deep-water fishery in the late 1970s and the on-set of the regulation of the fishery in the early 2000's and allowed us to investigate changes in the relationship between total demersal fish biomass and depth between the pre- and post commercial fishing periods, changes in the biomass (kg km2 depth distribution and length frequency distribution of the most dominant fish species. Our results show a decline in total demersal fish biomass of 36% within the depth range of the commercial fishery (< 1500 m. Whilst there were significant declines in target (e.g. Coryphaenoides rupestris decreased by 57% and non-target (e.g. Coryphaenoides guentheri and Antimora rostrata species, not all species declined significantly. Changes in the overall length-frequency distribution were detected for 2 species (Coryphaenoides armatus, Synaphobranchus kaupii, but only at depths greater than 1800 m (outside the maximum depth for commercial trawling. This suggests that whilst there is evidence for likely fisheries impacts on the biomass distribution of the demersal fish population as a whole, species-specific impacts are highly variable. It is clear that changes in population structure can extend beyond the depth at which fishing takes place, highlighting the importance for also considering the indirect effects on deep-sea fish populations.

  13. Regional-Scale Ozone Deposition to North-East Atlantic Waters

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    L. Coleman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A regional climate model is used to evaluate dry deposition of ozone over the North East Atlantic. Results are presented for a deposition scheme accounting for turbulent and chemical enhancement of oceanic ozone deposition and a second non-chemical, parameterised gaseous dry deposition scheme. The first deposition scheme was constrained to account for sea-surface ozone-iodide reactions and the sensitivity of modelled ozone concentrations to oceanic iodide concentration was investigated. Simulations were also performed using nominal reaction rate derived from in-situ ozone deposition measurements and using a preliminary representation of organic chemistry. Results show insensitivity of ambient ozone concentrations modelled by the chemical-enhanced scheme to oceanic iodide concentrations, and iodide reactions alone cannot account for observed deposition velocities. Consequently, we suggest a missing chemical sink due to reactions of ozone with organic matter at the air-sea interface. Ozone loss rates are estimated to be in the range of 0.5–6 ppb per day. A potentially significant ozone-driven flux of iodine to the atmosphere is estimated to be in the range of 2.5–500 M molec cm−2  s−1, leading to a mixing-layer enhancement of organo-iodine concentrations of 0.1–22.0 ppt, with an average increase in the N.E. Atlantic of around 4 ppt per day.

  14. The meiofauna : macrofauna ratio across the continental slope of the Goban Spur (north-east Atlantic)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, E.; Van Averbeke, J.; Heip, C.H.R.

    1999-01-01

    Meio- and macrofauna density and biomass were estimated at the OMEX-transect across the continental slope of the Goban Spur at water depths ranging from 208 to 4460 m in the north-east Atlantic. A linear increase in the ratio between meio- and macrofauna densities with increasing water depth was

  15. Parasitic anemone infects the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Møller, Lene Friis; Sundberg, Per

    2010-01-01

    We report of the first finding of parasitic sea anemone larvae infecting the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North East Atlantic. Parasitic anemone larvae are common in the native habitat of Mnemiopsis, but have not previously been reported from any of the locations where Mnemiopsis...

  16. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 03 June 1981 - 09 June 1981 (NODC Accession 8100724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from June 3, 1981 to June 9, 1981. Data...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 27 July 1982 - 02 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8400002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 27, 1982 to August 2, 1982....

  18. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 15 April 1981 - 20 April 1981 (NODC Accession 8100656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 15, 1981 to April 20, 1981....

  19. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 02 September 1980 - 06 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8100628)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from September 2, 1980 to September 6,...

  20. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 28 May 1982 - 04 June 1982 (NODC Accession 8300008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from May 28, 1982 to June 4, 1982. Data...

  1. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 21 April 1980 - 18 July 1980 (NODC Accession 8100501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 21, 1980 to July 18, 1980....

  2. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron) aerosol size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Monahan, C.; Greaney, R.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland) offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time), open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time), background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time) and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time) aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation), albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE) Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%), this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  3. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical cluster analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75% throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 clusters were identified as systematically occurring. These 12 clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time, open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6% of the time, background clean marine category (occurring 26.1% of the time and anthropogenic category (occurring 20% of the time aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less than 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine aerosol exhibited a clear bimodality in the sub-micron size distribution, with although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. However, peculiar background clean marine size distributions with coarser accumulation modes are also observed during winter months. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more monomodal (accumulation, albeit with traces of bimodality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the North East (NE Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6%, this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new nano aerosol particles in NE Atlantic Air.

  4. A molecular comparison of Alaskan and North East Atlantic Halicondria panicea (Pallas 1766) (Porifera: Demospongiae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, Dirk; Knowlton, Anne L.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Highsmith, Ray C.; van Soest, Rob W.M.

    2004-01-01

    The intraspecific relationships between populations of Alaskan Halichondria cf. panicea are the subjects of ongoing research. In this study we compare CO1 sequences of Alaskan Halichondria cf. panicea with North East Atlantic Halichondria panicea and its sister species Halichondria bowerbanki. Alaskan Halichondria cf. panicea form a well-supported sister group to the European Halichondria panicea/ H. bowerbanki species complex in the resulting gene tree and cluster distantly from their European conspecifics.

  5. Sea surface height variability in the North East Atlantic from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke; Katsman, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Data from 21 years of satellite altimeter measurements are used to identify and understand the major contributing components of sea surface height variability (SSV) on monthly time-scales in the North East Atlantic. A number of SSV drivers is considered, which are categorised into two groups; local (wind and sea surface temperature) and remote (sea level pressure and the North Atlantic oscillation index). A multiple linear regression model is constructed to model the SSV for a specific target area in the North Sea basin. Cross-correlations between candidate regressors potentially lead to ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. We therefore use an objective hierarchical selection method based on variance inflation factors to select the optimal number of regressors for the target area and accept these into the regression model if they can be associated to SSV through a direct underlying physical forcing mechanism. Results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and that it can be represented well with a regression model that uses local wind, sea surface temperature and sea level pressure as primary regressors. The regression model developed here helps to understand sea level change in the North East Atlantic. The methodology is generalised and easily applied to other regions.

  6. Contribution of Isoprene Oxidation Products to Marine Aerosol over the North-East Atlantic

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    Tatu Anttila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation through isoprene oxidation was investigated with the regional-scale climate model REMOTE. The applied modeling scheme includes a treatment for marine primary organic aerosol emissions, aerosol microphysics, and SOA formation through the gas/particle partitioning of semivolatile, water-soluble oxidation products. The focus was on SOA formation taking place over the North-East Atlantic during a period of high biological activity. Isoprene SOA concentrations were up to ~5 ng m−3 over North Atlantic in the base case model runs, and isoprene oxidation made a negligible contribution to the marine organic aerosol (OA mass. In particular, isoprene SOA did not account for the observed water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC concentrations over North Atlantic. The performed model calculations, together with results from recent field measurements, imply a missing source of SOA over remote marine areas unless the isoprene oxidation products are considerably less volatile than the current knowledge indicates.

  7. Modeling concentrations and fluxes of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geels, C.; Christensen, J.H.; Hansen, A.W.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Danish NEAREX project a three-dimensional Eulerian hemispheric air pollution model is used to study the transport and concentrations of atmospheric CO2 in the North East Atlantic region. The model domain covers the major part of the Northern Hemisphere and currently the model...... source types. Here the model setup and the used parameterizations will be described. The model is validated by comparing the results with atmospheric measurements from four monitoring stations in or close to the northern part of the North Atlantic. Some preliminary model results will be shown and shortly...... includes simple parameterizations of the main sinks and sources for atmospheric CO2. One of the objectives of the project is to study and maybe quantify the relative importance of the various sinks and source types and areas for this region. In order to do so the model has been run with differentiated...

  8. Consumer interest in social sustainability issues of whitefish from capture fisheries in the north-east Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, Linda J.L.; Lans, van der Ivo A.; Berentsen, Paul B.M.; Boer, de Imke J.M.; Bokkers, Eddy

    2017-01-01

    Capture fisheries in the north-east Atlantic account for approximately 10% of all fish consumed from capture fisheries globally. The literature shows that consumers show considerable interest in social sustainability of products in general and of fish specifically. This interest, however, has not

  9. Modelled spatial and seasonal distribution of Blue Whiting (Micromesistius poutassou) larvae in the North-East Atlantic (1951 to 2005)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Blue whiting (Micromesistius poutassou, http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=126439) is a small mesopelagic planktivorous gadoid found throughout the North-East Atlantic. This data contains the results of a model-based analysis of larvae captured by the Continuous Plankton...

  10. North East Atlantic vs. Mediterranean Marine Protected Areas as Fisheries Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Pérez-Ruzafa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of management initiatives implemented in the context of the European Common Fisheries Policy has been questioned, especially with regard to the Mediterranean. Some of the analyses made to compare the fishing activity and management measures carried out in the North East Atlantic and in the Mediterranean do not take into account some of the differentiating peculiarities of each of these regions. At the same time, they resort to traditional fisheries management measures and do not discuss the role of marine protected areas as a complementary management tool. In this respect, the apparent failure of marine protected areas in the North-East Atlantic compared with the same in the Mediterranean is challenging European fishery scientists. Application of the classical holistic view of ecological succession to the functioning of fishery closures and no-use areas highlights the importance of combining both management regimes to fully satisfy both fishery- and biodiversity-oriented goals. We advocate that an optimal management strategy for designing an MPA to protect biodiversity and sustain fishing yields consists of combining a network of no-use areas (close to their mature state with fish boxes (buffer zones maintained by fishing disturbance in a relatively early successional stage, where productivity is higher, under a multi-zoning scheme. In this framework, the importance of no-use areas for fisheries is based on several observations: (1 They preserve biological diversity at regional scale, at all levels—specific, habitat/seascape, and also genetic diversity and the structure of populations, allowing natural selection to operate. (2 They permit the natural variability of the system to be differentiated from the effects of regulation and to be integrated in appropriate sampling schemes as controls. (3 They maintain the natural size and age structure of the populations, hence maximizing potential fecundity, allowing biomass export to

  11. Long-term satellite tracking reveals variable seasonal migration strategies of basking sharks in the north-east Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P. D.; Baxter, J. M.; Gell, F. R.; Godley, B. J.; Graham, R. T.; Hall, G.; Hall, J.; Hawkes, L. A.; Henderson, S. M.; Johnson, L.; Speedie, C.; Witt, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Animal migration is ubiquitous in nature with individuals within a population often exhibiting varying movement strategies. The basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus) is the world’s second largest fish species, however, a comprehensive understanding of their long-term wider-ranging movements in the north-east Atlantic is currently lacking. Seventy satellite tags were deployed on basking sharks over four years (2012–2015) off the west coast of Scotland and the Isle of Man. Data from 28 satellite tags with attachment durations of over 165 days reveal post-summer ranging behaviours. Tagged sharks moved a median minimum straight-line distance of 3,633 km; achieving median displacement of 1,057 km from tagging locations. Tagged individuals exhibited one of three migration behaviours: remaining in waters of UK, Ireland and the Faroe Islands; migrating south to the Bay of Biscay or moving further south to waters off the Iberian Peninsula, and North Africa. Sharks used both continental shelf areas and oceanic habitats, primarily in the upper 50–200 m of the water column, spanning nine geo-political zones and the High Seas, demonstrating the need for multi-national cooperation in the management of this species across its range. PMID:28216646

  12. Organohalogen contaminants and trace metals in North-East Atlantic porbeagle shark (Lamna nasus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendall, Victoria A; Barber, Jonathan L; Papachlimitzou, Alexandra; Bolam, Thi; Warford, Lee; Hetherington, Stuart J; Silva, Joana F; McCully, Sophy R; Losada, Sara; Maes, Thomas; Ellis, Jim R; Law, Robin J

    2014-08-15

    The North-East Atlantic porbeagle (Lamna nasus) population has declined dramatically over the last few decades and is currently classified as 'Critically Endangered'. As long-lived, apex predators, they may be vulnerable to bioaccumulation of contaminants. In this study organohalogen compounds and trace elements were analysed in 12 specimens caught as incidental bycatch in commercial gillnet fisheries in the Celtic Sea in 2011. Levels of organohalogen contaminants were low or undetectable (summed CB and BDE concentrations 0.04-0.85 mg kg(-1)wet weight). A notably high Cd concentration (7.2 mg kg(-1)wet weight) was observed in one mature male, whereas the range observed in the other samples was much lower (0.04-0.26 mg kg(-1)wet weight). Hg and Pb concentrations were detected only in single animals, at 0.34 and 0.08 mg kg(-1)wet weight, respectively. These contaminant levels were low in comparison to other published studies for shark species.

  13. Evaluating machine-learning techniques for recruitment forecasting of seven North East Atlantic fish species

    KAUST Repository

    Fernandes, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The effect of different factors (spawning biomass, environmental conditions) on recruitment is a subject of great importance in the management of fisheries, recovery plans and scenario exploration. In this study, recently proposed supervised classification techniques, tested by the machine-learning community, are applied to forecast the recruitment of seven fish species of North East Atlantic (anchovy, sardine, mackerel, horse mackerel, hake, blue whiting and albacore), using spawning, environmental and climatic data. In addition, the use of the probabilistic flexible naive Bayes classifier (FNBC) is proposed as modelling approach in order to reduce uncertainty for fisheries management purposes. Those improvements aim is to improve probability estimations of each possible outcome (low, medium and high recruitment) based in kernel density estimation, which is crucial for informed management decision making with high uncertainty. Finally, a comparison between goodness-of-fit and generalization power is provided, in order to assess the reliability of the final forecasting models. It is found that in most cases the proposed methodology provides useful information for management whereas the case of horse mackerel is an example of the limitations of the approach. The proposed improvements allow for a better probabilistic estimation of the different scenarios, i.e. to reduce the uncertainty in the provided forecasts.

  14. Availability of iron for phytoplankton growth in the north-east Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, S.; Guieu, C.; Claustre, H.; Leblanc, K.; Moutin, T.; Quéguiner, B.; Sarthou, G.

    2003-04-01

    We present results from a cruise (February March 2001, Programme Océanographique Multi disciplinaire Meso-echelle POMME) in the north east Atlantic between Azore and Portugal (39N--44N, 17--21W). The studied area was characterised by high mesoscale activities. The availability of iron for phytoplankton was studied using deck incubation experiments. On a qualitative point of view, experiments demonstrated that dissolved iron concentration was limiting the primary production in spring. For diatoms a simultaneous limitation by silicic acid has been also observed. The availability of iron has been manipulated using desferral ligand (DFOB). Addition of DFOB clearly reduced the growth of the phytoplankton community showing that a large part of the ambient iron was bioavailable. However our results confirm also previous works showing that a small growth of the phytoplankton community is possible even if DFOB is added. Based on pigment analysis we determined the half saturation constant for different phytoplankton groups. Estimated values were 0.2 nM for micro- and nano-phytoplankton and and much lower for picoplankton.

  15. A statistical analysis of North East Atlantic (submicron aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Global Atmospheric Watch research station at Mace Head (Ireland offers the possibility to sample some of the cleanest air masses being imported into Europe as well as some of the most polluted being exported out of Europe. We present a statistical Cluster~analysis of the physical characteristics of aerosol size distributions in air ranging from the cleanest to the most polluted for the year 2008. Data coverage achieved was 75 % throughout the year. By applying the Hartigan-Wong k-Means method, 12 Clusters were identified as systematically occurring and these 12 Clusters could be further combined into 4 categories with similar characteristics, namely: coastal nucleation category (occurring 21.3 % of the time, open ocean nucleation category (occurring 32.6 % of the time, background clean marine category (occurring 26.1 % of the time and anthropogenic category (occurring 20 % of the time aerosol size distributions. The coastal nucleation category is characterised by a clear and dominant nucleation mode at sizes less that 10 nm while the open ocean nucleation category is characterised by a dominant Aitken mode between 15 nm and 50 nm. The background clean marine characteristic is a clear bimodality in the size distribution, although it should be noted that either the Aitken mode or the Accumulation mode may dominate the number concentration. By contrast, the continentally-influenced size distributions are generally more mono-modal, albeit with traces of bi-modality. The open ocean category occurs more often during May, June and July, corresponding with the N. E. Atlantic high biological period. Combined with the relatively high percentage frequency of occurrence (32.6 %, this suggests that the marine biota is an important source of new aerosol particles in N. E. Atlantic Air.

  16. Diversity of cultured photosynthetic flagellates in the North East Pacific and Arctic Oceans in summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzano, S.; Gourvil, P.; Siano, R.; Chanoine, M.; Marie, D.; Lessard, S.; Sarno, D.; Vaulot, D.

    2012-06-01

    During the MALINA cruise (summer 2009) an extensive effort was undertaken to isolate phytoplankton strains from the North East (NE) Pacific Ocean, the Bering Strait, and the Beaufort Sea. Strains were isolated by flow cytometry sorting (FCS) and pipetting before or after phytoplankton enrichment of seawater samples. Strains were isolated both onboard and back in the laboratory and cultured at 4 °C under light/dark conditions. Overall, we isolated and characterised by light microscopy and 18S rRNA gene sequencing 104 strains of photosynthetic flagellates which grouped into 21 genotypes (defined by 99.5% 18S rRNA gene sequence similarity) mainly affiliated to Chlorophyta and Heterokontophyta. The taxon most frequently isolated was an Arctic ecotype of the green algal genus Micromonas (Arctic Micromonas) which was almost the only phytoplankter recovered within picoplankton (≤ 2 μm) size range. Strains of Arctic Micromonas as well as three unidentified strains related to the same genus were identified in further details by sequencing the Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) region of the rRNA operon. The MALINA Micromonas strains share identical 18S rRNA and ITS sequences suggesting high genetic homogeneity within Arctic Micromonas. The unidentified strains form a genotype likely belonging to a new genus within the family Mamiellaceae to which Micromonas belongs. Other green algae genotypes from the genera Nephroselmis, Chlamydomonas, Pyramimonas were also isolated whereas Heterokontophyta included Pelagophyceae, Dictyochophyceae and Chrysophyceae. Dictyochophyceae included Pedinellales which could not be identified to the genus level whereas Chrysophyceae comprised Dinobryon faculiferum. Moreover, we isolated Rhodomonas sp. as well as a few Haptophyta and dinoflagellates. We identified the dinoflagellate Woloszynskia cincta by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and 28S rRNA gene sequencing. Our morphological analyses show that this species possess the diagnostic

  17. The cycling of iron, zinc and cadmium in the North East Pacific Ocean - Insights from stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved stable isotope ratios of the transition metals provide useful information, both for understanding the cycling of these bioactive trace elements through the oceans, and tracing their marine sources and sinks. Here, we present seawater dissolved Fe, Zn and Cd concentration and stable isotope ratio (δ56Fe, δ66Zn, and δ114Cd) profiles from two stations in the Pacific Ocean, the SAFe Station (30°N 140°W) in the subtropical North East Pacific from the GEOTRACES IC2 cruise, and the marginal San Pedro Basin (33.8°N 118.4°W) within the South California Bight. These data represent, to our knowledge, the first full-water column profiles for δ66Zn and δ56Fe from the open-ocean North Pacific, and the first observations of dissolved δ66Zn and δ114Cd in a low-oxygen marginal basin. At the SAFe station, δ56Fe is isotopically lighter throughout the water column (-0.6 to +0.1‰, relative to IRRM-014) compared to the North Atlantic, suggesting significant differences in Fe sources or Fe cycling between these two ocean basins. A broad minimum in δ56Fe associated with the North Pacific oxygen minimum zone (OMZ; hydrothermal vents and oxic sediments below the OMZ. Zn and Cd concentration profiles at both stations broadly match the distribution of the macronutrients silicate and phosphate, respectively. At SAFe, δ114Cd increases towards the surface, reflecting the biological preference for assimilation of lighter Cd isotopes, while negative Cd∗ (-0.12) associated with low oxygen waters supports the recently proposed hypothesis of water-column CdS precipitation. In contrast to δ114Cd, δ66Zn at SAFe decreases towards the surface ocean, perhaps due to scavenging of isotopically heavy Zn, while at intermediate depths δ66Zn provides further evidence of a mid-depth dissolved δ66Zn maximum. We suggest this may be a global feature of Zn biogeochemistry related to either regeneration of heavy adsorbed Zn, or to ZnS formation and removal within the water column. Data

  18. Egg and larval distributions of seven fish species in north-east Atlantic waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibaibarriaga, L.; Irigoien, X.; Santos, M.; Eltink, A.T.G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of egg and larvae of mackerel, horse mackerel, sardine, hake, megrim, blue whiting and anchovy along the European Atlantic waters (south Portugal to Scotland) during 1998 is described. Time of the year, sea surface temperature and bottom depth are used to define the spawning habitat

  19. Sub meso scale phytoplankton distribution in the north east Atlantic surface waters determined with an automated flow cytometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Thyssen

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton cells in the size range ~1–50 μm were analysed in surface waters using an automated flow cytometer, the Cytosub (http://www.cytobuoy.com, from the Azores to the French Brittany during spring 2007. The Cytosub records the pulse shape of the optical signals generated by phytoplankton cells when intercepted by the laser beam. A total of 6 distinct optical groups were resolved during the whole transect, and the high frequency sampling (15 min provided evidence for the cellular cycle (based on cyclic changes in cell size and fluorescence and distribution changes linked to the different water characteristics crossed in the north east Atlantic provinces. Nutrient concentrations and mixed layer depth varied from west to east, with a decrease in the mixed layer depth and high nutrient concentrations in the middle of the transect as well as near the French coast. Data provided a link between the sub meso scale processes and phytoplankton patchiness, some abundance variations due to the cellular cycle can be pointed out. The high frequency spatial sampling encompasses temporal variations of the phytoplankton abundance, offering a better insight into phytoplankton distribution.

  20. Distribution and conservation of three important bird groups of the Atlantic Forest in north-east Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract The Pernambuco Endemism Center in north-east Brazil has the most fragmented forest cover and the largest number of threatened birds of the whole Atlantic Forest. We analyzed the distribution of three groups of bird species: forest-dependent, endemic and/or threatened using the interpolation method of Inverse Distance Weighting. We also checked the concentration of these birds in protected and unprotected areas, suggesting new sites that need to be protected. The richness concentration of forest-dependent, endemic and/or threatened birds in 123 sites were analysed. There was a greater concentration of the three groups in north Alagoas, south and north Pernambuco, and north and west Paraíba. The distribution of the three groups was almost regular in different vegetation types, although a lower concentration was found in the pioneer formation. There was a greater concentration of birds from all three groups between Pernambuco and Alagoas, and this must be due to the presence of more forest fragments with better structure and vegetation heterogeneity. The protected and unprotected areas hosted important records of endemic and/or threatened birds. We suggested some important places for implementation of new protected areas due to the larger concentrations of the target birds and because they are located within the boundaries of the Important Bird Areas.

  1. Distribution and conservation of three important bird groups of the Atlantic Forest in north-east Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, G A; Araújo, H F P; Azevedo-Júnior, S M

    2016-01-01

    The Pernambuco Endemism Center in north-east Brazil has the most fragmented forest cover and the largest number of threatened birds of the whole Atlantic Forest. We analyzed the distribution of three groups of bird species: forest-dependent, endemic and/or threatened using the interpolation method of Inverse Distance Weighting. We also checked the concentration of these birds in protected and unprotected areas, suggesting new sites that need to be protected. The richness concentration of forest-dependent, endemic and/or threatened birds in 123 sites were analysed. There was a greater concentration of the three groups in north Alagoas, south and north Pernambuco, and north and west Paraíba. The distribution of the three groups was almost regular in different vegetation types, although a lower concentration was found in the pioneer formation. There was a greater concentration of birds from all three groups between Pernambuco and Alagoas, and this must be due to the presence of more forest fragments with better structure and vegetation heterogeneity. The protected and unprotected areas hosted important records of endemic and/or threatened birds. We suggested some important places for implementation of new protected areas due to the larger concentrations of the target birds and because they are located within the boundaries of the Important Bird Areas.

  2. Vertical distribution of sub-micron aerosol chemical composition from North-Western Europe and the North-East Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Morgan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A synthesis of UK based airborne in-situ measurements of aerosol properties representing air masses from North-West Europe and the North-East Atlantic is presented. The major focus of the study is the vertical distribution of sub-micron aerosol chemical composition. Vertical profiles are derived from a Quadrupole Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (Q-AMS. Background sub-micron aerosol vertical profiles are identified and are primarily composed of organic matter and sulphate aerosol. Such background conditions occurred predominantly during periods associated with long-range air mass transport across the Atlantic. These instances may serve as useful model input of aerosol to Western Europe. Increased mass concentration episodes are coincident with European outflow and periods of stagnant/recirculating air masses. Such periods are characterised by significantly enhanced concentrations of nitrate aerosol relative to those of organic matter and sulphate. Periods of enhanced ground level PM2.5 loadings are coincident with instances of high nitrate mass fractions measured on-board the aircraft, indicating that nitrate is a significant contributor to regional pollution episodes. The vertical structure of the sulphate and organic aerosol profiles were shown to be primarily driven by large-scale dynamical processes. The vertical distribution of nitrate is likely determined by both dynamic and thermodynamic processes, with chemical partitioning of gas phase precursors to the particle phase occurring at lower temperatures at the top of the boundary layer. Such effects have profound implications for the aerosol's lifetime and subsequent impacts, highlighting the requirement for accurate representation of the aerosol vertical distribution.

  3. Regression modeling of the North East Atlantic Spring Bloom suggests previously unrecognized biological roles for V and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick J Klein

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify the biogeochemical parameters controlling pCO2, total chlorophyll a, and dimethylsulfide (DMS concentrations during the North East Atlantic Spring Bloom (NASB, we used previously unpublished particulate and dissolved elemental concentrations to construct several linear regression models; first by hypothesis-testing, and then with exhaustive stepwise linear regression followed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The field data was obtained along a latitudinal transect from the Azores Islands to the North Atlantic, and best-fit models (determined by lowest predictive error of up to three variables are presented. Total chlorophyll a is predicted best by biomass (POC, PON parameters and by pigments characteristic of picophytoplankton for the southern section of the sampling transect (from the Azores to the Rockhall-Hatton Plateau and coccolithophores in the northern portion (from the Rockhall-Hatton Plateau to the Denmark Strait. Both the pCO2 and DMS models included variables traditionally associated with the development of the NASB such as mixed-layer depth and with Fe, Si and P-deplete conditions (dissolved Fe, dissolved and biogenic silica, dissolved PO43-. However, the regressions for pCO2 and DMS also include intracellular V and Mo concentrations, respectively. Mo is involved in DMS production as a cofactor in dimethylsulfoxide reductase. No significant biological role for V has yet been determined, although intracellular V is significantly correlated (p-value < 0.05 with biogenic silica (R2 = 0.72 and total chlorophyll a (R2 = 0.49 while the same is not true for its biogeochemical analogue Mo, suggesting active uptake of V by phytoplankton. Our statistical analysis suggests these two lesser-studied metals may play more important roles in bloom dynamics than previously thought, and highlights a need for studies focused on determining their potential biological requirements and cell quotas.

  4. Evidence for Distinct Coastal and Offshore Communities of Bottlenose Dolphins in the North East Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudejans, Machiel G.; Visser, Fleur; Englund, Anneli; Rogan, Emer; Ingram, Simon N.

    2015-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphin stock structure in the northeast Atlantic remains poorly understood. However, fine scale photo-id data have shown that populations can comprise multiple overlapping social communities. These social communities form structural elements of bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) populations, reflecting specific ecological and behavioural adaptations to local habitats. We investigated the social structure of bottlenose dolphins in the waters of northwest Ireland and present evidence for distinct inshore and offshore social communities. Individuals of the inshore community had a coastal distribution restricted to waters within 3 km from shore. These animals exhibited a cohesive, fission-fusion social organisation, with repeated resightings within the research area, within a larger coastal home range. The offshore community comprised one or more distinct groups, found significantly further offshore (>4 km) than the inshore animals. In addition, dorsal fin scarring patterns differed significantly between inshore and offshore communities with individuals of the offshore community having more distinctly marked dorsal fins. Specifically, almost half of the individuals in the offshore community (48%) had characteristic stereotyped damage to the tip of the dorsal fin, rarely recorded in the inshore community (7%). We propose that this characteristic is likely due to interactions with pelagic fisheries. Social segregation and scarring differences found here indicate that the distinct communities are likely to be spatially and behaviourally segregated. Together with recent genetic evidence of distinct offshore and coastal population structures, this provides evidence for bottlenose dolphin inshore/offshore community differentiation in the northeast Atlantic. We recommend that social communities should be considered as fundamental units for the management and conservation of bottlenose dolphins and their habitat specialisations. PMID:25853823

  5. Forecasting database for the tsunami warning center for the western Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailler, A.; Hebert, H.; Loevenbruck, A.; Hernandez, B.

    2011-12-01

    Improvements in the availability of sea-level observations and advances in numerical modeling techniques are increasing the potential for tsunami warnings to be based on numerical model forecasts. Numerical tsunami propagation and inundation models are well developed, but they present a challenge to run in real-time, partly due to computational limitations and also to a lack of detailed knowledge on the earthquake rupture parameters. A first generation model-based tsunami prediction system is being developed as part of the French Tsunami Warning Center that will be operational by mid 2012. It involves a pre-computed unit source functions database (i.e., a number of tsunami model runs that are calculated ahead of time and stored) corresponding to tsunami scenarios generated by a source of seismic moment 1.75E+19 N.m with a rectangular fault 25 km by 20 km in size and 1 m in slip. The faults of the unit functions are placed adjacent to each other, following the discretization of the main seismogenic faults bounding the western Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic basins. An authomatized composite scenarios calculation tool is implemented to allow the simulation of any tsunami propagation scenario (i.e., of any seismic moment). The strategy is based on linear combinations and scaling of a finite number of pre-computed unit source functions. The number of unit functions involved varies with the magnitude of the wanted composite solution and the combined wave heights are multiplied by a given scaling factor to produce the new arbitrary scenario. Uncertainty on the magnitude of the detected event and inaccuracy on the epicenter location are taken into account in the composite scenarios calculation. For one tsunamigenic event, the tool produces finally 3 warning maps (i.e., most likely, minimum and maximum scenarios) together with the rough decision matrix representation. A no-dimension code representation is chosen to show zones in the main axis of energy at the basin

  6. Summer monsoon rainfall variability over North East regions of India and its association with Eurasian snow, Atlantic Sea Surface temperature and Arctic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Amita; Oh, Jaiho; Kim, In-won; Kripalani, R. H.; Mitra, A. K.; Pandithurai, G.

    2016-11-01

    This observational study during the 29-year period from 1979 to 2007 evaluates the potential role of Eurasian snow in modulating the North East-Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall with a lead time of almost 6 months. This link is manifested by the changes in high-latitude atmospheric winter snow variability over Eurasia associated with Arctic Oscillation (AO). Excessive wintertime Eurasian snow leads to an anomalous cooling of the overlying atmosphere and is associated with the negative mode of AO, inducing a meridional wave-train descending over the tropical north Atlantic and is associated with cooling of this region. Once the cold anomalies are established over the tropical Atlantic, it persists up to the following summer leading to an anomalous zonal wave-train further inducing a descending branch over NE-India resulting in weak summer monsoon rainfall.

  7. Regional distribution of styrene analogues generated from polystyrene degradation along the coastlines of the North-East Pacific Ocean and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Bum Gun; Saido, Katsuhiko; Koizumi, Koshiro; Sato, Hideto; Ogawa, Naoto; Chung, Seon-Yong; Kusui, Takashi; Kodera, Yoichi; Kogure, Kazuhio

    2014-05-01

    Beach sand and seawater taken from the coastlines of the North-East Pacific Ocean and Hawaii State were investigated to determine the causes of global chemical contamination from polystyrene (PS). All samples were found to contain styrene monomer (SM), styrene dimers (SD), and styrene trimers (ST) with a concentration distribution of styrene analogues in the order of ST > SD > SM. The contamination by styrene analogues along the West Coast proved more severe than in Alaska and other regions. The Western Coastlines of the USA seem be affected by both land- and ocean-based pollution sources, which might result from it being a heavily populated area as the data suggest a possible proportional relationship between PS pollution and population. Our results suggest the presence of new global chemical contaminants derived from PS in the ocean, and along coasts.

  8. The cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa (Scleractinia) and enigmatic seabed mounds along the north-east Atlantic margin: are they related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J M; Long, D; Wilson, J B; Mortensen, P B; Gage, J D

    2003-01-01

    In this study, an updated distribution of Lophelia pertusa between the Porcupine Seabight and Norwegian shelf is presented. It seems unlikely that enigmatic mound structures observed at water depths of more than 570 m during acoustic seabed surveys, particularly to the west of the Shetland Islands, are related to the occurrence of L. pertusa. At these depths in the Faroe-Shetland Channel, the predominant influence of cold Arctic water precludes its growth. Iceberg dumpsites are also considered unlikely explanations for the origin of these mounds, and they are interpreted as most likely to be related to the release of fluids at the seabed. When mound structures were investigated, no scleractinian corals were recovered at water depths >500 m. This study shows the importance of seabed temperature as an environmental control on cold-water coral distribution. The significance of cold-water coral habitats in sustaining high levels of local-scale biodiversity is now becoming apparent in parallel with increased hydrocarbon extraction and fishing activity beyond the shelf edge. There is growing evidence that these areas have been marked by the passage of deep-water trawls. It seems likely that trawling activity has already reduced the extent of cold-water coral distribution in this region of the north-east Atlantic.

  9. South Atlantic intermediate water advances into the North-east Atlantic with reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation during the last glacial period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois-Dauphin, Quentin; Bonneau, Lucile; Colin, Christophe; Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; Montagna, Paolo; Blamart, Dominique; Hebbeln, Dierk; Van Rooij, David; Pons-Branchu, Edwige; Hemsing, Freya; Wefing, Anne-Marie; Frank, Norbert

    2016-06-01

    The Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd) of seawater and cold-water coral (CWC) samples from the Gulf of Cádiz and the Alboran Sea, at a depth of 280-827 m were investigated in order to constrain middepth water mass dynamics within the Gulf of Cádiz over the past 40 ka. ɛNd of glacial and Holocene CWC from the Alboran Sea and the northern Gulf of Cádiz reveals relatively constant values (-8.6 to -9.0 and -9.5 to -10.4, respectively). Such values are similar to those of the surrounding present-day middepth waters from the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW; ɛNd ˜ -9.4) and Mediterranean Sea Water (MSW; ɛNd ˜ -9.9). In contrast, glacial ɛNd values for CWC collected at thermocline depth (550-827 m) in the southern Gulf of Cádiz display a higher average value (-8.9 ± 0.4) compared to the present-day value (-11.7 ± 0.3). This implies a higher relative contribution of water masses of Mediterranean (MSW) or South Atlantic origin (East Antarctic Intermediate Water, EAAIW). Our study has produced the first evidence of significant radiogenic ɛNd values (˜ -8) at 19, 23-24, and 27 ka, which are coeval with increasing iceberg discharges and a weakening of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Since MOW ɛNd values remained stable during the last glacial period, it is suggested that these radiogenic ɛNd values most likely reflect an enhanced northward propagation of glacial EAAIW into the eastern Atlantic Basin.

  10. Millennial-scale influence of southern intermediate component water into the North-east Atlantic during the last 40 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Christophe; Frank, Norbert; Dubois-Dauphin, Quentin; Bonneau, Lucile; Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; Blamart, Dominique; Van Rooij, David

    2014-05-01

    Throughout the last glacial-interglacial cycle major reorganisations of water masses in the North Atlantic occurred. Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) being an important source of saline and warm intermediate water has been modulated regarding its strength and mean depth. The Gulf of Cadiz near the Strait of Gibraltar is located in a region influenced by the 3 major temperate Atlantic mid-depth water masses: MOW, mid-depth subtropical gyre water and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW). Those water masses are today characterized by contrasted Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd): NACW ɛNd = -11.9; MOW ɛNd= -9.4; AAIW ɛNd= -6 to -7. Here, we have investigated ɛNd of seawater and cold-water corals (L. pertusa, M. oculata and D. dianthus) located to the Alboran Sea and to the SE of the Gulf of Cadiz (between 550 and 850 m) to constrain the present day seawater ɛNd and to reconstruct the past water mass mixing, i.e. MOW variability during the last 37 kyr. Seawater ɛNd values of ~-11.6 indicate that the NACW is today the predominant water mass at the position of the coral bearing sediment core MD08-3231. Cold-water coral fragments have been 230Th/U dated yielding ages of 4.5 to 37 kyr. The coral ɛNd values range from -8 to -10.4 during the last 37 kyr, most likely indicating changes of the dominant water mass provenance. Glacial cold-water corals (from 19 to 37 kyr) are characterized by more radiogenic ɛNd values (> -9.5) compared to the ones from the Holocene demonstrating a decreasing contribution of MOW and/or AAIW in the SE Gulf of Cadiz during climate warming. Strikingly, Heinrich events H2 and H3 reveal even more radiogenic ɛNd values (~-8). In addition, deep-sea corals from the Alboran Sea indicate that ɛNd of the MOW do not change significantly trough time. These results imply a higher contribution of AAIW at 500 m depth in the eastern temperate Atlantic. This first coral based paleo-seawater ɛNd record for the Gulf of Cadiz thus points to significant

  11. Diversity and community structure of harpacticoid copepods associated with cold-water coral substrates in the Porcupine Seabight (North-East Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheerardyn, Hendrik; de Troch, Marleen; Vincx, Magda; Vanreusel, Ann

    2010-03-01

    The influence of microhabitat type on the diversity and community structure of the harpacticoid copepod fauna associated with a cold-water coral degradation zone was investigated in the Porcupine Seabight (North-East Atlantic). Three substrate types were distinguished: dead fragments of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa, skeletons of the glass sponge Aphrocallistes bocagei and the underlying sediment. At the family level, it appears that coral fragments and underlying sediment do not harbour distinctly different assemblages, with Ectinosomatidae, Ameiridae, Pseudotachidiidae, Argestidae and Miraciidae as most abundant. Conclusions on assemblage structure and diversity of the sponge skeletons are limited as only two samples were available. Similarity analysis at species level showed a strong variation in the sediment samples, which did not harbour a distinctly different assemblage in opposition to the coral and sponge samples. Several factors (sediment infill on the hard substrates, mobility of the copepods, limited sample sizes) are proposed to explain this apparent lack of a distinct difference between the microhabitats. Coral fragments and sediment were both characterised by high species diversity and low species dominance, which might indicate that copepod diversity is not substantially influenced by hydrodynamical stress. The additive partitioning of species diversity showed that by adding locations species richness was greatly enhanced. The harpacticoid community in the cold-water coral degradation zone is highly diverse and includes 157 species, 62 genera and 19 families. Information from neighbouring soft-bottom regions is necessary to assess whether total species diversity is increased by the presence of these complex habitat-providing substrates.

