WorldWideScience

Sample records for normal volunteers dynamic

  1. The personality structure of 'normal' volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C J; McLaren, P M; Morrison, P J

    1993-01-01

    The personality structure of 65 volunteers for a Phase 1 drug trial was examined using the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. It revealed a common pattern of high extroversion, low neuroticism and psychoticism. The reasons why the study might attract such people are examined and the structure compared with those that take drugs that might have 'strange or dangerous effects'. The likely forms of bias that this personality structure may bring to the trial are explored. PMID:12959318

  2. Dynamics of Volunteering in Older Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hank, Karsten; Erlinghagen, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dynamics of volunteering in the population aged 50 years or older across 11 Continental European countries. Design and Methods: Using longitudinal data from the first 2 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, we run multivariate regressions on a set of binary-dependent variables indicating…

  3. Normal range values for thromboelastography in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelini, S; Rhind, S G; Nascimento, B; Tien, H; Shek, P N; Peng, H T; Huang, H; Pinto, R; Speers, V; Reis, M; Rizoli, S B

    2009-12-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) provides a functional evaluation of coagulation. It has characteristics of an ideal coagulation test for trauma, but is not frequently used, partially due to lack of both standardized techniques and normal values. We determined normal values for our population, compared them to those of the manufacturer and evaluated the effect of gender, age, blood type, and ethnicity. The technique was standardized using citrated blood, kaolin and was performed on a Haemoscope 5000 device. Volunteers were interviewed and excluded if pregnant, on anticoagulants or having a bleeding disorder. The TEG parameters analyzed were R, K, alpha, MA, LY30, and coagulation index. All volunteers outside the manufacturer's normal range underwent extensive coagulation investigations. Reference ranges for 95% for 118 healthy volunteers were R: 3.8-9.8 min, K: 0.7-3.4 min, alpha: 47.8-77.7 degrees, MA: 49.7-72.7 mm, LY30: -2.3-5.77%, coagulation index: -5.1-3.6. Most values were significantly different from those of the manufacturer, which would have diagnosed coagulopathy in 10 volunteers, for whom additional investigation revealed no disease (81% specificity). Healthy women were significantly more hypercoagulable than men. Aging was not associated with hypercoagulability and East Asian ethnicity was not with hypocoagulability. In our population, the manufacturer's normal values for citrated blood-kaolin had a specificity of 81% and would incorrectly identify 8.5% of the healthy volunteers as coagulopathic. This study supports the manufacturer's recommendation that each institution should determine its own normal values before adopting TEG, a procedure which may be impractical. Consideration should be given to a multi-institutional study to establish wide standard values for TEG.

  4. Volunteers for biomedical research. Recruitment and screening of normal controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtasel, D L; Gur, R E; Mozley, P D; Richards, J; Taleff, M M; Heimberg, C; Gallacher, F; Gur, R C

    1991-11-01

    We examined the process of accruing healthy control subjects for biomedical research on brain function. Of 1670 responders to newspaper advertising, 23.1% were uninterested when learning more about the studies, and 50.9% of those remaining were found by structured telephone screening to meet exclusionary criteria for having a history of psychiatric, neurologic, or medical disease that might affect brain function. Of 312 volunteers passing the telephone screening who came to an in-person evaluation by a physician and agreed to participate, 49.7% were found to meet exclusionary criteria, and only 157 were admitted to the study. This underscores the importance of attending to the issue of screening and assessment of "normal volunteers." Alternative strategies should be considered for enriching the pool.

  5. Investigation of normal flatus production in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlin, J; Lowis, C; Read, N W

    1991-01-01

    Flatulence can cause discomfort and distress but there are few published data of normal patterns and volumes. Twenty four hour collections were made using a rectal catheter in 10 normal volunteers taking their normal diet plus 200 g baked beans. Total daily volume ranged from 476 to 1491 ml (median 705 ml). Women and men (both n = 5) expelled equivalent amounts. The median daily flatus hydrogen volume was 361 ml/24 h (range 42-1060) and the carbon dioxide volume 68 ml/24 h (range 25-116), three volunteers produced methane (3, 26, and 120 ml/24 h), and the remaining unidentified gas (presumably nitrogen) or gases contributed a median 213 ml/24 h (range 61-476). Larger volumes of flatus were produced after meals than at other times. Flatus produced at a faster rate tended to contain more fermentation gases. Flatus was produced during the sleeping period, but the rate was significantly lower than the daytime rate (median 16 and 34 ml/h respectively). Ingestion of a 'fibre free' diet (Fortisip) for 48 hours significantly reduced the total volume collected in 24 hours (median 214 ml/24 h), reduced the carbon dioxide volume (median 6 ml/24 h), and practically eradicated hydrogen production. The volume of unidentified gas was not significantly affected (median 207 ml/24 h). Thus fermentation gases make the highest contribution to normal flatus volume. A 'fibre free' diet eliminates these without changing residual gas release of around 200 ml/24 h. PMID:1648028

  6. Dynamic magnetic resonance defecography in 10 asymptomatic volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas G Schreyer; Christian Paetzel; Alois Fürst; Lena M Dendl; Elisabeth Hutzel; René Müller-Wille; Philipp Wiggermann

    2012-01-01

    AIM:Evaluation of the wide range of normal findings in asymptomatic women undergoing dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) defecography.METHODS:MR defecography of 10 healthy female volunteers (median age:31 years) without previous pregnancies or history of surgery were evaluated.The rectum was filled with 180 mL gadolinium ultrasound gel mixture.MR defecography was performed in the supine position.The pelvic floor was visualized with a dynamic T2-weighted sagittal plane where all relevant pelvic floor organs were acquired during defecation.The volunteers were instructed to relax and then to perform straining maneuvers to empty the rectum.The pubococcygeal line (PCGL) was used as the line of reference.The movement of pelvic floor organs was measured as the vertical distance to this reference line.Data were recorded in the resting position as well as during the defecation process with maximal straining.Examinations were performed and evaluated by two experienced abdominal radiologists without knowledge of patient history.RESULTS:Average position of the anorectal junction was located at-5.3 mm at rest and-29.9 mm during straining.The anorectal angle widened significantly from 93° at rest to 109° during defecation.A rectocele was diagnosed in eight out of 10 volunteers showing an average diameter of 25.9 mm.The bladder base was located at a position of +23 mm at rest and descended to-8.1 mm during defecation in relation to the PCGL.The bladder base moved below the PCGL in six out of 10 volunteers,which was formally defined as a cystocele.The uterocervical junction was located at an average level of +43.1 mm at rest and at +7.9 mm during straining.The uterocervical junction of three volunteers fell below the PCGL; described formally as uterocervical prolapse.CONCLUSION:Based on the range of standard values in asymptomatic volunteers,MR defecography values for pathological changes have to be re-evaluated.

  7. Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, Lesley; Handy, Femida; Cnaan, Ram A

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a burgeoning interest in the study of volunteering, and the number of publications devoted to volunteering has grown exponentially. In this chapter, we examine emerging theories and new directions in volunteering research. First, we discuss multi-level perspectives that try to understand volunteering in complex interaction with the organizational and institutional context. Next, we present process-oriented approaches that focus on the experience of volunteeri...

  8. Interaction between oral ciprofloxacin and caffeine in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, D P; Polk, R E; Kanawati, L; Rock, D T; Mooney, M L

    1989-01-01

    The influence of multiple doses of ciprofloxacin on the disposition of caffeine and its major metabolite, paraxanthine, was investigated in healthy volunteers. Ten xanthine-free, fasting males were given 100 mg of caffeine orally 24 h before being given ciprofloxacin and again with the third dose of ciprofloxacin (750 mg administered every 12 h). Blood samples were serially collected after both doses of caffeine and after the first and last doses of ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin significantly ...

  9. Thoracic costotransverse joint pain patterns: a study in normal volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wainner Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain referral patterns of asymptomatic costotransverse joints have not been established. The objective of this study was to determine the pain referral patterns of asymptomatic costotransverse joints via provocative intra-articular injection. Methods Eight asymptomatic male volunteers received a combined total of 21 intra-articular costotransverse joint injections. Fluoroscopic imaging was used to identify and isolate each costotransverse joint and guide placement of a 25 gauge, 2.5 inch spinal needle into the costotransverse joint. Following contrast medium injection, the quality, intensity, and distribution of the resultant pain produced were recorded. Results Of the 21 costotransverse joint injections, 16 (76% were classified as being intra-articular via arthrograms taken at the time of injection, and 14 of these injections produced a pain sensation distinctly different from that of needle placement. Average pain produced was 3.3/10 on a 0–10 verbal pain scale. Pain was described generally as a deep, dull ache, and pressure sensation. Pain patterns were located superficial to the injected joint, with only the right T2 injections showing referred pain 2 segments cranially and caudally. No chest wall, upper extremity or pseudovisceral pains were reported. Conclusion This study provides preliminary data of the pain referral patterns of costotransverse joints. Further research is needed to compare these findings with those elicited from symptomatic subjects.

  10. Mild Hypothermia Alters Midazolam Pharmacokinetics in Normal Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostler, David; Zhou, Jiangquan; Tortorici, Michael A.; Bies, Robert R.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Empey, Philip E.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2010-01-01

    The clinical use of therapeutic hypothermia has been rapidly expanding due to evidence of neuroprotection. However, the effect of hypothermia on specific pathways of drug elimination in humans is relatively unknown. To gain insight into the potential effects of hypothermia on drug metabolism and disposition, we evaluated the pharmacokinetics of midazolam as a probe for CYP3A4/5 activity during mild hypothermia in human volunteers. A second objective of this work was to determine whether benzodiazepines and magnesium administered intravenously would facilitate the induction of hypothermia. Subjects were enrolled in a randomized crossover study, which included two mild hypothermia groups (4°C saline infusions and 4°C saline + magnesium) and two normothermia groups (37°C saline infusions and 37°C saline + magnesium). The lowest temperatures achieved in the 4°C saline + magnesium and 4°C saline infusions were 35.4 ± 0.4 and 35.8 ± 0.3°C, respectively. A significant decrease in the formation clearance of the major metabolite 1′-hydroxymidazolam was observed during the 4°C saline + magnesium compared with that in the 37°C saline group (p midazolam. This model predicted that midazolam clearance decreases 11.1% for each degree Celsius reduction in core temperature from 36.5°C. Midazolam with magnesium facilitated the induction of hypothermia, but shivering was minimally suppressed. These data provided proof of concept that even mild and short-duration changes in body temperature significantly affect midazolam metabolism. Future studies in patients who receive lower levels and a longer duration of hypothermia are warranted. PMID:20164112

  11. The effects of long-term administration of guarana on the cognition of normal, elderly volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Fernandes Galduróz

    Full Text Available Paulinia cupana (guarana is a Brazilian plant given great prestige in popular medicine, for example as being a potent stimulator of brain functions. The authors assessed the effects of the long-term administration of guarana on the cognition of normal, elderly volunteers. Forty-five volunteers were studied, with a random distribution in three experimental groups: placebo (n=15, caffeine (n=15, and guarana (n=15, in a double-blind study. There were no significant cognitive alterations in these volunteers.

  12. Acute efects of the Paulinia cupana, "Guaraná" on the cognition of normal volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Fernandes Galduróz

    Full Text Available The authors studied the acute effects of "Guaraná", when compared to caffeine and placebo, (double blind study on cognition, anxiety and sleep in 30 normal volunteers. Although results were negative it cannot be concluded that "Guaraná" is harmless. Other studies shall be undertaken, administering "Guaraná" on a long term basis, as popularly proclaimed.

  13. [Dynamic posturography in normal subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, A; Guglielmetti, G; Bindi, G F; Dellepiane, M

    1990-01-01

    The relative lack of data on the dynamic posturography led us to start a study in order to give our contributions to the standardization of M1, M2, M3, response parameters in normal subjects. Our research was carried out on 35 normal subjects aged 21 to 50. All of them were standing in Romberg's position on a Tönnies model board in a normally lit and ventilated room. We performed two tests: the first one open-eyed staring at no point, the second, 5 minutes later, closed-eyed. The EMG signals were obtained by surface electrodes on triceps sural and front tibial muscles. The EMG recording was determined by a "tilt" movement of the board at a steady speed of 50 per sec. and 4 wide. We use a XT 286 IBM computer with "T POST" software for checking and testing the data. Our results showed a significant variation in the value of the duration parameter in open-eyed and closed-eyed tests. Latency and area values were inferior to those obtained by other authors, except for Diener and Dichgans (3) whose results differ in latency value only.

  14. Plasma metabolomic profiles enhance precision medicine for volunteers of normal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lining; Milburn, Michael V; Ryals, John A; Lonergan, Shaun C; Mitchell, Matthew W; Wulff, Jacob E; Alexander, Danny C; Evans, Anne M; Bridgewater, Brandi; Miller, Luke; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Caskey, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Precision medicine, taking account of human individuality in genes, environment, and lifestyle for early disease diagnosis and individualized therapy, has shown great promise to transform medical care. Nontargeted metabolomics, with the ability to detect broad classes of biochemicals, can provide a comprehensive functional phenotype integrating clinical phenotypes with genetic and nongenetic factors. To test the application of metabolomics in individual diagnosis, we conducted a metabolomics analysis on plasma samples collected from 80 volunteers of normal health with complete medical records and three-generation pedigrees. Using a broad-spectrum metabolomics platform consisting of liquid chromatography and GC coupled with MS, we profiled nearly 600 metabolites covering 72 biochemical pathways in all major branches of biosynthesis, catabolism, gut microbiome activities, and xenobiotics. Statistical analysis revealed a considerable range of variation and potential metabolic abnormalities across the individuals in this cohort. Examination of the convergence of metabolomics profiles with whole-exon sequences (WESs) provided an effective approach to assess and interpret clinical significance of genetic mutations, as shown in a number of cases, including fructose intolerance, xanthinuria, and carnitine deficiency. Metabolic abnormalities consistent with early indications of diabetes, liver dysfunction, and disruption of gut microbiome homeostasis were identified in several volunteers. Additionally, diverse metabolic responses to medications among the volunteers may assist to identify therapeutic effects and sensitivity to toxicity. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolomics could be an effective approach to complement next generation sequencing (NGS) for disease risk analysis, disease monitoring, and drug management in our goal toward precision care.

  15. Establishing a normal reference range for thromboelastography in North Indian healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arulselvi Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Thromboelastography (TEG is relatively recent assay to analyze the coagulation state of a blood sample, providing a continuous visualization of physical changes occurring during blood coagulation. There is a paucity of published literature on assessment of coagulation status using TEG in Indian population. Aim: The primary aim of the following study is to establish normal reference values for TEG in North Indian healthy volunteers and secondary aim is to compare them with conventional plasma-based routine coagulation tests and the manufacturers reference range. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 healthy volunteers comprised of 100 males and 100 females of age groups between 20 and 50 years, were enrolled over a period of 1 year, i.e., 2011-2012. Thromboelastometry (TEM was performed on TEM-A automated thromboelastometer (Framar Biomedica, Rome, Italy, using whole blood non-additive (360 µl. TEG parameters analyzed were r-time, k-time, α-angle, maximal amplitude (MA. Prothrombin time (PT, activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT and platelet count was performed for all volunteers. The 95% reference range was calculated as (mean-1.96 standard deviation [SD] to (mean + 1.96 SD. Results: Our reference values for 95% of 200 volunteers were r-time: 1.8-14.2 min, k-time: 0.7-7.3 min, α-angle: 27.3-72.3° and MA: 32.1-87.9 mm. Maximum clot strength was higher in women compared with men, however statistically insignificant. Overall 14.5% (29/200 of the volunteers had at least one abnormal parameter while 74% (149/200 had deranged TEG values using the manufacturer′s reference range. Statistically significant variation was seen in r-time for 84.8% (P < 0.001, for k-time, in 87.1% (P < 0.001, for α-angle in 83.7% (P < 0.001 and for MA in 84% (P < 0.001, between the manufacturer and our reference range. Conclusion: The efficacy of classical coagulation test has been well-established; on the contrary TEG is a fairly recent assay and

  16. Multidimensional dynamical systems accepting the normal shift

    CERN Document Server

    Boldin, A Y

    1994-01-01

    The dynamical systems of the form \\ddot\\bold r=\\bold F (\\bold r,\\dot\\bold r) in \\Bbb R^n accepting the normal shift are considered. The concept of weak normality for them is introduced. The partial differential equations for the force field \\bold F(\\bold r,\\dot\\bold r) of the dynamical systems with weak and complete normality are derived.

  17. Dynamic normal forms and dynamic characteristic polynomial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Gudmund Skovbjerg; Sankowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    with relative error 2−b in additional O(nlog2nlogb) time. Furthermore, it can be used to dynamically maintain the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a generic matrix. Together with the algorithm, the hardness of the problem is studied. For the symmetric case, we present an Ω(n2) lower bound for rank...

  18. Effects of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses in male schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; Meltzer, H Y

    1996-10-16

    Functional alterations in the central serotonergic system, including presynaptic and postsynaptic function, have been reported in schizophrenia. Recently, there have been conflicting reports that the increase in plasma cortisol or prolactin concentrations induced by meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) was significantly blunted in schizophrenic patients compared with normal volunteers. Studies of the behavioral effects of mCPP, a serotonin (5-HT) receptor partial agonist with high affinity for 5-HT1C binding sites, have also yielded conflicting results in schizophrenic patients. The purpose of this study was to examine plasma levels of prolactin and cortisol, body temperature, and behavioral responses to mCPP and placebo in a single-blind study in 25 schizophrenic and 15 normal men. No differences either between schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers or between paranoid and undifferentiated/residual subtypes of schizophrenia were found in mCPP-induced prolactin, cortisol, or temperature responses. Schizophrenic patients and normal volunteers reported significant increases in feeling calm and feeling strange of comparable magnitude following mCPP. No significant differences between normal volunteers and schizophrenic patients were found in post-mCPP behavioral ratings, such as anxiety, irritability, depression, restlessness, or arousal.

  19. Characterization of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma NPY levels in normal volunteers over a 24-h timeframe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Dewleen G; Bertram, Tobias Moeller; Patel, Piyush M; Barkauskas, Donald A; Clopton, Paul; Patel, Sejal; Geracioti, Thomas D; Haji, Uzair; O'Connor, Daniel T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hauger, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is abundant in mammals, where it contributes to diverse behavioral and physiological functions, centrally and peripherally, but little information is available in regard to NPY cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma concentration relationships and dynamics. Since plasma NPY levels are commonly used as proxy "biomarkers" for central NPY activity in stress and mental health research in humans this study aims to better characterize the CSF/plasma NPY relationships. Subjects were eleven healthy male volunteers, admitted to the clinical research center for placement of an indwelling CSF catheter, as well as venous catheter, for 24-h collection of CSF NPY (cNPY) and plasma NPY (pNPY) samples. As observed in prior studies, group mean (SE) cNPY concentrations [792.1 (7.80) pg/mL] were higher than pNPY concentrations [220.0 (3.63) pg/mL]. For the eleven normal volunteers who had sufficient common (hourly) pNPY and cNPY data points, analysis of pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios and lagged cross-correlation analysis was completed. Average pNPY/cNPY concentration ratios ranged from .20 to .40 across study subjects, with a mean of .29. pNPY/cNPY cross correlation analyses, computed at varying time lags, were non-significant. An attempt was made to analyze the circadian rhythmicity of NPY secretion, but circadian components were not detectable. Using 24-h data collection, we characterized CSF/plasma NPY relationships, including presentation of evidence of weak CSF and plasma correlations, an important consideration for study design of NPY in stress or mental health.

  20. Histamine and Nt-methylhistamine in the circulation during intravenous infusion of histamine in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, B D; Devalia, J L; Wylie, G; Davies, R J

    1988-12-01

    Plasma levels of histamine and Nt-methylhistamine were measured simultaneously by high performance liquid chromatography during the intravenous infusion of histamine acid phosphate in six normal volunteers. Progressive, dose-related increases in plasma histamine were noted, reaching a maximum value of 3.1 +/- 0.14 ng ml-1 corresponding to a maximum infusion rate of 180 ng kg-1 min-1 (means +/- SEM). Increases in plasma histamine were accompanied by a significant dose-related fall in mean diastolic blood pressure (baseline 74.0 +/- 4.4 mm Hg falling to 60.0 +/- 3.3 mm Hg at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.001) and an increase in pulse rate (baseline 76.3 +/- 2.8 beats min-1 rising to 89.24 beats min-1 at maximum infusion rate, p less than 0.05). All subjects exhibited facial flushing, the threshold plasma histamine level for this effect being 1.3 +/- 0.15 ng ml-1 corresponding to an infusion rate of 60 ng kg-1 min-1. Elevation of plasma Nt-methylhistamine was seen in only one subject, who exhibited a level of 0.5 ng ml-1 at the highest infusion rate. These results suggest that measurements of plasma Nt-methylhistamine are unlikely to provide a useful index of histamine release into the circulation.

  1. Axial lower-limb alignment: comparison of knee geometry in normal volunteers and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, D; Scudamore, A; Li, J; Wyss, U; Bryant, T; Costigan, P

    1997-01-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is associated with deformities of the lower limb and malalignment of the limb segments. Pathogenetic relationships between the two are poorly understood. Alignment was studied by standardized radiography in 167 symptomatic Canadian osteoarthritis patients, and compared with 119 healthy adult volunteers. In healthy adults overall alignment (hip-knee-ankle angle) was principally determined by distal femoral valgus (condylar hip angle) and proximal tibial-plateau varus (plateau-ankle angle): the angle between the joint surfaces (condylar plateau) was relatively constant. In osteoarthritis, disease-associated differences included condylar-plateau angles that were divergent: accentuated medial convergence in varus osteoarthritis and lateral convergence in valgus osteoarthritis. This was interpreted as change arising from focal loss of cartilage in the medial (varus osteoarthritis) or lateral (valgus osteoarthritis) compartments of the knee. The changes would contribute to increasing limb malalignment during disease progression. But differences of limb geometry also contributed to malalignment. These were the average trends: in varus osteoarthritis there was abnormal femoral geometry (lesser femoral condylar valgus), but tibial surface geometry was the same. In valgus osteoarthritis, the opposite was true: abnormal tibial geometry (lesser plateau varus), but normal femoral geometry. A possible explanation is that these abnormal knee geometries pre-exist and predispose to osteoarthritis, although it is not impossible that they (like condylar-plateau angle) change as disease progresses. Further approaches to population studies are discussed based on these findings, along with their implications for knee surgery.

  2. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  3. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabbe, B.G.C.; Hulstijn, W.; Maes, M.; Pier, M.P.B.I.; Scharpé, S.; Zitman, F.G.

    2001-01-01

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine ef

  4. Head repositioning errors in normal student volunteers: a possible tool to assess the neck's neuromuscular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudavalli M Ram

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A challenge for practitioners using spinal manipulation is identifying when an intervention is required. It has been recognized that joint pain can interfere with the ability to position body parts accurately and that the recent history of muscle contraction can play a part in that interference. In this study, we tested whether repositioning errors could be induced in a normal population by contraction or shortening of the neck muscles. Methods In the experimental protocol, volunteers free of neck problems first found a comfortable neutral head posture with eyes closed. They deconditioned their cervical muscles by moving their heads 5 times in either flexion/extension or lateral flexion and then attempted to return to the same starting position. Two conditioning sequences were interspersed within the task: hold the head in an extended or laterally flexed position for 10 seconds; or hold a 70% maximum voluntary contraction in the same position for 10 seconds. A computer-interfaced electrogoniometer was used to measure head position while a force transducer coupled to an auditory alarm signaled the force of isometric contraction. The difference between the initial and final head orientation was calculated in 3 orthogonal planes. Analysis of variance (1-way ANOVA with a blocking factor (participants was used to detect differences in proprioceptive error among the conditioning sequences while controlling for variation between participants. Results Forty-eight chiropractic students participated: 36 males and 12 females, aged 28.2 ± 4.8 yrs. During the neck extension test, actively contracting the posterior neck muscles evoked an undershoot of the target position by 2.1° (p Conclusion The results suggest that the recent history of cervical paraspinal muscle contraction can influence head repositioning in flexion/extension. To our knowledge this is the first time that muscle mechanical history has been shown to influence

  5. Cine MRI of Tracheal Dynamics in Healthy Volunteers and Patients With Tracheobronchomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Boiselle, Phillip M; Heidinger, Benedikt; Andrinopoulou, Eleni-Rosalina; O'Donnel, Carl; Alsop, David C; Litmanovich, Diana E

    2017-10-01

    Bronchoscopy and MDCT are routinely used to assess tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). Recently, dynamic MRI (cine MRI) has been proposed as a radiation-free alternative to MDCT. In this study, we tested cine MRI assessment of airway dynamics during various breathing conditions and compared cine MRI and MDCT measurements in healthy volunteers and patients with suspected TBM. Cine MRI was found to be a technically feasible alternative to MDCT for assessing central airway dynamics.

  6. Psychomotor slowing, neuroendocrine responses, and behavioral changes after oral administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbe, B; Hulstijn, W; Maes, M; Pier, M; Scharpé, S; Zitman, F

    2001-12-31

    The mixed 5-HT receptor agonist/antagonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) is known to suppress locomotor activity in mice and rats. This study aimed: (1) to determine whether mCPP induces cognitive and motor changes in normal human volunteers and how these changes relate to the neuroendocrine effects of mCPP; and (2) to compare these cognitive and motor changes to the known cognitive and motor slowing patterns in depression and schizophrenia. A computerized method (used in previous research) analyzed fine motor behavior during figure-copying tasks. In 14 normal male volunteers behavioral responses, body temperature, plasma levels of prolactin and cortisol, and cognitive and motor performance during figure-copying tasks were measured after a single oral dose of mCPP (0.5 mg/kg). mCPP-induced prolongation of the reaction times in all copying tasks, parallel to increases in cortisol and prolactin and some self-reported behavioral effects. There were no changes in the movement times or the velocities of the writing movements. In conclusion, mCPP induced cognitive, but not motor slowing, in normal male volunteers. This indicates that the human serotonin system is also implicated in psychomotor behavior. This pattern of slowing was different from that in depressed and schizophrenic patients.

  7. Effects of food on the central and peripheral haemodynamic response to upright exercise in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, J. J.; Fullwood, L.; Stainer, K; Cowley, A. J.; Hampton, J R

    1990-01-01

    The central and peripheral haemodynamic effects of a modest meal were investigated in healthy volunteers at rest and in response to submaximal exercise. The meal increased heart rate, cardiac output, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute ventilation at rest and during exercise. The effects of food were additive to those induced by the exercise. Food had no effect on limb blood flow and lowered total systemic vascular resistance suggesting that there were no compensatory ch...

  8. Neither cimetidine nor probenecid affect the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R O; Geisslinger, G; Paull, P; Williams, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with cimetidine (1 g day-1, 7 days) and of probenecid (1 g twice daily, 4 days) on the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam (single oral dose, 20 mg) was studied in six healthy volunteers. Cmax was increased significantly when tenoxicam was given with probenecid (2.8 micrograms ml-1 alone, 3.5 micrograms ml-1 after probenecid; P < 0.005). No other pharmacokinetic parameters were altered significantly by either drug. It is concluded that neither cimetidine nor probenecid affects the pharmacokinetics of tenoxicam in a clinically important way. PMID:8148224

  9. Effects of GUASHA on Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Volunteers under Normal Condition and Weightlifters after Weightlifting Training Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingze Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims at exploring the effects of GUASHA on heart rate variability between healthy volunteers under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions. Methods. Ten healthy male volunteers under normal condition and 15 male weightlifters after weightlifting training sessions were recruited into two groups. Electrocardiography was recorded before and immediately after 20-minute GUASHA. HRV was calculated in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Results. Stress index was reduced, while standard deviation of N-N intervals (SDNN, proportion derived by dividing the number of interval differences of successive N-N intervals greater than 50 ms, and root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD were enhanced after GUASHA therapy in the two groups. The changes in SDNN and RMSSD were higher in the healthy men group than in the weightlifters group. In addition, low frequency was decreased whereas high frequency was significantly increased in healthy men after the GUASHA session. Conclusions. GUASHA therapy facilitates the parasympathetic nervous activity and modulates the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic activities in both healthy men under normal condition and weightlifters after training sessions as indicated. Although the changes of the HRV parameters were similar in both groups, the responsiveness was more pronounced in healthy men than in male weightlifters.

  10. Phase 1 study of an inactivated vaccine against American tegumentary leishmaniasis in normal volunteers in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzochi, K B; Marzochi, M A; Silva, A F; Grativol, N; Duarte, R; Confort, E M; Modabber, F

    1998-01-01

    A Phase 1 double-blind placebo-controlled study was performed to evaluate a vaccine against American tegumentary leishmaniasis in 61 healthy male volunteers. Side effects and the immune response to the vaccine were evaluated, with 1- and 2- dose schemes, with intervals of 7 or 21 days, each dose containing 1440 mg of protein N antigen of a single strain of Leishmania amazonensis (PH8) diluted in merthiolated saline (1:10,000). Merthiolated saline and an inert substance were used as placebos. No significant clinical alterations were found following the respective injections in the vaccinated individuals as compared to the placebos, except for local pain, which was associated significantly with injection of the vaccine. The laboratory alterations we observed bore no association with the clinical findings and were unimportant. We observed no differences between the groups with regard to seroconversion of the Montenegro skin test. However, the group that received a single dose of the vaccine and the one that received two doses with a 21-day interval displayed cutaneous induration significantly larger than in the control group, with 100%, 100%, and 66% conversion in the skin test, respectively. We concluded that the vaccine does not present any major side effect that would contraindicate its use in healthy individuals.

  11. Event Normalization Through Dynamic Log Format Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christoph Meinel

    2014-01-01

    The analytical and monitoring capabilities of central event re-positories, such as log servers and intrusion detection sys-tems, are limited by the amount of structured information ex-tracted from the events they receive. Diverse networks and ap-plications log their events in many different formats, and this makes it difficult to identify the type of logs being received by the central repository. The way events are logged by IT systems is problematic for developers of host-based intrusion-detection systems (specifically, host-based systems), develop-ers of security-information systems, and developers of event-management systems. These problems preclude the develop-ment of more accurate, intrusive security solutions that obtain results from data included in the logs being processed. We propose a new method for dynamically normalizing events into a unified super-event that is loosely based on the Common Event Expression standard developed by Mitre Corporation. We explain how our solution can normalize seemingly unrelat-ed events into a single, unified format.

  12. Influence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow and mental function in the normal aged volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Katsube, Tomoko; Kitani, Kohaku; Okada, Masanori (Shimane Medical University (Japan))

    1983-12-01

    The infuence of social activity on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and mental function was studied by Xe133 inhalation method in normal aged volunteers. Subjects: The first group consisted of 33 aged volunteers living in nursing home and exposed to little social stimuli. There were 15 males (mean age of 77 years) and 18 females (77 years). The second group consisted of 49 aged community volunteers who were confirmed socially active. There were 25 males (76 years) and 24 females (72 years). All subjects were healthy persons without a past history of cerebral diseases and lung diseases. There were no difference in blood pressure and hematocrit between the two groups. The rCBF was measured by 16-ch-Novo-cerebrograph. Verbal intelligence was evaluated by the Hasegawa Simple Intelligence Scale for Aged. Performance intelligence was evaluated with the Kohs' Block Design Test. The mean rCBF in group I showed significantly lower value than that of group II, especially in the frontotemporal region. The performance intelligence was decreased in group I. However, there were no significant difference in the verbal intelligence between the two groups. 2) The aging effect on rCBF and intelligences was more prominent in group II. 3) In males, hemispheric rCBF of group I decreased bilaterally associated with the decrease of both intelligences. While the left hemispheric rCBF in females was relatively preserved as well as the preservation of verbal intelligence. These results indicate that the social environmental factors may have significant influence to aging of the brain especially in the males.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow pattern in normal young and aged volunteers: a {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catafau, A.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Lomena, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Pavia, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Parellada, E. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Bernardo, M. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Setoain, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain); Tolosa, E. [Dept. of Neurology, Hospital Clinic, Univ. of Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normal pattern of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) distribution in normal young and aged volunteers using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ({sup 99m}-Tc-HMPAO) as a tracer. The region brain perfusion of young and aged subjects was compared, especially regarding rCBF differences due to age and gender, and interhemispheric rCBF asymmetries. Sixty-eight right-handed normal volunteers - 40 young (mean age 29.5{+-}6.3 years) and 28 aged (mean age 71.2{+-}4.3 years) - were included in the study. rCBF was estimated on the basis of a semiquantitative approach by means of a left-right index and two region/reference ratios, using the cerebellum and the whole brain activity as references. A good correlation between these two region/reference ratios was found (P<0.005 in all cerebral regions). The highest rCBF ratios corresponded to the cerebellum, followed by the occipital lobe. The remaining cortical regions (temporal, parietal, frontal and basal ganglia) showed slightly lower values. The white matter showed rCBF ratios substantially lower than the grey matter. In neighter young nor aged subjects were significant rCBF differences between the genders found in any of the two region/reference indices employed. Aged sugjects showed significantly lower rCBF ratios than young subjects in the left frontal lobe and in the posterior region of the left temporal lobe. In both young and aged subjects, lower perfusion was found in the left hemisphere, except for the white matter region in both age groups and the frontal lobe in the young subjects. Aged subjects presented a slightly higher interhemispheric asymmetry in the frontal lobe. However, interhemispheric asymmetry was minimal (-1.01% to 3.14%). Consequently, a symmetrical rCBF distribution can be assumed between homologous regions, independent of age. (orig.)

  14. Normal threshold values for a monofilament sensory test in sural and radial cutaneous nerves in Indian and Nepali volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Inge; Brandsma, Wim; Post, Erik; Richardus, Jan Hendrik

    2014-12-01

    The monofilament test (MFT) is a reliable method to assess sensory nerve function in leprosy and other neuropathies. Assessment of the radial cutaneous and sural nerves, in addition to nerves usually tested, can help improve diagnosis and monitoring of nerve function impairment (NFI). To enable the detection of impairments in leprosy patients, it is essential to know the monofilament threshold of these two nerves in normal subjects. The radial cutaneous, sural, ulnar, median and posterior tibial nerves of 245 volunteers were tested. All nerves were tested at three sites on both left and right sides. Normal monofilament thresholds were calculated per test-site and per nerve. We assessed 490 radial cutaneous and 482 sural nerves. The normal monofilament was 2 g (Filament Index Number (FIN) 4.31) for the radial cutaneous and 4 g (FIN 4.56) for the sural nerve, although heavy manual laborers demonstrated a threshold of 10 g (FIN 5.07) for the sural nerve. For median and ulnar nerves, the 200 mg (FIN 3.61) filament was confirmed as normal while the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filament was normal for the posterior tibial. Age and occupation have an effect on the mean touch sensitivity but do not affect the normal threshold for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves. The normal thresholds for the radial cutaneous and sural nerves are determined as the 2 g (FIN 4.31) and the 4 g (FIN 4.56) filaments, respectively. The addition of the radial cutaneous and sural nerve to sensory nerve assessment may improve the diagnosis of patients with impaired sensory nerve function.

  15. CBF/CBV maps in normal volunteers studied with (15)O PET: a possible index of cerebral perfusion pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Kato, Hiroki; Isohashi, Kayako; Ishibashi, Mana; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Local cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) is a primary factor controlling cerebral circulation and previous studies have indicated that the ratio of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to cerebral blood volume (CBV) can be used as an index of the local CPP. In this study, we investigated whether the CBF/CBV ratio differs among different brain structures under physiological conditions, by means of (15)O positron emission tomography. Nine healthy volunteers (5 men and 4 women; mean age, 47.0 ± 1.2 years) were studied by H2 (15)O bolus injection for CBF measurement and by C(15)O inhalation for CBV measurement. The CBF/CBV ratio maps were created by dividing the CBF images by the CBV images after anatomical normalization. Regions of interest were placed on the CBF/CBV maps and comparing the regions. The mean CBF/CBV ratio was highest in the cerebellum (19.3 ± 5.2/min), followed by the putamen (18.2 ± 3.9), pons (16.4 ± 4.6), thalamus (14.5 ± 3.3), cerebral cortices (13.2 ± 2.4), and centrum semiovale (11.5 ± 2.1). The cerebellum and putamen showed significantly higher CBF/CBV ratios than the cerebral cortices and centrum semiovale. We created maps of the CBF/CBV ratio in normal volunteers and demonstrated higher CBF/CBV ratios in the cerebellum and putamen than in the cerebral cortices and deep cerebral white matter. The CBF/CBV may reflect the local CPP and should be studied in hemodynamically compromised patients and in patients with risk factors for small-artery diseases of the brain.

  16. Nonlinear dynamics exploration through normal forms

    CERN Document Server

    Kahn, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students, this exposition covers the method of normal forms and its application to ordinary differential equations through perturbation analysis. In addition to its emphasis on the freedom inherent in the normal form expansion, the text features numerous examples of equations, the kind of which are encountered in many areas of science and engineering. The treatment begins with an introduction to the basic concepts underlying the normal forms. Coverage then shifts to an investigation of systems with one degree of freedom that model oscillations

  17. Payments to normal healthy volunteers in phase 1 trials: avoiding undue influence while distributing fairly the burdens of research participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Ana S

    2009-02-01

    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups for participation in phase 1 studies. Investigators are at risk of routinely failing to fulfill the obligation of justice, which prohibits the systematic targeting and recruiting of subjects for reasons unrelated to the nature of the study. Insofar as we take seriously the obligation to engage in just subject recruitment and selection, I argue that we must acknowledge the implications low payments might have for subject recruitment and selection and examine the effect of low payments. If low payments de facto target the less well-off for phase 1 studies, we must defend the priority ranking of the obligation to avoid undue influence over the obligation of justice or adopt an alternative recruitment approach. This paper identifies a number of alternatives to the current system of low-value payments to research participants.

  18. Pharmacokinetics and steady-state bioequivalence of treprostinil sodium (Remodulin) administered by the intravenous and subcutaneous route to normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Kevin; Arneson, Carl; Jeffs, Roger; Hunt, Thomas; Wade, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Treprostinil sodium is a chemically stable analogue of prostacyclin administered as a chronic, continuous subcutaneous infusion for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). There has been significant clinical interest in determining the feasibility of delivering treprostinil by intravenous infusion. Therefore, a bioequivalence and comparative pharmacokinetics study of the two routes of administration was conducted in normal volunteers. A randomized, two-period, crossover study design was employed. Each subject was dosed at 10 ng/kg/min for 72 hours by each route, with the infusions separated by a 4-day wash-out period. In the 51 subjects who received at least 24 hours of treprostinil administered subcutaneously and intravenously, the steady-state ratios of the geometric means (i.v./s.c.) and 90% confidence intervals for AUCss and Cmaxss were 92.9% (89.8-96.1%) and 106% (99.4-113%), respectively. Secondary pharmacokinetic assessments confirmed the comparability of the two routes of administration at steady state, and also demonstrated that the elimination half-life of treprostinil was 4.4 and 4.6 hours following intravenous and subcutaneous administration, respectively. Based on these findings it was concluded that intravenously and subcutaneously administered treprostinil are bioequivalent at steady state.

  19. Leptin promoter gene polymorphism on -2549 position decreases plasma leptin and increases appetite in normal weight volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Bragança Coelho

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Investigate whether polymorphism in the promoter region encoding leptin and leptin receptor gene, in normal weight individuals, affects hormonal and appetite responses to peanuts.Materials and methods: Appetite, anthropometric indices, body composition, physical activity, dietary intake and leptin, ghrelin and insulin levels were monitored. Polymorphism analyses were also carried out.Results: None of the treatments led to statistical differences in the analyzed hormones. No polymorphism was found for leptin receptor gene, while for leptin gene, 50% of the volunteers presented one polymorphic allele and 13% presented both polymorphic alleles. These last ones presented lower body fat mass, leptin and ghrelin plasma concentrations, and fullness rates. They also presented higher hunger, desire to eat, and desire to eat sweet and salty foods.Conclusions: Peanut did not affect appetite and presented no different hormonal responses, compared to other foods studied. Polymorphic allele carriers in both alleles presented higher probability to develop obesity. However, the magnitude of this probability could not be measured.

  20. Dynamic model of normal behavior of rock fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Wen-yi; KONG Guang-ya; CAI Jun-gang

    2005-01-01

    Based on laboratory tests of artificial fractures in mortar material, established the dynamic constitutive model of normal behaviour of rock fracture,. The tests were systematically conducted under quasi-static and dynamic monotonic loading conditions. The fractures were of different numbers of asperities in contact and were subsequently of different initial contact areas, which imitated the natural rock fractures. The rate of compressive load applied normal to the fractures covers a wide range from 10-1 MPa/s (quasi-static) up to 103 MPa/s (highly dynamic). The normal stress-closure responses of fractures were measured for different loading rates. Based on the stress-closure relation curves measured, a nonlinear (hyperbolic) dynamic model of fracture, normal behaviour, termed as dynamic BB model, was proposed, which was modified from the existing BB model of static normal behaviour of fractures by taking into account the effect of loading rate.

  1. DYNAMIC BAYESIAN MODEL FOR A TRUNCATED NORMAL

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Nesta tese desenvolvemos um Modelo Dinâmico Bayesiano para a densidade Normal Truncada. A estimação clássica e estática de observações desta densidade foi desenvolvida por A.C. Cohen nas décadas de 1950 e 1960, enquanto R. C. Souza apresentou, em 1978, um modelo dinâmico Bayesiano para esta densidade, no qual utilizava idéias da Teoria de Informação. O presente trabalho estende a formulação dinâmica Bayesiana de West, Harrinson e Migon por tratar de observações...

  2. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of a long-acting formulation of the new somatostatin analogue, lanreotide, in normal healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, J M; Legrand, A; Ruiz, J M; Obach, R; De Ronzan, J; Thomas, F

    1994-01-01

    1. The aims of the study were to assess the pharmacokinetic parameters and the hormonal effects of the slow-release formulation of the somatostatin analogue (SR-L) in normal male volunteers. 2. Eight healthy males were studied. For the determination of basal values blood was sampled before the injection of vehicle and then every other hour for 8 h in order to measure plasma GH, prolactin (PRL), TSH, free thyroxin (fT4), insulin and glucagon levels. Plasma insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were measured on a single sample. On day 1 of the study, 30 mg SR-L was administered intramuscularly. Blood was drawn just before injection and then every other hour for a period of 8 h. Thereafter, blood was sampled three times a week for 3 weeks in order to measure lanreotide, IGF-1, TSH, fT4 and PRL concentrations. Plasma GH was determined on days 6 and 11 of the study. 3. Plasma lanreotide concentrations rose to 38.3 +/- 4.1 ng ml-1 2 h following injection. The levels then progressively decreased, remaining above 1.5 ng ml-1 until day 11 and reaching 0.92 +/- 0.28 ng ml-1 2 weeks after injection. The apparent plasma half-life and mean residence time were 4.52 +/- 0.50 and 5.48 +/- 0.51 days respectively. 4. By comparison with the control day, plasma insulin concentrations only decreased 2 h following injection, whereas plasma glucagon did not change at any time. 5. Plasma TSH concentrations were significantly (P < 0.01) reduced from 2 h to day 4 following SR-L injection.2+ ' PMID:7826822

  3. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction of normal bone marrow and diffuse bone marrow disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsuya, Tomoo; Inoue, Tomio; Ishizaka, Hiroshi; Aoki, Jun; Endo, Keigo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    vs. 7.13{+-}1.74 %/min, p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference in the washout rate among patients with MDS, CML, polycythemia vera, and normal volunteers. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the water fraction provides additional valuable qualitative information about structural changes of the hematopoietic element. (author)

  4. Volunteering leads to rock-paper-scissors dynamics in a public goods game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmann, Dirk; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Milinski, Manfred

    2003-09-01

    Collective efforts are a trademark of both insect and human societies. They are achieved through relatedness in the former and unknown mechanisms in the latter. The problem of achieving cooperation among non-kin has been described as the `tragedy of the commons', prophesying the inescapable collapse of many human enterprises. In public goods experiments, initial cooperation usually drops quickly to almost zero. It can be maintained by the opportunity to punish defectors or the need to maintain good reputation. Both schemes require that defectors are identified. Theorists propose that a simple but effective mechanism operates under full anonymity. With optional participation in the public goods game, `loners' (players who do not join the group), defectors and cooperators will coexist through rock-paper-scissors dynamics. Here we show experimentally that volunteering generates these dynamics in public goods games and that manipulating initial conditions can produce each predicted direction. If, by manipulating displayed decisions, it is pretended that defectors have the highest frequency, loners soon become most frequent, as do cooperators after loners and defectors after cooperators. On average, cooperation is perpetuated at a substantial level.

  5. Dynamical systems on a Riemannian manifold that admit normal shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boldin, A.Yu.; Dmitrieva, V.V.; Safin, S.S.; Sharipov, R.A. [Bashkir State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01

    Newtonian dynamical systems that admit normal shift on an arbitrary Riemannian manifold are considered. The determining equations for these systems, which constitute the condition of weak normality, are derived. The extension of the algebra of tensor fields to manifolds is considered.

  6. Gastric potential difference and pH in ulcer patients and normal volunteers during Stroop's colour word conflict test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bendtsen, Flemming

    1989-01-01

    . The volunteers fell into two groups: In seven no sympathetic activation was elicited as no changes in heart rate were demonstrated. Gastric pH was unchanged, and PD increased slightly. Sympathetic activation was elicited in the other six with increased heart rate by 18 (6) beats per min. Potential difference...... declined significantly during sympathetic activation (delta PD = -5 (2)mV, p less than 0.05). Gastric pH increased. Eleven of 12 ulcer patients had sympathetic activation accompanied by a decline in PD, and an increased pH. Sympathetic activation in ulcer patients and volunteers impaired gastric mucosal...

  7. Positive explorers: modeling dynamic control in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian D; Osman, Magda

    2017-01-01

    Situations in which there are multiple changes occurring all at once and which demand complex decisions to be made are common throughout life, but little is known about how normal aging influences performance on these types of scenarios. To determine performance differences associated with normal aging, we test older and younger adults in a dynamic control task. The task involves the control of a single output variable over time via multiple and uncertain input controls. The Single Limited Input, Dynamic Exploratory Responses (SLIDER) computational model, is implemented to determine the behavioral characteristics associated with normal aging in a dynamic control task. Model-based analysis demonstrates a unique performance signature profile associated with normal aging. Specifically, older adults exhibit a positivity effect in which they are more influenced by positively valenced feedback, congruent with previous research, as well as enhanced exploratory behavior.

  8. Gastric potential difference and pH in ulcer patients and normal volunteers during Stroop's colour word conflict test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bendtsen, Flemming

    1989-01-01

    mucosal electrical potential difference (PD). In 13 healthy volunteers and 12 duodenal ulcer patients gastric PD, pH, and heart rate were measured continuously during basal conditions, during mental stress evoked by the Stroop's colour word conflict test, and after return to basal conditions...... declined significantly during sympathetic activation (delta PD = -5 (2)mV, p less than 0.05). Gastric pH increased. Eleven of 12 ulcer patients had sympathetic activation accompanied by a decline in PD, and an increased pH. Sympathetic activation in ulcer patients and volunteers impaired gastric mucosal......Whether mental stress is important in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders is not clearly established. This study investigated the relationship between sympathetic activation caused by the Stroop's colour word conflict test and gastric mucosal function, monitored by measuring the gastric...

  9. Gastric potential difference and pH in ulcer patients and normal volunteers during Stroop's colour word conflict test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, L; Bendtsen, Flemming

    1989-01-01

    Whether mental stress is important in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal disorders is not clearly established. This study investigated the relationship between sympathetic activation caused by the Stroop's colour word conflict test and gastric mucosal function, monitored by measuring the gastric...... mucosal electrical potential difference (PD). In 13 healthy volunteers and 12 duodenal ulcer patients gastric PD, pH, and heart rate were measured continuously during basal conditions, during mental stress evoked by the Stroop's colour word conflict test, and after return to basal conditions...

  10. Robust adaptive output stabilization using dynamic normalizing signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixia SU; Xuejun XIE; Haikuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    For a class of nonlinear systems with dynamic uncertainties,robust adaptive stabilization problem is considered in this paper.Firstly,by introducing an observer,an augmented system is obtained.Based on the system,we construct an exp-ISpS Lyapunov function for the unmodeled dynamics,prove that the unmodeled dynamics is exp-ISpS,and then obtain a dynamic normalizing signal to counteract the dynamic disturbances.By the backstepping technique,an adaptive controller is given,it is proved that all the signals in the adaptive control system are globally uniformly ultimately bounded,and the output can be regulated to the origin with any prescribed accuracy.A simulation example further demonstrates the efficiency of the control scheme.

  11. Assessment of doxylamine influence on mixed function oxidase activity upon multiple dose oral administration to normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G A; St Peter, J V; Heise, M A; Horowitz, Z D; Salyers, G C; Charles, T T; Brezovic, C; Russell, D A; Skare, J A; Powell, J H

    1996-11-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of doxylamine and phenobarbital on antipyrine/metabolites pharmacokinetics and 6 beta-hydroxycortisol urinary excretion. This study was conducted in 48 healthy male human volunteers (16 per treatment group) using a parallel study design. Treatment groups consisted of 12.5 mg of doxylamine succinate, placebo, or 30 mg of phenobarbital administered orally every 6 h for 17 days. Results indicate that no statistically significant differences were observed between the doxylamine and placebo groups that are indicative of enzyme induction. For the phenobarbital group, a significant increase for antipyrine total (36 versus 45 mL/h/kg) and nonrenal (35 versus 44 mL/h/kg) clearances and 6 beta-hydroxycortisol excretion (338 versus 529 micrograms) and a significant decrease in the terminal exponential half-life (11 versus 9 h) of antipyrine were observed.

  12. Quasi-Normal Modes from Non-Commutative Matrix Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aprile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We explore the connection between the process of relaxation in the BMN matrix model and the physics of black holes in AdS/CFT. Focusing on Dyson-fluid solutions of the matrix model, we perform numerical simulations of the real time dynamics of the system. By quenching the equilibrium distribution we study the quasi-normal oscillations of scalar single trace observables, we isolate the lowest quasi-normal mode, and we determine its frequencies as function of the energy. Considering the BMN matrix model as a truncation of $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM, we also compute the frequencies of the quasi-normal modes of the dual scalar fields in the AdS$_5$-Schwarzschild background. We compare the results of the black hole and the classical Dyson fluid, and we point out a correspondence between the two descriptions.

  13. Hard sphere dynamics for normal and granular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James W; Baskaran, Aparna

    2005-06-01

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collision) and granular (inelastic collision) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so that the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics system is identified in a special stationary representation. This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  14. Dynamic CT in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horibe, Kunio; Akagi, Katsuhito; Go, Junto; Kohmura, Eiji; Yamazaki, Mami

    1984-11-01

    In order to elucidate the cerebral circulation before and after shunt in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus(NPH), a comparative study of 12 cases was performed using dynamic CT. In the effective shunt group, blood flow in the frontal gray matter and PVL was improved. The improvement in PVL was particularly marked. On the other hand, in the non-effective group, blood flow in the frontal gray matter was reduced compared with that before operation. In regard to predicting the effectiveness of the shunt from the features of preoperative dynamic CT study in NPH, it is suggested that blood flow in the frontal gray matter was lower in the effective shunt group than in the non-effective group. This cerebral circulation study using dynamic CT, which can be easily manipulated, is non-invasive, and is thought to be a useful method when highly reproducible parameters are chosen. (Author).

  15. Test-retest variability of multifocal electroretinography in normal volunteers and short-term variability in hydroxychloroquine users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Browning DJ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available David J Browning,1 Chong Lee2 1Charlotte Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Associates, 2University of North Carolina – Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, USA Purpose: To determine measurement variability of N1P1 amplitudes and the R1/R2 ratio in normal subjects and hydroxychloroquine users without retinopathy. Design: Retrospective, observational study. Subjects: Normal subjects (n=21 and 44 patients taking hydroxychloroquine (n=44 without retinopathy. Methods: Multifocal electroretinography (mfERG was performed twice in one session in the 21 normal subjects and twice within 1 year in the hydroxychloroquine users, during which time no clinical change in macular status occurred. Main outcome measures: N1P1 amplitudes of rings R1–R5, the R1/R2 ratio, and coefficients of repeatability (COR for these measurements. Results: Values for N1P1 amplitudes in hydroxychloroquine users were reduced compared with normal subjects by the known effect of age, but R1/R2 was not affected by age. The COR for R1–R5 ranged from 43% to 52% for normal subjects and from 43% to 59% for hydroxychloroquine users; for R1/R2 the COR was 29% in normal subjects and 45% in hydroxychloroquine users. Conclusion: mfERG measurements show high test-retest variability, limiting the ability of a single mfERG test to influence a decision to stop hydroxychloroquine; corroborative evidence with a different ancillary test is recommended in a suspicious case. Keywords: multifocal electroretinography, hydroxychloroquine, test-retest variability 

  16. Cardiac MRI. Estimation of changes in normalized myocardial gadolinium accumulation over time after contrast injection in patients with acute myocarditis and healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuckmann, F.; Buhr, C. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine II; Maderwald, S. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Erwin L. Hahn Inst. for Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Bruder, O. [Elisabeth Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology and Angiology; Schlosser, T.; Nassenstein, K. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology; Erbel, R. [University Hospital Essen (Germany). West German Heart Center Essen; Barkhausen, J. [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2011-10-15

    An increased normalized gadolinium accumulation (NGA) in the myocardium during early washout has been used for the diagnosis of acute myocarditis (AM). Due to the fact that the pharmacokinetics of contrast agents are complex, time-related changes in NGA after contrast injection are likely. Because knowledge about time-related changes of NGA may improve the diagnostic accuracy of MR, our study aimed to estimate the time course of NGA after contrast injection in patients as well as in healthy volunteers. An ECG-triggered inversion recovery SSFP sequence with incrementally increasing inversion times was repetitively acquired over the 15 minutes after injection of 0.2 Gd-DTPA per kg body weight in a 4-chamber view in 15 patients with AM and 20 volunteers. The T 1relaxation times and the longitudinal relaxation rates (R1) of the myocardium and skeletal musculature were calculated for each point in time after contrast injection. The time course of NGA was estimated based on the linear relationship between R 1 and tissue Gd concentration. NGA decreased over time in the form of a negative power function in patients with AM and in healthy controls. NGA in AM tended to be higher than in controls (p > 0.05). NGA rapidly changes after contrast injection, which must be considered when measuring NGA. Although we observed a trend towards higher NGA values in patients with AM with a maximum difference one minute after contrast injection, NGA did not allow us to differentiate patients with AM from healthy volunteers, because the observed differences did not reach a level of significance. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage in the knee. Evaluation of 3D-fat-saturation FLASH sequence in normal volunteer and patient with osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Katsuhiko [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-07-01

    MR imaging of normal and abnormal articular cartilage of the knee was performed using 3D-fat-saturation FLASH sequence (FSF). Contrast-to-noise ratios between the cartilage and fluid, and cartilage and bone marrow were evaluated respectively in 10 normal volunteers. The optimal imaging parameters were determined as flip angle of 40deg and TE of 10 ms. Good correlation was noted between MR images and macroscopic appearance of the hyaline cartilages in the cadaver knees. Comparison of MR and radiographic findings was made in 39 cases of osteoarthritis. MR was significantly more sensitive than radiography in detecting cartilage abnormalities. In patient with radiographically normal joint spaces, cartilage abnormality was detected by MRI in the medial compartment of 13 cases and the lateral compartment of 19 cases. Signal intensity of joint effusion was sufficiently suppressed and did not hamper evaluation of the cartilages. FSF method was considered as a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of cartilage abnormalities of the knee. (author)

  18. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, Leonid V.; Zakharova, Anna N.; Kabachkova, Anastasia V.; Kironenko, Tatyana A.; Orlov, Sergei N.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  19. Dynamic and Static Exercises Differentially Affect Plasma Cytokine Content in Elite Endurance- and Strength-Trained Athletes and Untrained Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilevich, Leonid V; Zakharova, Anna N; Kabachkova, Anastasia V; Kironenko, Tatyana A; Orlov, Sergei N

    2017-01-01

    Extensive exercise increases the plasma content of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and several other cytokines via their augmented transcription in skeletal muscle cells. However, the relative impact of aerobic and resistant training interventions on cytokine production remains poorly defined. In this study, we compared effects of dynamic and static load on cytokine plasma content in elite strength- and endurance-trained athletes vs. healthy untrained volunteers. The plasma cytokine content was measured before, immediately after, and 30 min post-exercise using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pedaling on a bicycle ergometer increased IL-6 and IL-8 content in the plasma of trained athletes by about 4- and 2-fold, respectively. In contrast to dynamic load, weightlifting had negligible impact on these parameters in strength exercise-trained athletes. Unlike IL-6 and IL-8, dynamic exercise had no impact on IL-15 and LIF, whereas static load increases the content of these cytokines by ~50%. Two-fold increment of IL-8 content seen in athletes subjected to dynamic exercise was absent in untrained individuals, whereas the ~50% increase in IL-15 triggered by static load in the plasma of weightlifting athletes was not registered in the control group. Thus, our results show the distinct impact of static and dynamic exercises on cytokine content in the plasma of trained athletes. They also demonstrate that both types of exercises differentially affect cytokine content in plasma of athletes and untrained persons.

  20. A randomized control trial of the effect of yoga on Gunas (personality and Health in normal healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Sudheer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To study the efficacy of yoga on Guna (yogic personality measure and general health in normal adults. Methods : Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects aged 18-71 years, of both sexes, who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. The Yoga(Y group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas , pranayama , meditation, notional correction and devotional sessions. The control group practised mild to moderate physical exercises (PE. Both groups had supervised practice sessions (by trained experts for one hour daily, six days a week for eight weeks. Guna (yogic personality was assessed before and after eight weeks using the self-administered Vedic Personality Inventory (VPI which assesses Sattva (gentle and controlled, Rajas (violent and uncontrolled and Tamas (dull and uncontrolled. The general health status (total health, which includes four domains namely somatic symptoms (SS, anxiety and insomnia (AI, social dysfunction (SF and severe depression (SP, was assessed using a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. Results : Baseline scores for all the domains for both the groups did not differ significantly ( P > 0.05, independent samples t test. Sattva showed a significant difference within the groups and the effect size was more in the Y than in the PE group. Rajas showed a significant decrease within and between the groups with a higher effect size in the PE group. Tamas showed significant reduction within the PE group only. The GHQ revealed that there was significant decrease in SS, AI, SF and SP in both Y and PE groups (Wilcoxcon Singed Rank t test. SS showed a significant difference between the groups (Mann Whitney U Test. Conclusions : There was an improvement in Sattva in both the Yoga and control groups with a trend of higher effect size in Yoga; Rajas reduced in both but significantly better in PE than

  1. A randomized control trial of the effect of yoga on Gunas (personality and Health in normal healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Sudheer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the efficacy of yoga on Guna (yogic personality measure and general health in normal adults. Methods: Of the 1228 persons who attended introductory lectures, 226 subjects aged 18-71 years, of both sexes, who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria and who consented to participate in the study were randomly allocated into two groups. The Yoga(Y group practised an integrated yoga module that included asanas , pranayama , meditation, notional correction and devotional sessions. The control group practised mild to moderate physical exercises (PE. Both groups had supervised practice sessions (by trained experts for one hour daily, six days a week for eight weeks. Guna (yogic personality was assessed before and after eight weeks using the self-administered Vedic Personality Inventory (VPI which assesses Sattva (gentle and controlled, Rajas (violent and uncontrolled and Tamas (dull and uncontrolled. The general health status (total health, which includes four domains namely somatic symptoms (SS, anxiety and insomnia (AI, social dysfunction (SF and severe depression (SP, was assessed using a General Health Questionnaire (GHQ. Results: Baseline scores for all the domains for both the groups did not differ significantly ( P > 0.05, independent samples t test. Sattva showed a significant difference within the groups and the effect size was more in the Y than in the PE group. Rajas showed a significant decrease within and between the groups with a higher effect size in the PE group. Tamas showed significant reduction within the PE group only. The GHQ revealed that there was significant decrease in SS, AI, SF and SP in both Y and PE groups (Wilcoxcon Singed Rank t test. SS showed a significant difference between the groups (Mann Whitney U Test. Conclusions: There was an improvement in Sattva in both the Yoga and control groups with a trend of higher effect size in Yoga; Rajas reduced in both but significantly better in PE than in

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid production and dynamics in normal aging: a MRI phase-mapping study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) phase mapping was used for non-invasive evaluation of the to-and-fro motion of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cerebral aqueduct, and to measure the supratentorial CSF production in vivo, in 13 healthy volunteers to determine whether normal aging affects...... these parameters. Eight young healthy volunteers (mean age 29.8 years) and five elderly healthy volunteers (mean age 69.0 years) were examined, all were normal on conventional MRI. Slightly higher aqueductal CSF peak flow velocities and peak volume flow in both the caudal and rostral directions were found...... in fact occurs at this relatively high rate. Our study further suggests that the differences found in human CSF production rates are caused by interindividual factors other than age....

  3. Entanglement Dynamics in Typical Local- and Normal-Mode Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Xi-Wen; WAN Ming-Fang; MA Zhong-Qi

    2007-01-01

    The entanglement dynamics of two stretching vibrations in theoretically typical local- and normal-mode molecules and realistic molecules H2O and SO2 in an algebraic model is studied in terms of the reduced-density linear entropy with initial entangled states taken to be two-mode squeezed vacuum states. It is shown that the behaviour of the entropy in theoretically typical molecules appears to be more regular than that in realistic ones, and that the entropy becomes irregular as the amplitude of two-mode squeezed vacuum states increases. For initial states with a small amplitude, it is demonstrated that the periodicity and the "classical" beat phenomenon of the entropy occur with the beat in theoretically typical molecules being more regular than that in realistic molecules H2O and SO2.

  4. Sensory dynamics of visual hallucinations in the normal population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Joel; Chiou, Rocco; Rogers, Sebastian; Wicken, Marcus; Heitmann, Stewart; Ermentrout, Bard

    2016-01-01

    Hallucinations occur in both normal and clinical populations. Due to their unpredictability and complexity, the mechanisms underlying hallucinations remain largely untested. Here we show that visual hallucinations can be induced in the normal population by visual flicker, limited to an annulus that constricts content complexity to simple moving grey blobs, allowing objective mechanistic investigation. Hallucination strength peaked at ~11 Hz flicker and was dependent on cortical processing. Hallucinated motion speed increased with flicker rate, when mapped onto visual cortex it was independent of eccentricity, underwent local sensory adaptation and showed the same bistable and mnemonic dynamics as sensory perception. A neural field model with motion selectivity provides a mechanism for both hallucinations and perception. Our results demonstrate that hallucinations can be studied objectively, and they share multiple mechanisms with sensory perception. We anticipate that this assay will be critical to test theories of human consciousness and clinical models of hallucination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17072.001 PMID:27726845

  5. Dynamic displacement of normal and detached semicircular canal cupula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbitt, Richard D; Breneman, Kathryn D; King, Curtis; Yamauchi, Angela M; Boyle, Richard; Highstein, Stephen M

    2009-12-01

    The dynamic displacement of the semicircular canal cupula and modulation of afferent nerve discharge were measured simultaneously in response to physiological stimuli in vivo. The adaptation time constant(s) of normal cupulae in response to step stimuli averaged 36 s, corresponding to a mechanical lower corner frequency for sinusoidal stimuli of 0.0044 Hz. For stimuli equivalent to 40-200 deg/s of angular head velocity, the displacement gain of the central region of the cupula averaged 53 nm per deg/s. Afferents adapted more rapidly than the cupula, demonstrating the presence of a relaxation process that contributes significantly to the neural representation of angular head motions by the discharge patterns of canal afferent neurons. We also investigated changes in time constants of the cupula and afferents following detachment of the cupula at its apex-mechanical detachment that occurs in response to excessive transcupular endolymph pressure. Detached cupulae exhibited sharply reduced adaptation time constants (300 ms-3 s, n = 3) and can be explained by endolymph flowing rapidly over the apex of the cupula. Partially detached cupulae reattached and normal afferent discharge patterns were recovered 5-7 h following detachment. This regeneration process may have relevance to the recovery of semicircular canal function following head trauma.

  6. Trigeminal neuralgia: how often are trigeminal nerve-vessel contacts found by MRI in normal volunteers; Trigeminusneuralgie: Wie haeufig gibt es einen Gefaess-Nerven-Kontakt bei schmerzfreien Probanden?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, B.; Schindler, M.; Haehnel, S.; Sartor, K. [Abt. Neuroradiologie, Neurologische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V. [Neurochirurgische Klinik, Universitaetsklinik Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess prospectively how often contacts are found between the trigeminal nerve and arteries or veins in the perimesencephalic cistern via MRI in normal volunteers. Materials and methods: 48 volunteers without a history of trigeminal neuralgia were examined prospectively (MRI at 1.5T; T2-CISS sequence, coronal orientation, 0.9 mm slice thickness). Two radiologists decided by consensus whether there was a nerve-vessel contact in the perimesencephalic cistern. Results: In 27% of the volunteers, no contact was found between the trigeminal nerve and regional vessels, while in 73%, such a contact was present. In 61% of the cases, the offending vessel was an artery, in 39%, it was a vein. In 2 volunteers, a deformation of the nerve was noted. Conclusion: Contrary to what has been suggested by retrospective studies, the majority of normal volunteers, if studied prospectively, do show a contact between the trigeminal nerve and local vessels. A close proximity between the nerve and regional vessels is thus normal and is not necessarily proof of a pathological nerve-vessel conflict. (orig.)

  7. Effects of dynamic exercise on plasma arachidonic acid epoxides and diols in human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Rose M; Newman, John W; Pedersen, Theresa L; Ramos, Marisa I; Stebbins, Charles L

    2011-12-01

    Metabolites of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathway may contribute to vasodilation of the vasculature. However, it is not known whether exercise affects their circulating concentrations. The authors determined effects of exercise intensity and duration on plasma concentrations of epoxy and dihydroxy metabolites of arachidonic acid. Their goal was to delineate the threshold workload, optimal workload, and duration required to produce increases in plasma concentrations of these vasoactive substances. Healthy volunteers (N = 14) performed maximal exercise testing on a bicycle ergometer during Visit 1. On separate days, subjects cycled for 20 min at 30%, 60%, and 80% of their maximal exercise intensity. The last day consisted of 40 min of exercise at 60% of maximal exercise intensity. Venous blood was obtained before, during, and after exercise for analysis. Compared with rest, increases were observed during the 80% workload at 20 min postexercise -14,15-DHET (0.77 ± 0.21 vs. 0.93 ± 0.27 nM) - and at 2 min postexercise: 11,12-DHET (0.64 ± 0.22 vs. 0.71 ± 0.24 nM; p < .05). Also compared with rest, 40-min values during the 60% workload were 14,15-DHET 0.79 ± 0.22 vs. 0.91 ± 0.31 nM and at 2 min post 14,15 EET 0.12 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.16 nM (p < .05). Results suggest the CYP metabolites (i.e., DHETs) are released during short-term high-intensity and long-term moderate-intensity exercise.

  8. Effects of ticlopidine or ticlopidine plus aspirin on platelet aggregation and ATP release in normal volunteers: why aspirin improves ticlopidine antiplatelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, R; Scazziota, A; Rouvier, J; Gonzalez, C

    1999-10-01

    Aspirin and ticlopidine are used to prevent arterial thrombosis. In some clinical settings ticlopidine is administered with aspirin for improving antithrombotic effect. We administered aspirin (100 mg/day), ticlopidine (500 mg/day), or ticlopidine and aspirin for 7 days to healthy volunteers. Platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by sodium arachidonate, ADP, or a combination of both were measured. Sodium arachidonate (0.25 mmol/L), which produces no platelet aggregation, combined with adenosine diphosphate (1 mumol/L), which produced a reversible platelet aggregation of 20% after ticlopidine, resulted in a synergistic platelet aggregation response in normal (74.6 +/- 9.2%) and in ticlopidine platelet-rich plasma (59.1% +/- 14.9%, p < 0.0001). Synergism after sodium arachidonate (0.75 mmol/L) plus adenosine diphosphate (4 mumol/L) fell from 75.8% +/- 11.0% and 59.1% +/- 15.6% after ticlopidine or aspirin, respectively, to 14.8% +/- 18.0% (p < 0.0001) after ticlopidine plus aspirin. Aspirin and ticlopidine alone did not inhibit adenosine triphosphate release as thoroughly as did aspirin plus ticlopidine. Aspirin or ticlopidine does not adequately prevent platelet activity as ticlopidine plus aspirin do. Addition of aspirin to treatment with ticlopidine improves their antiplatelet activity and better results could be obtained in arterial thrombotic prevention strategies.

  9. Dynamic CT study of normal-pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Norihiko; Kojima, Noriaki; Shirakuni, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1984-08-01

    A dynamic CT study was performed in 14 patients with presumed normal-pressure hydrocephalus, of which diagnosis had been made by clinical symptomatology, CT findings, the results of the continuous monitoring of intracranial pressure, and CT cisternographic findings. It is demonstrated by serial CT scans that the cerebral arteries and arterioles were initially filled with contrast media, which were followed by the symmetrical and homogeneous staining of the cortical gray matter and basal ganglia, the diencephalia, and then the white matter. The venous system was stained in the late phase. The contrast media was finally cleared out from the intracranial space. Thus, the staining of the cerebral vessels and brain parenchym showed a uniform pattern in all cases. Functional CT images revealed that the patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus who responded well to the shunt procedure had areas of prolonged mean circulation time scattered diffusely not only in the paraventricular structures, but also in the cortical gray matter of all the cerebral hemispheres. Following the shunt procedure, the hemodynamic conditions improved in almost all the areas mentioned above, but especially in the frontal and temporal gray matters and the paraventricular structures. In the patients who did not benefit from the shunt operation, however, there was no special abnormality of hemodynamic distribution. The analysis of the mean circulation time in the region of interest demonstrated that a significant improvement in cerebral hemodynamics was noted in the regions of the frontal and temporal gray matters, the periventricular white matter, and the caudate nucleus in patients who benefitted from the shunt operation. In patients who did not improve after the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, however, there was no statistically significant difference between pre- and post-shunt mean circulation times. (J.P.N.).

  10. Assessment of pulmonary dynamics in normal newborns: a pneumotachographic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estol, P; Píriz, H; Pintos, L; Nieto, F; Simini, F

    1988-01-01

    A pneumotachographic method for assessment of pulmonary dynamics in critically ill newborns in an intensive care setting was developed in our laboratory. Before the results obtained with this method could be applied, the normal range of values were determined in 48 normal term and preterm newborns. Their body weight ranged between 1200 and 4100 g, and postnatal ages between 24 hours and 21 days. In three infants, two determinations were performed after an interval of 7 days. The studies were performed with a pneumotachograph applied to the upper airway by means of an inflatable face mask or latex nasal prongs. The air flow signal was electronically integrated to time to produce a volume signal. Airway pressure was determined proximal to the pneumotachograph. Esophageal pressure was determined with a water filled catheter placed in the lower third of the esophague. Tidal volume (VT), minute ventilation (V), Dynamic compliance (Cdyn), total pulmonary resistance (R), total pulmonary work (Wt), Elastic work (We), and flow resistive work (Wv), were determined. A significant linear correlation was found between Cdyn and body weight (r = 0.50, p less than 0.01) whereas no significative correlation was found between body weight and VT, V or R. Values for VT, V and Cdyn were corrected for body weight and means (X), standard deviation (SD) so as 10th and 90th percentiles are shown in table III. X, SD and percentiles for R were shown in table III. Wt, We and Wv were corrected for V, and X, SD and percentiles shown in table III. Values of VT/Kg, Cdyn/Kg and R are similar to those found by other authors with pneumotachography and plethysmography. The V/Kg values obtained by us were higher than those reported by other authors, which together with the lack of correlation of VT and V with body weight, question the reliability of V values in our study. This could be explained by: 1) excessive increase in dead space in cases in which a face mask was used; 2) nocioceptive stimulus

  11. Lipopolysaccharide infusion enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation without affecting cerebral oxygen vasoreactivity in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Mg; Plovsing, Ronni R; Evans, Kevin A;

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis may be associated with disturbances in cerebral oxygen transport and cerebral haemodynamic function, thus rendering the brain particularly susceptible to hypoxia. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of isocapnic hypoxia and hyperoxia on dynamic cerebral autoregulation...... in a human-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during the early stages of sepsis....

  12. Evaluating automated dynamic contrast enhanced wrist 3 T MRI in healthy volunteers: One-year longitudinal observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastogi, Anshul, E-mail: anshul.rastogi@bartshealth.nhs.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Kubassova, Olga, E-mail: olga@imageanalysis.org.uk [Image Analysis, Leeds (United Kingdom); Krasnosselskaia, Lada V., E-mail: solaguz@yahoo.com [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Lim, Adrian K.P., E-mail: a.lim@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Satchithananda, Keshthra, E-mail: keshthra.satchithananda@imperial.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boesen, Mikael, E-mail: mikael.boesen@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg and Bispebjerg Hospitals (Denmark); Binks, Michael, E-mail: michael.h.binks@gsk.com [GlaxoSmithKline, Stevenage, SG1 2NY (United Kingdom); Hajnal, Joseph V., E-mail: jo.hajnal@kcl.ac.uk [Imaging Sciences Department, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); Taylor, Peter C., E-mail: peter.taylor@kennedy.ox.ac.uk [Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Rational and Objective: Dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI has great potential to provide quantitative measure of inflammatory activity in rheumatoid arthritis. There is no current benchmark to establish the stability of signal in the joints of healthy subjects when imaged with DCE-MRI longitudinally, which is crucial so as to differentiate changes induced by treatment from the inherent variability of perfusion measures. The objective of this study was to test a pixel-by-pixel parametric map based approach for analysis of DCE-MRI (Dynamika) and to investigate the variability in signal characteristics over time in healthy controls using longitudinally acquired images. Materials and Methods: 10 healthy volunteers enrolled, dominant wrists were imaged with contrast enhanced 3T MRI at baseline, week 12, 24 and 52 and scored with RAMRIS, DCE-MRI was analysed using a novel quantification parametric map based approach. Radiographs were obtained at baseline and week 52 and scored using modified Sharp van der Heidje method. RAMRIS scores and dynamic MRI measures were correlated. Results: No erosions were seen on radiographs, whereas MRI showed erosion-like changes, low grade bone marrow oedema and low-moderate synovial enhancement. The DCE-MRI parameters were stable (baseline scores, variability) (mean ± st.dev); in whole wrist analysis, ME{sub mean} (1.3 ± 0.07, −0.08 ± 0.1 at week 24) and IRE{sub mean} (0.008 ± 0.004, −0.002 ± 0.005 at week 12 and 24). In the rough wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.07, 0.04 ± 0.02 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0006 ± 0.0009 at week 52) and precise wrist ROI, ME{sub mean} (1.2 ± 0.09, 0.04 ± 0.04 at week 52) and IRE{sub mean} (0.001 ± 0.0008, 0.0008 ± 0.001 at week 24 and 52). The Dynamic parameters obtained using fully automated analysis demonstrated strong, statistically significant correlations with RAMRIS synovitis scores. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that contrast enhancement does occur in

  13. Enantioselective effects of levodropropizine and dropropizine on psychomotor functions in normal volunteers: a placebo-controlled, double-blind comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, G; Barzaghi, N; Dominijanni, R; Cordaro, C; Perucca, E

    1993-01-01

    Levodropropizine is the l-isomer of dropropizine, a racemic drug widely used as a cough suppressant. Compared with the racemate, levodropropizine retains equal antitussive activity but exhibits considerably lower central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects in animal models. In order to assess whether the same differential pharmacodynamic profile also applies to man, a double-blind placebo-controlled study was carried out to investigate the effects of single oral doses (60 and 120 mg) of levodropropizine and dropropizine on subjective alertness (scored on visual analogue scales), general tolerability and psychomotor function tests (cancellation, tapping, choice reaction times and critical flicker fusion frequency) in ten normal volunteers. Treatments were administered in random sequence at intervals of at least one week, evaluation procedures being carried out at times 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 h after dosing. Following intake of a 60 mg levodropizine dose, subjective effects and objective estimates of psychomotor function were superimposable to those recorded after placebo. There was a trend for 60 mg dropropizine and 120 mg levodropropizine to produce detrimental effects at occasional evaluations, although the changes associated with these treatments could not be differentiated from placebo on the basis of most subjective scores and psychomotor function tests. Conversely, administration of 120 mg dropropizine was consistently associated with subjective CNS impairment and with reduced performance (compared to baseline) in recognition time, critical flicker fusion thresholds and possibly tapping rate, for up to three hours after dosing. These data are consistent with evidence that racemic dropropizine adversely affects central nervous system function to a greater extent compared with the levo-isomer.

  14. Dynamic CT Scan of the Normal Scapholunate Joint in a Clenched Fist and Radial and Ulnar Deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Paul M; Hopkins, John G; Furey, Andrew J; Squire, Daniel S

    2017-08-01

    Injuries to the scapholunate can have severe long-term effects on the wrist. Early detection of these injuries can help identify pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the motions of the scapholunate joint in normal wrists in a clenched fist and through radial and ulnar deviation using novel dynamic computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifteen participants below 40 years of age consented to have their wrist scanned. Eight participants were randomized to have the right wrist scanned and 7 the left wrist. Volunteers were positioned at the back of the gantry with the wrist placed on the table, palmar side down. Participants began with the hand in a relaxed fist position and then proceeded through an established range of motion protocol. Dynamic CT imaging was captured throughout the range of motion. The movement in the healthy scapholunate joint through a clenched fist and radial and ulnar deviation is minimal. The averages were 1.19, 1.01, and 0.95 mm, representing the middle, dorsal, and volar measurements, respectively. This novel dynamic CT scan of the wrist is a user-friendly way of measuring of the scapholunate distance, which is minimal in the normal wrist below 40 years of age.

  15. Modeling spatial trajectories in dynamics testing using basis splines: application to tracking human volunteers in low-speed frontal impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Marina A; Reed, Matthew P; Arbogast, Kristy B; Seacrist, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Designing motor vehicle safety systems requires knowledge of whole body kinematics during dynamic loading for occupants of varying size and age, often obtained from sled tests with postmortem human subjects and human volunteers. Recently, we reported pediatric and adult responses in low-speed (<4 g) automotive-like impacts, noting reductions in maximum excursion with increasing age. Since the time-based trajectory shape is also relevant for restraint design, this study quantified the time-series trajectories using basis splines and developed a statistical model for predicting trajectories as a function of body dimension or age. Previously collected trajectories of the head, spine, and pelvis were modeled using cubic basis splines with eight control points. A principal component analysis was conducted on the control points and related to erect seated height using a linear regression model. The resulting statistical model quantified how trajectories became shorter and flatter with increasing body size, corresponding to the validation data-set. Trajectories were then predicted for erect seated heights corresponding to pediatric and adult anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs), thus generating performance criteria for the ATDs based on human response. This statistical model can be used to predict trajectories for a subject of specified anthropometry and utilized in subject-specific computational models of occupant response.

  16. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  17. Measurement of blood flow in the superior sagittal sinus in healthy volunteers, and in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and idiopathic intracranial hypertension with phase-contrast cine MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Thomsen, C; Gjerris, F

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure blood flow and velocity in the superior sagittal ++sinus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: MR velocity mapping was used to examine 14 healthy volunteers, 15 patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH), 3 patients with high pressure hydrocephalus (HPH), and 11 patients with idiopathic...... intracranial hypertension (IIH). RESULTS: Mean blood flow was 443 ml/min in healthy volunteers with a tendency towards reduced blood flow with increasing age. In NPH patients significantly lower superior sagittal sinus blood flow values were found, but this difference was no longer significant when patients...... and controls were matched for age. In HPH and IIH patients blood flow and velocity were within the normal range. In one patient with thrombosis of the superior sagittal sinus the blood flow was reduced to 40 ml/min. CONCLUSION: MR velocity mapping methods may be of value in the assessment of blood flow...

  18. Nonlinear normal modes and their application in structural dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the area of nonlinear modal analysis for structural systems is reported. Systematic methods are developed for generating minimally sized reduced-order models that accurately describe the vibrations of large-scale nonlinear engineering structures. The general approach makes use of nonlinear normal modes that are defined in terms of invariant manifolds in the phase space of the system model. An efficient Galerkin projection method is developed, which allows for the construction of nonlinear modes that are accurate out to large amplitudes of vibration. This approach is successfully extended to the generation of nonlinear modes for systems that are internally resonant and for systems subject to external excitation. The effectiveness of the Galerkin-based construction of the nonlinear normal modes is also demonstrated for a realistic model of a rotating beam.

  19. The plucked string: An example of non-normal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politzer, David

    2015-05-01

    The motion of a single Fourier mode of the plucked string is an example of transient, free decay of linear, coupled, damped oscillators. It shares the rarely discussed features of the generic case, e.g., possessing a complete set of non-orthogonal eigenvectors and no normal modes, but it can be analyzed and solved analytically by hand in an approximation that is appropriate to musical instruments' plucked strings.

  20. The plucked string: an example of non-normal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Politzer, David

    2014-01-01

    Motion of a single Fourier mode of the plucked string is an example of transient, free decay of coupled, damped oscillators. It shares the rarely discussed features of the generic case, e.g., possessing a complete set of non-orthogonal eigenvectors and no normal modes, but it can be analyzed and solved analytically by hand in an approximation that is appropriate to musical instruments' plucked strings.

  1. A method to dynamic stochastic multicriteria decision making with log-normally distributed random variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Fan; Wang, Jian-Qiang; Deng, Sheng-Yue

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamic stochastic multicriteria decision making (SMCDM) problems, in which the criterion values take the form of log-normally distributed random variables, and the argument information is collected from different periods. We propose two new geometric aggregation operators, such as the log-normal distribution weighted geometric (LNDWG) operator and the dynamic log-normal distribution weighted geometric (DLNDWG) operator, and develop a method for dynamic SMCDM with log-normally distributed random variables. This method uses the DLNDWG operator and the LNDWG operator to aggregate the log-normally distributed criterion values, utilizes the entropy model of Shannon to generate the time weight vector, and utilizes the expectation values and variances of log-normal distributions to rank the alternatives and select the best one. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this developed method.

  2. A Method to Dynamic Stochastic Multicriteria Decision Making with Log-Normally Distributed Random Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Fan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic stochastic multicriteria decision making (SMCDM problems, in which the criterion values take the form of log-normally distributed random variables, and the argument information is collected from different periods. We propose two new geometric aggregation operators, such as the log-normal distribution weighted geometric (LNDWG operator and the dynamic log-normal distribution weighted geometric (DLNDWG operator, and develop a method for dynamic SMCDM with log-normally distributed random variables. This method uses the DLNDWG operator and the LNDWG operator to aggregate the log-normally distributed criterion values, utilizes the entropy model of Shannon to generate the time weight vector, and utilizes the expectation values and variances of log-normal distributions to rank the alternatives and select the best one. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of this developed method.

  3. Disassociation of Static and Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulatory Performance in Healthy Volunteers After Lipopolysaccharide Infusion and in Patients with Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan Martin Griffin; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Ronit, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    autoregulatory performance after LPS infusion and in patients with sepsis was similar to values in healthy volunteers at baseline. In contrast, TFA showed decreased gain and an increased phase difference between blood pressure and cerebral artery blood flow velocity after LPS (both p ...-experimental model of the systemic inflammatory response during early sepsis, and (ii) in patients with advanced clinical sepsis. Cerebral autoregulation was tested using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography (i) before and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion in healthy volunteers (n=9), and (ii) in patients......); patients exhibited similar gain but lower phase difference values (p

  4. Benefits and Dynamics of Learning Gained through Volunteering: A Qualitative Exploration Guided by Seniors' Self-Defined Successful Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Social participation is an important strategy in promoting successful aging. Although participating in volunteering has been proven to benefit older adults' health and well-being, we often ignore its role as a process of learning while helping others. The purpose of this study was to use the self-defined successful aging concept of seniors to…

  5. Cardiovascular and respiratory dynamics during normal and pathological sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, Thomas; Wessel, Niels; Riedl, Maik; Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Rostig, Sven; Glos, Martin; Suhrbier, Alexander; Malberg, Hagen; Fietze, Ingo

    2007-03-01

    Sleep is an active and regulated process with restorative functions for physical and mental conditions. Based on recordings of brain waves and the analysis of characteristic patterns and waveforms it is possible to distinguish wakefulness and five sleep stages. Sleep and the sleep stages modulate autonomous nervous system functions such as body temperature, respiration, blood pressure, and heart rate. These functions consist of a sympathetic tone usually related to activation and to parasympathetic (or vagal) tone usually related to inhibition. Methods of statistical physics are used to analyze heart rate and respiration to detect changes of the autonomous nervous system during sleep. Detrended fluctuation analysis and synchronization analysis and their applications to heart rate and respiration during sleep in healthy subjects and patients with sleep disorders are presented. The observed changes can be used to distinguish sleep stages in healthy subjects as well as to differentiate normal and disturbed sleep on the basis of heart rate and respiration recordings without direct recording of brain waves. Of special interest are the cardiovascular consequences of disturbed sleep because they present a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders such as arterial hypertension, cardiac ischemia, sudden cardiac death, and stroke. New derived variables can help to find indicators for these health risks.

  6. Obtaining maximum muscle excitation for normalizing shoulder electromyography in dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Joanne N; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Muscle specific maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) are commonly used to elicit reference amplitudes to normalize electromyographic signals (EMG). It has been questioned whether this is appropriate for normalizing EMG from dynamic contractions. This study compares EMG amplitude when shoulder muscle activity from dynamic contractions is normalized to isometric and isokinetic maximal excitation as well as a hybrid approach currently used in our laboratory. Anterior, middle and posterior deltoid, upper and lower trapezius, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi and infraspinatus were monitored during (1) manually resisted MVICs, and (2) maximum voluntary dynamic concentric contractions (MVDC) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Dynamic contractions were performed (a) at 30°/s about the longitudinal, frontal and sagittal axes of the shoulder, and (b) during manual bi-rotation of a tilted wheel at 120°/s. EMG from the wheel task was normalized to the maximum excitation from (i) the muscle specific MVIC, (ii) from any MVIC (MVICALL), (iii) for any MVDC, (iv) from any exertion (maximum experimental excitation, MEE). Mean EMG from the wheel task was up to 45% greater when normalized to muscle specific isometric contractions (method i) than when normalized to MEE (method iv). Seventy-five percent of MEE's occurred during MVDCs. This study presents an 20 useful and effective process for obtaining the greatest excitation from the shoulder muscles when normalizing dynamic efforts.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation study on zwitterionic structure to maintain the normal conformations of Glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Han; ZHU; HaoMiao; SHEN; Jian

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to normal conformational Glutathione (GSH) and GSH over zwitterionic and hydrophobic surfaces respectively. Conformational analysis of GSH during the simulation time on RMSD, conformational flexibility and dihedral distribution were performed. The results showed that zwitterionic structure maintains the normal conformations of GSH to a better extent, which should be a first good proof of the hypothesis of "maintain of normal structure".

  8. Dynamic divisive normalization predicts time-varying value coding in decision-related circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, Kenway; LoFaro, Thomas; Webb, Ryan; Glimcher, Paul W

    2014-11-26

    Normalization is a widespread neural computation, mediating divisive gain control in sensory processing and implementing a context-dependent value code in decision-related frontal and parietal cortices. Although decision-making is a dynamic process with complex temporal characteristics, most models of normalization are time-independent and little is known about the dynamic interaction of normalization and choice. Here, we show that a simple differential equation model of normalization explains the characteristic phasic-sustained pattern of cortical decision activity and predicts specific normalization dynamics: value coding during initial transients, time-varying value modulation, and delayed onset of contextual information. Empirically, we observe these predicted dynamics in saccade-related neurons in monkey lateral intraparietal cortex. Furthermore, such models naturally incorporate a time-weighted average of past activity, implementing an intrinsic reference-dependence in value coding. These results suggest that a single network mechanism can explain both transient and sustained decision activity, emphasizing the importance of a dynamic view of normalization in neural coding.

  9. Decrease in circulating tryptophan availability to the brain after acute ethanol consumption by normal volunteers: implications for alcohol-induced aggressive behaviour and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, A A; Morgan, C J; Lovett, J W; Bradley, D M; Thomas, R

    1995-10-01

    Acute ethanol consumption by fasting male volunteers decreases circulating trytophan (Trp) concentration and availability to the brain as determined by the ratio of (Trp) to the sum of its five competitors ([Trp]/[CAA]ratio). These effects of alcohol are specific to Trp, because levels of the 5 competitors are not increased. The decrease in circulating (Trp) is not associated with altered binding to albumin and may therefore be due to enhancement of hepatic Trp pyrrolase activity. It is suggested that, under these conditions brain serotonin synthesis is likely to be impaired and that, as a consequence, a possible strong depletion of brain serotonin in susceptible individuals may induce aggressive behaviour after alcohol consumption. The possible implications of these findings in the relationship between alcohol and depression are also briefly discussed.

  10. Precise measurement of renal filtration and vascular parameters using a two-compartment model for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of the kidney gives realistic normal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tofts, Paul S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Cutajar, Marica [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom); Mendichovszky, Iosif A. [University of Manchester, Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, Manchester (United Kingdom); Peters, A.M. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer, Sussex (United Kingdom); Gordon, Isky [UCL Institute of Child Health, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    To model the uptake phase of T{sub 1}-weighted DCE-MRI data in normal kidneys and to demonstrate that the fitted physiological parameters correlate with published normal values. The model incorporates delay and broadening of the arterial vascular peak as it appears in the capillary bed, two distinct compartments for renal intravascular and extravascular Gd tracer, and uses a small-vessel haematocrit value of 24%. Four physiological parameters can be estimated: regional filtration K{sup trans} (ml min {sup -1} [ml tissue ]{sup -1}), perfusion F (ml min {sup -1} [100 ml tissue ]{sup -1}), blood volume v{sub b} (%) and mean residence time MRT (s). From these are found the filtration fraction (FF; %) and total GFR (ml min {sup -1}). Fifteen healthy volunteers were imaged twice using oblique coronal slices every 2.5 s to determine the reproducibility. Using parenchymal ROIs, group mean values for renal biomarkers all agreed with published values: K{sup trans}: 0.25; F: 219; v{sub b}: 34; MRT: 5.5; FF: 15; GFR: 115. Nominally cortical ROIs consistently underestimated total filtration (by {proportional_to} 50%). Reproducibility was 7-18%. Sensitivity analysis showed that these fitted parameters are most vulnerable to errors in the fixed parameters kidney T{sub 1}, flip angle, haematocrit and relaxivity. These renal biomarkers can potentially measure renal physiology in diagnosis and treatment. circle Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can measure renal function. circle Filtration and perfusion values in healthy volunteers agree with published normal values. circle Precision measured in healthy volunteers is between 7 and 15%. (orig.)

  11. Assessment of Left Ventricular 2D Flow Pathlines during Early Diastole Using Spatial Modulation of Magnetization with Polarity Alternating Velocity Encoding (SPAMM-PAV): a study in normal volunteers and canine animals with myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziheng; Friedman, Daniel; Dione, Donald P.; Lin, Ben A.; Duncan, James S.; Sinusas, Albert J.; Sampath, Smita

    2013-01-01

    A high temporal resolution 2D flow pathline analysis method that describes the spatio-temporal distribution of blood entering the left ventricle during early diastolic filling is presented. Filling patterns in normal volunteers (n=8) and canine animals (baseline (n=1) and infarcted (n=6)) are studied using this approach. Data is acquired using our recently reported MR technique, SPAMM-PAV, which permits simultaneous quantification of blood velocities and myocardial strain at high temporal resolution of 14 ms. Virtual emitter particles, released from the mitral valve plane every time frame during rapid filling, are tracked to depict the propagation of 2D pathlines on the imaged plane. The pathline regional distribution patterns are compared with regional myocardial longitudinal strains and regional chamber longitudinal pressure gradients. Our results demonstrate strong spatial inter-dependence between left ventricular (LV) filling patterns and LV mechanical function. Significant differences in pathline-described filling patterns are observed in the infarcted animals. Quantitative analysis of net kinetic energy for each set of pathlines is performed. Peak net kinetic energy of 0.06±0.01 mJ in normal volunteers, 0.043 mJ in baseline dog, 0.143±0.03 mJ in three infarcted dogs with nominal flow dysfunction, and 0.016±0.007 mJ in three infarcted dogs with severe flow dysfunction is observed. PMID:23044637

  12. Effect of Electronic Toilet System (Bidet) on Anorectal Pressure in Normal Healthy Volunteers: Influence of Different Types of Water Stream and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Seungbum; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Choe, Eun Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Although bidets are widely used in Korea, its effects on anorectal pressures have not been studied in detail in terms of the water settings used. Twenty healthy volunteers were placed on a toilet equipped with a bidet, and anorectal pressures were measured with a manometry catheter inserted into the rectum and anal canal before and after using the bidet at different water forces (40, 80, 160, 200 mN), temperatures (24℃ vs 38℃), and water jet widths (narrow vs wide). The pressure at anal high pressure zone decreased from 96.1 ± 22.5 to 81.9 ± 23.3 mmHg at water jet pressure of 40 mN and 38℃ wide water jet (P water jet pressure of 80 mN and 38℃ narrow water jet (P water jet pressure of 80 mN and 38℃ wide water jet (P water jet pressure, a warm water temperature, and a wide type water jet. PMID:21218033

  13. Effect of electronic toilet system (bidet) on anorectal pressure in normal healthy volunteers: influence of different types of water stream and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Seungbum; Song, Yoon Suk; Seo, Mi Sun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Choe, Eun Kyung; Park, Kyu Joo

    2011-01-01

    Although bidets are widely used in Korea, its effects on anorectal pressures have not been studied in detail in terms of the water settings used. Twenty healthy volunteers were placed on a toilet equipped with a bidet, and anorectal pressures were measured with a manometry catheter inserted into the rectum and anal canal before and after using the bidet at different water forces (40, 80, 160, 200 mN), temperatures (24°C vs 38°C), and water jet widths (narrow vs wide). The pressure at anal high pressure zone decreased from 96.1 ± 22.5 to 81.9 ± 23.3 mmHg at water jet pressure of 40 mN and 38°C wide water jet (P bidet could be used to reduce anal resting pressure in the same manner as the traditional warm sitz bath under the conditions of low or medium water jet pressure, a warm water temperature, and a wide type water jet.

  14. Volunteers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cone, Richard; Johnson, Judith

    The results of nine studies evaluating the effectiveness of volunteer programs in the schools were reviewed in an attempt to answer three questions: What is the value of volunteers to schools? Why do people volunteer to work in classrooms? What is the effect of volunteering on the volunteer? The studies involved were originally intended to…

  15. Application of the segment weight dynamic movement method to the normalization of gait EMG amplitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Y; Kato, T; Yoshizawa, M; Miyashita, M; Iida, H

    2010-06-01

    This study aims at determining the applicability of a segment weight dynamic movement (SWDM) method as an alternative for normalizing gait EMGs in comparison with the conventional isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) method. The SWDM method employs reference exercises, each being a dynamic, repetitive movement of a joint under the load of the segment weight (i.e., the total weight of all segments distal to the joint). EMG amplitudes of 28 healthy male subjects walking at 120 steps/min were normalized by the two methods. CV and VR were used to assess the inter-individual variability of both the normalized gait EMG for 8 muscles. The CV and VR values attained with the two methods were close to each other, as well as to those obtained by other researchers using the isometric MVC method. These results suggest that the SWDM method has a comparable level of applicability to gait EMG normalization as the isometric MVC method.

  16. Analysis of a Dynamic Viscoelastic Contact Problem with Normal Compliance, Normal Damped Response, and Nonmonotone Slip Rate Dependent Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Barboteu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a mathematical model which describes the dynamic evolution of a viscoelastic body in frictional contact with an obstacle. The contact is modelled with a combination of a normal compliance and a normal damped response law associated with a slip rate-dependent version of Coulomb’s law of dry friction. We derive a variational formulation and an existence and uniqueness result of the weak solution of the problem is presented. Next, we introduce a fully discrete approximation of the variational problem based on a finite element method and on an implicit time integration scheme. We study this fully discrete approximation schemes and bound the errors of the approximate solutions. Under regularity assumptions imposed on the exact solution, optimal order error estimates are derived for the fully discrete solution. Finally, after recalling the solution of the frictional contact problem, some numerical simulations are provided in order to illustrate both the behavior of the solution related to the frictional contact conditions and the theoretical error estimate result.

  17. Why Volunteer? Understanding Motivations for Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The profile of volunteering in English Higher Education (HE) has been enhanced in recent years through various initiatives that have not only funded activities, but have sought to expand the range of volunteering opportunities available to students and recognise the contribution that volunteering can make to students' employability. This expansion…

  18. Volunteering and Volunteers: Benefit-Cost Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy, Femida; Mook, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of volunteering from a benefit-cost perspective. Both the individual making a decision to volunteer and the organization making a decision to use volunteer labor face benefits and costs of their actions, yet these costs and benefits almost always remain unarticulated, perhaps because the common perception of…

  19. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    The use of volunteers is becoming more visible and important in the experience economy also in the light of the financial crisis. From a management perspective within both public and private organizations the use of volunteers is an important element partly because they strengthen the brand...... and they help in the product development but also because they are seen as a cheap resource. From an employee perspective you often hear that it creates a sense of fear for cuts or loss of professionalism, but can also be seen as a helpful resource and dynamic element in the organization. In the Experience...... economy volunteers create a new set of dimensions, because they shift between being part of the experience producer and being one of the experience consumers. Volunteers are becoming increasingly more important in the experience economy as they contribute to the overall experience for users or customers...

  20. Speech recognition with dynamic range reduction: (1) deaf and normal subjects in laboratory conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, A E; Gregory, R L

    1978-08-01

    Processing to reduce the dynamic range of speech should increase intelligibility and protect the impaired ear from overloading. There are theoretical and practical objections to using AGC devices to reduce dynamic range. These are overcome by using recently available signal processing employing high frequency carrier clipping. An increase in intelligibility of speech with this HFCC has been demonstrated, for normal subjects with simulated deafness, and for most partially hearing patients. Intelligibility is not improved for some patients; possibly due to their having learned to extract features which are lost. These patients may also benefit after training.

  1. Observability of nonlinear dynamics: Normalized results and a time-series approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis A.; Bastos, Saulo B.; Alves, Marcela A.; Letellier, Christophe

    2008-03-01

    This paper investigates the observability of nonlinear dynamical systems. Two difficulties associated with previous studies are dealt with. First, a normalized degree observability is defined. This permits the comparison of different systems, which was not generally possible before. Second, a time-series approach is proposed based on omnidirectional nonlinear correlation functions to rank a set of time series of a system in terms of their potential use to reconstruct the original dynamics without requiring the knowledge of the system equations. The two approaches proposed in this paper and a former method were applied to five benchmark systems and an overall agreement of over 92% was found.

  2. Ⅰ期临床药物试验中健康志愿者一般状况分析%Analysis about the general healthy situation of normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭月梅; 王宏山; 易嘉龙; 李玲芝; 宓为峰

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyse the healthy situation of the normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail. Methods One hundred and seventy- seven healthy volunteers who came to the Sixth Hospital of Peking University for screening of phase Ⅰ new drug chnical trail were elected, from January/2009 to August/2010. Results The ratio of male and female was 2. 53 (170: 70). The rate of abnormality red blood cell count and hemoglobin of male healthy volunteers was higher than females, and the rate of hemoglobin abnormality of lower age ( < 28 years) group had a higher than the elder group ( > 28 years) ( P <0. 05 ). The rate of neutrophilic granulocyte count abnormality male group person had a lower than females (6. 5% vs 15.7%, x2 = 3.90, P <0. 05 ). The abnormality rate of blood glucose in male was 34. 6%, higher than that in female group 20. 0% (x2 = 4. 39, P = 0. 036 < 0. 05 ).Conclusion During the screening of normal healthy volunteers in phase Ⅰ new drug clinical trail, it is necessary to monitor the red blood cell count, hemoglobin, blood glucose in male or younger ( < 28 years)groups, and monitor neutrophilic granulocyte count in female group.%目的 分析Ⅰ期临床药物试验中健康志愿者的一般状况.方法 选择2009年1月到2010年8月在本院药物临床试验机构参加Ⅰ期临床药物试验筛选的177名健康志愿者,对一般资料及实验室、体格检查、心电图检查进行汇总分析.结果 参加筛选的健康志愿者男女性别比值为2.53(170:70),红细胞计数及血红蛋白异常的比例男性均比女性高(P<0.05),且低年龄组(<28岁)血红蛋白异常的比例更高(P<0.05);男性的中性粒细胞计数异常的比例为6.5%(女性:15.7%),与女性比较差别有统计学意义(x2=3.90,P<0.05);男性的血糖异常比例为34.6%(女性:20.0%),与女性比较差别有统计学意义(x2=4.39,P=0.036<0.05).结论 筛选Ⅰ期临床药物试验的健康志

  3. Probing the dynamics of Andreev states in a coherent normal/superconducting ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, F; Ferrier, M; Tikhonov, K; Virtanen, P; Heikkilä, T T; Feigelman, M; Guéron, S; Bouchiat, H

    2011-01-01

    The supercurrent that establishes between two superconductors connected through a normal N mesoscopic link is carried by quasiparticule states localized within the link, the "Andreev bound states (ABS)". Whereas the dc properties of this supercurrent in SNS junctions are now well understood, its dynamical properties are still an unresolved issue. In this letter we probe this dynamics by inductively coupling an NS ring to a multimode superconducting resonator, thereby implementing both a phase bias and current detection at high frequency. Whereas at very low temperatures we essentially measure the phase derivative of the supercurrent, at higher temperature we find a surprisingly strong frequency dependence in the current response of the ring: the ABS do not follow adiabatically the phase modulation. This experiment also illustrates a new tool to probe the fundamental time scales of phase coherent systems that are decoupled from macroscopic normal contacts and thermal baths.