  12. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC or calcium carbonate, particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (POC, PON and POP, respectively, as well as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. Results were compared with other studies undertaken in this area since the JGOFS NABE program. Characteristics of the spring bloom generally agreed well with the accepted scenario for the development of the autotrophic community. The NEA seasonal diatom bloom was in the late stages when we sampled the area and diatoms were constrained to the northern part of our transect, over the Icelandic Basin (IB and Icelandic Shelf (IS. Coccolithophores dominated the phytoplankton community, with a large distribution over the Rockall-Hatton Plateau (RHP and IB. The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP region at the southern end of our transect was the region with the lowest biomass, as demonstrated by very low chl-a concentrations and a community dominated by picophytoplankton. Early depletion of dissolved silicic acid (DSi and increased stratification of the surface layer most likely triggered the end of the diatom bloom, leading to coccolithophore dominance. The chronic Si deficiency observed in the NEA could be linked to moderate Fe limitation, which increases the efficiency of the Si pump. TEP closely mirrored the distribution of both biogenic silica at depth and prymnesiophytes in the surface layer suggesting the sedimentation of the diatom bloom in the form of aggregates, but the relative contribution of diatoms and

  13. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC or calcium carbonate, particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (POC, PON and POP, respectively, as well as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. Results were compared with other studies undertaken in this area since the JGOFS NABE program. Characteristics of the spring bloom generally agreed well with the accepted scenario for the development of the autotrophic community. The NEA seasonal diatom bloom was in the late stages when we sampled the area and diatoms were constrained to the northern part of our transect, over the Icelandic Basin (IB and Icelandic Shelf (IS. Coccolithophores dominated the phytoplankton community, with a large distribution over the Rockall-Hatton Plateau (RHP and IB. The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP region at the southern end of our transect was the region with the lowest biomass, as demonstrated by very low Chla concentrations and a community dominated by picophytoplankton. Early depletion of dissolved silicic acid (DSi and increased stratification of the surface layer most likely triggered the end of the diatom bloom, leading to coccolithophore dominance. The chronic Si deficiency observed in the NEA could be linked to moderate Fe limitation, which increases the efficiency of the Si pump. TEP closely mirrored the distribution of both biogenic silica at depth and prymnesiophytes in the surface layer suggesting the sedimentation of the diatom bloom in the form of aggregates, but the relative contribution of diatoms and

  14. Identification and characterization of a distinct banana bunchy top virus isolate of Pacific-Indian Oceans group from North-East India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amrita; Roy, Somnath; Behere, Ganesh T; Roy, Subhra Saikat; Dutta, Sudip Kumar; Ngachan, S V

    2014-04-01

    Banana bunch top virus (BBTV) is considered to be a serious threat to banana production. A new isolate of the virus (BBTV-Umiam) was identified and characterized from local banana mats growing in mid-hills of Meghalaya in North-East India. The complete nucleotide sequence analysis revealed the presence of six full-length ssDNA components (DNA R, DNA U3, DNA S, DNA M, DNA C and DNA N) sharing major common region (CR-M) and a stem-loop common region (CR-SL). BBTV-Umiam showed a unique deletion of 20 nucleotides in the intergenic region of DNA R, the absence of predicted open reading frame (ORF) in DNA U3 and probability for a small ORF in DNA U3 expecting functional evidence at transcriptional level. Phylogenetic analysis based on 88 complete nucleotide sequence of BBTV DNA R available in GenBank generated two broad clusters of Pacific-Indian Oceans (PIO) and South-East Asian (SEA) groups including BBTV-Umiam within PIO cluster. However, BBTV-Umiam was identified as the most distinct member of the PIO group with 100% bootstrap support. This was further supported by the phylogenetic grouping of each genomic component of BBTV-Umiam at the distant end of PIO group during clustering of 21 complete BBTV sequences. BBTV-Umiam shared relatively less nucleotide identity with PIO group for each genomic component (85.0-95.4%) and corresponding ORF (93.8-97.5%) than that of earlier PIO isolates (91.5-99.6% and 96.0-99.3%, respectively). Recombination analysis revealed two intra-component and five inter-component recombination events in BBTV-Umiam, but none of them was unique. Moreover, the isolate was identified as major parental sequence for intra-component recombination event spanning the replication-associated protein encoding region in Tongan BBTV DNA R. The current study indicated differential evolution of BBTV in North-East India (Meghalaya). The natural occurrence of hybrids of Musa balbisiana and M. acuminata in this geographically isolated region could be the

  15. Validation of satellite derived LHF using coare_3.0 scheme and time series data over north-east Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Sathe, P.V.

    -6538 versión on-line Gayana (Concepc.) v.68 n.2 supl.TIIProc Concepción 2004 Como citar este artículo Gayana 68(2): 420-426, 2004 VALIDATION OF SATELLITE DERIVED LHF USING COARE_3.0 SCHEME AND TIME SERIES DATA OVER NORTH-EAST INDIAN...

  16. Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Survey has covered an area from Cape Hatteras to Georges Bank. The survey was conducted every two or three...

  17. Distribution and species identification in the crustacean isopod genus Dynamene Leach, 1814 along the North East Atlantic-Black Sea axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Pedro E.; Queiroga, Henrique; Costa, Filipe O.; Holdich, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sphaeromatid isopods, such as Dynamene, are common and abundant members of the invertebrate fauna of littoral and shallow sublittoral substrates. Six species of Dynamene occur in the northern hemisphere. Only two species exist outside this range, in Australia. The distribution of the various species in the NE Atlantic-Black Sea axis has been controversial due to the difficulty in the identification of the different species. This has led to inaccurate records of their distribution, ultimately generating uncertain or faulty assessments on the biodiversity of these habitats. An update and a clarification about the distribution of this genus is therefore in order. In this study, we describe the distribution of Dynamene species in the light of new records from the NE Atlantic Ocean and its associated islands, and the Mediterranean, Black and Red Seas, and from re-examination of museum and several authors’ personal collections. Based on these observations, we extend the northern and southern limits of Dynamene bidentata (Adams); the western and southern limits of Dynamene magnitorata Holdich; the northern, eastern and western limits of Dynamene edwardsi (Lucas); and the eastern and western limits of Dynamene bifida Torelli. The range of Dynamene tubicauda Holdich is extended, but is still only known from the eastern Mediterranean. We also clarify the synonymy of Dynamene torelliae Holdich with Dynamene bicolor (Rathke), and the occurrence of Dynamene bicolor in the Black Sea. New distribution maps of the six Dynamene species are presented. Illustrated keys to the adult males and females of the northern hemisphere species are provided. PMID:27917055

  18. Distribution and species identification in the crustacean isopod genus Dynamene Leach, 1814 along the North East Atlantic-Black Sea axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro E. Vieira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sphaeromatid isopods, such as Dynamene, are common and abundant members of the invertebrate fauna of littoral and shallow sublittoral substrates. Six species of Dynamene occur in the northern hemisphere. Only two species exist outside this range, in Australia. The distribution of the various species in the NE Atlantic-Black Sea axis has been controversial due to the difficulty in the identification of the different species. This has led to inaccurate records of their distribution, ultimately generating uncertain or faulty assessments on the biodiversity of these habitats. An update and a clarification about the distribution of this genus is therefore in order. In this study, we describe the distribution of Dynamene species in the light of new records from the NE Atlantic Ocean and its associated islands, and the Mediterranean, Black and Red Seas, and from re-examination of museum and several authors’ personal collections. Based on these observations, we extend the northern and southern limits of D. bidentata (Adams; the western and southern limits of D. magnitorata Holdich; the northern, eastern and western limits of D. edwardsi (Lucas; and the eastern and western limits of D. bifida Torelli. The range of Dynamene tubicauda Holdich is extended, but is still only known from the eastern Mediterranean. We also clarify the synonymy of D. torelliae Holdich with D. bicolor (Rathke, and the occurrence of D. bicolor in the Black Sea. New distribution maps of the six Dynamene species are presented. Illustrated keys to the adult males and females of the northern hemisphere species are provided.

  19. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Worsnop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the NE Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm−3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400–600 cm−3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm−3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Black carbon concentrations in polluted air were between 300–400 ng m−3, and in clean marine air were less than 50 ng m−3. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN to total condensation nuclei (CN concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40–50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume

  20. Aerosol properties associated with air masses arriving into the North East Atlantic during the 2008 Mace Head EUCAARI intensive observing period: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of the EUCAARI Intensive Observing Period, a 4-week campaign to measure aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties, atmospheric structure, and cloud microphysics was conducted from mid-May to mid-June, 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station, located at the interface of Western Europe and the N. E. Atlantic and centered on the west Irish coastline. During the campaign, continental air masses comprising both young and aged continental plumes were encountered, along with polar, Arctic and tropical air masses. Polluted-continental aerosol concentrations were of the order of 3000 cm−3, while background marine air aerosol concentrations were between 400–600 cm−3. The highest marine air concentrations occurred in polar air masses in which a 15 nm nucleation mode, with concentration of 1100 cm−3, was observed and attributed to open ocean particle formation. Continental air submicron chemical composition (excluding refractory sea salt was dominated by organic matter, closely followed by sulphate mass. Although the concentrations and size distribution spectral shape were almost identical for the young and aged continental cases, hygroscopic growth factors (GF and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN to total condensation nuclei (CN concentration ratios were significantly less in the younger pollution plume, indicating a more oxidized organic component to the aged continental plume. The difference in chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factor appear to result in a 40–50% impact on aerosol scattering coefficients and Aerosol Optical Depth, despite almost identical aerosol microphysical properties in both cases, with the higher values been recorded for the more aged case. For the CCN/CN ratio, the highest ratios were seen in the more age plume. In marine air, sulphate mass dominated the sub-micron component, followed by water soluble organic carbon, which, in turn, was dominated by

  1. First-year survival of North East Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus) from 1998 to 2012 appears to be driven by availability of Calanus, a preferred copepod prey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Teunis

    2016-01-01

    Mackerel (Scomber scombrus) is one of the ecologically and economically most important fish species in the Atlantic. Its recruitment has, for unknown reasons, been exceptional from 1998 to 2012. The majority (75%) of the survivors in the first winter were found north of an oceanographic division ...

  2. Environmental drivers of temporal succession in recent dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from a coastal site in the North-East Atlantic (Lisbon Bay, Portugal)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Amorim, Ana

    2008-01-01

    the river runoff cyst signal is characterised by dominance of autotrophs forming calcareous cysts, mainly Scrippsiella spp. Lingulodinium polyedrum is suggested to be indicative of upwelling conditions in the region but reflecting an ecological niche different from the more classical heterotrophic...... assemblage and G. catenatum. Our results reinforce the applicability of dinoflagellate cysts as environmental tracers in the warm-temperate region of the NE Atlantic, and contribute to the development of palaeoenvironmental cyst-based signals....

  3. Resource utilization by deep-sea sharks at the Le Danois Bank, Cantabrian Sea, north-east Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, I; Cartes, J E; Serrano, A; Velasco, F; Olaso, I; Sánchez, F; Frutos, I

    2009-10-01

    The feeding habits of birdbeak dogfish Deania calcea, velvet belly lantern shark Etmopterus spinax and blackmouth catshark Galeus melastomus at Le Danois Bank, Cantabrian Sea, south Bay of Biscay were studied in relation to their bathymetric distribution. Deep-sea sharks were collected during two multidisciplinary surveys carried out in October 2003 and April 2004 at the Le Danois Bank. Two different habitats were defined: (1) the top of the bank, ranging from 454 to 642 m depth and covered by fine-sand sediments with a low percentage of organic matter, and (2) the inner basin located between the bank and the Cantabrian Sea's continental shelf, at depths of 810-1048 m, which was characterized by a high proportion of silt and organic matter. Deania calcea was not present at the top of the bank but was abundant below 642 m, while E. spinax was abundant in the shallower top of the bank but was not found in the deeper inner basin. There was almost no bathymetric overlap between these two deep-sea shark species. Galeus melastomus was found over the whole depth range. There seemed to be an ontogenetic segregation with depth for this species, however, since 80% of the specimens collected at the top of the bank were < 600 mm total length (L(T)) (mean 510 mm L(T)), whereas larger individuals (mean 620 mm L(T)) inhabited deeper zones. Galeus melastomus exhibited a significantly higher feeding intensity than both E. spinax at the top of the bank and D. calcea in the inner basin. Little dietary overlap between D. calcea and G. melastomus in the inner basin was found, with D. calcea being an ichthyophagous predator while the diet of G. melastomus at these depths was composed of a variety of meso-bathypelagic shrimps (e.g. Acantephyra pelagica, Pasiphaea spp. and Sergia robusta), cephalopods and fishes. The diets of E. spinax and G. melastomus at the top of the bank showed a high dietary overlap of euphausiids, which represented the main prey taxa for both species. Euphausiids declined in abundance with depth which was reflected in the diet of G. melastomus. The cluster analysis of prey affinities among hauls depicted two major groups, corresponding to the two different habitats (top of the bank and inner basin). Redundancy analysis also indicated top-basin segregation, with euphausiids representing the main prey taxa at the top of the bank and bathypelagic shrimps in the inner basin. Euphausiids and Micromesistius poutassou were key prey within the Le Danois Bank ecosystem since they were positively selected by the three deep-sea shark species. These results show that the feeding ecology of these predators in Le Danois Bank ecosystem is highly influenced by depth-related variables, as a result of changes in prey availability. Overall results were analysed in relation to the deep-sea Le Danois ecosystem structure and functioning.

  4. Observations of newborn blue sharks Prionace glauca in shallow inshore waters of the north-east Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañón, R; Maño, T; Mucientes, G

    2016-10-01

    The anomalous presence of numerous blue shark Prionace glauca neonates and juveniles in shallow inshore waters of Galicia, north-west Spain, during the summers of 2014 and 2015 is reported. Changes in oceanographic conditions, high recruitment events or changes in the pupping area are discussed as possible causes of this unusual behaviour. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. CARINA: nutrient data in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanhua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Data on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged to a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. These data have gone through rigorous quality control (QC procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the measured parameters in the CARINA data base were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the data products, i.e. three merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions; Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Out of a total of 188 cruise entries in the CARINA database, 98 were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean and of these 84 cruises report nitrate values, 79 silicate, and 78 phosphate. Here we present details of the secondary QC for nutrients for the Atlantic Ocean part of CARINA. Procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between cruises and inversion analysis of all crossover data are briefly described. Adjustments were applied to the nutrient values for 43 of the cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. With these adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s (Key et al., 2004. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal accuracy of the CARINA-ATL nutrient data to be: nitrate 1.5%; phosphate 2.6%; silicate 3.1%. The CARINA data are now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation.

  6. CARINA: nutrient data in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanhua

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Data on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged to a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic. These data have gone through rigorous quality control (QC procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the measured parameters in the CARINA data base were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the data products, i.e. three merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions; Arctic, Atlantic and Southern Ocean. Out of a total of 188 cruise entries in the CARINA database, 98 were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean and of these 84 cruises report nitrate values, 79 silicate, and 78 phosphate. Here we present details of the secondary QC for nutrients for the Atlantic Ocean part of CARINA. Procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between cruises and inversion analysis of all crossover data are briefly described. Adjustments were applied to the nutrient values for 43 of the cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. With these adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s (Key et al., 2004. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal accuracy of the CARINA-ATL nutrient data to be: nitrate 1.5%; phosphate 2.6%; silicate 3.1%. The CARINA data are now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates and for model validation.

  7. Conference report for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) : wind integration in the North East : addressing wind integration issues in north eastern North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-03-27

    This conference report prepared for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) contains a summary of the presentations which addressed wind integration issues facing northeastern North America. The region of northeastern North America encompasses New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont. Wind generation, load and transmission issues associated with wind integration in the region were discussed, including those that inhibit the transmission of wind; actions that will improve the integration of wind; and the process that could facilitate the uptake of wind. The conference reviewed key drivers behind wind industry growth; system operator capabilities; the European experience of wind integration; technology drivers; forecasting; balancing; and transmission planning, cost allocation and regulation. Advanced grid options and wind turbine generator products designed to solve grid connection problems were reviewed with reference to tools currently being designed to improve wind power plant performance and grid compliance. Developments within various independent system operators were reviewed along with governmental transmission entities and interconnection requirements for wind power plants. 38 refs., 17 figs., 2 appendices.

  8. Atlantic and indian oceans pollution in africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Babagana

    Africa is the second largest and most populated continent after Asia. Geographically it is located between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. Most of the Africa's most populated and industrialized cities are located along the coast of the continent facing the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, example of such cities include Casablanca, Dakar, Accra, Lagos, Luanda and Cape town all facing the Atlantic Ocean and cities like East London, Durban, Maputo, Dar-es-salaam and Mogadishu are all facing the Indian Ocean. As a result of the geographical locations of African Coastal Cities plus increase in their population, industries, sea port operations, petroleum exploration activities, trafficking of toxic wastes and improper waste management culture lead to the incessant increase in the pollution of the two oceans. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE ATLANTIC OCEAN i. The petroleum exploration activities going on along the coast of "Gulf of Guinea" region and Angola continuously causes oil spillages in the process of drilling, bunkering and discharging of petroleum products in the Atlantic Ocean. ii. The incessant degreasing of the Sea Ports "Quay Aprons" along the Coastal cities of Lagos, Luanda, Cape Town etc are continuously polluting the Atlantic Ocean with chemicals. iii. Local wastes generated from the houses located in the coastal cities are always finding their ways into the Atlantic Ocean. NATURE OF POLLUTION OF THE INDIAN OCEAN i. Unlike the Atlantic ocean where petroleum is the major pollutant, the Indian Ocean is polluted by Toxic / Radioactive waste suspected to have been coming from the developed nations as reported by the United Nations Environmental Programme after the Tsunami disaster in December 2004 especially along the coast of Somalia. ii. The degreasing of the Quay Aprons at Port Elizabeth, Maputo, Dar-es-Salaam and Mongolism Sea Ports are also another major source polluting the Indian Ocean. PROBLEMS GENERATED AS A RESULT OF THE OCEANS POLLUTION i. Recent report

  9. A preliminary report on the biomass of chaetognaths in the Indian Ocean comparing the south-west and north-east monsoon periods

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, V.R.

    The data for the present paper have been derived from the analysis 1276 standard samples of plankton collected during the International Indian Ocean Expedition (1962-65) At the Indian Ocean Biological Centre fractions (3-5 ml) of the samples were...

  10. Vertical distribution of temperature, salinity and density in the upper 500 metres of the north equatorial Indian Ocean during the north-east monsoon period

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, L.V.G.; Jayaraman, R.

    In the 4th and 5th scientific cruises of INS KISTNA under the Indian Programme of IIOE, five sections were worked out in the North Equatorial Indian Ocean during Jan-Feb 1963. Using the physical oceanographic data collected in these cruises...

  11. CARINA oxygen data in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stendardo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean project, a new dataset with many previously unpublished hydrographic data from the Atlantic, Arctic and Southern Ocean was assembled and subjected to careful quality control (QC procedures. Here, we present the dissolved oxygen measurements in the Atlantic region of the dataset and describe in detail the secondary QC procedures that aim to ensure that the data are internally consistent. This is achieved by a cross-over analysis, i.e. the comparison of deep ocean data at places that were sampled by different cruises at different times. Initial adjustments to the individual cruises were then determined by an inverse procedure that computes a set of adjustments that requires the minimum amount of adjustment and at the same time reduces the offsets in an optimal manner. The initial adjustments were then reviewed by the CARINA members, and only those that passed the following two criteria were adopted: (i the region is not subject to substantial temporal variability, and (ii the adjustment must be based on at least three stations from each cruise. No adjustment was recommended for cruises that did not fit these criteria. The final CARINA-Oxygen dataset has 103414 oxygen samples from 9491 stations obtained during 98 cruises covering three decades. The sampling density of the oxygen data is particularly good in the North Atlantic north of about 40° N especially after 1987. In contrast, the sample density in the South Atlantic is much lower. Some cruises appear to have poor data quality, and were subsequently omitted from the adjusted dataset. Of the data included in the adjusted dataset, 20% were adjusted with a mean adjustment of 2%. Due to the achieved internal consistency, the resulting product is well suited to produce an improved climatology or to study long-term changes in the oxygen content of the ocean. However, the adjusted dataset is not necessarily better suited than the unadjusted data to

  12. Plankton respiration in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol; Serret, Pablo; Tilstone, Gavin; Teira, Eva; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Rees, Andrew P.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.

    2002-05-01

    Concurrent measurements of dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), size fractionated primary production ( 14C PP), nitrogen uptake, nutrients, chlorophyll a concentration, and heterotrophic and autotrophic bacterial abundance were collected from the upper 200 m of a latitudinal (32°S-48°N) transect in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean during May/June 1998. The mean mixed layer respiration rate was 2.5±2.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=119) for the whole transect, 2.2±1.1 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 ( n=32) in areas where chlorophyll a was dissolved oxygen consumption, was 0.8 ( n=11). At the time of the study, plankton community respiration exceeded GP in the picoautotroph dominated oligotrophic regions (Eastern Tropical Atlantic [15.5°S-14.2°N] and North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre [21.5-42.5°N]), which amounted to 50% of the stations sampled along the 12,100 km transect. These regions also exhibited high heterotrophic: autotrophic biomass ratios, higher turnover rates of phytoplankton than of bacteria and low f ratios. However, the carbon supply mechanisms required to sustain the rates of respiration higher than GP could not be fully quantified. Future research should aim to determine the temporal balance of respiration and GP together with substrate supply mechanisms in these ocean regions.

  13. Compostos orgânicos em sedimentos marinhos: uma viagem ao fundo do Oceano Atlântico Norte Organic compounds in marine sediments: a journey to the bottom of the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Augusto dos Santos Madureira

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the origin and distribution of several classes of organic compounds present in recently deposited abyssal sediments in the North East Atlantic Ocean. Six cores were sampled (multicorer along 20ºW longitude as part of the UK's Biogeochemical Ocean Flux Study (BOFS. The sediments underlie diverse water columns, ranging from the Iceland Basin, an area of high primary productivity but presumed low aeolian inputs, to an area off West Africa characterized by oligotrophic and upwelling waters and high aeolian input. Concentration of predominantly marine (e.g. sterols and alkenones and terrestrial (n-alkanes compounds showed remarkable changes along the transect.

  14. Ocean station data collected using bottle casts from ALMIRANTE SALDANHA From Northwest Atlantic and Southwest Atlantic Ocean from 30 October 1980 to 21 August 1982 (NODC Accession 9000164)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean station data were collected using seechi disk, meteorological sensors, and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) and Southwest Atlantic...

  15. Exploring the interannual variability of extreme wave climate in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaguirre, Cristina; Menéndez, Melisa; Camus, Paula; Méndez, Fernando J.; Mínguez, Roberto; Losada, Inigo J.

    2012-12-01

    The extreme wave climate is of paramount importance for: (i) off-shore and coastal engineering design, (ii) ship design and maritime transportation, or (iii) analysis of coastal processes. Identifying the synoptic patterns that produce extreme waves is necessary to understand the wave climate for a specific location. Thus, a characterization of these weather patterns may allow the study of the relationships between the magnitude and occurrence of extreme wave events and the climate system. The aim of this paper is to analyze the interannual variability of extreme wave heights. For this purpose, we present a methodological framework and its application to an area over the North East (NE) Atlantic Ocean. The climatology in the NE Atlantic is analyzed using the self-organizing maps (SOMs). The application of this clustering technique to monthly mean sea level pressure fields provides a continuum of synoptic categorizations compared with discrete realizations produced through most traditional methods. The extreme wave climate has been analyzed by means of monthly maxima of the significant wave height (SWH) in several locations over the NE Atlantic. A statistical approach based on a time-dependent generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution has been applied. The seasonal variation was characterized and, afterwards, the interannual variability was studied throughout regional pressure patterns. The anomalies of the 50-year return level estimates of SWH, due to interannual variability have been projected into the weather types of SOM. It provides a comprehensive visual representation, which relates the weather type with the positive or negative contribution to extreme waves over the selected locations.

  16. A new CO2 vent for the study of ocean acidification in the Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, C A; Sangil, C; Hernández, J C

    2016-08-15

    Natural CO2 vents are considered the gold standard of ocean acidification (OA) studies. In coastal areas these rare vents have only been investigated at the Mediterranean temperate rocky reefs and at Indo-Pacific coral reefs, although there should be more at other volcanic shores around the world. Substantial scientific efforts on investigating OA effects have been mostly performed by laboratory experiments. However, there is a debate on how acute this kind of approach truly represents the responses to OA scenarios, since it generally involves short-term, rapid perturbation and single variable and species experiments. Due to these limitations, world areas with natural CO2 vents are essential to understand long-term marine ecosystem responses to rising human derived atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Here, we presented a new vent found in the subtropical North East Atlantic reefs (28°N, La Palma Island) that shows moderate CO2 emission (900ppm), reducing pH values to an annual average of 7.86±0.16. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Physical and remineralization processes govern the cobalt distribution in the deep western Atlantic ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dulaquais

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The distributions of the bio-essential trace element dissolved Co (DCo and the apparent particulate Co (PCo are presented along the GEOTRACES-A02 deep section from 64° N to 50° S in the West Atlantic Ocean. PCo was determined as the difference between total cobalt (TCo, unfiltered samples and DCo. DCo concentrations ranged from 14.7 pM to 94.3 pM, and PCo concentrations from undetectable values to 18.8 pM. The lowest DCo concentrations were observed in the subtropical domains, and the highest in the low-oxygenated Atlantic Central Waters (ACW that appeared to be the major reservoir of DCo in the West Atlantic. In the Antarctic Bottom Waters, the enrichment in DCo with ageing of the water-mass can be related to suspension and redissolution of bottom sediments a well as diffusion of DCo from abyssal sediments. Mixing and dilution of deep water-masses, rather than scavenging of DCo onto settling particles, generated the meridional decrease of DCo along the southward large-scale circulation in the deep West Atlantic. Furthermore the apparent scavenged profile of DCo observed in the deep waters likely resulted from the persistence of relatively high concentrations in intermediate waters and low DCo concentrations in underlaying bottom waters. We suggested that the 2010 Icelandic volcanic eruption can be a source of DCo that could have been transported in the core of the North-East Atlantic Deep Waters. At intermediate depths, the high concentrations of DCo recorded in the ACW linearly correlated with the apparent utilization of oxygen (AOU, indicating that remineralization of DCo can be significant (representing up to 29% of the DCo present. Furthermore the preferential remineralization of phosphate (P compared to Co in these low-oxygenated waters suggested a decoupling between the deep cycles of P and Co. The vertical diffusion of DCo from the ACW appeared to be a significant source of DCo into the surface waters of the equatorial domain

  18. The oceanic tides in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Genco

    Full Text Available The finite element ocean tide model of Le Provost and Vincent (1986 has been applied to the simulation of the M2 and K1 components over the South Atlantic Ocean. The discretisation of the domain, of the order of 200 km over the deep ocean, is refined down to 15 km along the coasts, such refinement enables wave propagation and damping over the continental shelves to be correctly solved. The marine boundary conditions, from Dakar to Natal, through the Drake passage and from South Africa to Antarctica, are deduced from in situ data and from Schwiderski's solution and then optimised following a procedure previously developed by the authors. The solutions presented are in very good agreement with in situ data: the root mean square deviations from a standard subset of 13 pelagic stations are 1.4 cm for M2 and 0.45 cm for K1, which is significantly better overall than solutions published to date in the literature. Zooms of the M2 solution are presented for the Falkland Archipelago, the Weddell Sea and the Patagonian Shelf. The first zoom allows detailing of the tidal structure around the Falklands and its interpretation in terms of a stationary trapped Kelvin wave system. The second zoom, over the Weddell Sea, reveals for the first time what must be the tidal signal under the permanent ice shelf and gives a solution over that sea which is generally in agreement with observations. The third zoom is over the complex Patagonian Shelf. This zoom illustrates the ability of the model to simulate the tides, even over this area, with a surprising level of realism, following purely hydrodynamic modelling procedures, within a global ocean tide model. Maps of maximum associated tidal currents are also given, as a first illustration of a by-product of these simulations.

  19. NAO and extreme ocean states in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Emily; Gallagher, Sarah; Clancy, Colm; Dias, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Large scale atmospheric oscillations are known to have an influence on waves in the North Atlantic. In quantifying how the wave and wind climate of this region may change towards the end of the century due to climate change, it is useful to investigate the influence of large scale oscillations using indices such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO: fluctuations in the difference between the Icelandic low pressure system and the Azore high pressure system). In this study a statistical analysis of the station-based NAO index was carried out using an ensemble of EC-Earth global climate simulations, where EC-Earth is a European-developed atmosphere ocean sea-ice coupled climate model. The NAO index was compared to observations and to projected changes in the index by the end of the century under the RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 forcing scenarios. In addition, an ensemble of EC-Earth driven WAVEWATCH III wave model projections over the North Atlantic was analysed to determine the correlations between the NAO and significant wave height (Hs) and the NAO and extreme ocean states. For the most part, no statistically significant differences were found between the distributions of observed and modelled station-based NAO or in projected distributions of the NAO. Means and extremes of Hs are projected to decrease on average by the end of this century. The 95th percentile of Hs is strongly positively correlated to the NAO. Projections of Hs extremes are location dependent and in fact, under the influence of positive NAO the 20-year return levels of Hs were found to be amplified in some regions. However, it is important to note that the projected decreases in the 95th percentile of Hs off the west coast of Ireland are not statistically significant in one of the RCP4.5 and one of the RCP8.5 simulations (me41, me83) which indicates that there is still uncertainty in the projections of higher percentiles.

  20. AtlantOS - Optimizing and Enhancing the Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Anja; Visbeck, Martin; AtlantOS Consortium, the

    2016-04-01

    Atlantic Ocean observation is currently undertaken through loosely-coordinated, in-situ observing networks, satellite observations and data management arrangements of heterogeneous international, national and regional design to support science and a wide range of information products. Thus there is tremendous opportunity to develop the systems towards a fully integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System consistent with the recently developed 'Framework of Ocean Observing'. The vision of AtlantOS is to improve and innovate Atlantic observing by using the Framework of Ocean Observing to obtain an international, more sustainable, more efficient, more integrated, and fit-for-purpose system. Hence, the AtlantOS initiative will have a long-lasting and sustainable contribution to the societal, economic and scientific benefit arising from this integrated approach. This will be delivered by improving the value for money, extent, completeness, quality and ease of access to Atlantic Ocean data required by industries, product supplying agencies, scientist and citizens. The overarching target of the AtlantOS initiative is to deliver an advanced framework for the development of an integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System that goes beyond the state-of -the-art, and leaves a legacy of sustainability after the life of the project. The legacy will derive from the following aims: i) to improve international collaboration in the design, implementation and benefit sharing of ocean observing, ii) to promote engagement and innovation in all aspects of ocean observing, iii) to facilitate free and open access to ocean data and information, iv) to enable and disseminate methods of achieving quality and authority of ocean information, v) to strengthen the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and to sustain observing systems that are critical for the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service and its applications and vi) to contribute to the aims of the Galway Statement on Atlantic

  1. Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation slowdown cooled the subtropical ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Stuart A; Roberts, Christopher D; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Johns, William E; Hobbs, Will; Palmer, Matthew D; Rayner, Darren; Smeed, David A; McCarthy, Gerard

    2013-12-16

    [1] Observations show that the upper 2 km of the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean cooled throughout 2010 and remained cold until at least December 2011. We show that these cold anomalies are partly driven by anomalous air-sea exchange during the cold winters of 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 and, more surprisingly, by extreme interannual variability in the ocean's northward heat transport at 26.5°N. This cooling driven by the ocean's meridional heat transport affects deeper layers isolated from the atmosphere on annual timescales and water that is entrained into the winter mixed layer thus lowering winter sea surface temperatures. Here we connect, for the first time, variability in the northward heat transport carried by the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation to widespread sustained cooling of the subtropical North Atlantic, challenging the prevailing view that the ocean plays a passive role in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system on monthly-to-seasonal timescales.

  2. Changes in North Atlantic nitrogen fixation controlled by ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Marietta; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Martínez-García, Alfredo; Meckler, A Nele; Hain, Mathis P; Haug, Gerald H

    2013-09-12

    In the ocean, the chemical forms of nitrogen that are readily available for biological use (known collectively as 'fixed' nitrogen) fuel the global phytoplankton productivity that exports carbon to the deep ocean. Accordingly, variation in the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir has been proposed as a cause of glacial-interglacial changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Marine nitrogen fixation, which produces most of the ocean's fixed nitrogen, is thought to be affected by multiple factors, including ocean temperature and the availability of iron and phosphorus. Here we reconstruct changes in North Atlantic nitrogen fixation over the past 160,000 years from the shell-bound nitrogen isotope ratio ((15)N/(14)N) of planktonic foraminifera in Caribbean Sea sediments. The observed changes cannot be explained by reconstructed changes in temperature, the supply of (iron-bearing) dust or water column denitrification. We identify a strong, roughly 23,000-year cycle in nitrogen fixation and suggest that it is a response to orbitally driven changes in equatorial Atlantic upwelling, which imports 'excess' phosphorus (phosphorus in stoichiometric excess of fixed nitrogen) into the tropical North Atlantic surface. In addition, we find that nitrogen fixation was reduced during glacial stages 6 and 4, when North Atlantic Deep Water had shoaled to become glacial North Atlantic intermediate water, which isolated the Atlantic thermocline from excess phosphorus-rich mid-depth waters that today enter from the Southern Ocean. Although modern studies have yielded diverse views of the controls on nitrogen fixation, our palaeobiogeochemical data suggest that excess phosphorus is the master variable in the North Atlantic Ocean and indicate that the variations in its supply over the most recent glacial cycle were dominated by the response of regional ocean circulation to the orbital cycles.

  3. Identifying the European fossil fuel plumes in the atmosphere over the Northeast Atlantic Region through isotopic observations and numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geels, C.; Christensen, J.H.; Hansen, A.W.;

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric transport, C-14. fossil fuel CO_2, numerical modeling, the north East Atlantic Region Udgivelsesdato: 18 August......Atmospheric transport, C-14. fossil fuel CO_2, numerical modeling, the north East Atlantic Region Udgivelsesdato: 18 August...

  4. Enhanced warming of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Vincent S.; Griffies, Stephen M.; Anderson, Whit G.; Winton, Michael; Alexander, Michael A.; Delworth, Thomas L.; Hare, Jonathan A.; Harrison, Matthew J.; Rosati, Anthony; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fifth assessment of projected global and regional ocean temperature change is based on global climate models that have coarse (˜100 km) ocean and atmosphere resolutions. In the Northwest Atlantic, the ensemble of global climate models has a warm bias in sea surface temperature due to a misrepresentation of the Gulf Stream position; thus, existing climate change projections are based on unrealistic regional ocean circulation. Here we compare simulations and an atmospheric CO2 doubling response from four global climate models of varying ocean and atmosphere resolution. We find that the highest resolution climate model (˜10 km ocean, ˜50 km atmosphere) resolves Northwest Atlantic circulation and water mass distribution most accurately. The CO2 doubling response from this model shows that upper-ocean (0-300 m) temperature in the Northwest Atlantic Shelf warms at a rate nearly twice as fast as the coarser models and nearly three times faster than the global average. This enhanced warming is accompanied by an increase in salinity due to a change in water mass distribution that is related to a retreat of the Labrador Current and a northerly shift of the Gulf Stream. Both observations and the climate model demonstrate a robust relationship between a weakening Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and an increase in the proportion of Warm-Temperate Slope Water entering the Northwest Atlantic Shelf. Therefore, prior climate change projections for the Northwest Atlantic may be far too conservative. These results point to the need to improve simulations of basin and regional-scale ocean circulation.

  5. Atlantic Ocean CARINA data: overview and salinity adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanhua, T. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Steinfeldt, R. [University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; Key, Robert [Princeton University; Brown, P. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Gruber, N. [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Wanninkhof, R. [Atlantic Oceanographic & Meteorological Laboratory, NOAA; Perez, F.F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas de Vigo, CSIC, Vigo, Spain; Kortzinger, A. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Velo, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas de Vigo, CSIC, Vigo, Spain; Schuster, U. [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Van Heuven, S. [University of Groningen, The Netherlands; Bullister, J.L. [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Stendardo, I. [ETH Zurich, Switzerland; Hoppema, M. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Olsen, Are [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Pierrot, D. [Cooperative Institute of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, U. Miami; Schirnick, C. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany; Wallace, D.W.R. [IFM-GEOMAR, Leibniz Institute for Marine Sciences, Chemical Oceanography, Kiel, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged into a new database: CARINA (CARbon dioxide IN the Atlantic Ocean). The data have gone through rigorous quality control procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for the pertinent parameters in the CARINA database were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the three data products: merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions, i.e. the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. These products have been corrected to be internally consistent. Ninety-eight of the cruises in the CARINA database were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean, defined here as the region south of the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge and north of about 30 S. Here we present an overview of the Atlantic Ocean synthesis of the CARINA data and the adjustments that were applied to the data product. We also report the details of the secondary QC (Quality Control) for salinity for this data set. Procedures of quality control including crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data are briefly described. Adjustments to salinity measurements were applied to the data from 10 cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal consistency of the CARINA-ATL salinity data to be 4.1 ppm. With these adjustments the CARINA data products are consistent both internally was well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s, and is now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories

  6. Chloromethane and dichloromethane in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolusu, Seshagiri Rao; Schlünzen, K. Heinke; Grawe, David; Seifert, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Chloromethane and dichloromethane were measured in the air of marine environment and in seawater during a cruise from the Port of Spain to Rio de Janeiro in the tropical Atlantic Ocean in April and May of 2009. Variation of chloromethane and dichloromethane concentrations was analysed as a function of latitude. There is no correlation observed between chloromethane and dichloromethane concentrations in the seawater suggest that they may not have a common oceanic source. In addition, a relation of concentrations, fluxes and sea surface temperature were studied to determine a dependency of concentrations and fluxes on sea surface temperature. Sea surface temperature does not show any significant effect on dichloromethane concentrations in surface seawater. Chloromethane and dichloromethane are supersaturated in the seawater during the cruise. This implies that the tropical Atlantic Ocean emits chloromethane and dichloromethane into the atmosphere. The tropical Atlantic Ocean mean fluxes of chloromethane and dichloromethane during the cruise were 150 nmol m-2 d-1 and 81 nmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The backward trajectory analysis revealed that the tropical Atlantic Ocean and African coast were primary and secondary source regions for chloromethane and dichloromethane respectively, during the Meteor cruise.

  7. Extension of the range of the bryozoans Tricellaria inopinata and Bugula simplex in the North-east Atlantic Ocean (Bryozoa: Cheilostomatida)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauwe, de H.; Faasse, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    Uitbreiding van het areaal van de mosdiertjes Tricellaria inopinata en Bugula simplex in het noordoosten van de Atlantische Oceaan (Bryozoa: Cheilostomatida) In 2000 werd het mosdiertje Tricellaria inopinata op twee plaatsen bij Goes (Zeeland) aangetroffen. De soort is in 1985 beschreven aan de hand

  8. Quantifying recreational shore angling catch and harvest in southern Portugal (north-east Atlantic Ocean): implications for conservation and integrated fisheries management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiga, P; Ribeiro, J; Gonçalves, J M S; Erzini, K

    2010-06-01

    Recreational shore fishing along 250 km of the south and south-west coast of Portugal was studied based on roving creel and aerial surveys. Surveys were conducted between August 2006 and July 2007, following a stratified random-sampling design and provided information on catch and effort, harvest and discards, angler demographics and fishing habits. Overall, 192 roving creel surveys, 24 aerial surveys and 1321 interviews were conducted. Based on the aerial surveys, a mean +/-s.e. total fishing effort of 705,236 +/- 32,765 angler h year(-1) was estimated, corresponding to 166,430 +/- 9792 fishing trips year(-1). Average time spent per fishing trip was 4.7 h. A total of 48 species, belonging to 22 families, were recorded in roving creel surveys. The most important species was Diplodus sargus, accounting for 44% of the total catches by number and 48% by mass. Estimated mean +/-s.e. total annual recreational shore fishing catch was 160.2 +/- 12.6 t year(-1) (788,049 +/- 54,079 fishes year(-1)), of which 147.4 +/- 11.9 t year(-1) (589,132 +/- 42,360 fishes year(-1)) was retained. Although overall shore-based recreational catches only corresponded to 0.8% of the commercial landings (only common species considered), D. sargus catches by recreational shore anglers were considerable, corresponding to 65% of the commercial landings. The implications of these results for integrated fisheries management and conservation are discussed, and future research proposed.

  9. Total Mercury, Methylmercury, Inorganic Arsenic and Other Elements in Meat from Minke Whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) from the North East Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maage, Amund; Nilsen, Bente M; Julshamn, Kaare; Frøyland, Livar; Valdersnes, Stig

    2017-08-01

    Meat samples of 84 minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) mainly from the Barents Sea, collected between 1 May and 16 August 2011, were analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, cadmium, lead, total arsenic, inorganic arsenic and selenium. The average total mercury concentration found was 0.15 ± 0.09 mg/kg, with a range from 0.05 to 0.49 mg/kg. The molar ratio of selenium to mercury varied between 1.0 and 10.3. Cadmium content ranged from 0.002 to 0.036 mg/kg, while the content of lead in whale meat ranged from whale samples exceeded established EU maximum levels for metals in fish muscle, but 4.8% and 6.8% of the samples exceeded Japanese maximum levels for total mercury and methylmercury, respectively, in whale meat. There was only minor variations in element concentrations between whales from different geographical areas, and cadmium was the only element were the concentration increased with increasing length.

  10. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean: From the subpolar gyre, via plankton, to blue whiting and pilot whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hátún, H.; Payne, M. R.; Beaugrand, G.; Reid, P. C.; Sandø, A. B.; Drange, H.; Hansen, B.; Jacobsen, J. A.; Bloch, D.

    2009-03-01

    Pronounced changes in fauna, extending from the English Channel in the south to the Barents Sea in the north-east and off Greenland in the north-west, have occurred in the late 1920s, the late 1960s and again in the late 1990s. We attribute these events to exchanges of subarctic and subtropical water masses in the north-eastern North Atlantic Ocean, associated with changes in the strength and extent of the subpolar gyre. These exchanges lead to variations in the influence exerted by the subarctic or Lusitanian biomes on the intermediate faunistic zone in the north-eastern Atlantic. This strong and persistent bottom-up bio-physical link is demonstrated using a numerical ocean general circulation model and data on four trophically connected levels in the food chain - phytoplankton, zooplankton, blue whiting, and pilot whales. The plankton data give a unique basin-scale depiction of these changes, and a long pilot whale record from the Faroe Islands offers an exceptional temporal perspective over three centuries. Recent advances in simulating the dynamics of the subpolar gyre suggests a potential for predicting the distribution of the main faunistic zones in the north-eastern Atlantic a few years into the future, which might facilitate a more rational management of the commercially important fisheries in this region.

  11. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation without a role for ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Amy; Bellomo, Katinka; Murphy, Lisa N; Cane, Mark A; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Rädel, Gaby; Stevens, Bjorn

    2015-10-16

    The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is a major mode of climate variability with important societal impacts. Most previous explanations identify the driver of the AMO as the ocean circulation, specifically the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Here we show that the main features of the observed AMO are reproduced in models where the ocean heat transport is prescribed and thus cannot be the driver. Allowing the ocean circulation to interact with the atmosphere does not significantly alter the characteristics of the AMO in the current generation of climate models. These results suggest that the AMO is the response to stochastic forcing from the mid-latitude atmospheric circulation, with thermal coupling playing a role in the tropics. In this view, the AMOC and other ocean circulation changes would be largely a response to, not a cause of, the AMO. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. North Atlantic Ocean drivers of the 2015 European heat wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchez, Aurélie; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Josey, Simon A.; Hirschi, Joël; Evans, Gwyn

    2016-04-01

    Major European heat waves have occurred on several occasions in the past two decades, including the summer of 2015, with dramatic socioeconomic impacts and in a globally warming world, heat waves are expected to become longer, more frequent and more intense. Nevertheless, our understanding of heat wave causes remains at a basic level, limiting the usefulness of event prediction. We show that 2015 was the most extreme heat wave in central Europe in the past 35 years. We find that the heat wave was preceded by cold mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean surface temperatures, which contributed to its development. In order to explain the genesis of the cold ocean anomaly, we consider surface heat loss, ocean heat content and wind driven upwelling. The anomaly is primarily due to extreme ocean heat loss in the preceding two winters and re-emergent cold ocean water masses. Further analysis indicates that this ocean anomaly was a driver for the 2015 heat wave as it favoured a stationary position of the Jet Stream, which steered Atlantic cyclones away from central Europe towards northern Europe. The cold Atlantic anomaly was also present during the most devastating European heat waves since the 1980s indicating that it is a common factor in the development of these extreme events.

  13. Coccolithophores in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinkel, Hanno; Baumann, K.-H.; Cepek, M.

    2000-01-01

    tenuis are strongly diminished, causing an increase in relative abundance of the lower photic zone taxa Florisphaera profunda and Gladiolithus flabellatus. During the past 140,000 years the surface water circulation of the equatorial Atlantic has changed drastically, as can be seen from changes...

  14. Organic complexation of iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L.J.A.; Rijkenberg, M.J.; Schoemann, V.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the dissolved iron (DFe) binding organic ligands were determined during 3 Dutch GEOTRACES cruises covering the length of the West Atlantic Ocean. Adsorptive Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (AdDPCSV) with TAC as competing ligand was used to measure Fe binding

  15. Organic complexation of iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L. J. A.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Schoemann, V.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the dissolved iron (DFe) binding organic ligands were determined during 3 Dutch GEOTRACES cruises covering the length of the West Atlantic Ocean. Adsorptive Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (AdDPCSV) with TAC as competing ligand was used to measure Fe binding

  16. Speciation of Fe in the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuroczy, C-E; Gerringa, L. J. A.; Klunder, M. B.; Middag, R.; Laan, P.; Timmermans, K. R.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2010-01-01

    In the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean iron (Fe) speciation was investigated in three size fractions the dissolvable from unfiltered samples the dissolved fraction (0 2 mu m) fraction were unsaturated with Fe with respect to the dissolved fraction thus these waters had a scavenging potential Crown

  17. Planktonic coelenterates collected in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, van R.W.M.

    1973-01-01

    This short faunistic note contains a report on the species of Scyphozoa, Hydromedusae, Siphonophora and Ctenophora that were collected by OWS “Cirrus” and “Cumulus”, R.V. “Tridens” and HMS “Snellius” in the North Atlantic Ocean between 22° N and 66° N. In all, 61 species have been captured. New reco

  18. Process studies of the carbonate system in coastal and ocean environments of the Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salt, L.A.

    2014-01-01

    The increase in anthropogenic, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been largely mitigated by ocean uptake since the start of the Industrial Revolution, with the Atlantic Ocean providing the largest store of anthropogenic carbon. The thesis of Lesley Salt examines how the uptake of CO2 varies in

  19. Layered basic complex in oceanic crust, romanche fracture, equatorial atlantic ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, W G; Thompson, G

    1970-05-15

    A layered, basic igneous intrusion, analogous in mineralogy and texture to certain large, continental layered complexes, is exposed in the Romanche Fracture, equatorial Atlantic Ocean. Crustal intrusion of large masses of basic magmas with their subsequent gravity differentiation is probably one of a number of major processes involved in the formation of new oceanic crust during sea-floor spreading.

  20. Current velocity and hydrographic observations in the Southwestern North Atlantic Ocean: Subtropical Atlantic Climate Studies (STACS), 1989 (NCEI Accession 9100033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary objective of the STACS program are to increase our understanding of the dynamics of the North Atlantic circulation and the role of the ocean circulation...

  1. Transferrin gene polymorphisms and population genetic studies of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Berhan Asmamaw

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the cod transferrin gene by comparing the sequences from Norwegian (North East Atlantic Ocean) and Canadian (North West Atlantic Ocean) specimen, and to quantify the genetic variation and differentiation in East and West Atlantic cod populations. Methods:cDNA sequences between individuals of Canadian (North West Atlantic Ocean) and Norwegian (North East Atlantic Ocean) origin were aligned. Allele frequencies of theSNPs were used to discriminate the different Atlantic cod populations in West/East Atlantic Ocean, and the Baltic Sea. Results: The sequence alignment detected19SNPs, of which 18 of them resulted in amino acid changes in the transferrin protein. Nonsynonymous to synonymous site substitution ratio (dn/ds) was by far greater than 1 providing an evidence for the existence of positive selection. The West Atlantic cod populations showed high values of heterozygosity and the Baltic populations were found to be inbred. Conclusions: This study identified and indicated transferrin gene polymorphisms that can be used for population differentiations.

  2. South Atlantic circulation in a world ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H. England

    Full Text Available The circulation in the South Atlantic Ocean has been simulated within a global ocean general circulation model. Preliminary analysis of the modelled ocean circulation in the region indicates a rather close agreement of the simulated upper ocean flows with conventional notions of the large-scale geostrophic currents in the region. The modelled South Atlantic Ocean witnesses the return flow and export of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW at its northern boundary, the inflow of a rather barotropic Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC through the Drake Passage, and the inflow of warm saline Agulhas water around the Cape of Good Hope. The Agulhas leakage amounts to 8.7 Sv, within recent estimates of the mass transport shed westward at the Agulhas retroflection. Topographic steering of the ACC dominates the structure of flow in the circumpolar ocean. The Benguela Current is seen to be fed by a mixture of saline Indian Ocean water (originating from the Agulhas Current and fresher Subantarctic surface water (originating in the ACC. The Benguela Current is seen to modify its flow and fate with depth; near the surface it flows north-westwards bifurcating most of its transport northward into the North Atlantic Ocean (for ultimate replacement of North Atlantic surface waters lost to the NADW conveyor. Deeper in the water column, more of the Benguela Current is destined to return with the Brazil Current, though northward flows are still generated where the Benguela Current extension encounters the coast of South America. At intermediate levels, these northward currents trace the flow of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW equatorward, though even more AAIW is seen to recirculate poleward in the subtropical gyre. In spite of the model's rather coarse resolution, some subtle features of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence are simulated rather well, including the latitude at which the two currents meet. Conceptual diagrams of the recirculation and interocean

  3. The Role of Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal in Supporting Ocean Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Lathrop

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Mid-Atlantic Regional Council on the Ocean (MARCO was established in 2009 to enhance the vitality of the region's ocean ecosystem and economy. One of MARCO's first action items was the development of the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Data Portal to serve as an on-line platform to engage stakeholders across the region with the objective of improving their understanding of how ocean resources and places are being used, managed, and conserved. A key component is the Marine Planner, an interactive map-based visualization and decision support tool. These types of on-line tools are becoming increasingly popular means of putting essential data and state-of-the-art visualization technology into the hands of the agencies, industry, community leaders, and stakeholders engaged in ocean planning. However, to be effective, the underlying geospatial data has to be seen as objective, comprehensive, up-to-date and regionally consistent. To meet this challenge, the portal utilizes a distributed network of web map services from credible and authoritative sources. Website analytics and feedback received during the review and comment period of the 2016 release of the Mid-Atlantic Ocean Action Plan confirm that the Data Portal is viewed as integral to this ocean planning process by the MidAtlantic Regional Planning Body and key stakeholders. While not all stakeholders may agree with specific planning decisions, there is broad based agreement on the need for better data and making access to that data widely available.

  4. Atlantic Ocean CARINA data: overview and salinity adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tanhua

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water column data of carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, Atlantic and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged into a new database: CARINA (CARbon dioxide IN the Atlantic Ocean. The data have gone through rigorous quality control procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for the pertinent parameters in the CARINA database were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values, i.e. secondary quality control. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the three data products: merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions, i.e. the Arctic Mediterranean Seas, the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean. These products have been corrected to be internally consistent. Ninety-eight of the cruises in the CARINA database were conducted in the Atlantic Ocean, defined here as the region south of the Greenland-Iceland-Scotland Ridge and north of about 30° S. Here we present an overview of the Atlantic Ocean synthesis of the CARINA data and the adjustments that were applied to the data product. We also report the details of the secondary QC (Quality Control for salinity for this data set. Procedures of quality control – including crossover analysis between stations and inversion analysis of all crossover data – are briefly described. Adjustments to salinity measurements were applied to the data from 10 cruises in the Atlantic Ocean region. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal consistency of the CARINA-ATL salinity data to be 4.1 ppm. With these adjustments the CARINA data products are consistent both internally as well as with GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s, and is now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example

  5. 77 FR 72762 - Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries; 2013 Fishing Quotas for Atlantic Surfclams and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... Atlantic surfclam and ocean quahog fisheries for 2013 will remain status quo. Regulations governing these... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jason Berthiaume, Fishery Management Specialist, (978) 281-9177; fax (978) 281-9135. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Section 648.72(c) of the regulations implementing the fishery management plan...

  6. Seafloor Asymmetry in the Atlantic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.S.Gao; K.H.Liu

    2004-01-01

    Measurements of seafloor asymmetry at about 360000 pairs of conjugate points along 1250 profiles across the mid-Atlantic Ridge(MAR)provide new constraints on models for the upwelling of the buoyant asthenosphere. The sign and amplitude of the asymmetry vary systematically and are functions of the distance between the spreading center and the location of the inferred location of maximum regional buoyancy(LMRB)in the asthenosphere. The LMRB is a smooth line derived from the observed asymmetry and is more centered at the regional topographic high than the spreading center. These observations are best explained by active upwelling of the underlying buoyant asthenosphere rather than by pressure-release melting.

  7. Decadal acidification in the water masses of the Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Aida F; Resplandy, Laure; García-Ibáñez, Maribel I; Fajar, Noelia M; Velo, Anton; Padin, Xose A; Wanninkhof, Rik; Steinfeldt, Reiner; Rosón, Gabriel; Pérez, Fiz F

    2015-08-11

    Global ocean acidification is caused primarily by the ocean's uptake of CO2 as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. We present observations of the oceanic decrease in pH at the basin scale (50 °S-36 °N) for the Atlantic Ocean over two decades (1993-2013). Changes in pH associated with the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 (ΔpHCant) and with variations caused by biological activity and ocean circulation (ΔpHNat) are evaluated for different water masses. Output from an Institut Pierre Simon Laplace climate model is used to place the results into a longer-term perspective and to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for pH change. The largest decreases in pH (∆pH) were observed in central, mode, and intermediate waters, with a maximum ΔpH value in South Atlantic Central Waters of -0.042 ± 0.003. The ΔpH trended toward zero in deep and bottom waters. Observations and model results show that pH changes generally are dominated by the anthropogenic component, which accounts for rates between -0.0015 and -0.0020/y in the central waters. The anthropogenic and natural components are of the same order of magnitude and reinforce one another in mode and intermediate waters over the time period. Large negative ΔpHNat values observed in mode and intermediate waters are driven primarily by changes in CO2 content and are consistent with (i) a poleward shift of the formation region during the positive phase of the Southern Annular Mode in the South Atlantic and (ii) an increase in the rate of the water mass formation in the North Atlantic.

  8. How does the connectivity between populations mediate range limits of marine invertebrates? A case study of larval dispersal between the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel (North-East Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayata, Sakina-Dorothée; Lazure, Pascal; Thiébaut, Éric

    2010-10-01

    For many marine species, larval dispersal plays a crucial role in population persistence, re-colonization of disturbed areas, and distribution of species range limits through the control of population connectivity. Along the French Atlantic coast (NE Atlantic), a biogeographical transition zone has been reported between temperate and cold-temperate marine faunal assemblages. Hydrodynamics in this area are highly complex and variable including numerous mesoscale features (e.g. river plumes, fronts, upwellings, low salinity lenses), which could constrain larval transport and connectivity. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess how hydrodynamic conditions and biological traits influence larval transport and contribute to population connectivity along the biogeographical transition zone between the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel. A coupled bio-physical individual-based model was used at a regional scale to track larval trajectories under realistic hydroclimatic conditions (tides, river run-offs, and meteorological conditions) and for some common life-history traits. Larval particles were released monthly from February to August for the years 2001 to 2005, from 16 spawning populations corresponding to the main bays and estuaries of the study area. Two planktonic larval durations (2 vs. 4 weeks) and three vertical distributions (no swimming behaviour, diel vertical migration, and ontogenic vertical migration) were considered. Dispersal kernels were described by 17 parameters and analysed in a multivariate approach to calculate connectivity matrices and indices. The main factors responsible for the variability of the dispersal kernels were the spawning month in relation to the seasonal variations in river run-offs and wind conditions, the planktonic larval duration, the spawning population location, and the larval behaviour. No significant inter-annual variability was observed. Self-retention rates were high and larval exchanges occurred mainly within

  9. On multiple equilibria of the global ocean circulation and the preference for North Atlantic sinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    In the ocean circulation there is the peculiar feature that heat transport is northwards throughout the entire Atlantic ocean. This means that the Atlantic heat transport in the southern hemisphere is towards the equator. Also, the heat transport in the Atlantic is much larger that in the Pacific.

  10. On multiple equilibria of the global ocean circulation and the preference for North Atlantic sinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    In the ocean circulation there is the peculiar feature that heat transport is northwards throughout the entire Atlantic ocean. This means that the Atlantic heat transport in the southern hemisphere is towards the equator. Also, the heat transport in the Atlantic is much larger that in the Pacific. T

  11. Physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN197-04 in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2010-02-19 to 2010-03-12 (NODC Accession 0104286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104286 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the KNORR during cruise KN197-04 in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  12. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ENDEAVOR during cruise EN481 in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2010-07-25 to 2010-08-19 (NODC Accession 0103942)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0103942 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ENDEAVOR during cruise EN481 in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  13. Deglacial pulses of deep-ocean silicate into the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, A N; Sigman, D M; Gibson, K A; François, R; Martínez-García, A; Jaccard, S L; Röhl, U; Peterson, L C; Tiedemann, R; Haug, G H

    2013-03-28

    Growing evidence suggests that the low atmospheric CO2 concentration of the ice ages resulted from enhanced storage of CO2 in the ocean interior, largely as a result of changes in the Southern Ocean. Early in the most recent deglaciation, a reduction in North Atlantic overturning circulation seems to have driven CO2 release from the Southern Ocean, but the mechanism connecting the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean remains unclear. Biogenic opal export in the low-latitude ocean relies on silicate from the underlying thermocline, the concentration of which is affected by the circulation of the ocean interior. Here we report a record of biogenic opal export from a coastal upwelling system off the coast of northwest Africa that shows pronounced opal maxima during each glacial termination over the past 550,000 years. These opal peaks are consistent with a strong deglacial reduction in the formation of silicate-poor glacial North Atlantic intermediate water (GNAIW). The loss of GNAIW allowed mixing with underlying silicate-rich deep water to increase the silicate supply to the surface ocean. An increase in westerly-wind-driven upwelling in the Southern Ocean in response to the North Atlantic change has been proposed to drive the deglacial rise in atmospheric CO2 (refs 3, 4). However, such a circulation change would have accelerated the formation of Antarctic intermediate water and sub-Antarctic mode water, which today have as little silicate as North Atlantic Deep Water and would have thus maintained low silicate concentrations in the Atlantic thermocline. The deglacial opal maxima reported here suggest an alternative mechanism for the deglacial CO2 release. Just as the reduction in GNAIW led to upward silicate transport, it should also have allowed the downward mixing of warm, low-density surface water to reach into the deep ocean. The resulting decrease in the density of the deep Atlantic relative to the Southern Ocean surface promoted Antarctic overturning

  14. Trace metal accumulation in carbonate biominerals of the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demina, L. L.; Oskina, N. S.; Galkin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    New data on trace metal (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb) distribution in carbonate biominerals formed in geochemically different oceanic environments are discussed. Calcite shells of shelf and deepwater hydrothermal vent mussels as well as planktic foraminifers and pteropods from the central Atlantic Ocean have been studied. The variability in concentrations of most trace elements between different groups of calcifying organisms are usually within one order of magnitude, except for Fe and Mn, the elevated contents of which in microfossils are caused by post-sedimentation interaction. Different groups of calcifying organisms demonstrate a biogeochemical uniformity in trace metal accumulation during the biomineralization processes.

  15. Volcanic impact on the Atlantic ocean over the last millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mignot

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic response to volcanic eruptions over the last 1000 years is investigated with a focus on the North Atlantic Ocean, using a fully coupled AOGCM forced by a realistic time series of volcanic eruptions, total solar irradiance (TSI and atmospheric greenhouse gases concentration. The model simulates little response to TSI variations but a strong and long-lasting thermal and dynamical oceanic adjustment to volcanic forcing, which is shown to be a function of the time period of the volcanic eruptions, probably due to their different seasonality. The thermal response consists of a fast tropical cooling due to the radiative forcing by the volcanic eruptions, followed by a penetration of this cooling in the subtropical ocean interior one to five years after the eruption, and propagation of the anomalies toward the high latitudes. The oceanic circulation first adjusts rapidly to low latitude anomalous wind stress induced by the strong cooling. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC shows a significant intensification 5 to 10 years after the eruptions of the period post-1400 AD, in response to anomalous atmospheric momentum forcing, and a slight weakening in the following decade. In response to the stronger eruptions occurring between 1100 and 1300, the AMOC shows no intensification and a stronger reduction after 10 years. This study thus stresses the diversity of AMOC response to volcanic eruptions in climate models and tentatively points to an important role of the seasonality of the eruptions.

  16. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic LiDAR: LiDAR for the North East

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026, Task Order Number: G10PD02143 Task Order Numbers: G10PD01027 (ARRA) and G10PD02143 (non-ARRA) The LiDAR for the North East Project, funded...

  17. Distribution patterns of oceanic micronekton at seamounts and hydrographic fronts of the subtropical Atlantic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Diekmann, Rabea

    2004-01-01

    In the past the oceanic environment has often been compared with terrestrial deserts and until today relatively little is known about the ecology of the high seas. Within the present study pelagic oceanic communities of cephalopods and fish in the subtropical North Atlantic were investigated, and it was analysed at different spatial scales how these communities varied in response to physical gradients and hydrographic processes. First, the influence of the subtropical convergence zone in the ...

  18. Deep Drilling Results in the Atlantic Ocean: Ocean Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    samples appears to reflect accumu- proportion6 of the crystallizing phases plagio - lation or removal of plagioclase from an initial clase and olivine...the bottom of the deepest Of this material, approximately 6% consists of ye T holes (417D and 418A). The basalts are plagio - smectite And calcite...producing a uralitic product, amphibolites is that altuandine gar-net is not seen -- where primary plagio .-lase survives relatively in ocean floor

  19. Monitoring the North Atlantic using ocean colour data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Yaco, C.; Caverhill, C.; Maass, H.; Porter, C.; White, GN, III

    2016-04-01

    The Remote Sensing Unit (RSU) at the Bedford Institute of Oceanography (BIO) has been monitoring the North Atlantic using ocean colour products for decades. Optical sensors used include CZCS, POLDER, SeaWiFS, MODIS/Aqua and MERIS. The monitoring area is defined by the Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program (AZMP) but certain products extend into Arctic waters, and all-Canadian waters which include the Pacific coast. RSU provides Level 3 images for various products in several formats and a range of temporal and spatial resolutions. Basic statistics for pre-defined areas of interest are compiled for each product. Climatologies and anomaly maps are also routinely produced, and custom products are delivered by request. RSU is involved in the generation of Level 4 products, such as characterizing the phenology of spring and fall phytoplankton blooms, computing primary production, using ocean colour to aid in EBSA (Ecologically and Biologically Significant Area) definition and developing habitat suitability maps. Upcoming operational products include maps of diatom distribution, biogeochemical province boundaries, and products from sensors such as VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite), OLCI (Ocean Land Colour Instrument), and PACE (Pre-Aerosol, Clouds and ocean Ecosystem) hyperspectral microsatellite mission.

  20. The North Atlantic Oscillation: variability and interactions with the North Atlantic ocean and Artic sea ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, T.

    2000-07-01

    The North Atlantic oscillation (NAO) represents the dominant mode of atmospheric variability in the North Atlantic region and describes the strengthening and weakening of the midlatitude westerlies. In this study, variability of the NAO during wintertime and its relationship to the North Atlantic ocean and Arctic sea ice is investigated. For this purpose, observational data are analyzed along with integrations of models for the Atlantic ocean, Arctic sea ice, and the coupled global climate system. From a statistical point of view, the observed NAO index shows unusually high variance on interdecadal time scales during the 20th century. Variability on other time scales is consistent with realizations of random processes (''white noise''). Recurrence of wintertime NAO anomalies from winter-to-winter with missing signals during the inbetween nonwinter seasons is primarily associated with interdecadal variability of the NAO. This recurrence indicates that low-frequency changes of the NAO during the 20th century were in part externally forced. (orig.)

  1. Propagation of Atlantic Ocean swells in the north Indian Ocean: A case study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samiksha, S.V.; Vethamony, P.; Aboobacker, V.M.; Rashmi, R.

    An analysis of altimeter significant wave height data of May 2007 revealed the occurrence of an extreme weather event off southern tip of South Africa in the Atlantic Ocean, and generation of a series of very high swells at 40 degrees S...

  2. Biogeochemistry of the North Atlantic during oceanic anoxic event 2: role of changes in ocean circulation and phosphorus input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baroni, I.R.; Topper, R.P.M.; van Helmond, N.A.G.M.; Brinkhuis, H.; Slomp, C.P.

    2014-01-01

    The geological record provides evidence for the periodic occurrence of water column anoxia and formation of organic-rich deposits in the North Atlantic Ocean during the mid-Cretaceous (hereafter called the proto-North Atlantic). Both changes in primary productivity and oceanic circulation likely

  3. Oceanic dominance of interannual subtropical North Atlantic heat content variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sonnewald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocean heat content varies on a range of timescales. Traditionally the atmosphere is seen to dominate the oceanic heat content variability. However, this variability can be driven either by oceanic or atmospheric heat fluxes. To diagnose the relative contributions and respective timescales, this study uses a box model forced with output from an ocean general circulation model (OGCM to investigate the heat content variability of the upper 800 m of the subtropical North Atlantic from 26° N to 36° N. The ocean and air-sea heat flux data needed to force the box model is taken from a 19 yr (1988 to 2006 simulation performed with the 1/12° version of the OCCAM OGCM. The box model heat content is compared to the corresponding heat content in OCCAM for verification. The main goal of the study is to identify to what extent the seasonal to interannual ocean heat content variability is of atmospheric or oceanic origin. To this end, the box model is subjected to a range of scenarios forced either with the full (detrended ocean and air-sea fluxes, or their deseasoned counterparts. Results show that in all cases, the seasonal variability is dominated by the seasonal component of the air-sea fluxes, which produce a seasonal range in mean temperature of the upper 800 m of ~ 0.42 °C. However, on longer timescales oceanic heat transport dominates, with changes of up to ~ 0.30 °C over 4 yr.

    The technique is subsequently applied to observational data. For the ocean heat fluxes, we use data from the RAPID program at 26° N from April 2004 to January 2011. At 36° N heat transport is inferred using a linear regression model based on the oceanic low-frequency transport in OCCAM. The air-sea flux from OCCAM is used for the period 2004 to 2006 when the RAPID timeseries and the OCCAM simulation overlap, and a climatology is used for the air-sea flux from 2006 onwards. The results confirm that on longer (> 2 yr timescales the ocean dominates the ocean heat

  4. Deep ocean early warning signals of an Atlantic MOC collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Qing Yi; Dijkstra, Henk A

    2014-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) is a crucial part of the climate system because of its associated northward heat transport. The present-day MOC is sensitive to freshwater anomalies and may collapse to a state with a strongly reduced northward heat transport. A future collapse of the Atlantic MOC has been identified as one of the most dangerous tipping points in the climate system. It is therefore crucial to develop early warning indicators for such a potential collapse based on relatively short time series. So far, attempts to use indicators based on critical slowdown have been marginally successful. Based on complex climate network reconstruction, we here present a promising new indicator for the MOC collapse that efficiently monitors spatial changes in deep ocean circulation. Through our analysis of the performance of this indicator we formulate optimal locations of measurement of the MOC to provide early warning signals of a collapse. Our results imply that an increase in spatial reso...

  5. South Atlantic Bight Habitat Mapping on NOAA Ship Nancy Foster in North Atlantic Ocean between 20070626 and 20070702

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This expedition on the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster used the recently-developed National Undersea Research Center for the North Atlantic and Great Lakes (NURC-NAGL) ROV...

  6. FEMA RiskMAP Atlantic, Ocean, and Monmouth, NJ Area of Interest (AOI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lidar data was acquired over a 1613 square mile area of interest over Atlantic, Ocean, and Monmouth Counties, New Jersey. The lidar data had a nominal point spacing...

  7. Aerosol isotopic ammonium signatures over the remote Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. T.; Jickells, T. D.; Baker, A. R.; Marca, A.; Johnson, M. T.

    2016-05-01

    We report aerosol ammonium 15N signatures for samples collected from research cruises on the South Atlantic and Caribbean using a new high sensitivity method. We confirm a pattern of isotopic signals from generally light (δ15N -5 to -10‰), for aerosols with very low (ocean, to generally heavier values (δ15N +5 to +10‰), for aerosols collected in temperate and tropical latitudes and with higher ammonium concentrations (>2 nmol m-3). We discuss whether this reflects a mixing of aerosols from two end-members (polluted continental and remote marine emissions), or isotopic fractionation during aerosol transport.

  8. Correcting North Atlantic sea surface salinity biases in the Kiel Climate Model: influences on ocean circulation and Atlantic Multidecadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, T.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2016-10-01

    A long-standing problem in climate models is the large sea surface salinity (SSS) biases in the North Atlantic. In this study, we describe the influences of correcting these SSS biases on the circulation of the North Atlantic as well as on North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal to multidecadal variability. We performed integrations of the Kiel Climate Model (KCM) with and without applying a freshwater flux correction over the North Atlantic. The quality of simulating the mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability is greatly enhanced in the freshwater flux-corrected integration which, by definition, depicts relatively small North Atlantic SSS biases. In particular, a large reduction in the North Atlantic cold sea surface temperature bias is observed and a more realistic Atlantic Multidecadal Variability simulated. Improvements relative to the non-flux corrected integration also comprise a more realistic representation of deep convection sites, sea ice, gyre circulation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The results suggest that simulations of North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability could strongly benefit from alleviating sea surface salinity biases in the North Atlantic, which may enhance the skill of decadal predictions in that region.

  9. East Greenland Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Arne Døssing; Dahl-Jensen, T.; Thybo, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The combined Greenland-Senja Fracture Zones (GSFZ) represent a first-order plate tectonic feature in the North Atlantic Ocean. The GSFZ defines an abrupt change in the character of magnetic anomalies with well-defined seafloor spreading anomalies in the Greenland and Norwegian basins to the south...... but ambiguous and weak magnetic anomalies in the Boreas Basin to the north. Substantial uncertainty exists concerning the plate tectonic evolution of the latter area, including the role of the East Greenland Ridge, which is situated along the Greenland Fracture Zone. In 2002, a combined ocean-bottom seismometer...... and multichannel seismic (MCS) survey acquired two intersecting wide-angle reflection and coincident MCS profiles across and along the East Greenland Ridge. We present the results of integrated reflection seismic interpretation, first-arrival tomography, 2D kinematic raytracing, full-wave amplitude modeling...

  10. Transequatorial migrations by basking sharks in the western Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomal, Gregory B; Zeeman, Stephen I; Chisholm, John H; Summers, Erin L; Walsh, Harvey J; McMahon, Kelton W; Thorrold, Simon R

    2009-06-23

    The world's second largest fish, the basking shark (Cetorhinus maximus), is broadly distributed in boreal to warm temperate latitudes of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans from shallow coastal waters to the open ocean. Previous satellite archival tagging in the North Atlantic has shown that basking sharks move seasonally, are often associated with productive frontal zones, and may make occasional dives to mesopelagic depths. However, basking sharks are thought to be restricted to temperate latitudes, and the extent to which they exploit deeper-water habitat remains enigmatic. Via satellite archival tags and a novel geolocation technique, we demonstrate here that basking sharks are seasonal migrants to mesopelagic tropical waters. Tagged sharks moved from temperate feeding areas off the coast of southern New England to the Bahamas, the Caribbean Sea, and onward to the coast of South America and into the Southern Hemisphere. When in these areas, basking sharks descended to mesopelagic depths and in some cases remained there for weeks to months at a time. Our results demonstrate that tropical waters are not a barrier to migratory connectivity for basking shark populations and highlight the need for global conservation efforts throughout the species range.

  11. Saline Indian Ocean waters invaded the South Atlantic thermocline during glacial termination II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scussolini, P.; Scussolini, G.; Brummer, G.-J.A.; Peeters, F.J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Salty and warm Indian Ocean waters enter the South Atlantic via the Agulhas leakage, south of Africa. Model simulations and proxy evidence of Agulhas leakage strengthening during glacial terminations led to the hypothesis that it was an important modulator of the Atlantic Ocean circulation. Yet, the

  12. 77 FR 63722 - Special Local Regulations; Palm Beach World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., Atlantic Ocean; Jupiter, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Indiantown Road and Donald Ross Road, just offshore of Jupiter, Florida during the Palm Beach World... will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, just offshore of Jupiter, Florida. The high...

  13. 33 CFR 165.T01-0542 - Safety Zones: Neptune Deepwater Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, MA. 165.T01-0542 Section 165.T01-0542 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Guard District § 165.T01-0542 Safety Zones: Neptune Deepwater Port, Atlantic Ocean, Boston, MA. (a) Location. The following areas are safety zones: All navigable waters of the United States within a...

  14. 78 FR 35596 - Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Long Beach Regatta, Powerboat Race, Atlantic Ocean, Long Beach, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Proposed Rulemaking... Atlantic Ocean off Long Beach, NY during the Long Beach Regatta Powerboat Race scheduled for August...

  15. 78 FR 56151 - Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, North Atlantic Ocean; Virginia Beach, VA... zone on the navigable waters of the North Atlantic Ocean in Virginia Beach, VA to support the Virginia... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

  16. 77 FR 13519 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ..., Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard proposes establishing a safety zone on the navigable waters of the Atlantic Ocean in..., which will then become highlighted in blue. In the ``Document Type'' drop down menu select...

  17. 77 FR 50019 - Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Cocoa Beach Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa... establishing a temporary safety zone on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean located east of Cocoa Beach, Florida during the Cocoa Beach Air Show. The Cocoa Beach Air Show will include aircraft engaging in...

  18. Manganese in the west Atlantic Ocean in the context of the first global ocean circulation model of manganese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, Marco; Middag, Rob; Dutay, Jean-Claude; de Baar, Hein; Roy-Barman, Matthieu; Gehlen, Marion; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element. Moreover, its oxidised form is involved in removing itself and several other trace elements from ocean waters. Here we report the longest thus far (17 500 km length) full-depth ocean section of dissolved Mn in the west Atlantic Ocean,

  19. Factors influencing particulate lipid production in the East Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gašparović, B.; Frka, S.; Koch, B. P.; Zhu, Z. Y.; Bracher, A.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Neogi, S. B.; Lara, R. J.; Kattner, G.

    2014-07-01

    Extensive analyses of particulate lipids and lipid classes were conducted to gain insight into lipid production and related factors along the biogeochemical provinces of the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. Data are supported by particulate organic carbon (POC), chlorophyll a (Chl a), phaeopigments, Chl a concentrations and carbon content of eukaryotic micro-, nano- and picophytoplankton, including cell abundances for the latter two and for cyanobacteria and prokaryotic heterotrophs. We focused on the productive ocean surface (2 m depth and deep Chl a maximum (DCM). Samples from the deep ocean provided information about the relative reactivity and preservation potential of particular lipid classes. Surface and DCM particulate lipid concentrations (3.5-29.4 μg L-1) were higher than in samples from deep waters (3.2-9.3 μg L-1) where an increased contribution to the POC pool was observed. The highest lipid concentrations were measured in high latitude temperate waters and in the North Atlantic Tropical Gyral Province (13-25°N). Factors responsible for the enhanced lipid synthesis in the eastern Atlantic appeared to be phytoplankton size (micro, nano, pico) and the low nutrient status with microphytoplankton having the most expressed influence in the surface and eukaryotic nano- and picophytoplankton in the DCM layer. Higher lipid to Chl a ratios suggest enhanced lipid biosynthesis in the nutrient poorer regions. The various lipid classes pointed to possible mechanisms of phytoplankton adaptation to the nutritional conditions. Thus, it is likely that adaptation comprises the replacement of membrane phospholipids by non-phosphorus containing glycolipids under low phosphorus conditions. The qualitative and quantitative lipid compositions revealed that phospholipids were the most degradable lipids, and their occurrence decreased with increasing depth. In contrast, wax esters, possibly originating from zooplankton, survived downward transport probably due to the fast sinking

  20. Are Global In-Situ Ocean Observations Fit-for-purpose? Applying the Framework for Ocean Observing in the Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbeck, M.; Fischer, A. S.; Le Traon, P. Y.; Mowlem, M. C.; Speich, S.; Larkin, K.

    2015-12-01

    There are an increasing number of global, regional and local processes that are in need of integrated ocean information. In the sciences ocean information is needed to support physical ocean and climate studies for example within the World Climate Research Programme and its CLIVAR project, biogeochemical issues as articulated by the GCP, IMBER and SOLAS projects of ICSU-SCOR and Future Earth. This knowledge gets assessed in the area of climate by the IPCC and biodiversity by the IPBES processes. The recently released first World Ocean Assessment focuses more on ecosystem services and there is an expectation that the Sustainable Development Goals and in particular Goal 14 on the Ocean and Seas will generate new demands for integrated ocean observing from Climate to Fish and from Ocean Resources to Safe Navigation and on a healthy, productive and enjoyable ocean in more general terms. In recognition of those increasing needs for integrated ocean information we have recently launched the Horizon 2020 AtlantOS project to promote the transition from a loosely-coordinated set of existing ocean observing activities to a more integrated, more efficient, more sustainable and fit-for-purpose Atlantic Ocean Observing System. AtlantOS takes advantage of the Framework for Ocean observing that provided strategic guidance for the design of the project and its outcome. AtlantOS will advance the requirements and systems design, improving the readiness of observing networks and data systems, and engaging stakeholders around the Atlantic. AtlantOS will bring Atlantic nations together to strengthen their complementary contributions to and benefits from the internationally coordinated Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and the Blue Planet Initiative of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). AtlantOS will fill gaps of the in-situ observing system networks and will ensure that their data are readily accessible and useable. AtlantOS will demonstrate the utility of

  1. Bacteriology data from moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean during the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS-Mid Atlantic Ocean) project, 05 November 1976 - 16 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7800207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bacteriology data were collected using moored buoy casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 5, 1976 to August 16, 1977....

  2. Heterogeneous oxygenation states in the Atlantic and Tethys oceans during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Stéphane; Vance, Derek; Cameron, Vyllinniskii; Archer, Corey; Robinson, Stuart A.

    2014-10-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary (ca. 93.5 Ma) is marked by an episode of profound environmental change, including a major perturbation of the carbon cycle and an Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE-2). Here, we present molybdenum (Mo) isotope variations within the OAE-2 interval for four sections from the western Tethys (Furlo and La Contessa) and the North-Atlantic (ODP site 1276 and DSDP site 367). The main target of this study is to investigate the extent of reducing conditions (truly global in extent or restricted to poorly-ventilated restricted deep basins), with particular reference to the relationship between the change in the oxygenation state of the ocean and the link to global perturbations of the carbon cycle recorded in carbon isotopes. All four sections show fluctuations in the redox sensitive trace metal (RSTE) distribution, suggesting rapid variations in local redox conditions, ranging from anoxic to euxinic. The RSTE enrichment factors (EFs) also suggest different depositional conditions and paleoceanographic processes in the western Tethys versus the North Atlantic. Whereas the North Atlantic sites show evidence of weak watermass restriction associated with the action of a particulate shuttle within the water column, the EFs of the Tethyan sections are characteristic of unrestricted marine systems. Mo isotopes show surprisingly negative values through the Tethyan sections. At the onset of OAE-2, an increasing trend in δMo98 is observed, with values ranging from -0.6 to 0.6‰. During the second half of OAE-2, the δMo98 curve shows a progressive shift towards more negative values. In the North Atlantic, δMo98 signatures from ODP site 1276 show a similar behaviour as observed in the western Tethys. At DSDP site 367, Mo isotopes are generally heavier during OAE-2, fluctuating around an average value of 1.1‰. This is consistent with fully euxinic conditions and the black shales deposited may have recorded the seawater signature during OAE-2. The Mo isotope

  3. Mass, nutrient and oxygen budgets for the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Maze

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The northeast Atlantic is a key horizontal and vertical crossroads region for the meridional overturning circulation, but basic nutrient and oxygen fluxes are still poorly constrained by observations in the region. A surface to bottom northeast Atlantic Ocean budget for mass, nutrients (nitrate and phosphate and oxygen is determined using an optimization method based on three surveys of the OVIDE transect (from Greenland to Portugal completed with the World Ocean Atlas 2009. Budgets are derived for two communicating boxes representing the northeastern European basin (NEEB and the Irminger Sea.

    For the NEEB (Irminger box, it is found that 30% of the mass import (export across the OVIDE section reach (originate from the Nordic Seas, while 70% are redistributed between both boxes through the Reykjanes Ridge (9.3 ± 0.7 × 109 kg s−1.

    Net biological source/sink terms of nitrate point to both the Irminger and NEEB boxes as net organic matter production sites (consuming nitrate at a rate of –7.8 ± 6.5 kmol s−1 and –8.4 ± 6.6 kmol s−1, respectively. Using a standard Redfield ratio of C : N = 106 : 16, nitrate consumption rates indicate that about 40 TgC yr−1 of carbon is fixed by organic matter production between the OVIDE transect and the Greenland–Scotland Ridge. Nutrient fluxes also induce a net biological production of oxygen of 73 ± 60 kmol s−1 and 79 ± 62 kmol s−1 in the Irminger and NEEB boxes, which points to the region as being autotrophic.