  4. Normal and Anomalous Diffusion: An Analytical Study Based on Quantum Collision Dynamics and Boltzmann Transport Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahakrishnan, Sathiya; Chakraborty, Subrata; Vijay, Amrendra

    2016-09-15

    Diffusion, an emergent nonequilibrium transport phenomenon, is a nontrivial manifestation of the correlation between the microscopic dynamics of individual molecules and their statistical behavior observed in experiments. We present a thorough investigation of this viewpoint using the mathematical tools of quantum scattering, within the framework of Boltzmann transport theory. In particular, we ask: (a) How and when does a normal diffusive transport become anomalous? (b) What physical attribute of the system is conceptually useful to faithfully rationalize large variations in the coefficient of normal diffusion, observed particularly within the dynamical environment of biological cells? To characterize the diffusive transport, we introduce, analogous to continuous phase transitions, the curvature of the mean square displacement as an order parameter and use the notion of quantum scattering length, which measures the effective interactions between the diffusing molecules and the surrounding, to define a tuning variable, η. We show that the curvature signature conveniently differentiates the normal diffusion regime from the superdiffusion and subdiffusion regimes and the critical point, η = ηc, unambiguously determines the coefficient of normal diffusion. To solve the Boltzmann equation analytically, we use a quantum mechanical expression for the scattering amplitude in the Boltzmann collision term and obtain a general expression for the effective linear collision operator, useful for a variety of transport studies. We also demonstrate that the scattering length is a useful dynamical characteristic to rationalize experimental observations on diffusive transport in complex systems. We assess the numerical accuracy of the present work with representative experimental results on diffusion processes in biological systems. Furthermore, we advance the idea of temperature-dependent effective voltage (of the order of 1 μV or less in a biological environment, for example

  5. Dynamics of mode-coupling-induced microresonator frequency combs in normal dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Jang, Jae K; Yu, Mengjie; Luke, Kevin; Ji, Xingchen; Lipson, Michal; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate the dynamics of microresonator-based frequency comb generation assisted by mode coupling in the normal group-velocity dispersion (GVD) regime. We show that mode coupling can initiate intracavity modulation instability (MI) by directly perturbing the pump-resonance mode. We also observe the formation of a low-noise comb as the pump frequency is tuned further into resonance from the MI point. We determine the phase-matching conditions that accurately predict all the essential features of the MI and comb spectra, and extend the existing analogy between mode coupling and high-order dispersion to the normal GVD regime. We discuss the applicability of our analysis to the possibility of broadband comb generation in the normal GVD regime.

  6. Bifurcations of Normally Hyperbolic Invariant Manifolds and Consequences for Reaction Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mauguiere, F A L; Ezra, G S; Wiggins, S

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the breakdown of normal hyperbolicity and its consequences for reaction dynamics; in particular, the dividing surface, the flux through the dividing surface (DS), and the gap time distribution. Our approach is to study these questions using simple, two degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian models where calculations for the different geometrical and dynamical quantities can be carried out exactly. For our examples, we show that resonances within the normally hyperbolic invariant manifold may, or may not, lead to a `loss of normal hyperbolicity'. Moreover, we show that the onset of such resonances results in a change in topology of the dividing surface, but does not affect our ability to define a DS. The flux through the DS varies continuously with energy, even as the energy is varied in such a way that normal hyperbolicity is lost. For our examples the gap time distributions exhibit singularities at energies corresponding to the existence of homoclinic orbits in the DS, but these singularities a...

  7. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging features of the normal central zone of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Barry G; Karademir, Ibrahim; Peng, Yahui; Jiang, Yulei; Karczmar, Gregory; Thomas, Stephen; Yousuf, Ambereen; Antic, Tatjana; Eggener, Scott; Oto, Aytekin

    2014-05-01

    Evaluate qualitative dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of normal central zone based on recently described central zone MRI features. Institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant study, 59 patients with prostate cancer, histopathology proven to not involve central zone or prostate base, underwent endorectal MRI before prostatectomy. Two readers independently reviewed T2-weighted images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps identifying normal central zone based on low signal intensity and location. Next, two readers drew bilateral central zone regions of interest on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images in consensus and independently recorded enhancement curve types as type 1 (progressive), type 2 (plateau), and type 3 (wash-out). Identification rates of normal central zone and enhancement curve type were recorded and compared for each reviewer. The institutional review board waiver was approved and granted 05/2010. Central zone identified in 92%-93% of patients on T2-weighted images and 78%-88% on ADC maps without significant difference between identification rates (P = .63 and P = .15 and inter-reader agreement (κ) is 0.64 and 0.29, for T2-weighted images and ADC maps, respectively). All central zones were rated either curve type 1 or curve type 2 by both radiologists. No statistically significant difference between the two radiologists (P = .19) and inter-reader agreement was κ = 0.37. Normal central zone demonstrates either type 1 (progressive) or type 2 (plateau) enhancement curves on dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI that can be potentially useful to differentiate central zone from prostate cancer that classically demonstrates a type 3 (wash-out) enhancement curve. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Volunteering, income and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detollenaere, Jens; Willems, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Separate literatures have related volunteering to health gains and income gains. We study the association between volunteering, income and health within one statistical framework. A state-of-the-art mediation analysis is conducted on data concerning the health, volunteering and sociodemographic characteristics of 42926 individuals within 29 European countries. We find that volunteering is positively associated to self-rated health. This association is partially mediated by household income. PMID:28273163

  9. Lateral dynamic flight stability of a model hoverfly in normal and inclined stroke-plane hovering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Na; Sun, Mao

    2014-09-01

    Many insects hover with their wings beating in a horizontal plane ('normal hovering'), while some insects, e.g., hoverflies and dragonflies, hover with inclined stroke-planes. Here, we investigate the lateral dynamic flight stability of a hovering model hoverfly. The aerodynamic derivatives are computed using the method of computational fluid dynamics, and the equations of motion are solved by the techniques of eigenvalue and eigenvector analysis. The following is shown: The flight of the insect is unstable at normal hovering (stroke-plane angle equals 0) and the instability becomes weaker as the stroke-plane angle increases; the flight becomes stable at a relatively large stroke-plane angle (larger than about 24°). As previously shown, the instability at normal hovering is due to a positive roll-moment/side-velocity derivative produced by the 'changing-LEV-axial-velocity' effect. When the stroke-plane angle increases, the wings bend toward the back of the body, and the 'changing-LEV-axial-velocity' effect decreases; in addition, another effect, called the 'changing-relative-velocity' effect (the 'lateral wind', which is due to the side motion of the insect, changes the relative velocity of its wings), becomes increasingly stronger. This causes the roll-moment/side-velocity derivative to first decrease and then become negative, resulting in the above change in stability as a function of the stroke-plane angle.

  10. Dynamic high-resolution US of ankle and midfoot ligaments: normal anatomic structure and imaging technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Orlandi, Davide; Lacelli, Francesca; Serafini, Giovanni; Silvestri, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    The ankle is the most frequently injured major joint in the body, and ankle sprains are frequently encountered in individuals playing football, basketball, and other team sports, in addition to occurring in the general population. Imaging plays a crucial role in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to provide excellent evaluation of ligaments around the ankle, with the ability to show associated intraarticular abnormalities, joint effusion, and bone marrow edema. Ultrasonography (US) performed with high-resolution broadband linear-array probes has become increasingly important in the assessment of ligaments around the ankle because it is low cost, fast, readily available, and free of ionizing radiation. US can provide a detailed depiction of normal anatomic structures and is effective for evaluating ligament integrity. In addition, US allows the performance of dynamic maneuvers, which may contribute to increased visibility of normal ligaments and improved detection of tears. In this article, the authors describe the US techniques for evaluation of the ankle and midfoot ligaments and include a brief review of the literature related to their basic anatomic structures and US of these structures. Short video clips showing dynamic maneuvers and dynamic real-time US of ankle and midfoot structures and their principal pathologic patterns are included as supplemental material. Use of a standardized imaging technique may help reduce the intrinsic operator dependence of US. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I investigate the strength of intergenerational transmission of volunteering for non-profit associations in The Netherlands. Data from the Family Survey of the Dutch Population 2000 reveal that there are significant relations between current volunteering and parental volunteering in

  12. Intergenerational Transmission of Volunteering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2007-01-01

    In this article, I investigate the strength of intergenerational transmission of volunteering for non-profit associations in The Netherlands. Data from the Family Survey of the Dutch Population 2000 reveal that there are significant relations between current volunteering and parental volunteering in

  13. My Volunteer Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengAi

    2004-01-01

    SEVERAL years ago, I read a notice soliciting volunteer teachers to work in the west.It caught my interest and I clipped it. Upon graduation in August 2000, 1 postponed my graduate stud-ies in sociology and joined the Fudan Team of China Youth Volunteer Aid.My one-year volunteer life began in

  14. Rupture dynamics along bimaterial interfaces: a parametric study of the shear-normal traction coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Antonio; Festa, Gaetano; Vilotte, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Earthquake ruptures often develop along faults separating materials with dissimilar elastic properties. Due to the broken symmetry, the propagation of the rupture along the bimaterial interface is driven by the coupling between interfacial sliding and normal traction perturbations. We numerically investigate in-plane rupture growth along a planar interface, under slip weakening friction, separating two dissimilar isotropic linearly elastic half-spaces, and we perform a parametric study of the classical Prakash-Clifton regularisation, for different material contrasts. In particular the mesh-dependence and the regularisation-dependence of the numerical solutions are analysed in this parameter space. When the regularisation involves a slip-rate dependent relaxation time, a characteristic sliding distance is identified below which numerical solutions no longer depend on the regularisation parameter, i.e. they are physically well-posed solutions. Such regularisation provides an adaptive high-frequency filter of the slip-induced normal traction perturbations, following the dynamic shrinking of the dissipation zone during the acceleration phase. In contrast, a regularisation involving a constant relaxation time leads to numerical solutions that always depend on the regularisation parameter since it fails in adapting to the shrinking of the process zone. Dynamic regularisation is further investigated using a non-local regularisation based on a relaxation time that depends on the dynamic length of the dissipation zone. Such reformulation is shown to provide similar results as the dynamic time scale regularisation proposed by Prakash-Clifton when the slip rate is replaced by the maximum slip rate along the sliding interface. This leads to the identification of a dissipative length scale associated with the coupling between interfacial sliding and normal traction perturbations, together with a scaling law between the maximum slip rate and the dynamic size of the process zone

  15. Diurnal changes in postural control in normal children: Computerized static and dynamic assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourelle, Sophie; Taiar, Redha; Berge, Benoit; Gautheron, Vincent; Cottalorda, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) causes postural control deficits and accordingly comparison of aberrant postural control against normal postural control may help diagnose mTBI. However, in the current literature, little is known regarding the normal pattern of postural control in young children. This study was therefore conducted as an effort to fill this knowledge gap. Eight normal school-aged children participated. Posture assessment was conducted before (7-8 a.m. in the morning) and after (4-7 p.m. in the afternoon) school on regular school days using the Balance Master® evaluation system composed of 3 static tests and 2 dynamic balance tests. A significant difference in the weight-bearing squats was detected between morning hours and afternoon hours (P control of the lateral rhythmic weight shifts was observed at the end of the afternoon than at morning hours (P posture control in humans. On a regular school day, the capacity of postural control and laterality or medio-lateral balance in children varies between morning and afternoon hours. We suggest that posturographic assessment in children, either in normal (e.g., physical education and sports training) or in abnormal conditions (e.g., mTBI-associated balance disorders), be better performed late in the afternoon.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamic Study on Geomagnetic Polarity Reversal and Cretaceous Normal Superchron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that geomagnetic polarity has reversed many times in geological history and an abnormal geologic phenomenon is the Cretaceous normal superchron. However, the causes have been unknown up to now. The nonlinear theory has been applied to analyze the phenomenon in geomagnetic polarity reversal and the Cretaceous normal superchron. The Cretaceous normal superchron implies that interaction of the Earth's core-mantle and liquid movement in the outer core may be the lowest energy state and the system of Earth magnetic field maintains a sort of temporal or spatial order structure by exchanging substance and energy in the outside continuously.During 121-83 Ma, there was no impact of a celestial body that would result in a geomagnetic polarity reversal, which may be a cause for occurrence of the Cretaceous normal superchron. The randomness of geomagnetic polarity reversal has the self-reversion characteristic of chaos and the chaos theory gives a simple and clear explanation for the dynamic cause of the geomagnetic polarity reversal.

  17. From shunting inhibition to dynamic normalization: Attentional selection and decision-making in brief visual displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip L; Sewell, David K; Lilburn, Simon D

    2015-11-01

    Normalization models of visual sensitivity assume that the response of a visual mechanism is scaled divisively by the sum of the activity in the excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms in its neighborhood. Normalization models of attention assume that the weighting of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms is modulated by attention. Such models have provided explanations of the effects of attention in both behavioral and single-cell recording studies. We show how normalization models can be obtained as the asymptotic solutions of shunting differential equations, in which stimulus inputs and the activity in the mechanism control growth rates multiplicatively rather than additively. The value of the shunting equation approach is that it characterizes the entire time course of the response, not just its asymptotic strength. We describe two models of attention based on shunting dynamics, the integrated system model of Smith and Ratcliff (2009) and the competitive interaction theory of Smith and Sewell (2013). These models assume that attention, stimulus salience, and the observer's strategy for the task jointly determine the selection of stimuli into visual short-term memory (VSTM) and the way in which stimulus representations are weighted. The quality of the VSTM representation determines the speed and accuracy of the decision. The models provide a unified account of a variety of attentional phenomena found in psychophysical tasks using single-element and multi-element displays. Our results show the generality and utility of the normalization approach to modeling attention.

  18. Abnormal computerized dynamic posturography findings in dizzy patients with normal ENG results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sataloff, Robert T; Hawkshaw, Mary J; Mandel, Heidi; Zwislewski, Amy B; Armour, Jonathan; Mandel, Steven

    2005-04-01

    The complexities of the balance system create difficulties for professionals interested in testing equilibrium function objectively. Traditionally, electronystagmography (ENG) has been used for this purpose, but it provides information on only a limited portion of the equilibrium system. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) is less specific than ENG, but it provides more global insight into a patient's ability to maintain equilibrium under more challenging environmental circumstances. CD Palso appears to be valuable in obtaining objective confirmation of an abnormality in some dizzy patients whose ENG findings are normal. Our review of 33 patients with normal ENG results and abnormal CDP findings suggests that posturography is useful for confirming or quantifying a balance abnormality in some patients whose complaints cannot be confirmed by other tests frequently used by otologists.

  19. Transport coefficients of normal liquid helium-4 calculated by path integral centroid molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaoka, Haruna; Kinugawa, Kenichi

    2017-03-01

    Thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity of normal liquid 4He at 1.7-4.0 K are calculated using path integral centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations. The calculated thermal conductivity and shear viscosity above lambda transition temperature are on the same order of magnitude as experimental values, while the agreement of shear viscosity is better. Above 2.3 K the CMD well reproduces the temperature dependences of isochoric shear viscosity and of the time integral of the energy current and off-diagonal stress tensor correlation functions. The calculated bulk viscosity, not known in experiments, is several times larger than shear viscosity.

  20. CORRELATION OF ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION WITH DYNAMIC BALANCE IN YOUNG NORMAL INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali Suryavanshi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study was to examine correlation of ankle dorsiflexion range of motion with dynamic balance in young normal individuals. A cross sectional study has been done on 60 females by convenient sampling. The study was to examine dorsiflexion ROM by using star excursion balance test. It was performed in all directions for three trials. Distance was recorded with measure tape. Ankle ROM was performed by weight bearing lunge. Individuals who demonstrate impairments in dorsiflexion ROM may also demonstrate difficulty with portions of the SEBT. There is significant positive correlation in between dorsiflexion range of motion and star excursion balance test in anterior and postero lateral direction.

  1. Unstable normal modes of low T/W dynamical instabilities in differentially rotating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Saijo, Motoyuki

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the nature of low T/W dynamical instabilities in differentially rotating stars by means of linear perturbation. Here, T and W represent rotational kinetic energy and the gravitational binding energy of the star. This is the first attempt to investigate low T/W dynamical instabilities as a complete set of the eigenvalue problem. Our equilibrium configuration has "constant" specific angular momentum distribution, which potentially contains a singular solution in the perturbed enthalpy at corotation radius in linear perturbation. We find the unstable normal modes of differentially rotating stars by solving the eigenvalue problem along the equatorial plane of the star, imposing the regularity condition on the center and the vanished enthalpy at the oscillating equatorial surface. We find that the existing pulsation modes become unstable due to the existence of the corotation radius inside the star. The feature of the unstable mode eigenfrequency and its eigenfunction in the linear analysis roughly ...

  2. Global geometric structures associated with dynamical systems admitting normal shift of hypersurfaces in Riemannian manifolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan A. Sharipov

    2002-01-01

    keeps orthogonality to the trajectories of all its points. Geodesic lines correspond to the motion of free particles if the points of hypersurface are treated as physical entities obeying Newton's second law. An attempt to introduce some external force F acting on the points of moving hypersurface in Bonnet construction leads to the theory of dynamical systems admitting a normal shift. As appears in this theory, the force field F of dynamical system should satisfy some system of partial differential equations. Recently, this system of equations was integrated, and explicit formula for F was obtained. But this formula is local. The main goal of this paper is to reveal global geometric structures associated with local expressions for F given by explicit formula.

  3. Utilização da algometria de pressão na determinação dos limiares de percepção dolorosa trigeminal em voluntários sadios: um novo protocolo de estudos Using algometry of pressure measuring the threshold of trigeminal pain perception in normal volunteers: a new protocol of studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Juliato Piovesan

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Algometria de pressão é uma técnica que mensura a fisiologia do sistema nociceptivo. Atuando diretamente sobre os nociceptores periféricos responsívos aos estímulos pressóricos esta técnica permite o estudo da integridade nociceptiva em indivíduos normais ou portadores de diferentes síndromes álgicas. Foram testados 29 voluntários assintomáticos em que pesquisamos os limiares de percepção dolorosa, mensurando-os de forma direta sobre a emergência dos nervos supra-orbital, infra-orbital, mental. Registramos os seguintes valores médios algométricos: nervo mental direito 46,2 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 48,6 Kg/cm²; nervo supra-orbital direito 47,7 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 45,2 Kg/cm²; nervo infra-orbital direito 53,9 Kg/cm² e esquerdo 55,4 Kg/cm². Após revisão dos princípios de utilização da algometria, validamos este protocolo apresentando os valores médios obtidos pela mensuração do sistema trigeminal comparando-os posteriormente com uma região inervada pelos primeiros ramos cervicais (nervo occipital maior e região do músculo temporal.Algometry of pressure is a technique that measures the physiology of the nociceptive system. Acting directly on the responsive peripheral nociceptors to pressure stimuli, this technique allows the study on nociceptive integrity in normal subjects or having different algic syndromes. Utilizing 29 asymptomatic volunteers, the threshold of the painful perception was studied, measuring them in a direct way over the emergence of the supra-orbital, infra-orbital and mental nerves. The following algometric average were recorded: right mental nerve 46.2 Kg/cm² and left 48.6 Kg/cm² ; right supra-orbital nerve 47.7 Kg/cm² and left 45.2 Kg/cm²; right infra-orbital nerve 53.9 Kg/cm² and left 55.4 Kg/cm². After reviewing the principles of the algometry utilization, we have validated this protocol, showing the average values obtained by measuring the trigeminal system, afterwards comparing them with an

  4. Nonlinear dynamics in pulsatile secretion of parathyroid hormone in normal human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Harms, Heio; Brabant, Georg; Hesch, Rolf-Dieter; Dämmig, Matthias; Mitschke, Fedor

    1995-03-01

    In many biological systems, information is transferred by hormonal ligands, and it is assumed that these hormonal signals encode developmental and regulatory programs in mammalian organisms. In contrast to the dogma of endocrine homeostasis, it could be shown that the biological information in hormonal networks is not only present as a constant hormone concentration in the circulation pool. Recently, it has become apparent that hormone pulses contribute to this hormonal pool, which modulates the responsiveness of receptors within the cell membrane by regulation of the receptor synthesis, movement within the membrane layer, coupling to signal transduction proteins and internalization. Phase space analysis of dynamic parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion allowed the definition of a (in comparison to normal subjects) relatively quiet ``low dynamic'' secretory pattern in osteoporosis, and a ``high dynamic'' state in hyperparathyroidism. We now investigate whether this pulsatile secretion of PTH in healthy men exhibits characteristics of nonlinear determinism. Our findings suggest that this is conceivable, although on the basis of presently available data and techniques, no proof can be established. Nevertheless, pulsatile secretion of PTH might be a first example of nonlinear deterministic dynamics in an apparently irregular hormonal rhythm in human physiology.

  5. Volunteers in Sport Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VESNA CILERDZIC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is done in order to describe student’s attitudes on volunteering in sport. The sample consists of 231 students from Serbia, average age 21,06±3,12years. They were from eight colleges and faculties. For nominal and ordinal variables, frequencies were determined. Many of examined students have volunteering experiences. The results confirm that students believe that we live in a society which his generally thought only to its own benefit; they think that volunteering can not solve the problems in society; that people do not have enough experience with volunteering and people do not have time to volunteering; volunteering is for young people; in their family and among friends, there are no volunteers; everyone could be volunteer only if that wishes; do not believe that volunteering is a waste of time and it helps in future career. The prevalent number of students, regardless of the Faculty which they belong, rarely volunteered in areas outside of sport. Results also shows that students from sport faculties have less experience in volunteering in sport than students from other faculties, but this difference is not dramatic.

  6. Participation of healthy volunteers in research projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrae, F A; Mackay, I R; Fraser, J R

    1989-03-20

    Research that involves healthy normal volunteers frequently is performed. This article examines ethical guide-lines for the recruitment of healthy volunteers in research projects. Ethical decisions on projects that are based on patient-volunteers or healthy normal volunteers should balance the risk to the volunteer and the collective benefit to the community. For healthy normal volunteers that risk should be minimal or trivial. Investigators should follow recruitment practices that avoid approaches to persons who are dependent upon them in some way, and should carry the day-to-day ethical responsibility even after institutional ethical approval has been granted. Pilot studies and self-experimentation readily can transgress ethical guide-lines. Compensation for mishaps or injuries that occur during research in which there is no question of negligence (for example, an unforeseeable reaction in a phase-1 drug trial) is an unresolved issue which should be addressed by the research community. It is recommended that action be taken to ensure that healthy volunteers who participate in approved research have redress in the rare event of an accident, whether this is a result of negligence, chance or misadventure. Hospitals/institutions or other bodies that sponsor research should extend their insurance to cover specifically such unforeseeable events in which there may be liability, and to have the facility for a payment of beneficence in the case of accidents in which liability cannot be established.

  7. Improved epileptic seizure detection combining dynamic feature normalization with EEG novelty detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaarts, J G; Hilkman, D M W; Gommer, E D; van Kranen-Mastenbroek, V H J M; Reulen, J P H

    2016-12-01

    Continuous electroencephalographic monitoring of critically ill patients is an established procedure in intensive care units. Seizure detection algorithms, such as support vector machines (SVM), play a prominent role in this procedure. To correct for inter-human differences in EEG characteristics, as well as for intra-human EEG variability over time, dynamic EEG feature normalization is essential. Recently, the median decaying memory (MDM) approach was determined to be the best method of normalization. MDM uses a sliding baseline buffer of EEG epochs to calculate feature normalization constants. However, while this method does include non-seizure EEG epochs, it also includes EEG activity that can have a detrimental effect on the normalization and subsequent seizure detection performance. In this study, EEG data that is to be incorporated into the baseline buffer are automatically selected based on a novelty detection algorithm (Novelty-MDM). Performance of an SVM-based seizure detection framework is evaluated in 17 long-term ICU registrations using the area under the sensitivity-specificity ROC curve. This evaluation compares three different EEG normalization methods, namely a fixed baseline buffer (FB), the median decaying memory (MDM) approach, and our novelty median decaying memory (Novelty-MDM) method. It is demonstrated that MDM did not improve overall performance compared to FB (p < 0.27), partly because seizure like episodes were included in the baseline. More importantly, Novelty-MDM significantly outperforms both FB (p = 0.015) and MDM (p = 0.0065).

  8. Velocity, temperature and normal force dependence on friction: An analytical and molecular dynamic study

    CERN Document Server

    Dias, R A; Rapini, M; Costa, B V

    2007-01-01

    In this work we propose an extension to the analytical one-dimensional model proposed by E. Gnecco (Phys. Rev. Lett. 84:1172) to describe friction. Our model includes normal forces and the dependence with the angular direction of movement in which the object is dragged over a surface. The presence of the normal force in the model allow us to define judiciously the friction coefficient, instead of introducing it as an {\\sl a posteriori} concept. We compare the analytical results with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulated model corresponds to a tip sliding over a surface. The tip is simulated as a single particle interacting with a surface through a Lennard-Jones $(6-12)$ potential. The surface is considered as consisting of a regular BCC(001) arrangement of particles interacting with each other through a Lennard-Jones $(6-12)$ potential. We investigate the system under several conditions of velocity, temperature and normal forces. Our analytical results are in very good agreement with those obtained by...

  9. Induction of systemic TH1-like innate immunity in normal volunteers following subcutaneous but not intravenous administration of CPG 7909, a synthetic B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide TLR9 agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Arthur M; Efler, Susan M; Wittpoth, Michael; Al Adhami, Mohammed J; Davis, Heather L

    2004-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of normal human volunteers with a B-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) TLR9 agonist, CPG 7909, induced a TH1-like pattern of systemic innate immune activation manifested by expression of IL-6, IL-12p40, IFN-alpha, and IFN-inducible chemokines. Serum IP-10 was found to be the most sensitive assay for subcutaneous CPG 7909 stimulation; its level was significantly increased in all subjects at all dose levels, including the lowest tested dose of just 0.0025 mg/kg. This pattern of chemokine and cytokine induction was markedly different from that previously reported to be induced by TLR9 stimulation in rodents, most likely reflecting species-specific differences in the cell types expressing TLR9. Subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection induced transient shifts in blood neutrophils, lymphocytes, and monocytes, consistent with the increased chemokine expression. Levels of acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein were also increased. A second subcutaneous CPG 7909 injection administered 2 weeks after the first elicited similar immune responses, showing little or no tolerance to the effects of repeated in vivo TLR9 stimulation. Subjects developed dose-dependent transient injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms but otherwise tolerated injection well, with no evidence of organ toxicity or systemic autoimmunity. The activation of innate immunity was dependent on the route of ODN administration, since intravenous injection caused no such effects. These studies indicate that in vivo activation of TLR9 by subcutaneous administration of CPG 7909 could be a well-tolerated immunotherapeutic approach for induction of TH1 innate immune activation.

  10. Diurnal changes in postural control in normal children: Computerized static and dynamic assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bourelle

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI causes postural control deficits and accordingly comparison of aberrant postural control against normal postural control may help diagnose mTBI. However, in the current literature, little is known regarding the normal pattern of postural control in young children. This study was therefore conducted as an effort to fill this knowledge gap. Eight normal school-aged children participated. Posture assessment was conducted before (7-8 a.m. in the morning and after (4-7 p.m. in the afternoon school on regular school days using the Balance Master ® evaluation system composed of 3 static tests and 2 dynamic balance tests. A significant difference in the weight-bearing squats was detected between morning hours and afternoon hours (P < 0.05. By end of afternoon, the body weight was borne mainly on the left side with the knee fully extended and at various degrees of knee flexion. A significantly better directional control of the lateral rhythmic weight shifts was observed at the end of the afternoon than at morning hours (P < 0.05. In summary, most of our findings are inconsistent with results from previous studies in adults, suggesting age-related differences in posture control in humans. On a regular school day, the capacity of postural control and laterality or medio-lateral balance in children varies between morning and afternoon hours. We suggest that posturographic assessment in children, either in normal (e.g., physical education and sports training or in abnormal conditions (e.g., mTBI-associated balance disorders, be better performed late in the afternoon.

  11. Complex oscillatory redox dynamics with signaling potential at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembro, Jackelyn M; Cortassa, Sonia; Aon, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    The time-keeping properties bestowed by oscillatory behavior on functional rhythms represent an evolutionarily conserved trait in living systems. Mitochondrial networks function as timekeepers maximizing energetic output while tuning reactive oxygen species (ROS) within physiological levels compatible with signaling. In this work, we explore the potential for timekeeping functions dependent on mitochondrial dynamics with the validated two-compartment mitochondrial energetic-redox (ME-R) computational model, that takes into account (a) four main redox couples [NADH, NADPH, GSH, Trx(SH)2], (b) scavenging systems (glutathione, thioredoxin, SOD, catalase) distributed in matrix and extra-matrix compartments, and (c) transport of ROS species between them. Herein, we describe that the ME-R model can exhibit highly complex oscillatory dynamics in energetic/redox variables and ROS species, consisting of at least five frequencies with modulated amplitudes and period according to power spectral analysis. By stability analysis we describe that the extent of steady state-as against complex oscillatory behavior-was dependent upon the abundance of Mn and Cu, Zn SODs, and their interplay with ROS production in the respiratory chain. Large parametric regions corresponding to oscillatory dynamics of increasingly complex waveforms were obtained at low Cu, Zn SOD concentration as a function of Mn SOD. This oscillatory domain was greatly reduced at higher levels of Cu, Zn SOD. Interestingly, the realm of complex oscillations was located at the edge between normal and pathological mitochondrial energetic behavior, and was characterized by oxidative stress. We conclude that complex oscillatory dynamics could represent a frequency- and amplitude-modulated H2O2 signaling mechanism that arises under intense oxidative stress. By modulating SOD, cells could have evolved an adaptive compromise between relative constancy and the flexibility required under stressful redox/energetic conditions.

  12. An analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabe, Hideo; Nagai, Hajime (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Banno, Tatsuo

    1994-07-01

    Using a cine mode technique and a gradient-echo magnetic resonance (MR) sequencing, the MR signal intensity of the aqueduct has been evaluated in twelve patients suspected of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). In patients with a substantial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation disturbance in the subarachnoid space, marked changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct were seen during heart cycles, whereas in patients with less of a CSF circulation disturbance, changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct were not as marked. Further, all patients manifesting marked changes in the signal intensity of the aqueduct showed a clinical improvement in their symptoms after undergoing a shunt. These results suggest that cine-mode MRI is useful for assessing the CSF dynamics and may be helpful in selecting patients who would benefit from shunt therapy. (author).

  13. Dynamical analysis of tRNA Gln-GlnRS complex using normal mode calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shugo; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Shimizu, Kentaro

    2003-04-01

    We applied normal mode calculation in internal coordinates to a complex of glutamine transfer RNA (tRNA Gln) and glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (GlnRS). Calculated deviations of atoms agreed well with those obtained from X-ray data. The differences of motions corresponding to low mode frequencies between the free state and the complex state were analyzed. For GlnRS, many motions in the free state were conserved in the complex state, while the dynamics of tRNA Gln was largely affected by the complex formation. Superimposed images of the conserved and non-conserved motions of tRNA Gln clearly indicated the restricted direction of motions in the complex.

  14. Correction of vibrational broadening in molecular dynamics clusters with the normal mode optimization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudecová, Jana; Hopmann, Kathrin H; Bouř, Petr

    2012-01-12

    Vibrational properties of solutions are frequently simulated with clusters of a solute and a few solvent molecules obtained during molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The raw cluster geometries, however, often provide unrealistic vibrational band broadening, for both ab initio and empirical force fields. In this work, partial optimization in normal-mode coordinates is used on empirical basis to reduce the broadening. The origin of the error is discussed on a simplified two-dimensional system, which indicates that the problem is caused by the anharmonic MD potential, mode coupling, and neglect of quantum effects. Then the procedure of partial geometry optimization on Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra is applied and analyzed for the solvated lactamide molecule. Comparison to experiment demonstrates that the normal-mode partial optimization technique with a suitable frequency limit can significantly reduce the broadening error. For lactamide, experimental and simulated vibrational bandwidths are compared; the most realistic theoretical spectra are obtained for partially optimized clusters with the vibrational wavenumber cutoff of about 200 cm(-1).

  15. Effects of dynamic range compression on spatial selective auditory attention in normal-hearing listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew H.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2013-01-01

    Many hearing aids introduce compressive gain to accommodate the reduced dynamic range that often accompanies hearing loss. However, natural sounds produce complicated temporal dynamics in hearing aid compression, as gain is driven by whichever source dominates at a given moment. Moreover, independent compression at the two ears can introduce fluctuations in interaural level differences (ILDs) important for spatial perception. While independent compression can interfere with spatial perception of sound, it does not always interfere with localization accuracy or speech identification. Here, normal-hearing listeners reported a target message played simultaneously with two spatially separated masker messages. We measured the amount of spatial separation required between the target and maskers for subjects to perform at threshold in this task. Fast, syllabic compression that was independent at the two ears increased the required spatial separation, but linking the compressors to provide identical gain to both ears (preserving ILDs) restored much of the deficit caused by fast, independent compression. Effects were less clear for slower compression. Percent-correct performance was lower with independent compression, but only for small spatial separations. These results may help explain differences in previous reports of the effect of compression on spatial perception of sound. PMID:23556599

  16. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  17. College Students' Volunteering: Factors Related to Current Volunteering, Volunteer Settings, and Motives for Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Erin W.; Warta, Samantha; Erichsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Research has not explored the types of settings that college students prefer to volunteer for and how these settings might be influenced by personal factors (e.g., demographic, academic major, volunteering motivation, religiosity). Students from a Midwestern university (N = 406, 71.9% female) completed a survey that inquired about their…

  18. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John, E-mail: wangja@ornl.gov

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A conformational potential effect of fuel assembly contact interaction induced transient shock. • Complex vibration modes and vibration load intensity were observed from fuel assembly system. • The project was able to link the periodic transient shock to spent fuel fatigue strength reduction. - Abstract: In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside the cask during NCT. Dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly. To further evaluate the intensity of contact interaction induced by the local contacts’ impact loading at the spacer grid, detailed models of the actual spring and dimples of the spacer grids were created. The impacts between the fuel rod and springs and dimples were simulated with a 20 g transient shock load. The associated contact interaction intensities, in terms of reaction forces, were estimated from the finite element analyses (FEA) results. The bending moment estimated from the resultant stress on the clad under 20 g transient shock can be used to define the loading in cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) vibration testing for the equivalent condition. To estimate the damage potential of the transient shock to the SNF vibration

  19. Dynamic infrared imaging of cutaneous melanoma and normal skin in patients treated with BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santa Cruz, G.A. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: santacr@cnea.gov.ar; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J. [Universidad Favaloro, Solis 453 (1078), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, S.J. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917 (1033), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gossio, S. [FCEyN, Pabellon II, Ciudad Universitaria (1428), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez, D. [Fundacion Favaloro, Av. Belgrano 1746 (1093), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Roth, B.M.C.; Menendez, P. [Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Av. San Martin 5481 (1417), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pereira, M.D. [Agencia Nacional de Promocion Cientifica y Tecnologica, PAV 22393 (Argentina); Albero, M.; Cubau, L.; Orellano, P. [INVAP S.E., F.P. Moreno 1089 (R8400AMU), S.C. de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Liberman, S.J. [Dpto. de Instrumentacion y Control, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-15

    We recently initiated a program aimed to investigate the suitability of dynamic infrared imaging for following-up nodular melanoma patients treated with BNCT. The reason that makes infrared imaging attractive is the fact that it constitutes a functional and non-invasive imaging method, providing information on the normal and abnormal physiologic response of the nervous and vascular systems, as well as the local metabolic rate and inflammatory processes that ultimately appear as differences in the skin temperature. An infrared camera, with a focal plane array of 320x240 uncooled ferroelectric detectors is employed, which provides a video stream of the infrared emission in the 7-14 {mu}m wavelength band. A double blackbody is used as reference for absolute temperature calibration. After following a protocol for patient preparation and acclimatization, a basal study is performed. Subsequently, the anatomic region of interest is subjected to a provocation test (a cold stimulus), which induces an autonomic vasoconstriction reflex in normal structures, thus enhancing the thermal contrast due to the differences in the vasculature of the different skin regions. Radiation erythema reactions and melanoma nodules possess typically a faster temperature recovery than healthy, non-irradiated skin. However, some other non-pathological structures are also detectable by infrared imaging, (e.g. scars, vessels, arteriovenous anastomoses and injuries), thus requiring a multi-study comparison in order to discriminate the tumor signal. Besides the superficial nodules, which are readily noticeable by infrared imaging, we have detected thermal signals that are coincident with the location of non-palpable nodules, which are observable by CT and ultrasound. Diffuse regions of fast temperature recovery after a cold stimulus were observed between the third and sixth weeks post-BNCT, concurrent with the clinical manifestation of radiation erythema. The location of the erythematous visible and

  20. Investigation of Vegetation Dynamics using Long-Term Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Time-Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Bellone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI is the most extensively used satellite-derived index of vegetation health and density. Since climate is one of the most important factors affecting vegetation condition, satellite-derived vegetation indexes have been often used to evaluate climatic and environmental changes at regional and global scale. The proposed study attempted to investigate the temporal vegetation dynamics in the whole Africa using historical NDVI time-series. Approach: For this aim, 15 day maximum value NDVI composites at 8 km spatial resolution produced from the NASA Global Inventory Mapping and Monitoring System (GIMMS had been used. They were derived from data collected daily by NOAA AVHRR satellites. The AVHRR NDVI GIMMS dataset was freely available and gives global coverage over an extensive time period. First of all, the selected NDVI base data had been geometrically pre-processed and organized into a historical database implemented in order to grant their spatial integration. Starting from this archive, monthly and yearly NDVI historical time-series, extended from 1982-2006, had been then developed and analysed on a pixel basis. Several routines hade been developed in IDL (Interactive Data Language programming tool with the purpose of applying suitable statistical analysis techniques to the historical information in the database in order to identify the long-term trend components of generated NDVI time-series and extract vegetation dynamics. Specific tests had been then considered in order to define the validity of results. Results: The existence of clear regional trends of NDVI, both decreasing and increasing had been showed, which helped to highlight areas subject, respectively to reduction or increase in vegetation greenness. Conclusion: As the relationship between the NDVI and vegetation productivity was well established, these estimated long-term trend components may be also, with much more

  1. The oxidation of tyrosine and tryptophan studied by a molecular dynamics normal hydrogen electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Francesca; Sulpizi, Marialore; Della Valle, Raffaele Guido; Sprik, Michiel

    2011-06-28

    The thermochemical constants for the oxidation of tyrosine and tryptophan through proton coupled electron transfer in aqueous solution have been computed applying a recently developed density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics method for reversible elimination of protons and electrons. This method enables us to estimate the solvation free energy of a proton (H(+)) in a periodic model system from the free energy for the deprotonation of an aqueous hydronium ion (H(3)O(+)). Using the computed solvation free energy of H(+) as reference, the deprotonation and oxidation free energies of an aqueous species can be converted to pK(a) and normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) potentials. This conversion requires certain thermochemical corrections which were first presented in a similar study of the oxidation of hydrobenzoquinone [J. Cheng, M. Sulpizi, and M. Sprik, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 154504 (2009)]. Taking a different view of the thermodynamic status of the hydronium ion, these thermochemical corrections are revised in the present work. The key difference with the previous scheme is that the hydronium is now treated as an intermediate in the transfer of the proton from solution to the gas-phase. The accuracy of the method is assessed by a detailed comparison of the computed pK(a), NHE potentials and dehydrogenation free energies to experiment. As a further application of the technique, we have analyzed the role of the solvent in the oxidation of tyrosine by the tryptophan radical. The free energy change computed for this hydrogen atom transfer reaction is very similar to the gas-phase value, in agreement with experiment. The molecular dynamics results however, show that the minimal solvent effect on the reaction free energy is accompanied by a significant reorganization of the solvent.

  2. My volunteer work

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫子辰

    2015-01-01

    <正>As we all know,being a volunteer can help us learn many things,such as new skills,staying active,improving our social skills,accumulating work experience,making new friends with those who have the same topic,helping us grow more rapidly...I can still recall the days when I worked as a volunteer in a hospital in my city.The unforgetable experience was not only a volunteer work,but also a small society to me.It was in the summer vocation after high school entrance examination,when I had nothing to do but to play computer

  3. [Comparative investigations of osteotropic radionucleides. IV. The dynamics of uptake in normal and abnormal bone (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creutzig, H; Gerdts, K G; Creutzig, A

    1977-03-01

    The dynamics of uptake of osteotropic radionucleides in normal and abnormal bone were studied by means of sequential and functional scans. Various phosphate and phosphonate complexes were compared in vivo and in vitro. Only phosphonates were considered as suitable for bone scanning. In normal bones in beagles, radioactivity after HEDP fell to 65% after two hours, but was 105% with 18F. In relation to healing fractures, the curves differ quantitatively and qualitatively. In this situation, functional curves derived from dynamic scans provide a better parallel with histological findings than does static scintigraphy with an uptake quotient. Sequential and functional scanning are able to document the therapeutic effect of irradiation of bone metastases.

  4. Cooperative motion in liquids: On librational dynamics of chloroform throughout its normal liquid-phase range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Walter G.; Cavagnat, Raymond M.

    1994-03-01

    We have extended the Raman spectral accumulations of the ν3 mode (A1, 367 cm-1) of liquid CHCl3-Cl-35 and its simulation in terms of an orientational equilibrium renewal process [W. G. Rothschild, R. M. Cavagnat, and P. Maraval, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 8922 (1993)] to a temperature of 338 K, about the normal boiling point of the system (335 K). The values of the best-fit parameters predict that the orientational motion of liquid chloroform, even at such a relatively high kinetic energy, is described predominantly by libratory states; their lifetime (˜1 ps) is four times longer than that of the free-rotational steps. The character of the orientational motion of the system, when traversing the range of 213 to 338 K from just above its melting to near its boiling point at about atmospheric pressure, reflects the softening of the liquid-cage structure in terms of an increasing dispersion and/or a decreasing value of the mean libration frequency, a lowering of the depth of its potential well, but near-invariance of its lifetime. Simultaneously, there is an approximately twofold increase in the lifetime of the much shorter stages of free-rotational motion. In essence, the system dynamics remain that of an assembly of librators.

  5. Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Protocol of the Normal Canine Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Krystina L.; Pease, Anthony P.; Ballegeer, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically dynamic susceptibility MRI (DSC-MRI) is routinely performed as a supplement to conventional MRI in human medicine for patients with intracranial neoplasia and cerebrovascular events. There is minimal data on the use of DSC-MRI in veterinary patients and a DSC-MRI protocol in the veterinary patient has not been described. Sixteen normal dogs, 6 years or older were recruited for this study. The sample population included 11 large dogs (>11 kg) and 5 small dogs (11 kg, a useable AIF and perfusion map was generated. One dog less than 11 kg received the same contrast dose and rate. In this patient, the protocol did not generate a useable AIF. The remainder of the dogs less than 11 kg followed a protocol of 0.2 mmol/kg gadolinium-based contrast media at 1.5 ml/s with a 10 ml saline flush at 1.5 ml/s. A useable AIF and perfusion map was generated in the remaining dogs <11 kg using the higher contrast dose and slower rate protocol. This study establishes a contrast dose and administration rate for canine DSC-MRI imaging that is different in dogs greater than 11 kg compared to dogs less than 11 kg. These protocols may be used for future applications to evaluate hemodynamic disturbances in canine intracranial pathology.

  6. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  7. Shack-Hartmann centroid detection method based on high dynamic range imaging and normalization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Javier; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Luis; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Tomas

    2010-05-01

    In the optical quality measuring process of an optical system, including diamond-turning components, the use of a laser light source can produce an undesirable speckle effect in a Shack-Hartmann (SH) CCD sensor. This speckle noise can deteriorate the precision and accuracy of the wavefront sensor measurement. Here we present a SH centroid detection method founded on computer-based techniques and capable of measurement in the presence of strong speckle noise. The method extends the dynamic range imaging capabilities of the SH sensor through the use of a set of different CCD integration times. The resultant extended range spot map is normalized to accurately obtain the spot centroids. The proposed method has been applied to measure the optical quality of the main optical system (MOS) of the mid-infrared instrument telescope smulator. The wavefront at the exit of this optical system is affected by speckle noise when it is illuminated by a laser source and by air turbulence because it has a long back focal length (3017 mm). Using the proposed technique, the MOS wavefront error was measured and satisfactory results were obtained.

  8. Volunteering, Happiness and Public Policy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Is the activity of volunteering something that benefits the volunteer as well as the recipient of the volunteer's activities? We analyze this relationship and apply matching estimators to the large- scale British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) data set to estimate the causal impact of volunteering on happiness. We take into account personality traits that could jointly determine volunteering behaviour and happiness. We find that the causal impact of volunteering on happiness is positive and in...

  9. The Effective Volunteer Teacher

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides information for volunteer teachers of adults and older youth on how to conduct an effective presentation. Topics include focus of presentation, characteristics of the learners, teaching methods, visual aides and evaluations.

  10. NASTEP Volunteer Request (CSA) -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Allows users to add themselves to a Service Area wide ?volunteer for emergency duty? list (was created after Gulf Coast Hurricanes). Approval and email by managers,...

  11. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional…

  12. Discrimination of prostate cancer from normal peripheral zone and central gland tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, M.R.W.; Huisman, H.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jager, G.J.; Leenders, G.J.L.H. van; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.; Rosette, J.J.M.H.C. de la; Blickman, J.G.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate which parameters of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T2 relaxation rate would result in optimal discrimination of prostatic carcinoma from normal peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG) tissues and to correlate these parameters with tumor stage, Gleason score, pat

  13. Wasted Resources: Volunteers and Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    included using proven human resource management techniques, to include screening and providing handbooks of what to expect before volunteers are...the relief & recovery stages.  Operates volunteer centers to serve as clearing houses for relief teams. American Radio Relay League ( ARRL ...cellular and other infrastructure-dependent systems.  ARRL volunteers act as communications volunteers with local public safety organizations. In

  14. Volunteering and Organizational Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lars Skov; Rosdahl, David

    2008-01-01

    members' interests, while others act to help other people in need. Under the heading of ‘voluntary' we include everything from the local church choir, Greenpeace, political parties, unions, hunters' association, nursing homes, to homeless shelters, football clubs and so on. In other words, we all have...... by trained staff at The Survey Department of The Danish National Institute of Social Research. The pre-coded questionnaire applied, was constructed in accordance with the Johns Hopkins manual. A comparison of the characteristics of the 2,319 persons in the data set used for the analysis in this paper...... volunteering within the three major welfare fields: social service, health, and education. It could be argued that this is a more heterogeneous type of volunteering, because some volunteers work in ‘service organizations' aiming at particular client groups (battered women, homeless, elderly people etc.) while...

  15. Be a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴世纪

    2016-01-01

    I’m writing to recommend myself as a volunteer for"Help You Know More about Lianyungang".I’m a student in Class 1,Grade 7.I like English and I’m good at it.I am also good at sports.I am good with my classmates and teachers.I have plenty of free time after school.I also know Lianyungang well.I’d like to be a volunteer because it’s a good chance for me to help others.I can help the tourists

  16. It takes three to tango: 2. Bubble dynamics in basaltic volcanoes and ramifications for modeling normal Strombolian activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckale, Jenny; Hager, Bradford H.; Elkins-Tanton, Linda T.; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2010-07-01

    This is the second paper of two that examine numerical simulations of buoyancy-driven flow in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In the first paper, we demonstrated that a combination of three numerical tools, an extended ghost fluid type method, the level set approach, and the extension velocity technique, accurately simulates complex interface dynamics in the presence of large viscosity contrasts. In this paper, we use this threefold numerical method to investigate bubble dynamics in the conduits of basaltic volcanos with a focus on normal Strombolian eruptions. Strombolian type activity, named after the famously episodic eruptions at Stromboli volcano, is characterized by temporally discrete fountains of incandescent clasts. The mildly explosive nature of normal Strombolian activity, as compared to more effusive variants of basaltic volcanism, is related to the presence of dissolved gas in the magma, yielding a complex two-phase flow problem. We present a detailed scaling analysis allowing identification of the pertinent regime for a given flow problem. The dynamic interactions between gas and magma can be classified into three nondimensional regimes on the basis of bubble sizes and magma viscosity. Resolving the fluid dynamics at the scale of individual bubbles is not equally important in all three regimes: As long as bubbles remain small enough to be spherical, their dynamic interactions are limited compared to the rich spectrum of coalescence and breakup processes observed for deformable bubbles, in particular, once inertia ceases to be negligible. One key finding in our simulations is that both large gas bubbles and large conduit-filling gas pockets ("slugs") are prone to dynamic instabilities that lead to their rapid breakup during buoyancy-driven ascent. We provide upper bound estimates for the maximum stable bubble size in a given magmatic system and discuss the ramifications of our results for two commonly used models of normal Strombolian type

  17. Volunteers who care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeroen Devilee

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Vrijwillig verzorgd. Everyone knows them: volunteers from churches and other civil-society organisations who visit the chronically sick, lonely elderly and other people in need. This service is provided from a wide array of organisations. Unfortunately, it is by no means always clea

  18. Making room for volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    that is singleminded in its instrumental pursuit of victory can thus be less effective than one that is more accommodating- a campaign that makes room for volunteers by accepting that, unlike staffers, they come to politics with a different perspective and conception of what is and ought to be going on....

  19. Volunters for Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jane Kahan

    1983-01-01

    Describes "volunteers for schools," a new concept of community involvement based on changing educational needs. Explains the need for community education programs to encourage community involvement in education and the benefits that can result from increased community involvement in elementary-secondary schools. Notes key elements of…

  20. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  1. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. II. Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ann Dorrit; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Diama, A.;

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of monolayer films of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52) and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite have been studied by quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their carbon...

  2. Retired RNs: perceptions of volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocca-Bates, Katherine C; Neal-Boylan, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    A qualitative study was done to explore the perceptions of volunteering among retired registered nurses (RNs) in Kansas. Participants were volunteers in formal nursing roles or were using their nursing knowledge and experience in non-nursing roles, such as church work. Regardless of the type of volunteer position, retired RNs reported that they use what they have learned as nurses when they volunteer. Volunteering benefits include enhanced self-worth, intellectual stimulation, reduced social isolation, and opportunities to help others. Increased paperwork, new technology, difficulty finding nursing-specific volunteer opportunities, resistance from health care organizations, and a lack of respect for what these nurses know are challenges and barriers to volunteering. Retired RNs have accumulated years of clinical nursing experience and can be helpful to employed nurses. Health care organizations should launch targeted efforts to recruit and utilize retired RN volunteers. Health care professionals who care for older adults should recommend volunteering as a healthful endeavor.

  3. The dynamical transition in proteins and non-Gaussian behavior of low frequency modes in Self Consistent Normal Mode Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jianguang; Ward, Joshua M; Prohofsky, Earl W

    2010-01-01

    Self Consistent Normal Mode Analysis (SCNMA) is applied to heme c type cytochrome f to study temperature dependent protein motion. Classical Normal Mode Analysis (NMA) assumes harmonic behavior and the protein Mean Square Displacement (MSD) has a linear dependence on temperature. This is only consistent with low temperature experimental results. To connect the protein vibrational motions between low temperature and physiological temperature, we have incorporated a fitted set of anharmonic potentials into SCNMA. In addition, Quantum Harmonic Oscillator (QHO) theory has been used to calculate the displacement distribution for individual vibrational modes. We find that the modes involving soft bonds exhibit significant non-Gaussian dynamics at physiological temperature, which suggests it may be the cause of the non-Gaussian behavior of the protein motions probed by Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS). The combined theory displays a dynamical transition caused by the softening of few "torsional" modes in...

  4. Dynamic response characteristics of high temperature superconducting maglev systems: Comparison between Halbach-type and normal permanent magnet guideways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Zheng, J., E-mail: jzheng@swjtu.cn [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Che, T. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Zheng, B.T.; Si, S.S. [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); School of Electrical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China); Deng, Z.G., E-mail: deng@swjtu.cn [Applied Superconductivity Laboratory, State Key Laboratory of Traction Power, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031, P R China (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The loading weight affects the RF tremendously. • Reducing the FCH can improve the stability of the maglev vehicle. • The Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the conventional PMG. • Pre-load is an effective way to enhance the dynamic characteristic of the HTS maglev vehicle. - Abstract: The permanent magnet guideway (PMG) is very important for the performance of the high temperature superconducting (HTS) system in terms of electromagnetic force and operational stability. The dynamic response characteristics of a HTS maglev model levitating on two types of PMG, which are the normal PMG with iron flux concentration and Halbach-type PMG, were investigated by experiments. The dynamic signals for different field-cooling heights (FCHs) and loading/unloading processes were acquired and analyzed by a vibration analyzer and laser displacement sensors. The resonant frequency, stiffness and levitation height of the model were discussed. It was found that the maglev model on the Halbach-type PMG has higher resonant frequency and higher vertical stiffness compared with the normal PMG. However, the low lateral stiffness of the model on the Halbach-type PMG indicates poor lateral stability. Besides, the Halbach-type PMG has better loading capacity than the normal PMG. These results are helpful to design a suitable PMG for the HTS system in practical applications.

  5. Comparative study of normal and branched alkane monolayer films adsorbed on a solid surface. II. Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.; Dimeo, R. M.; Neumann, D. A.; Copley, J. R. D.

    2007-03-01

    The dynamics of monolayer films of the n-alkane tetracosane (n-C24H52) and the branched alkane squalane (C30H62) adsorbed on graphite have been studied by quasielastic and inelastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Both molecules have 24 carbon atoms along their carbon backbone, and squalane has an additional six methyl side groups symmetrically placed along its length. The authors' principal objective has been to determine the influence of the side groups on the dynamics of the squalane monolayer and thereby assess its potential as a nanoscale lubricant. To investigate the dynamics of these monolayers they used both the disk chopper spectrometer (DCS) and the high flux backscattering spectrometer (HFBS) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. These instruments made it possible to study dynamical processes such as molecular diffusive motions and vibrations on very different time scales: 1-40ps (DCS) and 0.1-4ns (HFBS). The MD simulations were done on corresponding time scales and were used to interpret the neutron spectra. The authors found that the dynamics of the two monolayers are qualitatively similar on the respective time scales and that there are only small quantitative differences that can be understood in terms of the different masses and moments of inertia of the two molecules. In the course of this study, the authors developed a procedure to separate out the low-frequency vibrational modes in the spectra, thereby facilitating an analysis of the quasielastic scattering. They conclude that there are no major differences in the monolayer dynamics caused by intramolecular branching. It remains to be seen whether this similarity in monolayer dynamics also holds for the lubricating properties of these molecules in confined geometries.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes.

  7. Continental Dynamics in High Tibetan Plateau: Normal Faulting Type Earthquake Activities and Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jiren; Zhao Zhixin

    2009-01-01

    Various earthquake fault types were analyzed for this study on the crust movement in the high region of the Tibetan plateau by analyzing mechanism solutions and stress fields. The results show that a lot of normal faulting type earthquakes are concentrated in the central High Tibetan plateau. Many of them are nearly perfect normal fault events. The strikes of the fault planes of normal faulting earthquakes are almost in an N-S direction based on the analyses of the Wulff stereonet diagrams of fault plane solutions. It implies that the dislocation slip vectors of the normal faulting type events have quite great components in the E-W direction. The extensions probably are an eastward extensional motion, being mainly a tectonic active regime in the plateau altitudes. The tensional stress in the E-W or NWW-SEE direction predominates earthquake occurrences in the normal event region of the central plateau. The eastward extensional motion in the high Tibetan plateau is attributable to the gravitational collapse of the high plateau and the eastward extrusion of hotter mantle materials beneath the east boundary of the plateau. Extensional motions from the relaxation of the topography and/or gravitational collapse in the high plateau hardly occurred along the N-S direction. The obstruction for the plateau to move eastward is rather weak.

  8. Effect of Dynamic Platform Lateral Step-Up versus Stable Platform Lateral Step-Up Weight Bearing Exercise in Hip Abductor Strengthening on Healthy Male Volunteers - Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagatheesan Alagesan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective & Background: To determine the effect of the dynamic platform lateral step-up and stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in strengthening of hip abductor. Many researchers have reported that strengthening of hip muscles as important component especially hip abductors in lower extremity rehabilitation program. Study Design: Single blinded randomized comparative clinical trial. Methodology: Sixty five healthy college going male subjects (Age group of 18 – 24 years volunteered for this study. They were randomly assigned to one of the 2 groups. One group received the dynamic platform lateral step-up and the other received stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise. The strength measurements were recorded using hand held dynamometer. Results: The results indicate that both groups had a positive effect on the outcome measures. The strength of hip abductors in dynamic platform group improved from a mean value (SD of 19.47(3.59 to 26.93(3.19 and in stable platform group from 19.07(2.32 to 22.67(2.46. Significant difference is also observed between the two groups at p value .05. Conclusion: The study shows that dynamic platform lateral step-up exercise is more beneficial than stable platform lateral step-up weight bearing standing exercise in improving hip abductor muscle strength.

  9. Comparison of dynamic changes in endogenous hormones and sugars between abnormal and normal Castanea mollissima

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Liu; Yunqian Hu; Xiaoxian Li

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the possible functions of endogenous hormones in the flowering of chestnut, concentrations of four endogenous hormones [indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), gibberellic acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), zeatin riboside (ZR)) and the soluble sugars content were measured in both normal and developmentally abnormal Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) during flowering and fruiting stages. Our results showed that the contents of ZR, ABA, and GA exhibited a significant different pattern in normal trees from that in abnormal trees, while the contents of IAA and soluble sugars showed a similar change pattern between them. These results suggest that quantitative changes in endogenous hormones may correspond to different flowering and fruiting mechanisms.

  10. Volunteering and the State

    OpenAIRE

    Hackl, Franz; Halla, Martin; Pruckner, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the capability of the state to affect the individual’s decision to work for free. For this purpose we combine individual-level data from the European and World Values Survey with macroeconomic and political variables for OECD member countries. Empirically we identify three channels for crowding out of voluntary labor. Firstly, an increase in public social expenditure decreases the probability that the individual will volunteer (fiscal crowding out). Secondly, a political c...

  11. Special Report: Volunteers in Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Noel

    1976-01-01

    Many New York librarians view volunteers as a serious job threat; their unions back them in their opposition to volunteers; and some administrators are afraid to launch volunteer programs during the budget crunch because of their probably adverse effect on staff morale. (Author)

  12. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  13. Enhancing Leadership Skills in Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Landry L.; Boyd, Barry

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how professionals leading volunteers can purposefully work toward developing the "leadership identity" of individual volunteers. These concepts and the application of them are presented in the context of Cooperative Extension volunteer groups. Specific methods of developing the leadership identity and capacity of individual…

  14. Recruiting and Supporting Latino Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Beverly B.

    This booklet is intended to help volunteer recruiters better understand characteristics of the Latino community that might impact volunteering. It also suggests strategies or steps to use in successfully recruiting and supporting Latino volunteers. Information is based on a study of Latinos and volunteerism conducted in Oregon in 1999. The…

  15. Virtual screening for potential inhibitors of Mcl-1 conformations sampled by normal modes, molecular dynamics, and nuclear magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glantz-Gashai Y

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Yitav Glantz-Gashai,* Tomer Meirson,* Eli Reuveni, Abraham O Samson Faculty of Medicine in the Galilee, Bar Ilan University, Safed, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1 is often overexpressed in human cancer and is an important target for developing antineoplastic drugs. In this study, a data set containing 2.3 million lead-like molecules and a data set of all the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs are virtually screened for potential Mcl-1 ligands using Protein Data Bank (PDB ID 2MHS. The potential Mcl-1 ligands are evaluated and computationally docked on to three conformation ensembles generated by normal mode analysis (NMA, molecular dynamics (MD, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, respectively. The evaluated potential Mcl-1 ligands are then compared with their clinical use. Remarkably, half of the top 30 potential drugs are used clinically to treat cancer, thus partially validating our virtual screen. The partial validation also favors the idea that the other half of the top 30 potential drugs could be used in the treatment of cancer. The normal mode-, MD-, and NMR-based conformation greatly expand the conformational sampling used herein for in silico identification of potential Mcl-1 inhibitors. Keywords: virtual screening, Mcl-1, molecular dynamics, NMR, normal modes

  16. Cerebral hemodynamics in normal-pressure hydrocephalus. Evaluation by 133Xe inhalation method and dynamic CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, N.; Kusunoki, T.; Wakabayashi, T.; Matsumoto, S.

    1984-09-01

    Cerebral hemodynamics in 31 patients with suspected normal-pressure hydrocephalus were studied by means of the xenon-133 (133Xe) inhalation method and on dynamic computerized tomography (CT) scanning. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is reduced in all patients with dementia. Hypoperfusion was noted in a frontal distribution in these patients compared with normal individuals. There was no difference in CBF patterns between patients with good and those with poor outcome. The CBF was increased following cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting in patients who responded to that procedure: increase in flow correlated with clinical improvement, frontal and temporal lobe CBF was most markedly increased, and the CBF pattern became normal. In contrast, CBF was decreased after shunt placement in patients who were considered to have suffered from degenerative dementia, as evidenced by non-response to shunting. Dynamic computerized tomography studies demonstrated that patients with a good outcome showed a postoperative reduction in mean transit time of contrast material, most prominent in the frontal and temporal gray matter, and slight in the deep frontal structures, but not in the major cerebral vessels. Patients with poor outcome after shunting, however, had an increase in transit time in all regions. This corresponded well with the results as determined by the 133Xe inhalation method.

  17. Exogenous reference gene normalization for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis under dynamic endogenous transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Johnston; Zachary Gallaher; Krzysztof Czaja

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is widely used to investigate transcriptional changes following experimental manipulations to the nervous system. Despite the widespread utilization of qPCR, the interpretation of results is marred by the lack of a suitable reference gene due to the dynamic nature of endogenous transcription. To address this inherent deficiency, we investigated the use of an exogenous spike-in mRNA, luciferase, as an internal reference gene for the 2-ΔΔCt normalization method. To induce dynamic transcription, we systemically administered capsaicin, a neurotoxin selective for C-type sensory neurons expressing the TRPV-1 receptor, to adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. We later isolated nodose ganglia for qPCR analysis with the reference being either exogenous luciferase mRNA or the commonly used endogenous reference β-III tubulin. The exogenous luciferase mRNA reference clearly demonstrated the dynamic expression of the endogenous reference. Furthermore, variability of the endogenous reference would lead to misinterpretation of other genes of interest. In conclusion, traditional reference genes are often unstable under physiologically normal situations, and certainly unstable following the damage to the nervous system. The use of exogenous spike-in reference provides a consistent and easily implemented alternative for the analysis of qPCR data.

  18. Volunteers in the experience economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudiksen, Sune Klok

    2012-01-01

    and discussed. The Questions addressed is how to enlist, motivate and reward volunteers a long the way and how to manage and guide volunteers. Furthermore what kind of special relationship does the volunteer have in the making of the experience design and in the experience of that design. This paper combines......The use of volunteers is becoming more visible and important in the experience economy also in the light of the financial crisis. From a management perspective within both public and private organizations the use of volunteers is an important element partly because they strengthen the brand...... economy volunteers create a new set of dimensions, because they shift between being part of the experience producer and being one of the experience consumers. Volunteers are becoming increasingly more important in the experience economy as they contribute to the overall experience for users or customers...

  19. Volunteer Team Management

    OpenAIRE

    Monych, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looked into volunteer team management in a project in AIESEC in Finland through the action research method. AIESEC in Finland is a non-profit non-government organization with a purpose of “peace and fulfilment of humankinds potential” through development of the youth’s future leadership. AIESEC was not a commissioning party; the project was the basis for the thesis without the supervision of the company. The thesis is based on a project that the author was in charge of, in ...

  20. Dynamic Responses of A Semi-Type Offshore Floating Wind Turbine During Normal State and Emergency Shutdown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡志强; 李良; 王晋; 胡秋皓; 沈马成

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses joint wind-wave induced dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) under normal states and fault event conditions. The analysis in this paper is conducted in time domain, using an aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation code-FAST. Owing to the unique viscous features of the reference system, the original viscous damping model implemented in FAST is replaced with a quadratic one to gain an accurate capture of viscous effects. Simulation cases involve free-decay motion in still water, steady motions in the presence of regular waves and wind as well as dynamic response in operational sea states with and without wind. Simulations also include the cases for transient responses induced by fast blade pitching after emergency shutdown. The features of platform motions, local structural loads and a typical mooring line tension force under a variety of excitations are obtained and investigated.

  1. Dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine during normal state and emergency shutdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhi-qiang; Li, Liang; Wang, Jin; Hu, Qiu-hao; Shen, Ma-cheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper addresses joint wind-wave induced dynamic responses of a semi-type offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT) under normal states and fault event conditions. The analysis in this paper is conducted in time domain, using an aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation code-FAST. Owing to the unique viscous features of the reference system, the original viscous damping model implemented in FAST is replaced with a quadratic one to gain an accurate capture of viscous effects. Simulation cases involve free-decay motion in still water, steady motions in the presence of regular waves and wind as well as dynamic response in operational sea states with and without wind. Simulations also include the cases for transient responses induced by fast blade pitching after emergency shutdown. The features of platform motions, local structural loads and a typical mooring line tension force under a variety of excitations are obtained and investigated.

  2. Using NV centers to probe magnetization dynamics in normal metal/magnetic insulator hybrid system at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Ku, Mark J. H.; Han, Minyong; Casola, Francesco; van der Sar, Toeno; Yacoby, Amir; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2016-05-01

    Understanding magnetization dynamics induced by electric current is of great interest for both fundamental and practical reasons. Great endeavor has been dedicated to spin-orbit torques (SOT) in metallic structures, while quantitative study of analogous phenomena in magnetic insulators remains challenging where transport measurements are not feasible. Recently we have developed techniques using nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to probe few-nanometre-scale correlated-electron magnetic excitations (i.e., spin waves). Here we demonstrate how this powerful tool can be implemented to study magnetization dynamics inside ferromagnetic insulator, Yttrium iron garnet (YIG) with spin injection from electrical current through normal metal (Platinum in our case). Particularly our work will focus on NV magnetic detection, imaging, and spectroscopy of coherent auto-oscillations in Pt/YIG microdisc. Magnetic fluctuations and local temperature measurements, both with nearby NV centers, will also be interesting topics relevant to SOT physics in Pt/YIG hybrid system.

  3. Quantum spin transport and dynamics through a ferromagnetic/normal metal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Bedell, Kevin S.

    2015-12-01

    We study the spin transport in the low-temperature regime (often referred to as the precession-dominated regime) between a ferromagnetic Fermi liquid (FFL) and a normal metal metallic Fermi liquid (NFL), also known as the F/N junction, which is considered as one of the most basic spintronic devices. In particular, we explore the propagation of spin waves and transport of magnetization through the interface of the F/N junction where nonequilibrium spin polarization is created on the normal metal side of the junction by electrical spin injection. We calculate the probable spin wave modes in the precession-dominated regime on both sides of the junction especially on the NFL side where the system is out of equilibrium. Proper boundary conditions at the interface are introduced to establish the transport of the spin properties through the F/N junction. A possible transmission conduction electron spin resonance (CESR) experiment is suggested on the F/N junction to see if the predicted spin wave modes could indeed propagate through the junction. Potential applications based on this novel spin transport feature of the F/N junction are proposed in the end.

  4. Vortex dynamics and surface pressure fluctuations on a normal flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, Arman; Wood, David H.; Martinuzzi, Robert J.; Ferrari, Simon W.; Hu, Yaoping

    2016-11-01

    The effect of vortex formation and interactions on surface pressure fluctuations is examined in the wake of a normal flat plate by analyzing Direct Numerical Simulations at Re =1200. A novel local maximum score-based 3D method is used to track vortex development in the region close to the plate where the major contributions to the surface pressure are generated. Three distinct vortex shedding regimes are identified by changes in the lift and drag fluctuations. The instances of maximum drag coincide with impingement of newly formed vortices on the plate. This results in large and concentrated areas of rotational and strain contributions to generation of pressure fluctuations. Streamwise vortex straining and chordwise stretching are correlated with the large ratios of streamwise to chordwise normal stresses and regions of significant rotational contribution to the pressure. In contrast at the minimum drag, the vorticity field close to the plate is disorganized, and vortex roll-up occurs farther downstream. This leads to a uniform distribution of pressure. This study was supported by Alberta Innovates Technology Futures (AITF) and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  5. Indication for shunt operation of normal pressure hydrocephalus. Combined assessment of infusion test and dynamic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinnai, Takahiro; Nagao, Seigo [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan); Kuyama, Hideyuki

    2000-03-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the diseases that causes a neuro-surgically treatable form of dementia. Although patients with NPH can be treated with shunt operation, reliable indications for the surgery are not yet established. In this study, 20 NPH patients diagnosed by clinical symptoms were subjected to combined assessment by infusion test and dynamic CT scan, a useful diagnostic tool to select a shunt responsive cases. Patients were evaluated by measuring sequential changes in the density of the periventricular lucency (PVL) using dynamic CT scan and continuous lumbar subdural pressure monitoring during an infusion manometric test at a rate of 0.8 ml/min for 30 min. The average lumbar subdural pressure during infusion manometric test in the shunt responsive group was 18.4{+-}5.8 mmHg, which was significantly higher than that in the shunt non-responsive group which was 10.0{+-}4.0 mmHg (p<0.01). The relative changes in PVL density in the dynamic CT was also significantly higher in the shunt responsive group (0.99{+-}0.61 HU) compared to the shunt non-responsive group (0.15{+-}0.32) (p<0.01). Dynamic CT scan with infusion manometric test is useful in the selection of patients with NPH who are likely to respond to shunt surgery. (author)

  6. Challenges in volunteering from cancer care volunteers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaludin, Kauthar Mohamad; Muhammad, Mazanah; Wahat, Nor Wahiza Abdul; Ibrahim, Rahimah

    2013-01-01

    The involvement of non-government organizations (NGOs) and support groups has helped strengthen public health services in addressing cancer care burden. Owing to the contribution of volunteers in cancer care, this article documents a qualitative study that examined challenges in attracting and retaining cancer care volunteers as part of the effort to develop a volunteer recruitment model. Data were collected through three focus group discussions involving 19 cancer support group members in Malaysia. Findings of the study revealed that mobility and locality appeared to be significant in Malaysian context, while the need for financial support and time flexibility are challenges faced by cancer support groups to attract and retain volunteers. The findings imply that cancer care initiatives can benefit from more local volunteers but at the same time these volunteers require flexibility and financial support to sustain their engagement.

  7. Normal dynamic deformation characteristics of non-consecutive jointed rock masses under impact loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Sheng; Jiang, Bowei; Sun, Bing

    2017-08-01

    In order to study deformation characteristics of non-consecutive single jointed rock masses under impact loads, we used the cement mortar materials to make simulative jointed rock mass samples, and tested the samples under impact loads by the drop hammer. Through analyzing the time-history signal of the force and the displacement, first we find that the dynamic compression displacement of the jointed rock mass is significantly larger than that of the intact jointless rock mass, the compression displacement is positively correlated with the joint length and the impact height. Secondly, the vertical compressive displacement of the jointed rock mass is mainly due to the closure of opening joints under small impact loads. Finally, the peak intensity of the intact rock mass is larger than that of the non-consecutive jointed rock mass and negatively correlated with the joint length under the same impact energy.

  8. A Comparison of the Monolayer Dynamics of the Branched Alkane Squalane and the Normal Alkane Tetracosane Adsorbed on Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enevoldsen, A. D.; Hansen, F. Y.; Diama, A.; Taub, H.

    2004-03-01

    Squalane is a branched alkane (C_30H_62) with 24 carbon atoms in its backbone, like the normal alkane tetracosane ( n-C_24H_50), and six symmetrically placed methyl side groups. In general, branched alkanes such as squalane are better lubricants than n-alkanes. We have studied the dynamics of the squalane and tetracosane monolayers by quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on two different time scales. Both experiments and simulations showed that diffusion at 260 K is about 2.5 times faster in the squalane than in the tetracosane system. It is somewhat surprising that the diffusion in a system with a branched alkane is faster than with a normal alkane. A possible explanation is that the squalane molecule does not bind as strongly to the surface as tetracosane, because the MD simulations have shown that the adsorbed molecules have a distorted backbone. This may also explain why the slow intramolecular motions associated with conformational changes are seen at lower temperatures in the squalane than the tetracosane monolayer where they are only observed near melting.

  9. A van der Waals-like Transition Between Normal and Cancerous Phases in Cell Populations Dynamics of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Kang; Wang, Li-Fang; Shen, Jian; Yousif, Alssadig A. M.; He, Peng; Shao, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Min; Kirunda, John B.; Jia, Ya

    2016-11-01

    Based on a deterministic continuous model of cell populations dynamics in the colonic crypt and in colorectal cancer, we propose four combinations of feedback mechanisms in the differentiations from stem cells (SCs) to transit cells (TCs) and then to differentiated cells (DCs), the four combinations include the double linear (LL), the linear and saturating (LS), the saturating and linear (SL), and the double saturating (SS) feedbacks, respectively. The relative fluctuations of the population of SCs, TCs, and DCs around equilibrium states with four feedback mechanisms are studied by using the Langevin method. With the increasing of net growth rate of TCs, it is found that the Fano factors of TCs and DCs go to a peak in a transient phase, and then increase again to infinity in the cases of LS and SS feedbacks. The “up-down-up” characteristic on the Fano factor (like the van der Waals loop) demonstrates that there exists a transient phase between the normal and cancerous phases, our novel findings suggest that the mathematical model with LS or SS feedback might be better to elucidate the dynamics of a normal and abnormal (cancerous) phases.

  10. Numerical Study on Dynamic Response of a Horizontal Layered-Structure Rock Slope under a Normally Incident Sv Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifa Zhan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several post-earthquake investigations have indicated that the slope structure plays a leading role in the stability of rock slopes under dynamic loads. In this paper, the dynamic response of a horizontal layered-structure rock slope under harmonic Sv wave is studied by making use of the Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua method (FLAC. The suitability of FLAC for studying wave transmission across rock joints is validated through comparison with analytical solutions. After parametric studies on Sv wave transmission across the horizontal layered-structure rock slope, it is found that the acceleration amplification coefficient η, which is defined as the ratio of the acceleration at the monitoring point to the value at the toe, wavily increases with an increase of the height along the slope surface. Meanwhile, the fluctuation weakens with normalized joint stiffness K increasing and enhances with normalized joint spacing ξ increasing. The acceleration amplification coefficient of the slope crest ηcrest does not monotonously increase with the increase of ξ, but decreases with the increase of K. Additionally, ηcrest is more sensitive to ξ compared to K. From the contour figures, it can also be found that the contour figures of η take on rhythm, and the effects of ξ on the acceleration amplification coefficient are more obvious compared to the effects on K.

  11. Dynamic feet distance: A new functional assessment during treadmill locomotion in normal and thoracic spinal cord injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Costa, Luís Maltez da; Pereira, José Eduardo; Filipe, Vítor; Couto, Pedro Alexandre; Magalhães, Luís G; Geuna, Stefano; Armada-da-Silva, Paulo A; Maurício, Ana Colette; Varejão, Artur Severo

    2017-09-29

    Of all the detrimental effects of spinal cord injury (SCI), one of the most devastating is the disruption of the ability to perform functional movement. Very little is known on the recovery of hindlimb joint kinematics after clinically-relevant contusive thoracic lesion in experimental animal models. A new functional assessment instrument, the dynamic feet distance (DFD) was used to describe the distance between the two feet throughout the gait cycle in normal and affected rodents. The purpose of this investigation was the evaluation and characterization of the DFD during treadmill locomotion in normal and T9 contusion injured rats, using three-dimensional (3D) instrumented gait analysis. Despite that normal and injured rats showed a similar pattern in the fifth metatarsal head joints distance excursion, we found a significantly wider distance between the feet during the entire gait cycle following spinal injury. This is the first study to quantify the distance between the two feet, throughout the gait cycle, and the biomechanical adjustments made between limbs in laboratory rodents after nervous system injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Theory and Normal Mode Analysis of Change in Protein Vibrational Dynamics on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortisugu, Kei [RIKEN, Japan; Njunda, Brigitte [Computational Molecular Biophysics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    The change of protein vibrations on ligand binding is of functional and thermodynamic importance. Here, this process is characterized using a simple analytical 'ball-and-spring' model and all-atom normal-mode analysis (NMA) of the binding of the cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) to its target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The analytical model predicts that the coupling between protein vibrations and ligand external motion generates entropy-rich, low-frequency vibrations in the complex. This is consistent with the atomistic NMA which reveals vibrational softening in forming the DHFR-MTX complex, a result also in qualitative agreement with neutron-scattering experiments. Energy minimization of the atomistic bound-state (B) structure while gradually decreasing the ligand interaction to zero allows the generation of a hypothetical 'intermediate' (I) state, without the ligand force field but with a structure similar to that of B. In going from I to B, it is found that the vibrational entropies of both the protein and MTX decrease while the complex structure becomes enthalpically stabilized. However, the relatively weak DHFR:MTX interaction energy results in the net entropy gain arising from coupling between the protein and MTX external motion being larger than the loss of vibrational entropy on complex formation. This, together with the I structure being more flexible than the unbound structure, results in the observed vibrational softening on ligand binding.

  13. Dynamics of an optically confined nanoparticle diffusing normal to a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schein, Perry; O'Dell, Dakota; Erickson, David

    2016-06-01

    Here we measure the hindered diffusion of an optically confined nanoparticle in the direction normal to a surface, and we use this to determine the particle-surface interaction profile in terms of the absolute height. These studies are performed using the evanescent field of an optically excited single-mode silicon nitride waveguide, where the particle is confined in a height-dependent potential energy well generated from the balance of optical gradient and surface forces. Using a high-speed cmos camera, we demonstrate the ability to capture the short time-scale diffusion dominated motion for 800-nm-diam polystyrene particles, with measurement times of only a few seconds per particle. Using established theory, we show how this information can be used to estimate the equilibrium separation of the particle from the surface. As this measurement can be made simultaneously with equilibrium statistical mechanical measurements of the particle-surface interaction energy landscape, we demonstrate the ability to determine these in terms of the absolute rather than relative separation height. This enables the comparison of potential energy landscapes of particle-surface interactions measured under different experimental conditions, enhancing the utility of this technique.

  14. A penalized likelihood approach for bivariate conditional normal models for dynamic co-expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Xie, Jichun; Li, Hongzhe

    2011-03-01

    Gene co-expressions have been widely used in the analysis of microarray gene expression data. However, the co-expression patterns between two genes can be mediated by cellular states, as reflected by expression of other genes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and activity of protein kinases. In this article, we introduce a bivariate conditional normal model for identifying the variables that can mediate the co-expression patterns between two genes. Based on this model, we introduce a likelihood ratio (LR) test and a penalized likelihood procedure for identifying the mediators that affect gene co-expression patterns. We propose an efficient computational algorithm based on iterative reweighted least squares and cyclic coordinate descent and have shown that when the tuning parameter in the penalized likelihood is appropriately selected, such a procedure has the oracle property in selecting the variables. We present simulation results to compare with existing methods and show that the LR-based approach can perform similarly or better than the existing method of liquid association and the penalized likelihood procedure can be quite effective in selecting the mediators. We apply the proposed method to yeast gene expression data in order to identify the kinases or single nucleotide polymorphisms that mediate the co-expression patterns between genes.

  15. Electron dynamics in the normal state of cuprates: Spectral function, Fermi surface and ARPES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubov, E. E.

    2016-11-01

    An influence of the electron-phonon interaction on excitation spectrum and damping in a narrow band electron subsystem of cuprates has been investigated. Within the framework of the t-J model an approach to solving a problem of account of both strong electron correlations and local electron-phonon binding with characteristic Einstein mode ω0 in the normal state has been presented. In approximation Hubbard-I it was found an exact solution for the polaron bands. We established that in the low-dimensional system with a pure kinematic part of Hamiltonian a complicated excitation spectrum is realized. It is determined mainly by peculiarities of the lattice Green's function. In the definite area of the electron concentration and hopping integrals a correlation gap may be possible on the Fermi level. Also, in specific cases it is observed a doping evolution of the Fermi surface. We found that the strong electron-phonon binding enforces a degree of coherence of electron-polaron excitations near the Fermi level and spectrum along the nodal direction depends on wave vector module weakly. It corresponds to ARPES data. A possible origin of the experimentally observed kink in the nodal direction of cuprates is explained by fine structure of the polaron band to be formed near the mode -ω0.

  16. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høimyr, N.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Giovannozzi, M.; Gonzalez, A.; Harutyunyan, A.; Jones, P. L.; Karneyeu, A.; Marquina, M. A.; Mcintosh, E.; Segal, B.; Skands, P.; Grey, F.; Lombraña González, D.; Zacharov, I.

    2012-12-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name “LHC@home 2.0” and the BOINC project: “Test4Theory”. At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the “Sixtrack” beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup into a generic BOINC application service that will allow scientists and engineers at CERN to profit from volunteer computing. This paper describes the experience with the two different approaches to volunteer computing as well as the status and outlook of a general BOINC service.

  17. Motivational aspects of sport volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Mičinec, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Title: The motivational aspects of sport volunteerism. Objectives: The main aim of this bachelor work is to find out motivational aspects of sport volunteers, who have taken part in sport event. Methods: In this thesis was used quality method to get informations - specifically it was a structure interview with associated questions. Results: It was find out that it is appropriate to get those volunteers with inner motivation. These volunteers do not need to be so much motivated by external mot...

  18. Psychosocial Differences between Elderly Volunteers and Non-Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, K.I.; Linn, Margaret W.

    1980-01-01

    Volunteer workers over sixty-five were compared to retired elderly who did not engage in work activity. Volunteers had significantly higher degree of life satisfaction, stronger will to live, and fewer symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization. No differences were found on demographics or background. (Author)

  19. Model-free methods of analyzing domain motions in proteins from simulation : A comparison of normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation of lysozyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayward, S; Kitao, A; Berendsen, HJC

    1997-01-01

    Model-free methods are introduced to determine quantities pertaining to protein domain motions from normal mode analyses and molecular dynamics simulations, For the normal mode analysis, the methods are based on the assumption that in low frequency modes, domain motions can be well approximated by m

  20. Volunteering for charity: pride, respect, and the commitment of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2007-05-01

    This study builds upon and extends the social-identity-based model of cooperation with the organization (T. R. Tyler, 1999; T. R. Tyler & S. L. Blader, 2000) to examine commitment and cooperative intent among fundraising volunteers. In Study 1, structural equation modeling indicated that pride and respect related to the intent to remain a volunteer with an organization, and that this relation was mediated primarily by normative organizational commitment. In Study 2, structural equation modeling indicated that the perceived importance of volunteer work was related to pride, that perceived organizational support related to the experience of respect, and that pride and respect mediated the relation between perceived importance and support on the one hand and organizational commitment on the other. Overall, the results suggest that volunteer organizations may do well to implement pride and respect in their volunteer policy, for instance to address the reliability problem (J. L. Pearce, 1993).

  1. To volunteer or not to volunteer? A cross-country study of volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Sardinha, Boguslawa Maria Barszczak; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Comunicação apresentada em 5th Annal Meeting of the Portuguese Economic Journal - Aveiro, 8-9 July 2011 This paper uses data from the 4th wave of the European Values Survey (EVS) to inves- tigate the factors that in uence the decision to participate in volunteering activities, con- sidering both volunteering in general as well as volunteering in particular types of activities. Like previous studies we include several socioeconomic and demographic variables. However our study al...

  2. The role of normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMS) in the context of the phase space setting for chemical reaction dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we give an introduction to the notion of a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold (NHIM) and its role in chemical reaction dynamics.We do this by considering simple examples for one-, two-, and three-degree-of-freedom systems where explicit calculations can be carried out for all of the relevant geometrical structures and their properties can be explicitly understood. We specifically emphasize the notion of a NHIM as a "phase space concept". In particular, we make the observation that the (phase space) NHIM plays the role of "carrying" the (configuration space) properties of a saddle point of the potential energy surface into phase space. We also consider an explicit example of a 2-degree-of-freedom system where a "global" dividing surface can be constructed using two index one saddles and one index two saddle. Such a dividing surface has arisen in several recent applications and, therefore, such a construction may be of wider interest.

  3. Dynamics of dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Zhao, Luming; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of dissipative solitons (DSs) are explored in a high repetition rate normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser for the first time. Despite of the high fundamental repetition rate of 129 MHz and thus the low pulse energy, a DS train with a dechirped pulse width of 418 fs, period-doubling of single and dual DSs, as well as 258 MHz 2nd-order harmonic mode-locking of DSs can be observed in the fiber laser with increasing pump power and appropriate settings. A transmitted semiconductor saturable absorber and a wavelength division multiplexer/isolator/tap hybrid module are employed to simplify the laser configuration, thus not only increasing the repetition rate, but also enhancing the stability and robustness of the fiber laser due to the commercial availability of all the components.

  4. Managing Library Volunteers, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driggers, Preston; Dumas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers are essential to a successful library program--and at a time when deep budget cuts are the norm, there are many libraries that depend on the help of dedicated volunteers, who do everything from shelving books to covering the phones. Whether these are friends, trustees, or community members, managing them effectively is the key to…

  5. My Days as a Volunteer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲; 杨梦倩; 许文侠; 陈丽敏; 陈丽琼; 陈昊; 李雯

    2009-01-01

    Volunteer, a word derived from Latin, carries the meaning of "will". A volunteer is someone who works for a community or for the benefit of environment. There are various forms of voluntary work including "serving food at the local homeless shelter,

  6. Surface relaxations as a tool to distinguish the dynamic interfacial properties of films formed by normal and diseased meibomian lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Georgi As; Yokoi, Norihiko; Ivanova, Slavyana; Tonchev, Vesselin; Nencheva, Yana; Krastev, Rumen

    2014-08-14

    The surface properties of human meibomian lipids (MGS), the major constituent of the tear film (TF) lipid layer, are of key importance for TF stability. The dynamic interfacial properties of films by MGS from normal eyes (nMGS) and eyes with meibomian gland dysfunction (dMGS) were studied using a Langmuir surface balance. The behavior of the samples during dynamic area changes was evaluated by surface pressure-area isotherms and isocycles. The surface dilatational rheology of the films was examined in the frequency range 10(-5) to 1 Hz by the stress-relaxation method. A significant difference was found, with dMGS showing slow viscosity-dominated relaxation at 10(-4) to 10(-3) Hz, whereas nMGS remained predominantly elastic over the whole range. A Cole-Cole plot revealed two characteristic processes contributing to the relaxation, fast (on the scale of characteristic time τ 100 s), the latter prevailing in dMGS films. Brewster angle microscopy revealed better spreading of nMGS at the air-water interface, whereas dMGS layers were non-uniform and patchy. The distinctions in the interfacial properties of the films in vitro correlated with the accelerated degradation of meibum layer pattern at the air-tear interface and with the decreased stability of TF in vivo. These results, and also recent findings on the modest capability of meibum to suppress the evaporation of the aqueous subphase, suggest the need for a re-evaluation of the role of MGS. The probable key function of meibomian lipids might be to form viscoelastic films capable of opposing dilation of the air-tear interface. The impact of temperature on the meibum surface properties is discussed in terms of its possible effect on the normal structure of the film.

  7. Comparison of Goldmann applanation tonometry,rebound tonometry and dynamic contour tonometry in normal and glaucomatous eyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatih; ?zcura; Nilgün; Yildirim; Afsun; Sahin; Ertugrul; ?olak

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the intraocular pressure(IOP)measurements obtained with the rebound tonometry(RT), dynamic contour tonometry(DCT) and Goldmann applanation tonometry(GAT) in normal and glaucomatous eyes and investigate the effects of central corneal thickness(CCT) and corneal curvature(CC) on IOP measurements.METHODS: One hundred and twenty-four eyes of 124 subjects were enrolled in this cross-sectional study.Fifty-six of participants were healthy individuals and 68 of them were glaucomatous patients. IOP was measured on each subject always in the same order, ICare RT-Pascal DCT-GAT, after a minimum interval of 10 min between measurements. CCT and CC were measured using a rotating Scheimpflug camera before the IOP measurements in all subjects. One way repeated measures ANOVA, Pearson correlation coefficient and regression analysis, and Bland-Altman analysis was used for the statistical assessment.RESULTS: Mean IOP for all enrolled eyes was 16.00±3.80 mm Hg for GAT, 16.99 ±4.91 mm Hg for RT, and20.40 ±4.44 mm Hg for DCT. Mean differences between GAT and RT was-1.75±3.41 mm Hg in normal(P <0.001)and-0.37 ±3.00 mm Hg in glaucomatous eyes(P =0.563).Mean differences between GAT and DCT was-4.06 ±3.42 mm Hg in normal(P < 0.001) and-4.67 ±3.12 mm Hg in glaucomatous eyes(P <0.001). GAT and RT were significantly positive correlated with CCT in normal(r2=0.101, P =0.017 and r2=0.331, P <0.001, respectively) and glaucomatous eyes(r2=0.084, P =0.016 and r2=0.123,P =0.003, respectively). DCT was also significantly positive correlated with CCT in normal eyes( r2=0.179,P =0.001) but not in glaucomatous eyes(r2=0.029, P =0.165).All tonometers were unaffected by CC.CONCLUSION: IOP measurements by RT and DCT were significantly higher than GAT. DCT has highest IOP measurements among these tonometers. RT was most influenced tonometer from CCT although all tonometers were significantly positive correlated with CCT except DCT in glaucomatous eyes. CC did not influence IOP

  8. Dynamic contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance imaging study of the nutrition pathway for lumbar intervertebral disk cartilage of normal goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Heng; Ma, Shao-hui; Guan, Min; Han, Bo; Yang, Guang-fu; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Miao

    2011-05-01

    Study of the nutrition pathway for lumbar intervertebral disk cartilage of normal goats. Four lumbar intervertebral disks from each of eight 24-month-old goats (32 disks) were studied. After the goats had been anesthetized, signal intensity changes in the regions of interest (ROI) were observed by dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance scanning. Before and after enhancement at the time points of 0, 5, 10, and 30 mins, and 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 hs, the ROI signal intensity was measured, and the time-signal intensity curve and peak times analyzed. Signal intensity in the vertebral bodies reached a peak at 0 min and decreased quickly thereafter. Signal intensity in the cartilage endplate zones reached the first peak at 30 mins and then went down slightly before increasing to a second peak at 2 hs. Signal intensity in the nuclei pulposus was negative within 5 mins, increased slowly to a peak at 2 hs, and declined thereafter. Nutrient metabolism of the lumbar intervertebral disks of normal goats occurs mainly through the cartilage end-plate pathway. © 2011 Tianjin Hospital and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Stellar Orbital Studies in Normal Spiral Galaxies II: Restrictions to Structural and Dynamical parameters on Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Villegas, Angeles; Moreno, Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Making use of a set of detailed potential models for normal spiral galaxies, we analyze the disk stellar orbital dynamics as the structural and dynamical parameters of the spiral arms (mass, pattern speed and pitch angle) are gradually modified. With this comprehensive study of ordered and chaotic behavior, we constructed an assemblage of orbitally supported galactic models and plausible parameters for orbitally self-consistent spiral arms models. We find that, to maintain orbital support for the spiral arms, the spiral arm mass, M$_{sp}$, must decrease with the increase of the pitch angle, $i$; if $i$ is smaller than $\\sim10\\deg$, M$_{sp}$ can be as large as $\\sim7\\%$, $\\sim6\\%$, $\\sim5\\%$ of the disk mass, for Sa, Sb, and Sc galaxies, respectively. If $i$ increases up to $\\sim25\\deg$, the maximum M$_{sp}$ is $\\sim1\\%$ of the disk mass independently in this case of morphological type. For values larger than these limits, spiral arms would likely act as transient features. Regarding the limits posed by extrem...

  10. The use of normalized cross-correlation analysis for automatic tendon excursion measurement in dynamic ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Stephen J; Ritchings, Tim; Mohamed, Ahmad S A

    2013-04-01

    The work describes an automated method of tracking dynamic ultrasound images using a normalized cross-correlation algorithm, applied to the patellar and gastrocnemius tendon. Displacement was examined during active and passive tendon excursions using B-mode ultrasonography. In the passive test where two regions of interest (2-ROI) were tracked, the automated tracking algorithm showed insignificant deviations from relative zero displacement for the knee (0.01 ± 0.04 mm) and ankle (-0.02 ± 0.04 mm) (P > .05). Similarly, when tracking 1-ROI the passive tests showed no significant differences (P > .05) between automatic and manual methods, 7.50 ± 0.60 vs 7.66 ± 0.63 mm for the patellar and 11.28 ± 1.36 vs 11.17 ± 1.35 mm for the gastrocnemius tests. The active tests gave no significant differences (P > .05) between automatic and manual methods with differences of 0.29 ± 0.04 mm for the patellar and 0.26 ± 0.01 mm for the gastrocnemius. This study showed that automatic tracking of in vivo displacement of tendon during dynamic excursion under load is possible and valid when compared with the standardized method. This approach will save time during analysis and enable discrete areas of the tendon to be examined.

  11. Volunteer Program for the WSIS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    PALEXPO, GENEVA, from 4 - 13 December Are you concerned by the digital divide between the North and the South? Would you like to contribute personally to the success of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), in particular the activities of civil society? Join the team of volunteers and/or offer accommodation to an international volunteer! Contact: Charlotte (Project Coordinator WSIS) Kathy (Volunteer Coordinator) ICVolunteers PO Box 755 - CH-1211 Genève 4 Phone: +41 22 800 1436 - Fax: +41 22 800 14 37 E-mail: charlotte@icvolunteers.org kathy@icvolunteers.org For further information, please consult the website: http://www.icvolunteers.org

  12. Unravelling the escape dynamics and the nature of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds in tidally limited star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotos, Euaggelos E.; Jung, Christof

    2017-02-01

    The escape mechanism of orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit is investigated. A three degrees of freedom model is used for describing the dynamical properties of the Hamiltonian system. The gravitational field of the star cluster is represented by a smooth and spherically symmetric Plummer potential. We distinguish between ordered and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. The Smaller ALignment Index (SALI) method is used for determining the regular or chaotic nature of the orbits. The basins of escape are located and they are also correlated with the corresponding escape time of the orbits. Areas of bounded regular or chaotic motion and basins of escape were found to coexist in the (x, z) plane. The properties of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs), located in the vicinity of the index-1 Lagrange points L1 and L2, are also explored. These manifolds are of paramount importance as they control the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of tidal tails observed in star clusters. Bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov periodic orbits as well as restrictions of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs are deployed for elucidating the dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points. The extended tidal tails, or tidal arms, formed by stars with low velocity which escape through the Lagrange points are monitored. The numerical results of this work are also compared with previous related work.

  13. Volunteer Monitoring to Protect Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The involvement of volunteers in ecological monitoring is a realistic, cost-effective, and beneficial way to obtain important information which might otherwise be unavailable due to lack of resources at government agencies.

  14. Reappraisal of the intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in patients with the so-called "normal pressure hydrocephalus" syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahuquillo, J; Rubio, E; Codina, A; Molins, A; Guitart, J M; Poca, M A; Chasampi, A

    1991-01-01

    Fifty-four shunt-responsive patients were selected from a prospective protocol directed to study patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Patients with gait disturbances, dementia, non-responsive L-Dopa Parkinsonism, urinary or faecal incontinence and an Evans ratio greater or equal to 0.30 on the CT scan were included in the study. As a part of their work-up all patients underwent intracranial pressure monitoring and hydrodynamic studies using Marmarou's bolus test. According to mean intracranial pressure (ICP) and the percentage of high amplitude B-waves, patients were subdivided in the following categories: 1) Active hydrocephalus (mean ICP above 15 mmHg), which is in fact no tone normal pressure hydrocephalus; 2) Compensated unstable hydrocephalus, when mean ICP was below 15 mmHg and B-waves were present in more than 25% of the total recording time and 3) Compensated stable hydrocephalus when ICP was lower or equal to 15 mmHg and beta waves were present in less than 25% of the total recording time. The majority of the patients in this study (70%) presented continuous high or intermittently raised ICP (active or unstable compensated hydrocephalus group). Mean resistance to outflow of CSF (Rout) was 38.8 mm Hg/ml/min in active hydrocephalus and 23.5 mm Hg/ml/min in the compensated group (Students t-test, p less than 0.05). Higher resistance to outflow was found in patients with obliterated cortical sulci and obliterated Sylvian cisterns in the CT scan. No statistically significant correlation was found when plotting the percentage of beta waves against pressure volume index (PVI), compliance or Rout. An exponential correlation was found when plotting beta waves against the sum of conductance to outflow and compliance calculated by PVI method (r = 0.79). Patients with the so-called normal pressure hydrocephalus syndrome have different ICP and CSF dynamic profiles. Additional studies taking into consideration these differences are necessary

  15. Pain perception in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Susanne; Nielsen, Signe Tellerup; Werner, Mads U

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to study the relationship between pain perception and cytokine release during systemic inflammation. We present a randomized crossover trial in healthy volunteers (n = 17) in 37 individual trials. Systemic inflammation was induced by an i.v. bolus of Escherichia coli LPS (2 ng/kg) on two...... in healthy human volunteers leads to reduction in pain pressure threshold and an increase in pain perception to heat stimuli, supporting a relationship between acute systemic inflammation and pain perception....

  16. Contrast enhancement kinetics of normal breast parenchyma in dynamic MR mammography: effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegenscheid, Katrin; Seipel, Rebecca; Laqua, Rene; Hosten, Norbert; Puls, Ralf [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Schmidt, Carsten O. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); Ohlinger, Ralf [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To investigate effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives (OC), and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on normal breast parenchymal contrast enhancement (CE) and non-mass-like enhancing areas in magnetic resonance mammography (MRM). A total of 459 female volunteers (mean age 49.1 {+-} 12.5 years) underwent T1-weighted 3D MRM 1-5 min after bolus injection of gadobutrol. Quantitative analysis was performed in normal breast parenchyma by manually tracing regions of interest and calculating percentage CE. Semiquantitative analysis was performed in non-mass-like enhancing areas, and signal intensity changes were characterised by five predefined kinetic curve types. The influence of OC (n = 69) and HT (n = 24) on CE was studied using random effects models. Breast parenchymal enhancement was significantly higher in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women (P < 0.001). CE decreased significantly with the use of OC (P = 0.01), while HT had negligible effects (P = 0.52). Prevalence of kinetic curve types of non-mass-like enhancement differed strongly between pre- and postmenopausal women (P < 0.0001), but was similar in OC users and non-OC users (P = 0.61) as well as HT users and non-HT users (P = 0.77). Normal breast parenchymal enhancement and non-mass-like enhancing areas were strongly affected by menopausal status, while they were not affected by HT use and only moderately by OC use. (orig.)