    The abiotic air–sea oxygen flux leads to an oceanic oxygen uptake in the two regions (264 ± 66 kmol s−1 in the north and 443 ± 70 kmol s−1 in the south. The abiotic flux is partitioned into a mixing and a thermal component. It is found that the Irminger Sea oceanic oxygen uptake is driven by an air–sea heat flux cooling increasing the ocean surface

  4. Ocean-Atmosphere coupling and CO2 exchanges in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, R.; Pezzi, L. P.; Carmargo, R.; Acevedo, O. C.

    2013-05-01

    The establishment of the INTERCONF Program (Air-Sea Interactions at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone) in 2004 and subsequent developing of projects such as the SIMTECO (Integrated System for Monitoring the Weather, the Climate and the Ocean in the South of Brazil) and ACEx (Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment) from 2010 in Brazil brought to light the importance of understanding the impact of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean's mesoscale variability on the modulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) at the synoptic scale. Recent results of all these projects showed that the ABL modulation, as well as the ocean-atmosphere turbulent (heat, momentum and CO2) fluxes are dependent on the behavior of the ocean's surface thermal gradients, especially those found in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence Zone and at the southern coast off Brazil during the winter. As expected, when atmospheric large scale systems are not present over the study area, stronger heat fluxes are found over regions of higher sea surface temperature (SST) including over warm core eddies shed towards the subantarctic (cold) environment. In the coastal region off southern Brazil, the wintertime propagation of the Brazilian Costal Current (La Plata Plume) acts rising the chlorophyll concentration over the continental shelf as well as diminishing considerably the SST - hence producing prominent across-shore SST gradients towards the offshore region dominated by the Brazil Current waters. Owing to that, heat fluxes are directed towards the ocean in coastal waters that are also responsible for the carbon sinking off Brazil in wintertime. All this description is dependent on the synoptic atmospheric cycle and strongly perturbed when transient systems (cold fronts, subtropical cyclones) are present in the area. However, remote sensing data used here suggest that the average condition of the atmosphere directly responding to the ocean's mesoscale variability appears to imprint a signal that extends from the

  5. The Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) program: The North Atlantic Study, 1981; The Tropical Atlantic Study, 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Smethie, William M.

    1985-01-01

    The scientific papers here collected result from the Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) program. The two parts of this major geochemical and physical oceanographie expedition took place in the North Atlantic Ocean in 1981 and in the Tropical Atlantic in 1983 on the research vessel Knorr of the Woods Hole Oceanographie Institution. The expeditions, sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy (North Atlantic only), were designed to observe the passage of man-made geochemical tracers into the interior of the ocean. The foundations for such an experiment were laid in the 1972-1978 GEOSECS program. Here, for the first time, a systematic survey revealed the penetration into the thermocline and deep ocean of the products of man's military/industrial activities, principally tritium and carbon-14 resulting from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which terminated with the nuclear test ban treaty in 1962.

  6. Late Quaternary carbonate accumulation along eastern South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabill, K.; Slowey, N. C.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water masses originating from both the North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean intersect the Walvis Ridge and Namibian margin of southwest Africa. Changes in the distribution and properties of these water masses through time are reflected by variations in the nature of the sediments accumulating along this margin. A suite of piston and gravity cores that possess sediment records corresponding to the most recent glacial-interglacial cycles were collected from the water depth range of 550 to 3700 meters. Sediment dry bulk density, XRF analyses and the concentration of CaCO3 were precisely determined at regular depth intervals in these cores. Foraminiferal δ18O along with XRF Fe/Ca data provide an age-depth model for key cores. The age-depth model and dry bulk density will be used with the calcium carbonate contents to calculate the accumulation rates of CaCO3 during each MIS 1-5e. The spatial and temporal variability in both the CaCO3 content and the CaCO3 mass accumulation rates along the Namibian continental slope will be described. Based on comparisons of these two parameters, inferences will be made about how variations of CaCO3 production, dilution of by non-CaCO3 sediment components, and dissolution of CaCO3 due to changes in ocean circulation/climate have occurred during intervals of the last glacial-interglacial cycle.

  7. Late Quaternary carbonate accumulation along eastern South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabill, K.; Slowey, N. C.; Foreman, A. D.; Charles, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Water masses originating from both the North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean intersect the Walvis Ridge and Namibian margin of southwest Africa. Changes in the distribution and properties of these water masses through time are reflected by variations in the nature of the sediments accumulating along this margin. As part of our ongoing studies, we are investigating the interrelationships between oceanographic/climatic change and the accumulation of carbonate minerals during the late Quaternary. A suite of cores that possess sediment records corresponding to the most recent glacial-interglacial cycles was collected from the water depth range of 500 to 3000 meters. Cores that preserve records of key water masses were selected for detailed analyses. Sediment bulk density, the concentration of calcium carbonate, and the relative proportions of carbonate minerals were precisely determined at regular depth intervals in these cores. Foraminiferal d18O and C-14 dates provide chronologic control. Results will be used to calculate how the accumulation rates of carbonate minerals on the seafloor vary through time, and the correspondence of such variation to changes in ocean circulation and climate will be assessed.

  8. Lanternfish (Myctophidae from eastern Brazil, southwest Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana da Costa Braga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-nine species from 11 genera of Myctophidae were taken in daytime midwater and bottom trawl hauls off eastern Brazil (11º-22ºS. Trawls were performed aboard the French R/V Thalassa to depths from 19 to 2271 m, including samples from shelf, slope and in the vicinity of oceanic banks and seamounts. Diaphus garmani was the most abundant species, accounting for 84% of all identified individuals and with four other species (D. dumerilii, D. brachycephalus, D. perspicillatus and Myctophum obtusirostre accounted for >95% of all myctophids caught. Regarding longitudinal distribution patterns, 16 species are broadly tropical, seven tropical, three subtropical, two temperate and one amphi-Atlantic. For the most abundant and frequent species, highest abundances were associated mainly with cold waters, either South Atlantic Central Water or Antarctic Intermediate Water. Non-metric multidimensional scaling based on species presence-absence in the samples and oceanographic conditions was used to identify spatial distribution of myctophid assemblages. Three assemblages were identified in the studied area: north of Abrolhos Bank, south of Abrolhos Bank, and seamounts.

  9. North-east India’s forgotten IDPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monirul Hussain

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Misguided policies have displaced millions in the seven states of north-east India. The needs of environmental, development and conflict-induced IDPs have been ignored. India lacks a national IDP policy and the government systematically refers to internally displaced persons as ‘migrants’.

  10. Phytogeography of the tropical north-east African mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Friis

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropical north-east African mountains are tentatively divided into four phytochoria, the formal rank of which is not defined. The division is based on patterns of distribution and endemism in the region. The recognition of a distinct Afromontane phytochorion is now well established (Chapman & White, 1970; Werger, 1978; White, 1978. However, there is still very little information on the phytogeography of the individual mountains or mountain systems. This study hopes to fill a little of the gap by analysing distribution patterns and patterns of endemism in the flora of the tropical north-east African mountains. The north-east African mountain system is the largest in tropical Africa (see e.g. map in White, 1978. At the core of this system is the large Ethiopian massif, around which are located various mountains and mountain chains. These include the Red Sea Hills in the Sudan, the mountain chain in northern Somalia, the south-west Arabian mountains, and the Imatong mountains of south-east Sudan. The latter are often referred to the East African mountain system (White, 1978 but. as I will point out later, they also have a close connection with the south-west highlands of Ethiopia. The paper presents some results of my study of the mountain flora of tropical north-east Africa, particularly the forest species. Where no source is indicated, the data are from my own unpublished studies.

  11. Excitation of Annual Polar Motion by the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The global oceans play important roles in exciting the annual polar motion besides the atmosphere. However, it is still unclear about how large the regional oceans contribute to the annual polar motion. We investigate systemically the contributions of the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans to the excitation of the annual polar motion, based on the output data of ocean current velocity field and ocean bottom pressure field from "Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO)" ocean circulation model over the period 1993-2005. The result shows that due to its particular location and shape, the Atlantic Ocean makes a less significant contribution to the x-component of the annual polar motion excitation than the Pacific and Indian Oceans, while all these three oceans contribute to the y-component of the annual polar motion excitation to some extent.

  12. Atmospheric and oceanic dust fluxes in the northeastern tropical Atlantic Ocean: how close a coupling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bory

    Full Text Available Atmospheric inputs to the ocean of dust originating from Africa are compared with downward dust flux in the oceanic water column. Atmospheric fluxes were estimated using remote-sensing-derived dust optical thickness and parameters from a transport/deposition model (TM2z. Oceanic fluxes were measured directly over/in two regions of contrasting primary productivity of the northeastern tropical Atlantic (one mesotrophic and one oligotrophic, located at about 500 and 1500 km off Mauritania underlying the offshore dust plume. In both regions, estimates of annual atmospheric dust inputs to the ocean surface are lower than, but of the same order of magnitude as, oceanic fluxes (49.5 and 8.8 mg.m-2 .d-1 in the mesotrophic and oligotrophic regions. Part of this mismatch may reflect both a general flaw in the dust grain size distribution used in transport models, which likely underestimates large particles, and/or lateral advection to each region of dustier surface waters from upstream, where dust deposition is higher. Higher-frequency temporal coupling between atmospheric and oceanic fluxes seems to be primary-productivity dependent, as hypothesized in previously reported studies.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; geochemical cycles Oceanography: biological and chemical (geochemistry

  13. Temperature profile and sound velocity data collected using XSV, bottle, and CTD casts in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) and Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Mid-Ocean Dynamics Experiment (IDOE/MODE) project from 19 March 1973 to 03 July 1973 (NODC Accession 7600779)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and sound velocity data were collected using XSV, bottle, and CTD casts in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) and Northwest Atlantic...

  14. Antimony and arsenic biogeochemistry in the western Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, Gregory A.; Cutter, Lynda S.; Featherstone, Alison M.; Lohrenz, Steven E.

    The subtropical to equatorial Atlantic Ocean provides a unique regime in which one can examine the biogeochemical cycles of antimony and arsenic. In particular, this region is strongly affected by inputs from the Amazon River and dust from North Africa at the surface, and horizontal transport at depth from high-latitude northern (e.g., North Atlantic Deep Water) and southern waters (e.g., Antarctic Bottom and Intermediate Waters). As a part of the 1996 Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission's Contaminant Baseline Survey, data for dissolved As(III+V), As(III), mono- and dimethyl arsenic, Sb(III+V), Sb(III), and monomethyl antimony were obtained at six vertical profile stations and 44 sites along the 11,000 km transect from Montevideo, Uruguay, to Bridgetown, Barbados. The arsenic results were similar to those in other oceans, with moderate surface depletion, deep-water enrichment, a predominance of arsenate (>85% As(V)), and methylated arsenic species and As(III) in surface waters that are likely a result of phytoplankton conversions to mitigate arsenate "stress" (toxicity). Perhaps the most significant discovery in the arsenic results was the extremely low concentrations in the Amazon Plume (as low as 9.8 nmol/l) that appear to extend for considerable distances offshore in the equatorial region. The very low concentration of inorganic arsenic in the Amazon River (2.8 nmol/l; about half those in most rivers) is probably the result of intense iron oxyhydroxide scavenging. Dissolved antimony was also primarily in the pentavalent state (>95% antimonate), but Sb(III) and monomethyl antimony were only detected in surface waters and displayed no correlations with biotic tracers such as nutrients and chlorophyll a. Unlike As(III+V)'s nutrient-type vertical profiles, Sb(III+V) displayed surface maxima and decreased into the deep waters, exhibiting the behavior of a scavenged element with a strong atmospheric input. While surface water Sb had a slight correlation with

  15. Ocean station data collected using bottle from the PROFESSOR W. BESNARD in the South Atlantic Ocean from 17 January 1969 to 16 December 1987 (NODC Accession 9000030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean station data were collected using bottle in the South Atlantic Ocean. Data were submitted by the LCDR Persio Soares Souto of Directoria de Hidrografia e...

  16. NODC Standard Format Coastal Ocean Wave and Current (F181) Data from the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE) (1980) (NODC Accession 0014202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains time series coastal ocean wave and current data collected during the Atlantic Remote Sensing Land/Ocean Experiment (ARSLOE). ARSLOE was...

  17. Ocean station data collected using bottle casts from the ALMIRANTE SALDANHA in the South Atlantic Ocean from 19 February 1984 to 26 March 1984 (NODC Accession 9000034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean station data were collected using seechi disk, meteorological sensors, and bottle casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from 19 February 1984 to 26 March 1984. The...

  18. An intimate coupling of ocean-atmospheric interaction over the extratropical North Atlantic and Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Wu, Lixin; Wang, Qi; Qu, Liwei; Zhang, Liping

    2009-05-01

    The inter-basin teleconnection between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific ocean-atmosphere interaction is studied using a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. In the model, an idealized oceanic temperature anomaly is initiated over the Kuroshio and the Gulf Stream extension region to track the coupled evolution of ocean and atmosphere interaction, respectively. The experiments explicitly demonstrate that both the North Pacific and the North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions are intimately coupled through an inter-basin atmospheric teleconnection. This fast inter-basin communication can transmit oceanic variability between the North Atlantic and the North Pacific through local ocean-to-atmosphere feedbacks. The leading mode of the extratropical atmospheric internal variability plays a dominant role in shaping the hemispheric-scale response forced by oceanic variability over the North Atlantic and Pacific. Modeling results also suggest that a century (two centuries) long observations are necessary for the detection of Pacific response to Atlantic forcings (Atlantic response to Pacific forcing).

  19. Tropical climate variability: interactions across the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajtar, Jules B.; Santoso, Agus; England, Matthew H.; Cai, Wenju

    2016-06-01

    Complex interactions manifest between modes of tropical climate variability across the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans. For example, the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) extends its influence on modes of variability in the tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans, which in turn feed back onto ENSO. Interactions between pairs of modes can alter their strength, periodicity, seasonality, and ultimately their predictability, yet little is known about the role that a third mode plays. Here we examine the interactions and relative influences between pairs of climate modes using ensembles of 100-year partially coupled experiments in an otherwise fully coupled general circulation model. In these experiments, the air-sea interaction over each tropical ocean basin, as well as pairs of ocean basins, is suppressed in turn. We find that Indian Ocean variability has a net damping effect on ENSO and Atlantic Ocean variability, and conversely they each promote Indian Ocean variability. The connection between the Pacific and the Atlantic is most clearly revealed in the absence of Indian Ocean variability. Our model runs suggest a weak damping influence by Atlantic variability on ENSO, and an enhancing influence by ENSO on Atlantic variability.

  20. Acoustic habitat of an oceanic archipelago in the Southwestern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Lis; Barbosa, Mariana; Secchi, Eduardo; Lailson-Brito, José; Azevedo, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Underwater soundscapes can be highly variable, and in natural conditions are often dominated by biological signals and physical features of the environment. Few studies, however, focused on oceanic islands soundscapes. Islands in the middle of ocean basins can provide a good example of how untouched marine soundscapes are. Autonomous acoustic recordings were carried out in two different seasons in Trindade-Martin Vaz Archipelago, Southwestern Atlantic, providing nearly continuous data for both periods. Sound levels varied daily and between seasons. During summer, higher frequencies were noisier than lower frequencies, with snapping shrimp being the dominating sound source. During winter, lower frequencies were noisier than higher frequencies due to humpback whale constant singing. Biological signal detection had a marked temporal pattern, playing an important role in the soundscape. Over 1000 humpback whale sounds were detected hourly during winter. Fish vocalizations were detected mostly during night time during both summer and winter. The results show an acoustic habitat dominated by biological sound sources and highlight the importance of the island to humpback whales in winter.

  1. Changes in ocean circulation in the South-east Atlantic Ocean during the Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, B. F.; McClymont, E.; Felder, S.; Leng, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important ocean gateway because major oceanic systems interact with each other in a relatively small geographic area. These include the Benguela Current, Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the input of warm and saline waters from the Indian Ocean via the Agulhas leakage. However, there remain questions about circulation change in this region during the Pliocene, including whether there was more or less Agulhas Leakage, which may have implications for the strength of the global thermohaline circulation. ODP Site 1087 (31°28'S, 15°19'E, 1374m water depth) is located outside the Benguela upwelling region and is affected by Agulhas leakage in the modern ocean. Sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) are thus sensitive to the influence of Agulhas Leakage at this site. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the Pliocene history of ODP 1087, including the UK37' index (SSTs), pigments (primary productivity) and planktonic foraminifera (water mass changes). SSTs during the Pliocene range from 17 to 22.5 °C (mean SSTs at 21 °C), and show variability on orbital and suborbital time scales. Our results indicate that the Benguela upwelling system had intensified and/or shifted south during the Pliocene. We find no evidence of Agulhas leakage, meaning that either Agulhas Leakage was severely reduced or displaced during the mid-Pliocene. Potential causes of the observed signals include changes to the local wind field and/or changes in the temperature of intermediate waters which upwell in the Benguela system. Pronounced cooling is observed during cold stages in the Pliocene, aligned with the M2 and KM2 events. These results may indicate that changes to the extent of the Antarctic ice sheet had impact on circulation in the south east Atlantic during the Pliocene via displacement of the Antarctic Circumpolar Currents.

  2. Understanding the transport of Patagonian dust and its influence on marine biological activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Johnson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The supply of bioavailable iron to the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC waters of the Southern Ocean through atmospheric pathways could stimulate phytoplankton blooms and have major implications for the global carbon cycle. In this study, model results and remotely-sensed data are analyzed to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of iron-laden mineral dust deposition on marine biological productivity in the surface waters of the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO. Model simulations for the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron are carried out for two large dust outbreaks originated at the source regions of northern Patagonia during the austral summer of 2009. Model-simulated horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes are in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Simulations indicate that the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems are largely accountable for dust transport trajectories over the SAO. According to model results and retrievals from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO, synoptic flows caused by opposing pressure systems (a high pressure system located to the east or north-east of a low pressure system elevate the South American dust plumes well above the marine boundary layer. Under such conditions, the bulk concentration of mineral dust can quickly be transported around the low pressure system in a clockwise manner, follow the southeasterly advection pathway, and reach the HNLC waters of the SAO and Antarctica in ~3–4 days after emission from the source regions of northern Patagonia. Two different mechanisms for dust-iron mobilization into a bioavailable form are considered in this study. A global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, is employed to estimate the atmospheric fluxes of soluble

  3. Understanding the transport of Patagonian dust and its influence on marine biological activity in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The supply of bioavailable iron to the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC waters of the Southern Ocean through atmospheric pathways could stimulate phytoplankton blooms and have major implications for the global carbon cycle. In this study, model results and remotely-sensed data are analyzed to examine the horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust and quantify the effect of iron-laden mineral dust deposition on marine biological productivity in the surface waters of the South Atlantic Ocean (SAO. Model simulations for the atmospheric transport and deposition of mineral dust and bioavailable iron are carried out for two large dust outbreaks originated at the source regions of Northern Patagonia during the austral summer of 2009. Model-simulated horizontal and vertical transport pathways of Patagonian dust plumes are in reasonable agreement with remotely-sensed data. Simulations indicate that the synoptic meteorological patterns of high and low pressure systems are largely accountable for dust transport trajectories over the SAO. According to model results and retrievals from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO, synoptic flows caused by opposing pressure systems (a high pressure system located to the east or north-east of a low pressure system elevate the South American dust plumes well above the marine boundary layer. Under such conditions, the bulk concentration of mineral dust can quickly be transported around the low pressure system in a clockwise manner, follow the southeasterly advection pathway, and reach the HNLC waters of the SAO and Antarctica in ~3–4 days after emission from the source regions of Northern Patagonia. Two different mechanisms for dust-iron mobilization into a bioavailable form are considered in this study. A global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem, implemented with an iron dissolution scheme, is employed to estimate the atmospheric fluxes of soluble

  4. On forecasting abnormal climatic events in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Servain

    Full Text Available Modelling and observational evidence indicate that interannual variabilities of dynamic height and sea surface temperature (SST in the eastern part of the tropical Atlantic Ocean (Gulf of Guinea are largely induced by preceding fluctuations in wind stress, mainly in the western equatorial basin. A wind-driven linear ocean model is used here to test the possibility of forecasting the abnormal dynamic heights. A control run of the model, forced by 1964–1993 wind stress monthly means, is first conducted. Yearly test runs (1964–1994 are subsequently performed from January to August by forcing the model with observed winds from January to May, and then by forcing with the May wind assumed to persist from June to August. During the last three decades the largest deviations of dynamic height simulated by the control run in the Gulf of Guinea in boreal summer would have been correctly forecast from wind data related only to conditions in May of each year. However, for weak climatic anomalies, the model may forecast overestimated values. For the most part (about 20 times during the last 30 years, the sign of the observed SST anomaly in the centre of the Gulf of Guinea during the boreal summer is identical to the sign of simulated anomalies of dynamic height deduced from both control and test runs. Along the eastern equatorial waveguide, the sea level forecasting skill slowly decreases from the first 2 weeks of June until the second 2 weeks of August, but remains high on both sides of the equator throughout boreal summer, as is expected from the adjustment in a linear ocean model. It is established that throughout the year in the Gulf of Guinea the accuracy of the 1-month forecast dynamic height anomaly provided by the simple linear method is greater than that of the 1-month forecast assuming persistence.

  5. Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment (acex): Implementation of Eddy Covariance Implementation of Eddy Covariance CO2 Flux Measurements on the SW Atlantic Ocean and Results from the Second Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, C.; Pezzi, L. P.; Miller, S. D.; Martins, L. G.; Araujo, R. G.; Acevedo, O. C.; Moller, O.; Souza, R.; Tavano, V. M.; Farias, P.; Casagrande, F.

    2013-05-01

    The project observational and numerical study of heat, momentum and CO2 fluxes at the ocean-atmosphere interface in the South Atlantic Ocean - Atlantic Ocean Carbon Experiment (ACEx) combines observational and modeling approaches to characterize heat, momentum and CO2 fluxes at the ocean-atmosphere interface in the South Atlantic Ocean. This project is part of an innovative initiative aimed at providing a better understanding of the chemical, physical and dynamic processes of ocean-atmosphere interaction in micro and meso-scales at the South Atlantic Ocean, as well as fluxes across this interface. The ACEx project has performed three cruises so far, collecting measurements with CTDs and XBTs, launching radiosondes, and deploying a micro-meteorological tower to make in situ measurements of heat, momentum and CO2 fluxes. Our successful deployment of this tower represents the first use of a CO2 flux measurement system using eddy covariance technique in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean. In this work, we present results from the second ACEx cruise, in which the crew onboard the Hydro-oceanographic Vessel Cruzeiro do Sul took measurements at 31 stations between Paranaguá (PR) and Chuí (RS). In addition to physical data, this cruise collected phytoplankton and nutrient data, allowing carbonic gas fluxes to be analyzed and compared with both physical and biological forcings. The highest chlorophyll concentrations were found in water derived from the La Plata River, which showed low salinity waters close to the surface. The influence of these waters was observed mainly at the southernmost stations of the cruise, coincident with increases on the CO2 fluxes that had remained slightly negative until then. This suggests that the biological forcings might have a significant impact on the gas fluxes in this area, through both respiration and the consumption of organic matter. We are currently working to apply circulation and biogeochemical models to evaluate the importance of

  6. Sediment from Northwest Atlantic Ocean acquired in 1978 (ROWE78 shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Presented in this dataset are data determined from sediments collected by different means during a variety of cruises to the northwest Atlantic Ocean. These data...

  7. Ship Sensor Observations for North Atlantic Stepping Stones 2005 - Office of Ocean Exploration

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly measurements made by selected ship sensors on the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown during the "North Atlantic Stepping Stones 2005" expedition sponsored by the...

  8. Recent Changes in Arctic Ocean Sea Ice Motion Associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, R.

    1999-01-01

    Examination of a new ice motion dataset of the Arctic Ocean over a recent eighteen year period (1978-1996) reveals patterns of variability that can be linked directly to the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  9. Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program: a new international ocean observing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozier, M.S.; Bacon, S.; Bower, A.S.; de Jong, M.F.; de Steur, L.; Zika, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    A new ocean observing system has been launched in the North Atlantic in order to understand the linkage between the meridional overturning circulation and deep water formation.For decades oceanographers have understood the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to be primarily driven by

  10. Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program: a new international ocean observing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozier, M.S.; Bacon, S.; Bower, A.S.; de Jong, F; de Steur, L.; Zika, J.D.

    2017-01-01

    A new ocean observing system has been launched in the North Atlantic in order to understand the linkage between the meridional overturning circulation and deep water formation.For decades oceanographers have understood the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to be primarily driven by

  11. 77 FR 50062 - Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean; Daytona Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic... Daytona Beach, Florida during the Embry-Riddle Wings and Waves air show. The event is scheduled to take...: Sec. 165.T07-0653 Safety Zone; Embry Riddle Wings and Waves, Atlantic Ocean, Daytona Beach, FL. (a...

  12. Overturning in the Subpolar North Atlantic Program: a new international ocean observing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozier, M.S.; Bacon, S.; Bower, A.S.; de Jong, F; de Steur, L.; Zika, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    A new ocean observing system has been launched in the North Atlantic in order to understand the linkage between the meridional overturning circulation and deep water formation.For decades oceanographers have understood the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) to be primarily driven by

  13. The morphostructure of the atlantic ocean floor its development in the meso-cenozoic

    CERN Document Server

    Litvin, V M

    1984-01-01

    The study of the topography and structure of the ocean floor is one of the most important stages in ascertaining the geological structure and history of development of the Earth's oceanic crust. This, in its turn, provides a means for purposeful, scientifically-substantiated prospecting, exploration and development of the mineral resources of the ocean. The Atlantic Ocean has been geologically and geophysically studied to a great extent and many years of investigating its floor have revealed the laws governing the structure of the major forms of its submarine relief (e. g. , the continental shelf, the continental slope, the transition zones, the ocean bed, and the Mid-Oceanic Ridge). The basic features of the Earth's oceanic crust structure, anomalous geophysical fields, and the thickness and structure of its sedimentary cover have also been studied. Based on the investigations of the Atlantic Ocean floor and its surrounding continents, the presently prevalent concept of new global tectonics has appeared. A g...

  14. Manganese in the west Atlantic Ocean in the context of the first global ocean circulation model of manganese

    OpenAIRE

    Hulten, Marco; Middag, Rob; Dutay, Jean-Claude; de Baar, Hein; Roy-Barman, Matthieu; Gehlen, Marion; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Sterl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element. Moreover, its oxidised form is involved in removing itself and several other trace elements from ocean waters. Here we report the longest thus far (17 500 km length) full-depth ocean section of dissolved Mn in the west Atlantic Ocean, comprising 1320 data values of high accuracy. This is the GA02 transect that is part of the GEOTRACES programme, which aims to understand trace element distributions. The goal ...

  15. Southern Ocean origin for the resumption of Atlantic thermohaline circulation during deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Gregor; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2003-07-31

    During the two most recent deglaciations, the Southern Hemisphere warmed before Greenland. At the same time, the northern Atlantic Ocean was exposed to meltwater discharge, which is generally assumed to reduce the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water. Yet during deglaciation, the Atlantic thermohaline circulation became more vigorous, in the transition from a weak glacial to a strong interglacial mode. Here we use a three-dimensional ocean circulation model to investigate the impact of Southern Ocean warming and the associated sea-ice retreat on the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. We find that a gradual warming in the Southern Ocean during deglaciation induces an abrupt resumption of the interglacial mode of the thermohaline circulation, triggered by increased mass transport into the Atlantic Ocean via the warm (Indian Ocean) and cold (Pacific Ocean) water route. This effect prevails over the influence of meltwater discharge, which would oppose a strengthening of the thermohaline circulation. A Southern Ocean trigger for the transition into an interglacial mode of circulation provides a consistent picture of Southern and Northern hemispheric climate change at times of deglaciation, in agreement with the available proxy records.

  16. Synechococcus in the Atlantic gateway to the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lund Paulsen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing temperatures, with pronounced effects at high latitudes, have raised questions about potential changes in species composition, as well as possible increased importance of small-celled phytoplankton in marine systems. In this study, we mapped out one of the smallest and globally most widespread primary producers, the picocyanobacterium Synechococcus, within the Atlantic inflow to the Arctic Ocean. In contrast to the general understanding that Synechococcus is almost absent in polar oceans due to low temperatures, we encountered high abundances (up to 21,000 cells mL-1 at 79 °N, and documented their presence as far north as 82.5 °N. Covering an annual cycle in 2014, we found that during autumn and winter, Synechococcus was often more abundant than picoeukaryotes, which usually dominate the picophytoplankton communities in the Arctic. Synechococcus community composition shifted from a quite high genetic diversity during the spring bloom to a clear dominance of two specific operational taxonomic units (OTUs in autumn and winter. We observed abundances higher than 1,000 cells mL-1 in water colder than 2 °C at seven distinct stations and size-fractionation experiments demonstrated a net growth of Synechococcus at 2 °C in the absence of nano-sized grazers at certain periods of the year. Phylogenetic analysis of petB sequences demonstrated that these high latitude Synechococcus group within the previously described cold-adapted clades I and IV, but also contributed to unveil novel genetic diversity, especially within clade I.

  17. Iberian Atlantic Margins Group investigates deep structure of ocean margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Iberian Atlantic Margins Group; Banda, Enric; Torne, Montserrat

    With recent seismic reflection data in hand, investigators for the Iberian Atlantic Margins project are preparing images of the deep continental and oceanic margins of Iberia. In 1993, the IAM group collected near vertical incidence seismic reflection data over a total distance of 3500 km along the North and Western Iberian Margins, Gorringe Bank Region and Gulf of Cadiz (Figure 1). When combined with data on the conjugate margin off Canada, details of the Iberian margin's deep structure should aid in distinguishing rift models and improve understanding of the processes governing the formation of margins.The North Iberian passive continental margin was formed during a Permian to Triassic phase of extension and matured during the early Cretaceous by rotation of the Iberian Peninsula with respect to Eurasia. From the late Cretaceous to the early Oligocene period, Iberia rotated in a counterclockwise direction around an axis located west of Lisbon. The plate boundary between Iberia and Eurasia, which lies along the Pyrenees, follows the north Spanish marginal trough, trends obliquely in the direction of the fossil Bay of Biscay triple junction, and continues along the Azores-Biscay Rise [Sibuet et al., 1994]. Following the NE-SW convergence of Iberia and Eurasia, the reactivation of the North Iberian continental margin resulted in the formation of a marginal trough and accretionary prism [Boillot et al., 1971].

  18. Ocean impact on decadal Atlantic climate variability revealed by sea-level observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Gerard D; Haigh, Ivan D; Hirschi, Joël J-M; Grist, Jeremy P; Smeed, David A

    2015-05-28

    Decadal variability is a notable feature of the Atlantic Ocean and the climate of the regions it influences. Prominently, this is manifested in the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) in sea surface temperatures. Positive (negative) phases of the AMO coincide with warmer (colder) North Atlantic sea surface temperatures. The AMO is linked with decadal climate fluctuations, such as Indian and Sahel rainfall, European summer precipitation, Atlantic hurricanes and variations in global temperatures. It is widely believed that ocean circulation drives the phase changes of the AMO by controlling ocean heat content. However, there are no direct observations of ocean circulation of sufficient length to support this, leading to questions about whether the AMO is controlled from another source. Here we provide observational evidence of the widely hypothesized link between ocean circulation and the AMO. We take a new approach, using sea level along the east coast of the United States to estimate ocean circulation on decadal timescales. We show that ocean circulation responds to the first mode of Atlantic atmospheric forcing, the North Atlantic Oscillation, through circulation changes between the subtropical and subpolar gyres--the intergyre region. These circulation changes affect the decadal evolution of North Atlantic heat content and, consequently, the phases of the AMO. The Atlantic overturning circulation is declining and the AMO is moving to a negative phase. This may offer a brief respite from the persistent rise of global temperatures, but in the coupled system we describe, there are compensating effects. In this case, the negative AMO is associated with a continued acceleration of sea-level rise along the northeast coast of the United States.

  19. Thermal Niche Tracking and Future Distribution of Atlantic Mackerel Spawning in response to Ocean Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine eBruge

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available North-east Atlantic mackerel spawning distribution has shifted northward in the last three decades probably in response to global sea warming. Yet, uncertainties subsist regarding on the shift rate, causalities, and how this species will respond to future conditions. Using egg surveys, we explored the influence of temperature change on mackerel’s spawning distribution (western and southern spawning components of the stock between 1992 and 2013, and projected how it may change under future climate change scenarios. We developed three generalized additive models: (i a spatiotemporal model to reconstruct the spawning distribution for the north-east Atlantic stock over the period 1992-2013, to estimate the rate of shift; (ii a thermal habitat model to assess if spawning mackerel have tracked their thermal spawning-niche; and (iii a niche-based model to project future spawning distribution under two predicted climate change scenarios. Our findings showed that mackerel spawning activity has shifted northward at a rate of 15.9 ± 0.9 km/decade between 1992 and 2013. Similarly, using the thermal habitat model, we detected a northward shift of the thermal spawning-niche. This indicates that mackerel has spawned at higher latitudes to partially tracking their thermal spawning-niche, at a rate of 28.0 ± 9.0 km/°C of sea warming. Under future scenarios (mid and end of the century, the extrapolation of the niche-based model to coupled hydroclimatic and biogeochemical models indicates that centre of gravity of mackerel spawning distribution is expected to shift westward (32 to 117 km and northward (0.5 to 328 km, but with high variability according to scenarios and time frames. The future of the overall egg production in the area is uncertain (change from -9.3% to 12%. With the aim to allow the fishing industry to anticipate the future distribution of mackerel shoals during the spawning period, future research should focus on reducing uncertainty in

  20. Microbial community diversity and physical-chemical features of the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alves Junior, Nelson; Meirelles, Pedro Milet; de Oliveira Santos, Eidy; Dutilh, Bas; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Paranhos, Rodolfo; Cabral, Anderson S; Rezende, Carlos; Iida, Tetsuya; de Moura, Rodrigo L; Kruger, Ricardo Henrique; Pereira, Renato C; Valle, Rogério; Sawabe, Tomoo; Thompson, Cristiane; Thompson, Fabiano

    2014-01-01

    Microbial oceanography studies have demonstrated the central role of microbes in functioning and nutrient cycling of the global ocean. Most of these former studies including at Southwestern Atlantic Ocean (SAO) focused on surface seawater and benthic organisms (e.g., coral reefs and sponges). This

  1. Abrupt climate fluctuations in the tropics: the influence of Atlantic Ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street-Perrott, F. Alayne; Perrott, R. Alan

    1990-02-01

    Several prolonged droughts in the Sahel and tropical Mexico during the past 14,000 years were coincident with large injections of fresh water into the northern North Atlantic Ocean. The link between these phenomena lies in the thermohaline circulation of the oceans: input of fresh water decreases salinity leading to reduced North Atlantic Deep Water formation and anomalies of sea surface temperature of the kind associated with decreased rainfall in the northern tropics. Ice-sheet disintegration, the most important source of fresh-water input to the oceans, should therefore be considered explicitly in models of past and future climate.

  2. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, Carolin; Fischer, Martin; Neulinger, Sven; Fiedler, Björn; Philippi, Miriam; Schütte, Florian; Singh, Arvind; Hauss, Helena; Karstensen, Johannes; Körtzinger, Arne; Schmitz, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of approximately 40 μmol kg-1. The recent discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with close to anoxic O2 concentrations (promoted transcription of the key gene for denitrification, nirS. This process is usually absent from the open ETNA waters. In light of future projected ocean deoxygenation, our results show that even distinct events of anoxia have the potential to alter microbial community structure with critical impacts on primary productivity and biogeochemical processes of oceanic water bodies.

  3. Identification of Atlantic Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures Drivers of French Streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, O. A.; Tootle, G. A.; Anderson, S.

    2010-12-01

    The identification of Atlantic Ocean climatic drivers [e.g., Sea Surface Temperature (SST) variability] may be valuable in long lead-time forecasting of streamflow in France. Previous research efforts have identified the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) as drivers of European hydrology. The current research applies, for the first time, the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) statistical method to Atlantic Ocean SSTs and French streamflow to identify the primary Atlantic Ocean climatic driver of French streamflow. The use of Atlantic Ocean SSTs as a whole eliminates any biased that may be associated with using a predefined region of SSTs (e.g., AMO). Approximately 60 unimpaired streamflow stations with a period of record beginning around 1960 were evaluated and 25 were usable due to missing data. These data were obtained from the hydrology website of the Ministry of Ecology and Sustainable Development - Ministère de l’Ecologie et du Developpment Durable (http://www.hydro.eaufrance.fr). The Atlantic Ocean SST data cover the region spanning from 20° South to 60° North and 80° West to 2° West and were obtained from the National Climatic Data Center website (http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/cdc/data.noaa.erSST.html). AMO index values are available from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Diagnostics Center (CDC) (http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/ClimateIndices/) and NAO index values were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) website (http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/cas/jhurrell/indices.html). SVD has been used previously in similar studies, evaluating Pacific (should this be Pacific?), Atlantic, and global SSTs with various hydrologic responses including streamflow, precipitation, snowpack, and drought. Seasonal and yearly French streamflow are the hydrologic response while average Atlantic Ocean SSTs calculated for three different six month windows (January-June or JFMAMJ, April

  4. Comment on "The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation without a role for ocean circulation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Sutton, Rowan; Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Delworth, Thomas L; Kim, Who M; Robson, Jon; Yeager, Stephen G

    2016-06-24

    Clement et al (Reports, 16 October 2015, p. 320) claim that the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) is a thermodynamic response of the ocean mixed layer to stochastic atmospheric forcing and that ocean circulation changes have no role in causing the AMO. These claims are not justified. We show that ocean dynamics play a central role in the AMO. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. SPURS: Salinity Processes in the Upper-Ocean Regional Study: THE NORTH ATLANTIC EXPERIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, Eric; Bryan, Frank; Schmitt, Ray

    2015-01-01

    In this special issue of Oceanography, we explore the results of SPURS-1, the first part of the ocean process study Salinity Processes in the Upper-ocean Regional Study (SPURS). The experiment was conducted between August 2012 and October 2013 in the subtropical North Atlantic and was the first of two experiments (SPURS come in pairs!). SPURS-2 is planned for 20162017 in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean.

  6. Zooplankton data from zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 03 November 1976 - 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 3, 1976 to November 18,...

  7. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise KNOX21RR in the North Atlantic Ocean, Rio de la Plata and South Atlantic Ocean from 2008-11-11 to 2008-12-01 (NCEI Accession 0155900)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0155900 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise KNOX21RR in the North Atlantic Ocean, Rio de la Plata and...