  17. Performance of Junctional Tourniquets in Normal Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR), JBSA Fort Sam Houston, Texas (JFK, RSK, APC, JKA, TJW, BSK, RAD , HFP, LCC), and Medical Evacuation Fusion Cell, U.S...tions. Furthermore, the American College of Surgeon’s Committee on Trauma has an External Hemorrhage Control Guideline whose authors specifically mention...improving com- bat casualty care. J Trauma . 2011;71:S4–8. 5. Eastridge BJ, Mabry RL, Seguin P, et al. Death on the battlefield (2001–2011): implications for

  18. Inter-relationship between CSF dynamics and CSF to-and-fro movement in the cervical region as assessed by MR velocity imaging with phase encoding in hydrocephalic and normal patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudo, Sumio (Hitachi General Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan)); Wachi, Akihiko; Sato, Kiyoshi; Sumie, Hirotoshi

    1992-04-01

    The to-and-fro velocity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at C-1 and C-2 spinal-cord levels was measured by means of MR velocity-imaging technique, and the correlation of changes in velocity and various biophysical factors influencing the intracranial pressure environment were analyzed. Eight hydrocephalic patients, male and female, of different ages (both infants and adults), and 11 normal volunteers with a similar age range were investigated. The to-and-fro CSF movement was measured by means of phase-shift techniques with a bipolar gradient pulse. The cerebrospinal opening pressure was also recorded in 6 of the 8 hydrocephalic patients, either through a ventricular catheter reservoir or a spinal catheter inserted in the lumbosacral subarachnoid space; the CSF pulse amplitude, the pressure volume index (PVI), and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro) were also evaluated during the procedure. CSF flowed towards caudally in the early systolic phase of a cardiac stroke, but the flow direction was reversed in the early diastolic phase when the maximum flow rate was reached. Although such a flow pattern was commonly observed in all normal and hydrocephalic subjects, whatever the age, there was a marked difference in flow rate between the infants and the pediatric-adults groups, -i.e., it was 5-10 mm/sec for the former and 10-20 mm/sec for the latter. An abnormally high flow rate (33.0 mm/sec) was observed in the hydrocephalic patients when there was a malfunction of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. A close correlation was found to exist among the changes in the CSF flow velocity, the CSF pressure amplitude, and the CSF outflow resistance (Ro), but not in the PVI. The measurement of the CSF flow velocity by MR velocity imaging appears to have an important role not only in the investigation of CSF dynamics, but also in the diagnosis and treatment of such pathologies as hydrocephalus and ventriculoperitoneal shunt malfunction. (author).

  19. Volunteering among Young People. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo; Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet presents information on the frequency of volunteering, trends in volunteering, and the organizations for which young people volunteer, utilizing data from multiple sources. Unlike many surveys, it shows that volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. Findings of the Civic and…

  20. Volunteering Among Young People. CIRCLE Fact Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mark Hugo

    2004-01-01

    Volunteering rates among young people are generally higher than they are among adults 26 and older. However, measuring volunteer rates among all adults is a difficult task. In recent years, efforts at measuring volunteering have produced widely different estimates, largely because of the methods employed to measure volunteering. For example, the…

  1. Volunteering among High School Students. Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Karlo Barrios

    2007-01-01

    This fact sheet explores volunteering among high school students, ages 16-18. Overall, volunteering among high school students was down slightly in 2006 as compared to 2005. Additional information includes types of volunteer organizations and activities, and ways that high school students become involved in these activities. Volunteer rate vary by…

  2. Exploring Volunteering of Committed Young Catholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of volunteer levels of Catholics from various World regions who attended an international youth Catholic festival. Volunteering levels, types of volunteering, reason for volunteering, Catholic group membership and pro-social values are analysed. An online survey was administered five months after the Festival to…

  3. Parallel Volunteer Learning during Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesmeister, Marilyn K.; Green, Jeremy; Derby, Amy; Bothum, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Lack of time is a hindrance for volunteers to participate in educational opportunities, yet volunteer success in an organization is tied to the orientation and education they receive. Meeting diverse educational needs of volunteers can be a challenge for program managers. Scheduling a Volunteer Learning Track for chaperones that is parallel to a…

  4. Exposure to (12)C particles alters the normal dynamics of brain monoamine metabolism and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V; Belokopytova, Ksenia V; Bazyan, Ara S; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Narkevich, Viktor B; Ivanov, Aleksandr A; Severiukhin, Yury S; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Krasavin, Eugene A

    2016-09-01

    Planning of the deep-space exploration missions raises a number of questions on the radiation protection of astronauts. One of the medical concerns is associated with exposure of a crew to highly energetic particles of galactic cosmic rays. Among many other health disorders, irradiation with these particles has a substantial impact on the central nervous system (CNS). Although radiation damage to CNS has been addressed extensively during the last years, the mechanisms underlying observed impairments remain mostly unknown. The present study reveals neurochemical and behavioural alterations induced in rats by 1Gy of 500MeV/u (12)C particles with a relatively moderate linear energy transfer (10.6keV/μm). It is found that exposure to carbon ions leads to significant modification of the normal monoamine metabolism dynamics as well as the locomotor, exploratory, and anxiety-like behaviours during a two-month period. The obtained results indicate an abnormal redistribution of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain regions after exposure. The most pronounced impairments are detected in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus that illustrate the sensitivity of these brain regions to densely ionizing radiations. It is also shown that exposure to (12)C particles enhances the anxiety in animals and accelerates the age-related reduction in their exploratory capability. The observed monoamine metabolism pattern may indicate the presence of certain compensatory mechanisms being induced in response to irradiation and capable of partial restoration of monoaminergic systems' functions. Overall, these findings support a possibility of CNS damage by space-born particles of a relatively moderate linear energy transfer.

  5. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Juzbasic; Tena Vukasovic Hlupic

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarc...

  6. Volunteers - how to motivate and lead them

    OpenAIRE

    Sajo, Elise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to study the leadership of volunteers and its specific characteristics. The motivation of volunteers is studied and also how the leadership of volunteers is implemented in some volunteer organisations operating in Finland. The thesis also presents basic theories in human motivation and leadership styles to help identify suitable methods for the leadership of volunteers. The thesis process was conducted during the spring of 2014 and consisted of two parts. The fir...

  7. More than Volunteering: Active Citizenship through Youth Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learning and Skills Network (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    This pack aims to provide materials to help all those involved in youth volunteering and post-16 citizenship education to ensure that there are some citizenship learning outcomes from these valuable experiences. The pack has been produced by the Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme to help the integration of citizenship education into post-16…

  8. North Central Region 4-H Volunteers: Documenting Their Contributions and Volunteer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nippolt, Pamela Larson; Pleskac, Sue; Schwartz, Vicki; Swanson, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Documenting volunteer contributions strengthens Extension partnerships with volunteers. A team of North Central Region 4-H volunteer specialists collaborated to conduct a study of 4-H volunteer contributions and impacts related to working with youth within the 4-H program. Over three thousand (3,332) 4-H volunteers from throughout the 12-state…

  9. Communicative competence of sport volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Petrenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the level of communicative competence of sport volunteers. Material & Methods: students of Kharkov state academy of physical culture (2–4 courses who are engaged in sports volunteering. The theoretic-methodological analysis of problem is carried out; the technique "Need for communication and achievements", "Self-checking assessment in communication", "Machiavellianism level" is used for studying of indicators of self-assessment. Results: the high level of communicative competence on three indicators is revealed at sport volunteers: need for communication (60,71%, communicative control (57%, Machiavellianism (91% that gives them the chance to come into contacts with people around quickly, to correlate the reactions to behavior of surrounding people and to operate the emotions, at the same time they are inclined to manipulations and demonstration of the strengths at communication with people. Conclusions: the purposeful psychology and pedagogical preparation, which program has to include the communicative block and the block of personal development, is necessary for sport volunteers.

  10. BOINC service for volunteer cloud computing

    CERN Document Server

    Høimyr, N; Buncic, P; Giovannozzi, M; Gonzalez, A; Harutyunyan, A; Jones, P L; Karneyeu, A; Marquina, M A; Mcintosh, E; Segal, B; Skands, P; Grey, F; Lombraña González, D; Zacharov, I; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2012-01-01

    Since a couple of years, a team at CERN and partners from the Citizen Cyberscience Centre (CCC) have been working on a project that enables general physics simulation programs to run in a virtual machine on volunteer PCs around the world. The project uses the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC) framework. Based on CERNVM and the job management framework Co-Pilot, this project was made available for public beta-testing in August 2011 with Monte Carlo simulations of LHC physics under the name "LHC@home 2.0" and the BOINC project: "Test4Theory". At the same time, CERN's efforts on Volunteer Computing for LHC machine studies have been intensified; this project has previously been known as LHC@home, and has been running the "Sixtrack" beam dynamics application for the LHC accelerator, using a classic BOINC framework without virtual machines. CERN-IT has set up a BOINC server cluster, and has provided and supported the BOINC infrastructure for both projects. CERN intends to evolve the setup i...

  11. A Signal Normalization Technique for Illumination-Based Synchronization of 1,000-fps Real-Time Vision Sensors in Dynamic Scenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Hashimoto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available To acquire images of dynamic scenes from multiple points of view simultaneously, the acquisition time of vision sensors should be synchronized. In this paper, an illumination-based synchronization derived from the phase-locked loop (PLL mechanism based on the signal normalization method is proposed and evaluated. To eliminate the system dependency due to the amplitude fluctuation of the reference illumination, which may be caused by the moving objects or relative positional distance change between the light source and the observed objects, the fluctuant amplitude of the reference signal is normalized framely by the estimated maximum amplitude between the reference signal and its quadrature counterpart to generate a stable synchronization in highly dynamic scenes. Both simulated results and real world experimental results demonstrated successful synchronization result that 1,000-Hz frame rate vision sensors can be successfully synchronized to a LED illumination or its reflected light with satisfactory stability and only 28-μs jitters.

  12. 大学生参与社区志愿服务的现状调查--以上海师范大学为例%A Survey on the Participation Situation of College Students in Community Volunteer Service--A Case Study of Shanghai Normal University

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆

    2013-01-01

    College students to participate in community volunteer activities both is helping others, service to the community, but also is to spread love and civilization, and thus influence and improve the moral standards of society as a whole. The survey showed that the atmosphere of students to participate in community volunteer service is not thick, the volunteer service contents are relatively simple and lack of continuity, motivation to participate in volunteer community service is more mature, with more emphasis on mental stimulation. To carry out in-depth the community volunteer service of college students, it is necessary to step up publicity efforts to create a good volunteer service atmosphere on campus;expand the field of community volunteer service;promote volunteer service legislative process; establish a platform for college students volunteer community service activities, and off-campus volunteer organizational structure.%  大学生参与社区志愿服务活动既是在帮助他人、服务社会,也是在传递爱心和传播文明,进而影响和改善整个社会的道德水平。调查表明,目前大学生参与社区志愿服务的氛围不浓,志愿服务的内容较单一、缺乏服务持续性,参与社区志愿服务的动机较成熟,更为注重精神激励。为使大学生社区志愿服务深入开展,需要加强宣传力度,在校园中营造良好的志愿服务氛围;拓展社区志愿服务的领域;推进志愿服务立法进程;建立大学生社区志愿服务活动的平台,与校外的志愿组织结对。

  13. Towards trusted volunteer grid environments

    CERN Document Server

    Khemakhem, Maher; University, Sousse; Tunisia,; University, Manouba; Tunisia),; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2207

    2010-01-01

    Intensive experiences show and confirm that grid environments can be considered as the most promising way to solve several kinds of problems relating either to cooperative work especially where involved collaborators are dispersed geographically or to some very greedy applications which require enough power of computing or/and storage. Such environments can be classified into two categories; first, dedicated grids where the federated computers are solely devoted to a specific work through its end. Second, Volunteer grids where federated computers are not completely devoted to a specific work but instead they can be randomly and intermittently used, at the same time, for any other purpose or they can be connected or disconnected at will by their owners without any prior notification. Each category of grids includes surely several advantages and disadvantages; nevertheless, we think that volunteer grids are very promising and more convenient especially to build a general multipurpose distributed scalable enviro...

  14. AVOCLOUDY: a simulator of volunteer clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastio, Stefano; Amoretti, Michele; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    providers. The relationship between users and providers is defined by a service-level agreement, where the non-fulfillment of its terms is regulated by the associated penalty fees. Therefore, it is important that the providers adopt proper monitoring and managing strategies. Despite their reduced......, with the purpose to ‘green’ them. Indeed, the combination of data center and volunteer resources, managed by agents, allows one to obtain a more robust and scalable cloud computing platform. The increased challenges in designing such a complex system can benefit from a simulation-based approach, to test autonomic...... management solutions before their deployment in the production environment. However, currently available simulators of cloud platforms are not suitable to model and analyze such heterogeneous, large-scale, and highly dynamic systems. We propose the AVOCLOUDY simulator to fill this gap. This paper presents...

  15. The Understanding of Volunteer Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Arbuzova, K. I.; Арбузова, К. И.

    2012-01-01

    The article considers the notion of volunteer tourism. The author identifies the main meaning of the term, considers the main problems of volunteer tourism and identifies relevant of volunteer tourism. В статье рассматривается понятие волонтерского туризма. Автор статьи определяет основные значения термина, рассматривает основные проблемы волонтерского туризма и определяет значимость волонтерского туризма....

  16. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  17. Normal-state charge dynamics in doped BaFe2As2: Roles of doping and necessary ingredients for superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, M.; Ishida, S.; Tanaka, T.; Kihou, K.; Tomioka, Y.; Saito, T.; Lee, C. H.; Fukazawa, H.; Kohori, Y.; Kakeshita, T.; Iyo, A.; Ito, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.

    2014-01-01

    In high-transition-temperature superconducting cuprates and iron arsenides, chemical doping plays an important role in inducing superconductivity. Whereas in the cuprate case, the dominant role of doping is to inject charge carriers, the role for the iron arsenides is complex owing to carrier multiplicity and the diversity of doping. Here, we present a comparative study of the in-plane resistivity and the optical spectrum of doped BaFe2As2, which allows for separation of coherent (itinerant) and incoherent (highly dissipative) charge dynamics. The coherence of the system is controlled by doping, and the doping evolution of the charge dynamics exhibits a distinct difference between electron and hole doping. It is found in common with any type of doping that superconductivity with high transition temperature emerges when the normal-state charge dynamics maintains incoherence and when the resistivity associated with the coherent channel exhibits dominant temperature-linear dependence. PMID:25077444

  18. Nurses' perceptions of hospice palliative care volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Hastings, Emily; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2008-01-01

    A total of 50 nurses (hospital and home care) responded to a survey designed to measure: (1) their attitudes toward, and knowledge of, hospice palliative care volunteers; (2) the types of tasks they felt it was appropriate for volunteers to perform; and (3) how valuable they felt different members of the hospice palliative care team are. In addition, they were asked to respond to some open-ended questions (eg, "Do you feel that it is appropriate for hospice palliative care volunteers to know patient medical information?"). The nurses' responses to the "Attitude/Knowledge" part of the survey revealed that they generally held positive attitudes toward volunteers. The majority of the nurses felt that it was appropriate for volunteers to perform most of the tasks listed, except for hands-on patient care. Nurses rated the value of nurses, family members, doctors, and pharmacists significantly higher than volunteers. Fifty-three percent of the nurses felt that volunteers should know patient medical information, and 77% thought that volunteers should have the opportunity to provide input regarding patient care. Also, 75% of the nurses felt that volunteers made their jobs easier, and 56% felt that volunteers should be included in team meetings. When asked to list the topics covered in a hospice palliative care volunteer training program, 73% of the nurses indicated that they were not sure or did not know what topics were covered, indicating a lack of knowledge regarding volunteer training.

  19. Student Volunteering in English Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Clare; Quinn, Jocey

    2010-01-01

    Volunteering in English higher education has come under political scrutiny recently, with strong cross-party support for schemes to promote undergraduate volunteering in particular. Recent targeted initiatives and proposals have sought to strengthen both the role of volunteering in higher education and synergies between higher education and…

  20. 76 FR 20215 - National Volunteer Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... real and lasting impact on the lives of millions of women and men across the globe. Last year, nearly... they see a need. During National Volunteer Week, we celebrate the profound impact of volunteers and... week by volunteering in service projects across our country and pledging to make service a part...

  1. The Contribution of Social Resources To Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John; Musick, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a theory of how social capital contributes to volunteering, hypothesizing that social capital has a stronger effect on volunteering among people with more human capital and socioeconomic status. Specifies a test (of the effects) of social capital on volunteering and discusses the findings (of the test) in detail. (CMK)

  2. Can micro-volunteering help in Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available is convenient to the micro-volunteer, and in small pieces of time (bitesized). This paper looks at a micro-volunteering project where participants can volunteer for five to ten minutes at a time using a smart phone and assist pupils with their mathematics....

  3. Direct assignment of molecular vibrations via normal mode analysis of the neutron dynamic pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry-Petit, A. M., E-mail: mcqueen@jhu.edu, E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu; Sheckelton, J. P.; McQueen, T. M., E-mail: mcqueen@jhu.edu, E-mail: afry@fullerton.edu [Department of Chemistry, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute for Quantum Matter and Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rebola, A. F.; Fennie, C. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mourigal, M.; Valentine, M.; Drichko, N. [Institute for Quantum Matter and Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-09-28

    For over a century, vibrational spectroscopy has enhanced the study of materials. Yet, assignment of particular molecular motions to vibrational excitations has relied on indirect methods. Here, we demonstrate that applying group theoretical methods to the dynamic pair distribution function analysis of neutron scattering data provides direct access to the individual atomic displacements responsible for these excitations. Applied to the molecule-based frustrated magnet with a potential magnetic valence-bond state, LiZn{sub 2}Mo{sub 3}O{sub 8}, this approach allows direct assignment of the constrained rotational mode of Mo{sub 3}O{sub 13} clusters and internal modes of MoO{sub 6} polyhedra. We anticipate that coupling this well known data analysis technique with dynamic pair distribution function analysis will have broad application in connecting structural dynamics to physical properties in a wide range of molecular and solid state systems.

  4. Volunteer Tourism in Japan: Its Potential in Transforming “Non-volunteers” to Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Yoda, Mami

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of volunteer tourism to transform “non-volunteers” to volunteers in Japan. Volunteer tourism is defined as travel to a location outside the immediate vicinity of daily life in order to engage in organized volunteer activities. In-depth interviews and a survey were conducted to the employees of Haagen-Dazs Japan, Inc., who participated to volunteer tours to the Kiritappu Wetland Trust in Hokkaido. The study closely examines the motivations of the participants...

  5. Insulin Dynamics in Young Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Normal Glucose Tolerance across Categories of Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Castagneto-Gissey, Lidia; Arrighi, Eugenio; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Brufani, Claudia; Luciano, Rosa; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2014-01-01

    Background Evidence favours insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia as the predominant, perhaps primary, defects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of the present study was to evaluate insulin metabolism in young women with PCOS but normal glucose tolerance as compared with age, body mass index and insulin resistance-matched controls to answer the question whether women with PCOS hypersecrete insulin in comparison to appropriately insulin resistance-matched controls. Research Design and Methods Sixty-nine cases were divided according to their body mass index (BMI) in normal-weight (N = 29), overweight (N = 24) and obese patients (N = 16). Controls were 479 healthy women (age 16–49 y). Whole body Insulin Sensitivity (WBISI), fasting, and total insulin secretion were estimated following an oral glucose tolerance test (C-peptide deconvolution method). Results Across classes of BMI, PCOS patients had greater insulin resistance than matched controls (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons), but they showed higher fasting and total insulin secretion than their age, BMI and insulin resistance-matched peers (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons). Conclusion Women with PCOS show higher insulin resistance but also larger insulin secretion to maintain normal glucose homeostasis than age-, BMI- and insulin resistance-matched controls. PMID:24705280

  6. Insulin dynamics in young women with polycystic ovary syndrome and normal glucose tolerance across categories of body mass index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melania Manco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence favours insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia as the predominant, perhaps primary, defects in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. The aim of the present study was to evaluate insulin metabolism in young women with PCOS but normal glucose tolerance as compared with age, body mass index and insulin resistance-matched controls to answer the question whether women with PCOS hypersecrete insulin in comparison to appropriately insulin resistance-matched controls. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Sixty-nine cases were divided according to their body mass index (BMI in normal-weight (N = 29, overweight (N = 24 and obese patients (N = 16. Controls were 479 healthy women (age 16-49 y. Whole body Insulin Sensitivity (WBISI, fasting, and total insulin secretion were estimated following an oral glucose tolerance test (C-peptide deconvolution method. RESULTS: Across classes of BMI, PCOS patients had greater insulin resistance than matched controls (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons, but they showed higher fasting and total insulin secretion than their age, BMI and insulin resistance-matched peers (p<0.0001 for all the comparisons. CONCLUSION: Women with PCOS show higher insulin resistance but also larger insulin secretion to maintain normal glucose homeostasis than age-, BMI- and insulin resistance-matched controls.

  7. An Analysis of volunteer motivation in HIV/AIDS community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... engage in volunteering and factors that maintain volunteer motivation. ... Volunteers were intrinsically motivated and inspired by their religious beliefs ... Volunteers reported drawing satisfaction from the positive impact on the recipient's life.

  8. Towards a sustainable volunteer mobile, online tutoring model for mathematics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer workers contribute to many aspects of society. There are volunteer organisations which formally assist in many areas such as health, education, housing, safety and security. Virtual volunteering is less common. Virtual volunteering...

  9. Lattice dynamics and normal coordinate analysis of HTSC Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohan, S. [Pondicherry Univ. (India). Raman School of Physics; Sonamuthu, K. [J.N.R. Mahavidyalaya, Port Blair, Andaman (India)

    2002-02-01

    The lattice dynamics of the high-temperature superconductor Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been investigated on the basis of the three-body-force shell model (TSM). The various interactions between ions are treated in a general way without making them numerically equal. The phonon frequency at the zone centre of Brillouin zone are presented and the vibrational assignments are discussed. Further, a normal coordinate calculation has also been employed to study the vibrational analysis of this compound. The normal coordinate analysis of the superconductor Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} has been calculated by using Wilson's F-G matrix method which is useful for the confirmation of our present investigation. The vibrational frequencies and the potential energy distribution (PED) of the optically active phonon modes are also presented. (orig.)

  10. Dynamics of oligodendrocyte responses to anterograde axonal (Wallerian) and terminal degeneration in normal and TNF-transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drøjdahl, Nina; Fenger, Christina; Nielsen, Helle H

    2004-01-01

    degeneration and lesion-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice with the response in genetically normal mice. Transectioning of the entorhino-dentate perforant path axonal projection increased hippocampal TNF mRNA expression in both types of mice, but to significantly...... larger levels in the TNF-transgenics. At 5 days after axonal transection, numbers of oligodendrocytes and myelin basic protein (MBP) mRNA expression in the denervated dentate gyrus in TNF-transgenic mice had increased to the same extent as in nontransgenic littermates. At this time, transgenics showed...

  11. The TSH dynamics in upperand low-normal range in patients with primary hypothyroidism: clinical presentation, well-being and quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Podzolkov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In our study we try to determine whether small changes in thyroxine treatment is effective in patients with symptoms of hypothyroidism but with thyroid function tests within the reference range, and to investigate the effect of thyroxine treatment on psychological and physical wellbeing in healthy participants. Sixty ambulatory patients with primary hypothyroidism receiving levothyroxine (L-T4 participated in the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to their TSH level. The first group was in TSH low-normal range (0.4–2.0 mU/l, the second in upper-normal (2.1–4.0 mU/l range. We analyzed the results of several tests: “12 classical hypothyroidism symp- toms”, SF36, HARS, HDRS, Zung scale at baseline and in 3 months. With a small-dose changes we cross the groups to compare the results. Results: At baseline analyze there was a small differ-ence between two groups. Women with in the upper-normal TSH range had more expressed symptoms of hypothyroidism. After small changes in thyroxine treatment we could not say that the clinical picture of a hypothyroidism has changed cardinally, however, it is necessary to notice that there was dynamics of separate symptoms. The same picture was noticed with the depression and anxiety levels. The meanings were rather close and small dose changes in L-T4 treatment were more expressed in group with upper-normal range. The positive dynamics of well-being after dose changing were registered in both groups. Conclusion: Small changes in T4 dosage do not produce measurable changes in hypothyroid symptoms, well-being, or quality of life.

  12. Dynamics and ‘normal stress’ evaluation of dilute suspensions of periodically forced prolate spheroids in a quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds numbers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Madhukar; P V Kumar; T R Ramamohan; I S Shivakumara

    2010-12-01

    The problem of determining the force acting on a particle in a fluid where the motion of the fluid and the particle is given has been considered in some detail in the literature. In this work, we propose an example of a new class of problems where, the fluid is quiescent and the effect of an external periodic force on the motion of the particle is determined at low non-zero Reynolds numbers. We present an analysis of the dynamics of dilute suspensions of periodically forced prolate spheroids in a quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds numbers including the effects of both convective and unsteady inertia. The inclusion of both forms of inertia leads to a nonlinear integro – differential equation which is solved numerically for the velocity and displacement of the individual particle. We show that a ‘normal stress’ like parameter can be evaluated using standard techniques of Batchelor. Hence this system allows for an experimentally accessible measurable macroscopic parameter, analogous to the ‘normal stress’, which can be related to the dynamics of individual particles. We note that this ‘normal stress’ arises from the internal fluctuations induced by the periodic force. In addition, a preliminary analysis leading to a possible application of separating particles by shape is presented. We feel that our results show possibilities of being technologically important since the ‘normal stress’ depends strongly on the controllable parameters and our results may lead to insights in the development of active dampeners and smart fluids. Since we see complex behaviour even in this simple system, it is expected that the macroscopic behaviour of such suspensions may be much more complex in more complex flows.

  13. Normal-state charge dynamics of ternary platinum germanide superconductor La{sub 2}Pt{sub 3}Ge{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, S. J.; Moon, S. J. [Dept. of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, N. H.; Cho, B. K. [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We report on the infrared spectroscopic studies of the normal-state electronic response of rare-earth ternary platinum germanide superconductor La{sub 2}Pt{sub 3}Ge{sub 5}. We analyzed the temperature-dependent optical conductivity spectra using the Drude-Lorentz oscillator model. We found that the two Drude responses with distinct scattering rates are required to explain the charge dynamics at 10 K while a single Drude mode could reproduce the far-infrared conductivity at higher temperatures. Our results indicated the two-band character of the electronic structure and highlighted the disparate temperature evolution of the electrodynamics of the two electronic states.

  14. Value-Expressive Volunteer Motivation and Volunteering by Older Adults: Relationships With Religiosity and Spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris A; O'Rourke, Holly P; Keller, Brian; Johnson, Kathryn A; Enders, Craig

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the interplay among religiosity, spirituality, value-expressive volunteer motivation, and volunteering. We examined religiosity and spirituality as predictors of value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering and whether religiosity moderated the relations between (a) spirituality and value-expressive volunteer motivation and (b) value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering. After applying multiple imputation procedures to data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study among participants 64-67 years old who survived beyond 2004 (N = 8,148), we carried out regression analyses to predict value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering from religiosity and spirituality controlling for demographic variables, physical, emotional, and cognitive health, health risk behaviors, and personality traits. Both religiosity and spirituality were significant (p religiosity were significant (p Religiosity amplified the relation between value-expressive volunteer motivation and volunteering (p .45). Religiosity may provide the way, and value-expressive volunteer motivation the will, to volunteer. The implications of our findings for the forecasted shortage of older volunteers are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A unified normal mode approach to dynamic tides and its application to rotating Sun-like stars

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, P B; Chernov, S V

    2013-01-01

    We determine the response of a uniformly rotating star to tidal perturbations due to a companion. General periodic orbits and parabolic flybys are considered. We evaluate energy and angular momentum exchange rates as a sum of contributions from normal modes allowing for dissipative processes. We consider the case when the response is dominated by the contribution of an identifiable regular spectrum of low frequency modes, such as gravity modes and evaluate it in the limit of very weak dissipation. Our formalism may be applied both to Sun-like stars with radiative cores and convective envelopes and to more massive stars with convective cores and radiative envelopes. We provide general expressions for transfer of energy and angular momentum valid for an orbit with any eccentricity. Detailed calculations are made for Sun-like stars in the slow rotation regime where centrifugal distortion is neglected in the equilibrium and the traditional approximation is made for the normal modes. We use both a WKBJ procedure a...

  16. Influences of the breathing route on upper airway dynamics properties in normal awake subjects with constant mouth opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Verin, Eric; Sériès, Frédéric

    2006-11-01

    MB (mouth breathing) promotes the occurrence of sleep-disordered breathing even in non-apnoeic subjects. Considering that MO (mouth opening) contributes to an increase in UA (upper airway) collapsibility independently of MB, the aim of the present study was to assess the influence of breathing route on UA dynamics in the presence of MO. Bilateral anterior magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation was performed 2 s after expiratory onset in 12 healthy male subjects during wakefulness (age, 50+/-5 years; body mass index, 27.8+/-2.4 kg/m(2)) during MB through a mouthpiece and during exclusive NB (nasal breathing) with the same mouthpiece in place. Twitch-induced V(I) (instantaneous flow), P(ph) and P(es) (pharyngeal and oesophageal pressures respectively) were recorded and the corresponding resistances were measured. A polynomial regression model, V(I)=k(1)P(d)+k(2)P(d)(2), was used to characterize flow-pressure relationship and to determine the P(d) value at which UA collapses. There was no difference in UA dynamic properties between NB and MB when UA collapse occurred above the pharyngeal catheter. For twitches where UA collapse occurred lower in the UA, pharyngeal resistance decreased from NB to MB (2.0+/-0.3 and 1.5+/-0.2 cmH(2)Oxl(-1)xs respectively; P=0.02; values are means+/-S.D.), whereas closing pressure increased (-25.7+/-10.1 and -18.0+/-3.0 cmH(2)O respectively; P=0.04). We conclude that (i) in the presence of MO the dynamic properties of the proximal UA free of phasic activity do not differ between NB and MB, and (ii) MB decreases the upstream resistance and increases collapsibility of the distal UA.

  17. The Salmonella effector SseJ disrupts microtubule dynamics when ectopically expressed in normal rat kidney cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Sally A.; Hodgkinson, Michael R.; Dowle, Adam A.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella effector protein SseJ is secreted by Salmonella into the host cell cytoplasm where it can then modify host cell processes. Whilst host cell small GTPase RhoA has previously been shown to activate the acyl-transferase activity of SseJ we show here an un-described effect of SseJ protein production upon microtubule dynamism. SseJ prevents microtubule collapse and this is independent of SseJ’s acyl-transferase activity. We speculate that the effects of SseJ on microtubules would be mediated via its known interactions with the small GTPases of the Rho family. PMID:28235057

  18. Cryptosporidium muris: Infectivity and Illness in Healthy Adult Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Cynthia L.; Okhuysen, Pablo C.; Langer-Curry, Rebecca C.; Lupo, Philip J.; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul

    2015-01-01

    Although Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis cause the majority of human cryptosporidiosis cases, other Cryptosporidium species are also capable of infecting humans, particularly when individuals are immunocompromised. Ten C. muris cases have been reported, primarily in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -positive patients with diarrhea. However, asymptomatic cases were reported in two HIV-negative children, and in another case, age and immune status were not described. This study examines the infectivity of C. muris in six healthy adults. Volunteers were challenged with 105 C. muris oocysts and monitored for 6 weeks for infection and/or illness. All six patients became infected. Two patients experienced a self-limited diarrheal illness. Total oocysts shed during the study ranged from 6.7 × 106 to 4.1 × 108, and the number was slightly higher in volunteers with diarrhea (2.8 × 108) than asymptomatic shedders (4.4 × 107). C. muris-infected subjects shed oocysts longer than occurred with other species studied in healthy volunteers. Three volunteers shed oocysts for 7 months. Physical examinations were normal, with no reported recurrence of diarrhea or other gastrointestinal complaints. Two persistent shedders were treated with nitazoxanide, and the infection was resolved. Thus, healthy adults are susceptible to C. muris, which can cause mild diarrhea and result in persistent, asymptomatic infection. PMID:25311695

  19. The liquid organization of volunteer tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steele, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Drawing from developments in sociology and organizational studies, this paper argues for a new understanding of volunteer tourism as liquid organization. It aims to explore the organization of volunteer tourism using a liquid organization perspective and to better understand the potential...... implications of this liquidity on the responsibility of volunteer tourism organizations to host com- munities. The analysis is based on data collected from 80 volunteer tourism organizations. The findings reveal that the volunteer tourism organizations show characteristics of liquid organiza- tion to varying...... degrees. The significance of the research is to problematize the way in which the institutional characteristics of volunteer tourism are (not) conceptualized in current literature and to introduce liquid organization as a means of reinvigorating debate about responsibility....

  20. Perilymphatic pressure dynamics following posture change in patients with Menière's disease and in normal hearing subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosingh, H J; Wit, H P; Albers, F W

    1998-01-01

    The hydrostatic pressure of the inner ear depends on the cerebrospinal fluid pressure through the cochlear aqueduct. The time-course of inner ear pressure change following rapid change in cerebrospinal fluid pressure is related to the aqueduct patency. In this study the patency of the cochlear aqueduct in 27 patients with Menière's disease (28 affected ears, 16 non-affected ears) and in 12 normal hearing subjects (18 control ears) was assessed non-invasively by means of the MMS-10 Tympanic Displacement Analyser. Following a rapid change in body position, changes in intracranial cerebrospinal fluid pressure were found to influence perilymphatic pressure within 1 min. No significant differences were found among affected ears, non-affected ears and control ears.

  1. 20 CFR 10.730 - What are the conditions of coverage for Peace Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? 10.730 Section... Corps volunteers and volunteer leaders injured while serving outside the United States? (a) Any injury sustained by a volunteer or volunteer leader while he or she is located abroad shall be presumed to...

  2. Post-Event Volunteering Legacy: Did the London 2012 Games Induce a Sustainable Volunteer Engagement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Koutrou

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70,000 volunteers involved and to provide a post-event volunteer legacy. A total of 77 individuals who had acted as volunteers in London 2012 were contacted approximately four years after the Games and agreed to complete a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer experience for most of the volunteers who completed the survey, with the main motivation to volunteer being anything related to the Olympic Games. Just over half of the respondents are currently volunteering. Lack of time is shown to be the main barrier towards further volunteering commitment. Only half of respondents had been contacted by a volunteering scheme after London 2012. The implications of the findings for a potential volunteering legacy are then explored.

  3. The Effect of Volunteer Work on Employability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrovski, Erik

    2017-01-01

    sample of 1,867 individuals of working age. The survey data are linked to administrative registers containing individual-level data on unemployment. A combination of detailed controls, lagged dependent variables, and instrumental variable regression is used to determine cause and effect. Our findings......In addition to benefiting others, volunteer work is argued to supply volunteers themselves with skills, reputation, and social connections that increase overall employability. We test this hypothesized causal link between volunteer work and employability with a high-quality 2012 Danish survey...... show that performing volunteer work does not statistically significantly affect the risk or rate of unemployment for the typical individual on the labour market....

  4. Normal Functioning Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  5. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A.; Rege, Nirmala N.; Tadvi, Firoz M.; Solanki, Punita V.; Kene, Kirti R.; Shirolkar, Sudatta G.; Shefali N Pandey; Vaidya, Rama A.; Ashok B Vaidya

    2012-01-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a “rasayana” drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two ...

  6. Impact of Dynamic Orbital Correlations on Magnetic Excitations in the Normal State of Iron-Based Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Lv, Weicheng; Tranquada, John; Phillips, Philip

    2013-03-01

    We show here that orbital degrees of freedom produce a distinct signature in the magnetic excitation spectrum of iron-based superconductors above the magnetic ordering temperature. Because dxz and dyz orbitals are strongly connected with Fermi surface topology, the nature of magnetic excitations can be modified significantly due to the presence of either static or fluctuating orbital correlations. Within a five-orbital itinerant model, we show that static orbital order generally leads to an enhancement of commensurate magnetic excitations even when the original Fermi surface lacks nesting at commensurate wavevectors. When long-range orbital order is absent, Gaussian fluctuations beyond the standard random-phase approximation capture the effects of fluctuating orbital correlations on the magnetic excitations. We find that commensurate magnetic excitations can also be enhanced if the orbital correlations are strong. We propose that this unusual incommensurate-to-commensurate transformation is an important signature to distinguish orbital from spin physics in the normal state of iron-based superconductors. This work is supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center, Grant No. DE-AC0298CH1088.

  7. Assessment of normal left atrial appendage anatomy and function over gender and ages by dynamic cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucebci, Samy; Velasco, Stephane; Duboe, Pier-Olivier; Tasu, Jean-Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Poitiers (France); Pambrun, Thomas [University of Poitiers, University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Poitiers (France); Ingrand, Pierre [University of Poitiers, University Institute of Public Health, Poitiers (France)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate variations in anatomy and function according to age and gender using cardiac computed tomography (CT) in a large prospective cohort of healthy patients. The left atrial appendage (LAA) is considered the most frequent site of intracardiac thrombus formation. However, variations in normal in vivo anatomy and function according to age and gender remain largely unknown. Three-dimensional (3D) cardiac reconstructions of the LAA were performed from CT scans of 193 consecutive patients. Parameters measured included LAA number of lobes, anatomical position of the LAA tip, angulation measured between the proximal and distal portions, minimum (iVol{sub min}) and maximum (iVol{sub max}) volumes indexed to body surface area (BSA), and ejection fraction (LAAEF). Relationship with age was assessed for each parameter. We found that men had longer and wider LAAs. The iVol{sub min} and iVol{sub max} increased by 0.23 and 0.19 ml per decade, respectively, while LAAEF decreased by 2 % per decade in both sexes. Although LAA volumes increase, LAAEF decreases with age in both sexes. (orig.)

  8. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Smith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volunteering behaviour, motivations and benefits across the five Western predominately English-speaking countries. Altruism and self-orientated career motivations and benefits were most important to students; however volunteering and non-volunteering students differed in the relative value they attached to volunteering for CV-enhancement and social factors.

  9. Dynamical response of the "GGG" rotor to test the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Comandi, G L; Chiofalo, M L; Nobili, A M; Polacco, E; Toncelli, R

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the Equivalence Principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration $\\eta$ between two test bodies -of different composition, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass- if the measurement is made to the level of $\\eta\\simeq 10^{-13}$ or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments, gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the Ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following paper (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into superc...

  10. Low-dose dynamic myocardial perfusion CT image reconstruction using pre-contrast normal-dose CT scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Changfei; Han, Ce; Gan, Guanghui; Deng, Zhenxiang; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yi, Jinling; Zheng, Xiaomin; Xie, Congying; Jin, Xiance

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic myocardial perfusion CT (DMP-CT) imaging provides quantitative functional information for diagnosis and risk stratification of coronary artery disease by calculating myocardial perfusion hemodynamic parameter (MPHP) maps. However, the level of radiation delivered by dynamic sequential scan protocol can be potentially high. The purpose of this work is to develop a pre-contrast normal-dose scan induced structure tensor total variation regularization based on the penalized weighted least-squares (PWLS) criteria to improve the image quality of DMP-CT with a low-mAs CT acquisition. For simplicity, the present approach was termed as ‘PWLS-ndiSTV’. Specifically, the ndiSTV regularization takes into account the spatial-temporal structure information of DMP-CT data and further exploits the higher order derivatives of the objective images to enhance denoising performance. Subsequently, an effective optimization algorithm based on the split-Bregman approach was adopted to minimize the associative objective function. Evaluations with modified dynamic XCAT phantom and preclinical porcine datasets have demonstrated that the proposed PWLS-ndiSTV approach can achieve promising gains over other existing approaches in terms of noise-induced artifacts mitigation, edge details preservation, and accurate MPHP maps calculation.

  11. Influence of the aortic valve leaflets on the fluid-dynamics in aorta in presence of a normally functioning bicuspid valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, D; Vergara, C; Faggiano, E; Stevanella, M; Conti, C; Redaelli, A; Puppini, G; Faggian, G; Formaggia, L; Luciani, G B

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we consider the blood fluid-dynamics in the ascending aorta in presence of a normally functioning bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). In particular, we perform an unsteady finite element study in real geometries with physiological velocity boundary conditions at the inlet to assess the effect of the inclusion of the leaflets on the fluid-dynamic abnormalities characterizing BAV cases. To this aim, we perform a comparison in two geometries (a dilated and a non-dilated ones) among three scenarios which are built up for each geometry: BAV without leaflets, BAV with leaflets, and tricuspid case with leaflets. For each case, we compute four indices quantifying flow asymmetry, reversal flows, helical patterns, and wall shear stresses. Our results show that the inclusion of the leaflets increases the fluid-dynamics abnormalities, especially for the non-dilated configuration, which presents a greater increment of the indices. In particular, we observe that the values of the time-averaged wall shear stress and of the systolic jet asymmetry increase by approximatively 100 and 40%, respectively, when considering the leaflets.

  12. Motivations and Benefits of Student Volunteering: Comparing Regular, Occasional, and Non-Volunteers in Five Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Karen Smith; Kirsten Holmes; Debbie Haski-Leventhal; Cnaan, Ram A; Femida Handy; Brudney, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    Programmes targeting student volunteering and service learning are part of encouraging civic behaviour amongst young people. This article reports on a large scale international survey comparing volunteering amongst tertiary students at universities in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The data revealed high rates of student volunteering and the popularity of occasional or episodic volunteering. There were strong commonalities in student volu...

  13. Do monetary rewards undermine intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Damiano

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies show that intrinsic motivations increase the volunteer labour supply. This paper studies how monetary rewards to volunteers affect their intrinsic motivations. Using a sample of Italian volunteers, allowing to distinguish the type of volunteer, the paper shows that monetary rewards (extrinsic motivations) influence positively the choice to donate voluntary hours, while a low intrinsic motivation seems to decrease hours per week. Moreover, monetary rewards increase the hours ...

  14. Do monetary rewards undermine intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorillo, Damiano

    2007-01-01

    Empirical studies show that intrinsic motivations increase the volunteer labour supply. This paper studies how monetary rewards to volunteers affect their intrinsic motivations. Using a sample of Italian volunteers, allowing to distinguish the type of volunteer, the paper shows that monetary rewards (extrinsic motivations) influence positively the choice to donate voluntary hours, while a low intrinsic motivation seems to decrease hours per week. Moreover, monetary rewards increase the hours ...

  15. Dynamics of testicular germ cell apoptosis in normal mice and transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrusz Peter

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The number and type of testicular germ cells undergoing apoptosis in different age groups of mice (from 7 to 360 days of age was determined and compared in age-matched wild type (WT control and in a transgenic (TG mice homozygous to rat androgen binding protein (ABP using flow cytometry. Flow cytometric quantification revealed that the total number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis did not differ significantly in WT and TG mice up to Day 14. From Day 21 to Day 60, the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis was consistently higher in TG than in WT mice. Starting from Day 90, the number of germ cells undergoing apoptosis in TG mice was lower than controls until Day 360. In 21–60 days old TG mice, spermatogonia, S-Phase cells, and primary spermatocytes are the cell types undergoing apoptosis at significantly greater numbers than those in WT mice. However, starting from day 60, the total number of spermatids undergoing apoptosis was significantly lower in TG mice than in age-matched WT controls. TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL in testicular sections from TG mice of 21 and 30 days of age confirmed the presence of increased numbers of apoptotic germ cells compared to their age matched controls. These data indicate that the continuous presence of greater than physiological concentrations of ABP in the mouse testis has a biphasic effect on the frequency of apoptosis in germ cells. The initial pre-pubertal increase in testicular germ cell apoptosis may result from direct or indirect actions of ABP and is likely to determine the subsequent life-death balance of germ cell populations in TG mice, whereas the subsequent reduction may result from maturation depletion. A wave of apoptosis during the pre-pubertal period is required for normal spermatogenesis to develop, and our data indicate that this apoptotic wave may be regulated by ABP and/or androgens.

  16. The Volunteering Legacy of London 2012 Games. A Pilot Study.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The hosting of the London 2012 Olympic Games was seen as an opportunity to harness the enthusiasm of the 70000 volunteers involved and to provide a volunteer legacy post event. A total of 77 London 2012 volunteers completed a web-based open-ended survey. The participants were asked to indicate their level of current volunteering engagement and whether volunteering at the Games had an impact on their current volunteering levels. The study found that the London Olympics were the first volunteer...

  17. A Guide for Co-ordinators of Volunteers and Volunteer Services in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Janet W., Comp.

    This manual for those responsible for matching teacher requests and student needs to volunteer services is applicable to a variety of school volunteer programs but concentrates on the type of volunteer service which evolved from the Winnetka, Illinois, project in which older citizens in the community form a "talent pool" to work to enrich the…

  18. Corporate volunteering - motivation for voluntary work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Azevedo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, when the welfare state is a responsibility of the entire society, organizations in the private sector assume co-responsibility for social issues. They are also pressured by the challenges presented by technological advances and the globalization , involving new parameters and requirements for quality. In this context, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (RSC emerges as an option for solutions to the issues related to the company and the whole community. Among the actions of the RSC is the Corporate Volunteering-program, which aims to promote / encourage employes to do voluntary work. A central issue when talking about volunteering is the withdrawal of these (SILVA and FEITOSA, 2002; TEODÓSIO, 1999 and, in accordance with the Community Solidarity (1997, one of the possible causes for the withdrawal is the lack of clarity as to the motives and expectations that lead the person to volunteer themselves. This study uses qualitative research and triangulation of feedback from volunteers, coordinators of volunteers and social organizations, to present a framework from which it is possible to analyze the various motivations for the volunteer work. Key words: Corporate Volunteering program. Volunteering. Corporate social responsibility.

  19. Volunteer map data collection at the USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, B. Wolf; Poore, Barbara S.; Caro, Holly K.; Matthews, Greg D.

    2011-01-01

    Since 1994, citizen volunteers have helped the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) improve its topographic maps. Through the Earth Science Corps program, citizens were able to "adopt a quad" and collect new information and update existing map features. Until its conclusion in 2001, as many as 300 volunteers annotated paper maps which were incorporated into the USGS topographic-map revision process.

  20. Student Volunteering in England: A Critical Moment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwen, Jamie; Rannard, Andrea Grace

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the current state of student volunteering in English universities, and show how it contributes to some of the core activities of higher education, including teaching and learning, employability, and public engagement. The paper goes on to describe challenges currently faced by student volunteering,…

  1. Matching Expectations for Successful University Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Megan; Omari, Maryam; MacCallum, Judith; Young, Susan; Walker, Gabrielle; Holmes, Kirsten; Haski-Leventha, Debbie; Scott, Rowena

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of expectation formation and matching for university student volunteers and their hosts. Design/methodology/approach: This research involved a multi-stage data collection process including interviews with student volunteers, and university and host representatives from six…

  2. Training Shelter Volunteers to Teach Dog Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Veronica J.; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which training procedures influenced the integrity of behaviorally based dog training implemented by volunteers of an animal shelter. Volunteers were taught to implement discrete-trial obedience training to teach 2 skills (sit and wait) to dogs. Procedural integrity during the baseline and written instructions…

  3. Senior Volunteers: Helping Hands & Willing Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessely, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Volunteers and other community-based assistants can relieve some of the financial burden brought on by school-budget cutbacks. This publication describes how enlisting the help of senior volunteers and workers benefits both children and seniors, and it presents some guidelines for implementation of intergeneration programs. The programs provide…

  4. Volunteer Flying Organizations: Law Enforcements Untapped Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    volunteers took on many of the following duties to help enable CAP functions: clerical work , aircraft maintenance , refueling operations, first aid...Highway Patrol, Monterey County Aero Squadron, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Civil Air Patrol, volunteer flying organizations, law enforcement...5 3. Civil Air Patrol’s Use in Law Enforcement .................................7 D. POTENTIAL EXPLANATIONS AND HYPOTHESES

  5. Meaningful Commitment: Finding Meaning in Volunteer Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Tatjana; Hoof, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    This study tests the hypothesis that volunteer work is associated with various aspects of meaning making by employing a multi-dimensional model of meaning operationalized by the "Sources of Meaning and Meaning in Life Questionnaire" ("SoMe"). An empirical study comparing 168 volunteers with a representative sample of the general population (N =…

  6. Sumatriptan and cerebral perfusion in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A K; Grimes, S; Ng, K; Critchley, M; Breckenridge, A M; Thomson, C; Pilgrim, A J

    1992-04-01

    1. The effect of sumatriptan on regional cerebral perfusion was studied in healthy volunteers. 2. Intravenous sumatriptan (2 mg) had no detectable effect on regional cerebral perfusion as measured using a SPECT system with 99technetiumm labelled hexemethylpropyleneamineoxime. 3. Sumatriptan had no effect on pulse, blood pressure or ECG indices. 4. All six volunteers experienced minor adverse effects during the intravenous infusion.

  7. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  8. Orbital and escape dynamics in barred galaxies - II. The 3D system: exploring the role of the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christof; Zotos, Euaggelos E.

    2016-12-01

    A three degrees of freedom (3-dof) barred galaxy model composed of a spherically symmetric nucleus, a bar, a flat disc and a spherically symmetric dark matter halo is used for investigating the dynamics of the system. We use colour-coded plots to demonstrate how the value of the semimajor axis of the bar influences the regular or chaotic dynamics of the 3-dof system. For distinguishing between ordered and chaotic motion, we use the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) method, a fast yet very accurate tool. Undoubtedly, the most important elements of the dynamics are the normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds (NHIMs) located in the vicinity of the index 1 Lagrange points L2 and L3. These manifolds direct the flow of stars over the saddle points, while they also trigger the formation of rings and spirals. The dynamics in the neighbourhood of the saddle points is visualized by bifurcation diagrams of the Lyapunov orbits as well as by the restriction of the Poincaré map to the NHIMs. In addition, we reveal how the semimajor axis of the bar influences the structure of these manifolds which determine the final stellar structure (rings or spirals). Our numerical simulations suggest that in galaxies with weak bars the formation of R1 rings or R_1^' } pseudo-rings is favoured. In the case of galaxies with intermediate and strong bars, the invariant manifolds seem to give rise to R1R2 rings and twin spiral formations, respectively. We also compare our numerical outcomes with earlier related work and with observational data.