  8. It is the time for oceanic seabirds: Tracking year-round distribution of gadfly petrels across the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Raul; Carlile, Nicholas; Madeiros, Jeremy; Ramirez, Ivan; Paiva, Vitor H.; Dinis, Herculano A.; Zino, Francis; Biscoito, Manuel; Leal, Gustavo R.; Bugoni, Leandro; Jodice, Patrick G.; Ryan, Peter G.; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    AimAnthropogenic activities alter and constrain the structure of marine ecosystems with implications for wide-ranging marine vertebrates. In spite of the environmental importance of vast oceanic ecosystems, most conservation efforts mainly focus on neritic areas. To identify relevant oceanic areas for conservation, we assessed the year-round spatial distribution and spatio-temporal overlap of eight truly oceanic seabird species of gadfly petrels (Pterodroma spp.) inhabiting the Atlantic Ocean.LocationAtlantic Ocean.MethodsUsing tracking data (mostly from geolocators), we examined year-round distributions, the timing of life-cycle events, and marine habitat overlap of eight gadfly petrel species that breed in the Atlantic Ocean.ResultsWe compiled 125 year-round tracks. Movement strategies ranged from non-migratory to long-distance migrant species and from species sharing a common non-breeding area to species dispersing among multiple non-breeding sites. Gadfly petrels occurred throughout the Atlantic Ocean but tended to concentrate in subtropical regions. During the boreal summer, up to three species overlapped spatio-temporally over a large area around the Azores archipelago. During the austral summer, up to four species coincided in a core area in subtropical waters around Cape Verde, and three species shared habitat over two distinct areas off Brazil. The petrels used many national Exclusive Economic Zones, although they also exploited offshore international waters.Main conclusionsTracking movements of highly mobile vertebrates such as gadfly petrels can provide a powerful tool to evaluate and assess the potential need for and location of protected oceanic areas. As more multispecies, year-round data sets are collected from wide-ranging vertebrates, researchers and managers will have greater insight into the location of biodiversity hotspots. These can subsequently inform and guide marine spatial planning efforts that account for both conservation and

  9. The influence of Southern Ocean winds on the North Atlantic carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronselaer, Ben; Zanna, Laure; Munday, David R.; Lowe, Jason

    2016-06-01

    Observed and predicted increases in Southern Ocean winds are thought to upwell deep ocean carbon and increase atmospheric CO2. However, Southern Ocean dynamics affect biogeochemistry and circulation pathways on a global scale. Using idealized Massachusetts Institute of Technology General Circulation Model (MITgcm) simulations, we demonstrate that an increase in Southern Ocean winds reduces the carbon sink in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre. The increase in atmospheric CO2 due to the reduction of the North Atlantic carbon sink is shown to be of the same magnitude as the increase in atmospheric CO2 due to Southern Ocean outgassing. The mechanism can be described as follows: The increase in Southern Ocean winds leads to an increase in upper ocean northward nutrient transport. Biological productivity is therefore enhanced in the tropics, which alters the chemistry of the subthermocline waters that are ultimately upwelled in the subpolar gyre. The results demonstrate the influence of Southern Ocean winds on the North Atlantic carbon sink and show that the effect of Southern Ocean winds on atmospheric CO2 is likely twice as large as previously thought in past, present, and future climates.

  10. Global linkages originating from decadal oceanic variability in the subpolar North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafik, L.; Häkkinen, S.; England, M. H.; Carton, J. A.; Nigam, S.; Ruiz-Barradas, A.; Hannachi, A.; Miller, L.

    2016-10-01

    The anomalous decadal warming of the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean (SPNA), and the northward spreading of this warm water, has been linked to rapid Arctic sea ice loss and more frequent cold European winters. Recently, variations in this heat transport have also been reported to covary with global warming slowdown/acceleration periods via a Pacific climate response. We here examine the role of SPNA temperature variability in this Atlantic-Pacific climate connectivity. We find that the evolution of ocean heat content anomalies from the subtropics to the subpolar region, likely due to ocean circulation changes, coincides with a basin-wide Atlantic warming/cooling. This induces an Atlantic-Pacific sea surface temperature seesaw, which in turn, strengthens/weakens the Walker circulation and amplifies the Pacific decadal variability that triggers pronounced global-scale atmospheric circulation anomalies. We conclude that the decadal oceanic variability in the SPNA is an essential component of the tropical interactions between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

  11. MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SANDSTONE AND CLAY, NORTH-EAST CONSTANTINE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M BENYAMINA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The north-east area of Constantine has a very complex geological setting. The variety of sedimentary rocks such as sandstone and clay in abundance, represent a big importance in the industry and road infrastructure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, Scanning Electron Microscopy SEM/EDS, FTIR spectroscopy of sandstone and clay are required for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the existing phases. In addition, chemical analysis of the same samples is required to confirm the XRD, EDS (Energy Dispersive X ray Spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy results. The results of this multidisciplinary study, obtained by various analytical techniques, show a good agreement on the existing phases.

  12. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 01 August 1978 - 20 March 1979 (NODC Accession 7900312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 1, 1978 to March 20, 1979. Data were submitted by Science...

  13. Oceanographic and meteorological data collected during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in the Atlantic Ocean from multiple USSR platforms from 1974-06-02 to 1974-08-09 (NCEI Accession 7700677)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains oceanographic and meteorological data collected during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in the Atlantic Ocean from multiple USSR...

  14. Oceanographic and meteorological data collected during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in the North Atlantic Ocean from multiple USSR platforms from 1974-07-08 to 1974-09-20 (NCEI Accession 7700676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains oceanographic and meteorological data collected during the GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment (GATE) in the North Atlantic Ocean from multiple...

  15. Profile and bottle data collected on the RV Melville (cruise Vancouver 06) from the Agulhas-South Atlantic Thermohaline Transport Experiment (ASTTEX) in the Atlantic Ocean from 20030102 to 20030115 (NODC Accession 0074001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Introduction: The Agulhas-South Atlantic Thermohaline Experiment (ASTTEX) examined the fluxes of heat, salt and mass entering the South Atlantic ocean via the...

  16. Oceanographic profile data collected aboard Atlantic Surveyor as part of project OPR-D302-KR-12 in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2012-07-05 to 2012-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0130622)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130622 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the Atlantic Surveyor during project OPR-D302-KR-12 in the North Atlantic Ocean from...

  17. Extant Rhabdosphaeraceae (coccolithophorids, class Prymnesiophyceae) from the Indian Ocean, Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijne, A.

    1992-01-01

    Rhabdosphaerids were consistently present as a minor constituent of the 1985 summer coccolithophorid flora in surface waters of the Indian Ocean, Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea and North Atlantic. Sixteen taxa are identified, belonging to seven genera, including the two new combinations Cyrtosphaera acu

  18. Tropical Cyclone Exposure for U.S. waters within the North Atlantic Ocean basin, 1900-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent modeled, historical exposure of U.S. offshore and coastal waters to tropical cyclone activity within the North Atlantic Ocean basin. BOEM Outer...

  19. WATER TEMPERATURE and Other Data from ATLANTIS II From North Atlantic Ocean from 19791017 to 19791102 (NODC Accession 8600043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Helium and Tritium data from the North Atlantic ocean was submitted by Dr. William Jenkins from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). The data were collected...

  20. Observations of Pigment and Particle Distributions in the Western North Atlantic from an Autonomous Float and Ocean Color Satellite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. Boss; D. Swift; L. Taylor; P. Brickley; R. Zaneveld; S. Riser; M. J. Perry; P. G. Strutton

    2008-01-01

    ... as surface waters obscured by clouds. Here we demonstrate this ability by pairing satellite ocean color data with records from a profiling float that obtained continuous, high-quality optical data for 3 yr in the North Atlantic Ocean...

  1. Oceanographic temperature, salinity, pressure, and current data collected in the Sub Tropical North Atlantic Ocean, SPURS-1 (NCEI Accession 0125198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SPURS field campaign consisted of a variety of observing assets. SPURS-1 (Salinity Processes in the Upper Ocean Regional Study - North Atlantic Field Campaign)...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1990-10-04 to 1990-10-27 (NODC Accession 0116643)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116643 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  3. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1983-10-07 to 1984-02-19 (NODC Accession 0117503)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117503 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  4. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the MELVILLE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-01-23 to 1989-04-12 (NODC Accession 0115014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115014 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from MELVILLE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  5. pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Strait of Gibraltar from 2013-03-20 to 2013-05-22 (NODC Accession 0114434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114434 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and...

  6. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2002-10-13 to 2002-11-16 (NODC Accession 0113890)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113890 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  7. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway, discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MAURICE EWING in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1994-01-04 to 1994-03-21 (NODC Accession 0115157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115157 includes Surface underway, discrete sample and profile data collected from MAURICE EWING in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  8. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2010-04-05 to 2010-05-16 (NODC Accession 0109927)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109927 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2010-04-05 to...

  9. pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2002-03-04 to 2002-04-09 (NODC Accession 0108097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108097 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  10. pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2001-03-05 to 2001-04-17 (NODC Accession 0108096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108096 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from HESPERIDES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  11. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SONNE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2000-11-28 to 2000-12-27 (NODC Accession 0115599)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115599 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SONNE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  12. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1987-11-24 to 1989-04-12 (NODC Accession 0117501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117501 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  13. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1981-03-28 to 1981-04-23 (NODC Accession 0116646)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116646 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2006-06-06 to 2006-07-09 (NODC Accession 0108078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0108078 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-10-26 to 2009-11-23 (NODC Accession 0109918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0109918 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-10-26 to...

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from the OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1988-07-23 to 1988-09-01 (NODC Accession 0117675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117675 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  17. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2003-06-04 to 2003-08-11 (NODC Accession 0108061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108061 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1993-01-02 to 1993-02-10 (NODC Accession 0115753)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115753 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1993-01-02 to...

  19. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1994-02-19 to 1994-03-25 (NODC Accession 0115594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115594 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1999-07-12 to 1999-09-22 (NODC Accession 0113601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113601 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  1. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the EDWIN LINK in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 1996-04-15 to 1996-05-16 (NODC Accession 0113539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113539 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from EDWIN LINK in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2008-02-23 to 2008-03-15 (NODC Accession 0117496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117496 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from L'ATALANTE in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  3. Microplastic pollution in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean: validated and opportunistic sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusher, Amy L; Burke, Ann; O'Connor, Ian; Officer, Rick

    2014-11-15

    Levels of marine debris, including microplastics, are largely un-documented in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Broad scale monitoring efforts are required to understand the distribution, abundance and ecological implications of microplastic pollution. A method of continuous sampling was developed to be conducted in conjunction with a wide range of vessel operations to maximise vessel time. Transects covering a total of 12,700 km were sampled through continuous monitoring of open ocean sub-surface water resulting in 470 samples. Items classified as potential plastics were identified in 94% of samples. A total of 2315 particles were identified, 89% were less than 5mm in length classifying them as microplastics. Average plastic abundance in the Northeast Atlantic was calculated as 2.46 particles m(-3). This is the first report to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of microplastic pollution in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and to present a potential method for standardised monitoring of microplastic pollution.

  4. Atmospheric transport of pollutants from North America to the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harriss, R. C.; Browell, E. V.; Sebacher, D. I.; Gregory, G. L.; Hinton, R. R.; Beck, S. M.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Shipley, S. T.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based measurements strongly support the hypothesis that pollutant materials of anthropogenic origin are being transported over long distances in the midtroposphere and are a significant source of acid rain, acid snow, trace metal deposition, ozone and visibility-reducing aerosols in remote oceanic and polar regions of the Norhern Hemisphere. Atmospheric sulphur budget calculations and studies of acid rain on Bermuda indicate that a large fraction of pollutant materials emitted into the atmosphere in eastern North America are advected eastwards over the North Atlantic Ocean. The first direct airborne measurements of the vertical distribution of tropospheric aerosols over the western North Atlantic is reported here. A newly developed airborne differential adsorption lidar system was used to obtain continuous, remotely sensed aerosol distributions along its flight path. The data document two episodes of long-distance transport of pollutant materials from North America over the North Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Arctic contribution to upper-ocean variability in the North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John E.; Chapman, William L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential climatic leverage of salinity and temperature anomalies in the high-latitude North Atlantic is large. Substantial variations of sea ice have accompanied North Atlantic salinity and temperature anomalies. Atmospheric pressure data are used here to show that the local forcing of high-latitude North Atlantic Ocean fluctuations is augmented by antecedent atmospheric circulation anomalies over the central Arctic. These circulation anomalies are consistent with enhanced wind-forcing of thicker older ice into the Transpolar Drift Stream and an enhanced export of sea ice (fresh water) from the Arctic into the Greenland Sea prior to major episodes of ice severity in the Greenland and Iceland seas.

  6. AMO-like variations of holocene sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Feng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental records of the North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SST show a significant 60–80 year cycle, referred to as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO. During AMO warm (cold phases, SST over the entire North Atlantic Ocean is dominated by basin-wide positive (negative anomalies. We analyzed SST variations in the North Atlantic Ocean for the last 10 ka. The long-term and centennial variations of Holocene SST in the North Atlantic demonstrate a basin-wide mode that clearly resembles the AMO signal recorded during the recent instrumental period. The long-term changes of Holocene SST were controlled by the solar insolation related to the orbital variations, and the centennial variations were closely coupled with the intensity of the thermohaline circulation. The spatial extent in the Atlantic realm of temperature anomalies around two specific time intervals, 8.2 ka and during the medieval warm period, also resemble the observed temperature anomalies associated with the AMO. These results demonstrate that the modern AMO, and centennial and longer time scale SST variations during the Holocene share a similar spatial extent in the North Atlantic, and presumably as well physical processes associated with their existence and their far-field teleconnection effects.

  7. Large bio-geographical shifts in the north-eastern Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hátún, Hjálmar; Payne, Mark; Beaugrand, G.

    2009-01-01

    and persistent bottom-up bio-physical link is demonstrated using a numerical ocean general circulation model and data on four trophically connected levels in the food chain – phytoplankton, zooplankton, blue whiting, and pilot whales. The plankton data give a unique basin-scale depiction of these changes...... water masses in the north-eastern North Atlantic Ocean, associated with changes in the strength and extent of the subpolar gyre. These exchanges lead to variations in the influence exerted by the subarctic or Lusitanian biomes on the intermediate faunistic zone in the north-eastern Atlantic. This strong...

  8. 33 CFR 334.100 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape May, N.J.; Coast Guard Rifle Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape May, N.J.; Coast Guard Rifle Range. 334.100 Section 334.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Ocean off Cape May, N.J.; Coast Guard Rifle Range. (a) The danger zone. The waters of the Atlantic...

  9. 76 FR 26931 - Safety Zone; Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Prix, Atlantic Ocean, Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... Cocoa Beach, Florida during the Second Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix. The Second Annual Space... will be held on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida. Approximately 30...

  10. 75 FR 20802 - Safety Zone; New York Air Show at Jones Beach State Park, Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ..., Atlantic Ocean off of Jones Beach, Wantagh, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... an air show which consist of aircraft performing aerobatic maneuvers over the Atlantic Ocean off of..., which will then become highlighted in blue. In the ``Document Type'' drop down menu select...

  11. Physical and chemical data collected from bottle casts in the Atlantic Ocean from ALBATROS and other platforms from 21 July 1965 to 17 February 1988 (NODC Accession 0000409)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts in the Atlantic Ocean from ALBATROS, ARGUS, ATLANT, and other platforms from 21 July 1965 to 17 February...

  12. The Distribution of Dissolved Iron in the West Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; Middag, Rob; Laan, Patrick; Gerringa, Loes J. A.; van Aken, Hendrik M.; Schoemann, Veronique; de Jong, Jeroen T.M.; Baar, de Hein J.W.

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential trace element for marine life. Extremely low Fe concentrations limit primary production and nitrogen fixation in large parts of the oceans and consequently influence ocean ecosystem functioning. The importance of Fe for ocean ecosystems makes Fe one of the core chemical

  13. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open-ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Löscher, C. R.; Fischer, M A; Neulinger, S. C.; B. Fiedler; M. Philippi; F. Schütte; A Singh; H. Hauss; Karstensen, J.; Körtzinger, A.; S. Künzel; R. A. Schmitz

    2015-01-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open-ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of approximately 40 μmol kg−1. The recent discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with close to anoxic O2 concentrations (< 1 μmol kg−1) located just below the mixed layer has challenged our understanding of O2 distribution and biogeochemical processes in this area. He...

  14. Dynamics of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and Southern Ocean in an ocean model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Julian P.; Furue, Ryo; Schloesser, Fabian; Burkhardt, Theodore W.; Nonaka, Masami

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state, variable-density, 2-layer, ocean model (VLOM) is used to investigate basic dynamics of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and Southern Ocean. The domain consists of idealized (rectangular) representations of the Atlantic, Southern, and Pacific Oceans. The model equations represent the depth-averaged, layer-1 response (except for one solution in which they represent the depth-integrated flow over both layers). To allow for overturning, water can cross the bottom of layer 1 at the velocity we =wd +wm +wn , the three parts representing: interior diffusion wd that increases the layer-1 thickness h throughout the basin, mixed-layer entrainment wm that ensures h is never less than a minimum value hm , and diapycnal (cooling) processes external to the basin wn that adjust h to hn . For most solutions, horizontal mixing has the form of Rayleigh damping with coefficient ν , which we interpret to result from baroclinic instability through the closure, V∗ = - (ν /f2) ∇P , where ∇P = ∇(1/2 g‧h2) is the depth-integrated pressure gradient, g‧ is the reduced-gravity coefficient, and ν is a mixing coefficient; with this interpretation, the layer-1 flow corresponds to the sum of the Eulerian-mean and eddy-mean (V∗) transport/widths, that is, the "residual" circulation. Finally, layer-1 temperature cools polewards in response to a surface heat flux Q, and the cooling can be strong enough in the Southern Ocean for g‧ = 0 south of a latitude y0 , in which case layer 1 vanishes and the model reduces to a single layer 2. Solutions are obtained both numerically and analytically. The analytic approach splits fields into interior and boundary-layer parts, from which a coupled set of integral constraints can be derived. The set allows properties of the circulation (upwelling-driven transport out of the Southern Ocean M , downwelling transport in the North Atlantic, transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current) and stratification (Atlantic

  15. Bioclimatism and vernacular architecture of north-east India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Manoj Kumar; Atreya, S.K. [Instrument Design and Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Mahapatra, Sadhan [Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India)

    2009-05-15

    Vernacular architecture based on bioclimatism concepts was developed and used through the centuries by many civilizations across the world. Different civilizations have produced their own architectural styles based on the local conditions. This study is carried out on the vernacular buildings of north-east India across all the bioclimatic zones. A survey of 42 houses, more than 70 years old was carried out at representative locations across all bioclimatic zones. The study has yielded findings relating bioclimatism, socio-economic status and cultural setup to the vernacular architecture of the region. Also, different solar passive features are available in most of these houses, related to temperature control and promoting natural ventilation. These houses are constructed using locally available materials like wood, cane, bamboo, stone, mud, jute, lime and represent unique examples towards sustainable building design. (author)

  16. Interannual-to-decadal variability of the North Atlantic from an ocean data assimilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, S.; Di Pietro, P.; Navarra, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2004-10-01

    An ocean analysis, assimilating both surface and subsurface hydrographic temperature data into a global ocean model, has been produced for the period 1958-2000, and used to study the time and space variations of North Atlantic upper ocean heat content (HC). Observational evidence is presented for interannual-to-decadal variability of upper ocean thermal fluctuations in the North Atlantic related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) variability over the last 40 years. The assimilation scheme used in the ocean analysis is a univariate, variational optimum interpolation of temperature. The first guess is produced by an eddy permitting global ocean general circulation forced by atmospheric reanalysis from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The validation of the ocean analysis has been done through the comparison with objectively analyzed observations and independent data sets. The method is able to compensate for the model systematic error to reproduce a realistic vertical thermal structure of the region and to improve consistently the model estimation of the time variability of the upper ocean temperature. Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis shows that an important mode of variability of the wintertime upper ocean climate over the North Atlantic during the period of study is characterized by a tripole pattern both for SST and upper ocean HC. A similar mode is found for summer HC anomalies but not for summer SST. Over the whole period, HC variations in the subtropics show a general warming trend while the tropical and north eastern part of the basin have an opposite cooling tendency. Superimposed on this linear trend, the HC variability explained by the first EOF both in winter and summer conditions reveals quasi-decadal oscillations correlated with changes in the NAO index. On the other hand, there is no evidence of correlation in time between the NAO index and the upper ocean HC averaged over the whole North Atlantic which exhibits a

  17. Atlantic Ocean Circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum: Inferences from Data and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Program Approved for Distribution: John M. Toole, Chair Department of Physical Oceanography James A. Yoder WHOI Dean of Graduate Studies Atlantic...Mullerworth, A. Pardaens, G. Rickard , R. Thorpe, and R. Wood. Impact of an eddy-permitting ocean resolution on control and climate change simulations with

  18. Regional warming chnages fish species richness in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstede, ter R.; Hiddink, J.G.; Rijnsdorp, A.D.

    2010-01-01

    Regional warming causes changes in local communities due to species extinctions and latitudinal range shifts. We show that the species richness of fish in 3 regional seas in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean has changed over time (1997 to 2008), and we relate this to higher water temperatures and the

  19. An observational study of the western boundary currents in the Indian and South Atlantic Oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponsoni, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we have investigated different aspects of the WBCs in the Indian and South Atlantic Oceans, based on observational data sampled both in situ and from satellites. In October 2010 an array of five moorings were deployed off eastern Madagascar, nominally at 23S, as part of the “INdian-AT

  20. 33 CFR 334.130 - Atlantic Ocean off Wallops Island and Chincoteague Inlet, Va.; danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Chincoteague Inlet, Va.; danger zone. 334.130 Section 334.130 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.130 Atlantic Ocean off Wallops Island and Chincoteague Inlet, Va.; danger zone. (a) The...

  1. Amorphinosis (Halichondrida: Demospongiae) from the Atlantic Ocean with the desription of new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, M.S.; Hajdu, E.; Mothes, B.; van Soest, R.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    A species of the genus Amorphinopsis is described for the first time for the Atlantic Ocean. The new species was described based on the study of 25 specimens, collected inthe area of teh Sao Sebastiao Channel and its environs (northern sector of Sao Paulo State coastline) and in the Cabo Frio region

  2. Micropaleontological evidence for increased meridional heat transport in the North Atlantic Ocean during the pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Poore, R.Z.; Thompson, R.S.; Whatley, R.C.; Wood, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Middle Pliocene (???3 million years ago) has been identified as the last time the Earth was significantly warmer than it was during the Last Interglacial and Holocene. A quantitative micropaleontological paleotemperature transect from equator to high latitudes in the North Atlantic indicates that Middle Pliocene warmth involved increased meridional oceanic heat transport.

  3. What is natural? : The scale of cryptogenesis in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haydar, Deniz

    2012-01-01

    Aim Cryptogenic species may include those taxa that were historically introduced and are now falsely viewed as native. Investigated here is the scale of cryptogenesis in the North Atlantic Ocean by examining disjunct distributions, defined as temperate species occurring only on both sides of the Nor

  4. Atlantic-Arctic exchange in a series of ocean model simulations (CORE-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christina; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne

    2014-05-01

    In this study we aim to improve the understanding of exchange processes between the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean. The Nordic Sea builds an important connector between these regions, by receiving and modifying warm and saline Atlantic waters, and by providing dense overflow as a backbone of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Using a hierarchy of global ocean/sea-ice models, the specific role of the Nordic Seas, both providing a feedback with the AMOC, but also as a modulator of the Atlantic water flowing into the Arctic Ocean, is examined. The models have been performed under the CORE-II protocol, in which atmospheric forcing of the past 60 years was applied in a subsequent series of 5 iterations. During the course of this 300-year long integration, the AMOC shows substantial changes, which are correlated with water mass characteristics in the Denmark Strait overflow characteristics. Quantitative analyses using Lagrangian trajectories explore the impact of these trends on the Arctic Ocean through the Barents Sea and the Fram Strait.

  5. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A section... four (4) nautical miles. (3) Firing on the ranges will be suspended as long as any vessel is within...

  6. 75 FR 19356 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Framework...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... (VMS) and to obtain fishery-dependent data to monitor, evaluate, and enforce fishery regulations. Framework Adjustment 1 (FW1) to the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog FMP contains a VMS requirement for... access Maine mahogany quahog vessels. VMS was identified as a need in this fishery to (1) Eliminate...

  7. 75 FR 20980 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Atlantic Surfclam and Ocean Quahog Framework...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Monitoring System (VMS) and to obtain fishery-dependent data to monitor, evaluate, and enforce fishery regulations. Framework Adjustment 1 (FW1) to the Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog FMP contains a VMS... and limited access Maine mahogany quahog vessels. VMS was identified as a need in this fishery to...

  8. 77 FR 27120 - Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ..., Virginia Beach, VA in the Federal Register (76 FR 13519). We received one comment on the proposed rule. No... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Virginia Beach Oceanfront Air Show, Atlantic Ocean, Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY:...

  9. Physical and remineralization processes govern the cobalt distribution in the deep western Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulaquais, G.; Boye, M.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Carton, X.

    2014-01-01

    The distributions of the bio-essential trace element dissolved cobalt (DCo) and the apparent particulate Co (PCo) are presented along the GEOTRACES-A02 deep section from 64(o) N to 50(o) S in the western Atlantic Ocean (longest section of international GEOTRACES marine environment program). PCo was

  10. Transport of Antarctic bottom water through the Kane Gap, tropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozov, E.G.; Tarakanov, R.Y.; van Haren, H.

    2013-01-01

    We study low-frequency properties of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flow through the Kane Gap (9° N) in the Atlantic Ocean. The measurements in the Kane Gap include five visits with CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) sections in 2009–2012 and a year-long record of currents on a mooring using th

  11. Hogfish Lachnolaimus maximus (Labridae) confirmed in the south-western Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, C L S; Santander-Neto, J; Costa, T L A

    2016-09-01

    Based on material deposited in collections, photographic records and other reports from fishermen and divers, the occurrence of the hogfish Lachnolaimus maximus (Labridae) is confirmed in the south-western Atlantic Ocean, near the Brazilian coast as far south as southern Brazil. The recognized range of this species should therefore be extended c. 3000 km further south.

  12. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean-potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  13. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - Potential impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier Gon, H.A.C. van der

    2010-01-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size dis

  14. Physical and remineralization processes govern the cobalt distribution in the deep western Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulaquais, G.; Boye, M.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Carton, X.

    2014-01-01

    The distributions of the bio-essential trace element dissolved cobalt (DCo) and the apparent particulate Co (PCo) are presented along the GEOTRACES-A02 deep section from 64(o) N to 50(o) S in the western Atlantic Ocean (longest section of international GEOTRACES marine environment program). PCo was

  15. Transport of Antarctic bottom water through the Kane Gap, tropical NE Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozov, E.G.; Tarakanov, R.Y.; van Haren, H.

    2013-01-01

    We study low-frequency properties of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) flow through the Kane Gap (9° N) in the Atlantic Ocean. The measurements in the Kane Gap include five visits with CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) sections in 2009–2012 and a year-long record of currents on a mooring using th

  16. Controversies and consensus on the lionfish invasion in the Western Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carballo Cárdenas, E.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how the lionfish (Pterois sp.) invasion of the Western Atlantic Ocean has been socially constructed by natural scientists, the media, and stakeholders associated with various marine protected areas in the Caribbean. By examining the use of data and metaphors by these actors,

  17. 77 FR 75853 - Safety Zone; Bone Island Triathlon, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bone Island Triathlon, Atlantic Ocean; Key... Island Triathlon on Saturday, January 12, 2013. The safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of..., Questor Multisport, LLC is hosting the Bone Island Triathlon. The event will be held on the waters of...

  18. 78 FR 70901 - Safety Zone; Bone Island Triathlon, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bone Island Triathlon, Atlantic Ocean; Key..., during the Bone Island Triathlon on Saturday, January 25, 2014. The safety zone is necessary to provide... Multisport, LLC. is hosting the Bone Island Triathlon. The event will be held on the waters of the...

  19. Rosacea flaccida n. sp., a new species of siphonophore (Calycophorae Prayinae) from the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biggs, D.C.; Pugh, P.R.; Carré, C.

    1978-01-01

    Rosacea flaccida, a new prayine siphonophore, is described from specimens collected by SCUBA divers in the upper 30m of the subtropical and temperate North Atlantic Ocean. The new species has stoutly cylindrical, flaccid nectophores and delicate flattened bracts. The nectophores are morphologically

  20. Microstructure measurements along a quasi-meridional transect in the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurado, E.; van der Woerd, H.J.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents vertical profiles of turbulence parameters obtained in the upper 100 m of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean along a transect from tropical permanently stratified waters to subpolar seasonally stratified waters in July–August 2009. The focus is to fully characterize the vertical mix

  1. 76 FR 68314 - Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Key West World Championship, Atlantic Ocean; Key West, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast... Key West, Florida during the Key West World Championship, a series of high-speed boat races. The...

  2. Arctic and N Atlantic Crustal Thickness and Oceanic Lithosphere Distribution from Gravity Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Alvey, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The ocean basins of the Arctic and N. Atlantic formed during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic as a series of distinct ocean basins, both small and large, leading to a complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust and rifted continental margins. The plate tectonic framework of this region was demonstrated by the pioneering work of Peter Ziegler in AAPG Memoir 43 " Evolution of the Arctic-North Atlantic and the Western Tethys" published in 1988. The spatial evolution of Arctic Ocean and N Atlantic ocean basin geometry and bathymetry are critical not only for hydrocarbon exploration but also for understanding regional palaeo-oceanography and ocean gateway connectivity, and its influence on global climate. Mapping crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution represents a substantial challenge for the Polar Regions. Using gravity anomaly inversion we have produced comprehensive maps of crustal thickness and oceanic lithosphere distribution for the Arctic and N Atlantic region, We determine Moho depth, crustal basement thickness, continental lithosphere thinning and ocean-continent transition location using a 3D spectral domain gravity inversion method, which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir 2008). Gravity anomaly and bathymetry data used in the gravity inversion are from the NGA (U) Arctic Gravity Project and IBCAO respectively; sediment thickness is from a new regional compilation. The resulting maps of crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor are used to determine continent-ocean boundary location and the distribution of oceanic lithosphere. Crustal cross-sections using Moho depth from the gravity inversion allow continent-ocean transition structure to be determined and magmatic type (magma poor, "normal" or magma rich). Our gravity inversion predicts thin crust and high continental lithosphere thinning factors in the Eurasia, Canada, Makarov, Podvodnikov and Baffin Basins

  3. Multi-decadal uptake of carbon dioxide into subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bates

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural climate variability impacts the multi-decadal uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (Cant into the North Atlantic Ocean subpolar and subtropical gyres. Previous studies have shown that there is significant uptake of CO2 into subtropical mode water (STMW of the North Atlantic. STMW forms south of the Gulf Stream in winter and constitutes the dominant upper-ocean water mass in the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean. Observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site near Bermuda show an increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC of +1.51 ± 0.08 μmol kg−1 yr−1 between 1988 and 2011, but also an increase in ocean acidification indicators such as pH at rates (−0.0022 ± 0.0002 yr−1 higher than the surface ocean (Bates et al., 2012. It is estimated that the sink of CO2 into STMW was 0.985 ± 0.018 Pg C (Pg = 1015 g C between 1988 and 2011 (70 ± 1.8% of which is due to uptake of Cant. The sink of CO2 into the STMW is 20% of the CO2 uptake in the North Atlantic Ocean between 14°–50° N (Takahashi et al., 2009. However, the STMW sink of CO2 was strongly coupled to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO, with large uptake of CO2 into STMW during the 1990s during a predominantly NAO positive phase. In contrast, uptake of CO2 into STMW was much reduced in the 2000s during the NAO neutral/negative phase. Thus, NAO induced variability of the STMW CO2 sink is important when evaluating multi-decadal changes in North Atlantic Ocean CO2 sinks.

  4. The nonlinear North Atlantic-Arctic ocean response to CO2 forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2017-04-01

    Most climate models project an increase in oceanic energy transport towards high northern latitudes in future climate projections, but the physical mechanisms are not yet fully understood. To obtain a more fundamental understanding of the processes that cause the ocean heat transport to increase, we carried out a set of sensitivity experiments using a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model. Within these experiments, atmospheric CO2 levels are instantaneously set to one-fourth to four times current values. These model integrations, each with a length of 550 years, result in five considerably different quasi-equilibrium climate states. Our simulations show that poleward ocean heat transport in the Atlantic sector of the Arctic at 70°N increases from 0.03 PW in the coldest climate state to 0.2 PW in the warmest climate state. This increase is caused primarily by changes in sea ice cover, in horizontal ocean currents owing to anomalous winds in response to sea ice changes, and in ocean advection of thermal anomalies. Surprisingly, at subpolar latitudes, the subpolar gyre is found to weaken toward both the warmer and colder climates, relative to the current climate. This nonlinear response is caused by a complex interplay between seasonal sea ice melt, the near-surface wind response to sea ice changes, and changes in the density-driven circulation. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and its associated heat transport even oppose the total ocean heat transport towards the Arctic in the warmest climate. Going from warm to cold climates, or from high to low CO2 concentrations, the strength of the AMOC initially increases, but then declines towards the coldest climate, implying a nonlinear AMOC-response to CO2-induced climate change. Evidently, the North Atlantic-Arctic ocean heat transport depends on an interplay between various (remote) coupled ocean-atmosphere-sea ice mechanisms that respond in a nonlinear way to climate change.

  5. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1101 in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from 2011-01-11 to 2011-02-16 (NCEI Accession 0126863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0126863 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1101 in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific...

  6. Response to Comment on "The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation without a role for ocean circulation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Amy; Cane, Mark A; Murphy, Lisa N; Bellomo, Katinka; Mauritsen, Thorsten; Stevens, Bjorn

    2016-06-24

    Zhang et al interpret the mixed-layer energy budget in models as showing that "ocean dynamics play a central role in the AMO." Here, we show that their diagnostics cannot reveal the causes of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) and that their results can be explained with minimal ocean influence. Hence, we reaffirm our findings that the AMO in models can be understood primarily as the upper-ocean thermal response to stochastic atmospheric forcing. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Tropical Atlantic climate response to different freshwater input in high latitudes with an ocean-only general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Guang; Wan, Xiuquan; Liu, Zedong

    2016-10-01

    Tropical Atlantic climate change is relevant to the variation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) through different physical processes. Previous coupled climate model simulation suggested a dipole-like SST structure cooling over the North Atlantic and warming over the South Tropical Atlantic in response to the slowdown of the AMOC. Using an ocean-only global ocean model here, an attempt was made to separate the total influence of various AMOC change scenarios into an oceanic-induced component and an atmospheric-induced component. In contrast with previous freshwater-hosing experiments with coupled climate models, the ocean-only modeling presented here shows a surface warming in the whole tropical Atlantic region and the oceanic-induced processes may play an important role in the SST change in the equatorial south Atlantic. Our result shows that the warming is partly governed by oceanic process through the mechanism of oceanic gateway change, which operates in the regime where freshwater forcing is strong, exceeding 0.3 Sv. Strong AMOC change is required for the gateway mechanism to work in our model because only when the AMOC is sufficiently weak, the North Brazil Undercurrent can flow equatorward, carrying warm and salty north Atlantic subtropical gyre water into the equatorial zone. This threshold is likely to be model-dependent. An improved understanding of these issues may have help with abrupt climate change prediction later.

  8. The impact of polar mesoscale storms on northeast Atlantic Ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condron, Alan; Renfrew, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric processes regulate the formation of deep water in the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean and hence influence the large-scale ocean circulation. Every year thousands of mesoscale storms, termed polar lows, cross this climatically sensitive region of the ocean. These storms are often either too small or too short-lived to be captured in meteorological reanalyses or numerical models. Here we present simulations with a global, eddy-permitting ocean/sea-ice circulation model, run with and without a parameterization of polar lows. The parameterization reproduces the high wind speeds and heat fluxes observed in polar lows as well as their integrated effects, and leads to increases in the simulated depth, frequency and area of deep convection in the Nordic seas, which in turn leads to a larger northward transport of heat into the region, and southward transport of deep water through Denmark Strait. We conclude that polar lows are important for the large-scale ocean circulation and should be accounted for in short-term climate predictions. Recent studies predict a decrease in the number of polar lows over the northeast Atlantic in the twenty-first century that would imply a reduction in deep convection and a potential weakening of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.

  9. Impacts of Sea Surface Salinity Bias Correction on North Atlantic Ocean Circulation and Climate Variability in the Kiel Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taewook; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2016-04-01

    We investigated impacts of correcting North Atlantic sea surface salinity (SSS) biases on the ocean circulation of the North Atlantic and on North Atlantic sector mean climate and climate variability in the Kiel Climate Model (KCM). Bias reduction was achieved by applying a freshwater flux correction over the North Atlantic to the model. The quality of simulating the mean circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability is greatly enhanced in the freshwater flux-corrected integration which, by definition, depicts relatively small North Atlantic SSS biases. In particular, a large reduction in the North Atlantic cold sea surface temperature (SST) bias is observed and a more realistic Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV) simulated. Improvements relative to the non-flux corrected integration also comprise a more realistic representation of deep convection sites, sea ice, gyre circulation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). The results suggest that simulations of North Atlantic sector mean climate and decadal variability could strongly benefit from alleviating sea surface salinity biases in the North Atlantic, which may enhance the skill of decadal predictions in that region.

  10. North Atlantic ocean circulation and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L G; McManus, J F; Curry, W B; Roberts, N L; Piotrowski, A M; Keigwin, L D

    2016-07-29

    The most recent ice age was characterized by rapid and hemispherically asynchronous climate oscillations, whose origin remains unresolved. Variations in oceanic meridional heat transport may contribute to these repeated climate changes, which were most pronounced during marine isotope stage 3, the glacial interval 25 thousand to 60 thousand years ago. We examined climate and ocean circulation proxies throughout this interval at high resolution in a deep North Atlantic sediment core, combining the kinematic tracer protactinium/thorium (Pa/Th) with the deep water-mass tracer, epibenthic δ(13)C. These indicators suggest reduced Atlantic overturning circulation during every cool northern stadial, with the greatest reductions during episodic Hudson Strait iceberg discharges, while sharp northern warming followed reinvigorated overturning. These results provide direct evidence for the ocean's persistent, central role in abrupt glacial climate change. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Distribution and composition of suspended particulate matter in the Atlantic Ocean: Direct measurements and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitzin, A. P.; Klyuvitkin, A. A.; Burenkov, V. I.; Kravchishina, M. D.; Politova, N. V.; Novigatsky, A. N.; Shevchenko, V. P.; Klyuvitkina, T. S.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the real distribution and spatial-temporal variations of suspended particulate matter and its main components in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean on the basis of direct and satellite measurements for development of new and perfection of available algorithms for converting satellite data. The distribution fields of suspended particulate matter were calculated and plotted for the entire Atlantic Ocean. It is established that its distribution in the open ocean is subordinate to the latitudinal climatic zonality. The areas with maximum concentrations form latitudinal belts corresponding to high-productivity eutrophic and mesotrophic waters of the northern and southern temperate humid belts and with the equatorial humid zone. Phytoplankton, the productivity of which depends primarily on the climatic zonality, is the main producer of suspended particulate matter in the surface water layer.

  12. Meiobenthic and Macrobenthic Community Structure in Carbonate Sediments of Rocas Atoll (North-east, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, S. A.; Warwick, R. M.; Attrill, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Rocas is the only atoll of the South Atlantic and it is built almost exclusively by coralline red algae, vermetid gastropods and encrusting foraminiferans. Patterns in the community structure of meiofauna and macrofauna, particularly nematodes and polychaetes, at Rocas Atoll, north-east Brazil, are determined and compared for different habitats: sublittoral, tidal flat, reef pools and lagoon. Nematodes and copepods were the most abundant meiofaunal taxa. In all studied habitats at Rocas Atoll, oligochaetes, nematodes and polychaetes numerically dominate the macrofauna. Univariate and multivariate analyses reveal clear differences in community structure between the habitats of the atoll, especially between the sublittoral and the inner habitats. The number of species, total density, diversity (H') and trophic structure vary significantly between the habitats, but the differences are dependent on which faunistic category (meiobenthic or macrobenthic) is analysed. Nematodes belonging to the Epsilonematidae and Draconematidae, together with a diverse community of meiobenthic polychaetes, characterize the sublittoral habitat of Rocas Atoll. Both meiofauna and macrofauna are depressed in the tidal flat, and the local sediment instability particularly affects the polychaete abundance. Reef pools and lagoons support a very dense aggregation of invertebrates, particularly the macrofauna, when compared with other carbonate reef sediments. However, differences in the structure of meiofauna and macrofauna communities between reef pools and lagoons are not significant. Changes in meiobenthic and macrobenthic community structure are related to the gradation in the physical environment of the atoll.

  13. Some hydroids (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calder, D.R.; Vervoort, W.

    1998-01-01

    An account is given of some hydroids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, collected during dives of submersibles "Nautile" (operated by IFREMER, France) and "Alvin" (operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, U.S.A). The specimens came from three main sectors of the ridge: 15 species from localities

  14. Pliocene pre-glacial North Atlantic: A coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation climate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishman, S.E.; Dowsett, H.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States). National Center)

    1992-01-01

    A latitudinal transect of North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes from the equatorial region to 56 N in the 2,300- to 3,000-meter depth range was designed for a high-resolution study of coupled sea surface and deep ocean response to climate change. Precise age control was provided using magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from the cores to identify the 4.0 to 2.2 Ma interval, a period of warm-to-cool climatic transitions in the North Atlantic. The objective is to evaluate incremental (10 kyr) changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) and deep North Atlantic circulation patterns between 4.0 and 2.2 Ma to develop a coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation response model. Sea surface temperature (SST) estimates are based on planktic foraminifer-based factor-analytic transfer functions. Oxygen isotopic data from paired samples provide tests of the estimated temperature gradients between localities. Benthic foraminifer assemblage data and [partial derivative]O-18 and [partial derivative]C-13 Isotopic data are used to quantitatively determine changes in deep North Atlantic circulation. These data are used to determine changes in source area (North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water) and (or) in the components of NADW that were present (Upper or Lower NADW). These paired paleoceanographic sea surface and deep circulation interpretations over a 1.8 my interval form the basis for a coupled sea surface-deep circulation response model for the Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean.

  15. Barium isotopes reveal role of ocean circulation on barium cycling in the Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephanie L.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Pryer, Helena V.; Kinsley, Christopher W.; Pyle, Kimberley M.; Woodward, E. Malcolm S.; Horner, Tristan J.

    2017-05-01

    We diagnose the relative influences of local-scale biogeochemical cycling and regional-scale ocean circulation on Atlantic barium cycling by analysing four new depth profiles of dissolved Ba concentrations and isotope compositions from the South and tropical North Atlantic. These new profiles exhibit systematic vertical, zonal and meridional variations that reflect the influence of both local-scale barite cycling and large-scale ocean circulation. Epipelagic decoupling of dissolved Ba and Si reported previously in the tropics is also found to be associated with significant Ba isotope heterogeneity. As such, we contend that this decoupling originates from the depth segregation of opal and barite formation but is exacerbated by weak vertical mixing. Zonal influence from isotopically-'heavy' water masses in the western North Atlantic evidence the advective inflow of Ba-depleted Upper Labrador Sea Water, which is not seen in the eastern basin or the South Atlantic. Meridional variations in Atlantic Ba isotope systematics below 2000 m appear entirely controlled by conservative mixing. Using an inverse isotopic mixing model, we calculate the Ba isotope composition of the Ba-poor northern end-member as +0.45 ‰ and the Ba-rich southern end-member +0.26 ‰, relative to NIST SRM 3104a. The near-conservative behaviour of Ba below 2000 m indicates that Ba isotopes can serve as an independent tracer of the provenance of northern- versus southern-sourced water masses in the deep Atlantic Ocean. This finding may prove useful in palaeoceanographic studies, should appropriate sedimentary archives be identified, and offers new insights into the processes that cycle Ba in seawater.

  16. Observational description of the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers over the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Dourado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Time evolution of atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers are described for an upwelling region in the Atlantic Ocean located in Cabo Frio, Brazil (23°00'S, 42°08'W. The observations were obtained during a field campaign carried out by the "Instituto de Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira", on board of the oceanographic ship Antares of the Brazilian Navy, between July 7 and 10 of 1992. The analysis shown here was based on 19 simultaneous vertical soundings of atmosphere and ocean, carried out consecutively every 4 hours. The period of observation was characterized by a passage of a cold front that penetrated in Cabo Frio on July 6. During the cold front passage the vertical extension of atmospheric (and oceanic mixed layer varied from 200 m (and 13 m to 1000 m (and 59 m. These changes occurred in the first day of observation and were followed by an increase of 1.2°C in the oceanic mixed layer temperature and by a decrease of 6 K and 6 g/kg in the virtual potential temperature and specific humidity of the atmospheric mixed layer. The short time scale variations in the ocean can be explained in terms of the substitution of cold upwelling water by warm downwelling water regime, as the surface winds shift from pre-frontal NE to post-frontal SSW during the cold front passage in Cabo Frio. The large vertical extent of the atmospheric mixed layer can be explained in terms of an intensification of the thermal mixing induced by the warming of the oceanic upper layers combined with the cooling of the lower atmospheric layers during the cold front passage. An intensification of the mechanical mixing, observed during the cold front passage, may also be contributing to the observed variations in the vertical extent of both layers.A evolução temporal das camadas limites atmosféricas e oceânicas são descritas para a região de ressurgência do Oceano Atlântico localizada em Cabo Frio. As observações foram obtidas durante a campanha de medidas

  17. 78 FR 25574 - Special Local Regulations; Third Annual Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Cocoa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    ... Super Boat Grand Prix, Atlantic Ocean; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida during the Space Coast Super Boat Grand Prix, a series of high-speed... Ocean east of Cocoa Beach, Florida. Approximately 30 high-speed power boats are anticipated...

  18. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ANTARES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2010-08-06 (NODC Accession 0114477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0114477 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from ANTARES in the North Atlantic Ocean and South Atlantic...

  19. Multi-decadal uptake of carbon dioxide into subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Bates

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural climate variability impacts the multi-decadal uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (Cant into the North Atlantic Ocean subpolar and subtropical gyres. Previous studies have shown that there is significant uptake of CO2 into the subtropical mode water (STMW that forms south of the Gulf Stream in winter and constitutes the dominant upper-ocean water mass in the subtropical gyre of the North Atlantic Ocean. Observations at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site near Bermuda show an increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC of +1.51 ± 0.08 μmol kg−1 yr−1 between 1988 and 2011. It is estimated that the sink of CO2 into STMW was 0.985 ± 0.018 Pg C (Pg = 1015 g C between 1988 and 2011 (~70 % of which is due to uptake of Cant. However, the STMW sink of CO2 was strongly coupled to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO with large uptake of CO2 into STMW during the 1990s (NAO positive phase. In contrast, uptake of CO2 into STMW was much reduced in the 2000s during the NAO neutral/negative phase. Thus, NAO induced variability of the STMW CO2 sink is important when evaluating multi-decadal changes in North Atlantic Ocean CO2 sinks.

  20. Interhemispheric Changes in Atlantic Ocean Heat Content and Their Link to Global Monsoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, H.; Lee, S. K.; Dong, S.; Goni, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study tested the hypothesis whether low frequency decadal variability of the South Atlantic meridional heat transport (SAMHT) influences decadal variability of the global monsoons. A multi-century run from a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model is used as basis for the analysis. Our findings indicate that multi-decadal variability of the South Atlantic Ocean plays a key role in modulating atmospheric circulation via interhemispheric changes in Atlantic Ocean heat content. Weaker SAMHT produces anomalous ocean heat divergence over the South Atlantic resulting in negative ocean heat content anomaly about 15 years later. This, in turn, forces a thermally direct anomalous interhemispheric Hadley circulation in the atmosphere, transporting heat from the northern hemisphere (NH) to the southern hemisphere (SH) and moisture from the SH to the NH, thereby intensify (weaken) summer (winter) monsoon in the NH and winter (summer) monsoon in the SH. Results also show that anomalous atmospheric eddies, both transient and stationary, transport heat northward in both hemispheres producing eddy heat flux convergence (divergence) in the NH (SH) around 15-30°, reinforcing the anomalous Hadley circulation. The effect of eddies on the NH (SH) poleward of 30° is opposite with heat flux divergence (convergence), which must be balanced by sinking (rising) motion, consistent with a poleward (equatorward) displacement of the jet stream and mean storm track. The mechanism described here could easily be interpreted for the case of strong SAMHT, with the reverse influence on the interhemispheric atmospheric circulation and monsoons. Overall, SAMHT decadal variability leads its atmospheric response by about 15 years, suggesting that the South Atlantic is a potential predictor of global climate variability.

  1. Geomagnetic observations on Tristan da Cunha, South Atlantic Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, J.; Olsen, Nils; Maule, C. F.

    2009-01-01

    Few geomagnetic ground observations exist of the Earth's strongest core field anomaly, the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The geomagnetic repeat station on the island Tristan da Cunha, located half-way between South Africa and South America at 37 degrees 05' S, 12 degrees 18' W, is therefore...... of crucial importance. We have conducted several sets of repeat station measurements during magnetically quiet conditions (Kp 2o or less) in 2004. The procedures are described and the results are compared to those from earlier campaigns and to the predictions of various global field models. Features...... and operate a magnetometer station on Tristan da Cunha during the Swarm magnetic satellite mission (2011-2014)....

  2. Biogeochemical cycling of cadmium isotopes along a high-resolution section through the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a bioactive trace element in the oceans, with a nutrient-like distribution that closely matches dissolved phosphate. Seawater-dissolved stable Cd isotope ratios (δ114Cd) are a relatively new parameter, which show much promise for furthering our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of Cd in the oceans. Here we present a high-resolution paired section of dissolved Cd concentrations and dissolved δ114Cd from 21 open-ocean stations along the US GEOTRACES GA03 transect through the North Atlantic Ocean. Dissolved Cd concentrations along the section are strongly influenced by water-mass distribution and the cycling of Cd. The highest dissolved Cd concentrations (400-540 pmol kg-1) are associated with Antarctic-sourced water masses, whilst biological uptake in the surface ocean results in a strong vertical gradient in dissolved Cd towards the surface, reaching as low as 0.03 pmol kg-1 in western surface waters. Dissolved δ114Cd is also characterized by a vertical gradient from ∼+0.2‰ in the deep ocean to +2‰ to +5‰ in the Cd-depleted surface ocean (relative to NIST SRM 3108). This variability in δ114Cd can be ascribed to mixing of Antarctic and North Atlantic water masses, together with fractionation due to in situ biological uptake of light Cd in the very surface ocean. Subtle deviations from this overall pattern of dissolved Cd concentration and dissolved δ114Cd are observed within low-oxygen waters off North Africa, where a dissolved Cd deficit relative to phosphate is associated with higher dissolved δ114Cd values. Together with elevated particulate Cd and Ba, this suggests that Cd sulfide precipitation is occurring within the water column of the North Atlantic, constituting a potentially important sink for isotopically light Cd. Additionally, the first measurements of dissolved δ114Cd within a hydrothermal plume at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge show that Cd is scavenged from the dissolved phase, leaving the remnant dissolved Cd

  3. Socially segregated, sympatric sperm whale clans in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøttcher, Anne; Whitehead, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) are unusual in that there is good evidence for sympatric populations with distinct culturally determined behaviour, including potential acoustic markers of the population division. In the Pacific, socially segregated, vocal clans with distinct dialects coexist; by contrast, geographical variation in vocal repertoire in the Atlantic has been attributed to drift. We examine networks of acoustic repertoire similarity and social interactions for 11 social units in the Eastern Caribbean. We find the presence of two socially segregated, sympatric vocal clans whose dialects differ significantly both in terms of categorical coda types produced by each clan (Mantel test between clans: matrix correlation = 0.256; p ≤ 0.001) and when using classification-free similarity which ignores defined types (Mantel test between clans: matrix correlation = 0.180; p ≤ 0.001). The more common of the two clans makes a characteristic 1 + 1 + 3 coda, while the other less often sighted clan makes predominantly regular codas. Units were only observed associating with other units within their vocal clan. This study demonstrates that sympatric vocal clans do exist in the Atlantic, that they define a higher order level of social organization as they do in the Pacific, and suggests that cultural identity at the clan level is probably important in this species worldwide. PMID:27429766

  4. Wintertime atmospheric response to Atlantic multidecadal variability: effect of stratospheric representation and ocean-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peings, Yannick; Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) on the wintertime atmosphere circulation is investigated using three different configurations of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5). Realistic SST and sea ice anomalies associated with the AMV in observations are prescribed in CAM5 (low-top model) and WACCM5 (high-top model) to assess the dependence of the results on the representation of the stratosphere. In a third experiment, the role of ocean-atmosphere feedback is investigated by coupling CAM5 to a slab-ocean model in which the AMV forcing is prescribed through oceanic heat flux anomalies. The three experiments give consistent results concerning the response of the NAO in winter, with a negative NAO signal in response to a warming of the North Atlantic ocean. This response is found in early winter when the high-top model is used, and in late winter with the low-top model. With the slab-ocean, the negative NAO response is more persistent in winter and shifted eastward over the continent due to the damping of the atmospheric response over the North Atlantic ocean. Additional experiments suggest that both tropical and extratropical SST anomalies are needed to obtain a significant modulation of the NAO, with small influence of sea ice anomalies. Warm tropical SST anomalies induce a northward shift of the ITCZ and a Rossby-wave response that is reinforced in the mid-latitudes by the extratropical SST anomalies through eddy-mean flow interactions. This modeling study supports that the positive phase of the AMV promotes the negative NAO in winter, while illustrating the impacts of the stratosphere and of the ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in the spatial pattern and timing of this response.

  5. Helminth parasites of the oceanic horse mackerel Trachurus picturatus Bowdich 1825 (Pisces: Carangidae) from Madeira Island, Atlantic Ocean, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G; Melo-Moreira, E; Pinheiro de Carvalho, M A A

    2012-09-01

    The helminth parasite fauna of the oceanic horse mackerel Trachurus picturatus Bowdich 1825, caught off the Madeira Islands was composed of six different taxa. Prevalence and abundance of larval Anisakis sp. (Nematoda: Anisakidae) and Nybelinia lingualis (Trypanorhyncha: Tentaculariidae), the most common parasite taxa, were 24.3%, 0.9 and 37.9%, 0.7, respectively. Bolbosoma vasculosum (Acanthocephala: Polymorphidae) and the monogeneans Heteraxinoides atlanticus (Monogenea: Heteraxinidae) and Pseudaxine trachuri (Monogenea: Gastrocotylidae) were comparatively rare. The depauperate helminth fauna of the oceanic horse mackerel at Madeira compared to other geographical regions of the north-eastern Atlantic, namely the Azores banks and the West African coast, may be attributed to the paucity of nutrients off oceanic islands and to a low density of the fish population.

  6. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    CERN Document Server

    van Hulten, Marco; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Gehlen, Marion; de Baar, Hein J W; Middag, Rob

    2012-01-01

    A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing and reversible scavenging. The model has been evaluated against a number of selected high-quality datasets covering much of the world ocean, especially those from the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises of 2010 and 2011. Generally, the model results are in fair agreement with the observations. However, the model does not describe well the vertical distribution of dissolved Al in the North Atlantic Ocean. The model may require changes in the physical forcing and the vertical dependency of the sinking velocity of biogenic silica to account for other discrepancies. To explore the model behaviour, sensitivity experiments have been performed, in which we changed the key parameters of the scavenging process as well as the input of aluminium into the ocean. This resulted in a bet...

  7. Modelling the Oceanic Nd Isotopic Composition With a North Atlantic Eddy Permitting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronne, S.; Treguier, A.; Arsouze, T.; Dutay, J.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.

    2006-12-01

    The oceanic water masses differ by their temperatures, salinity, but also a number of geochemical tracers characterized by their weak concentrations and their ability to quantify oceanic processes (mixing, scavenging rates etc). Among these tracers, the Nd isotopic composition (hereafter epsilon-Nd) is a (quasi) conservative tracer of water mass mixing in the ocean interior, far from any lithogenic inputs. It has been recently established that exchange of Nd at the oceanic margins could be the dominant process controlling both its concentration and isotopic composition distribution in the ocean. This was demonstrated using in situ measurements and budget calculations and has recently been confirmed by a low resolution (2°) modeling approach (Arsouze et al., 2006). However, the currents flowing on the ocean margins are not correctly represented in coarse ocean models. It is the case in the North Atlantic ocean, which is of particular interest since i) it is the area of deep water formation and ii) these deep waters are characterized by the most negative epsilon-Nd values of the world ocean, which are used as "imprint" of the present and past thermohaline circulation. It is therefore essential to understand how these water masses acquire their epsilon-Nd signature. We propose here the first results of the modeling of oceanic Nd isotopic composition at eddy-permitting resolution, with the North Atlantic 0.25° version of the NEMO model used for the DRAKKAR European project. A 150 years off-line experiment and a shorter on-line experiment are performed. Simulated Nd distributions are compared to the present-day data base, vertical profiles, and the results of the low resolution model (in the North Atlantic). The eddy permitting model generally provides improved results, provided a high enough exchange rate is imposed in the deep ocean. Deficiencies of the simulated distribution in the Nordic Seas and the subpolar gyre are explained by errors in the input function on

  8. Oceanographic profile temperature, salinity, oxygen and other measurement collected from various platforms in the South Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans from 1961-1964 (NODC Accession 0001903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and nutrients data were collected using bottle casts from the ARGUS in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean. Data were collected from...

  9. Outreach surgical consulting services in North East Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittleborough, Timothy John; Lourensz, Kaleb; Elliott, Matthew; Thomas, Peter; Franzi, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the provision of consultative outreach specialist surgical services to rural areas. This paper aims to describe a model of outreach consultative practice to deliver specialist surgical services to rural communities. Analysis of prospectively collected data for consultations in a three month period for two surgeons based in Wangaratta. Two surgeons in regional Victoria based in Wangaratta, North East Victoria, conducting outreach consultations to Beechworth, Benalla, Bright and Mansfield. All patients seen in consultations over a 3-month period. Patient workload, casemix of presenting complaint, consultation outcome including plan for surgical procedure. Outreach surgical consulting was associated with a higher proportion of new consultations, and there was trend towards being more likely to result in a surgical procedure than consultations in the base rural centre. Outreach surgical consulting provides surgeons with a larger referral base and provides communities with better access to local specialists. Outreach practice should be encouraged for surgeons in regional centres. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  10. STUDIES ON INTESTINAL HELMINTHIASIS IN, NORTH-EAST OF IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Arfaa

    1977-07-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of various intestinal helminthiasis has been established among the population of 42 villages in Gonbad Kavus in the north-east of the Caspian Littoral during a longitudinal health survey undertaken in this area. Stool examination by formaline ether technique been performed among 1240 randomly selected population. Surprisingly and contrary to most other areas in Iran; very low infection rate With Ascaris (0.2%, Trichostrongylus (1.2%, hookworm (2.4% and Trichuris (0.2% were foundt among the population. Prevalence of infection with Hymenolepis nana was rather high (overall prevalence. of 12.5%. Significant variation has only been observed in the prevalence of Hymenolepis nana in various age groups. Simultaneous infection with two or more helminths has been found in 16.5% of people and 9.6% were infected with one, worm. Infection with all helminths except Hymenolepis was very low in 20 villages where 20 or more people were examined. Strongyloides stercoralis with a maximum rate of infection of 4% was found among the population of 5 out of 20 villages. Dicrocoelium dendriticum was also found in 7 persons. Reasons for low prevalence of helminthiasis and its reverse correlation with the high incidence of 4 esophageal cancers in that area are discussed.

  11. Pattern of chromosomal aberrations in patients from north East iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaey, Saeedeh; Mirzaei, Farzaneh; Ahadian, Mitra; Keifi, Fatemeh; Semiramis, Tootian; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques. In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities. The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS) was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%). Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner's syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter's syndrome. According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  12. The epidemiology of adolescent acne in North East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, B; Pang, Y; Zhu, H; Qu, L; Xiao, T; Wei, H-C; Chen, H-D; He, C-D

    2010-08-01

    Adolescent acne impacts self-esteem and quality of life in adolescents and its aetiology is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological features of adolescent acne in North East China and determine the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the pathogenesis of acne. Data were collected from 5696 undergraduates (2920 patients and 2776 controls) using questionnaire. The survey data were analysed using spss version 13.0 and heritability of adolescent acne was calculated using Falconer's method. Total prevalence of adolescent acne was 51.30% (52.74% in males, 49.65% in females). The difference between genders was statistically significant (P acne had earlier age of onset (P acne in first- and second-degree relatives of acne patients was 22.5% and 7.19%, respectively, significantly higher than in controls (P acne was 78.47 +/- 2.05% in first-degree relatives and 75.05 +/- 3.18% in second-degree relatives. Risk factors to the acne suffers include (in descending order of occurrence), acne family history, mental stress, menstrual disorder, frequent insomnia, high fat diet, being male, dysmenorrhoea, anxiety, sleeping acne includes a familial genetic predisposition. Additional environmental factors of psychological stress, skin oiliness and high caloric diets may also contribute to the onset of acne in Chinese adolescents.

  13. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern he...

  14. Convective lofting links Indian Ocean air pollution to paradoxical South Atlantic ozone maxima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, R. B.; Guan, H.; Thompson, A. M.; Witte, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a broad resolution of the Atlantic Parado concerning the seasonal and geographic distribution, of tropical tropospheric ozone. We highlight periods of significant maximum tropospheric O3 for Jan.- April, 1999, exploiting satellite estimates and SHADOZ (Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes). Trajectory analyses connecting sondes and Total Tropospheric Ozone (TTO) maps suggest a complex influence from the Indian Ocean: beginning with mixed combustion sources, then low level transport, cumulonimbus venting, possible stratospheric input, and finally high-level transport to the west, with possible mixing over Africa. For the Jan.-March highest column-O3 periods in the Atlantic, distinct sounding peaks trace to specific NO sources, especially lightning, while in the same episodes, recurring every 20-50 days, more diffuse buildups of Indian-to-Atlantic pollution make important contributions.

  15. CURRENT - DIRECTION and Other Data from UNKNOWN From North Atlantic Ocean and Others from 19630101 to 19841231 (NODC Accession 8900254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains the University of Wisconsin's Indian/Atlantic/Pacific Climate Atlas data. This data set includes maps of: temperature; salinity; mixed-layer...

  16. Inputs of iron, manganese and aluminium to surface waters of the Northeast Atlantic Ocean and the European continental shelf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Jeroen T.M. de; Boyé, Marie; Gelado-Caballero, Maria D.; Timmermans, Klaas R.; Veldhuis, Marcel J.W.; Nolting, Rob F.; Berg, Constant M.G. van den; Baar, Hein J.W. de

    2007-01-01

    Dissolved Fe, Mn and Al concentrations (dFe, dMn and dAl hereafter) in surface waters and the water column of the Northeast Atlantic and the European continental shelf are reported. Following an episode of enhanced Saharan dust inputs over the Northeast Atlantic Ocean prior and during the cruise in

  17. Latitudinal distribution of Trichodesmium spp. and N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marañón

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the latitudinal distribution of Trichodesmium spp. abundance and community N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean along a meridional transect from ca. 30° N to 30° S in November–December 2007 and April–May 2008. The observations from both cruises were highly consistent in terms of absolute magnitude and latitudinal distribution, showing a strong association between Trichodesmium abundance and community N2 fixation. The highest Trichodesmium abundances (mean = 220 trichomes L−1, and community N2 fixation rates (mean = 60 μmol m−2 d−1 occurred in the Equatorial region between 5° S–15° N. In the South Atlantic gyre, Trichodesmium abundance was very low (ca. 1 trichome L−1 but N2 fixation was always measurable, averaging 3 and 10 μmol m2 d−1 in 2007 and 2008, respectively. We suggest that N2 fixation in the South Atlantic was sustained by other, presumably unicellular, diazotrophs. Comparing these distributions with the geographical pattern in atmospheric dust deposition points to iron supply as the main factor determining the large scale latitudinal variability of Trichodesmium spp. abundance and N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean. We observed a marked South to North decrease in surface phosphate concentration, which argues against a role for phosphorus availability in controlling the large scale distribution of N2 fixation. Scaling up from all our measurements (42 stations results in conservative estimates for total N2 fixation of ∼6 TgN yr−1 in the North Atlantic (0–40° N and ~1.2 TgN yr−1 in the South Atlantic (0–40° S.

  18. Latitudinal distribution of Trichodesmium spp. and N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Marañón

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have determined the latitudinal distribution of Trichodesmium spp. abundance and community N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean along a meridional transect from ca. 30° N to 30° S in November–December 2007 and April–May 2008. The observations from both cruises were highly consistent in terms of absolute magnitude and latitudinal distribution, showing a strong association between Trichodesmium abundance and community N2 fixation. The highest Trichodesmium abundances (mean = 220 trichomes L−1 and community N2 fixation rates (mean = 60 μmol m−2 d−1 occurred in the Equatorial region between 5° S–15° N. In the South Atlantic gyre, Trichodesmium abundance was very low (ca. 1 trichome L−1 but N2 fixation was always measurable, averaging 3 and 10 μmol m2 d−1 in 2007 and 2008, respectively. We suggest that N2 fixation in the South Atlantic was sustained by other, presumably unicellular, diazotrophs. Comparing these distributions with the geographical pattern in atmospheric dust deposition points to iron supply as the main factor determining the large scale latitudinal variability of Trichodesmium spp. abundance and N2 fixation in the Atlantic Ocean. We observed a marked South to North decrease in surface phosphate concentration, which argues against a role for phosphorus availability in controlling the large scale distribution of N2 fixation. Scaling up from all our measurements (42 stations results in conservative estimates for total N2 fixation of ~6 TgN yr−1 in the North Atlantic (0–40° N and 1.2 TgN yr−1 in the South Atlantic (0–40° S.

  19. Physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR0903 in the Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2009-03-20 to 2009-05-13 (NODC Accession 0089624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0089624 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the ROGER REVELLE during cruise RR0903 in the Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from...

  20. Salinity, oxygen, temperature, and other data from CTD casts from the GEOLOG FERSMAN in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from 13 July 1990 to 17 October 1991 (NODC Accession 0000232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salinity, oxygen, temperature, and other data were collected using CTD casts from the GEOLOG FERSMAN in the North Atlantic Ocean and North Pacific Ocean from to July...

  1. Physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1202 in the Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean from 2012-01-23 to 2012-02-08 (NCEI Accession 0130703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0130703 includes physical, profile and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1202 in the Indian Ocean and South Atlantic Ocean...

  2. Temperature profile data collected using XBT and BT casts in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER from 1979-04-11 to 1983-05-10 (NCEI Accession 8300081)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using XBT and BT casts from NOAA Ship RESEARCHER in the North/South Pacific Ocean and North Atlantic Ocean from 11 April 1979...

  3. Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and meteorological data collected in the Arctic Ocean and Atlantic Ocean by various countries from 20 Jul 1870 to 17 Jul 1995 (NODC Accession 0085914)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical temperature, salinity, oxygen, nutrients and meteorological data collected in the Arctic Ocean and Atlantic Ocean by various countries from 1870 to 1995,...

  4. Physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1204 in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 2012-04-03 to 2012-04-18 (NCEI Accession 0138036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0138036 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the MELVILLE during cruise MV1204 in the South Atlantic Ocean and South Pacific Ocean...

  5. Sinking of North Atlantic waters in a global ocean model: location and controlling factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsman, Caroline; Drijfhout, Sybren; Dijkstra, Henk; Spall, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) plays an important role in climate. The classical view of an ocean conveyor belt with northward surface currents and southward return currents transporting convectively-formed waters from the subpolar North Atlantic Ocean to other ocean basins suggests a tight relation between convection and sinking. However, convection regions feature very little vertical mass transport. Instead, it has been argued that the sinking of waters must take place near boundaries where ageostrophic processes affect the flow. So far, this has been confirmed in highly idealized regional model studies and in laboratory experiments. It is, however, unclear how well the sinking of dense waters is represented in the current generation of global ocean models and climate models, and whether the factors driving and controlling the sinking in these models are in accordance with the developed theory. This is of crucial importance for our confidence in projections of the future behavior of the AMOC, which are based on this type of model. In this study, we analyze the characteristics of the vertical transport in two global ocean models: an eddy-permitting model at 0.25 degree resolution and its coarser 1.0 degree resolution counterpart. We show that the sinking indeed predominantly occurs in a narrow region close to the boundary in both model simulations, and not in deep convection regions. Notably, the amount of vertical transport that is found along the edges of the North Atlantic Ocean is highly variable in space, and large differences exist between the two model versions. In the eddy-permitting model, the magnitude of the local sinking appears to be governed by alongshore variations in density near the boundary, in line with theory.

  6. Emerging impact of Greenland meltwater on deepwater formation in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, Claus W.; Behrens, Erik; Biastoch, Arne; Getzlaff, Klaus; Bamber, Jonathan L.

    2016-07-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has experienced increasing mass loss since the 1990s. The enhanced freshwater flux due to both surface melt and outlet glacier discharge is assuming an increasingly important role in the changing freshwater budget of the subarctic Atlantic. The sustained and increasing freshwater fluxes from Greenland to the surface ocean could lead to a suppression of deep winter convection in the Labrador Sea, with potential ramifications for the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Here we assess the impact of the increases in the freshwater fluxes, reconstructed with full spatial resolution, using a global ocean circulation model with a grid spacing fine enough to capture the small-scale, eddying transport processes in the subpolar North Atlantic. Our simulations suggest that the invasion of meltwater from the West Greenland shelf has initiated a gradual freshening trend at the surface of the Labrador Sea. Although the freshening is still smaller than the variability associated with the episodic `great salinity anomalies', the accumulation of meltwater may become large enough to progressively dampen the deep winter convection in the coming years. We conclude that the freshwater anomaly has not yet had a significant impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation.

  7. Non-Rayleigh control of upper-ocean Cd isotope fractionation in the western South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruifang C.; Galer, Stephen J. G.; Abouchami, Wafa; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; De Jong, Jeroen; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-08-01

    We present seawater Cd isotopic compositions in five depth profiles and a continuous surface water transect, from 50°S to the Equator, in the western South Atlantic, sampled during GEOTRACES cruise 74JC057 (GA02 section, Leg 3), and investigate the mechanisms governing Cd isotope cycling in the upper and deep ocean. The depth profiles generally display high ε 112 / 110Cd at the surface and decrease with increasing depth toward values typical of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). However, at stations north of the Subantarctic Front, the decrease in ε 112 / 110Cd is interrupted by a shift to values intermediate between those of surface and bottom waters, which occurs at depths occupied by North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). This pattern is associated with variations in Cd concentration from low surface values to a maximum at mid-depths and is attributed to preferential utilization of light Cd by phytoplankton in the surface ocean. Our new results show that in this region Cd-deficient waters do not display the extreme, highly fractionated ε 112 / 110Cd reported in some earlier studies from other oceanic regions. Instead, in the surface and subsurface southwest (SW) Atlantic, when [Cd] drops below 0.1 nmol kg-1, ε 112 / 110Cd are relatively homogeneous and cluster around a value of +3.7, in agreement with the mean value of 3.8 ± 3.3 (2SD, n = 164) obtained from a statistical evaluation of the global ocean Cd isotope dataset. We suggest that Cd-deficient surface waters may acquire their Cd isotope signature via sorption of Cd onto organic ligands, colloids or bacterial/picoplankton extracellular functional groups. Alternatively, we show that an open system, steady-state model is in good accord with the observed Cd isotope systematics in the upper ocean north of the Southern Ocean. The distribution of ε 112 / 110Cd in intermediate and deep waters is consistent with the water mass distribution, with the north-south variations reflecting changes in the mixing proportion

  8. Alternate sites for a connecting passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Samuel Jose

    1990-01-01

    CIVINS Approved for public release ; distribution is unlimited This thesis is a geotechnical engineering report which includes a topographical profile at three propitious locations across the American continent for the construction of an interoceanic passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Surficial soils as well as the general topography of the centerline of the alignments were investigated to the extent possible and an attempt was made to investigate underlying strata. Some i...

  9. Iodine isotopes species fingerprinting environmental conditions in surface water along the northeastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Peng; Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala; Possnert, Göran; Yi, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations and species of iodine isotopes (127I and 129I) provide vital information about iodine geochemistry, environmental conditions and water masses exchange in oceans. Despite extensive investigations of anthropogenic 129I in the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, concentrations of the isotope in the Atlantic Ocean are, however, still unknown. We here present first data on 129I and 127I, and their species (iodide and iodate) in surface water transect along the northeastern Atlantic between 30° and 50°N. The results show iodate as the predominant species in the analyzed marine waters for both 127I and 129I. Despite the rather constant ratios of 127I−/127IO3−, the 129I−/129IO3− values reveal variations that apparently response to sources, environmental conditions and residence time. These findings provide a new tracer approach that will strongly enhance the application of anthropogenic 129I in ocean environments and impact on climate at the ocean boundary layer. PMID:24284916

  10. The Lone Ranger Mission: Understanding Synthetic Polymer Microbe Interactions In the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, R.; Neal, A.; Stam, C. N.; Ferry, J. G.; Schlegel, R.; Tsapin, A. I.; Park, S.; Bhartia, R.; Salas, E.; Hug, W.; Behar, A. E.; Nadeau, J.

    2011-12-01

    Pollution is one of the most ubiquitous and insidious problems currently facing the oceans. As synthetic polymer debris degrades, it becomes increasingly accessible to organisms that forage or absorb food particles. However, research on this significant environmental pollution problem has not been able to keep up with the scope of the issue, since some of the first studies published in 1972 by Edward Carpenter. In January 2011, The Lone Ranger Atlantic Expedition, a collaboration between Blue Ocean Sciences (BOS) and the Schmidt Ocean Institute (SOI) transected the Atlantic Ocean covering 3,100 nautical miles sampling the first 15cm of the water column to investigate microbial interactions with synthetic polymer marine debris. Using established and novel techniques of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), we were able to image and locate material degradation of pre-production, association of microbial biofilms, and accumulation of persistent organic pollutants (POP's) on environmental microplastics. We then used Spectroscopic Organic Analysis and ArcGIS mapping systems to observe the material degradation and the associated biofilm lattice on the environmental microplastics. This data sheds light on possible mechanisms of material weathering of synthetic polymers in deep ocean environments and new methods for identifying POP's association with them. These new techniques are highly transferable to many studies on material biofilm interactions in the environment.

  11. PBDEs in the atmosphere over the Asian marginal seas, and the Indian and Atlantic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Qilu; Gioia, Rosalinda; Zhang, Yanlin; Zhang, Gan; Li, Xiangdong; Spiro, Baruch; Bhatia, Ravinder S.; Jones, Kevin C.

    2011-12-01

    Air samples were collected from Jan 16 to Mar 14, 2008 onboard the Oceanic II- The Scholar Ship which navigated an east-west transect from Shanghai to Cape Verde, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were analyzed in these samples. PBDE concentrations in the atmosphere over the open seas were influenced by proximity to source areas and land, and air mass origins. The concentrations of Σ 21PBDEs over the East and South China Seas, the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean were 10.8 ± 6.13, 3.22 ± 1.57, 5.12 ± 3.56, and 2.87 ± 1.81 pg m -3, respectively. BDE-47 and -99 were the dominant congeners in all the samples, suggesting that the widely used commercial penta-BDE products were the original sources. Over some parts of Atlantic and Indian Ocean, daytime concentrations of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were higher than the concentrations at night. The strong atmospheric variability does not always coincide with a diurnal cycle, but the variability in air concentrations in such remote areas of the ocean remains strong. No significant trends were found for each of PBDE congener with latitude.

  12. State estimation of Atlantic Ocean circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Holly; Heimbach, Patrick; Wunsch, Carl

    2010-05-01

    Preliminary results are presented from application of state estimation techniques to Atlantic Ocean circulation at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). An extended North Atlantic (33S to 75N) is modeled using the MIT General Circulation Model. ICE-5G 21K bathymetry and first guess atmospheric forcing fields from fully coupled CCSM3 LGM simulations are used. The model is least-squares fit to the proxies using an algorithm based on the model adjoint. A one-degree resolution, basin-scale setup was chosen so that the adjointed model remains efficient and processes that influence circulation over decades and longer are accessible. Estimates are sought of the ocean circulation that are dynamically consistent and within error bounds of available LGM proxy records. As compared to modern ocean state estimation, challenges include large and uncertain errors, data sparsity, and poorly known atmospheric circulation. The initial focus is on sea surface temperature and sea ice extent data compiled and unified by the Multiproxy Approach for the Reconstruction of the Glacial Ocean surface (MARGO) project. Estimates are made of the wind field and atmospheric heat flux adjustments required to obtain a consistent ocean circulation solution.

  13. The biogeochemical cycling of zinc and zinc isotopes in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Tim M.; John, Seth G.

    2014-10-01

    Zinc (Zn) is a marine micronutrient, with an overall oceanic distribution mirroring the major macronutrients, especially silicate. Seawater Zn isotope ratios (δ66Zn) are a relatively new oceanographic parameter which may offer insights into the biogeochemical cycling of Zn. To date, the handful of published studies of seawater δ66Zn show the global deep ocean to be both remarkably homogeneous (approximately +0.5‰) and isotopically heavier than the marine sources of Zn (+0.1 to +0.3‰). Here we present the first high-resolution oceanic section of δ66Zn, from the U.S. GEOTRACES GA03 North Atlantic Transect, from Lisbon to Woods Hole. Throughout the surface ocean, biological uptake and release of isotopically light Zn, together with scavenging of heavier Zn, leads to large variability in δ66Zn. In the ocean below 1000 m, δ66Zn is generally homogeneous (+0.50 ± 0.14‰; 2 SD), though deviations from +0.5‰ allow us to identify specific sources of Zn. The Mediterranean Outflow is characterized by δ66Zn of +0.1 to +0.3‰, while margin sediments are a source of isotopically light Zn (-0.5 to -0.8‰), which we attribute to release of nonregenerated biogenic Zn. Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents are also a source of light Zn (close to -0.5‰), though Zn is not transported far from the vents. Understanding the biogeochemical cycling of Zn in the modern ocean begins to address the imbalance between the light δ66Zn signature of marine sources and the globally homogeneous deep oceans (δ66Zn of +0.5‰) on long timescales, with overall patterns pointing to sediments as an important sink for isotopically light Zn throughout the oceans.

  14. The hydrography of the mid-latitude northeast Atlantic Ocean. I: The deep water masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aken, Hendrik M.

    2000-05-01

    The circulation of the deep water masses in the mid-latitude northeast Atlantic Ocean was studied by analysis of the distributions of potential temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, and silicate. Pre-formed nutrients were used to allow a quantitative description of the deep water masses, especially the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water, in terms of four local source water types: Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water, Lower Deep Water, Labrador Sea Water, and Mediterranean Sea Water. Over the Porcupine Abyssal Plain between 2500 and 2900 dbar Northeast Atlantic Deep Water appears to be a mixture of mainly Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and Labrador Sea Water (˜80%), with minor contributions of Lower Deep Water and Mediterranean Sea Water. When the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water re-circulates in the north-eastern Atlantic and flows southwards towards the Madeira Abyssal Plain, contributions of the former two water types of northern origin diminish to about 50% due to diapycnal mixing with the overlying and underlying water masses. The observed meridional and zonal trends of dissolved oxygen and nutrients in the Northeast Atlantic Deep Water appear to be caused both by diapycnal mixing with the underlying Lower Deep Water and by mineralization of organic matter. The eastward decrease of oxygen and increase of nutrients especially require considerable mineralization of organic matter near the European continental margin. At deeper levels (˜4100 dbar), where the nutrient rich Lower Deep Water is found near the bottom, the meridional gradients of oxygen and nutrients are opposite to those found between 2500 and 2900 dbar. Diapycnal mixing cannot explain this change in gradients, which is therefore considered to be a qualitative indication of ageing of the Lower Deep Water when it flows northwards. A considerable part of the Iceland-Scotland Overflow Water and the Lower Deep Water that enter the northeast Atlantic may be removed by deep upwelling in the Bay

  15. Identification of an assembly site for migratory and tropical seabirds in the South Atlantic Ocean

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    B. John Hughes

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Seabirds are good indicators of wider biodiversity and where they assemble in large numbers signifies sites important to many marine faunal species. Few such large assemblage sites have been identified and none in pelagic waters has been identified in the tropical Atlantic Ocean despite their importance for resident seabirds and those ‘on passage’ during migration. Here, we identify the likely location of just such an assembly site and provide preliminary information about the distribution of pelagic seabirds around Ascension Island in the tropical South Atlantic Ocean using a combination of trans-equatorial seabird migrant tracking data, records of at-sea surveys and land counts of seabirds returning from foraging trips. We found that waters north–north-west of Ascension Island are used more often by seabirds than those south and east of the island. Three-fifths of the species recorded in the assembly site breed at mid- or high-latitudes and some of these migratory seabirds stopover possibly to wait for favourable winds that facilitate onward flight. Our findings are important because to the best of our knowledge no seabird assembly sites have previously been identified in tropical Atlantic Ocean pelagic waters. We provide evidence to support the aspirations of the Marine Reserves Coalition that waters in the vicinity of Ascension Island should be recognised as a sanctuary for marine wildlife and we highlight an area that is worthy of further targeted investigation.