  9. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming, E-mail: dming@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-10-07

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  10. Multi-scaled normal mode analysis method for dynamics simulation of protein-membrane complexes: A case study of potassium channel gating motion correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaokun; Han, Min; Ming, Dengming

    2015-10-01

    Membrane proteins play critically important roles in many cellular activities such as ions and small molecule transportation, signal recognition, and transduction. In order to fulfill their functions, these proteins must be placed in different membrane environments and a variety of protein-lipid interactions may affect the behavior of these proteins. One of the key effects of protein-lipid interactions is their ability to change the dynamics status of membrane proteins, thus adjusting their functions. Here, we present a multi-scaled normal mode analysis (mNMA) method to study the dynamics perturbation to the membrane proteins imposed by lipid bi-layer membrane fluctuations. In mNMA, channel proteins are simulated at all-atom level while the membrane is described with a coarse-grained model. mNMA calculations clearly show that channel gating motion can tightly couple with a variety of membrane deformations, including bending and twisting. We then examined bi-channel systems where two channels were separated with different distances. From mNMA calculations, we observed both positive and negative gating correlations between two neighboring channels, and the correlation has a maximum as the channel center-to-center distance is close to 2.5 times of their diameter. This distance is larger than recently found maximum attraction distance between two proteins embedded in membrane which is 1.5 times of the protein size, indicating that membrane fluctuation might impose collective motions among proteins within a larger area. The hybrid resolution feature in mNMA provides atomic dynamics information for key components in the system without costing much computer resource. We expect it to be a conventional simulation tool for ordinary laboratories to study the dynamics of very complicated biological assemblies. The source code is available upon request to the authors.

  11. Personality traits of British hospice volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane; Paulovic, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    In total, 120 British female hospice volunteers completed the NEO five-factor inventory (NEO-FFI) of Costa Jr and McCrae. The NEO-FFI measures the so-called big 5 personality traits of neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Compared to both American NEO-FFI norms for adult females and emerging British NEO-FFI norms for adult females, the hospice volunteers scored significantly lower, on average, in neuroticism and significantly higher, on average, in agreeableness and conscientiousness. No significant differences were found on any of the 5 traits between the British female hospice volunteers' scores and the NEO-FFI scores previously collected from a sample of Canadian female hospice palliative care volunteers. Implications for the recruitment of British hospice volunteers are discussed.

  12. Personality Traits and Motives for Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Juzbasic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the possibility of predicting volunteer motives based on five-factor model of personality in a sample of 159 volunteers from Zagreb, Osijek and Split. Data was collected using IPIP-300 personality questionnaire and Volunteer Functions Inventory. Results indicate that Croatian volunteers are agreeable, conscientious, altruistic, dutiful, and moral persons with artistic interests. Their most salient motives for volunteering are understanding and values. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed that the five-factor model personality traits independently predict 17% of protective motive variance, 12% of values motive, 18% of career motive, 10% of understanding motive, and 12% of enhancement motive. Social motive was not explained by personality traits.

  13. Volunteers for Researchers’ Night wanted

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Every year, on the last Friday of September, the European Researchers’ Night (see here) takes place in about 300 cities all over Europe - promoting research in engaging and fun ways for the general public. This year, CERN will be participating once again, hosting dozens of events across the Balexert shopping centre – and we’ll need YOUR help to make the celebration a success.   From film screenings and celebrity Q&A sessions to “Ask a Researcher” and build-your-own LEGO LHC events, this year’s Researchers’ Night is going to be jam-packed! The fun will kick off prior to the night itself with a mock-up of the LHC tunnel installed in the central court of the Balexert shopping centre, 8-12 September*. CERN people will be on hand to speak to shoppers about the LHC, and to encourage them to participate in Researchers’ Night! The CERN organisers are recruiting volunteers and support staff for Researchers’ ...

  14. Antithrombin III: biodistribution in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knot, E A; de Jong, E; ten Cate, J W; Gie, L K; van Royen, E A

    1987-12-18

    Five healthy volunteers were injected intravenously with 73-90 uCi purified human 131I-Antithrombin III (AT III), specific biological activity 5.6 U/mg. The tracer data were analysed using a three compartment model. The plasma radioactivity half life was 66.2 +/- 1.2 (sem) h, the fractional catabolic rate constant of the plasma pool was 0.025 +/- 0.002 (sem) h-1. These data were comparable with those described in the literature. Because of the difficulty in translating the mathematical analysis of various compartments into the biological model, biodistribution was monitored by a gamma camera linked to a DEC PDP 11/34 computer system. Dynamic and static images were obtained at fixed time intervals following the injection of 131I-AT III. Whole body scanning at intervals between the time of injection (t = 0) and t = 24.5 h showed 131I-AT III distribution over the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and great vessels. Dynamic scanning was performed over the heart, spleen and liver. Overlayed frames in the first ten minutes after the 131I-AT III injection showed the following radioactivity expressed as percentage of the injected dose; 5.9% +/- 0.3 (sem) over the heart, 10.6% +/- 0.9 (sem) over the liver and 1.1% +/- 0.1 (sem) over the spleen. A slower decline of the radioactivity between t = 0 and t = 24 h; (19%) was measured over the liver compared with the radioactivity disappearance over the heart region. This shows, in combination with the fact that the radioactivity disappearance over the heart was identical with the radioactivity decline measured in the plasma samples that retention of 131I-AT III occurred in the liver.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Analysis of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of power systems using normal forms of superior order; Analisis del comportamiento dinamico no lineal de sistemas de potencia usando formas normales de orden superior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinez Carrillo, Irma

    2003-08-01

    This thesis investigates the application of parameter disturbance methods of analysis to the nonlinear dynamic systems theory, for the study of the stability of small signal of electric power systems. The work is centered in the determination of two fundamental aspects of interest in the study of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the system: the characterization and quantification of the nonlinear interaction degree between the fundamental ways of oscillation of the system and the study of the ways with greater influence in the response of the system in the presence of small disturbances. With these objectives, a general mathematical model, based on the application of the expansion in series of power of the nonlinear model of the power system and the theory of normal forms of vector fields is proposed for the study of the dynamic behavior of the power system. The proposed tool generalizes the existing methods in the literature to consider effects of superior order in the dynamic model of the power system. Starting off of this representation, a methodology is proposed to obtain analytical solutions of loop back and the extension of the existing methods is investigated to identify and quantify the of interaction degree among the fundamental ways of oscillation of the system. The developed tool allows, from analytical expressions of loop backs, the development of analytical measures to evaluate the stress degree in the system, the interaction between the fundamental ways of oscillation and the determination of stability borders. The conceptual development of the proposed method in this thesis offers, on the other hand, a great flexibility to incorporate detailed models of the power system and the evaluation of diverse measures of the nonlinear modal interaction. Finally, the results are presented of the application of the method of analysis proposed for the study of the nonlinear dynamic behavior in a machine-infinite bus system considering different modeled degrees

  16. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling…

  17. 45 CFR 1217.6 - Roles of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roles of volunteers. 1217.6 Section 1217.6 Public... VISTA VOLUNTEER LEADER § 1217.6 Roles of volunteers. VISTA volunteer leaders may have the following roles: (a) Primary contact with VISTA volunteers on personal and administrative matters. (b) Aid in...

  18. Top Ten Myths and Realities of Working with Teen Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Kellie

    1998-01-01

    Discusses misconceptions about teen volunteers in public libraries: teens who hang out make good volunteers; teens who apply want to work; parents aren't important; incorporating volunteers is easy; enthusiasm means commitment; volunteers will tell you if they don't enjoy the job; non-performers are easy to fire; teens volunteer because they need…

  19. Program Evaluation of "Young at Heart": Examining Elderly Volunteers' Generativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jean Pearson; Reifman, Alan; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2003-01-01

    Elderly volunteers in the Young at Heart child care program (n=14), Meals on Wheels (n=14), other volunteer activities (n=24), and nonvolunteers (n=49) were compared. Although child-care volunteers were expected to score highest in generativity, volunteers in other activities did, followed by Young at Heart volunteers. (Contains 10 references.)…

  20. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy from Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Static Normal Mode Analysis: The C-H Region of DMSO as a Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Sean A.; Ueltschi, Tyler W.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Mifflin, Amanda L.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Hongfei; Cramer, Christopher J.; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-03-03

    Carbon-hydrogen (C-H) vibration modes serve as key probes in the chemical iden- tication of hydrocarbons and in vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spec- *troscopy of hydrocarbons at the liquid/gas interface. Their assignments pose a chal- lenge from a theoretical viewpoint. In this work, we present a detailed study of the C-H stretching region of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) using a new Gaussian basis set- based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) module that we have implemented in the NWChem computational chemistry program. By combining AIMD simulations and static normal mode analysis, we interpret experimental infrared and Raman spectra and explore the role of anharmonic effects in this system. Our anharmonic normal mode analysis of the in-phase and out-of-phase symmetric C-H stretching modes chal- lenges the previous experimental assignment of the shoulder in the symmetric C-H stretching peak as an overtone or Fermi resonance. In addition, our AIMD simulations also show signicant broadening of the in-phase symmetric C-H stretching resonance, which suggests that the experimentally observed shoulder is due to thermal broadening of the symmetric stretching resonance.

  1. Evaluation of Central Corneal Thickness Using Corneal Dynamic Scheimpflug Analyzer Corvis ST and Comparison with Pentacam Rotating Scheimpflug System and Ultrasound Pachymetry in Normal Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ayong; Zhao, Weiqi; Savini, Giacomo; Huang, Zixu; Bao, Fangjun; Lu, Weicong; Wang, Qinmei; Huang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability and reproducibility of central corneal thickness (CCT) measurements by corneal dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer Corvis ST in normal eyes and compare the agreement with Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug System and ultrasound pachymetry. Methods. 84 right eyes underwent Corvis ST measurements performed by two operators. The test-retest repeatability (TRT), within-subject coefficient of variation (CoV), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were used to evaluate the intraoperator repeatability and interoperator reproducibility. CCT measurements also were obtained from Pentacam and ultrasound pachymetry by the first operator. The agreement between the three devices was evaluated with 95% limits of agreement (LoA) and Bland-Altman plots. Results. Corvis ST showed high repeatability as indicated by TRT ≤ 13.0 μm, CoV 0.97. The interoperator reproducibility was also excellent. The CoV was 0.97. Corvis ST showed significantly lower values than Pentacam and ultrasound pachymetry (P < 0.001). The 95% LoA between Corvis ST and Pentacam or ultrasound pachymetry were −15.8 to 9.5 μm and −27.9 to 12.3 μm, respectively. Conclusions. Corvis ST showed excellent repeatability and interoperator reproducibility of CCT measurements in normal eyes. Corvis ST is interchangeable with Pentacam but not with ultrasound pachymetry. PMID:26697213

  2. Evaluation of Central Corneal Thickness Using Corneal Dynamic Scheimpflug Analyzer Corvis ST and Comparison with Pentacam Rotating Scheimpflug System and Ultrasound Pachymetry in Normal Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayong Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the repeatability and reproducibility of central corneal thickness (CCT measurements by corneal dynamic Scheimpflug analyzer Corvis ST in normal eyes and compare the agreement with Pentacam rotating Scheimpflug System and ultrasound pachymetry. Methods. 84 right eyes underwent Corvis ST measurements performed by two operators. The test-retest repeatability (TRT, within-subject coefficient of variation (CoV, and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC were used to evaluate the intraoperator repeatability and interoperator reproducibility. CCT measurements also were obtained from Pentacam and ultrasound pachymetry by the first operator. The agreement between the three devices was evaluated with 95% limits of agreement (LoA and Bland-Altman plots. Results. Corvis ST showed high repeatability as indicated by TRT ≤ 13.0 μm, CoV 0.97. The interoperator reproducibility was also excellent. The CoV was 0.97. Corvis ST showed significantly lower values than Pentacam and ultrasound pachymetry (P<0.001. The 95% LoA between Corvis ST and Pentacam or ultrasound pachymetry were −15.8 to 9.5 μm and −27.9 to 12.3 μm, respectively. Conclusions. Corvis ST showed excellent repeatability and interoperator reproducibility of CCT measurements in normal eyes. Corvis ST is interchangeable with Pentacam but not with ultrasound pachymetry.

  3. Clarifying Normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Donald A.

    2008-01-01

    Confusion exists among database textbooks as to the goal of normalization as well as to which normal form a designer should aspire. This article discusses such discrepancies with the intention of simplifying normalization for both teacher and student. This author's industry and classroom experiences indicate such simplification yields quicker…

  4. The normal posterior atlantoaxial relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, J.E. (Rochester General Hospital, NY (USA)); Schuster, J.A. (Rochester Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The relationship of the posterior aspects of the atlas and the axis were studied in 100 normal adult volunteers. The ratio of the height of the atlantal spinolaminar line to the atlantoaxial interspinous distance was found to be remarkably constant and was less than 2.0 in all men and women. This ratio should prove helpful in detecting hyperflexion injuries isolated to the atlantoaxial level. (orig.).

  5. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  6. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Hopkins

    Full Text Available Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception.

  7. Volunteering as a determinant of civil society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Matiychyk

    2016-06-01

    Another prerequisite of volunteerism was the surge of Advantages Revolution in 2013-2014, and after it – the anti-terrorist operation in eastern Ukraine. In 2015 the aid organization in terms of ATO and internally displaced persons has increased directions volunteering. Important indicators of volunteering were high levels of involvement of Ukrainian philanthropy and consequently public confidence in voluntary organizations, qualitative growth of volunteerism, the founders of which were gradually included among the managerial elite Ukraine. At the same time, there are number of problems that discredit the work of volunteers and the idea of volunteering in general, for example, fraud volunteers and fake organizations. Moreover, the increased activity of the volunteer movement was caused by the internal crisis that led to the imbalance of public administration, lack of high-quality management decisions, lack of resource capabilities. Also it was caused by external factors, such as the need to participate in the organization of international events and conduct military operations against separatist groups in eastern Ukraine. So, volunteer activity gradually becomes an effective mechanism of self-organization of citizens.

  8. 'Making a Difference': Volunteer Tourism and Development,

    OpenAIRE

    Butcher, Jim; Smith, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: \\ud \\ud In recent decades there has been a boom in international volunteer tourism, mainly in the form of the growth of gap-year companies offering placements, linked to conservation and community well-being goals. This paper makes two points: firstly, it argues that the growth of volunteer tourism is in part a product of the politics of the current period – the decline of grand narratives and the growth of ‘life political’ alternative forms of agency. Hence volunteer tourism, motiv...

  9. Role-modeling and conversations about giving in the socialization of adolescent charitable giving and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoni-Wilhelm, Mark; Estell, David B; Perdue, Neil H

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the monetary giving and volunteering behavior of adolescents and the role-modeling and conversations about giving provided by their parents. The participants are a large nationally-representative sample of 12-18 year-olds from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics' Child Development Supplement (n = 1244). Adolescents reported whether they gave money and whether they volunteered. In a separate interview parents reported whether they talked to their adolescent about giving. In a third interview, parents reported whether they gave money and volunteered. The results show that both role-modeling and conversations about giving are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering. Knowing that both role-modeling and conversation are strongly related to adolescents' giving and volunteering suggests an often over-looked way for practitioners and policy-makers to nurture giving and volunteering among adults: start earlier, during adolescence, by guiding parents in their role-modeling of, and conversations about, charitable giving and volunteering.

  10. Safety evaluation of saffron (Crocus sativus) tablets in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi; Shahabian, Masoud; Esmaeili, Habib-Allah; Rajbai, Omid; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2008-12-01

    Saffron (Crocus sativus) stigma tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. The study was a double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of a 1 week treatment of saffron tablets. Volunteers were divided into 3 groups of 10 each (5 males and 5 females). Group I received placebo; groups 2 and 3 received 200 and 400mg saffron tablets, respectively, for 7 days. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical and electrocardiographic parameters done in pre- and post-treatment periods. Clinical examination showed no gross changes in all volunteers after intervention. Saffron with higher dose (400mg) decreased standing systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressures significantly. Saffron decreased slightly some hematological parameters such as red blood cells, hemoglobin, hematocrit and platelets. Saffron increased sodium, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. This study showed that saffron tablets may change some hematological and biochemical parameters. However, these alterations were in normal ranges and they were not important clinically.

  11. Seven characteristics of a successful virtual volunteering platform

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butgereit, L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available characteristics were found to be necessary for platforms which support virtual tutoring to retain their volunteers. It is believed that these seven characteristics apply in general to virtual volunteering and would assist any virtual volunteer organisation...

  12. Becoming an Older Volunteer: A Grounded Theory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Witucki Brown

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Grounded Theory study describes the process by which older persons “become” volunteers. Forty interviews of older persons who volunteered for Habitat for Humanity were subjected to secondary content analysis to uncover the process of “becoming” a volunteer. “Helping out” (core category for older volunteers occurs within the context of “continuity”, “commitment” and “connection” which provide motivation for volunteering. When a need arises, older volunteers “help out” physically and financially as health and resources permit. Benefits described as “blessings” of volunteering become motivators for future volunteering. Findings suggest that older volunteering is a developmental process and learned behavior which should be fostered in older persons by personally inviting them to volunteer. Intergenerational volunteering projects will allow older persons to pass on knowledge and skills and provide positive role modeling for younger volunteers.

  13. Monitoring and Evaluation of Volunteer Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taplin, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne; Scherrer, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion and commercialisation of the volunteer tourism sector and the potential for negative impacts on host communities have put the sector under increasing scrutiny. Monitoring and evaluation are key aspects of sustainable tourism planning and management, and play important roles...... in the project planning and implementation cycles of volunteer tourism organisations and destination managements. However, they can be both value-laden and politically charged, making an understanding of context, purpose and various approaches to monitoring and evaluation important. Drawing from evaluation...... highlights the important influence of context (the issue the volunteer tourism programme is addressing, the nature of the intervention, the setting, the evaluation context and the decision-making context), and identifies four dimensions of volunteer tourism (stakeholders, organisations, markets...

  14. Volunteering Internationally: Why, Where and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David E; Kelly, Nancy A

    2015-12-01

    Oral health volunteers have an important role in addressing oral health care shortages around the world, but to be effective they need to understand and prepare for the challenges of working overseas.

  15. Monitoring and Evaluation of Volunteer Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taplin, Jessica; Dredge, Dianne; Scherrer, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    in the project planning and implementation cycles of volunteer tourism organisations and destination managements. However, they can be both value-laden and politically charged, making an understanding of context, purpose and various approaches to monitoring and evaluation important. Drawing from evaluation......The rapid expansion and commercialisation of the volunteer tourism sector and the potential for negative impacts on host communities have put the sector under increasing scrutiny. Monitoring and evaluation are key aspects of sustainable tourism planning and management, and play important roles...... highlights the important influence of context (the issue the volunteer tourism programme is addressing, the nature of the intervention, the setting, the evaluation context and the decision-making context), and identifies four dimensions of volunteer tourism (stakeholders, organisations, markets...

  16. Measuring the Dollar Value of Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironmonger, Duncan

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of sample surveys to estimate the amount of time spent volunteering. States that it is necessary to estimate the number of hours involved and to establish an appropriate value per hour. (SK)

  17. Holding on to what you have got: keeping hospice palliative care volunteers volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Jones, Richard

    2013-08-01

    In all, 119 hospice palliative care volunteers from 3 community-based hospice programs completed the Volunteer Retention Questionnaire (VRQ), a 33-item survey designed for this study. The VRQ asks volunteers to rate the importance of each item to their decision to continue volunteering. The items that received the highest mean importance ratings included enjoying the work they do, feeling adequately prepared/trained to perform their role, and learning from their patients' experiences/listening to their patients' life stories. Being recognized (eg, pins for years of service or being profiled in the hospice newsletter), receiving phone calls/cards from their volunteer coordinator on special occasions, and being reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses were among the items that received the lowest mean importance ratings. Suggestions for improving volunteer retention are provided.

  18. Effects of different sleep deprivation protocols on sleep perception in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Leonardo I; Pinto, Luciano R; Perlis, Michael L; Martins, Raquel; Caboclo, Luis Otavio; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L

    2014-10-01

    To investigate whether different protocols of sleep deprivation modify sleep perception. The effects of total sleep deprivation (TD) and selective rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (RD) on sleep perception were analyzed in normal volunteers. Thirty-one healthy males with normal sleep were randomized to one of three conditions: (i) normal uninterrupted sleep; (ii) four nights of RD; or (iii) two nights of TD. Morning perception of total sleep time was evaluated for each condition. Sleep perception was estimated using total sleep time (in hours) as perceived by the volunteer divided by the total sleep time (in hours) measured by polysomnography (PSG). The final value of this calculation was defined as the perception index (PI). There were no significant differences among the three groups of volunteers in the total sleep time measured by PSG or in the perception of total sleep time at baseline condition. Volunteers submitted to RD exhibited lower sleep PI scores as compared with controls during the sleep deprivation period (P sleep deprivation reduced the ability of healthy young volunteers to perceive their total sleep time when compared with time measured by PSG. The data reinforce the influence of sleep deprivation on sleep perception. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. I. The normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandi, G. L.; Chiofalo, M. L.; Toncelli, R.; Bramanti, D.; Polacco, E.; Nobili, A. M.

    2006-03-01

    Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the equivalence principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration η between two test bodies—of different compositions, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass—if the measurement is made to the level of η ≃10-13 or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in a low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following articles (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation—in particular, its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)—can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining a quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

  20. Birkhoff normalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, H.; Hoveijn, I.; Lunter, G.; Vegter, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Birkhoff normal form procedure is a widely used tool for approximating a Hamiltonian systems by a simpler one. This chapter starts out with an introduction to Hamiltonian mechanics, followed by an explanation of the Birkhoff normal form procedure. Finally we discuss several algorithms for comput

  1. Motivations, Death Anxiety, and Empathy in Hospice Volunteers in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbay, Meriem; Gay, Marie-Claire; Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the motivations for volunteering of hospice volunteers in France. In addition, their levels of death anxiety and empathy were measured and compared with those of French non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers. Three questionnaires-the Inventory of Motivations for Hospice Palliative Care Volunteerism (IMHPCV), the Templer/McMordie Death Anxiety Scale, and the Interpersonal Reactivity Index-were sent via an Internet link to 2 hospice volunteer associations and to non-hospice volunteers and non-volunteers (only the hospice volunteers received the IMHPCV). Altruistic motives had the most influence on the respondents' decision to become a hospice volunteer. French hospice volunteers scored significantly lower on 3 categories of motives on the IMHPCV compared to a sample of Canadian hospice palliative care volunteers (study 2), suggesting that cultural differences may be involved. No significant differences were found in levels of death anxiety or empathy between the 3 groups of respondents of the study.

  2. [Method for determination of individual normal values of blood pressure in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volians'kyĭ, O M

    2010-01-01

    The base of a methodology for evaluation of individual normal values of blood pressure (BP) was the determination of homeostatic reaction scale range of mechanism adaptation in each individual, which then were compared with test values of this parameter. Averaged values of dynamic arterial pressure were used to construct the scale. The values were obtained during daily monitoring, and in process of veloergometry test. The method of comparison of obtained values of blood pressure with the scale allowed to carry out pre-diagnostics of both hypertensive, and hypotensive disorders in each volunteer

  3. Quantum dynamics of adsorbed normal- and para- H2 , HD, and D2 in the microporous framework MOF-74 analyzed using infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, S. A.; Hopkins, J.; Burkholder, B.; Friedman, M.; Rowsell, J. L. C.

    2010-03-01

    Low-temperature diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy is used to measure the quantum dynamics of molecular hydrogen and its isotopologues adsorbed in the microporous material MOF-74. At least two distinct adsorption sites are revealed by increasing the concentration of H2 within the material and monitoring the successive appearance of absorption bands with decreasing bathochromic shifts (or “redshifts”) from the unperturbed (gas-phase) vibrational frequencies. Under conditions wherein both the primary and neighboring secondary sites are occupied, additional frequency shifts are observed that confirm the interactions among the adsorbed molecules are non-negligible. Ortho to para conversion of the adsorbed normal- H2 is observed to occur within minutes and this process is accelerated when both primary and secondary sites are occupied. Translational sidebands are also observed, providing an estimation of 124cm-1 for the frequency of the center-of-mass motion of H2 at the primary adsorption site. The frequency shifts of the absorption bands of HD and D2 diverge from the predictions of a simple isotope effect, emphasizing the importance of the zero-point energy contribution.

  4. The use of isometric exercise as a means of evaluating the parasympathetic contribution to the tachycardia induced by dynamic exercise in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, L; Maciel, B C; Marin-Neto, J A; Martins, L E; Lima-Filho, E C; Manço, J C

    1988-07-01

    Fourteen normal subjects were submitted to isometric exercise (IE), dynamic exercise (DE) and a combination of the two (IE + DE). The main purpose of the present study was to use IE as a means of evaluating the mechanism of the heart rate (HR) increase induced by DE. To this end, the magnitude of the IE (handgrip) was standardized so as to cause an elevation of HR almost exclusively by vagal withdrawal: IE was performed using a dynamometer strain-gauge system with a linear response at 75% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) for 10 s, repeated at 1 min intervals. The change in HR evoked by IE under control conditions was compared with that evoked during DE, and during the corresponding recovery period. DE was performed by the legs, with the subject in the seated position for 4 min, at workloads of 55 and 105 watts, separated by a rest period. In the combined protocol, IE was performed at the beginning of DE, as well as at 1, 2 and 3 min during DE, and at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 min during recovery period. The following results were obtained: (1) IE associated with DE always induced smaller increase in heart rate than IE alone, and this effect was more marked at 105 than at 55 W; this finding suggested a workload-dependent vagal withdrawal at the very beginning of DE that was sustained until the end of effort.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Learning in Later Life: Benefits and Challenges for Volunteers and Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findsen, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Older adults in most societies are keen volunteers in a myriad of contexts for the betterment of individuals and for the agencies in which they volunteer. This article discusses how volunteerism among older adults may enhance their learning and the kinds of benefits and challenges they encounter in their work for employing authorities. It also considers how agencies can be better attuned to the lifelong learning aspirations of older volunteers. Research related to older adults, lifelong learning and the character of volunteerism is reviewed with examples provided from New Zealand and Australia of older adults' participation in volunteerism and consequential impact. While volunteerism is normally viewed as a "win-win" situation for the volunteers and the organisations in which knowledge is further developed for varied purposes (economic sufficiency; personal development; active citizenship; social inclusion), there are nevertheless challenges for both parties. The article explores salient factors which function as enhancers or limitations for older volunteers in their work and learning. It is important that the motives of volunteers for participation are fully transparent and understood by the older adults themselves and by the relevant agencies. Organisations can provide considerable opportunities for older people to engage in continuing learning/ education but they need to be aware of effective recruitment and retention strategies; older people can provide a much needed labour resource where their previous life experiences can be drawn upon and they should be fully cognisant of the organisation's mission and how they can help to enhance it.

  6. Characteristics of the Essence of Volunteering in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagurova, Angelina Alexandrovna; Ivanovna, Efremova Galina; Aleksandrovna, Bochkovskaya Irina; Denisenko, Sergey Ivanovich; Valerievich, Tarasov Mihail; Viktorovna, Nekrasova Marina; Potutkova, Svetlana Anatolievna

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the basic ideas of volunteering; it analyzes the data of psychological studies on social activity and it highlights the importance of studying the motivational part of volunteering. The conclusion on structure and content of volunteering is made. Key focus is on the fact that volunteering is of particular importance in the…

  7. Neighbourly Acts--Volunteering, Social Capital and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jennifer; Bittman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Robert Putnam's view of social capital considers the decline in volunteering as a crisis for democracy. However, data on volunteering in Australia from 1974-1997 indicate that there is likely to be a significant increase in total volunteer hours. Beyond the contribution to democratic society, the values implicit in volunteering increase the…

  8. Neighbourly Acts--Volunteering, Social Capital and Democracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jennifer; Bittman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Robert Putnam's view of social capital considers the decline in volunteering as a crisis for democracy. However, data on volunteering in Australia from 1974-1997 indicate that there is likely to be a significant increase in total volunteer hours. Beyond the contribution to democratic society, the values implicit in volunteering increase the…

  9. The White Lion Volunteer Program in South Africa: A Study of Volunteer Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boretti Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volunteer tourists are motivated to participate in volunteer programs due to their need to ‘do something different’, ‘see another culture’ and ‘to escape’, amongst others. The research aims to determine the internal and external factors that motivate individuals to participate in the Tsau! Global White Lion Protection Trust’s (GWLPT volunteer program. Maslow’s theory of human motivation and Frankl’s study of human behaviour are used to explore intrinsic factors whereas extrinsic or macro environmental factors of influence are also investigated. A mixed method approach with focus group discussions and an online survey is followed. A background to the volunteer program is presented with the activities available to volunteers. The key findings indicate that most volunteers are young females that volunteer for a minimum of two weeks; are internally motivated to ‘give back and be useful’ and ‘to work with the white lions’ for the purpose of self-actualisation. External motivation is mainly social in terms of concern about the well-being of the lions, and South Africa being an economically affordable destination. The GWLPT strives to fulfil the needs of volunteers, especially intrinsic needs associated with self-actualisation and self-transcendence.

  10. Optional contributions have positive effects for volunteering public goods games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qi-Qing; Li, Zhen-Peng; Fu, Chang-He; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Public goods (PG) games with the volunteering mechanism are referred to as volunteering public goods (VPG) games, in which loners are introduced to the PG games, and a loner obtains a constant payoff but not participating the game. Considering that small contributions may have positive effects to encourage more players with bounded rationality to contribute, this paper introduces optional contributions (high value or low value) to these typical VPG games-a cooperator can contribute a high or low payoff to the public pools. With the low contribution, the logit dynamics show that cooperation can be promoted in a well mixed population comparing to the typical VPG games, furthermore, as the multiplication factor is greater than a threshold, the average payoff of the population is also enhanced. In spatial VPG games, we introduce a new adjusting mechanism that is an approximation to best response. Some results in agreement with the prediction of the logit dynamics are found. These simulation results reveal that for VPG games the option of low contributions may be a better method to stimulate the growth of cooperation frequency and the average payoff of the population.

  11. Communications between volunteers and health researchers during recruitment and informed consent: qualitative content analysis of email interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Anne; Amarsi, Zubin; Backman, Catherine L; Cox, Susan M; Li, Linda C

    2011-10-13

    undocumented researcher work during recruitment. Emails can be key forms of data. They provide richly contextual prospective records of an underresearched dimension of the research process: routine volunteer-researcher interactions during recruitment. Emails record the context of volunteering, and the motivations and priorities of volunteers. They also highlight the "invisible work" of research workers during what are typically considered to be standard administrative tasks. Further research is needed to fully understand the role of routine emails, what they may reveal about volunteers' decisions to participate, and their implications for research relationships-for example, whether they have the potential to foster rapport, trust, and understanding between volunteer and researcher, and ultimately shift the power dynamic of the volunteer-researcher relationship.

  12. Structure and functional dynamics characterization of the ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domain by combining molecular dynamics with excited normal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Gabriela C; Silva, Ricardo H T; Scott, Luis P B; Araujo, Alexandre S; Souza, Fatima P; de Oliveira, Ronaldo Junio

    2016-12-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is the major cause of lower respiratory tract infection in children and elderly people worldwide. Its genome encodes 11 proteins including SH protein, whose functions are not well known. Studies show that SH protein increases RSV virulence degree and permeability to small compounds, suggesting it is involved in the formation of ion channels. The knowledge of SH structure and function is fundamental for a better understanding of its infection mechanism. The aim of this study was to model, characterize, and analyze the structural behavior of SH protein in the phospholipids bilayer environment. Molecular modeling of SH pentameric structure was performed, followed by traditional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein immersed in the lipid bilayer. Molecular dynamics with excited normal modes (MDeNM) was applied in the resulting system in order to investigate long time scale pore dynamics. MD simulations support that SH protein is stable in its pentameric form. Simulations also showed the presence of water molecules within the bilayer by density distribution, thus confirming that SH protein is a viroporin. This water transport was also observed in MDeNM studies with histidine residues of five chains (His22 and His51), playing a key role in pore permeability. The combination of traditional MD and MDeNM was a very efficient protocol to investigate functional conformational changes of transmembrane proteins that act as molecular channels. This protocol can support future investigations of drug candidates by acting on SH protein to inhibit viral infection. Graphical Abstract The ion channel of the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) small hydrophobic protein (SH) transmembrane domainᅟ.

  13. Seed loss and volunteer seedling establishment of rapeseed in the northernmost European conditions: potential for weed infestation and GM risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirjo Peltonen-Sainio

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapeseed soil seed bank development and volunteer plant establishment represent substantial risk for crop infestation and GM contamination. This study was designed to complement such investigations with novel understanding from high latitude conditions. Four experiments were designed to characterise seed loss at harvest, persistence, viability and capacity for volunteer seedling establishment, as well as impact of management measures on soil seed bank dynamics. Oilseed rape was the primary crop investigated due to the availability of GM cultivars and because of the increasing importance. Harvest losses and soil seed bank development were significant. Volunteer seedlings emerged at reasonably high rates, especially in the first autumn after harvest, but about 10% of buried seeds maintained their viability for at least three years. Soil incorporation methods had no major effect on numbers of volunteer seedlings, but herbicide treatments controlled volunteer seedlings efficiently, though not completely, due to irregular timing of seedling emergence.

  14. Diffusion tensor imaging reliably differentiates patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardekani, Babak A; Tabesh, Ali; Sevy, Serge; Robinson, Delbert G; Bilder, Robert M; Szeszko, Philip R

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine whether fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the brain are able to reliably differentiate patients with schizophrenia from healthy volunteers. DTI and high resolution structural magnetic resonance scans were acquired in 50 patients with schizophrenia and 50 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. FA and MD maps were estimated from the DTI data and spatially normalized to the Montreal Neurologic Institute standard stereotactic space. Individuals were divided randomly into two groups of 50, a training set, and a test set, each comprising 25 patients and 25 healthy volunteers. A pattern classifier was designed using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) based on the training set of images to categorize individuals in the test set as either patients or healthy volunteers. Using the FA maps, the classifier correctly identified 94% of the cases in the test set (96% sensitivity and 92% specificity). The classifier achieved 98% accuracy (96% sensitivity and 100% specificity) when using the MD maps as inputs to distinguish schizophrenia patients from healthy volunteers in the test dataset. Utilizing FA and MD data in combination did not significantly alter the accuracy (96% sensitivity and specificity). Patterns of water self-diffusion in the brain as estimated by DTI can be used in conjunction with automated pattern recognition algorithms to reliably distinguish between patients with schizophrenia and normal control subjects.

  15. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Bourdarios, Claire; The ATLAS collaboration; Cameron, David; Filip\\v{c}i\\v{c}, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizeable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one task to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  16. Volunteer Computing Experience with ATLAS@Home

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration; Bourdarios, Claire; Lan\\c con, Eric

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a volunteer computing project which allows the public to contribute to computing for the ATLAS experiment through their home or office computers. The project has grown continuously since its creation in mid-2014 and now counts almost 100,000 volunteers. The combined volunteers' resources make up a sizable fraction of overall resources for ATLAS simulation. This paper takes stock of the experience gained so far and describes the next steps in the evolution of the project. These improvements include running natively on Linux to ease the deployment on for example university clusters, using multiple cores inside one job to reduce the memory requirements and running different types of workload such as event generation. In addition to technical details the success of ATLAS@Home as an outreach tool is evaluated.

  17. The relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Kontogeorgopoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Short-term international voluntary service is frequently linked to development discourse in the literature on volunteer tourism and the marketing materials of organizations that offer short-term volunteer opportunities. This paper explores the relationship between volunteer tourism and development in Thailand, and assesses the role played by development in the motivations and experiences of volunteers. Based on interviews with 55 volunteer tourists in the northern Thai province of Chiang Mai,...

  18. THE STUDY OF SELF-CONCEPT BETWEEN VOLUNTEER AND NON-VOLUNTEER STUDENTS IN SPORT OF UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Andam

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding personality characteristics of volunteers are important for their recruitment and retention in sport associations. This study compared self-concept as a personality characteristic between volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations. The method of this research was survey and descriptive. The statistical population consisted of volunteer and non-volunteer students in sport associations of Iran universities. Two hundred and fifty two students (120 volunteers and 132 non-volunteers from 10 universities were selected as subjects by using random clustered sampling method. Pyryt and Mandaglio Self Perceived Survey (PMSPS was used to collect the data. The content and face reliability of questionnaire was checked and confirmed. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to test the reliability of the questionnaire (alfa=0.90. Independent t test and U Mann-Whitney test were used for comparison of the factors between volunteers and non-volunteers. Findings of this study indicated that there was a significant difference between volunteer and non-volunteer students in social and athletic self-concept. The mean of scientific and value factors were higher in volunteers than non-volunteers, however, they were not statistically significant. We concluded that the nature of sport (active and sport volunteering (social encourage students who have higher self-concept for volunteering. Moreover, the characteristics of sport associations can increase self-concept in sport volunteers.

  19. Volunteered Cloud Computing for Disaster Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. D.; Hao, W.; Chettri, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Disaster management relies increasingly on interpreting earth observations and running numerical models; which require significant computing capacity - usually on short notice and at irregular intervals. Peak computing demand during event detection, hazard assessment, or incident response may exceed agency budgets; however some of it can be met through volunteered computing, which distributes subtasks to participating computers via the Internet. This approach has enabled large projects in mathematics, basic science, and climate research to harness the slack computing capacity of thousands of desktop computers. This capacity is likely to diminish as desktops give way to battery-powered mobile devices (laptops, smartphones, tablets) in the consumer market; but as cloud computing becomes commonplace, it may offer significant slack capacity -- if its users are given an easy, trustworthy mechanism for participating. Such a "volunteered cloud computing" mechanism would also offer several advantages over traditional volunteered computing: tasks distributed within a cloud have fewer bandwidth limitations; granular billing mechanisms allow small slices of "interstitial" computing at no marginal cost; and virtual storage volumes allow in-depth, reversible machine reconfiguration. Volunteered cloud computing is especially suitable for "embarrassingly parallel" tasks, including ones requiring large data volumes: examples in disaster management include near-real-time image interpretation, pattern / trend detection, or large model ensembles. In the context of a major disaster, we estimate that cloud users (if suitably informed) might volunteer hundreds to thousands of CPU cores across a large provider such as Amazon Web Services. To explore this potential, we are building a volunteered cloud computing platform and targeting it to a disaster management context. Using a lightweight, fault-tolerant network protocol, this platform helps cloud users join parallel computing projects

  20. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J. M.; Deneva, J. S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jenet, F. A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V. M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; Lyne, A. G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D. J.; Papa, M. A.; Pletsch, H. J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-09-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722’s pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  1. Pulsar Discovery by Global Volunteer Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Knispel, B; Cordes, J M; Deneva, J S; Anderson, D; Aulbert, C; Bhat, N D R; Bock, O; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Champion, D J; Chatterjee, S; Crawford, F; Demorest, P B; Fehrmann, H; Freire, P C C; Gonzalez, M E; Hammer, D; Hessels, J W T; Jenet, F A; Kasian, L; Kaspi, V M; Kramer, M; Lazarus, P; van Leeuwen, J; Lorimer, D R; Machenschalk, A G Lyne B; McLaughlin, M A; Messenger, C; Nice, D J; Papa, M A; Pletsch, H J; Prix, R; Ransom, S M; Siemens, X; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Stovall, K; Venkataraman, A

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. It has now found a 40.8 Hz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pulsar is likely a disrupted recycled pulsar. PSR J2007+2722's pulse profile is remarkably wide with emission over almost the entire spin period; the pulsar likely has closely aligned magnetic and spin axes. The massive computing power provided by volunteers should enable many more such discoveries.

  2. Exploring transition pathway and free-energy profile of large-scale protein conformational change by combining normal mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Xu, Zhijian; Liu, Yingtao; Yang, Zhuo; Cossins, Benjamin P; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2014-01-09

    Large-scale conformational changes of proteins are usually associated with the binding of ligands. Because the conformational changes are often related to the biological functions of proteins, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these motions and the effects of ligand binding becomes very necessary. In the present study, we use the combination of normal-mode analysis and umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulation to delineate the atomically detailed conformational transition pathways and the associated free-energy landscapes for three well-known protein systems, viz., adenylate kinase (AdK), calmodulin (CaM), and p38α kinase in the absence and presence of respective ligands. For each protein under study, the transient conformations along the conformational transition pathway and thermodynamic observables are in agreement with experimentally and computationally determined ones. The calculated free-energy profiles reveal that AdK and CaM are intrinsically flexible in structures without obvious energy barrier, and their ligand binding shifts the equilibrium from the ligand-free to ligand-bound conformation (population shift mechanism). In contrast, the ligand binding to p38α leads to a large change in free-energy barrier (ΔΔG ≈ 7 kcal/mol), promoting the transition from DFG-in to DFG-out conformation (induced fit mechanism). Moreover, the effect of the protonation of D168 on the conformational change of p38α is also studied, which reduces the free-energy difference between the two functional states of p38α and thus further facilitates the conformational interconversion. Therefore, the present study suggests that the detailed mechanism of ligand binding and the associated conformational transition is not uniform for all kinds of proteins but correlated to their respective biological functions.

  3. Beliefs about Volunteerism, Volunteering Intention, Volunteering Behavior, and Purpose in Life among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunt...

  4. The Invention and Institutionalization of Volunteer Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Håkon; Henriksen, Lars Skov

    2014-01-01

    This article presents and explains differences in governmental implementation strategies of volunteer centers in Norway and Denmark. In the first part, we describe the emergence of centers, focusing on shifting policies and governmental initiatives. The second part aims at explaining the observed...

  5. The Benefits of Volunteering for Psychology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromnick, Rachel; Horowitz, Ava; Shepherd, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Within the current economic climate students are seen as needing more than a degree to succeed in securing graduate employment. One way that students chose to enhance their employability is through engaging in voluntary work. In this empirical study, undergraduate psychology students' reasons for volunteering are explored within the context of…

  6. International Volunteering: Employability, Leadership and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Andrew; Charleston, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of individuals in transition between education and work during international volunteering expeditions. While it was expected that outcomes might include employability enhancement and skill development, the authors aimed to clarify what the main factors were, examine employability…

  7. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Larsen, Mona

    from 2007 to 2011 and 2016. Based on a questionnaire survey, the report paints a picture of who the volunteers are, what motivates them and how they perceive their surrounding environment’s view of them as members of the Home Guard. The report also focuses on the volunteers’ view of the Home Guard...

  8. The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Østergaard; Bendix Kleif, Helle; Kolodziejczyk, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking the stre......The volunteer programme ‘Night Ravens’ (NR) was founded in Sweden in 1987 and has, over the years, developed into a Scandinavian concept covering large areas of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Greenland and the Faroe Islands. The NR programme is a crime prevention initiative with adults walking...... the streets at night in identifiable ‘uniforms’ in areas with high activity. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the NR programme in Denmark based on a volunteer set-up with a less intrusive approach to situational crime prevention than, for instance, hot spot policing. The analyses...... with NR organizations to districts without NR organizations. The results show no difference in the crime rates between Danish postcode districts with and without the NR programme. Hence, we cannot identify positive effects of situational crime prevention when evaluating this Scandinavian volunteer...

  9. Volunteers in the Danish Home Guard 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fridberg, Torben; Damgaard, Malene

    This report describes the composition of the Home Guard’s volunteer members and their attitudes to and expectations for the Home Guard. A similar survey was carried out in 2007, and the present report therefore also examines the trends from 2007 to 2011. Among other things, the report shows...

  10. 75 FR 20891 - National Volunteer Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... Americans are answering that call. From mentoring a student and feeding the homeless, to rebuilding after a natural disaster, volunteers are touching lives every day. Social entrepreneurs are pioneering innovative... Administration is committed to ushering in a new era of service and responsibility. We launched United We...

  11. Sesame Street Viewing Volunteer Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filep, Robert T.; And Others

    This guide was prepared to aid volunteers working with preschool children who view the television program, "Sesame Street". The suggestions in this booklet grew out of a study called the "Sesame Mother Pilot Project," conducted in 1970-71 by the Institute for Educational Development. This guide is divided into nine main parts:…

  12. Pulsar discovery by global volunteer computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knispel, B.; Allen, B.; Cordes, J.M.; Deneva, J.S.; Anderson, D.; Aulbert, C.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Bock, O.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Champion, D.J.; Chatterjee, S.; Crawford, F.; Demorest, P.B.; Fehrmann, H.; Freire, P.C.C.; Gonzalez, M.E.; Hammer, D.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Jenet, F.A.; Kasian, L.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kramer, M.; Lazarus, P.; van Leeuwen, J.; Lorimer, D.R.; Lyne, A.G.; Machenschalk, B.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Messenger, C.; Nice, D.J.; Papa, M.A.; Pletsch, H.J.; Prix, R.; Ransom, S.M.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.H.; Stappers, B.W.; Stovall, K.; Venkataraman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Einstein@Home aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to mine large data sets. It has now found a 40.8-hertz isolated pulsar in radio survey data from the Arecibo Observatory taken in February 2007. Additional timing observations indicate that this pul

  13. Tympanic displacement analysis in healthy volunteers after indomethacin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsted, Alice; Wagner, Niels; Andersen, Kim Møller

    2002-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a tympanic displacement analyser could detect decreases in cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure after administration of indomethacin in healthy volunteers. In a double-blind crossover study involving 14 healthy volunteers all subjects first underwent a test-retest evaluation to investigate reproducibility followed by tests performed in sitting and supine positions to confirm intracranial-cochlear pressure transfer. In two further sessions tests were performed before and 90 min after subjects were blindly administered a suppository containing either 100 mg of indomethacin or placebo. It was found that tympanic membrane analysis performed 90 min after administration of such a suppository did not mirror the induced reduction in cerebral blood flow after administration of active drug. After administration of indomethacin eight of the subjects experienced discomfort and dizziness; after placebo none experienced subjective symptoms. After administration of indomethacin a statistically significant decrease in heart rate was demonstrated. The exponential form of the intracranial pressure-volume curve may explain why a decrease in intracranial pressure was not detected using the tympanic membrane displacement method, because the measurements were made in subjects with normal intracranial pressure. More significant findings may be found in patients with elevated intracranial pressure.

  14. Who will volunteer? Analysing individual and structural factors of volunteering in Swiss sports clubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Torsten; Nagel, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    This article analyses the conditions influencing volunteering in sports clubs. It focuses not only on individual characteristics of volunteers but also on the corresponding structural conditions of sports clubs. It proposes a model of voluntary work in sports clubs based on economic behaviour theory. The influences of both the individual and context levels on the decision to engage in voluntary work are estimated in different multilevel models. Results of these multilevel analyses indicate that volunteering is not just an outcome of individual characteristics such as lower workloads, higher income, children belonging to the sports club, longer club memberships, or a strong commitment to the club. It is also influenced by club-specific structural conditions; volunteering is more probable in rural sports clubs whereas growth-oriented goals in clubs have a destabilising effect.

  15. A phase I trial of Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malee Banjob

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a phase I trial of Gynostemma pentaphyllum, grown in northern Thailand, to evaluate its safety in three groups of healthy volunteers. Fourteen, fifteen and fourteen volunteers respectively received the water extract of G. pentaphyllum in capsules at the doses of 50, 200 and 400 mg twice daily for two months. There were no major adverse events reported from any of the three groups throughout the study. Significant changes in hematological parameters, natural killer cell activities and the numbers of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were not seen during taking the extract. Some biochemical parameters were significantly different from baseline data. Those values were, however, within normal limits and did not result in clinically significant conditions. Our results suggested that the water extract of G. pentaphyllum at the doses of 50, 200 or 400 mg twice daily given to healthy volunteers for two months was safe.

  16. Volunteered Geographic Information System Design: Project and Participation Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Pablo Gómez-Barrón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article sets forth the early phases of a methodological proposal for designing and developing Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI initiatives based on a system perspective analysis in which the components depend and interact dynamically among each other. First, it focuses on those characteristics of VGI projects that present different goals and modes of organization, while using a crowdsourcing strategy to manage participants and contributions. Next, a tool is developed in order to design the central crowdsourced processing unit that is best suited for a specific project definition, associating it with a trend towards crowd-based or community-driven approaches. The design is structured around the characterization of different ways of participating, and the task cognitive demand of working on geo-information management, spatial problem solving and ideation, or knowledge acquisition. Then, the crowdsourcing process design helps to identify what kind of participants are needed and outline subsequent engagement strategies. This is based on an analysis of differences among volunteers’ participatory behaviors and the associated set of factors motivating them to contribute, whether on a crowd or community-sourced basis. From a VGI system perspective, this paper presents a set of guidelines and methodological steps in order to align project goals, processes and volunteers and thus successfully attract participation. This methodology helps establish the initial requirements for a VGI system, and, in its current state, it mainly focuses on two components of the system: project and participants.

  17. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwinikumar A Raut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera (WS, a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30 were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx (aqueous extract, 8:1 daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day x10 days, 1 000 mg/day x 10 days, 1 250 mg/day x 10 days. Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar′s test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  18. Exploratory study to evaluate tolerability, safety, and activity of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ashwinikumar A; Rege, Nirmala N; Tadvi, Firoz M; Solanki, Punita V; Kene, Kirti R; Shirolkar, Sudatta G; Pandey, Shefali N; Vaidya, Rama A; Vaidya, Ashok B

    2012-07-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) (WS), a "rasayana" drug, is recommended for balavardhan and mamsavardhan. The study was intended to evaluate dose-related tolerability, safety, and activity of WS formulation in normal individuals. The design was prospective, open-labeled, variable doses in volunteers. Eighteen apparently healthy volunteers (12M:6F, age:18-30 years, and BMI: 19-30) were enrolled. After baseline investigations, they received WS capsules (Rx) (aqueous extract, 8:1) daily in two divided doses with increase in daily dosage every 10 days for 30 days (750 mg/day ×10 days, 1 000 mg/day × 10 days, 1 250 mg/day × 10 days). Volunteers were assessed for symptoms/signs, vital functions, hematological and biochemical organ function tests. Muscle activity was measured by hand grip strength, quadriceps strength, and back extensor force. Exercise tolerance was determined using cycle ergometry. Lean body weight and fat% were computed from skin fold thickness measurement. Adverse events were recorded, as volunteered by the subjects. Repeated measures ANOVA, McNemar's test, and paired t test were employed. All but one volunteer tolerated WS without any adverse event. One volunteer showed increased appetite, libido, and hallucinogenic effects with vertigo at the lowest dose and was withdrawn from study. In six subjects, improvement in quality of sleep was found. Organ function tests were in normal range before and after the intervention. Reduction in total- and LDL- cholesterol and increase of strength in muscle activity was significant. Total body fat percentage showed a reduction trend. WS, in escalated dose, was tolerated well. The formulation appeared safe and strengthened muscle activity. In view of its traditional Rasayana use, further studies are planned to evaluate potential of this drug in patients of sarcopenia.

  19. Stress and Burnout: Concerns for the Hospice Volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Conrad, Jr.; Hastings, Janice L.

    1992-01-01

    Sources of stress for hospice volunteers are environmental, ideological, and personal. Attention to volunteer stress and burnout involves defining job requirements and responsibilities, frequent communication and feedback, stress management techniques, flexibility in assignments, and opportunities to verbalize emotions. (SK)

  20. Molecular helpers wanted... Call for volunteers!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The Task Force in charge of the organization of the LHC Inauguration is looking for 40 volunteers to support the team of molecular cooks directed by international chef Ettore Bocchia. The "molecular" volunteers will help in the preparation of liquid nitrogen ice-cream. Your help is requested from 12h to 18h on October 21st. Your participation in a general rehearsal on October 20th is also required - (the time of the rehearsal will be communicated at a later moment). Dress code: black pants and shoes, long sleeved white shirt. Do not miss this opportunity to take part in an extraordinary event! For further information and to enrol, contact: mailto:Catherine.Brandt@cern.ch

  1. Challenges for quality in volunteered geographical information

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available in volunteered geographical information Antony K Cooper1,2, Serena Coetzee3, Iwona Kaczmarek4, Derrick G Kourie2, Adam Iwaniak5 and Tomasz Kubik5 1 Built Environment, CSIR, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa, acooper@csir.co.za 2 Department... of Computer Science, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa, dkourie@cs.up.ac.za 3 Centre for Geoinformation Science, Department of Geography, Geoinformatics and Meteorology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0002, South Africa, serena...

  2. Religion, Inclusive Individualism, and Volunteering in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Storm, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    A well supported finding in social science is that religiosity is associated with pro-social behaviours such as volunteering, but the religious decline in Europe characterising the latter part of the twentieth century has not been accompanied by decline in voluntary participation. This period is also associated with a sharp increase in the moral emphasis on individual autonomy and inclusiveness over social norms and traditions. In this analysis of the European Values Study (2008–2010), I exam...

  3. [Features of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, V I

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the characteristics of emotional stability in volunteers of gerontology programs (among the students of the Faculty of Psychology), depending on the structure of their life meaning and values, personal factors and professional important qualities. It is shown that the emotional stability of volunteers determines the main directions to explore the potential of the psyche of volunteers; modeling appropriate professiogram; organization of volunteer work in a particular program.

  4. Student Volunteering in China and Canada:Comparative Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Hustinx; Cnaan, Ram A; Femida Handy

    2012-01-01

    While many of the theoretical frameworks for volunteering have beendeveloped and empirically tested in the West, our understanding of volunteering in non-Western countries, such as China, is relatively limited. Nevertheless, in recent decades enormous efforts have been made by the Chinese government to encourage and support volunteering among its citizens, especially youth. Chinese youth are volunteering in greater numbers in response to these initiatives. Given the strongly state-led nature ...

  5. ATLAS@Home looks for CERN volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS@Home is a CERN volunteer computing project that runs simulated ATLAS events. As the project ramps up, the project team is looking for CERN volunteers to test the system before planning a bigger promotion for the public.   The ATLAS@home outreach website. ATLAS@Home is a large-scale research project that runs ATLAS experiment simulation software inside virtual machines hosted by volunteer computers. “People from all over the world offer up their computers’ idle time to run simulation programmes to help physicists extract information from the large amount of data collected by the detector,” explains Claire Adam Bourdarios of the ATLAS@Home project. “The ATLAS@Home project aims to extrapolate the Standard Model at a higher energy and explore what new physics may look like. Everything we’re currently running is preparation for next year's run.” ATLAS@Home became an official BOINC (Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network ...

  6. Digestive tract microbiota in healthy volunteers Microbiota no trato digestivo em voluntários saudáveis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Zilberstein

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to standardize the methods of sample collection of mucus from the digestive tract and to determine the microbiota in healthy volunteers from Brazil, collecting samples from the mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, and rectum. METHODS: Microbiota of selected healthy volunteers from the oral cavity (n=10, the esophagus (n=10, the upper digestive tract (n=20, and the lower digestive tract (n=24 were evaluated through distinct collection methods. Collection methods took into account the different sites, using basic scraping and swabbing techniques, stimulated saliva from the oral cavity, irrigation-aspiration with sterile catheters especially designed for the esophagus, a probe especially designed for upper digestive tract, and a special catheter for the lower digestive tract. RESULTS: (i Mixed microbiota were identified in the oral cavity, predominantly Gram-positive aerobic and anaerobic cocci; (ii transitional flora mainly in the esophagus; (iii Veillonella sp, Lactobacillus sp, and Clostridium sp in the stomach and duodenum; (iv in the jejunum and upper ileum, we observed Bacteroides sp, Proteus sp, and Staphylococcus sp, in addition to Veillonella sp; (v in the colon, the presence of "nonpathogenic" anaerobic bacteria Veillonella sp (average 10(5 UFC indicates the existence of a low oxidation-reduction potential environment, which suggests the possibility of adoption of these bacteria as biological markers of total digestive tract health. CONCLUSIONS: The collection methods were efficient in obtaining adequate samples from each segment of the total digestive tract to reveal the normal microbiota. These procedures are safe and easily reproducible for microbiological studies.OBJETIVO: Padronizar os métodos de coleta do muco do trato digestivo e determinar a microbiota, em voluntários saudáveis no Brasil, coletando amostras da boca, esôfago, estômago, duodeno, jejunos e íleo, c

  7. Comparison of 24-hour urinary citrate excretion in stone formers and healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Goodarzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low urinary citrate excretion is a risk factor in stone formers (SF. This study aimed to measure the urinary citrate excretion in SF and healthy volunteers at our center from 12 June 2008 to 20 August 2009. There were 28 SF patients (18 males and ten females and 27 (18 males and nine females age-matched healthy adult volunteers who participated in this study. Both groups had a similar living environment, extrinsic factors, diet and genetic descent. After collecting 24-h urine, citrate was measured using an enzymatic kit. Routine urinalysis and 24-h creatinine and uric acid were also performed. There was a significant difference in urinary citrate excretion level among SF (mean 310, SD 260 mg/L and normal volunteer subjects (mean 800, SD 300 mg/L. By applying the previously defined normal values (320 mg/24 h of urinary citrate in the local population, 43% of the SF in our study group was hypocitric, and none among the controls. We conclude that prevalence of hypocitraturia in stone formers was higher than that in healthy volunteers in our population.

  8. Affecting Community Change: Involving "Pro Bono" Professionals as Extension Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Diane T.; Culp, Ken, III

    2013-01-01

    "Pro bono" volunteers provide an effective means for Extension professionals to expand limited financial and human resources. Volunteers recruited from business settings can provide skills, abilities, expertise, leadership, and resources to Extension programs. Allowing professional volunteers to meet their desired leadership goals while…

  9. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  10. Canadian Youth Volunteering Abroad: Rethinking Issues of Power and Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Mai

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of institutions in the ethical engagement of Canadian youth volunteers abroad. In recent years, researchers and practitioners in the international field have questioned the ethics of volunteering as part of development, with scrutiny on who actually benefits from volunteering initiatives. Since the 1960s, over 65,000…

  11. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  12. The Motivation to Volunteer: A Systemic Quality of Life Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shye, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to volunteer motivation research is developed. Instead of asking what motivates the volunteer (accepting "any" conceptual category), we ask to what extent volunteering rewards the individual with each benefit taken from a complete set of possible benefits. As a "complete set of benefits" we use the 16 human functioning modes…

  13. Will Natural Resources Professionals Volunteer to Teach Youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sanford S.; Finley, James C.; San Julian, Gary J.

    2010-01-01

    A unique approach to volunteer marketing research involved a mail survey with natural resources professionals from across Pennsylvania. Previous work identified this group as a source of potential volunteers for the 4-H youth natural resources program. The results give insights into those most likely to volunteer to teach youth through 4-H…

  14. Volunteer Motivations at a National Special Olympics Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Selina; Engelhorn, Rich

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the motivations for people to volunteer with the management and execution of major sporting events is important for the recruitment and retention of the volunteers. This research investigated volunteer motivations at the first National Special Olympics held in Ames, Iowa, USA in July 2006. A total of 289 participants completed the 28…

  15. The impact of volunteering in hospice palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton-Oldfield, Stephen; Claxton-Oldfield, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the impact of hospice palliative care work on volunteers' lives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 23 direct-patient care volunteers. More than half of the volunteers became involved in hospice palliative care because of their own experiences with family members and/or friends who have died. Most of the volunteers reported that they were different now or had changed in some way since they have been volunteering (e.g., they had grown in some way, have learned how to keep things in perspective). In addition, most of the volunteers felt that their outlook on life had changed since they started volunteering (e.g., they were more accepting of death, and they learned the importance of living one day at a time). Volunteers reported doing a number of different things to prevent compassion fatigue or burnout (e.g., reading a book, listening to music, talking to others, and taking time off from volunteering). Most of the volunteers said that they would tell anyone who might be thinking of volunteering in hospice palliative care that it is a very rewarding activity and/or that they should try it. Finally, many of the volunteers offered suggestions for doing things differently in their programs.

  16. The Impact of Various Personal and Social Characteristics on Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Philip; Black, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of Australian Community Survey data (n=6,242) identified three categories of volunteer involvement: assisting those who need help, serving the wider community, and being involved in volunteer groups. Volunteers in each category had different characteristics. Key influences were having resources to contribute, existence of recruitment…

  17. Motivations of Volunteer Leaders in an Extension Exercise Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Lisa T.; Cornell, Carol E.; Traywick, LaVona; Felix, Holly C.; Phillips, Martha

    2015-01-01

    This article describes findings from a qualitative study of volunteer leaders in the StrongWomen strength training program in Arkansas. The study explored reasons volunteers initially agreed to serve, perceptions of volunteer role, and motivations for continuing to lead strength training groups long-term. Findings suggest a combination of factors…

  18. Assessing Changes in Virginia Master Gardener Volunteer Management

    OpenAIRE

    Dorn, Sheri T.

    1999-01-01

    ASSESSING CHANGES IN VIRGINIA MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT Sheri T. Dorn ABSTRACT Master Gardener (MG) volunteers are nonpaid, education partners with Virginia Cooperative Extension (VCE). VCE MGs have assisted Extension agents in meeting VCE's educational goals and mission by following the Sustainable Landscape Management educational program objectives within the VCE Plan of Work. Local MG volunteer programs must be managed appropriately so that vol...

  19. Classroom Volunteers: Uh-Oh! or Right On!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, Joanne C.

    Noting that volunteer programs succeed only with careful forethought and maintenance, this book is designed to provide information necessary to create and operate a successful volunteer program in an elementary school setting. Steps in thinking about volunteers in innovative ways, recruitment, training, maintaining program effectiveness, and…

  20. An Evaluation of the Use of Volunteers as Parent Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1983-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of trained volunteers in leading parent education programs. Compared volunteer and professionally led groups in an ongoing extension-sponsored parenting program. Urban/rural comparisons were also made. There were no significant differences between volunteer and professionally led groups on child gains or parent…

  1. MRI of normal achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollandi, G.A. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Perrone, R. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, G. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the normal internal structure of tendons 11 volunteers without clinical evidence of tendinopathy were examined using conventional spin-echo T1-, T2- and proton-density weighted sequences. The Achilles tendon was chosen because of its high frequency of injury in athletic activity, large size, superficial position and because it is oriented nearly parallel to the static magnetic field, therefore minimizing the ``magic angle phenomenon``. The tendons exhibited areas of slighly increased signal in four T1-weighted and in all but one proton-density-weighted scans. No intratendinous signal was detected in T2-weighted images. The possible origin of these findings is discussed. We conclude that the knowledge of these normal signals may be useful to avoid incorrectly diagnosing as pathological. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  2. The plantar fasciotomy: MR imaging findings in asymptomatic volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S.; Ashman, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Smith, G.; Kaeding, C. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1999-08-01

    % (range 9-20%), but the thickness at the fasciotomy nearly doubled. No edema was evident in the fascia, perifascial tissues, deep plantar muscles, or calcaneal bone marrow.< rate at head-abs-p1.lf>Conclusions. The average thickness of the plantar fascia in asymptomatic volunteers after surgery is nearly 2-3 times that of normal. While there is increased thickness at the site of surgery, the changes in morphology and signal intensity were most prominent at the enthesis. The key observation was absence of edema in the fascia and perifascial soft tissues. This baseline information may be of value when assessing MR studies of symptomatic patients. (orig.) With 3 figs., 24 refs.

  3. Valuing volunteers: the impact of volunteerism on hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Renee Brent; Fottler, Myron D; Unruh, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Volunteers have been present in health care settings for centuries. However, there is little empirical evidence regarding the impact that volunteers make on hospital performance. Since the 1990s, hospitals in the United States have had a great deal of pressure to produce high-quality care at minimum expense. These pressures have enhanced the benefits of using volunteers in a hospital setting. This study utilized multiple regression analysis to explore the impact of the use of volunteers and the level of professionalism of volunteer programs on cost effectiveness and patient satisfaction in hospitals. Hospitals throughout the state of Florida were invited to participate in the study by completing a brief questionnaire about their volunteer programs. Performance indicators of volunteer cost savings and patient satisfaction scores for 50 Florida hospitals were analyzed using data sets from the American Hospital Association and Agency for Health Care Administration along with data obtained from a questionnaire. Results indicate that the use of volunteers offers significant cost savings to hospitals and enhances patient satisfaction scores. Larger volunteer programs appear to enhance patient satisfaction while containing costs. Future research opportunities related to the impact of volunteers and volunteer professionalism on other hospital performance measures are suggested.

  4. The stingy hour: how accounting for time affects volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Sanford E; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    2010-04-01

    These studies examined how the practice of accounting for one's time-so that work can be billed or charged to specific clients or projects-affects the decision to allocate time to volunteer activities. Using longitudinal data collected from law students transitioning to their first jobs, Study 1 showed that exposure to billing time diminished individuals' willingness to volunteer, even after controlling for attitudes about volunteering held before entering the workforce as well as the individual's specific opportunity costs of volunteering time. Studies 2-5 experimentally manipulated billing time and confirmed its causal effect on individuals' willingness to volunteer and actual volunteering behavior. Study 5 showed that the effect of exposure to billing time on volunteering occurred above and beyond any effects on general self-efficacy or self-determination. Individual differences moderated the effects of billing, such that people who did not value money as much were less affected.

  5. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  6. Widely Assumed but Thinly Tested: Do Employee Volunteers' Self-Reported Skill Improvements Reflect the Nature of Their Volunteering Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of companies use corporate volunteering programs (CVPs) to support and coordinate their employees' efforts to serve their communities. Among the most frequently touted benefits of such programs to sponsoring companies and employee volunteers alike is the opportunities for employees to develop tangible work-related skills through their volunteering activities. Evidence for skill development through volunteering, however, is mostly limited to the expressed beliefs of corporate leaders and employee volunteers. This study was designed to contribute to this largely anecdotal literature by testing hypotheses about the extent to which employee volunteers' self-reported skill development reflects the characteristics of the volunteers and their volunteering experiences. Study participants were 74 employee volunteers who completed a service apprenticeship managed by a U.S.-based nonprofit called Citizen Schools that partners with middle schools to extend the learning day with a combination of academic support, enrichment, and youth development activities. Data were obtained via the nonprofit's records, and surveys completed by employee volunteers before and after their service experience, including measures used to assess self-reported improvements in each of 10 work-related skills: communicating performance expectations, leadership, mentorship, motivating others, project management, providing performance feedback, public speaking and presenting, speaking clearly, teamwork, and time management. Support was found for several hypothesized effects suggesting that employees who practiced specific skills more often during their volunteering experience reported greater improvements in those skills. Improvements in some skills were higher among employee volunteers who completed a greater number of pre-volunteering preparation courses, and the effects of preparation courses were moderated by the employee volunteers' self-efficacy about improving their work

  7. Volunteering as a means to an equal end? The impact of a social justice function on intention to volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiranek, Patrick; Kals, Elisabeth; Humm, Julia Sophia; Strubel, Isabel Theresia; Wehner, Theo

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we combined components of the theory of planned behavior and the functional approach to predict the social sector volunteering intention of nonvolunteers (N = 513). Moreover, we added a new other-oriented "social justice function" to the Volunteer Functions Inventory of Clary and colleagues (1998), which contains mainly self-oriented functions. We distinguished the social justice function from the other five measured volunteer functions in confirmatory factor analysis, and showed its incremental validity in predicting intention to volunteer beyond established constructs such as self-efficacy, subjective norm, and the five volunteer functions. This study suggests that emphasizing potential social justice improvements by means of volunteering may attract new volunteers.

  8. Combined static-dynamic MR urography for the simultaneous evaluation of morphology and function in urinary tract obstruction. I. Evaluation of the normal status in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrschneider, W.K.; Hoffend, J.; Becker, K.; Clorius, J.H.; Darge, K.; Kooijman, H.; Troeger, J. [Paediatric Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany)

    2000-08-01

    Objective. A new approach, combined static-dynamic MR urography is evaluated to determine its potential utility for the functional-morphological diagnosis of paediatric urinary tract obstruction. In this initial investigation we sought to evaluate the procedure by imaging the urinary tract of piglets. Materials and methods. Twenty-nine healthy piglets were studied with MR urography (MRU), {sup 99} {sup m}Tc-MAG3 diuretic renal scintigraphy (DRS), ultrasound (US) and excretory urography (EU). The functional and morphological findings were compared. For MRU we combined a respiration-triggered 3D-IR-TSE sequence and a dynamic 2D-FFE sequence after Gd-DTPA injection. Results. MRU depicted the complete urinary tract with superior image quality compared to EU. Calculation of time-intensity curves from the dynamic sequence permitted determination of single kidney function from parenchymal ROIs and urinary excretion using the whole kidney ROI. MRU and DRS showed significant agreement in the assessment of both single kidney function and urinary excretion. Disturbances of urinary drainage were generally caused by an overfilled bladder. Conclusions. Combined static-dynamic MRU is well suited for the depiction of the complete urinary tract and for the determination of individual kidney function and urinary excretion in the piglet. (orig.)

  9. Shirodhara : A psycho-physiological profile in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana D Dhuri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shirodhara is a classical and a well-established ayurvedic procedure of slowly and steadily dripping medicated oil or other liquids on the forehead. This procedure induces a relaxed state of awareness that results in a dynamic psycho-somatic balance. Objectives: The objective of the study is to evaluate the psychological and physiological effects of Shirodhara in healthy volunteers by monitoring the rating of mood and levels of stress, electrocardiogram (ECG, electroencephalogram (EEG, and selected biochemical markers of stress. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the human pharmacology laboratory. The study design was open labeled, comparing the baseline variables with values after Shirodhara. The subjects (n = 16 chosen were healthy human volunteers who gave an informed consent. Shirodhara was preceded by Abhyanga - whole body massage. The Shirodhara method was standardized for rate of dripping with peristaltic pump and temperature was controlled with a thermostat. Mood and stress levels were assessed by validated rating scales. The pre- and post-Shirodhara ECG and EEG records were evaluated. Results: Student′s paired "t" test was applied to the means + SE of the variables to calculate statistical significance at P <0.05. There was a significant improvement in mood scores and the level of stress (P <0.001. These changes were accompanied by significant decrease in rate of breathing and reduction in diastolic blood pressure along with reduction in heart rate. The relaxed alert state, after Shirodhara, was co-related with an increase in alfa rhythm in EEG. Conclusion : A standardized Shirodhara leads to a state of alert calmness similar to the relaxation response observed in meditation. The clinical benefits observed with Shirodhara in anxiety neurosis, hypertension, and stress aggravation due to chronic degenerative diseases could be mediated through these adaptive physiological effects.

  10. Volunteer Functions Inventory: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Gema; Sauto, Verónica; Vecina, María L; Pérez, Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this research study was to conduct a systematic review of the research on volunteers using Clary et al.’s VFI (1998). A total of 48 research studies including 67 independent samples met eligibility criteria. The total sample of the studies analyzed ranged from 20375 to 21988 participants, depending on the motivation analyzed. The results show that the Values factor obtained the highest mean score, both overall and in each type of volunteering, whereas the lowest scores were for the Career and Enhancement factors. Studies conducted with samples with a mean age under 40 years obtain higher scores on Career and Understanding scales when compared to studies in older samples. The group of studies with less than 50% women yield higher mean scores on the Social scale than studies with more than 50% women in the sample. All the scales show reliability coefficients between .78 and .84. Only eight of the articles provide data on the reliability of the scale with a mean value of .90. Of the 26 studies that performed factor analysis, 18 confirmed the original structure of six factors.

  11. Evolutionary stability in the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Zhou He

    Full Text Available It is often assumed that in public goods games, contributors are either strong or weak players and each individual has an equal probability of exhibiting cooperation. It is difficult to explain why the public good is produced by strong individuals in some cooperation systems, and by weak individuals in others. Viewing the asymmetric volunteer's dilemma game as an evolutionary game, we find that whether the strong or the weak players produce the public good depends on the initial condition (i.e., phenotype or initial strategy of individuals. These different evolutionarily stable strategies (ESS associated with different initial conditions, can be interpreted as the production modes of public goods of different cooperation systems. A further analysis revealed that the strong player adopts a pure strategy but mixed strategies for the weak players to produce the public good, and that the probability of volunteering by weak players decreases with increasing group size or decreasing cost-benefit ratio. Our model shows that the defection probability of a "strong" player is greater than the "weak" players in the model of Diekmann (1993. This contradicts Selten's (1980 model that public goods can only be produced by a strong player, is not an evolutionarily stable strategy, and will therefore disappear over evolutionary time. Our public good model with ESS has thus extended previous interpretations that the public good can only be produced by strong players in an asymmetric game.

  12. Growing Your Career through Volunteering and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, C. A.; Meth, C.

    2007-12-01

    From giving your first paper at a scientific meeting to chairing committees that make multi-million dollar decisions, scientific organizations provide critical opportunities for growing your career. Many organizations support student activities by providing travel grants and fellowships - an important first step towards joining the larger scientific community. Beyond these standard opportunities, organizations also provide opportunities for students interested in gaining leadership experience, a skill not typically acquired in graduate science programs. For example, the Consortium for Leadership's Schlanger Ocean Drilling Fellowship provides research funds to graduate students, but also introduces the fellows to the communication skills needed to become successful members of their scientific community. Beyond student opportunities, volunteering provides mid-career and established scientists further experience in leadership. Opportunities exist in advising government science policy, guiding large-scale research programs, organizing large scientific meetings, and serving on non-profit boards. The variety of volunteer and leadership opportunities that are available give scientists at all stages of their career a chance to expand and diversify their experience, leading to new successes.

  13. 2008 LHC Open Days Training for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Information and training sessions are being organised for Open Day volunteers. The Open Days Organising Committee is offering information and training sessions every Thursday in March from 2.00 p.m. to 3.30 p.m. in the Main Building Auditorium. The first session will be on Thursday 6 March. It is important that volunteers attend these sessions to familiarise themselves with the practical arrangements for the two Open Days and with the main messages to be conveyed to the general public in order to make the event a success. General information will be given out at each session, followed by information on a specific theme. The sessions will be organised as follows: 2.00 - 2.45 p.m. : first part - general information 2.45 - 3.30 p.m. : second part - specific information * 6 March - specific theme "How to answer questions about the fears surrounding the LHC" * A different theme will be addressed at each session. The themes of subsequent sessions (13 , 20, 27 March and 3 Ap...

  14. Uses and biases of volunteer water quality data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loperfido, J.V.; Beyer, P.; Just, C.L.; Schnoor, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    State water quality monitoring has been augmented by volunteer monitoring programs throughout the United States. Although a significant effort has been put forth by volunteers, questions remain as to whether volunteer data are accurate and can be used by regulators. In this study, typical volunteer water quality measurements from laboratory and environmental samples in Iowa were analyzed for error and bias. Volunteer measurements of nitrate+nitrite were significantly lower (about 2-fold) than concentrations determined via standard methods in both laboratory-prepared and environmental samples. Total reactive phosphorus concentrations analyzed by volunteers were similar to measurements determined via standard methods in laboratory-prepared samples and environmental samples, but were statistically lower than the actual concentration in four of the five laboratory-prepared samples. Volunteer water quality measurements were successful in identifying and classifying most of the waters which violate United States Environmental Protection Agency recommended water quality criteria for total nitrogen (66%) and for total phosphorus (52%) with the accuracy improving when accounting for error and biases in the volunteer data. An understanding of the error and bias in volunteer water quality measurements can allow regulators to incorporate volunteer water quality data into total maximum daily load planning or state water quality reporting. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Do monetary rewards crowd out intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Fiorillo

    2009-01-01

    The paper studies the determinants of regular volunteering departing from previous literature on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. It contributes to the literature investigating the role of monetary rewards to influence intrinsic motivation. Using a simple framework that allows me to study the effect of monetary rewards on intrinsic motivation, the paper shows, controlling for endogenous bias, that monetary rewards crowd-out intrinsic motivation.

  16. Do monetary rewards crowd out intrinsic motivations of volunteers? Some empirical evidence for Italian volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano Fiorillo

    2009-01-01

    The paper studies the determinants of regular volunteering departing from previous literature on extrinsic and intrinsic motivations. It contributes to the literature investigating the role of monetary rewards to influence intrinsic motivation. Using a simple framework that allows me to study the effect of monetary rewards on intrinsic motivation, the paper shows, controlling for endogenous bias, that monetary rewards crowd-out intrinsic motivation.

  17. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  18. Safety Evaluation of Crocin (a constituent of saffron Tablets in Healthy Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mohamadpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Crocin is the chemical ingredient primarily responsible for the color of saffron. It has different pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, anticancer and memory improving activities. Crocin tablets were evaluated for short-term safety and tolerability in healthy adult volunteers. Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design consisting of one month treatment of crocin tablets. Volunteers who fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomized into 2 groups of 22 each (males and females and received 20 mg crocin tablets or placebo. General measures of health were recorded during the study such as hematological, biochemical, hormonal and urinary parameters in pre and post-treatment periods. Results: No major adverse events were reported during the trial. Crocin tablets did not change the above parameters except that it decreased amylase, mixed white blood cells and PTT in healthy volunteers after one month. Conclusion: This clinical safety evaluation showed a relatively safe and normal profile for crocin in healthy volunteers at the given doses within the trial period.

  19. STUDY OF REGIONAL STABILITY OF ECD DISTRIBUTION IN NORMAL BRAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李培勇; 陈刚; 朱承谟

    2001-01-01

    Objective To evaluate in vivo stability of ethylenedylbis cysteine diethylester ( ECD ) brain SPECT. Methods Each of13 normal volunteers (31.2±11.8 years) has12 dynamic SPECT scans acquired in 60min 1h after an injection of 99mTc-ECD using a triple headed gamma camera equipped with ultra high resolution fan beam collimators. Average counts per pixel were measured from frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital regions, cerebellum, basal ganglia, thalamus and white matter. Regional ECD clearance rates, regional gray-to-white matter (G/W) ratios and the change of the G /W ratio were calculated. Results The average ECD clearance rate was 4.2%/h, ranged from 3.03%/h to 5.41%/h corresponding to white matter and occipital. There was no significant difference between regional ECD clearance rates. Regional G/W ratio was between 1.27 to 1.75. The G /W ratio of temporal lobe was lower than the occipital (P<0.05). The change of regional G /W ratio with time is slow. Cbnclusion Regional ECD distribution is stable in normal brain. ECD clearance from brain is slow and no significant regional difference.

  20. New normal values not related to age and sex, of glomerular filtration rate by (99m)Tc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging, for the evaluation of living kidney graft donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiuyi; Shao, Yahui; Wang, Yanming; Tian, Jun; Sun, Ben; Ru, Yanhui; Zhang, Aimin; Hao, Junwen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normal values of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by technetium-99m diaethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) renal dynamic imaging for living kidney graft donors. In a total of 212 candidate donors, GFR was examined using (99m)Tc-DTPA renal dynamic imaging. Donors with GFR≥80mL/(min×1.73m(2)) and as low as with GFR≥70mL/(min×1.73m(2)) but a normal endogenous creatinine clearance rate (CCr) were quantified for living kidney donation. Differences in GFR levels based on sex and age were analyzed using rank correlation coefficient. Out of the 212 candidates, 161 were finally selected as kidney graft donors. The double kidney total GFR between the male and female donor groups, the GFR levels among differently-aged donor groups, and the GFR levels between the elderly (>55 years) and young- and middle-aged (≤55 years) donor groups did not show any significant difference (P>0.05). After kidney donation, renal function measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine of all donors returned to normal within one week, and no serious complications were noticed. In conclusion, renal dynamic imaging by (99m)Tc-DTPA had a good accuracy and repeatability in GFR evaluation for living kidney donors. Candidate donors with GFR between 70mL/(min×1.73m(2)) and 80mL/(min×1.73m(2)) can be selected as kidney donors after strict screening. In living kidney donors GFR is not significantly correlated with age or sex.

  1. A randomized controlled trial to promote volunteering in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lisa M; Wolff, Julia K; Ziegelmann, Jochen P; Wurm, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    Volunteering is presumed to confer health benefits, but interventions to encourage older adults to volunteer are sparse. Therefore, a randomized controlled trial with 280 community-dwelling older German adults was conducted to test the effects of a theory-based social-cognitive intervention against a passive waiting-list control group and an active control intervention designed to motivate physical activity. Self-reports of weekly volunteering minutes were assessed at baseline (5 weeks before the intervention) as well as 2 and 6 weeks after the intervention. Participants in the treatment group increased their weekly volunteering minutes to a greater extent than participants in the control groups 6 weeks after the intervention. We conclude that a single, face-to-face group session can increase volunteering among older community-dwelling adults. However, the effects need some time to unfold because changes in volunteering were not apparent 2 weeks after the intervention.

  2. Does volunteering moderate the relation between functional limitations and mortality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, Morris A; August, Kristin J; Rook, Karen S; Newsom, Jason T

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that functional limitations increase, and organizational volunteering decreases, the risk of mortality in later life. However, scant attention has been paid to investigating the joint effect of functional limitations and organizational volunteering on mortality. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that volunteering moderates the relation between functional limitations and risk of mortality. This prospective study used baseline survey data from a representative sample of 916 non-institutionalized adults 65 years old and older who lived in the continental United States. Data on mortality were extracted six years later from the National Death Index. Survival analyses revealed that functional limitations were associated with an increased risk of dying only among participants who never or almost never volunteered, suggesting that volunteering buffers the association between functional limitations and mortality. We conclude that although it may be more difficult for older adults with functional limitations to volunteer, they may receive important benefits from doing so.

  3. The role of nonprofessional volunteers in a Suicide Prevention Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, S M; Farberow, N L; Litman, R E; Shneidman, E S

    1968-08-01

    The procedures in the selection, training and supervision of 10 nonprofessional volunteers, to provide direct therapeutic crisis services to patients in a Suicide Prevention Center are described. One year's experience indicates a high degree of proficiency achieved by the volunteer in the handling of suicidal crises. The volunteers' reactions to the program are reported. Significant problems for the agency emerged in reference to precipitous increase in size of staff communication, and for the volunteer, in stimulation of problems of identity and selfconcept. The comments are limited to agency situations involving the use of nonprofessional volunteers in regular collaboration with a professional staff. Other models, such as entirely volunteer staffed groups, must be evaluated separately.

  4. Why do people volunteer for community first responder groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Vernon-Evans, Alix

    2013-03-01

    There is a growing number of community first responder (CFR) groups in the UK who provide emergency care in their local communities. To understand why people volunteer for, and continue to be active in CFR groups. Qualitative study, using focus groups of CFRs. Five focus groups were conducted, with a total of 35 participants. Ideas of altruism and a sense of community were found to be important to volunteers, though motives were complex and individual. Many volunteers had some sort of prior experience relevant to the CFR role, either as health professionals or first-aiders. Though volunteers' motives had some commonalities with the limited literature, there were issues that were unique to the CFR context. The flexibility and autonomy of CFR volunteering was particularly attractive to volunteers. It remains to be seen how sustainable the CFR model is.

  5. B1 homogeneity of breast MRI using RF shimming with individual specific values in volunteers simulating patients after mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a 3-T MRI scanner is now widely used for clinical examinations. However, B1 inhomogeneity becomes larger with MRI scanners using 3-T and higher. It especially becomes a problem in the breast. To improve B1 homogeneity, a RF shimming technique has been developed. Purpose To evaluate the B1 homogeneity of breast MRI using RF shimming with individual specific values for subjects after mastectomy. Material and Methods The subjects are healthy female volunteers who underwent normal breast imaging, followed by imaging of one breast while the other breast was bound tightly to the chest by bleached cotton cloths (simulating volunteers after mastectomy). B1 mappings were performed with RF shimming using two techniques: (i) optimized fixed value; and (ii) individual specific values using a 3-T MRI scanner. The means and standard deviations of the B1 maps for all slices in the breast were measured and compared between the fixed value and the individual specific value cases. Results For normal volunteers, the breast B1 variation was not statistically significantly different between the RF shimming techniques. For volunteers after simulated surgery, the breast B1 variation was (1.02 ± 0.29) with the fixed value and (0.98 ± 0.22) with the individual specific value ( P volunteers after simulated surgery. Conclusion RF shimming with individual specific values has the potential to improve the B1 homogeneity of breast MRI in patients after mastectomy.

  6. Offer of outgoing volunteer tourism in the Czech Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Bryndová, Karolína

    2015-01-01

    Bachelor thesis describes outgoing volunteer tourism in the Czech Republic through volunteer organizations that offer projects mainly for young people as a meaning leisure activity, but also organizations that are involved in rescue operations during various natural disasters and other emergencies. It then also describes types of projects as well as positive and negative impacts, benefits, and problems of international volunteering. Final survey identifies a profile of participants of these p...

  7. THE POTENTIAL OF EMPLOYEES ONLINE VOLUNTEERING IN ROMANIA

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We have started our research based on the hypothesis that although the concept of online volunteering has a history of more than 30 years (Cravens, 2006) it seems not to be very well known and used in Romania. One the other site, Corporate Social Responsibility programs have gained popularity in our country in recent years and we were interested in analysing the connection existing between the three concepts of CSR – Corporate Volunteering – Online Volunteering along with their impact in the ...

  8. A Systems Perspective on Volunteered Geographic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Fast

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI is geographic information collected by way of crowdsourcing. However, the distinction between VGI as an information product and the processes that create VGI is blurred. Clearly, the environment that influences the creation of VGI is different than the information product itself, yet most literature treats them as one and the same. Thus, this research is motivated by the need to formalize and standardize the systems that support the creation of VGI. To this end, we propose a conceptual framework for VGI systems, the main components of which—project, participants, and technical infrastructure—form an environment conducive to the creation of VGI. Drawing on examples from OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, and RinkWatch, we illustrate the pragmatic relevance of these components. Applying a system perspective to VGI allows us to better understand the components and functionality needed to effectively create VGI.

  9. Longitudinal Evaluation of Sympathetic Nervous System and Perfusion in Normal and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Hearts with Dynamic Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Zan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the sympathetic nervous system and structure remodeling during the progression of heart failure in a rodent model using dynamic cardiac single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR model was used to study changes in the nervous system innervation and perfusion in the left ventricular (LV myocardium with the progression of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH to heart failure. Longitudinal dynamic SPECT studies were performed with seven SHR and seven Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats over 1.5 years using a dual-head SPECT scanner with pinhole collimators. Time-activity curves (TACs of the 123I-MIBG and 201Tl distribution in the LV blood pool and myocardium were extracted from dynamic SPECT data and fitted to compartment models to determine the influx rate, washout rate, and distribution volume (DV of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium. The standardized uptake values (SUVs of 123I-MIBG and 201Tl in the LV myocardium were also calculated from the static reconstructed images. The influx and washout rates of 123I-MIBG did not show a significant difference between SHRs and WKY rats. The DVs of 123I-MIBG were greater in the SHRs than in the WKY rats (p = .0028. Specifically, the DV of 123I-MIBG became greater in the SHRs by 6 months of age (p = .0017 and was still significant at the age of 22 months. The SUV of 123I-MIBG in SHRs exhibited abnormal values compared to WKY rats from the age of 18 months. There was no difference in the influx rate and the washout rate of 201Tl between the SHRs and WKY rats. The SHRs exhibited greater DV of 201Tl than WKY rats after the age of 18 months (p = .034. The SUV of 201Tl in SHRs did not show any significant difference from WKY at all ages. The higher DV of 123I-MIBG in the LV myocardium reveals abnormal nervous system activity of the SHRs at an age of 6 months, whereas a greater DV of 201Tl in the LV myocardium can only be detected at

  10. Towards a Production Volunteer Computing Infrastructure for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høimyr, N.; Marquina, M.; Asp, T.; Jones, P.; Gonzalez, A.; Field, L.

    2015-12-01

    Following the successful inclusion of virtualisation to volunteer computing for theory simulations back in 2011, the use of volunteer computing with BOINC and CernVM has been extended to cover simulations for the LHC experiments ATLAS, CMS and LHCb. This paper describes the status of the BOINC volunteer computing platform at CERN used for LHC@home and how it has been designed to address a heterogeneous environment of different user communities with different computing infrastructure. The aim of the recent developments is to provide a volunteer computing platform that the experiments can build upon to exploit opportunistic resources. Furthermore, new developments of common solutions to span user authentication domains are explained.

  11. Leaving home: how older adults prepare for intensive volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, Cheryl; Piercy, Kathleen W; Grainger, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Using the concepts in the Fogg Behavioral Model, 37 volunteers aged 50 and older described their preparation for intensive volunteering with faith-based organizations. Their multistage preparation process included decision points where respondents needed to choose whether to drop out or continue preparation. Ability was a stronger determinant of serving than motivation, particularly in terms of health and finances. This model can facilitate understanding of the barriers to volunteering and aid organizations in tailoring support at crucial points for potential older volunteers in intensive service.

  12. Networking for philanthropy: increasing volunteer behavior via social networking sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoojung; Lee, Wei-Na

    2014-03-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) provide a unique social venue to engage the young generation in philanthropy through their networking capabilities. An integrated model that incorporates social capital into the Theory of Reasoned Action is developed to explain volunteer behavior through social networks. As expected, volunteer behavior was predicted by volunteer intention, which was influenced by attitudes and subjective norms. In addition, social capital, an outcome of the extensive use of SNSs, was as an important driver of users' attitude and subjective norms toward volunteering via SNSs.

  13. LSD enhances suggestibility in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, R L; Kaelen, M; Whalley, M G; Bolstridge, M; Feilding, A; Nutt, D J

    2015-02-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has a history of use as a psychotherapeutic aid in the treatment of mood disorders and addiction, and it was also explored as an enhancer of mind control. The present study sought to test the effect of LSD on suggestibility in a modern research study. Ten healthy volunteers were administered with intravenous (i.v.) LSD (40-80 μg) in a within-subject placebo-controlled design. Suggestibility and cued mental imagery were assessed using the Creative Imagination Scale (CIS) and a mental imagery test (MIT). CIS and MIT items were split into two versions (A and B), balanced for 'efficacy' (i.e. A ≈ B) and counterbalanced across conditions (i.e. 50 % completed version 'A' under LSD). The MIT and CIS were issued 110 and 140 min, respectively, post-infusion, corresponding with the peak drug effects. Volunteers gave significantly higher ratings for the CIS (p = 0.018), but not the MIT (p = 0.11), after LSD than placebo. The magnitude of suggestibility enhancement under LSD was positively correlated with trait conscientiousness measured at baseline (p = 0.0005). These results imply that the influence of suggestion is enhanced by LSD. Enhanced suggestibility under LSD may have implications for its use as an adjunct to psychotherapy, where suggestibility plays a major role. That cued imagery was unaffected by LSD implies that suggestions must be of a sufficient duration and level of detail to be enhanced by the drug. The results also imply that individuals with high trait conscientiousness are especially sensitive to the suggestibility-enhancing effects of LSD.

  14. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little positive impact on trust because social experiences of volunteers in organizations are not always positive. A second reason is that values are relatively stable over the life course. Finally, there ar...

  15. Quantitative analysis of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at phase contrast cine-MRI: predictivity of neurosurgical "Shunt" responsiveness in patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Alessandro; Cassarà, Alessia; Zuccalà, Alberto; Anoaica, Mihaela B; Genovese, Egidio; Car, Pier G; Panzarasa, Gabriele P; Guzzardi, Giuseppe; Carriero, Alessandro

    2017-09-04

    Aqueductal stroke volume (ACSV) measured by phase-contrast cine (PCC)-MRI has been proposed with controversy as a tool for the selection of patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) as candidates for shunt-surgery. The aim of this study was to assess if PCC-MRI scan measurements of ACSV could select properly these patients. We retrospectively reviewed charts and MRI of 38 shunted patients (72,16 ±6,16 years). ACSV measurements were performed 7-30 days before shunt and at the first and sixth months after surgery. Normally distributed variables were compared in the two groups (improved/unimproved) by T-test for baseline values and with repeated measures analysis of variance. 26 patients (68,4 %) improved after VPS (mean time of symptom onset was 8,15 ±7,19 months). Mean preoperative ACSV value was 271,85 ± 143,03, which decreased by 21,6 % (mean 213 ± 125,14 ) at the first month and 40,3% sixth months after VPS (mean 162,15 ± 91,5). 12 patients (31,6 %) did not improve (mean time of symptom onset was 29 ± 5,62 months). Mean preoperative ACSV value was 79,83 ± 31,24, decreased to 8,7 % (mean 72,83 ±28,66 ) at first month after VPS, 21,2% (mean 62,83 ± 31,12 ) after six months. We found statistical difference between preoperative ACSV of improved and unimproved patients (p<0,01), onset time of symptoms (p<0,01) and the changes in ACSV after one and six months in both groups (p<0,001). ACSV is useful to stratify patients with NPH after surgery (improved /not improved) suggesting to proceed with serial ACSV measurements before deciding treatment.

  16. Concentration-response relationships for salicylate-induced ototoxicity in normal volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Day, R O; Graham, G G; Bieri, D.; Brown, M.; Cairns, D; Harris, G.; Hounsell, J.; Platt-Hepworth, S.; Reeve, R.; Sambrook, P.N.; Smith, J.

    1989-01-01

    1 Ototoxicity is a common and troublesome side-effect of high-dose aspirin treatment but there has been little previous study of the relationships between the degree of ototoxicity and the plasma concentrations of salicylate.

  17. Dilation by CGRP of middle meningeal artery and reversal by sumatriptan in normal volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, M S; Hansen, A E; Kapijimpanga, T

    2010-01-01

    of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) using magnetic resonance angiography before and after infusion (20 minutes) of 1.5 μg/min human αCGRP or placebo (isotonic saline) as well as after a 6-mg sumatriptan subcutaneous injection. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, CGRP caused.......0001) and on the placebo day (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that exogenous CGRP dilates extracranial vessels and not intracranial, and that sumatriptan exerts part of its antinociceptive action by constricting MMA and not MCA. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that IV GCRP...

  18. Dilation by CGRP of middle meningeal artery and reversal by sumatriptan in normal volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, M S; Hansen, A E; Kapijimpanga, T

    2010-01-01

    of the middle meningeal artery (MMA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) using magnetic resonance angiography before and after infusion (20 minutes) of 1.5 µg/min human aCGRP or placebo (isotonic saline) as well as after a 6-mg sumatriptan subcutaneous injection. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, CGRP caused.......0001) and on the placebo day (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that exogenous CGRP dilates extracranial vessels and not intracranial, and that sumatriptan exerts part of its antinociceptive action by constricting MMA and not MCA. CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that IV GCRP...

  19. Characterization of the highly variable bioavailability of tiludronate in normal volunteers using population pharmacokinetic methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, G A; Lockwood, G F; Oppermann, J A; Wei, G; Bauer, P; Fedler-Kelly, J; Grasela, T

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the use of classical bioequivalence criteria is being called into question for certain classes of drugs such as bisphosphonates. These compounds typically possess a wide therapeutic index but may be characterized by low and variable absorption. The purpose of this communication was to characterize the highly variable bioavailability of tiludronate using a population pharmacokinetic method (NONMEM program) and compare the results to a standard 2 way cross-over bioequivalence trial in healthy subjects. Over 3500 plasma samples from 153 healthy subjects, representing 12 different clinical trials were pooled for mixed effect modeling purposes (complete data set). These studies, conducted under single and multiple dose conditions, contained all the directly comparable data available in healthy subjects administered a 400 mg dose of tiludronate. A two compartment model with first order absorption was fit to the plasma concentration-time data and a term for relative bioavailability (BA) was included. Intersubject and residual variability were modeled using a constant coefficient of variation (CCV) model. A pilot model development data set was obtained from a 24 subject cross-over bioequivalence study. Population estimates of BA and its associated 90% confidence interval of 1.12 and 0.89-1.35 compared favorably to standard bioequivalence methodology (1.15 and 0.93-1.42, respectively). Since a good fit of predicted and observed plasma concentrations as well as estimates of BA were obtained, a two compartment model with a term for BA was then applied to the complete data set. Under these conditions, BA and its 90% confidence interval were found to be 1.17 and 0.98-1.36. Intersubject variability of 31%, compared with 38% in the pilot model development data set and residual variability of 38% were seen. No differences in absorption characteristics as measured by Ka were found. Good agreement between the population pharmacokinetic parameters were observed when the pilot data set was compared with the full data set. The proposed model was confirmed by creating 10 additional smaller data sets that were matched for the number of subjects given both formulations under single and multiple dose conditions. No change in the estimate of BA was observed under these study conditions. This study demonstrated that population pharmacokinetic methodology can be applied successfully to problematical bioequivalence issues that may occur during the development process. Increasing the number of subjects in the overall analysis did not alter the estimate of BA or its 90% confidence interval, when compared to the original cross-over bioequivalence study. Bayesian approaches can be of value in large clinical trials where typically relatively few plasma samples are obtained from individual subjects.

  20. Effects of Catecholamine Depletion on Alertness and Mood in Rested and Sleep Deprived Normal Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    suggest- vw jon (AMIAPT/SD); 3) treatment with placebo plus sleep ing a link between the regulation of mood and arousal deprivation (P/SD); or 4) treatment...deprivation improves mood Drug Administration in depressed individuals remains unclear, but may in- volve catecholamines (Siegel and Rogawski 1988; Hart...neurotransmis- also be involved in the AMPT-indluced changes in mood. sion (Siegel and Rogawski 1988). For example, it has Although the relationship between

  1. Plasma, salivary and urinary cortisol levels following physiological and stress doses of hydrocortisone in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Caroline; Greco, Santo; Nguyen, Hanh H T; Ho, Jui T; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J; Inder, Warrick J

    2014-11-26

    Glucocorticoid replacement is essential in patients with primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency, but many patients remain on higher than recommended dose regimens. There is no uniformly accepted method to monitor the dose in individual patients. We have compared cortisol concentrations in plasma, saliva and urine achieved following "physiological" and "stress" doses of hydrocortisone as potential methods for monitoring glucocorticoid replacement. Cortisol profiles were measured in plasma, saliva and urine following "physiological" (20 mg oral) or "stress" (50 mg intravenous) doses of hydrocortisone in dexamethasone-suppressed healthy subjects (8 in each group), compared to endogenous cortisol levels (12 subjects). Total plasma cortisol was measured half-hourly, and salivary cortisol and urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio were measured hourly from time 0 (between 0830 and 0900) to 5 h. Endogenous plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) levels were measured at time 0 and 5 h, and hourly from time 0 to 5 h following administration of oral or intravenous hydrocortisone. Plasma free cortisol was calculated using Coolens' equation. Plasma, salivary and urine cortisol at 2 h after oral hydrocortisone gave a good indication of peak cortisol concentrations, which were uniformly supraphysiological. Intravenous hydrocortisone administration achieved very high 30 minute cortisol concentrations. Total plasma cortisol correlated significantly with both saliva and urine cortisol after oral and intravenous hydrocortisone (P cortisol and urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio may provide useful alternatives to plasma cortisol measurements to monitor replacement doses in hypoadrenal patients.

  2. Investing in volunteering: measuring social returns of volunteer recruitment, training, and management

    OpenAIRE

    G. Manetti; M. Bellucci; E.Como; L. Bagnoli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the costs and benefits of the investments that non-profit organizations (NPOs) make for the recruitment, training, and management of volunteers. Our main research question is whether we can apply the Social Return on Investment (SROI) to the identification and quantification of social returns in monetary terms. We believe that the “SROI of volunteering” may represent an effective instrument of internal control for NPOs for improving efficiency and sustainability. In o...

  3. Three Steps to Engage Volunteers in Membership Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Tony

    2011-01-01

    There is a big world out there, and volunteers can make a significant impact in helping one reach out to others and grow his/her PTA membership. In fact, word-of-mouth marketing tied for the top spot as the most effective method of new member recruitment in Marketing General's 2010 Membership Marketing Benchmarking Report. So getting volunteers'…

  4. Who Benefits from Volunteering? Variations in Perceived Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Song-Iee; Tang, Fengyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. Design and Methods: This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older…

  5. 28 CFR 548.14 - Community involvement (volunteers, contractors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Community involvement (volunteers... Community involvement (volunteers, contractors). (a) The institution's chaplain may contract with representatives of faith groups in the community to provide specific religious services which the chaplain...

  6. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what motivates…

  7. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what motivates…

  8. Volunteers as Products of a Zoo Conservation Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Robert D.; Joseph, Stephanie L.; Searles, Vicki M.

    2014-01-01

    Zoos embrace docents/volunteers as a means of interpreting the threats to wildlife and biodiversity to visitors. To accomplish this, zoos provide docents' education, training, and work experience. Docents themselves also engage in solitary and social wildlife experiences outside of their volunteer obligations. This study examined what…

  9. 75 FR 56501 - Information Collection; Land Management Agency Volunteer Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... exists regarding volunteering in general, there is very little rigorous, academic research on volunteering as it applies to LMAs, largely because there is no reliable, uniform, and comprehensive data... management values and objectives; and will facilitate further application of findings. The exact number...