  16. Population structure of Squatina guggenheim (Squatiniformes, Squatinidae) from the south-western Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, G; Pereyra, S; Gutierrez, V; Oviedo, S; Miller, P; Domingo, A

    2015-01-01

    Population genetic analyses based on both mitochondrial cytochrome b and the internal transcribed spacer 2 of recombinant (r)DNA genes were implemented to examine hypotheses of population differentiation in the angular angel shark Squatina guggenheim, one of the four most-widespread endemic species inhabiting coastal ecosystems in the south-western Atlantic Ocean. A total of 82 individuals of S. guggenheim from 10 sampling sites throughout the Río de la Plata mouth, its maritime front, the outer shelf at the subtropical confluence and the coastal areas of the south-west Atlantic Ocean, were included. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) based on the second internal transcribed spacer (its-2) region supports that the samples from the outer shelf represent an isolated group from other sites. Historical gene flow in a coalescent-based approach revealed significant immigration and emigration asymmetry between sampling sites. Based on the low level of genetic diversity, the existence of a long-term population decline or a past recent population expansion following a population bottleneck could be proposed in S. guggenheim. This demographic differentiation suggests a degree of vulnerability to overexploitation in this endemic and endangered south-west Atlantic Ocean shark, given its longevity and low reproductive potential.

  17. Temperature-dependence of planktonic metabolism in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

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    L. S. García-Corral

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence of planktonic metabolism in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean was assessed on the basis of measurements of gross primary production (GPP, community respiration (CR and net community production (NCP, as well as experimental assessments of the response of CR to temperature manipulations. Metabolic rates were measured at 68 stations along three consecutive longitudinal transects completed during the Malaspina 2010 Expedition, in three different seasons. Temperatures gradients were observed in depth and at basin and seasonal scale. The results showed seasonal variability in the metabolic rates, being the highest rates observed during the spring transect. The overall mean integrated GPP/CR ratio was of 1.39 ± 0.27 decreasing from winter to summer and the NCP for the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean during this cruises, was net autotrophy (NCP > 0 in about two-thirds of the total sampled communities (68.2%. Here, we reported the activation energies describing the temperature-dependence of planktonic community metabolism, which generally was higher for CR than for GPP in the Subtropical North Atlantic Ocean, as the metabolic theory of ecology predicts. Also, we performed an assessment of the activation energies describing the responses to in situ temperature at field (EaCR = 1.64 ± 0.36 eV and those derive experimentally by temperature manipulations (EaCR = 1.45 ± 0.6 eV, which showed a great consistency.

  18. Atlantic and Pacific Ocean synergistic forcing of the Mesomerican monsoon over the last two millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachniet, M. S.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V. J.; Bernal, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new replicated, high resolution (~2 yrs) and precisely-dated (± 4 yr) wet season hydroclimate reconstruction for the Mesoamerican sector of the North American Monsoon over the past 2250 years. Our new reconstruction is based on two aragonite stalagmites from southwestern Mexico which replicate oxygen isotope variations over the 950-1950 CE interval, and are calibrated to instrumental rainfall variations in the Basin of Mexico. Such data complement existing dendroclimatic reconstructions of early wet season and winter drought severity. Comparisons to indices of ocean-atmosphere circulation show a combined forcing by the North Atlantic Oscillation and the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Monsoon strengthening coincided with synergistic forcing of a La Niña-like mode and a negative North Atlantic Oscillation, and vice versa for droughts. Although drought is commonly invoked as an stressor leading to societal change, the role of intensified monsoon onto cultural development is rarely explored. We observe that prominent transitions from drought to pluvial conditions are associated with population increases in three of the major highland Mexico civilizations of Teotihuacan, Tula Grande, and the Aztecs. These data suggest a role for ocean-atmosphere dynamics arising from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans on Mesoamerican monsoon strength.

  19. Optimizing and Enhancing the Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System to enhance the societal, scientific and economic benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Anja; Karstensen, Johannes; Visbeck, Martin; AtlantOS Consortium, the

    2017-04-01

    Atlantic Ocean observation is currently undertaken through loosely-coordinated, in-situ observing networks, satellite observations and data management arrangements of heterogeneous international, national and regional design to support science and a wide range of information products. Thus there is tremendous opportunity to develop the systems towards a fully integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System consistent with the recently developed 'Framework of Ocean Observing'. The vision of AtlantOS is to improve and innovate Atlantic Ocean observing by establishing an international, more sustainable, more efficient, more integrated, and fit-for-purpose system. Hence, the EU Horizon 2020 project AtlantOS with its 62 partners from 18 countries (European and international) and several members will have a long-lasting and sustainable contribution to the societal, economic and scientific benefit by supporting the full cycle of the integrated ocean observation value chain from requirements via data gathering and observation, product generation, information, prediction, dissemination and stakeholder dialogue towards information and product provision. The benefits will be delivered by improving the value for money, extent, completeness, quality and ease of access to Atlantic Ocean data required by industries, product supplying agencies, scientist and citizens. The overarching target of the AtlantOS initiative is to deliver an advanced framework for the development of an integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System that goes beyond the state-of -the-art, and leaves a legacy of sustainability after the life of the project. The legacy will derive from the following aims: i) to improve international collaboration in the design, implementation and benefit sharing of ocean observing, ii) to promote engagement and innovation in all aspects of ocean observing, iii) to facilitate free and open access to ocean data and information, iv) to enable and disseminate methods of achieving quality

  20. Metamorphism in oceanic layer 3, Gorringe Bank, eastern Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mevel, Catherine

    1988-12-01

    Gorringe Bank is an anomalously high structure of the eastern part of the north Atlantic, which was known to be composed of mantle-derived peridotites (layer 4) and gabbros (layer 3). During the submersible cruise CYAGOR II in 1981, the contact between layer 4 and layer 3 was observed on Mount Gettysburg and interpreted as tectonic. The overlying series of gabbro was extensively sampled on both mounts composing the bank, Gettysburg and Ormonde. Coarse-grained to pegmatoid clinopyroxene gabbros predominate and are associated with differentiated rocks (ferrogabbros and diorites). Cumulate gabbros are missing. The gabbroic section sampled is therefore interpreted as the upper part of the plutonic section. Most samples were strongly recrystallized during two distinct events. Metamorphism occurred close to the ridge axis, from interaction of a seawater-derived fluid with still hot gabbros. High temperature shear zones favoured fluid circulation, but the water/rock ratio — estimated from the sodium input — was very small in undeformed rocks (<1). The low W/R ratio explains the strong evolution of the fluid phase and therefore some particular compositions of secondary minerals. Low temperature alteration occurred when the gabbros were tectonically emplaced close to the sea bottom.

  1. Marine debris ingestion by albatrosses in the southwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Sebastián; Domingo, Andrés; Brazeiro, Alejandro; Defeo, Omar; Phillips, Richard A

    2015-07-15

    Plastics and other marine debris affect wildlife through entanglement and by ingestion. We assessed the ingestion of marine debris by seven albatross species in the southwest Atlantic by analyzing stomach contents of birds killed in fisheries. Of the 128 specimens examined, including four Diomedea species (n=78) and three Thalassarche species (n=50), 21 (16.4%) contained 1-4 debris items, mainly in the ventriculus. The most common type was plastic fragments. Debris was most frequent in Diomedea species (25.6%) and, particularly, Diomedea sanfordi (38.9%) and very rare in Thalassarche species (2.0%), presumably reflecting differences in foraging behavior or distribution. Frequency of occurrence was significantly higher in male than female Diomedea albatrosses (39.3% vs. 18.0%). Although levels of accumulated debris were relatively low overall, and unlikely to result in gut blockage, associated toxins might nevertheless represent a health risk for Diomedea albatrosses, compounding the negative impact of other human activities on these threatened species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pattern of Chromosomal Aberrations in Patients from North East Iran

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    Saeedeh Ghazaey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Chromosomal aberrations are common causes of multiple anomaly syndromes. Recurrent chromosomal aberrations have been identified by conventional cytogenetic methods used widely as one of the most important clinical diagnostic techniques.Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, the incidences of chromosomal aberrations were evaluated in a six year period from 2005 to 2011 in Pardis Clinical and Genetics Laboratory on patients referred to from Mashhad and other cities in Khorasan province. Karyotyping was performed on 3728 patients suspected of having chromosomal abnormalities.Results: The frequencies of the different types of chromosomal abnormalities were determined, and the relative frequencies were calculated in each group. Among these patients, 83.3% had normal karyotypes with no aberrations. The overall incidences of chromosomal abnormalities were 16.7% including sex and autosomal chromosomal anomalies. Of those, 75.1 % showed autosomal chromosomal aberrations. Down syndrome (DS was the most prevalent autosomal aberration in the patients (77.1%. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 9 was seen in 5% of patients. This inversion was prevalent in patients with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA. Sex chromosomal aberrations were observed in 24.9% of abnormal patients of which 61% had Turner’s syndrome and 33.5% had Klinefelter’s syndrome.Conclusion: According to the current study, the pattern of chromosomal aberrations in North East of Iran demonstrates the importance of cytogenetic evaluation in patients who show clinical abnormalities. These findings provide a reason for preparing a local cytogenetic data bank to enhance genetic counseling of families who require this service.

  3. Childhood injuries in a tertiary institution in north east Nigeria

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    Issa Abdul Razaq Esin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injury has been recognised as a preventable cause of morbidity and mortality in children. The aim of this study was to determine the aetiology, pattern and location of childhood injuries in north east Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a 3-year retrospective hospital-based descriptive study. The study included 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.4 ± 3.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years who were admitted for various injuries in the female/paediatric surgical ward from January 2007 to December 2009. Information obtained from their case notes included demographic data, mechanism of injury, location of injury, anatomical site of injury and outcome of treatment. Results: Records for 114 children (77 boys, 37 girls; mean age 6.2 years; range 2 months to 15 years were available for analysis. The highest number of injuries occurred in the age group 6-10 years. Home was the most common location of injury among the age group 0-5 years while older children sustained most of their injuries outside the home on the street/highways. Burns from hot water was the most common injury among children aged 0-5 years while pedestrian accident accounted for the highest cause of injury among older children. Fall accounted for 20.2% of the injuries. The most common specific anatomic injury was head injury followed by limb fractures. Two mortalities were recorded (1.8%. Conclusion: This study provided useful information on the characteristics of childhood injuries in our environment. There is the need for parents and children education about the risks of injury and preventive measures in addition to legislation and policy on environmental modifications and enforcements to significantly reduce childhood injury.

  4. Investigating the potential for "water piracy" in North East Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe

    2013-04-01

    The incorporation of subglacial processes in ice flow models remains a challenge while at the same time observational evidence increasingly underscores the important role liquid water plays in ice flow dynamics. One of the many problems ice flow models face (that also includes scarcity of data at the bed and the deformational properties of water-saturated sediments) is the different time-scales on which the processes operate. For example, observations indicate that subglacial water may be re-routed to a neighbouring ice stream in response to changes in surface elevation. This implies that ice flow models have to allow for changes in ice flow mode where, depending on the basal properties, the flow may be dominated by deformation or basal sliding. The re-routing of water between neighbouring ice streams is often termed "water piracy" and in this study we demonstrate that the potential for water piracy exists even in regions with very small surface elevation changes. We use a simple, vertically integrated, 2D-plane ice flow model based on the shallow ice flow approximation to model the large-scale changes in surface elevation of North East Greenland in response to gravity and mass balance. Considering time-scales of 100-500 years the model predicts changes in elevation of less than a metre per year which is in agreement with data from remote sensing. We then calculate the corresponding changes in hydrological pressure potential and use evidence from radio-echo sounding data to identify areas with basal melting and thus potential liquid water production. The corresponding change in hydrological pressure potential in response to the surface elevation changes is sufficient to divert the subglacial water to different pathways. This change in subglacial water pathways could be sufficient to change the ice flow mode from deformation to sliding and might initiate speed-up and/or slow-down of the ice streams at the margins of the basin.

  5. Farmer's response to changing climate in North East India

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Utpal Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Diversification of land use in the cultivation of various crops provides an alternative way to moderate the climate risk. By choosing alternative crops that are resilient to various weather parameters, farmers can reduce the crop damage and achieve optimum output from their limited land resources. Apart from other adaptation measures, crop diversity can reflect farmers' response towards changing climate uncertainty. This paper tries to examine the changing climatic condition through spatio-temporal variation of two important weather variables (precipitation and temperature) in the largest North-East Indian state, Assam, since 1950. It is examined by the variation in crop diversification index. We have used (1) Herfindahl Index for measuring degree of diversification and (2) locational quotient for measuring the changes in the regional crop concentration. The results show that, in almost all the districts, crop specialization has been taking place slowly and that happened mostly in the last phase of our study. The hilly and backward districts recorded more diversification but towards lower value crops. It goes against the normal feature of crop diversification where farmers diversify in favour of high value crops. Employing ordinary least squares method and/or Fixed Effect model, irrigation is found to have significant impact on crop diversification; while the flood plain zones and hill zones are found to have better progress in this regard, which has been due to the survival necessity of poor farmers living the zone. Thus crop diversity does not reflect very significant response from the farmers' side towards changing weather factors (except rainfall) though they have significant impact on the productivity of various crops, and thus profitability. The study thus suggests the necessity for rapid and suitable diversification as alternative climate change mitigation in the long run.

  6. Harmonising and semantically linking key variables from in-situ observing networks of an Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System, AtlantOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroch, Louise; Buck, Justin

    2017-04-01

    Atlantic Ocean observation is currently undertaken through loosely-coordinated, in-situ observing networks, satellite observations and data management arrangements at regional, national and international scales. The EU Horizon 2020 AtlantOS project aims to deliver an advanced framework for the development of an Integrated Atlantic Ocean Observing System that strengthens the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and contributes to the aims of the Galway Statement on Atlantic Ocean Cooperation. One goal is to ensure that data from different and diverse in-situ observing networks are readily accessible and useable to a wider community, including the international ocean science community and other stakeholders in this field. To help achieve this goal, the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) produced a parameter matrix to harmonise data exchange, data flow and data integration for the key variables acquired by multiple in-situ AtlantOS observing networks such as ARGO, Seafloor Mapping and OceanSITES. Our solution used semantic linking of controlled vocabularies and metadata for parameters that were "mappable" to existing EU and international standard vocabularies. An AtlantOS Essential Variables list of terms (aggregated level) based on Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Essential Climate Variables (ECV), GOOS Essential Ocean Variables (EOV) and other key network variables was defined and published on the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Vocabulary Server (version 2.0) as collection A05 (http://vocab.nerc.ac.uk/collection/A05/current/). This new vocabulary was semantically linked to standardised metadata for observed properties and units that had been validated by the AtlantOS community: SeaDataNet parameters (P01), Climate and Forecast (CF) Standard Names (P07) and SeaDataNet units (P06). Observed properties were mapped to biological entities from the internationally assured AphiaID from the WOrld Register of Marine Species (WoRMS), http

  7. Large-scale diversity patterns of cephalopods in the Atlantic open ocean and deep sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rui; Dierssen, Heidi M; Gonzalez, Liliana; Seibel, Brad A

    2008-12-01

    Although the oceans cover 70% of the Earth's surface and the open ocean is by far the largest ecosystem on the planet, our knowledge regarding diversity patterns of pelagic fauna is very scarce. Here, we examine large-scale latitudinal and depth-related patterns of pelagic cephalopod richness in the Atlantic Ocean in relation to ambient thermal and productive energy availability. Diversity, across 17 biogeochemical regions in the open ocean, does not decline monotonically with latitude, but is positively correlated to the availability of oceanic resources. Mean net primary productivity (NPP), determined from ocean color satellite imagery, explains 37% of the variance in species richness. Outside the poles, the range in NPP explains over 40% of the variability. This suggests that cephalopods are well adapted to the spatial patchiness and seasonality of open-ocean resources. Pelagic richness is also correlated to sea surface temperature, with maximum richness occurring around 15 degrees C and decreasing with both colder and warmer temperatures. Both pelagic and benthos-associated diversities decline sharply from sublittoral and epipelagic regions to the slope and bathypelagic habitats and then steadily to abyssal depths. Thus, higher energy availability at shallow depths seems to promote diversification rates. This strong depth-related trend in diversity also emphasizes the greater influence of the sharp vertical thermal gradient than the smoother and more seasonal horizontal (latitudinal) one on marine diversity.

  8. Physiological and endocrine changes in Atlantic salmon smolts during hatchery rearing, downstream migration and ocean entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; Sheehan, Timothy F.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Lipsky, Christine; Kocik, John F.; Regish, Amy M.; O'Dea, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Billions of hatchery salmon smolts are released annually in an attempt to mitigate anthropogenic impacts on freshwater habitats, often with limited success. Mortality of wild and hatchery fish is high during downstream and early ocean migration. To understand changes that occur during migration, we examined physiological and endocrine changes in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts during hatchery rearing, downstream migration, and early ocean entry in two successive years. Gill Na+/K+-ATPase activity increased in the hatchery during spring, increased further after river release, and was slightly lower after recapture in the ocean. Plasma growth hormone levels increased in the hatchery, were higher in the river, and increased further in the ocean. Plasma IGF-I remained relatively constant in the hatchery, increased in the river, then decreased in the ocean. Plasma thyroid hormones were variable in the hatchery, but increased in both river- and ocean-captured smolts. Naturally reared fish had lower condition factor, gill NKA activity, and plasma thyroxine than hatchery fish in the river but were similar in the ocean. This novel data set provides a vital first step in understanding the role and norms of endocrine function in smolts and the metrics of successful marine entry.

  9. C : N : P stoichiometry at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study station in the North Atlantic Ocean

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    A. Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P availability determine the strength of the ocean's carbon (C uptake, and variation in the N : P ratio in inorganic nutrients is key to phytoplankton growth. A similarity between C : N : P ratios in the plankton biomass and deep-water nutrients was observed by Alfred C. Redfield around 80 years ago and suggested that biological processes in the surface ocean controlled deep ocean chemistry. Recent studies have emphasized the role of inorganic N : P ratios in governing biogeochemical processes, particularly the C : N : P ratio in suspended particulate organic matter (POM, with somewhat less attention given to exported POM and dissolved organic matter (DOM. Herein, we extend the discussion on ecosystem C : N : P stoichiometry but also examine temporal variation of stoichiometric relationships. We have analysed elemental stoichiometry in the suspended POM and total (POM + DOM organic matter (TOM pools in the upper 100 m, and in the exported POM and sub-euphotic zone (100–500 m inorganic nutrient pools from the monthly data collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site located in the western part of the North Atlantic Ocean. C : N : P ratios in the TOM pool were more than twice that in the POM pool. Observed C : N ratios in suspended POM were approximately equal to the canonical Redfield Ratio (C : N : P = 106 : 16 : 1, while N : P and C : P ratios in the same pool were more than twice the Redfield Ratio. Average N : P ratios in the subsurface inorganic nutrient pool were ~ 26 : 1, squarely between the suspended POM ratio and the Redfield ratio. We have further linked variation in elemental stoichiometry with that of phytoplankton cell abundance observed at the BATS site. Findings from this study suggest that the variation elemental ratios with depth in the euphotic zone was mainly due to different growth rates of cyanobacterial cells. These time-series data have also allowed us to examine the

  10. On the Flow of Atlantic Water Towards the Arctic Ocean; a Synergy Between Altimetry and Hydrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafik, L.; Nilsson, J.; Skagseth, O.; Lundberg, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic climate is strongly influenced by the inflow of warm Atlantic water conveyed by the Norwegian Atlantic Slope Current (NwASC); the main heat conveyor into the Arctic Ocean. Based on sea surface height (SSH) data from altimetry, we develop a dynamical measure of the NwASC transport to diagnose its spatio-temporal variability. This supports a dynamical division of the NwASC into two flow regimes; the Svinøy Branch (SvB) in the Norwegian Sea, and the Fram Strait Branch (FSB) west of Spitsbergen. The SvB transport is well correlated with the SSH and atmospheric variability within the Nordic Seas, factors that also affect the inflow to the Barents Sea. In contrast, the FSB is regulated by regional atmospheric patterns around Svalbard and northern Barents Sea. We further relate anomalous flow events to temperature fluctuations of Atlantic water. A warm anomaly is found to propagate northwards, with a tendency to amplify enroute, after events of strong flow in the Norwegian Sea. A roughly 12-months delayed temperature signal is identified in the FSB. This suggests that hydrographic anomalies both upstream from the North Atlantic, and locally generated in the Norwegian Sea, are important for the oceanic heat and salt transport that eventually enters into the Arctic. We believe that the combination of the flow from altimetry and temperature fluctuations in the Nordic Seas can be used to qualitatively predict warm anomalies towards the Arctic Ocean, which could be a valuable addition to the forecast skill of the statistical Arctic sea-ice models.

  11. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

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    M. Astitha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  12. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean – potential impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. C. Denier van der Gon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates, natural (desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, designating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols indicates that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud and entrainment. The sodium (sea salt related aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  13. Chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the Central Atlantic Ocean - potential impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2010-02-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates), natural (desert dust, sea salt) and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust) aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode) are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, designating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols indicates that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud and entrainment). The sodium (sea salt related) aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  14. Modelling the chemically aged and mixed aerosols over the eastern central Atlantic Ocean - potential impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astitha, M.; Kallos, G.; Spyrou, C.; O'Hirok, W.; Lelieveld, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.

    2010-07-01

    Detailed information on the chemical and physical properties of aerosols is important for assessing their role in air quality and climate. This work explores the origin and fate of continental aerosols transported over the Central Atlantic Ocean, in terms of chemical composition, number and size distribution, using chemistry-transport models, satellite data and in situ measurements. We focus on August 2005, a period with intense hurricane and tropical storm activity over the Atlantic Ocean. A mixture of anthropogenic (sulphates, nitrates), natural (desert dust, sea salt) and chemically aged (sulphate and nitrate on dust) aerosols is found entering the hurricane genesis region, most likely interacting with clouds in the area. Results from our modelling study suggest rather small amounts of accumulation mode desert dust, sea salt and chemically aged dust aerosols in this Atlantic Ocean region. Aerosols of smaller size (Aitken mode) are more abundant in the area and in some occasions sulphates of anthropogenic origin and desert dust are of the same magnitude in terms of number concentrations. Typical aerosol number concentrations are derived for the vertical layers near shallow cloud formation regimes, indicating that the aerosol number concentration can reach several thousand particles per cubic centimetre. The vertical distribution of the aerosols shows that the desert dust particles are often transported near the top of the marine cloud layer as they enter into the region where deep convection is initiated. The anthropogenic sulphate aerosol can be transported within a thick layer and enter the cloud deck through multiple ways (from the top, the base of the cloud, and by entrainment). The sodium (sea salt related) aerosol is mostly found below the cloud base. The results of this work may provide insights relevant for studies that consider aerosol influences on cloud processes and storm development in the Central Atlantic region.

  15. Coherency of late Holocene European speleothem δ18O records linked to North Atlantic Ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, Michael; McDermott, Frank; Mudelsee, Manfred; Werner, Martin; Frank, Norbert; Mangini, Augusto

    2016-09-01

    Speleothem δ18O records provide valuable information about past continental environmental and climatic conditions, although their interpretation is often not straightforward. Here we evaluate a compilation of late Holocene speleothem δ18O records using a Monte Carlo based Principal Component Analysis (MC-PCA) method that accounts for uncertainties in individual speleothem age models and for the variable temporal resolution of each δ18O record. The MC-PCA approach permits not only the identification of temporally coherent changes in speleothem δ18O; it also facilitates their graphical depiction and evaluation of their spatial coherency. The MC-PCA method was applied to 11 Holocene speleothem δ18O records that span most of the European continent (apart from the circum-Mediterranean region). We observe a common (shared) mode of speleothem δ18O variability that suggests millennial-scale coherency and cyclicity during the last 4.5 ka. These changes are likely caused by variability in atmospheric circulation akin to that associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, reflecting meridionally shifted westerlies. We argue that these common large-scale variations in European speleothem δ18O records are in phase with changes in the North Atlantic Ocean circulation indicated by the vigour of the Iceland Scotland Overflow Water (ISOW), the strength of the subpolar gyre (SPG) and an ocean stacked North Atlantic ice rafted debris (IRD) index. Based on a recent modelling study, we conclude that these changes in the North Atlantic circulation history may be caused by wind stress on the ocean surface driven by shifted westerlies. However, the mechanisms that ultimately force the westerlies remain unclear.

  16. Transport of North Pacific 137Cs labeled waters to the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.; Levy, I.; Gastaud, J.; Eriksson, M.; Osvath, I.; Aoyama, M.; Povinec, P. P.; Komura, K.

    2011-04-01

    During the reoccupation of the WOCE transect A10 at 30°S by the BEAGLE2003 cruise, the SHOTS project partners collected a large number of samples for the analysis of isotopic tracers. 137Cs was mostly deposited on the oceans surface during the late 1950s and early 1960s, after the atmospheric detonation of large nuclear devices, which mostly occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. The development of advanced radioanalytical and counting techniques allowed to obtain, for the first time in this region, a zonal section of 137Cs water concentrations, where little information existed before, thus constituting an important benchmark for further studies. 137Cs concentrations in the upper waters (0-1000 m) of the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean are similar to those observed in the south-western Indian Ocean, suggesting transport of 137Cs labeled waters by the Agulhas current to the Benguela Current region. In contrast, bomb radiocarbon data do not show this feature, indicating the usefulness of 137Cs as a radiotracer of water mass transport from the Indian to the South Atlantic Ocean.

  17. Climate impacts of recent multidecadal changes in Atlantic Ocean Sea surface temperature: a multimodel comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, Daniel L.R.; Sutton, Rowan T. [University of Reading, Walker Institute, Department of Meteorology, P.O. Box 243, Reading (United Kingdom); Cassou, Christophe [CERFACS, Toulouse Cedex (France); Keenlyside, Noel [IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel (Germany); Okumura, Yuko [CAS, CGD-NCAR, Boulder, CO (United States); Zhou, Tianjun [Chinese Acadamey of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2010-06-15

    During the twentieth century sea surface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean exhibited prominent multidecadal variations. The source of such variations has yet to be rigorously established - but the question of their impact on climate can be investigated. Here we report on a set of multimodel experiments to examine the impact of patterns of warming in the North Atlantic, and cooling in the South Atlantic, derived from observations, that is characteristic of the positive phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO). The experiments were carried out with six atmospheric General Circulation Models (including two versions of one model), and a major goal was to assess the extent to which key climate impacts are consistent between the different models. The major climate impacts are found over North and South America, with the strongest impacts over land found over the United States and northern parts of South America. These responses appear to be driven by a combination of an off-equatorial Gill response to diabatic heating over the Caribbean due to increased rainfall within the region and a Northward shift in the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) due to the anomalous cross-equatorial SST gradient. The majority of the models show warmer US land temperatures and reduced Mean Sea Level Pressure during summer (JJA) in response to a warmer North Atlantic and a cooler South Atlantic, in line with observations. However the majority of models show no significant impact on US rainfall during summer. Over northern South America, all models show reduced rainfall in southern hemisphere winter (JJA), whilst in Summer (DJF) there is a generally an increase in rainfall. However, there is a large spread amongst the models in the magnitude of the rainfall anomalies over land. Away from the Americas, there are no consistent significant modelled responses. In particular there are no significant changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) over the North Atlantic and Europe

  18. Mercury and Methylmercury Distributions Along a Longitudinal Transect of the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Maglio, M.; Ogorek, J.; Landing, W. M.; Morton, P. L.; Shelley, R.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    From August 1 to September 23, 2013 the A16N Repeat Hydrography Cruise (US CLIVAR program) conducted a nearly longitudinal (~20-25°W) sampling transect of the Atlantic Ocean (63°N to 6°S) originating in Reykjavik, Iceland. Water column profiles were taken at 145 locations along this transect, and at 13 of these locations samples for total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) were also collected. Although profile depths for this cruise reached nearly 6000 m, Hg and MeHg sampling was limited to 12 discrete samples ranging from the surface to about the 1000 m. All samples were collected while observing strict adherence to trace-metal-free protocols. Upon collection from the rosette, each whole-water sample was immediately acidified to 1% HCl, thus our analysis of THg and MeHg includes both particulate and filter-passing fractions. For MeHg, our results represent a composite of both monomethyl and dimethyl mercury species. All samples were analyzed at the USGS Mercury Research Lab. Our results show several clear and interesting trends. First, an examination of THg versus MeHg reveals a bimodal distribution. Samples with THg > 0.03 pM show a highly correlated and linear distribution (R2=0.72) and a high mean percentage of MeHg (49%). On the other hand, samples with THg levels observed in profiles collected between 9 and 14°N. This region of the North Atlantic Ocean is associated with an oxygen minimum and PCO2 maximum zone both driven by degradation of sinking algal-derived organic matter. Last, the overall results from the Atlantic Ocean show a clear MeHg enrichment compared to similar data collected in the Pacific and Southern Indian Oceans.

  19. Implication of eolian delivery and accumulation of highly reactive iron to the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. K.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Iron, although abundant in the Earth's crust, is present at low concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton. Eolian dust (loess) is a major source of this micronutrient, and its deposition has important implications for the global CO2 budget. In this study, we explore distributions of potentially bioreactive Fe, the soluble fraction required by phytoplankton for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation, in deep-sea sediments in the North and South Atlantic Oceans. We used a state-of-the-art Fe speciation technique to characterize Fe inputs from different source regions, specifically North Africa and Patagonia to address the patterns and implications across glacial-interglacial time scales. In many open-ocean regions the input of new iron to the surface waters is dominated by the atmospheric deposition of soluble iron in eolian dusts. Multiple records have shown dust accumulation is correlated with glacial-interglacial cycles - glacial periods are substantially dustier. Furthermore, the delivery of eolian dust to the North and South Atlantic Oceans are from two very different source regions and soil types. We analyzed IODP cores from these two regions and our preliminary data shows similar pattern of iron distribution from both the North and South Atlantic Oceans. To date we have found no simple global pattern of bioavailable iron distribution during glacial and interglacial periods. We have analyzed a range of size distributions to isolate the dust-dominated fraction and the data shows no size effects in bioavailable form of iron distribution. We will explore the role of deep-water dust dissolution and sedimentary redox implications and its role on the bioreactive Fe record in marine cores.

  20. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2008-12-26 to 2009-01-30 (NODC Accession 0110254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110254 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from JAMES CLARK ROSS in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  1. Dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, Coulometer for DIC measurement and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1996-03-17 to 1996-05-20 (NODC Accession 0116640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0116640 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1993-02-06 to 1993-03-18 (NCEI Accession 0143944)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143944 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60...

  3. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2010-11-28 to 2011-02-05 (NODC Accession 0108155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108155 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (>...

  4. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2009-02-03 to 2009-03-03 (NODC Accession 0110379)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0110379 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RRS JAMES COOK in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans...

  5. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans from 2006-12-14 to 2006-12-26 (NODC Accession 0108159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108159 includes Surface underway data collected from ODEN in the South Atlantic Ocean, South Pacific Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees...

  6. Aridity changes in the Sahel and their relation to Atlantic-Ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Mulitza, Stefan; Zabel, Matthias; Prange, Matthias

    2010-05-01

    Life in the semiarid Sahel belt of tropical North Africa strongly depends on the availability of water and has, at least since the Pliocene, been frequently affected by shifts to more arid climate. A recent example of abrupt droughts occurred in the early 70's and 80's of the last century. Here we present grain-size distribution data, analysed with an end-member modelling algorithm (Weltje 1997) as well as bulk chemical data of a sediment core collected from the continental slope offshore Senegal, covering the last 57 kyr. These data suggest that during this time interval there were several periods where a relatively humid climate changed abruptly to dry conditions. These dry conditions, which lasted up to several millennia, occurred synchronously with cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Atlantic and reductions in the meridional overturning circulation in the Atlantic Ocean, suggesting that Atlantic Ocean circulation could be closely related to climate conditions in the Sahel. Climate modeling suggests that this drying is induced by a southward shift of the West African monsoon trough in conjunction with an intensification and southward expansion of the midtropospheric African Easterly Jet.

  7. Biogeography of top predators - seabirds and cetaceans - along four latitudinal transects in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungblut, Simon; Nachtsheim, Dominik A.; Boos, Karin; Joiris, Claude R.

    2017-07-01

    The distribution, abundance, and species assemblage of top predators - seabirds and cetaceans - can be correlated to water masses as defined by hydrological parameters. In comparison to other oceans, information about the structuring effects of water masses on top predators in the Atlantic Ocean is limited. The present study aims 1) to provide baseline distributional data of top predators for future comparisons, for instance in the course of climate change, and 2) to test how water masses and seasons affect distributional patterns of seabirds and cetaceans in the temperate and tropical Atlantic. During four trans-equatorial expeditions of the RV Polarstern between 2011 and 2014, at-sea observation data of seabirds, cetaceans and other megafauna were collected. Counts of top predators were generally low in the surveyed regions. Statistical analyses for the eight most abundant seabird species and the pooled number of cetaceans revealed water masses and seasons to account for differences in counts and thus also distribution. In most cases, borders between water masses were not very distinct due to gradual changes in surface water properties. Thus, top predator counts were correlated to water masses but, in contrast to polar waters, not strongly linked to borders between water masses. Additional factors, e.g. distance to locally productive areas (upwelling), competition effects, and seabird associations to prey-accumulating subsurface predators may be similarly important in shaping distributional patterns of top predators in the tropical and temperate Atlantic, but could not be specifically tested for here.

  8. New insights into ocean sunfish (Mola mola) abundance and seasonal distribution in the northeast Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Patricia; Cañadas, Ana; Cadhla, Oliver Ó; Mackey, Mick; Scheidat, Meike; Geelhoed, Steve C V; Rogan, Emer; Jessopp, Mark

    2017-05-17

    The ocean sunfish, Mola mola, is the largest teleost fish in the world. Despite being found in all oceans of the world, little is known about its abundance and factors driving its distribution. In this study we provide the first abundance estimates for sunfish in offshore waters in the northeast Atlantic and the first record of extensive sunfish presence in these waters year-round. Abundance estimates and predictive distributions for sunfish in approximately 300,000 km² of the northeast Atlantic were derived from large scale offshore aerial surveys in 2015-2016 using distance sampling techniques. Generalized additive models of sunfish density were fitted to survey data from 17,360 km of line transect effort resulting in minimum abundance estimates of 12,702 (CI: 9,864-16,357) in the summer (Density = 0.043 ind/km²) and 8,223 individuals (CI: 6,178-10,946) (Density = 0.028 ind/km²) in the winter. Density surface models predicted seasonal shifts in distribution and highlighted the importance of the mixed layer depth, possibly related to thermoregulation following deep foraging dives. The abundance estimate and estimated daily consumption of 2,600 tonnes of jellyfish in the northeast Atlantic highlights the need to re-assess the importance of this species in the pelagic ecosystem, and its role in top-down control of jellyfish blooms.

  9. Invasion of the red seaweed Heterosiphonia japonica spans biogeographic provinces in the Western North Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Newton

    Full Text Available The recent invasion of the red alga Heterosiphonia japonica in the western North Atlantic Ocean has provided a unique opportunity to study invasion dynamics across a biogeographical barrier. Native to the western North Pacific Ocean, initial collections in 2007 and 2009 restricted the western North Atlantic range of this invader to Rhode Island, USA. However, through subtidal community surveys, we document the presence of Heterosiphonia in coastal waters from Maine to New York, USA, a distance of more than 700 km. This geographical distribution spans a well-known biogeographical barrier at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Despite significant differences in subtidal community structure north and south of Cape Cod, Heterosiphonia was found at all but two sites surveyed in both biogeographic provinces, suggesting that this invader is capable of rapid expansion over broad geographic ranges. Across all sites surveyed, Heterosiphonia comprised 14% of the subtidal benthic community. However, average abundances of nearly 80% were found at some locations. As a drifting macrophyte, Heterosiphonia was found as intertidal wrack in abundances of up to 65% of the biomass washed up along beaches surveyed. Our surveys suggest that the high abundance of Heterosiphonia has already led to marked changes in subtidal community structure; we found significantly lower species richness in recipient communities with higher Heterosiphona abundances. Based on temperature and salinity tolerances of the European populations, we believe Heterosiphonia has the potential to invade and alter subtidal communities from Florida to Newfoundland in the western North Atlantic.

  10. Explosive development of winter storm Xynthia over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. R. Liberato

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In winter of 2009–2010 south-western Europe was hit by several destructive windstorms. The most important was Xynthia (26–28 February 2010, which caused 64 reported casualties and was classified as the 2nd most expensive natural hazard event for 2010 in terms of economic losses. In this work we assess the synoptic evolution, dynamical characteristics and the main impacts of storm Xynthia, whose genesis, development and path were very uncommon. Wind speed gusts observed at more than 500 stations across Europe are evaluated as well as the wind gust field obtained with a regional climate model simulation for the entire North Atlantic and European area. Storm Xynthia was first identified on 25 February around 30° N, 50° W over the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Its genesis occurred on a region characterized by warm and moist air under the influence of a strong upper level wave embedded in the westerlies. Xynthia followed an unusual SW–NE path towards Iberia, France and central Europe. The role of moist air masses on the explosive development of Xynthia is analysed by considering the evaporative sources. A lagrangian model is used to identify the moisture sources, sinks and moisture transport associated with the cyclone during its development phase. The main supply of moisture is located over an elongated region of the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean with anomalously high SST, confirming that the explosive development of storm Xynthia had a significant contribution from the subtropics.

  11. TOPAZ4: an ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic and Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sakov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a detailed description of TOPAZ4, the latest version of TOPAZ – a coupled ocean-sea ice data assimilation system for the North Atlantic Ocean and Arctic. It is the only operational, large-scale ocean data assimilation system that uses the ensemble Kalman filter. This means that TOPAZ features a time-evolving, state-dependent estimate of the state error covariance. Based on results from the pilot MyOcean reanalysis for 2003–2008, we demonstrate that TOPAZ4 produces a realistic estimate of the ocean circulation in the North Atlantic and the sea-ice variability in the Arctic. We find that the ensemble spread for temperature and sea-level remains fairly constant throughout the reanalysis demonstrating that the data assimilation system is robust to ensemble collapse. Moreover, the ensemble spread for ice concentration is well correlated with the actual errors. This indicates that the ensemble statistics provide reliable state-dependent error estimates – a feature that is unique to ensemble-based data assimilation systems. We demonstrate that the quality of the reanalysis changes when different sea surface temperature products are assimilated, or when in-situ profiles below the ice in the Arctic Ocean are assimilated. We find that data assimilation improves the match to independent observations compared to a free model. Improvements are particularly noticeable for ice thickness, salinity in the Arctic, and temperature in the Fram Strait, but not for transport estimates or underwater temperature. At the same time, the pilot reanalysis has revealed several flaws in the system that have degraded its performance. Finally, we show that a simple bias estimation scheme can effectively detect the seasonal or constant bias in temperature and sea-level.

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG609 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2014-07-19 to 2014-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0131705)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider SG610 deployed by Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2015-08-11 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0145656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Seaglider data gathered as part of the Sustained Ocean Observations for Improving Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Intensity and Hurricane Seasonal Forecast project funded...

  14. Surface temperatures of the Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean: Implications for future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, Harry J.; Chandler, Mark A.; Robinson, Marci M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval in the Earth's history to have experienced warming of the magnitude predicted for the second half of the twenty-first century and is, therefore, a possible analogue for future climate conditions. With continents basically in their current positions and atmospheric CO2 similar to early twenty-first century values, the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth remains elusive. Understanding the behaviour of the North Atlantic Ocean during the Mid-Pliocene is integral to evaluating future climate scenarios owing to its role in deep water formation and its sensitivity to climate change. Under the framework of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) sea surface reconstruction, we synthesize Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic studies by PRISM members and others, describing each region of the North Atlantic in terms of palaeoceanography. We then relate Mid-Pliocene sea surface conditions to expectations of future warming. The results of the data and climate model comparisons suggest that the North Atlantic is more sensitive to climate change than is suggested by climate model simulations, raising the concern that estimates of future climate change are conservative.