  10. Human volunteer study with PGME: Eye irritation during vapour exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Arts, J.H.E.; Prinsen, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the possible occurrence of eye irritation and subjective symptoms in human volunteers exposed to propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) vapour at concentrations of 0, 100 and 150 ppm. Testing was conducted in 12 healthy male volunteers using a repeated

  11. The Association of Childhood Personality Type with Volunteering during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Robert; Hart, Daniel; Donnelly, Thomas M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a longitudinal design, we investigated the relation of childhood personality type to volunteering during adolescence. We hypothesized that participants with more adaptive personality functioning during childhood would be more likely to volunteer during adolescence and that membership in social organizations would mediate the relation of…

  12. Leveraging Telehealth to Bring Volunteer Physicians Into Underserved Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uscher-Pines, Lori; Rudin, Robert; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-11-28

    Many disadvantaged communities lack sufficient numbers of local primary care and specialty physicians. Yet tens of thousands of physicians, in particular those who are retired or semiretired, desire meaningful volunteer opportunities. Multiple programs have begun to use telehealth to bridge the gap between volunteer physicians and underserved patients. In this brief, we describe programs that are using this model and discuss the promise and pitfalls. Physician volunteers in these programs report that the work can be fulfilling and exciting, a cutting-edge yet convenient way to remain engaged and contribute. Given the projected shortfall of physicians in the United States, recruiting retired and semiretired physicians to provide care through telehealth increases the total supply of active physicians and the capacity of the existing workforce. However, programs typically use volunteers in a limited capacity because of uncertainty about the level and duration of commitment. Acknowledging this reality, most programs only use volunteer physicians for curbside consults rather than fully integrating them into longitudinal patient care. The part-time availability of volunteers may also be difficult to incorporate into the workflow of busy safety net clinics. As more physicians volunteer in a growing number of telehealth programs, the dual benefits of enriching the professional lives of volunteers and improving care for underserved communities will make further development of these programs worthwhile.

  13. School Volunteer Program. A Two-Year Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew Consolidated School Corp., Columbus, IN.

    This report evaluates a volunteer program established in the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation in Columbus, Indiana. Areas identified for evaluation were (1) the fulfillment or achievement of program objectives; (2) measurable differences in volunteers' attitudes toward the schooling process and parenting skills, as well as their…

  14. National context, religiosity and volunteering: Results from 53 countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, S.; Graaf, N.D. de

    2006-01-01

    To what extent does the national religious context affect volunteering? Does a religious environment affect the relation between religiosity and volunteering? To answer these questions, this study specifies individual level, contextual level, and cross-level interaction hypotheses. The authors test

  15. The Impact of Institutional Mission on Student Volunteering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Susan Crawford; Ludden, Alison Bryant; Singleton, Royce A., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns and predictors of volunteering among students at a liberal arts college with an institutional culture that strongly promotes community service. Results showed that predictors varied across four different types of volunteering: community service, social action, religious service, and service to the college. Year in…

  16. National Context, Religiosity, and Volunteering : Results from 53 Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, Stijn; Graaf, Nan Dirk de

    2008-01-01

    To what extent does the national religious context affect volunteering? Does a religious environment affect the relation between religiosity and volunteering? To answer these questions, this study specifies individual level, contextual level, and cross-level interaction hypotheses. The authors test

  17. Human volunteer study with PGME: Eye irritation during vapour exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmen, H.H.; Muijser, H.; Arts, J.H.E.; Prinsen, M.K.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish the possible occurrence of eye irritation and subjective symptoms in human volunteers exposed to propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) vapour at concentrations of 0, 100 and 150 ppm. Testing was conducted in 12 healthy male volunteers using a repeated

  18. Pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-junQIU; Guo-xinHU; Jian-gangWANG; Zong-shunDAI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the pharmacokinetics and bioequivalence of lorazepam tablets in Chinese healthy volunteers. METHODS:Twenty Chinese healthy male volunteers were involved in the study. Each subject received a single dose of 3 mg Lorazepam tested formulation (T, Hubei Zhongtian Airbeck Pharmaceutical Limited Company) or Lorazepam reference formulation (R, Thailand Atlatic Pharmaceutical Limited Company) with a random-

  19. Mé Féin nó an Pobal: Social Processes and Connectivity in Irish Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Claire Van Hout

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ireland has a longstanding history of diverse volunteer action (Volunteering Ireland, 2010a. Ireland’s current economic recession has impacted on the community and voluntary sector, with frequent contraction in staff numbers and incomes, and increasing reliance on volunteer participation (Harvey, 2012. This study utilised social capital theory to garner a phenomenological understanding of the contribution of volunteering to perceived social capital amongst Irish volunteers and host organisation representatives. A convenience sample of 28 participants (17 volunteers and 11 organisation representatives was interviewed. A shift in personal and social definitions of volunteering were described, with informal volunteering increasingly replaced by structured, formalized and regulated volunteer placements. Volunteers described their experiences as contributing to increased personal well being and sense of purpose, development of friendships and meeting new people. The volunteer participants identified volunteering activity as a specified community need, providing work related experiences, fulfillment in free time and opportunity for up-skilling. Integration of volunteers into the organisation’s workforce was described as dependent on duration, intensity of interaction and scope of volunteer contributions. Power differentials and a lack of trust between volunteers and staff, was described, as was a lack of volunteer recognition staff. Subsequently, some volunteers identified and aligned themselves within the wider social volunteer network rather than their host organisation. The research reflected an emergent consumerist approach to volunteering and underscores the need to preserve informal social networks of community volunteers, alongside the development of more formalized work specific routes for volunteering in Ireland.

  20. Differences in gluten metabolism among healthy volunteers, coeliac disease patients and first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero, Alberto; Nistal, Esther; Herrán, Alexandra R; Pérez-Andrés, Jénifer; Ferrero, Miguel A; Vaquero Ayala, Luis; Vivas, Santiago; Ruiz de Morales, José M G; Albillos, Silvia M; Casqueiro, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-28

    Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy resulting from exposure to gluten in genetically predisposed individuals. Gluten proteins are partially digested by human proteases generating immunogenic peptides that cause inflammation in patients carrying HLA-DQ2 and DQ8 genes. Although intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with patients with CD, bacterial metabolism of gluten has not been studied in depth thus far. The aim of this study was to analyse the metabolic activity of intestinal bacteria associated with gluten intake in healthy individuals, CD patients and first-degree relatives of CD patients. Faecal samples belonging to twenty-two untreated CD patients, twenty treated CD patients, sixteen healthy volunteers on normal diet, eleven healthy volunteers on gluten-free diet (GFD), seventy-one relatives of CD patients on normal diet and sixty-nine relatives on GFD were tested for several proteolytic activities, cultivable bacteria involved in gluten metabolism, SCFA and the amount of gluten in faeces. We detected faecal peptidasic activity against the gluten-derived peptide 33-mer. CD patients showed differences in faecal glutenasic activity (FGA), faecal tryptic activity (FTA), SCFA and faecal gluten content with respect to healthy volunteers. Alterations in specific bacterial groups metabolising gluten such as Clostridium or Lactobacillus were reported in CD patients. Relatives showed similar parameters to CD patients (SCFA) and healthy volunteers (FTA and FGA). Our data support the fact that commensal microbial activity is an important factor in the metabolism of gluten proteins and that this activity is altered in CD patients.

  1. English Training for College Student Volunteers at Sports Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies English training for student volunteers at large scale sports events with a comprehensive investigation of the undergraduate student volunteers from Capital University of Physical Education who have taken part in large scale sports events. By examining the current volunteer training situation, the author finds that there is a sever lack of professional and system-atical English training for student volunteers at large scale sports events. The study shows focusing on sports events knowledge and requirements of the volunteers’specific job is crucial to the service level of the volunteers. The study concludes that the problem can be solved by developing new course books, innovating new flexible training methods, and offering more comprehensive training content. The recommended training methods include intensive group training, computer aided teaching, task training and on-the-spot training to make them fit their work soon.

  2. Predicting professional quality of life among professional and volunteer caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avieli, Hila; Ben-David, Sarah; Levy, Inna

    2016-01-01

    This study is one of the few that has compared volunteers' professional quality of life (PQL), which includes secondary traumatic stress (STS), burnout, and compassion satisfaction (CS), to those of professional caregivers. In addition, the research compared the ethical behavior of volunteers with that of professional therapists and examined the connection between years of experience, ethical behavior, and PQL. One hundred eighty-three volunteers and professional caregivers filled out a sociodemographic questionnaire, an Ethical Behavior Questionnaire and the Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) questionnaire. The results indicated that professional caregivers report lower levels of STS and burnout, and higher levels of CS and ethical behavior compared with volunteer caregivers. Moreover, the findings suggest that ethical behavior correlates with STS, burnout, and CS. Ethical behavior has a protective value for mental health caregivers. The discussion emphasizes the value of a professional code of ethics and ethical training for professional and volunteering caregivers.

  3. "Communication is everything:" The experiences of volunteers who use AAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembath, David; Balandin, Susan; Stancliffe, Roger J; Togher, Leanne

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact that using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) had on the experiences of 24 adults with lifelong disabilities who worked as volunteers. This research forms part of a larger qualitative study of volunteering amongst adults who use AAC. Based on in-depth interviews and grounded theory analysis, the results indicate that communication is central to successful volunteering and, in particular, that access to AAC has the potential to provide valuable support to individuals with complex communication needs who want to volunteer. However, a number of barriers must be addressed in order for this potential to be achieved. Strategies for promoting and supporting adults who use AAC and want to volunteer are discussed.

  4. Gender and religious differences associated with volunteering in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Lydia K

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use a nationally representative sample of older adults in the United States to investigate the effect gender and religiosity has on volunteer behavior in later life. This study looks specifically at the gender and religious differences associated with volunteering in later life. Accounting for gender and religious differences, more specifically, this study examines the assumption that older women are more likely to volunteer in later life as opposed to men, and that gender is a better predictor than being religious for the likelihood of occupying a volunteer role in later life. This study poses questions about the differences in gender and religiosity associated with volunteering in later life; the results indicate there is more work to be done as we conduct research that is clearer about how volunteerism and religiosity are measured in relation to gender, and the overall impact these differences have for older women and their respective communities.

  5. Municipality and Neighborhood Influences on Volunteering in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Sarah; Willems, Jurgen; De Witte, Nico; De Donder, Liesbeth; Buffel, Tine; Verté, Dominique

    2016-06-01

    This article explores the relationships between municipality features and volunteering by older adults. In the literature, strong evidence exists of the influence of place on older people's health. However, the question how neighborhoods and municipalities promote or hinder volunteer participation remains under-explored. Data for the research are derived from the Belgian Aging Studies. We estimate logistic multilevel models for older individuals' engagement in volunteering across 141 municipalities in Belgium (N = 67,144). Analysis shows that neighborhood connectedness, neighborhood satisfaction, home ownership, and presence of services predict voluntary engagement at older ages. The findings support that perceptions and quality of social resources that relate to neighborhoods may be important factors to explain volunteering among older adults. Moreover, the findings suggest that volunteering in later life must be considered within a broader framework.

  6. A Method for Analyzing Volunteered Geographic Information ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) can be used to identify public valuation of ecosystem services in a defined geographic area using photos as a representation of lived experiences. This method can help researchers better survey and report on the values and preferences of stakeholders involved in rehabilitation and revitalization projects. Current research utilizes VGI in the form of geotagged social media photos from three platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Social media photos have been obtained for the neighborhoods next to the St. Louis River in Duluth, Minnesota, and are being analyzed along several dimensions. These dimensions include the spatial distribution of each platform, the characteristics of the physical environment portrayed in the photos, and finally, the ecosystem service depicted. In this poster, we focus on the photos from the Irving and Fairmount neighborhoods of Duluth, MN to demonstrate the method at the neighborhood scale. This study demonstrates a method for translating the values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially-explicit data to be used in multiple settings, including the City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development. This poster will demonstrate a method for translating values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially

  7. Using volunteered geographic information to visualize ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI), specifically geotagged photographs available from social media platforms, is a promising technology that can be utilized to identify public values for ecosystem goods and services in a defined geographic area. VGI can help researchers indirectly survey and report on the values and preferences of communities involved in restoration and revitalization projects. We are using geotagged images from three social media platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Images are obtained for the neighborhoods to the St. Louis River in the Duluth, MN and analyzed along several dimensions including the spatial distribution of images from each platform and the types and frequencies of social values and ecosystem service depicted. This study will demonstrate a method for translating the values of ecosystem goods and services as captured in social media into spatially-explicit data. Study outcomes are the incorporation of social media-derived indicators of ecosystems services into City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development Sustainable and Healthy Community research. Not applicable

  8. A Method for Analyzing Volunteered Geographic Information ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volunteered geographic information (VGI) can be used to identify public valuation of ecosystem services in a defined geographic area using photos as a representation of lived experiences. This method can help researchers better survey and report on the values and preferences of stakeholders involved in rehabilitation and revitalization projects. Current research utilizes VGI in the form of geotagged social media photos from three platforms: Flickr, Instagram, and Panaramio. Social media photos have been obtained for the neighborhoods next to the St. Louis River in Duluth, Minnesota, and are being analyzed along several dimensions. These dimensions include the spatial distribution of each platform, the characteristics of the physical environment portrayed in the photos, and finally, the ecosystem service depicted. In this poster, we focus on the photos from the Irving and Fairmount neighborhoods of Duluth, MN to demonstrate the method at the neighborhood scale. This study demonstrates a method for translating the values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially-explicit data to be used in multiple settings, including the City of Duluth’s Comprehensive Planning and community revitalization efforts, habitat restoration in a Great Lakes Area of Concern, and the USEPA’s Office of Research and Development. This poster will demonstrate a method for translating values expressed in social media photos into ecosystem services and spatially

  9. Education and Outreach for Volunteer Planetary Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    When a large meteor exploded over Chelyabinsk in 2013, people saw the bright flash and rushed to windows. Then the blast wave hit and many were injured by flying glass fragments. Education about airbursts might have reduced the casualties. Education and Public Outreach (EPO) can also be important in broadening public involvement in preparations for dealing with cosmic hazards. Amateur astronomers have an important role in discovering potentially hazardous asteroids and comets, and also in making follow-up observations after discovery. This is especially important for Southern Hemisphere observing sites where professional observers are relatively few. The Planetary Society makes small Shoemaker grants to aid amateur astronomers in this work. Much more could be done if educators, students and the general public were aware of the opportunity and the need. Beyond this, public engagement is essential to raise and maintain support for active agencies, including the UN-sponsored International Asteroid Warning Network (IAWN) and Space Mission Planning Advisory Group (SMPAG). This paper will describe and advocate EPO efforts in support of these and other Volunteer Planetary Defense activities.

  10. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Studerus

    Full Text Available Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  11. Prediction of psilocybin response in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studerus, Erich; Gamma, Alex; Kometer, Michael; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2012-01-01

    Responses to hallucinogenic drugs, such as psilocybin, are believed to be critically dependent on the user's personality, current mood state, drug pre-experiences, expectancies, and social and environmental variables. However, little is known about the order of importance of these variables and their effect sizes in comparison to drug dose. Hence, this study investigated the effects of 24 predictor variables, including age, sex, education, personality traits, drug pre-experience, mental state before drug intake, experimental setting, and drug dose on the acute response to psilocybin. The analysis was based on the pooled data of 23 controlled experimental studies involving 409 psilocybin administrations to 261 healthy volunteers. Multiple linear mixed effects models were fitted for each of 15 response variables. Although drug dose was clearly the most important predictor for all measured response variables, several non-pharmacological variables significantly contributed to the effects of psilocybin. Specifically, having a high score in the personality trait of Absorption, being in an emotionally excitable and active state immediately before drug intake, and having experienced few psychological problems in past weeks were most strongly associated with pleasant and mystical-type experiences, whereas high Emotional Excitability, low age, and an experimental setting involving positron emission tomography most strongly predicted unpleasant and/or anxious reactions to psilocybin. The results confirm that non-pharmacological variables play an important role in the effects of psilocybin.

  12. Comparative study of the differences between dynamic and normal strategies with Octopus 1-2-3 Estudo comparativo das diferenças entre as estratégias dinâmica e normal com o perímetro Octopus 1-2-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. O. Santos

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To show the results of a comparative study between dynamic and normal strategies with Octopus 1-2-3. Methods: Automatic perimetry using the Octopus 1-2-3 with dynamic and normal strategies was performed on 24 glaucomatous patients (eight males and 16 females within an average interval of six months between the two exams. All patients had previously submitted to at least one automatic perimetry with the Octopus 1-2-3. The data compared, for both eyes, were: the patient's age, number of questions, mean sensitivity (MS, mean defect (MD, loss variance (LV, short-term fluctuation (SF and the reliability factor (RF. In the statistical analyses through the paired t test, only the visual fields with RF less than 10 were included. The level of significance was equal to 5% (p Objetivo: Analisar os resultados de um estudo comparativo entre as estratégias dinâmica e normal utilizando o perí-metro Octopus 1-2-3. Métodos: Utilizando o Octopus 1-2-3 nas estratégias dinâmica e normal foi realizada a perimetria automatizada em 24 pacientes glaucomatosos (8 homens e 16 mulheres com uma média de intervalo entre os 2 exames de 6 meses. Todos pacientes já haviam sido previamente submetidos a pelo menos um exame de perimetria automatizada no Octopus 1-2-3. Os dados comparados, para ambos os olhos, foram: a idade do paciente, número de estímulos, sensibilidade média (MS, defeito médio (MD, perda localizada (LV, flutuação em curto prazo (SF e o fator de confiabilidade (RF. Na análise estatística, utilizando o teste t pareado, somente os campos visuais com RF menor que 10 foram incluídos. O nível de significância foi igual a 5% (p < 0,05. Resultados: Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as duas estratégias em relação à idade, LV, SF e RF. Entretanto, houve diferença estatisticamente significativa na duração do teste, número de estímulos, MS e MD. A estratégia dinâmica mostrou uma sensibilidade difusa maior e

  13. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local chapter Join our online community Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain ... About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal ...

  14. Organizational factors and mental health in community volunteers. The role of exposure, preparation, training, tasks assigned, and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormar, Sigridur Bjork; Gersons, Berthold P R; Juen, Barbara; Djakababa, Maria Nelden; Karlsson, Thorlakur; Olff, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    During disasters, aid organizations often respond using the resources of local volunteer members from the affected population who are not only inexperienced, but who additionally take on some of the more psychologically and physically difficult tasks in order to provide support for their community. Although not much empirical evidence exists to justify the claim, it is thought that preparation, training, and organizational support limit (or reduce) a volunteer's risk of developing later psychopathology. In this study, we examined the effects of preparation, training, and organizational support and assigned tasks on the mental health of 506 Indonesian Red Cross volunteers who participated in the response to a massive earthquake in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in 2006. Controlling for exposure level, the volunteers were assessed for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, and subjective health complaints (SHCs) 6, 12, and 18 months post-disaster. Results showed high levels of PTSD and SHCs up to 18 months post-disaster, while anxiety and depression levels remained in the normal range. Higher levels of exposure as well as certain tasks (e.g., provision of psychosocial support to beneficiaries, handling administration, or handing out food aid) made the volunteers more vulnerable. Sense of safety, expressed general need for support at 6 months, and a lack of perceived support from team leaders and the organization were also related to greater psychopathology at 18 months. The results highlight the importance of studying organizational factors. By incorporating these results into future volunteer management programs the negative effects of disaster work on volunteers can be ameliorated.

  15. Fatty muscle atrophy: prevalence in the hindfoot muscles on MR images of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Daniel T; Hodler, Juerg; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Espinosa, Norman; Zanetti, Marco

    2009-10-01

    To determine prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy in plantar foot muscles in asymptomatic volunteers and in patients with foot pain. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. The prevalence and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor digitorum brevis (FDB), abductor hallucis (AH), and quadratus plantae (QP) muscles in 80 asymptomatic volunteers (mean age, 48 years; range, 23-84 years) and 80 patients with foot pain (mean age, 48 years; range, 20-86 years). Muscles were characterized as normal (grade 0) or as having mild (grade 1) or substantial (grade 2) fatty atrophy by two readers separately. Results of visual grading for both readers were compared by using the Mann-Whitney test. Associations between age and degree of fatty muscle atrophy were assessed by using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Readers 1 and 2 found substantial fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle in four (5%) and five (6%) volunteers, respectively, and in three (4%) and nine (11%) patients, respectively. One reader diagnosed substantial fatty atrophy of the AH muscle in three (4%) volunteers and of the FDB muscle in two (2%) volunteers. Prevalence for the QP muscle varied between 0% and 1%. An association between age and degree of fatty atrophy of the ADM muscle was found for volunteers by both readers and for patients by reader 1 (P muscle atrophy of the ADM muscle-classically considered to represent entrapment neuropathy-is between 4% and 11% in both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with foot pain, and it increases with age.

  16. Beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life among Chinese adolescents in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ben M F; Shek, Daniel T L

    2009-09-01

    The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunteering behavior. Purpose in life was associated more strongly with prosocial value function than with other types of beliefs (except understanding function). When different beliefs are grouped, the correlation between purpose in life and other-serving beliefs was higher than that between purpose in life and self-serving beliefs. Purpose in life was also associated with volunteering intention and behavior. Path analyses showed that purpose in life predicted volunteering behavior via beliefs and intention. While other-serving beliefs predicted volunteering behavior directly, self-serving beliefs did not have such direct effect.

  17. Socialising adolescent volunteering : How important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Goethem, Anne A J; van Hoof, Anne; van Aken, Marcel A G; Orobio de Castro, Bram; Raaijmakers, Quinten A W

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age. = 15.19; SD= 1.43), revealed that ado

  18. Socialising adolescent volunteering: how important are parents and friends? Age dependent effects of parents and friends on adolescents' volunteering behaviours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goethem, A.A.J.; van Hoof, A.; van Aken, M.A.G.; Orobio de Castro, B.; Raaijmakers, Q.A.W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relative importance of best friend's and parents' volunteering and civic family orientation (combined with open family communication) in adolescent volunteering, and the moderating effect of age. Results, involving 698 adolescents (M age = 15.19; SD = 1.43), revealed that ado

  19. The Challenge of Volunteering Frequency in Croatia--Can Volunteers Contribute to the Social Capital Development Once a Year?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culum, Bojana; Forcic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Volunteering is one of the strongest elements of shaping democratic change within the society. It is also an essential element in citizenship development and in re-establishing a sense of community. Volunteering empowers individuals, builds solidarity, encourages participation and protects vulnerable groups against social and economic…

  20. When Volunteering Breeds Trust – and When it Does Not A Panel Study of the Volunteering – Trust Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René

    2006-01-01

    It is a common belief that participation in voluntary associations makes citizens more trusting of others. This paper reports longitudinal analyses of volunteering and trust on the Giving in the Netherlands Panel Study (2002-2004; n=1246) refuting this belief. I find that volunteering has little pos

  1. Measuring the Impacts of a Volunteer-Based Community Development Program in Developing Volunteers' Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Amy; Singletary, Loretta; Hill, George

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of an evaluation of the impacts of a community development program to develop leadership skills in its adult volunteers. The evaluation featured 20 questions about leadership skills learned as a result of volunteer experiences. Data analysis strategies beyond a simple means ranking resulted in evidence…

  2. Beliefs about Volunteerism, Volunteering Intention, Volunteering Behavior, and Purpose in Life among Chinese Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben M. F. Law

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationships among beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, volunteering behavior, and purpose in life were examined in this study. A total of 5,946 participants completed a series of scales, including the Revised Personal Functions of Volunteerism Scale, Volunteering Intention Scale, and Purpose in Life Scale. The results showed that participants whose purpose in life had different levels also had varied prosocial beliefs about volunteerism, volunteering intention, and volunteering behavior. Purpose in life was associated more strongly with prosocial value function than with other types of beliefs (except understanding function. When different beliefs are grouped, the correlation between purpose in life and other-serving beliefs was higher than that between purpose in life and self-serving beliefs. Purpose in life was also associated with volunteering intention and behavior. Path analyses showed that purpose in life predicted volunteering behavior via beliefs and intention. While other-serving beliefs predicted volunteering behavior directly, self-serving beliefs did not have such direct effect.

  3. Psychological characteristics of Swedish mandatory enlisted soldiers volunteering and not volunteering for international missions: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydstedt, Leif W; Osterberg, Johan

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess personality traits, psychological fitness, and hardiness among conscript soldiers volunteering for international missions (n = 146), by comparing them with conscripts from the same year class and unit who did not apply for international missions (n = 275). The sample consisted of all mandatory enlisted soldiers assigned to a supply and maintenance regiment. There were no demographic differences between the groups. The volunteers reported greater stress tolerance, concern for others, extraversion, and self-confidence than the non-volunteers. There were no differences between the groups in orderliness, temper instability, or independence. Volunteers repeatedly reported greater psychological fitness for military missions and greater hardiness over the period of military service compared to the non-volunteers.

  4. The impact of volunteer mentoring schemes on carers of people with dementia and volunteer mentors: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond; Greenwood, Nan

    2014-02-01

    This systematic review aims to examine the differences and similarities between the various types of volunteer mentoring (befriending, mentoring and peer support) and to identify the benefits for carers and volunteers. Literature searching was performed using 8 electronic databases, gray literature, and reference list searching of relevant systematic reviews. Searches were carried out in January 2013. Four studies fitted the inclusion criteria, with 3 investigating peer support and 1 befriending for carers. Quantitative findings highlighted a weak but statistically significant (P =.04) reduction in depression after 6 months of befriending. Qualitative findings highlighted the value carers placed on the volunteer mentors' experiential similarity. Matching was not essential for the development of successful volunteer mentoring relationships. In conclusion, the lack of need for matching and the importance of experiential similarity deserve further investigation. However, this review highlights a lack of demonstrated efficacy of volunteer mentoring for carers of people with dementia.

  5. Synergy of Volunteer Measurements and Volunteer Computing for Effective Data Collecting, Processing, Simulating and Analyzing on a Worldwide Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Gordienko, Nikita; Fedak, Gilles; Gordienko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    The paper concerns the hype idea of "Citizen Science" and the related paradigm shift: to go from the passive "volunteer computing" to other volunteer actions like "volunteer measurements" under guidance of scientists. They can be carried out by ordinary people with standard computing gadgets (smartphone, tablet, etc.) and the various standard sensors in them. Here the special attention is paid to the system of volunteer scientific measurements to study air showers caused by cosmic rays. The technical implementation is based on integration of data about registered night flashes (by radiometric software) in shielded camera chip, synchronized time and GPS-data in ordinary gadgets: to identify night "air showers" of elementary particles; to analyze the frequency and to map the distribution of "air showers" in the densely populated cities. The project currently includes the students of the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI", which are compactly located in Kyiv city and contribute their volunteer measur...

  6. Reactivity of allergy skin test in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakthanasiri, Phisit; Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Chantaphakul, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Healthy individuals may be exposed and sensitised to allergens, and have a positive response to a skin prick test despite being asymptomatic. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of atopic sensitisation and identify the reactivity of healthy volunteers to common aeroallergens. Healthy volunteers with no known allergic symptoms were recruited in this study. All volunteers were scheduled to undergo a skin prick test with 16 common aeroallergens that were previously identified among atopic patients. A total of 100 volunteers (mean age 28 years) were enrolled in this study. 42 volunteers had positive skin prick tests for at least one allergen. The median number of sensitised allergen was 2 (range 1-7). Volunteers with positive skin tests (n = 42) were younger than those with negative skin tests (n = 58) (mean age 25.5 vs. 29.2 years; p mite (n = 33), house dust (n = 23) and American cockroach (n = 20). In this study, up to 42% of healthy volunteers, particularly those with a family history of atopy, were sensitised to allergens. Reactivity of the skin test without allergic symptoms, however, does not indicate allergic disease. Therefore, the skin test should only be indicated in atopic symptomatic individuals.

  7. The consideration of emotional intelligence abilities in event volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Andam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of emotional intelligence abilities is one of the new subjects and important in human behavior studies. According to this matter, purpose of this research is consideration of emotional intelligence abilities in public sport events volunteers in 2011. For this purpose, Bradbury and Cruise's standard questionnaire was completed by present volunteers in event (n=80. The results indicated that 4 levels of emotional intelligence in volunteers are higher than expectational average significantly (p<0.01. Also, priority of emotional intelligence abilities indicated that self-awareness is first priority and social awareness, relationship management and self-management are second, third and fourth priorities in volunteers. Finally, in the basis of parameter, results stated that there is no difference between male and female volunteers emotional intelligence in first Olympia of public sport. According to results of present research and advantages of attention to emotional intelligence and human behavior in organizations, it recommended sport events managers to be more sensitive relative to human behavior abilities in human behavior abilities in human resource (volunteers under his management. At least, result of this meditation in student's sport is recruitment and development of motivated volunteers for continuous attendance in sport events.

  8. Pharmacogenetics of healthy volunteers in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio-Campos, Karla; Orengo-Mercado, Carmelo; Renta, Jessicca Y; Peguero, Muriel; García, Ricardo; Hernández, Gabriel; Corey, Susan; Cadilla, Carmen L; Duconge, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Puerto Ricans are a unique Hispanic population with European, Native American (Taino), and higher West African ancestral contributions than other non-Caribbean Hispanics. In admixed populations, such as Puerto Ricans, genetic variants can be found at different frequencies when compared to parental populations and uniquely combined and distributed. Therefore, in this review, we aimed to collect data from studies conducted in healthy Puerto Ricans and to report the frequencies of genetic polymorphisms with major relevance in drug response. Filtering for healthy volunteers or individuals, we performed a search of pharmacogenetic studies in academic literature databases without limiting the period of the results. The search was limited to Puerto Ricans living in the island, excluding those studies performed in mainland (United States). We found that the genetic markers impacting pharmacological therapy in the areas of cardiovascular, oncology, and neurology are the most frequently investigated. Coincidently, the top causes of mortality in the island are cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. In addition, polymorphisms in genes that encode for members of the CYP450 family (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) are also available due to their relevance in the metabolism of drugs. The complex genetic background of Puerto Ricans is responsible for the divergence in the reported allele frequencies when compared to parental populations (Africans, East Asians, and Europeans). The importance of reporting the findings of pharmacogenetic studies conducted in Puerto Ricans is to identify genetic variants with potential utility among this genetically complex population and eventually move forward the adoption of personalized medicine in the island.

  9. Probabilistic Flood Mapping using Volunteered Geographical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, S. J.; Girons Lopez, M.; Seibert, J.; Minsker, B. S.

    2016-12-01

    Flood extent maps are widely used by decision makers and first responders to provide critical information that prevents economic impacts and the loss of human lives. These maps are usually obtained from sensory data and/or hydrologic models, which often have limited coverage in space and time. Recent developments in social media and communication technology have created a wealth of near-real-time, user-generated content during flood events in many urban areas, such as flooded locations, pictures of flooding extent and height, etc. These data could improve decision-making and response operations as events unfold. However, the integration of these data sources has been limited due to the need for methods that can extract and translate the data into useful information for decision-making. This study presents an approach that uses volunteer geographic information (VGI) and non-traditional data sources (i.e., Twitter, Flicker, YouTube, and 911 and 311 calls) to generate/update the flood extent maps in areas where no models and/or gauge data are operational. The approach combines Web-crawling and computer vision techniques to gather information about the location, extent, and water height of the flood from unstructured textual data, images, and videos. These estimates are then used to provide an updated flood extent map for areas surrounding the geo-coordinate of the VGI through the application of a Hydro Growing Region Algorithm (HGRA). HGRA combines hydrologic and image segmentation concepts to estimate a probabilistic flooding extent along the corresponding creeks. Results obtained for a case study in Austin, TX (i.e., 2015 Memorial Day flood) were comparable to those obtained by a calibrated hydrologic model and had good spatial correlation with flooding extents estimated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

  10. Normal Calculation Back Analysis of Dynamic Incremental Displacement and its Application in Tunnel Engineering%动态增量位移正算反演分析及其在隧道工程中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵成龙; 李术才; 徐帮树; 张乐文

    2014-01-01

    In order to optimize the inversion method for physical and mechanical parameters of tunnel surround-ing rock and to improve the computational speed, normal calculation back analysis for dynamic incremental dis-placement in tunnel engineering is presented in this paper and applied in the Jiaozhou Bay subsea tunnel in Qingdao. With the establishment of an inversion prediction model of elastic-plastic dynamic incremental dis-placement, and the improvement of traditional elastic-plastic forward-optimized back analysis method, a con-struction process based inversion normal calculation back analysis of linear elastic dynamic incremental displace-ment is derived that is used for simplified analysis. A comparison is carried out regarding the calculated displace-ment and actual displacement in three construction sections of the Jiaozhou Bay subsea tunnel. Study results show that dynamic incremental displacement inversion normal calculation back analysis can reflect the increment mea-sure information in any construction stage during dynamic construction, and guarantee the implementation of de-formation control techniques; compared with the traditional elastic-plastic forward-optimized back analysis method, the proposed one increases efficiency and ensures calculation accuracy.%为了优化隧道围岩物理力学参数的反演方法并提高运算速度,文章提出了隧道工程动态增量位移正算反演分析法,并将该方法应用于青岛胶州湾海底隧道工程;建立了弹塑性动态增量位移反演预测模型,改进了传统的弹塑性正演优化反分析方法,衍生了作简化分析的基于施工过程的线弹性动态增量位移反演正算反分析方法;对青岛胶州湾海底隧道三个施工段计算位移和实测位移进行了比较。研究结果表明,动态增量位移反演正算反分析方法可反映动态施工过程中任意施工阶段间的增量量测信息,为变形控制技术的实施提供有力的保

  11. The headache-inducing effect of cilostazol in human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk, S; Kruuse, Christina; Petersen, K.A.;

    2006-01-01

    healthy volunteers were included in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study. Placebo or cilostazol (200 mg p.o.) was administered on two separate study days. Headache was scored on a verbal rating scale (0-10) and mechanical pain thresholds were measured with von Frey hairs. The median peak headache...... score 0-16 h postdose was 0 (range 0-2) after placebo and 3.5 (range 0-7) after cilostazol (P = 0.003). The median headache curve peaked at 6-9 h postdose. The headaches induced were usually bilateral and pulsating. Nausea occurred in two volunteers, photo- and phonophobia were not seen. Two volunteers...

  12. Volunteering in the maternity services: for whose benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In recent years volunteers have become part of the maternity services to support midwives in the UK. Future midwifery students are being expected to have gained such experience when applying for courses. They are providing significant support for women in relation to breastfeeding and in other supportive roles. However this article aims to explore what volunteers are doing, questions whether the recent shortage of midwives is leading to volunteers being asked to take on tasks that are beyond their unpaid status and asks who is really benefiting from this role.

  13. Influence of Youth Volunteering on Socialization and Development of Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Volunteering is one of manifestations of citizenship. It indicates the individual’s quality in terms of citizenship and the readiness to take an active part in public activities. The current paper analyses the phenomenon of volunteering (its place and role in ensuring public development and sustainability. The influence of volunteer - ing on the youth socialization and personal development of competences (in particular, social, professional and communicative is disclosed in the article. The article also highlights the motives and factors that promote and prevent the youth participation in voluntary activities.

  14. ATLAS@Home: Harnessing Volunteer Computing for HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has setup a volunteer computing project called ATLAS@home. Volunteers running Monte-Carlo simulation on their personal computer provide significant computing resources, but also belong to a community potentially interested in HEP. Four types of contributors have been identified, whose questions range from advanced technical details to the reason why simulation is needed, how Computing is organized and how it relates to society. The creation of relevant outreach material for simulation, event visualization and distributed production will be described, as well as lessons learned while interacting with the BOINC volunteers community.

  15. The Individual Economic Returns to Volunteering in Work Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Hans-Peter; Munk, Martin David

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the individual economic returns to volunteering over the course of one’s work life. Towards this end, the article uses a unique panel dataset created by combining rich survey data from Denmark with information on wages from administrative registers covering the period from 2...... mechanisms link volunteer work and wages depending on the current stage of people’s work lives.......This article examines the individual economic returns to volunteering over the course of one’s work life. Towards this end, the article uses a unique panel dataset created by combining rich survey data from Denmark with information on wages from administrative registers covering the period from...

  16. Improving remote sensing flood assessment using volunteered geographical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Schnebele

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology for the generation of flood hazard maps is presented fusing remote sensing and volunteered geographical data. Water pixels are identified utilizing a machine learning classification of two Landsat remote sensing scenes, acquired before and during the flooding event as well as a digital elevation model paired with river gage data. A statistical model computes the probability of flooded areas as a function of the number of adjacent pixels classified as water. Volunteered data obtained through Google news, videos and photos are added to modify the contour regions. It is shown that even a small amount of volunteered ground data can dramatically improve results.

  17. Normalization: A Preprocessing Stage

    OpenAIRE

    Patro, S. Gopal Krishna; Sahu, Kishore Kumar

    2015-01-01

    As we know that the normalization is a pre-processing stage of any type problem statement. Especially normalization takes important role in the field of soft computing, cloud computing etc. for manipulation of data like scale down or scale up the range of data before it becomes used for further stage. There are so many normalization techniques are there namely Min-Max normalization, Z-score normalization and Decimal scaling normalization. So by referring these normalization techniques we are ...

  18. The experimental study of the 3D-UTE dynamic enhanced MRI in the normal rabbit knee joint%正常兔膝关节的三维UTE动态增强MRI实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马立恒; 陈应明; 张朝晖; 孙海兴

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the application of 3D-ultrashort TE (3D-UTE)sequence in the dynamic enhanced MRI of the tissues containing majority of short T2 components.Methods:Plain scan and dynamic enhanced MRI with 3D ul-trashort TE double echo pulse sequence were performed on 6 knee joints of 6 New Zealand white rabbits according to ran-dom digital comparison table.The characteristics of the dynamic enhanced MRI of the patellar ligament,the cortical bone and the bone marrow of the lower segment of the femur and the upper segment of tibia were investigated and compared with the histologic findings.To compare the central canal count of young and adult rabbits with t test.Results:The signal intensi-ty-time curves of the dynamic enhanced MRI of the patellar ligament of the normal rabbits appeared as gradual slope of en-hancement.The dynamic curve of the bone cortex of the young rabbits appeared as gradual slope of enhancement and slow washout pattern.The dynamic curve of the bone cortex of the adult rabbits appeared as fast increase of enhancement and fast washout pattern.The dynamic curve of the bone marrow of both young and adult rabbit appeared as fast increase of en-hancement and gradual washout pattern.The contrast materials in the tissue persisted in high concentration.The dynamic characteristics of the bone cortex were in accordance with the histologic findings.Conclusion:3D UTE pulse sequence can be used in the dynamic enhanced MRI of the tissues containing majority of short T2 components.%目的:探讨三维超短回波时间(UTE)双回波脉冲序列在主要含短T2成分组织的动态增强 MRI 中的应用。方法:采用随机数字对照表对6只新西兰大白兔的6个膝关节行 MR平扫及UTE动态增强检查。分析正常兔的髌韧带、股骨下段或胫骨上段骨皮质、髓腔的动态增强特点,并与病理结果对照。采用 t 检验比较未成年兔与成年兔骨皮质的中央管计数。结果:正常兔髌韧带

  19. Enhancing Recruitment and Retention of Volunteers in the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y ( Millennials ), opt to continue working or pursue volunteer efforts with other volunteer organizations.180...the volunteer. The social function permits an individual to improve communication skills, gain friendship , and develop relationships while the value

  20. Peak oxygen uptake in relation to total heart volume discriminates heart failure patients from healthy volunteers and athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buhre Torsten

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An early sign of heart failure (HF is a decreased cardiac reserve or inability to adequately increase cardiac output during exercise. Under normal circumstances maximal cardiac output is closely related to peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak which has previously been shown to be closely related to total heart volume (THV. Thus, the aim of this study was to derive a VO2peak/THV ratio and to test the hypothesis that this ratio can be used to distinguish patients with HF from healthy volunteers and endurance athletes. Thirty-one patients with HF of different etiologies were retrospectively included and 131 control subjects (60 healthy volunteers and 71 athletes were prospectively enrolled. Peak oxygen uptake was determined by maximal exercise test and THV was determined by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. The VO2peak/THV ratio was then derived and tested. Results Peak oxygen uptake was strongly correlated to THV (r2 = 0.74, p 2 = 0.0002, p = 0.95. The VO2peak/THV ratio differed significantly between control subjects and patients, even in patients with normal ejection fraction and after normalizing for hemoglobin levels (p 2peak/THV ratio was the only independent predictor of presence of HF (p Conclusions The VO2peak/THV ratio can be used to distinguish patients with clinically diagnosed HF from healthy volunteers and athletes, even in patients with preserved systolic left ventricular function and after normalizing for hemoglobin levels.

  1. Reassessment of stiripentol pharmacokinetics in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigné, Sophie; Rey, Elisabeth; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Pons, Gerard; Jullien, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    Because children who have been receiving stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet syndrome for more than 10 years are now becoming young adults, it is important to accurately characterize stiripentol pharmacokinetics in this age range. A double-blind placebo-controlled dose ranging study was therefore conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of stiripentol in 12 healthy volunteers. Each subject received 3 single doses of stiripentol (500, 1000, and 2000 mg) separated by a wash-out period of 1 week. Pharmacokinetics of stiripentol was analyzed for each dose by non-compartmental analysis. Median area under the curve (AUC), terminal elimination half-life (t1/2,z) and maximal concentration (Cmax) were calculated for between-dose comparison. Safety was evaluated based on both clinical and biological criteria. Oppositely to previous results, there was no concentration rebounds in the elimination phase, which could be the consequence of the food intake. A more than proportional increase in the AUC was observed, associated with a significant increase in the t1/2,z, for increasing doses (median AUC of 8.3, 31 and 88 mgh/L, and median t1/2,z of 2, 7.7 and 10h for the 500, 1000, and 2000 mg doses respectively), which confirmed the Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetics of Stiripentol. However, dose-normalized Cmax did not significantly vary between doses. Median Michaelis-Menten parameters were 117 mg/h for Vmax and 1.9 mg/L for Km. No safety concern was observed during the study. The present study allowed a better characterization of the disposition phase of stiripentol and confirmed its non-linear pharmacokinetic behaviour. Further pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies would be useful to determine the optimal dose of stiripentol for the treatment of Dravet patients in adulthood.

  2. Volunteered Geographic Information for Disaster Management with Application to Earthquake Disaster Databank & Sharing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Zhang, W. C.; Deng, C.; Nie, N.; Yi, L.

    2017-02-01

    All phases of disaster management require up-to-date and accurate information. Different in-situ and remote sensor systems help to monitor dynamic properties such as air quality, water level or inundated areas. The rapid emergence of web-based services has facilitated the collection, dissemination, and cartographic representation of spatial information from the public, giving rise to the idea of using Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) to aid disaster management. In this study, with a brief review on the concept and the development of disaster management, opportunities and challenges for applying VGI in disaster management were explored. The challenges, including Data availability, Data quality, Data management and Legal issues of using VGI for disaster management, were discussed in detail with particular emphasis on the actual needs of disaster management practice in China. Three different approaches to assure VGI data quality, namely the classification and authority design of volunteers, a government-led VGI data acquisition framework for disaster management and a quality assessment system for VGI, respectively, were presented and discussed. As a case study, a prototype of VGI oriented earthquake disaster databank & sharing platform, an open WebGIS system for volunteers and other interested individuals collaboratively create and manage the earthquake disaster related information, was proposed, to provide references for improving the level of earthquake emergency response and disaster mitigation in China.

  3. Increasing efficiency of humanitarian organizations with volunteer driven information products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Kenny; van de Walle, B.A.

    Emerging technologies provide new opportunities to humanitarian organizations for enhancing their response to crisis situations. Since the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, online volunteer communities have been activated to gather data and generate information products to improve humanitarian organizations'

  4. Mid-Columbia - Invasive Species Management with Volunteers 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Project will initiate a program for the early detection, monitoring and mapping of invasive species on McNary and Umatilla NWR's using Refuge volunteers. The initial...

  5. Willamette Valley - Invasive Species Management with Volunteers 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Volunteers worked with staff to survey for and treat 17 different invasive species within the Willamette Valley Refuges (Ankeny, Baskett Slough and William L....

  6. Willamette Valley - Invasive Species Management with Volunteers 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Volunteers worked with refuge staff to survey for and treat invasive species on the Willamette Valley Refuges (Ankeny, Baskett Slough and WL Finley NWR). Scotch...

  7. Dentistry with a difference: volunteering for 'Dental Project Peru'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussell, M A

    2008-03-01

    As a young dentist looking for new challenges and experiences, Mary Bussell decided to use her skills and training by volunteering for a dental charity working in Peru. Here she gives an account of her 'dental adventure'.

  8. Willamette Valley - Invasive Species Management with Volunteers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Volunteers worked with refuge staff to survey for and treat invasive species on the Willamette Valley Refuges (Ankeny, Baskett Slough and WL Finley NWR). False brome...

  9. Volunteer work in the church among older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the factors that influence the amount of volunteer work that older Mexican Americans perform in the place where they worship. The relationship between religion and volunteering is viewed from a social identity perspective. Data from a nationally representative sample of older Mexican Americans suggest that Evangelical/Pentecostal church members spend more time performing volunteer work at church than older Mexican Americans who affiliate with other denominations. Moreover, the findings indicate that the difference in the amount of volunteering between the two groups can largely be explained by differences in the nature of the spiritual support that Evangelical/Pentecostal receive from their fellow church members as well as depth of their commitment to their faith.

  10. Cultural competency and diversity among hospice palliative care volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Maja

    2012-05-01

    This case study examines the current state of cultural competence in hospice and palliative care in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Because of changing demographic trends and ethnic minorities underutilizing hospice palliative care services, this research examined the current state of culturally competent care in a hospice setting, and the challenges to providing culturally competent care in a hospice in the GTA. A case study was conducted with a hospice and included in-depth interviews with 14 hospice volunteers. The findings reveal that volunteers encountered cultural clashes when their level of cultural competency was weak. Second, volunteers revealed there was a lack of adequate cultural competency training with their hospice, and finally, there was a lack of ethnic, cultural, and linguistic diversity among the hospice volunteers.

  11. The relationship between confidence in charitable organizations and volunteering revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René H.F.P.; Bowman, Woods

    2009-01-01

    Confidence in charitable organizations (charitable confidence) would seem to be an important prerequisite for philanthropic behavior. Previous research relying on cross-sectional data has suggested that volunteering promotes charitable confidence and vice versa. This research note, using new longitu

  12. Increasing efficiency of humanitarian organizations with volunteer driven information products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Kenny; van de Walle, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging technologies provide new opportunities to humanitarian organizations for enhancing their response to crisis situations. Since the 2010 Haiti Earthquake, online volunteer communities have been activated to gather data and generate information products to improve humanitarian organizations' s

  13. The conscientious retiree: The relationship between conscientiousness, retirement, and volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Anissa; Jackson, Joshua J; Oltmanns, Thomas F

    2014-10-01

    The current study examined the relationship between conscientiousness, work status, and volunteering utilizing two large samples, the St. Louis Personality and Aging Network (SPAN) and the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). It was hypothesized that conscientious adults who were retired would be more likely to volunteer because, after retirement, they gain a substantial amount of free time, while losing an outlet for their industrious and achievement-striving tendencies. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses revealed that conscientious, retired individuals were more likely to volunteer than conscientious, working individuals. Further analyses revealed that facets of conscientiousness provide differential information from the general trait. These findings indicate that volunteering during retirement fills an important niche for high-striving, conscientious individuals.

  14. Kudos to the volunteers of Qingdao Marine ProductMuseum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yan

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a brief introduction to the organization structure, personnel management and dis -tinctive services of the volunteers of Qingdao Marine Product Museum, and shows the effect of their work onscientific popularization and social responsibility.

  15. Want a Sharper Brain as You Age? Volunteer!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162899.html Want a Sharper Brain as You Age? Volunteer! Study finds slight improvement in ... sharper mental skills at the age of 50, a new study suggests. British researchers said their findings ...

  16. The relationship between confidence in charitable organizations and volunteering revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, René H.F.P.; Bowman, Woods

    2009-01-01

    Confidence in charitable organizations (charitable confidence) would seem to be an important prerequisite for philanthropic behavior. Previous research relying on cross-sectional data has suggested that volunteering promotes charitable confidence and vice versa. This research note, using new

  17. Willamette Valley - Invasive Species Management with Volunteers 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Volunteers worked with staff to map and control invasive species within the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex refuges (William L. Finley, Ankeny,...

  18. The Volunteers for Stevenson in the 1952 Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaybaugh, Douglas

    1985-01-01

    The limits of amateurism in the Stevenson campaign for the U.S. presidency in 1952 are examined. Both Stevenson and his volunteers lacked political and organizational skills and thus failed to win over wealthy contributors and powerful politicians. (RM)

  19. Psilocybin-Induced Decrease in Amygdala Reactivity Correlates with Enhanced Positive Mood in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Preller, Katrin H; Scheidegger, Milan; Pokorny, Thomas; Bosch, Oliver G; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2015-10-15

    The amygdala is a key structure in serotonergic emotion-processing circuits. In healthy volunteers, acute administration of the serotonin 1A/2A/2C receptor agonist psilocybin reduces neural responses to negative stimuli and induces mood changes toward positive states. However, it is little-known whether psilocybin reduces amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli and whether any change in amygdala reactivity is related to mood change. This study assessed the effects of acute administration of the hallucinogen psilocybin (.16 mg/kg) versus placebo on amygdala reactivity to negative stimuli in 25 healthy volunteers using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging. Mood changes were assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and the state portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A double-blind, randomized, cross-over design was used with volunteers counterbalanced to receive psilocybin and placebo in two separate sessions at least 14 days apart. Amygdala reactivity to negative and neutral stimuli was lower after psilocybin administration than after placebo administration. The psilocybin-induced attenuation of right amygdala reactivity in response to negative stimuli was related to the psilocybin-induced increase in positive mood state. These results demonstrate that acute treatment with psilocybin decreased amygdala reactivity during emotion processing and that this was associated with an increase of positive mood in healthy volunteers. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of amygdala hyperactivity and negative mood states in patients with major depression. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Galaxy Zoo: Exploring the Motivations of Citizen Science Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Raddick, M. Jordan; Bracey, Georgia; Gay, Pamela L.; Lintott, Chris J.; Murray, Phil; Schawinski, Kevin; Szalay, Alexander S.; Vandenberg, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The Galaxy Zoo citizen science website invites anyone with an Internet connection to participate in research by classifying galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. As of April 2009, more than 200,000 volunteers had made more than 100 million galaxy classifications. In this paper, we present results of a pilot study into the motivations and demographics of Galaxy Zoo volunteers, and define a technique to determine motivations from free responses that can be used in larger multiple-choice s...