  15. Invasive species in the Northeastern and Southwestern Atlantic Ocean: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Cecilia T de; Fileman, Timothy W; Hall-Spencer, Jason M

    2017-03-15

    The spread of non-native species has been a subject of increasing concern since the 1980s when human-mediated transportation, mainly related to ships' ballast water, was recognized as a major vector for species transportation and spread, although records of non-native species go back as far as 16th Century. Ever increasing world trade and the resulting rise in shipping have highlighted the issue, demanding a response from the international community to the threat of non-native marine species. In the present study, we searched for available literature and databases on shipping and invasive species in the North-eastern (NE) and South-western (SW) Atlantic Ocean and assess the risk represented by the shipping trade between these two regions. There are reports of 44 species associated with high impacts for the NE Atlantic and 15 for the SW Atlantic, although this may be an underestimate. Vectors most cited are ballast water and biofouling for both regions while aquaculture has also been a very significant pathway of introduction and spread of invasive species in the NE Atlantic. Although the two regions have significant shipping traffic, no exchange of invasive species could be directly associated to the shipping between the two regions. However, it seems prudent to bring the exchange of ballast water between the two regions under control as soon as possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impacts of the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean on the Antarctic Peninsula and sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichen; Holland, David M; Gerber, Edwin P; Yoo, Changhyun

    2014-01-23

    In recent decades, Antarctica has experienced pronounced climate changes. The Antarctic Peninsula exhibited the strongest warming of any region on the planet, causing rapid changes in land ice. Additionally, in contrast to the sea-ice decline over the Arctic, Antarctic sea ice has not declined, but has instead undergone a perplexing redistribution. Antarctic climate is influenced by, among other factors, changes in radiative forcing and remote Pacific climate variability, but none explains the observed Antarctic Peninsula warming or the sea-ice redistribution in austral winter. However, in the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean, the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (a leading mode of sea surface temperature variability) has been overlooked in this context. Here we show that sea surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen-Weddell seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. Support for these findings comes from analysis of observational and reanalysis data, and independently from both comprehensive and idealized atmospheric model simulations. We suggest that the north and tropical Atlantic is important for projections of future climate change in Antarctica, and has the potential to affect the global thermohaline circulation and sea-level change.

  17. Surface temperatures of the Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean: Implications for future climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Robinson, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mid-Pliocene is the most recent interval in the Earth's history to have experienced warming of the magnitude predicted for the second half of the twenty-first century and is, therefore, a possible analogue for future climate conditions. With continents basically in their current positions and atmospheric CO2 similar to early twenty-first century values, the cause of Mid-Pliocene warmth remains elusive. Understanding the behaviour of the North Atlantic Ocean during the Mid-Pliocene is integral to evaluating future climate scenarios owing to its role in deep water formation and its sensitivity to climate change. Under the framework of the Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping (PRISM) sea surface reconstruction, we synthesize Mid-Pliocene North Atlantic studies by PRISM members and others, describing each region of the North Atlantic in terms of palaeoceanography. We then relate Mid-Pliocene sea surface conditions to expectations of future warming. The results of the data and climate model comparisons suggest that the North Atlantic is more sensitive to climate change than is suggested by climate model simulations, raising the concern that estimates of future climate change are conservative. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  18. Southern Ocean forcing of the North Atlantic at multi-centennial time scales in the Kiel Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Torge; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2015-04-01

    Internal multi-centennial variability of open ocean deep convection in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean impacts the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the Kiel Climate Model. The northward extent of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) strongly depends on the state of Weddell Sea deep convection. The retreat of AABW results in an enhanced meridional density gradient that drives an increase in the strength and vertical extent of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) cell. This shows, for instance, as a peak in AMOC strength at 30°N about a century after Weddell Sea deep convection has ceased. The stronger southward flow of NADW is compensated by an expansion of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre and an acceleration of the North Atlantic Current, indicating greater deep water formation. Contractions of the North Atlantic subpolar gyre enable warm water anomalies, which evolved in response to deep convection events in the Southern Ocean, to penetrate farther to the north, eventually weakening the AMOC and closing a quasi-centennial cycle. Gyre contractions are accompanied by increases in sea level of up to 20 cm/century in some areas of the North Atlantic. In the Southern Ocean itself, the heat loss during the convective regime results in a sea surface height decrease on the order of 10 cm/century, with a maximum of 30 cm/century in the Weddell Sea. Hence, the impact of the Southern Ocean Centennial Variability (SOCV) on regional as well as North Atlantic sea level is of the same order of magnitude as the rise of global average sea level during the 20th century, which amounts to about 15-20 cm. This suggests that internal variability on a centennial time scale cannot be neglected a priori in assessments of 20th and 21st century AMOC and regional sea level change.

  19. Seasonal and latitudinal patterns of pelagic community metabolism in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Agusti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial patterns in the variability of the pelagic metabolism at the surface of the Atlantic Ocean were analyzed in a series of four oceanographic cruises (LATITUDE 1, 2, 3 and 4. The cruises crossed the oligotrophic waters of North and South subtropical gyres and this explained the low values of both gross primary production (GPP and community respiration (R found. Net community production (NCP, the balance between production and consumption, was strongly related to the variability in R rates (R2=0.72, P<0.0001. NCP was net heterotrophic in 83 % of the data, but showed strong temporal and spatial patterns. At the inter-tropical zone, around 10°–12° N and 10°–12° S, a large variability was observed with values of NCP oscillating from net heterotrophic to net autotrophic seasonally. This variability implied NCP to be net autotrophic in boreal fall and austral spring, and net heterotrophic in boreal spring and austral fall, in the areas around the boundaries of the inter-tropical zone. The variability observed concur with the seasonal climatic and oceanographic regimes of the inter-tropical area, whith documented seasonal changes of the North and South Atlantic equatorial currents system, the Guinea Dome, and the Benguela current. When considering the season of the data obtained, significant differences between spring and fall were found for the surface Atlantic, with water temperature and respiration increasing in autumn, showing a net heterotrophic metabolism, and with temperature and respiration decreasing in spring, where NCP were closer to the metabolic balance. In contrast, no seasonal differences were found for GPP and chlorophyll-a concentration. The results showed new spatial and temporal patterns in the pelagic metabolic balance of the surface Atlantic Ocean with consequences for the carbon flux.

  20. Phytoplankton biovolume is independent from the slope of the size spectrum in the oligotrophic atlantic ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Moreno-Ostos, Enrique

    2015-08-06

    Modelling the size-abundance spectrum of phytoplankton has proven to be a very useful tool for the analysis of physical-biological coupling and the vertical flux of carbon in oceanic ecosystems at different scales. A frequent observation relates high phytoplankton biovolume in productive regions with flatter spectrum slope and the opposite in oligotrophic ecosystems. Rather than this, the relationship between high biovolume phytoplankton assemblages and flatter size-abundance spectra does not correspond with measurements of the phytoplankton community in the Atlantic Ocean open waters. As part of the Malaspina Circunnavegation Expedition, sixty seven sampling stations within the Atlantic Ocean covering six oceanographic provinces, at different seasons, produced a complete set of phytoplankton size-spectra whose slope and biovolume did not show any obvious interrelation. In these oligotrophic sites, small (procaryotes) and medium-size (nanoplankton) cells are responsible for the most part of biovolume, and their response to environmental conditions does not apply to changes in the size-abundance spectrum slope as expected in richer, large-cell dominated ecosystems.

  1. Amazon River enhances diazotrophy and carbon sequestration in the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerkman, K. [Department of Oceanography, SOEST, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Capone, D.G. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies and Department of Biological Sciences; Carpenter, E.J. [San Francisco State University, Tiburon, CA (United States). Romberg Tiburon Center; Cooley, S. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Department of Marine Sciences; Kustka, A.B. [Ruters, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences; Mahaffey, C. [University of Liverpool (United Kingdom). Department of Earth and Ocean Science; Montoya, J.P. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Biology; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies and Department of Biological Sciences; Shipe, R. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Institute of the Environment; Subramaniam, A. [Columbia University, Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory; Yager, P.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Department of Marine Sciences

    2008-07-15

    The fresh water discharged by large rivers such as the Amazon is transported hundreds to thousands of kilometers away from the coast by surface plumes. The nutrients delivered by these river plumes contribute to enhanced primary production in the ocean, and the sinking flux of this new production results in carbon sequestration. Here, we report that the Amazon River plume supports N2 fixation far from the mouth and provides important pathways for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in the western tropical North Atlantic (WTNA). We calculate that the sinking of carbon fixed by diazotrophs in the plume sequesters 1.7 Tmol of C annually, in addition to the sequestration of 0.6 Tmol of C yr-1 of the new production supported by NO3 delivered by the river. These processes revise our current understanding that the tropical North Atlantic is a source of 2.5 Tmol of C to the atmosphere [Mikaloff-Fletcher SE, et al. (2007) Inverse estimates of the oceanic sources and sinks of natural CO2 and the implied oceanic carbon transport. Global Biogeochem Cycles 21, doi:10.1029/2006GB002751]. The enhancement of N2 fixation and consequent C sequestration by tropical rivers appears to be a global phenomenon that is likely to be influenced by anthropogenic activity and climate change.

  2. Coralline algal barium as indicator for 20th century northwestern North Atlantic surface ocean freshwater variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzinger, S; Halfar, J; Zack, T; Mecking, J V; Kunz, B E; Jacob, D E; Adey, W H

    2013-01-01

    During the past decades climate and freshwater dynamics in the northwestern North Atlantic have undergone major changes. Large-scale freshening episodes, related to polar freshwater pulses, have had a strong influence on ocean variability in this climatically important region. However, little is known about variability before 1950, mainly due to the lack of long-term high-resolution marine proxy archives. Here we present the first multidecadal-length records of annually resolved Ba/Ca variations from Northwest Atlantic coralline algae. We observe positive relationships between algal Ba/Ca ratios from two Newfoundland sites and salinity observations back to 1950. Both records capture episodical multi-year freshening events during the 20th century. Variability in algal Ba/Ca is sensitive to freshwater-induced changes in upper ocean stratification, which affect the transport of cold, Ba-enriched deep waters onto the shelf (highly stratified equals less Ba/Ca). Algal Ba/Ca ratios therefore may serve as a new resource for reconstructing past surface ocean freshwater changes.

  3. New nutrients exert fundamental control on dissolved organic carbon accumulation in the surface Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Letscher, Robert T.; Hansell, Dennis A.

    2016-09-01

    The inventories of carbon residing in organic matter dissolved in the ocean [dissolved organic carbon (DOC)] and in the atmosphere as CO2 are of the same order of magnitude, such that small changes in the DOC pool could have important consequences in atmospheric carbon and thus climate. DOC in the global ocean is largely formed in the sunlit euphotic zone, but identifying predictable controls on that production is an important yet unrealized goal. Here, we use a testable and causative correlation between the net production of DOC and the consumption of new nutrients in the euphotic zone of the Atlantic Ocean. We demonstrate that new nutrients introduced to the euphotic zone by upwelling in divergence zones and by winter convective overturn of the water column, and the primary production associated with those nutrients, are the ultimate driver of DOC distributions across the Atlantic basins. As new nutrient input will change with a changing climate, the role of DOC in the ocean’s biological pump should likewise be impacted.

  4. The not-so-silent world: Measuring Arctic, Equatorial, and Antarctic soundscapes in the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haver, Samara M.; Klinck, Holger; Nieukirk, Sharon L.; Matsumoto, Haru; Dziak, Robert P.; Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has been shown, under certain conditions, to influence the behavior and health of marine mammals. Noise from human activities may interfere with the low-frequency acoustic communication of many Mysticete species, including blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and fin whales (B. physalus). This study analyzed three soundscapes in the Atlantic Ocean, from the Arctic to the Antarctic, to document ambient sound. For 16 months beginning in August 2009, acoustic data (15-100 Hz) were collected in the Fram Strait (79°N, 5.5°E), near Ascension Island (8°S, 14.4°W) and in the Bransfield Strait (62°S, 55.5°W). Results indicate (1) the highest overall sound levels were measured in the equatorial Atlantic, in association with high levels of seismic oil and gas exploration, (2) compared to the tropics, ambient sound levels in polar regions are more seasonally variable, and (3) individual elements beget the seasonal and annual variability of ambient sound levels in high latitudes. Understanding how the variability of natural and man-made contributors to sound may elicit differences in ocean soundscapes is essential to developing strategies to manage and conserve marine ecosystems and animals.

  5. Deep-sea whale fall fauna from the Atlantic resembles that of the Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Paulo Y. G.; Alfaro-Lucas, Joan M.; Shimabukuro, Mauricio; Kitazato, Hiroshi; Perez, Jose A. A.; Soares-Gomes, Abilio; Toyofuku, Takashi; Lima, Andre O. S.; Ara, Koichi; Fujiwara, Yoshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Whale carcasses create remarkable habitats in the deep-sea by producing concentrated sources of organic matter for a food-deprived biota as well as places of evolutionary novelty and biodiversity. Although many of the faunal patterns on whale falls have already been described, the biogeography of these communities is still poorly known especially from basins other than the NE Pacific Ocean. The present work describes the community composition of the deepest natural whale carcass described to date found at 4204 m depth on Southwest Atlantic Ocean with manned submersible Shinkai 6500. This is the first record of a natural whale fall in the deep Atlantic Ocean. The skeleton belonged to an Antarctic Minke whale composed of only nine caudal vertebrae, whose degradation state suggests it was on the bottom for 5–10 years. The fauna consisted mainly of galatheid crabs, a new species of the snail Rubyspira and polychaete worms, including a new Osedax species. Most of the 41 species found in the carcass are new to science, with several genera shared with NE Pacific whale falls and vent and seep ecosystems. This similarity suggests the whale-fall fauna is widespread and has dispersed in a stepping stone fashion, deeply influencing its evolutionary history.

  6. Mechanisms of Interannual Variations of the Meridional Overturning Circulation of the North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Cecile; Lee, Tong; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigate the nature of the interannual variability of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) of the North Atlantic Ocean using an Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean (ECCO) assimilation product for the period of 1993-2003. The time series of the first empirical orthogonal function of the MOC is found to be correlated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index, while the associated circulation anomalies correspond to cells extending over the full ocean depth. Model sensitivity experiments suggest that the wind is responsible for most of this interannual variability, at least south of 40(deg)N. A dynamical decomposition of the meridional streamfunction allows a further look into the mechanisms. In particular, the contributions associated with 1) the Ekman flow and its depth-independent compensation, 2) the vertical shear flow, and 3) the barotropic gyre flowing over zonally varying topography are examined. Ekman processes are found to dominate the shorter time scales (1.5-3 yr), while for longer time scales (3-10 yr) the MOC variations associated with vertical shear flow are of greater importance. The latter is primarily caused by heaving of the pycnocline in the western subtropics associated with the stronger wind forcing. Finally, how these changes in the MOC affect the meridional heat transport (MHT) is examined. It is found that overall, Ekman processes explain a larger part of interannual variability (3-10 yr) for MHT (57%) than for the MOC (33%).

  7. Sea-air carbon dioxide fluxes along 35°S in the South Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencina-Avila, J. M.; Ito, R. G.; Garcia, C. A. E.; Tavano, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The oceans play an important role in absorbing a significant fraction of the atmospheric CO2 surplus, but there are still uncertainties concerning several open ocean regions, such as the under-sampled South Atlantic Ocean. This study assessed the net sea-air CO2 fluxes and distribution of sea-surface CO2 fugacity (f C O2sw) along the 35°S latitude in the South Atlantic, during 2011 spring and early summer periods. Underway CO2 molar fraction, temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were taken continuously from South American to South African continental shelves. Values of both satellite and discrete in situ chlorophyll-a concentration along the ship's track were used as ancillary data. Both f C O2sw and difference in sea-air fugacity (ΔfCO2) showed high variability along the cruise track, with higher values found on the continental shelf and slope regions. All ΔfCO2 values were negative, implying that a sinking process was occurring during the cruise period, with an average net CO2 flux of -3.1±2.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 (using Wanninkhof, 1992). Physical variables were the main drivers of f C O2sw variability in South American continental shelf and open ocean regions, while the biological factor dominated the South African continental shelf. Algorithms for estimating fCO2 and temperature-normalized fCO2 were developed and applied separately to the three defined sub-regions: the South American shelf, the open ocean and the South African continental shelf, with the regional temperature-normalized fCO2 models showing better results.

  8. Diversity and distribution of microbial eukaryotes in the deep tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan-Smith, Danielle; Clouse, Melissa A.; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Bochdansky, Alexander B.

    2013-08-01

    Employing a combination of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and fluorescein isothiocyanate (DAPI-FITC) staining and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH), we distinguished a variety of taxonomic and morphological types of eukaryotic microbes in the central and deep water masses of the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean. Samples were taken along a transect across the tropical Atlantic, along the equatorial upwelling and into the West-African upwelling region. Samples were collected as deep as 7000 m in the Romanche Fracture Zone within the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Approximately 50-70% of FISH-identified eukaryotes in deep water masses belong to one of seven groups: kinetoplastids, labyrinthulomycetes, fungi, diplonemids, group II alveolates, MAST 4 (stramenopiles), and an unidentified organism with a peculiar nuclear morphology. A smaller percentage of total eukaryotes was identified in the Central Water, especially in the oxygen minimum zone, than in deep water masses. CARD-FISH probes designed to identify broad taxonomic groups revealed kinetoplastids and fungi were more abundant than noted in previous studies employing 18S rRNA gene clone libraries. Group II alveolates, in contrast, were much less prevalent than previously reported. On a second survey, eukaryotic microbes were enumerated in the deep-sea basins below the North Atlantic subtropical gyre including the Vema Fracture Zone, which is another prominent trench in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The abundance of eukaryotes and chlorophyll concentrations were significantly different between the two cruises, which covered very different hydrographic regimes with associated high and low levels of primary production, respectively.

  9. Lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus along the coastal Atlantic Ocean, Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, M Elizabeth; Mazzoil, Marilyn; McCulloch, Stephen; Bechdel, Sarah; O'Corry-Crowe, Greg; Bossart, Gregory D; Reif, John S

    2010-10-26

    This study represents the first systematic study of lacaziosis (lobomycosis) in bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus in the Atlantic Ocean along the east-central coast of Florida, USA. Lacaziosis is a chronic infection of the skin caused by the fungus Lacazia loboi, which affects only dolphins and humans. Previous studies have shown a high prevalence (6.8 to 12.0%) of lacaziosis in resident dolphins from the adjacent Indian River Lagoon Estuary (IRL), where the disease is endemic. We examined the prevalence of lacaziosis in this coastal area using photo-identification data collected between 2002 and 2008 to determine the prevalence of lacaziosis in coastal dolphins using photographic methodology shown to have high sensitivity and specificity in prior research. The prevalence of skin lesions compatible with lacaziosis estimated from photographic data was 2.1% (6/284), approximately 3 times lower than that described for the estuarine population using similar methods. To exclude potential bias introduced by differences in study duration and survey effort among areas, an 18 mo period when effort was most equal (January 2006 to June 2007) was chosen for statistical comparison. The prevalence of lacaziosis estimated from photographic data was significantly lower (3.8%: n = 6/160) in the Atlantic Ocean compared to the IRL (12.0%: n = 20/167) (risk ratio = 3.19, 95% CI 1.32 to 7.75, p < 0.01 by chi-square analysis). The lower prevalence of lacaziosis in dolphins found in the Atlantic Ocean and the overall lack of movement of dolphins between these habitats suggests that environmental conditions within the estuary may favor viability of L. loboi, and/or that immune compromise in resident estuarine dolphins is a precursor to the disease.

  10. The impact of multidecadal Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variations on the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Delworth, Thomas L.; Zeng, Fanrong

    2017-03-01

    The impact of multidecadal variations of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) on the Southern Ocean (SO) is investigated in the current paper using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model. We find that the AMOC can influence the SO via fast atmosphere teleconnections and subsequent ocean adjustments. A stronger than normal AMOC induces an anomalous warm SST over the North Atlantic, which leads to a warming of the Northern Hemisphere troposphere extending into the tropics. This induces an increased equator-to-pole temperature gradient in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) upper troposphere and lower stratosphere due to an amplified tropical upper tropospheric warming as a result of increased latent heat release. This altered gradients leads to a poleward displacement of the SH westerly jet. The wind change over the SO then cools the SST at high latitudes by anomalous northward Ekman transports. The wind change also weakens the Antarctic bottom water (AABW) cell through changes in surface heat flux forcing. The poleward shifted westerly wind decreases the long term mean easterly winds over the Weddell Sea, thereby reducing the turbulent heat flux loss, decreasing surface density and therefore leading to a weakening of the AABW cell. The weakened AABW cell produces a temperature dipole in the SO, with a warm anomaly in the subsurface and a cold anomaly in the surface that corresponds to an increase of Antarctic sea ice. Opposite conditions occur for a weaker than normal AMOC. Our study here suggests that efforts to attribute the recent observed SO variability to various factors should take into consideration not only local process but also remote forcing from the North Atlantic.

  11. Genetic structure of capelin (Mallotus villosus in the northwest Atlantic Ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L Kenchington

    Full Text Available Capelin (Mallotus villosus is a commercially exploited, key forage-fish species found in the boreal waters of the North Pacific and North Atlantic Oceans. We examined the population structure of capelin throughout their range in the Canadian northwest Atlantic Ocean using genetic-based methods. Capelin collected at ten beach and five demersal spawning locations over the period 2002 through 2008 (N = 3,433 fish were genotyped using six polymorphic microsatellite loci. Temporally distinct samples were identified at three beach spawning locations: Chance Cove, Little Lawn and Straitsview, Newfoundland. Four capelin stocks are assumed for fisheries management in the northwest Atlantic Ocean based on meristics, morphometrics, tag returns, and seasonal distribution patterns. Our results suggested groupings that were somewhat different than the assumed structure, and indicate at least seven genetically defined populations arising from two ancestral populations. The spatial mosaic of capelin from each of the two basal cluster groups explains much of the observed geographic variability amongst neighbouring samples. The genetic-defined populations were resolved at Jost's Dest ≥ 0.01 and were composed of fish collected 1 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 2 along the south and east coasts of Newfoundland, 3 along coastal northern Newfoundland and southern Labrador, 4 along coastal northern Labrador, 5 near the Saguenay River, and at two nearshore demersal spawning sites, 6 one at Grebes Nest off Bellevue Beach on the east coast of Newfoundland, and 7 one off the coast of Labrador at Domino Run. Moreover, the offshore demersal spawners on the Scotian Shelf and Southeast Shoal appeared to be related to the inshore demersal spawners at Grebes Nest and in Domino Run and to beach spawners from the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  12. Annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass in the subarctic Atlantic and Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westberry, Toby K.; Schultz, Patrick; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Dunne, John P.; Hiscock, Michael R.; Maritorena, Stephane; Sarmiento, Jorge L.; Siegel, David A.

    2016-02-01

    High-latitude phytoplankton blooms support productive fisheries and play an important role in oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In the subarctic North Atlantic Ocean, blooms are a recurrent feature each year, while in the eastern subarctic Pacific only small changes in chlorophyll (Chl) are seen over the annual cycle. Here we show that when evaluated using phytoplankton carbon biomass (Cphyto) rather than Chl, an annual bloom in the North Pacific is evident and can even rival blooms observed in the North Atlantic. The annual increase in subarctic Pacific phytoplankton biomass is not readily observed in the Chl record because it is paralleled by light- and nutrient-driven decreases in cellular pigment levels (Cphyto:Chl). Specifically, photoacclimation and iron stress effects on Cphyto:Chl oppose the biomass increase, leading to only modest changes in bulk Chl. The magnitude of the photoacclimation effect is quantified using descriptors of the near-surface light environment and a photophysiological model. Iron stress effects are diagnosed from satellite chlorophyll fluorescence data. Lastly, we show that biomass accumulation in the Pacific is slower than that in the Atlantic but is closely tied to similar levels of seasonal nutrient uptake in both basins. Annual cycles of satellite-derived Chl and Cphyto are reproduced by in situ autonomous profiling floats. These results contradict the long-standing paradigm that environmental conditions prevent phytoplankton accumulation in the subarctic Northeast Pacific and suggest a greater seasonal decoupling between phytoplankton growth and losses than traditionally implied. Further, our results highlight the role of physiological processes in shaping bulk properties, such as Chl, and their interpretation in studies of ocean ecosystem dynamics and climate change.

  13. Changes in erosion and ocean circulation recorded in the Hf isotopic compositions of North Atlantic and Indian Ocean ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Lee, Der-Chuen; Christensen, John N.; Burton, Kevin W.; Halliday, Alex N.; Hein, James R.; Günther, Detlef

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution Hf isotopic records are presented for hydrogenetic Fe–Mn crusts from the North Atlantic and Indian Oceans. BM1969 from the western North Atlantic has previously been shown to record systematically decreasing Nd isotopic compositions from about 60 to ∼4 Ma, at which time both show a rapid decrease to unradiogenic Nd composition, thought to be related to the increasing influence of NADW or glaciation in the northern hemisphere. During the Oligocene, North Atlantic Hf became progressively less radiogenic until in the mid-Miocene (∼15 Ma) it reached +1. It then shifted gradually back to an ϵHf value of +3 at 4 Ma, since when it has decreased rapidly to about −1 at the present day. The observed shifts in the Hf isotopic composition were probably caused by variation in intensity of erosion as glaciation progressed in the northern hemisphere. Ferromanganese crusts SS663 and 109D are from about 5500 m depth in the Indian Ocean and are now separated by ∼2300 km across the Mid-Indian Ridge. They display similar trends in Hf isotopic composition from 20 to 5 Ma, with the more northern crust having a composition that is consistently more radiogenic (by ∼2 ϵHf units). Paradoxically, during the last 20 Ma the Hf isotopic compositions of the two crusts have converged despite increased separation and subsidence relative to the ridge. A correlatable negative excursion at ∼5 Ma in the two records may reflect a short-term increase in erosion caused by the activation of the Himalayan main central thrust. Changes to unradiogenic Hf in the central Indian Ocean after 5 Ma may alternatively have been caused by the expanding influence of NADW into the Mid-Indian Basin via circum-Antarctic deep water or a reduction of Pacific flow through the Indonesian gateway. In either case, these results illustrate the utility of the Hf isotope system as a tracer of paleoceanographic changes, capable of responding to subtle changes in erosional regime not readily resolved

  14. Temperature profile data from CTD casts from the NOAA WHITING in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 1998-07-05 to 1998-11-13 (NODC Accession 9800198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts from the NOAA WHITING in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 5, 1998 to November 13, 1998. Data were...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-05-01 to 2013-05-31 (NODC Accession 0108058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-04-01 to 2010-04-30 (NODC Accession 0065424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  17. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-04-01 to 2013-04-30 (NODC Accession 0105690)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-02-01 to 2014-02-28 (NODC Accession 0116779)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-01-01 to 2013-01-31 (NODC Accession 0101882)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-03-01 to 2011-03-31 (NODC Accession 0073284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-12-01 to 2013-12-31 (NODC Accession 0115495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  2. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-09-01 to 2015-09-30 (NCEI Accession 0133934)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  3. Temperature data from thermistor casts in the Atlantic Ocean's coastal waters off Florida by from 01 January 2000 to 31 December 2003 (NODC Accession 0002518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using SBE 39 thermistor casts in the Atlantic Ocean's coastal waters off Florida from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2003 as part of...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-05-01 to 2010-05-31 (NODC Accession 0066108)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-10-01 to 2008-10-31 (NODC Accession 0051618)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Current meter components and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the North Atlantic Ocean and others locations from 31 March 1979 to 01 November 1980 (NODC Accession 8600181)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the North Atlantic Ocean and others locations from 31 March 1979 to 01 November 1980. Data were...

  7. Temperature profile, pressure, and nutrients data from bottle in South Atlantic Ocean from 24 November 1987 to 12 March 1989 (NODC Accession 0000196)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, pressure, and nutrients data were collected using bottle in the South Atlantic Ocean from 24 November 1987 to 12 March 1989. Data were collected...

  8. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 15 November 1996 to 20 November 1996 (NODC Accession 0000874)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from JAMES CLARK ROSS. Data were collected from 15 November 1996 to 20 November...

  9. Temperature profile data collected using CTD casts from the JAMES CLARK ROSS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 15 November 1994 to 21 November 1994 (NODC Accession 0000873)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using CTD casts in the South Atlantic Ocean from JAMES CLARK ROSS. Data were collected from 15 November 1994 to 21 November...

  10. Current meter components and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS from the South Atlantic Ocean from 05 January 1991 to 19 February 1993 (NODC Accession 9500069)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the South Atlantic Ocean from 05 January 1991 to 19 February 1993. Data were collected by the...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-11-01 to 2010-11-30 (NODC Accession 0070404)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Temperature profile data collected from BT and XBT casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 09 November 1982 to 15 November 1982 (NODC Accession 8600192)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using BT and XBT casts from the OCEANUS in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 09 November 1982 to 15...

  13. Temperature profile and other data collected using CTD casts in the Southeast Atlantic Ocean from the KNORR from 13 November 1983 to 10 December 1983 (NODC Accession 8600266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, salinity, pressure, and oxygen data were collected using CTD casts from the KNORR in the Southeast Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 13...

  14. Temperature data from buoy casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from 01 August 1928 to 04 September 1932 (NODC Accession 0000242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using buoy casts from the COLUMBUS and HMAS SWAN from August 1, 1928 to September 4, 1932 in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were...

  15. Temperature profiles from bathythermograph casts from VALKIRIYA and other PLATFORMS in the Atlantic Ocean and other locations from 26 January 1985 to 31 March 1985 (NODC Accession 8500241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data was collected from VALKIRIYA and other PLATFORMS in the Atlantic Ocean and other locations. Data was collected from 26 January 1985 to 31 March...

  16. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from ISLAS ORCADAS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1978-04-07 to 1978-05-21 (NCEI Accession 8100428)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This record contains bottle cast data, collected by ISLAS ORCADAS ship (cruise 16) in the North Atlantic Ocean. This data is in CTD-78 format (binary) and included...

  17. Temperature, salinity, biological and nutrient profiles collected by CTD in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1/28/1905 - 4/12/1994 (NODC Accession 0000125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, nutrients, and other data were collected using CTD from the HELGA and other platforms in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 28...

  18. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 05 February 1973 to 19 August 1980 (NODC Accession 0000289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 5, 1973 to August 19, 1980. These...

  19. Temperature profile data from MBT casts from AKHILL and other platforms in the Atlantic Ocean from 02 August 1984 to 11 December 1990 (NODC Accession 0000323)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using MBT casts in the Atlantic Ocean from the AKHILL, ARTEMIDA, AYAKS, and other platforms from 02 August 1984 to 11...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-09-01 to 2012-09-30 (NODC Accession 0098135)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-04-01 to 2012-04-30 (NODC Accession 0089163)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  2. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-01-01 to 2012-01-31 (NODC Accession 0084919)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  3. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-11-01 to 2014-11-30 (NODC Accession 0123098)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-11-01 to 2008-11-30 (NODC Accession 0051620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-11-01 to 2009-11-30 (NODC Accession 0062139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-07-01 to 2012-07-31 (NODC Accession 0093398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-12-01 to 2006-12-31 (NODC Accession 0038690)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  8. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from ISLAS ORCADAS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1976-11-03 to 1976-12-18 (NCEI Accession 8100429)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This entry contains bottle cast data, collected by ISLAS ORCADAS SHIP (cruise 11) between November 3, 1976 to December 18, 1976, in the North Atlantic Ocean. This...

  9. Documentation for the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) models from the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) (NODC Accession 0026419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This NODC accession contains documentation files that apply to all data collections archived at NODC relating to the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System...

  10. Oceanographic profiles of temperature, salinity, and nutrients measurements collected using bottle in the Atlantic Ocean from the VNIRO institute from 2005-2006 (NCEI Accession 0045650)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic profiles of temperature, salinity, and dissolved inorganic nutrients measurements collected using bottle in the Atlantic Ocean from the VNIRO institute...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-06-01 to 2012-06-30 (NODC Accession 0092434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Current meter and temperature profile data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA area - Atlantic Ocean from 10 September 1970 - 27 October 1980 (NODC Accession 8600320)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and temperature profile data were collected using moored current meter - PCM casts in the TOGA area - Atlantic Ocean from September 10, 1970 to October...

  13. Zooplankton and other data collected in Northwest Atlantic Ocean from CTD, bottle casts, and other instruments from 10 September 1963 to 24 August 1964 (NODC Accession 7101509)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected using CTD, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected from 10 September 1963...

  14. Temperature, pressure, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 29 April 1975 to 26 January 1976 (NODC Accession 7700668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, pressure, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS in the North Atlantic Ocean. Data were collected by the Massachusetts Institute of...

  15. Chemical and physical data from bottle casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean from 07 June 1961 to 05 December 1989 (NODC Accession 0000305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Salinity, temperature, chemical, and physical data were collected using bottle casts in the North/South Atlantic Ocean from June 7, 1961 to December 5, 1989. Data...

  16. Chlorophyll-a profiles collected by various vessels in the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining seas from 03/02/1961 to 10/21/1992 (NODC Accession 9300147)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chlorophyll-a profiles were collected in the Atlantic Ocean and adjoining seas from March 2, 1961 to October 21, 1992. The data were collected by multiple...

  17. Meteorological and physical data from XSV casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from the Ship of Opportunity, 03 March 1999 to 29 June 1999 (NODC Accession 0000797)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Meteorological and physical data were collected using XSV casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from 03 March 1999 to 29 June 1999. Data were submitted by the US...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2016-06-01 to 2016-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0155306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Chemical, physical, and other data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 21 March 1934 to 24 June 1936 (NODC Accession 0000260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, and other data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from March 21, 1934 to June 24, 1936. Data were submitted by Woods...

  20. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 01 December 1974 to 04 November 1984 (NODC Accession 0000284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, and temperature data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from December 1, 1974 to November 4, 1984. Data were...

  1. Temperature profile and oxygen data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 31 October 1977 to 16 October 1989 (NODC Accession 0000357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and oxygen data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from October 31, 1977 to October 16, 1989. Data were submitted by...

  2. Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data from bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 07 February 1987 to 18 February 1991 (NODC Accession 0000290)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Dissolved oxygen, salinity, temperature, and depth data were collected using bottle casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from February 7, 1987 to February 18, 1991....

  3. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-01-01 to 2007-01-31 (NODC Accession 0046032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-02-01 to 2010-02-28 (NODC Accession 0063918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-11-01 to 2007-11-30 (NODC Accession 0045169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-05-01 to 2014-05-31 (NODC Accession 0119183)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-06-01 to 2007-06-30 (NODC Accession 0041372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  8. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-06-01 to 2011-06-30 (NODC Accession 0074002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  9. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-12-01 to 2009-12-31 (NODC Accession 0062434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  10. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-07-01 to 2014-07-31 (NODC Accession 0120760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-04-01 to 2007-04-30 (NODC Accession 0039230)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-06-01 to 2008-06-30 (NODC Accession 0050813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  13. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-06-01 to 2013-06-30 (NODC Accession 0109999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  14. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-07-01 to 2006-07-31 (NODC Accession 0038000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-08-01 to 2014-08-31 (NODC Accession 0121623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-06-01 to 2015-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0129547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  17. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-12-01 to 2007-12-31 (NODC Accession 0046092)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-09-01 to 2009-09-30 (NODC Accession 0060235)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-03-01 to 2010-03-31 (NODC Accession 0064868)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-11-01 to 2015-11-30 (NCEI Accession 0138739)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-04-01 to 2009-04-30 (NODC Accession 0055660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  2. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-05-01 to 2009-05-31 (NODC Accession 0057379)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  3. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-10-01 to 2010-10-31 (NODC Accession 0069617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-10-01 to 2009-10-31 (NODC Accession 0060954)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-03-01 to 2015-03-31 (NODC Accession 0127243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-09-01 to 2013-09-30 (NODC Accession 0113643)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-05-01 to 2011-05-31 (NODC Accession 0073607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  8. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-07-01 to 2010-07-31 (NODC Accession 0067579)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  9. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-05-01 to 2007-05-31 (NODC Accession 0041112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  10. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2016-01-01 to 2016-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0141436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-12-01 to 2011-12-31 (NODC Accession 0083186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-08-01 to 2010-08-31 (NODC Accession 0068299)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  13. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-04-01 to 2008-04-30 (NODC Accession 0050464)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  14. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-12-01 to 2015-12-31 (NCEI Accession 0140223)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-06-01 to 2006-06-30 (NODC Accession 0037715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-07-01 to 2015-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0130523)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  17. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-02-01 to 2007-02-28 (NODC Accession 0038868)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-03-01 to 2007-03-31 (NODC Accession 0039052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-10-01 to 2011-10-31 (NODC Accession 0079058)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-12-01 to 2008-12-31 (NODC Accession 0051875)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-04-01 to 2015-04-30 (NCEI Accession 0127550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  2. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2016-07-01 to 2016-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0156232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  3. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-01-01 to 2015-01-31 (NODC Accession 0125594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-08-01 to 2008-08-31 (NODC Accession 0051460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-10-01 to 2007-10-31 (NODC Accession 0044360)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-02-01 to 2012-02-29 (NODC Accession 0086247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-02-01 to 2015-02-28 (NODC Accession 0126591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  8. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-05-01 to 2015-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0129412)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  9. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-11-01 to 2012-11-30 (NODC Accession 0100023)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  10. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2016-03-01 to 2016-03-31 (NCEI Accession 0146057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-10-01 to 2006-10-31 (NODC Accession 0038590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-04-01 to 2014-04-30 (NODC Accession 0118274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  13. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2007-07-01 to 2007-07-31 (NODC Accession 0041385)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  14. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-07-01 to 2009-07-31 (NODC Accession 0058273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2015-08-01 to 2015-08-31 (NCEI Accession 0131500)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-05-01 to 2012-05-31 (NODC Accession 0090246)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  17. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-07-01 to 2011-07-31 (NODC Accession 0074617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-09-01 to 2008-09-30 (NODC Accession 0051512)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-01-01 to 2014-01-31 (NODC Accession 0116220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  20. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-07-01 to 2013-07-31 (NODC Accession 0111743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  1. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2010-12-01 to 2010-12-31 (NODC Accession 0071063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  2. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-02-01 to 2009-02-28 (NODC Accession 0053280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  3. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-11-01 to 2006-11-30 (NODC Accession 0038686)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  4. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2012-03-01 to 2012-03-31 (NODC Accession 0087573)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  5. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-06-01 to 2014-06-30 (NODC Accession 0119875)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  6. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2014-03-01 to 2014-03-31 (NODC Accession 0117684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  7. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-05-01 to 2008-05-31 (NODC Accession 0050607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  8. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-02-01 to 2008-02-29 (NODC Accession 0048724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  9. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-08-01 to 2013-08-31 (NODC Accession 0112743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  10. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2008-07-01 to 2008-07-31 (NODC Accession 0050977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  11. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-03-01 to 2009-03-31 (NODC Accession 0054211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  12. Zooplankton data collected using net casts from the ALMIRANTE SALDANHA in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean from 05 November 1958 to 15 January 1959 (NODC Accession 0000942)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using net casts in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean from ALMIRANTE SALDANHA. Data were collected from 05 November 1958 to 15 January...

  13. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-09-01 to 2006-09-30 (NODC Accession 0038417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  14. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2011-08-01 to 2011-08-31 (NODC Accession 0075308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  15. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2009-01-01 to 2009-01-31 (NODC Accession 0052486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  16. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2013-02-01 to 2013-02-28 (NODC Accession 0104156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  17. Temperature and other data from tow and CTD casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1995-08-31 to 1995-09-15 (NODC Accession 9700182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, conductivity, pressure, oxygen, and depth data were collected using tow and CTD casts from the ENDEAVOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 31, 1995...

  18. Output fields from the NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) for 2006-08-01 to 2006-08-31 (NODC Accession 0038184)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Atlantic Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS) dataset comprises output fields from the daily operational RTOFS model runs conducted at the National...

  19. Temperature profiles from bathythermograph casts from VALKIRIYA and other PLATFORMS in the Atlantic Ocean and other locations from 16 November 1985 to 02 February 1986 (NCEI Accession 8600063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bathythermograph data was collected from VALKIRIYA and other PLATFORMS in the Atlantic Ocean and other locations. Data was collected from 16 November 1985 to 02...

  20. Current direction and temperature data from moored current meter casts in the Atlantic Ocean from 29 August 1979 - 01 November 1979 (NODC Accession 8200153)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction and temperature data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Atlantic Ocean from August 29, 1979 to November 1, 1979. Data were...